Podcasts about EC

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Best podcasts about EC

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Latest podcast episodes about EC

The Go Diaper Free Podcast
#170 Biological Sleep + Reclaiming Parenthood without Fear (plus EC!)

The Go Diaper Free Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 37:28


Sleep – we all know we need it, but how to get it with a baby or toddler? Should you “sleep train”? What if it doesn't feel right? Who do you turn to for advice?  Today I chat with Taylor Kulik, Sleep & Well-being Specialist, who unpacks how reclaiming our intuition around biological sleep yields improved wellness (and sleep!) for babies and their parents. If you've been looking for help with baby sleep, you don't want to miss today's podcast! Get full show notes and add your comments or questions here: https://godiaperfree.com/170 Get my free easy start guide for EC https://godiaperfree.com/start Start EC with your baby today with Andrea's popular book, Go Diaper Free: https://godiaperfree.com/thebook  

Word Podcast
Elvis Costello, aka rock's “greatest communicator”

Word Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 41:17


In which we watch a breathtaking 40-minute piece of oratory by EC that takes in David Hockney, TikTok, Laurel & Hardy, what Pete Thomas did during Lockdown and how to avoid your new album being “just another bucket of herring tossed into the stream”. And go to the Premiere of Peter Jackson's Get Back. And remember some slightly hopeless second albums (ABC, Stones, Arctic Monkeys, Tracy Chapman) and some prime examples of the “front-loaded” LP (Let's Dance, the Joshua Tree etc). And delight in discovering the snobbery of people who work in record shops is still apparent when you're trying to buy an Ornette Coleman CD.Subscribe to Word In Your Ear on Patreon and receive every future Word Podcast before the rest of the world - and with full visuals!: https://www.patreon.com/wordinyourear Get bonus content on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Tales from the Podcast
Death of Some Salesmen - Tales From the Crypt S5E1

Tales from the Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 42:11


On this episode of Tales from the Podcast we talk with our good friend and cohost of 2G1C Chuck Nasty about a very fun episode from season 5, Death of Some Salesman starring Tim Curry, Ed Begley Jr., Tim Curry, Yvonne De Carlo and the great Tim CurryCheck out House of Mysterious Secrets @ HouseofMysteriousSecrets.com and use our discount code 4130 to save 10% on some awesome horror merch now!!!https://instagram.com/tales_from_the_podcasthttps://twitter.com/TalesFromThePodhttps://facebook.com/groups/talesfromthepodcastAnd can contact me through my website:http://talesfromthepodcast.comAnd email us here at talesfromthepodcast13@gmail.com

Life Liberty and the Pursuit
LLP #78: "Are Massive Food Shortages on the Horizon?"

Life Liberty and the Pursuit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 60:39


SDI: https://www.sdi.eduEric & Matt are both former US Army combat veterans who served together while deployed to Iraq during OIF III. Eric is most known for his YouTube channel IraqVeteran8888 which has over 2.4 million subscribers currently as well as his outspoken and no compromise stance regarding the 2nd amendment.  Matt runs Ballistic Ink which is a branding and merchandising company serving 2A content creators and the firearms industry.  He is also very passionate about the 2nd amendment and freedom.2A FRIENDLY CC PROCESSING: https://wetheprocessor.com/APPAREL AND OTHER MERCH:https://ballisticink.com/http://www.iraqveteran8888.com/CHECK OUT OUR YOUTUBE CHANNELS:https://www.youtube.com/c/iraqveteran8888https://www.youtube.com/c/Guitarsenal

The Emerging Cricket Podcast
Americas Men‘s T20WC Qualifier with Peter Della Penna, Nate and Nick

The Emerging Cricket Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 49:37


Sledging, Super Overs, but ultimately significant cricket action. Nick is joined by EC's USA correspondent Nate Hays and ESPN Cricinfo's Peter Della Penna to discuss the Americas Qualifier, with Canada and the USA progressing to the global qualifier

Discover CircRes
November 2021 Discover CircRes

Discover CircRes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 27:17


This month on Episode 30 of Discover CircRes, host Cynthia St. Hilaire highlights four original research articles featured in the October 29 and November 12 issues of Circulation Research. This episode also features a conversation with Dr Elisa Klein from the University of Maryland about her study, Laminar Flow on Endothelial Cells Suppresses eNOS O-GlcNAcylation to Promote eNOS Activity.   Article highlights:   Subramani, et al. CMA of eNOS in Ischemia-Reperfusion Liu, et al. Macrophage MST1 Regulates Cardiac Repair Van Beusecum, et al. GAS6/Axl Signaling in Hypertension Pati, et al. Exosomes Promote Efferocytosis and Cardiac Repair   Cindy St. Hilaire:        Hi and welcome to Discover CircRes, the podcast of the American Heart Association's Journal Circulation Research. I'm your host, Dr Cindy St. Hilaire from the Vascular Medicine Institute at the University of Pittsburgh and today I'll be highlighting articles presented in our October 29th and November 12th issues of Circulation Research. I also will speak with Dr Elisa Klein from the University of Maryland about her study, Laminar Flow on Endothelial Cells Suppresses eNOS O-GlcNAcylation to Promote eNOS Activity.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        The first article I want to share is titled, Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy of eNOS in Myocardial Ischemia Reperfusion Injury. The first author is Jaganathan Subramani and the corresponding author is Kumuda Das from Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center. Reestablishing blood flow to ischemic heart muscle after myocardial infarction is critical for restoring muscle function but the return of flow itself can cause damage, a so-called reperfusion injury. The generation of reactive oxygen species or ROS and loss of nitric oxide or NO both contribute to reperfusion injury.                                       Reperfusion injury is exacerbated when the NO producing enzyme, endothelial nitric oxide synthase or eNOS, produces damaging super oxide anions instead of NO. This switch in eNOS function is caused by glutathionylation of the enzyme, termed SG-eNOS. But how long this modification lasts and how it is fixed is unclear. This group used an in vitro model of ischemia reperfusion where human endothelial cells are exposed to several hours of hypoxia followed by reoxygenation. In this model, they found the level of SG-eNOS steadily increases for 16 hours and then sharply decreases. By blocking several different cellular degradation pathways, they discovered that this decrease in S-G eNOS was due to chaperone mediated autophagy with the chaperone protein, HSC70, being responsible for SG-eNOS destruction. Importantly, this team went on to show that pharmacological D-glutathionylation of eNOS in mice promoted NO production and reduced reperfusion injury, suggesting this approach may be of clinical benefit after myocardial infarction.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        The second article I want to share is titled Macrophage MST1/2 Disruption Impairs Post-Infarction Cardiac Repair via LTB4. The first author is Mingming Liu and the corresponding author is Ding Ai and they're from Tianjin Medical University. Myocardial infarction injures the heart muscle. These cells are unable to regenerate and instead a non-contractile scar forms and that fibrotic scar can lead to heart failure.                                     Cardiomyocytes specific inhibition of the kinase MST1 can prevent infarction induced death of the cells and preserve the heart function, suggesting that it may have clinical utility. However, MST1 also has anti-inflammatory properties in macrophages. So inhibition of MST1 in macrophages may delay inflammation resolution after MI and impair proper healing. Thus, targeting this enzyme for therapy is not a straightforward process. This study examined mice lacking MST1 in macrophages and found that after myocardial infarction, the inflammatory mediator leukotriene B4 was upregulated in macrophages and the animal's heart function was reduced compared to that of wild type controls. Blocking the action of leukotriene B4 in mice reduced infarction injuries in the hearts of MST1-lacking animals and enhanced repair in the injured hearts of wild type animals given an MST1 inhibitor. The results suggest that if MST1 inhibition is used as a future post infarction regenerative therapy, then leukotriene B4 blockade may prevent its inflammatory side effects.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        The next article I want to share is titled Growth Arrest Specific-6 and Axl Coordinate Inflammation and Hypertension. The first author is Justin Beusecum and the corresponding author is David Harrison and they're from Vanderbilt University. Inflammation contributes to hypertension pathology but the links of this relationship are unclear. It's thought one trigger of inflammation may be the hypertension-induced mechanical stretch of vascular endothelial cells. Mechanical stretch causes endothelial cells to release factors that convert circulating monocytes into inflammatory cells. And one such factor is the recently identified Axl and Siglec-6 positive dendritic cells, also called AS DCs.                                       AS DCs produce a large amount of inflammatory cytokines but little is known about the role of AS DCs or their cytokines in hypertension. This group found elevated levels of AS DCs in hypertensive people compared to normal tensive individuals. Mechanical stretch of human endothelial cells promoted the release of GAS6, which is an activator of the AS DC cell surface kinase, Axl. This stretch induced GAS6 release also promoted conversion of co-cultured monocytes to AS DCs. Inhibition of GAS6 or Axl in the co-cultured system prevented conversion of monocytes to AS DCs. This team went on to show that hypertensive humans and mice have elevated levels of plasma GAS6 and that blocking Axl activity in mice attenuated experimentally induced hypertension and the associated inflammation. This work highlights a new signaling pathway, driving hypertension associated inflammation and identifies possible targets to treat it.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        The last article I want to share is titled Novel Mechanisms of Exosome- Mediated Phagocytosis of Dead Cells in Injured Heart. The first author is Mallikarjun Patil and Sherin Saheera and the corresponding author is Prasanna Krishnamurthy from the University of Alabama, Birmingham. After myocardial infarction inflammation must quickly be attenuated to avoid excessive scarring and loss of muscle function. Macrophage mediated efferocytosis of dead cells is a critical part of this so-called inflammation resolution process. And resolution depends in part on the protein. MFGE8. MFGE8 helps macrophages engage with eat me signals on the dead cells and loss of macrophage MFGE8 delays inflammation resolution in mice. Because stem cell-derived exosomes promote cardiac repair after infarction and are anti-inflammatory and express MFGE8, this group hypothesized that perhaps part of a stem-cell derived exosomes proresolven activity may be due to boosting macrophage efferocytosis.                                     They showed that stem cell derived exosomes did indeed boost efferocytosis of apoptotic cardiomyocytes in vitro and in vivo. An in vitro experiments showed that if exosomes lacked MFGE8 then efferocytosis by macrophages was reduced. Furthermore, after myocardial infarction in mice, treatment with MFGE8 deficient exosomes did not reduce infarct size and did not improve heart function compared to control exosomes. These results suggest MFGE8 is important for the cardioprotective effects of stem cell-derived exosomes. And that this protein may be of interest for boosting efferocytosis after myocardial infarction and in other pathologies where inflammation is not readily resolved.   Cindy St. Hilaire         So today, Dr Elisa Klein from the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Maryland is with me to discuss her study Laminar Flow on Endothelial Cells Suppresses eNOS O-GlcNAcylation to Promote eNOS Activity and this article is in our November 12th issue of Circulation Research. So Dr Klein, thank you so much for joining me today.   Elisa Klein:                 Thank you for having me.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        Yeah. So broadly your study is investigating how blood flow patterns specifically, kind of, laminar and oscillatory flow, how those blood flow patterns impact protein modifications and activity. So before we, kind of, get to the details of the paper, I was wondering if you could just introduce for us the concept of blood flow patterns, how they change in the body naturally but then how they might influence or contribute to disease pathogenesis in the vessels?   Elisa Klein:                 Sure. So obviously we have blood flow through all of our vessels and since we are complex human beings, we have complex vascular beds that turn and that split or bifurcate. And so every place we get one of these bifurcations or a turn in a vessel, the blood flow can't quite make that turn or split perfectly. So you get a little area where the flow is a oscillatory or what we call disturbed. There's lots of different kinds of disturbed flow. And the reason why that's important is because you tend to develop atherosclerotic plaques at locations where the blood flow is disturbed. So in my lab, we look a lot at what it is about that disturbed flow that makes the endothelial cells there dysfunctional and that leads to the atherosclerotic plaque development.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        That is so interesting. So I can picture how this is happening in a mouse at the bifurcation of different arteries but how are you able to model this in vitro? Can you describe the setup and then also how that setup can mirror the physiological parameters?   Elisa Klein:                 Sure. So we have a couple of different systems we can use to model this and they all have their advantages and disadvantages, right? So a few years ago we made a system that's a parallel plate flow chamber. So you basically have your cells that you see that on a microscope slide and you use a gasket that's a given shape and that either drives the flow… Usually it drives the flow straight across the cells. So that's a nice laminar steady flow. And we see that the cells align and they produce nitric oxide in that type of flow which are measures that they are responding to the flow in vitro. So, a few years ago we made a device that actually makes the flow zigzag as it goes across the endothelial cells. And that creates these little pockets of disturbed flow and we did that in our parallel plate flow chamber.                                       And that parallel plate flow chamber is really good for visualizing the cells. So you can stick it on a microscope. You can see what's happening, we can label for specific markers but it's not good for doing the things that we did in this Circ Research paper, where we want it to measure metabolism, because you need a lot more cells to measure metabolism and we needed a better media to cell ratio, so less media and more cells. So for this one, we designed and built a cone-and-plate device. So what it is, it's a cone and you spin that cone on top of a dish of endothelial cells and that cone produces flow. So it's going around in a circle. And if we just make it go around in a circle, it'll produce a steady laminar flow but if we oscillated it, so basically we kind of turn it back and forth, it'll make this oscillating disturbed flow. And then we have our dish of cells.                                     We do this in a 60-millimeter dish and then we have a small amount of media in there and a lot of cells. And we can culture the cells in there for a while.                                     Cindy St. Hilaire:        That is so neat. And so I'm assuming that then your cone system is very tuneable. You could either speed it up, slow it down or change that oscillatory rate with different, I guess, shifts of it? Elisa Klein:                 Yeah, that's exactly right. So we can do all those things. It's programmable with a motor and so we can run whatever type of flow we want. Cindy St. Hilaire:        That's great. So before your study, what was known regarding this link between hemodynamics and endothelial cell dysfunction and also endothelial cell metabolism? Because I feel like that's a really interesting space that a lot of people look at, kind of, metabolism and EC dysfunction or they just look at shear stress and EC dysfunction and you're, kind of, combining the three. So what was kind of the knowledge gap that you were hoping to investigate? Elisa Klein:                 Yeah, so we're really interested in macrovascular endothelial cell dysfunction. So this pro atherosclerotic phenotype that you can get in endothelial cells. And most of the work on endothelial cell metabolism had actually been done in the context of angiogenesis. So how much energy and how do cells get their energy to make new blood vessels? And that's more of a microvascular thing. So there was a study that came out before ours, actually, before we started this study, that was looking at how steady laminar flow could decrease endothelial cell glycolysis. And so that was after 72 hours of flow and they showed some gene expression changes at that time. Our study is shorter than that and we were still able to see a decrease in glycolysis in our cells in laminar flow. Before we started this study, no one had really looked at disturbed flow. So in the meantime, there are a few other papers that came out showing that the cells don't decrease glycolysis when they're in disturbed flow but not so much connecting them back to this function of making nitric oxide. Cindy St. Hilaire:        So we were kind of dancing to the topic of O linked N acetylglucosamine or how do you say it? Elisa Klein:                 GlcNAC. Cindy St. Hilaire:        GlcNAC? O- GlcNAC. So, O- GlcNAC is a sugar drive modification and I think it's added to Syrian and three Indian residues and proteins. Elisa Klein:                 Yup, that's right. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Okay, good. And that modification, it does help dictate a protein's function. And you were investigating the role of this moiety on endothelial nitric oxide synthase or eNOS and so what exactly does this GlcNAC do for eNOS' function and under what conditions or disease states is this modification operative? Elisa Klein:                 Yeah. So there's some really important studies from a little bit ago that showed that eNOS gets GlcNAcylated in animals with diabetes, right? So if you have constantly high sugar levels, you get this modification of eNOS. The thought was that eNOS gets GlcNAcylated at the same site where it gets phosphorylated. But a more recent study came out and said, well, maybe that's not the case but it definitely gets GlcNAcylated somewhere where it affects this phosphorylation site. So it may be near it and prevent the folding or prevent the phosphorylation site availability. So if the eNOS gets GlcNAcylated, the thought is that it can't get phosphorylated and therefore it can't make nitric oxide. Cindy St. Hilaire:        And so an interesting thing about this GlcNAcylation, which is probably the hardest thing I've ever said on this podcast, is that it's integrated with lots of different things. Obviously you need glycolysis and the substrates from the breakdown of sugars to make that substrate but also the enzymes that make that substrate are required. And so what's known about that balance in endothelial cells? Is there much known regarding the metabolic rate of the cells and this N-Glcynation? Elisa Klein:                 Yeah. So endothelial cells are thought to be highly glycolytic in terms of how they use glucose but they definitely take up glutamine to fuel the tricarboxylic acid or TCA cycle. And another paper came out a few years ago showing that quiescent and endothelial cells metabolize a lot of fatty acids. So they're fueling their energy needs that way. So there wasn't a lot known about GlcNAcylation in endothelial cells.                                     A lot of this work has been done in cancer cells, which are also highly glycolytic but their metabolism actually seems like it's maybe more diverse than people have thought for a long time. So the weird thing about GlcNAcylation, which if you're used to working with phosphorylation there's a thousand different enzymes that can phosphorolate right. But with GlcNAcylation there's one enzyme that's known to put the GlcNAC on and one enzyme that's known to take it off. And so they're global, right? So in our studies, if we say, okay, we're going to knock down that enzyme, you're effecting every single protein in the cell that's GlcNAcylated. And obviously ourselves in particular, we're not a big fan of that. Especially once you put them in flow, they were, like, nope, we're not going to make it. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Well, and that's a perfect segue to my next question because your results show that this flow really did not alter the expression of these enzymes that either add or subtract to the moiety. And rather it was the Hexosamine Biosynthetic Pathway that was decreased itself. So can you maybe give us a quick primer on what that is exactly and how that pathway feeds into the glycosylation... I think you wrote in the paper of over 4,000 proteins? So how would that fit in and why eNOS then? Elisa Klein:                 Yeah, so the Hexosamine Biosynthetic Pathway is one of these branch pathways that comes off glycolysis and there are these numbers sometimes there are these pathways out there and people say for the HBP in particular, 2% to 5% of the glucose that's going down through glycolysis gets shunted off into the HBP. We've done a lot of looking to try and figure out exactly where that 2% to 5%- Cindy St. Hilaire:        Yeah, what exact percentage? Elisa Klein:                 Yeah, but some percentage of it comes down and we really thought there were going to be changes in these enzymes that do the GlcNacylation, we thought there might be changes in the localization of the proteins and it's possible that those things do occur. We just couldn't detect them in our cells. And in the end, what we showed was the main thing was that when you have cells and steady laminar flow, you just decreased glycolysis. And therefore, that 2% to 5% goes down. So you seem to make less of this UDP- GlcNAC, which is the substrate that gets put on to eNOS in this case. The really strange thing that we could not explain despite a lot of work and obviously we don't get to put all of our experiments that didn't work in the paper- Cindy St. Hilaire:        The blood, sweat and tears gets left out. So- Elisa Klein:                 Exactly. So we tried really hard to figure out why it was eNOS specifically, right? Because in steady laminar flow, you see a lot of these like GlcNAcylated  proteins and a lot of them didn't change but eNOS changed hugely, essentially this GlcNAcylation just went away for the cells and steady laminar flow. So we couldn't quite answer that. We're still working on that part of the question and looking at some of the other proteins that maybe get GlcNAcylated more in this case and trying to figure out what they are. Cindy St. Hilaire:        I thought one of the cool results in your paper was one of the last ones. It was the one in healthy mice. In that you looked at healthy mice, just normal C57 black 6 mice that were 10 weeks old. So they just, kind of, reached maturity but you looked at their kind of these bifurcations and you looked at the inner aortic arch where there is more disturbed flow and you saw, similar to your in vitro studies, that there was this higher level of O-GlcNAcylation compared to the outer arch in the descending order. So my question is, these are healthy mice that are relatively young, they're not even full adults yet. That takes a couple more months. And so what are your thoughts about the role of this O-GlcNAcylation specifically on eNOS in driving atherogenesis. Where do you think this is happening in the disease process? It appears if it's in these wild type mice, it's already happening early. So where do you think this is most operative in the disease pathogenesis? Elisa Klein:                 I mean, I think it's very early, the effects of disturbed flow on endothelial cells. I can't imagine that there's a time when it's not having an effect on the cells. So I teach college students and I tell them all the time you think you're invincible now but these choices you're making today are going to affect your cardiovascular future in 50 years, which is very hard to accept. So I think it's very early in the process and I think it's only made worse by the things that we eat, in particular, that changed our blood sugar and our blood fatty acids and things like that. And our lab is looking into this more to try and see how when you change your blood metabolites then how does that then also affect this GlcNAcylation and the endothelial cell metabolism and then how does that affect endothelial cell function? Cindy St. Hilaire:        Yeah. And it's funny, it's really making me think of those, kinds of, extreme diets like keto diets and things like that where you're just like depleting sugar. And obviously there's lots of controversy in that field, but if you just think about the sugar aspect what is that doing to those EC cells? Why do you think endothelial cells have this response? Meaning why do you think it is that they've adapted to induce a metabolic shift in response to disturbed flow? Because, obviously it's not going to be perfect laminar flow everywhere. So what do you think it is that provides some sort of advantage in the shift? Elisa Klein:                 That's a really good question. I haven't thought about the advantage that it might provide. There are a lot of things that are going on in this area of disturbed flow. So there is the shear stress, the differential shear stress that the cells are experiencing. There's also transport issues, right? So if you have this area of disturbed flow, you have blood and the contents of the blood, including the white blood cells and the red blood cells, everything else that's, kind of, sitting around in that area and not getting washed downstream as quickly. So it is possible that maintaining glycolysis provides energy for repair or for protecting the endothelial cell from some sort of inflammatory insult or something like that, that's happening in the area of disturbed flow. And I feel like I just read something recently, it was in a different genre but... if they stopped the increased glycolysis or stop the metabolic shifts, it actually was worse.                                     Right? So I also believe that we treat humans for a single metabolic change, right? So if you have diabetes, I'm going to give you this drug and if you have high triglycerides, I'm going to give you this drug. But it's possible that if you have this metabolic abnormality, your body shifts the rest of your metabolism to protect the cells because of that metabolic abnormality. And so part of what we do as engineers is try and build computational models or we can take into account some of this complexity. So that's a really interesting question and my guess is that there are some protective aspects of this maintenance of high glycolysis and disturbed flow. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Yeah, maybe it would be perfectly fine until we get athero and then it all goes awry. So in terms of... obviously it's early days and I know you're a bioengineer but in terms of translational potential, what do you think your findings suggest about future potential therapies or future targets for which we can use to develop therapies? Is modulating this O-GlcNAcylation itself, a viable option? Elisa Klein:                 I don't think that modulating it is a super viable option, right? Because as I said, when we tried to change those enzymes ourselves did not enjoy going through flow or anything else. So it's very hard to change it overall. What I think is these things that are coming out about how metabolism may shift for endothelial cells when they're activated versus when they're quiescent, right? So when laminar flow or cells are quiescent, they decrease glycolysis, they increase fatty acid oxidation. Those things are important to take into consideration when you are treating a person who has a metabolic disorder. So that's the biggest translational piece that I think is, how do we give therapies that modify the metabolism of a cell holistically instead of trying to hit one pathway in particular.                                     We have done some studies where we tried to give endothelial cells something to inhibit a specific metabolic pathway and you see the cell shifts its entire metabolism to account for that. So we're starting to look at some of these other drugs like statins or metformin that do change endothelial cell metabolism, possibly even the SGLT2 inhibitors and trying to see not just how they change glycolysis but how they change metabolism as a whole and how that then affects endothelial cell function. Cindy St. Hilaire:        So what are you going to do next on this project? Elisa Klein:                 So on this project, so we have some stuff in the works like I said on statins and how statins work together. And one of our big goals is to sort of build a comprehensive metabolic model of the endothelial cell. So this study really focused on glucose but there are other things that endothelial cells metabolize, glutamine, and fatty acids, and trying to look at some of those and then seeing how changes in the glycolytic pathway may affect some of those other pathways. We also have some really nice mass spec data part of which is in this paper but part of which is going to go into our next work, which is looking at how laminar flow impacts some of the other side branch pathways that are in metabolism and coming off of glycolysis as well as the TCA cycle, right? So we don't think of endothelial cells as being big mitochondrial energy producers but they do use their mitochondria. And so we think it's really interesting and part of our goal of building an endothelial cell model and then hopefully a model of the complexity of the whole vascular wall. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Wow. That would be amazing. Well, Dr Elisa Klein from the University of Maryland, thank you so much for joining me today. This is an amazing study and I'm looking forward to seeing hopefully more of your future work. Elisa Klein:                 Thank you so much. It was a pleasure. Cindy St. Hilaire:        That's it for the highlights the from October 29th and November 12th issues of Circulation Research. Thank you for listening. Please check out the CircRes Facebook page and follow us on Twitter and Instagram with the handle @CircRes or #DiscoverCircRes. Thank you to our guest, Dr Elisa Klein. This podcast is produced by Asahara Ratnayaka, edited by Melissa Stoner and supported by the editorial team of Circulation Research. Some of the copy texts for highlighted articles is provided by Ruth Williams. I'm your host, Dr Cindy St. Hilaire, and this is Discover CircRes, your on-the-go source for the most exciting discoveries and basic cardiovascular research. This program is copyright of the American Heart Association, 2021. The opinions expressed by speakers on this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association. For more information, visit AHAjournals.org.

Planners and Wine
Passing along joy ft. Tonia Misvaer, CEO of EC

Planners and Wine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 103:41


This week, Megan and Myra sit down with Tonia Misvaer, CEO of EC, to chat about EC giveback collections, advice for small shop owners, new holiday collections, and what we can expect to see from EC in 2022.  Megan and Myra wraps up the show to discuss the latest planner news and a fun fall tag!  DON'T FORGET: No regular episode next week ! Enjoy your holiday.  Be sure when you share the show on social media to use the hashtag #plannersandwine. Thanks so much for your support! Check out our website Plannersandwinepod.com for episode info, links to our Merch, Patreon and so much more! Purchase your Go Wild 2022 tickets now HERE! Follow us on IG: @plannersandwine Megan's IG: @megsgotaplan Myra's IG: @myraplansit Thank you to the sponsors of this episode Wild for Planners, EC, Fern Creek Stickers, and Anchor. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/planners-and-wine/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/planners-and-wine/support

PT Profit Podcast
Nutrition Fundamentals with EC Synkowski

PT Profit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 55:13


On this episode, we have EC Synkowski joining us. She is a biochemical engineer and nutrition specialist, and we talk all about the fundamentals of nutrition. We begin by discussing how to make a diet as simple as possible since people tend to make everything so complicated. When we do that, we can't keep up with the things we should be focusing on. We talked about how she was able to work with people having hard time eating fruits and vegetables as well as why it's hard for people to manage their nutrition properly. EC also talked to me about FODMAP, what that is, and how it affects your body. We break down the difference between Conventional Medicine and Functional Medicine, and lastly, EC talked about children's nutrition and how she helps parents guide their children to a healthy lifestyle. You'll hear:- Why people find it hard to manage their nutrition.- Addressing food anxiety.- Helping parents improve their children's nutrition. Don't forget to leave us a review on Apple Podcasts. About Today's Guest Eva Claire "EC" Synkowski is the Founder of OptimizeMe Nutrition, which delivers B2B and B2C educational nutrition programs without the dogma and gimmicks that saturate the current nutrition market. She holds a BS in Biochemical Engineering as well as two MS degrees (in Nutrition and in Functional Medicine). Additionally, she is a Certified Nutrition Specialist and Licensed-Dietician Nutritionist. EC has been a TEDx speaker and hosts The Consistency Project Podcast. She's also the Founder of the #800gChallenge, in which users add a healthy-daily dose of fruits and veggies each day without any diet eliminations. Yes! Nutrition can be simple, sustainable, and effective. Over 900 gyms have run the challenge for members and more than 15,000 individuals have participated. OptimizeMe NutritionOptimizeMe Nutrition on FacebookEC on InstagramThe Consistency Project Podcast"An El

Target USA Podcast by WTOP
Ep. 306 | The Belarus-Poland Migrant Standoff

Target USA Podcast by WTOP

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 25:47


How did it happen? What will happen to the migrants caught in the middle? Peter Stano, Spokesman for the European Commission explains how Belarus tricked migrants into coming there and what actions the EC is taking.

Marketers Take Flight Podcast
Get Found Online: Website and SEO Best Practices

Marketers Take Flight Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 42:40


Can A/E/C firms really expect to get leads based on their website?  In today's episode, I'm talking to Bryon McCartney who answers this question and many others about our websites and Search Engine Optimization (SEO).  Bryon knows that a bad website is going to equal lost opportunities.  He walks us through what every website needs to have.  Did you know that 84% of A/E/C buyers visit a firm's website during the buying process?  And that getting online leads is cheaper and less time-consuming than other methods.  Bryon even has a story for us on one client who received a lead via their website and then booked it – no proposal process needed!This interview was so informational, we have split it in two.  In this one, we talk about four key best practices for every website, the three critical questions people want to know when they visit your website, and why you should have different paths for different types of visitors on your website.  Here are a few highlights:After evaluating 550 websites, what are the key takeaways? 8:53What is Archi Babble? 16:28 Ideas to think about when creating your site: 18:483 critical questions people want to know when they come to your site: 20:49Behind the scenes foundational SEO: 21:51On-Page Content – What?  Why? How? 26:26Off-Page Content – What? Why? How? 27:52Different Visitor Paths: 33:55 Attract your Ideal Client: 35:34Visit the show notes webpage to learn more about Bryon and get the links to the resources mentioned in the show.Join the CommunityAre you looking for a mentor? Someone to go alongside you AND who gets what it's like to be an AEC marketing professional? For as little as $5/month you'll get bonus podcast content, early and discounted access to training, and individualized support from me. Go to marketerstakeflight.com/mentor to learn more and join today.

IFRS Talks - PwC's Global IFRS podcast
Episode 120: ECL for Climate Change

IFRS Talks - PwC's Global IFRS podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 21:40


Continuing our green mini series, Andrea Pryde is joined by Gethin Evans and Kevin McLeod to discuss how the effects of climate-related risks should be reflected in expected credit loss calculations used for measuring impairment of financial assets applying IFRS 9.

The Go Diaper Free Podcast
#168 How I learned about Elimination Communication

The Go Diaper Free Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 15:42


Today I share the story behind it all! How I learned about elimination communication as a natural alternative to diapers and toilet training. Get full show notes and add your comments or questions here: https://godiaperfree.com/168 Get my free easy start guide for EC at https://godiaperfree.com/start Start EC with your baby today with Andrea's popular book, Go Diaper Free: https://godiaperfree.com/thebook 

Best Hour of Their Day
482. Stop majoring in the minors | Coaches Development Q+A with EC Synkowski, OptimizeMe Nutrition

Best Hour of Their Day

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 67:43


EC Synkowski, Founder of OptimizeMe Nutrition, was recently named one of the most influential women in the CrossFit space, and we could not agree more. In honor of that, tune in today to her incredible Coaches Development Group Q+A where she answers all questions about nutrition, from the 800 Gram Challenge, to how to lead by example and meet your clients where they are at. To learn more about EC, check out https://optimizemenutrition.com. Today's episode is brought to you by our Coaches Development Course. This program is expertly designed to help you become the best CrossFit coach you can be by focusing on the six criteria of an effective coach: teaching, seeing, correcting, demonstrating, group management, and presence and attitude. Follow this link to sign up today: courses.ownyoureating.com/courses/coachesdevelopment So you never miss an episode, subscribe on YouTube and on all major podcasting platforms at Best Hour of Their Day. Check out more information on our sponsors below: Doc Spartan - Use code BESTHOUR at checkout for 15% off and check out docspartan.com for our Best Hour bundle. RX Smart Gear - Use code BESTHOUR at checkout for 10% off. InsideTracker - Visit info.insidetracker.com/coachjasonackerman. WheelPay - An official partner of our podcast. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jason-ackerman/support

SBC This Week
States commission sex abuse task forces; EC meets, announces new appointments

SBC This Week

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 48:09


State conventions are taking place all over the country, and we've got a recap of the big news items from them. Also, the EC met this week and announced some new appointments to its subcommittees.

The nascar series
535: Full Race Replay/ N R R R A All Star Race/ N R R R A Cup Series

The nascar series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 40:46


Listen into the full N R R R A All Star Race as time dominates and speed to Victory at the Los Angeles memorial colliseum and also where time and william begin to brew Their conflict with a fight on pit rosd after the checker EC flag.

Daily Tech News Show
The Naked Truth About Wearables – DTNS 4150

Daily Tech News Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021


Google will expand the Sleep Sensing features on the second-gen Nest Hub that uses a motion sensor to monitor your sleep patterns. We cover the latest events in the Epic vs Apple lawsuit. Google loses its appeal against a 2.42 billion Euro fine leveled by the EC in 2017 for abusing its monopoly on search.Continue reading "The Naked Truth About Wearables – DTNS 4150"

Daily Tech News Show (Video)
The Naked Truth About Wearables – DTNS 4150

Daily Tech News Show (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021


Google will expand the Sleep Sensing features on the second-gen Nest Hub that uses a motion sensor to monitor your sleep patterns. We cover the latest events in the Epic vs Apple lawsuit. Google loses its appeal against a 2.42 billion Euro fine leveled by the EC in 2017 for abusing its monopoly on search. Starring Tom Merritt, Sarah Lane, Roger Chang, Joe, Amos MP3 Download Using a Screen Reader? Click here Multiple versions (ogg, video etc.) from Archive.org Follow us on Twitter Instgram YouTube and Twitch Please SUBSCRIBE HERE. Subscribe through Apple Podcasts. A special thanks to all our supporters–without you, none of this would be possible. If you are willing to support the show or to give as little as 10 cents a day on Patreon, Thank you! Become a Patron! Big thanks to Dan Lueders for the headlines music and Martin Bell for the opening theme! Big thanks to Mustafa A. from thepolarcat.com for the logo! Thanks to our mods Jack_Shid and KAPT_Kipper on the subreddit Send to email to feedback@dailytechnewsshow.com Show Notes To read the show notes in a separate page click here!

Daily Tech News Show
The Naked Truth About Wearables - DTNS 4150

Daily Tech News Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 30:51


Google will expand the Sleep Sensing features on the second-gen Nest Hub that uses a motions Ensor to monitor your sleep patterns. We cover the latest events in the Epic vs Apple lawsuit. Google loses its appeal against a 2.42 billion Euro fine leveled by the EC in 2017 for abusing its monopoly on search.Starring Tom Merritt, Sarah Lane, Scott Johnson, Roger Chang, Joe.Link to the Show Notes.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Go Diaper Free Podcast
#167 Inconsistency in Potty Training!

The Go Diaper Free Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 10:48


Your toddler goes to the toilet willingly today, but pees his pants all day tomorrow. He tells you when he needs to go pee all week, and the following week...nothing. What gives with all the potty training inconsistency?!

Talk Film Society Podcast
Monsters Never Die: Tales From The Crypt Special

Talk Film Society Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 83:28


The spooky boils, Matt and Jacob (@TheRealMattC & @Jacob_DeNobel), come together for their second anniver-scary to talk about the bone, the only, Tales from the Crypt! Take a deep dive into EC comics history as we talk about Tales from the Crypt, The Vault of Horror, Demon Knight, Bordello of Blood, and Ritual, as well as take a terrible tour through the best episodes of the series. Shriek now, or forever rest in peace!

The Go Diaper Free Podcast
#166 Dealing with Inconsistency in Elimination Communication

The Go Diaper Free Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 12:56


If you are finding major inconsistencies in elimination communication, today's show is 100% for you. Today I cover both of these situations, in full: You not being consistent in offering your baby the potty and Your baby not consistently telling you he needs to go, cooperating in going, or showing an interest in using the toilet If you have experienced either of these situations, great!

Business of Architecture Podcast
389: Building Boldly with Bolanle Williams-Olley

Business of Architecture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 70:32


This week, I'm speaking with Bolanle Williams-Olley, Chief Financial Officer and part-owner of Mancini Duffy, a technology-first design firm based in NYC, overseeing the firm's financial and operational performance. Bolanle has had 12 years working in the AEC industry, having worked with HLW and Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) prior to joining Mancini Duffy. She holds a Masters in Education & Social Policy from NYU, Masters in Applied Mathematics, a Bachelors in Mathematics from the City University of New York, Hunter College, and is also a board member of the Beverly Willis Architecture Foundation (BWAF). In addition to her role at Mancini Duffy, she has founded several impact organizations in Nigeria that aim to improve education in low-income communities, empower women in the A/E/C industry and at small design firms, as well as create awareness about NGOs across Nigeria. Bolanle is launching her first book in November called "Build Boldly: Chart Your Unique Career Path", as a playbook for success in the architecture and design industry, offering business development tips including lessons she's learned from being Mancini's CFO. In this episode, we discuss the role of a CFO within an architecture practice and the importance of establishing a strong partnership between the accounts team and the project management team. We cover some key performance indicators or metrics they measure to ensure the success of their projects and how these metrics then filter into business development. We also talk about Bolanle's philanthropic work and a bit of a peek into her book Build Boldly.

How to Travel Vegan w/Tom Simak
The Monthly Paradigm: COP 26, Eating Our Way To Extinction, The Toxic In Plastic

How to Travel Vegan w/Tom Simak

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 110:40


Welcome to The Monthly Paradigm with Tom Simak & Sharna Harrington.This is where we talk about the biggest news stories, all things climate change, veganism, fitness, what we're cooking up, wins of the month and everything in-between.Video: https://youtu.be/OhV2CtqwP0kToday we're talking:04:00 - Visiting the Daintree Rainforest10:00 - Veganeasy12:45 - Amsterdam reducing meat15:00 -New study on fast food production and disease22:00 - The royals urge people to reduce animal products24:30 - Earth Shot Prize30:00 - Fossil Fuel subsidies32:30 - Problems with recycling38:00 - WA bans logging42:00 - NSW destroys for forests44:00 - Healthy pig culling problem49:30 - California Oil Spill52:30 - Pig Liver transplant58:00 - Vertical farms01:03:00 - Mushrooms for health01:07:30 - Eating Our Way To Extinction film01:10:00 - Being called a racist01:16:45 - Is Nestle ethical?01:22:00 - COP 2601:29:30 - Sustainability tip01:36:00 - Solar Electric campervan01:38:00 - VergerKing01:40:00 - Russia to ban plastic01:42:00 - TedX vegan event01:44:30 - Google lower carbon route01:46:00 - Danish plant-based food fundResources:Vegan Easy 30 Day Challenge: veganeasy.org   Amsterdam overweight rates:  Netherlands WHOPlastic in fast food: StudyUK Recycling case study: ArticleWA protects 2 million hectares: ArticleNSW destroy forest for gas: ArticleTrump doesn't want to go vegan: PBNCalifornia Oil Spill: YouTubePig liver transplant: NY Times articleEpisode with Jeff Chilton:  SpotifySolar campervan: ArticleVurgerKing: ArticleTedX countdown event: VideoConnect with us:Instagram | @plant.paradigmInstagram | @sharnaaleeYouTube | The Plant ParadigmTwitter | @plantparadigmWebsite | www.theplantparadigm.comSupport the show | Buy me a coffeeSubscribe to the podcast:Apple | Spotify | Stitcher |Stay happy,Eat plants,Peace

Principled
S6E11 | Is gamified learning really all fun and games?

Principled

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 32:31


Abstract: Gamification involves more than just shooting lasers and collecting gold coins. When done well, it has the power to enhance learning experiences and influence the way people make decisions. In this episode of the Principled Podcast, LRN Learning Director Kai Merriott speaks with Johnny McMonagle, one of LRN's lead Creative Designers, about how to leverage gamification effectively when developing E&C training. Listen in as Kai and Johnny discuss the process of identifying the right opportunities for gamified learning, the importance of telling the right story with training material, and their favorite gamified elements—including a 3D-printer of doughnuts.   Featured guest: Johnny McMonagle brings over 20 years of experience in e-learning and instructional design to LRN. As Lead Designer, he leverages his graphic design and animation skills to develop interactive elements for training software that create more engaging learning experiences and encourage ethical behavior. He also works collaboratively with clients and internal stakeholders to ensure these learning products deliver effectively on key business objectives. Johnny specializes in drawing, illustration, and character and concept design. Prior to joining LRN, Johnny was the Lead Designer at Interactive Services, where he developed interactive training elements using Flash and Photoshop. Before that, he worked as a graphic designer at the e-learning company MindLeaders. Johnny received his diploma in classical animation at Ballyfermot Senior College in Dublin, Ireland.   Featured Host:  Kai has worked in learning management and instructional design since 2001 and has worked at LRN (formerly Interactive Services) since 2013. As a Learning Director, he designs creative learning programs that focus on changing behavior, with a particular focus on pushing visual design and creating compelling animations and videos. He also leads and monitors his team's instructional design approaches. Kai has designed training on a variety of topics within compliance—including diversity, code of conduct, information security, anti-bribery, and money laundering. He's also created training on brand awareness, systems training, social media policies, food safety, sales, customer service, and marketing. He has created these programs for companies all over the world including Bloomberg, Amex, Finra, Facebook, Kraft-Heinz, AIB, Johnson & Johnson, Deloitte, Morgan Stanley, Intel, BlackRock, State Street, BNY Mellon, and Colgate. Several of Kai's training programs and videos have won awards from Brandon Hall and other training institutions. He earned his MA in creative writing and BA in English at University of Chichester in Sussex.   Transcript: Intro: Welcome to the Principled Podcast, brought to you by LRN. The Principled Podcast brings together the collective wisdom on ethics, business and compliance, transformative stories of leadership, and inspiring workplace culture. Listen in to discover valuable strategies from our community of business leaders and workplace change-makers. Kai Merriott: When you hear the word gamification, what comes to mind? Do you think of shooting lasers and collecting gold coins or about influencing the way people make decisions? Too often organizations lean on gamification for the sake of making their ethics compliance program look more tech-savvy. So how can you ensure you develop gamification in a way that enhances training? Hello, and welcome to another episode of LRN's Principled Podcast, I'm your host Kai Merriott a learning director at LRN. And today I'm joined by Johnny McMonagle one of our lead creative designers for LRN, we're going to be talking about gamification in learning. So, Johnny, is a real expert in this space with more than 20 years of experience designing interactive graphic elements for e-learning and training software. So Johnny, thanks for coming on the Principled Podcast. Johnny McMonagle: Hey Kai, thanks for having me, looking forward to this discussion. Kai Merriott: So Johnny we've obviously worked together on many gamified learning projects in the past but just for the purposes of this conversation, how would you describe gamification and meaning the way that we talk about it? Johnny McMonagle: Yeah. I think our approach to gamification is to make our training a lot more engaging, it's going to stand out from your normal e-learning and normal training and that is going to look and feel very different. It's going to be engaging, it's going to be enjoyable and it'll be short to the point, but the experience will actually be a pleasurable one and that's where the element comes in, that it's not just education it's actually a fun thing to do. Kai Merriott: And these sort of gamified elements on top of that is in there so, well, it's fun and it's engaging but also it has game mechanics as well like I suppose scoring. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah, we do that. Apart from the visuals, you will look at a screen and you will see things that you'll see on an arcade game, you'll see a score, you'll see a play button, you might hear the music and the sound effects that you're used to from games and you'll know the second you sit down to do it you're not just clicking next, you're seeing the elements that go into making a game. Kai Merriott: So when I think about all the projects we've done together which have those gaming mechanics and the gaming elements, I kind of think that every gamified course has really two distinct elements that make it really sort of compelling and engaging and the first is I think a really good story from beginning to end, you put that story element in there that kind of drives you from one part of the learning to the next, but also really good interactivity. Let's start from the beginning in terms of, what do we actually think about first usually? Do we actually start with the story or do we start with what gaming elements can we put into this training? Johnny McMonagle: Yes. And I've seen that where I think we always start with the story because the story will drive everything. How do we get from A to B on your learning journey? What is it we're trying to do? So we start with a story and we'll tell the story and everything will evolve from there. For example, a recent course I did was on global trade and we said, well, what is the story here? The global trade it tells itself, you're going to go around the world, you're trading with different countries so we said, how are we going to make that work? And I said to the learning manager, I said, well, how about this? I found an image, it was a little plain going around the globe, I said, well, that's you, you're the character, and we're going to go from A to B and we're going to learn things as you go. Every destination is going to have a consequence and at the end of it you have learned something. And it led to itself that it looked like a game board, it felt like a game and every step of the way it felt you were learning but it was very game-like, and that was the story that led all of those decisions that we put into it and it worked very well. Kai Merriott: And I think if you were to try and do it the other way around, you kind of start, oh, we know we've got 10 gaming elements to choose from and now let's try and build a story from that, that just never works, does it? Johnny McMonagle: No, it's kind of working backwards where you're shoehorning just for the sake of it and I've seen it never gels, there are too many different elements just they don't work. We've seen that in putting sound effects into a quiz, it doesn't make it a game, it's just window dressing. I think it has to be more cohesive and it has to have a strong narrative and all the different elements from the visuals, the style of writing, the sound effects, it all has to tie in. And with the idea of gamification in your mind you have to think, does this play, does it feel like a game? I think that's what you're striving to do. Kai Merriott: Yeah. And I think it's funny you said earlier about, you can't just put sound effects on a quiz and call it a game, I think that's absolutely right. I think you start with that really strong story but then I think we do layer it with sound effects and I think we shouldn't forget that either. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah. I think sound effects are very important and they can really enhance the whole experience, it's just one of the many elements and it's a very rich element to have and it can add so much to the experience. We were saying before about sound effects in games, we hark back to the beginning of games, the arcade games again and we all respond to those. We know what a good sound sounds like and we know what losing a life sounds like just from our shared memories of arcade games and home video systems. These are common things that we all understand, we all can respond to and it really does enhance it but having it on its own you need to think of the other elements too and they all have to come together to make that cohesive game experience that feels like a game. Kai Merriott: Yeah, absolutely. And I'm thinking about the sound effects, I think we slightly age ourselves, don't we? When we talk about arcade games. Johnny McMonagle: This is true. Yes. Like the coin slot in the arcade. Because it's funny in saying that though, I think to this day we still harp back to the early Nintendos and we know what that sounds like. And even for people who've never played a game of any age, we go, yeah, I am now playing a video game. It is kind of a universal and nearly a timeless thing that we can all relate to it in the same way. Kai Merriott: Yeah. There's something almost instinctive about, you said earlier, about the noise that means you've won and the noise that means you've lost a life. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah. I think it's some sort of shared global experience that no matter where we're from we know what it sounds like. Even if it's a mobile game or a contemporary platform or whatever, we know that means you've just won something, that means you've lost something, it's kind of just a unit universal language. Kai Merriott: Yeah. And I think as well we're kind of lucky in the age we live in which is that mobile games are so popular because I think they also do the same thing. They're very arcade game-like, very bright and colorful and kind of a lot of sounds, lots of music to convey a particular emotion, what do you think about the use of music in games and how important is that? Johnny McMonagle: Yeah. The use of music can really enhance it and it's a very important thing to consider and it sets the tone for the whole experience. And again, there is the universal thing of we know exciting music to suit the tone if that's what you're aiming for, we know cinematic, we know that if we want this to be dark and somber that's what we do, as you would if you were scoring a piece for a drama you speak the same sort of language. It's funny you mentioned mobile gaming and the target audience for mobile gaming wouldn't be what you would normally think of gamers. And today's gamers I think most people think of people sitting with five monitors, they have the best chairs, they've all the gear, that's what gaming is, but there's also the mobile thing. So it's every walk of life will have this experience, you wouldn't think of them as your typical gamer but they will engage with this kind of game and they do, they wouldn't call themselves a gamer but they do play these games. And I think that's what we aim for is to say, well, what is it that engages the non-gamer to play a game? It's something that is appealing to people who don't play games, it's something that'll engage them, it's something that they want to come back to and that they'll respond to it positively. Kai Merriott: So you mentioned gamers with their five monitors and I think you're right, I mean, there's a real important distinction I think to be drawn here between what we do when we talk about gamified learning and the people who are obsessively gamers, or even just casual gamers but more of the console type gamers. I think ours seems to be more like the mobile games. Johnny McMonagle: I think so. It has to be much more direct, it has to be for somebody who's never played a game, who's aware what a game is. They look at it, they can tell immediately how to play the game, they go, there's the start button. Once they start playing they don't want rule books, they don't want all that, they want to get in and start playing and so from the get-go it should be intuitive, and if it isn't intuitive, if it takes too much explaining, then it's not working. It has to be an immediate thing for people who are time-poor, for people who, as I said, aren't gamers, they want to look at it and go, I like the look of this, I want to press that play button and after I press that play button I want to keep clicking things, I know what I'm doing all the way to the end of the game. Kai Merriott: Yeah. Let's talk a little bit about that, making it intuitive. Because again, probably showing my age, I remember the old days of you take home a game and it comes with a sort of novel-like instruction manual, I mean, they still does this now, right? There's a picture of a controller and there's 1,000 things around it telling you what each button does, but, I mean, we can't really do that in gamified learning, can we? Johnny McMonagle: No and nor do we want to. It's like, we don't have the time, we're too busy in our lives, we have too many things going on. We have this training set aside we want to get there immediately and say like, if it's too complicated you're just going to disengage with it, if you don't automatically immediately know what you're going to do then I think we're failing, that's what we come into. The mobile version is a strip down to the bare element of, what is a game? And it is, does it look good? Does it look like something I want to play? Will I understand it? Am I daunted by it? Then it's not working, does it look like something I can dive into? Then it is work. Kai Merriott: Yeah. I was thinking of Tetris actually and how much we all never had to learn Tetris. Johnny McMonagle: That's it. From the second you saw it on screen you knew what to do and, yeah, no rule books, no help button, no nothing. You go, I know what to do, and within seconds you learn, oh, I didn't get that right, you hear the sound, we can all hear it in our memories, that sound, and you get the little endorphins when you get it right and there's the little positive thing. And you get that within moments of picking it up for the first time and that's the beauty of a game like Tetris. As you, I don't think that anyone ever read how to play Tetris, I'd say they are few and far between, so that's what we are aiming for is that immediacy. Kai Merriott: Also, I think the simplicity of the gamification options. So if you think about what that means, well, we named a few already so for instance, you lose a life, you have three lives and you lose three and then you're kind of kicked out of the game, you could have what we call internally power bars which is health bars that go up and down as you go, whether you answer a question right or wrong, I mean, there's lots, lots, and lots and lots of different options. We also have branching which is another kind of a popular gaming thing that we do where if you get a question right then the story changes and it's different than if you get the question wrong and you go down a different path. So, so many options but we shouldn't use them all, should we? Johnny McMonagle: No, because then I think we're overcomplicating. Use it if there's a reason for it, if it helps the narrative of that story we talked about then absolutely. And I like the branching one and it, again, harps back to the old adventure games even in the books, here's your choice, and whatever one you make you go off in a different direction and you're controlling that. You'll always come to the whatever conclusion, we make sure they come to the conclusion they have to, but having that choice is a great thing. But as you say, we don't have to throw all the whistles and bells there all the time but whatever helps the narrative is what we're aiming for. Kai Merriott: So it's back to story again, isn't it? You choose it as it is. Johnny McMonagle: I think it is always about the story. Kai Merriott: Yeah. Because I think back to the course we did together and obviously, we were not going to name any particular client names, but we did one for the cybersecurity course we did, which was seen as being a game, everyone calls it a game, but it only really I think had one gamified option in there, maybe two. And I'm thinking of the one we did, it was a cybersecurity where it was all based around a 3D printing donut machine and you had four donuts I think and then if you answer a question wrong then you lose a donut and that was number one, and then number two was, I think there was a very small amount of branching in there. But even then it was just to show you a little different animation depending on whether you got it right or wrong. Johnny McMonagle: And that was it, it was very multimedia-rich. It was music, it was bright engaging graphics, it was animation, it was sound effects. And they were all matching, the music suited the primary colors, even the sound effects of the good and bad results that all came together very well and it all sounded like it all belonged as part of the same product and that was a very successful one. And again, the story was you're starting at the start, I think you were getting parts or ingredients, and everywhere along the way there was somebody trying to foil you and your job was to make sure you foiled that hacker. It was about cybersecurity so we invented this character who was trying to stop you on your way and it had a little sound effect, little evil cackle, and stuff like that. And it was a very engaging little game, it was very short but it got the point across, it was all about cybersecurity and all that entails, and it feels very well received. Kai Merriott: Yeah. I think it had one of the biggest take-ups of any training, not just gamified training but any training for that particular organization. Johnny McMonagle: That's right. And a lot of that was just the fun of it and was immediately easy to play, you got immediately from the start you go, I like these graphics, I like that music, there's the play button. And I think we made a short intro animation to tell you this is what's going to happen, watch out for whatever we call the baddie and now go, learn this here, he'll try to trip you up on the way but go and answer these questions. And behind all that, it is just an e-learning quiz, but with all these things around it, it's so much more engaging. And it just showed there with the take-up as people were coming back to do it again and talking about it, comparing high scores would be the old way of doing it, but it worked just very well. Kai Merriott: And I remember even though it was our training every time I went back to test the course during the production process I found myself getting drawn into it every time, I just kept playing it. Johnny McMonagle: I think I've done that too. In the current one I'm working on we've come up with a new way if you win, a different little game piece for every successful thing. And as we're developing it I found myself playing the game because there's the little reward of the endorphins, the little positive sound, and something glows or sparkles every time you get it right. And then they're going, yeah, bear with me I'm just playing this game, and that shows that it's doing its job. Kai Merriott: We touched upon earlier about, I think, particularly the cybersecurity one being a short game, because if you think again of gamers back to the five monitor guy, the games they play last for, I say not in one go but sometimes it is, 10, 20, 30 hours of gaming just in one game. We obviously can't get away with that, can we? Johnny McMonagle: No. And I think no matter how good it is and how engaging it is, I think brevity is the key, I think less is more because the novelty will wear off. I think there's no set limit about how long it should be but I think if you have too much of a good thing too, yeah, kind of enthusiasm wins. And I think for us as contemporary workers we don't have that hour, so if we can do it in half an hour or 45 minutes and they've enjoyed that very much, that's better than dragging it out and turning it into a chore. Kai Merriott: I think the key time is actually 20 minutes, but whether we actually achieve that, I don't know, that's the kind of the dream, the 20-minute game. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah. I think 20 minutes is a perfect round number, I think any longer than that then you are pushing it. I know it depends on the content, it depends on the partner, but ideally we'd be trying to say, no, trust us on this, keep it around to 20 minutes and everyone will enjoy that bit a whole lot more. Kai Merriott: And it's back to this - people being time poor, isn't it? Because games are seen as a bit of frivolity. And if we're saying to people, right, you're going to spend three hours on this game, well, I think you're right that they would get bored but also they just won't have the time. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah. And touching on that, the gaming frivolity, is we have to sell this idea that gaming isn't a waste of time, it isn't a distraction, and maybe it goes back to teaching children that learn through play. And I think we never grow out of that, we do enjoy playing, we enjoy games, but it's not frivolous because actually, we are learning through this. And for employees, for staff and all that, it isn't a waste of time at all, it's like, you must do this training and you're going to enjoy it and that's a nice thing for everybody. If you're going to enjoy the training then everybody wins. Kai Merriott: Yeah, absolutely. I think it seems to be not just in gamified learning but just in every kind of training that idea of people really not having much time trying to cut things down to the chase because this is not a university, they're not on three-year courses, they have 20 minutes to do a job and they need to learn how to do it quickly. Johnny McMonagle: Yes, absolutely. I think we can all find in our daily working lives we can put aside 20 minutes and we can justify that 20 minutes and we will learn something. I think it's looking at the modern workplace as well, we have to take in consideration that we just don't have the time. So I think we can all agree we can make time for 20 minutes and that would be our optimum amount of time. And if we're not achieving that in 20 minutes then maybe we're not doing it right. Kai Merriott: I think that's right. What I often do is when we look at the information that needs to be covered as part of this game, I try and sort of throw away everything that isn't related to the task in hand. I think that's true of e-learning in general, I think it's especially true of games that really should reflect the role that you're doing. So everything in that game should be practical knowledge that you can go away and do something with rather than something that's it's kind of just knowledge and awareness. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah, that's right. I think it's always focused on what it is, is the goal of this game, what is the endpoint of the story we're telling, and don't try to be all things to all men, don't try and overload it and just keep it to a thing. If they need more information they can always go to different resources but for our games, we have to just focus on it, keep it very direct to the point, here's what you're taking away from this game, from this training. There are other ways of delivering information but with a game, we keep focused on what we need to tell, what we need to impart. Kai Merriott: Yeah. So I think you did touch upon earlier about the kind of visual side of the game. So we talked about the music, the sound effects, and what about the visuals, the way it looks, how important is that to the game? Johnny McMonagle: Well, I think that's extremely important obviously as a graphic designer. One thing it is again, it's the universal language off game, it is, what does game mean to you? What does it mean to me, to the seasoned gamer, to someone who never plays a game? I say, if you're walking through the office you look over your colleague's shoulder and there's something on that screen that looks engaging and fun and doesn't look like your stack e-learning, it doesn't look like there are two people in business suits shaking hands and a bit of text, next screen, here's two different people in business suits doing something. And that's the kind of thing, it has to look better than that, it has to look, I say fun without saying frivolous, it has to be a lot more engaging. There has to be something that separates it from your usually learning and I think that could be elements on the screen where you've done something with the graphics, there's something different about it and it can be anything but it has to stand apart or other elements on the screen too like scoring or a meter or something like that where you're immediately going, what is that? So you know from a glance that's a game. Kai Merriott: Yeah. I think having its own unique identity. I always think of games like Candy Crush which it's not a game I particularly play, I don't think it's really marketed to people like me, but it's got such an identity and the color scheme and the noises, going back to sound effects again, it all says, this is a game that even the sound effects and the colors are going to get you as high as the sugar from the candy. Johnny McMonagle: Those endorphins again, it's that thing of going, yeah, I'm going to have fun playing this, it's going to put a smile on their face, I'm going to enjoy doing it. And that's again if you saw a picture of it, it doesn't even have to be a live version just a picture of it, you know that's a fun looking game, I'm going to enjoy spending time with this. And I think that's, yeah, we try to do that with our games, we try immediately to go, is this training? Because this looks like something fun. Kai Merriott: Yeah. And again, I think the visuals go back to the story again and say, what is the story? The story is X or Y, and then from there, you can kind of come up with a brand identity. Because I was thinking about back to our cybersecurity game with the 3D printing donut which is a mad idea, and I think I seem to remember back in the early days, the brand that was suggested that was floated around was actually quite almost movie-like and a little bit subdued and probably wouldn't quite have fitted the idea. Do you remember it? Johnny McMonagle: Yeah. I remember the brand in particular. Many partners they're very aware of their own brand and they want to see their own brand back at them with that, we kind of threw that through book out. We said, well, for this game you're going to get your loco and that's about it, we kind of rewrote it and they agreed that this was the way to go. Is that what you're referencing? Kai Merriott: That's right. And I think it was what we decided because I think we both said that the original brand was quite subdued given that the idea was so mad. So we kind of went for a much more pastly almost and I think it was basically Simpsons inspired brand because of the donuts, I suppose. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah, I think so. I think everyone now you see a donut with pink frosting on you think Homer Simpson, I think we all do. But that was a point, as we said, well, here's your color palette, blah, blah, blah, here and so on, but look at these visuals. And I think they came around very quickly and they said, no, this looks really nice, we get it, we're responding well to it so we don't need to stick with that. And they went for that mad idea, as you say, their brand palette didn't suit so it didn't take much convincing, it was a strong idea that worked. Kai Merriott: Yeah. And it really did and that's a project I'm very proud of as well. So I was thinking again of, going back to the gaming options, we touched upon those before, we talked about lives, we talk about scoring, but of course, when you're kind of coming up with this brand identity in this game, you don't really use terms like lives and percentages in scoring you again, presume do you want to tie that back to the story. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah, that's right. Because yeah, the use of lives and all it is going back to our arcade games but that was literally you had your three little characters and you lose a life. And then it depends on your story, that doesn't make sense for the stuff we've done, well, you're not actually losing a life. When we think, what are you gaining? What are you losing? And in that way then I say in global trade, we had a thing we said, well, if you go to a certain jurisdiction and you get this question right then your project goes ahead and you've done well. If you get the question wrong in this particular jurisdiction, there's going to be consequences maybe that's your project is delayed or you've actually broken some global trade thing, you're going to face legal sanctions and we tie that into the real-life, that training, they need to know this but we've made it a game and we go, there is a big legal sign coming up going, you're in trouble, or we go, you've got this right, here's a little trophy, with a sound effect, a little glow, it all ties back to what you were saying. Kai Merriott: Yeah. And like the lives turned into donuts, and another one we did quite recently was on agile at the agile process. So the original gaming option, if you like, was a meter that goes down, if it goes down to zero then you get kicked out of the game. Now, we didn't want to just call it a meter so we actually made it a race between two companies who were developing a very similar product. And so if you answer the questions correctly then the meter goes towards you and then if you answer incorrectly the meter goes towards the other company, the rival company. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah. And that was a clever use of a very standard functionality of your progress bar basically telling you, yeah, you've answered these right and every time you do it goes up and increments up to the right or vertically and that's standard. But we say, well, how does it tie into our story? And then we had one for alcoholic spur company and we got the same idea, on the left you have a glass with nothing in it, on the right you have a glass that gets full every time you get something right. It's the same principle of the progress meter but dressed up for gaming and for gamification and that's a simple little thing you can do to tie in the game and make it relevant, make it suit the context. And people will react to it a lot better than you boring zero to 100 that they're so used to seeing and it just doesn't feel like a game, it just feels like standard learning. Kai Merriott: It's that simplicity again. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah. It's something that you can respond to immediately, you don't overthink it. You could see it a glance I know what's happening here and you want to get up to the right and you want to get up to the top of the screen, you know every time you're getting something right it's going up in increments and you're enjoying getting it there and it's your mission to get it there. And if you get it wrong, if it says retry, you're going, of course, I'll retry, I've enjoyed that, I really want to get that glassful or win that contract or whatever it is, that donut machine. It's an easy win but give it some thought, tie it into the design of the whole thing, and again, back to your story, how does this help sell the story? Kai Merriott: Yeah, absolutely. Because we're not dealing with, going back to the five monitor guy, I like the five monitor guy that you came up with, going back to him, I mean, thousands and thousands of hours, millions of dollars spent on those sorts of games, it does not need to be complicated to be a game and I think we've proven that time and time again. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah, I think it is. It just uses the fundamentals of what a game is that we can all respond to, that we can all relate to, we know immediately what it is, we recognize it when we see it, we know what it is when we are playing it, we respond to it, we know what we're doing and we enjoy it and we want to play it. We enjoy doing it so much that we'll play it again, we'll come back to it if we don't do well, we play until we win it. Kai Merriott: And I was thinking of, if we were to create a game that absolutely breaks all the rules, so we were talking about things like we have a great story, we have really interactivity that kind of tells the story, it's nice and short, it has a really nice visual identity and it uses sound effects and music and, I want to say, in an appropriate way because we've talked a lot about the fun side of it, but actually it doesn't need to be fun, it can also be dramatic as well. But what would the worst gamified course you can think of look like do you think? Johnny McMonagle: Well, yeah, getting all those things wrong or even that they don't match, that the visuals don't match the sound effects, that the sound effects sound like they're from a completely different product, that the music it sets completely the wrong tone, things like going, well, why I press something, something odd happens, why did that happen? What do I do next? If you get lost anywhere in the middle of it, if you have any doubt what you're doing, if you have to be reaching for the help button you're not doing it well, we haven't done our job well, if someone has to go, how do I play this again? Or I can't remember what I'm doing, what's the point of this? Then we haven't done our job, that's where the simplicity comes into. And all the elements have to work together or else it's jarring and it feels off and all those things would make it to me just a bad game experience, would be bad training but as a game it just wouldn't work. Kai Merriott: Yeah. It seems that games are particularly unsympathetic when you get one element wrong. It's almost not too grand a point and it's almost like poetry where every word is absolutely key versus a novel where it doesn't matter if there's a few dodgy sentences in this, it's absolutely you find, but with games, everything has just to be perfectly in place. Johnny McMonagle: Yeah, no, absolutely. It all has to work together cohesively and the wheat from the chaff is just saying it just should work. And all these, we talked about all the different building blocks, say, that go into it, they all have to just keep it simple, does this element work with that element and all put together, is it doing what we plan to do? Well, somebody just comes and sits down beside you, will they be able to play this and will they enjoy it? Will they respond to it the way we want them to? And if we get all those things right anyone should be able to do that. Kai Merriott: Fabulous. I think we've basically covered everything that we need to cover today and I think we're running out of time anyway. So, Johnny, it's been great having you on the Principled Podcast, I hope you come back and speak with us again soon. Johnny McMonagle: Thanks Kai. Kai Merriott: Thank you all and thank you all for listening. My name is Kai Merriott, we'll see you on another episode of the Principled Podcast by LRN. Outro: We hope you enjoyed this episode. The Principled Podcast is brought to you by LRN, at LRN our mission is to inspire principled performance in global organizations by helping them foster winning ethical cultures rooted in sustainable values. Please visit us at lrn.com to learn more and if you enjoyed this episode subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, or wherever you listen and don't forget to leave us a review.

商界早知道|一早速览商业事
【商界早知道】微信屏蔽淘宝购物车分享链接;郭德纲称德云社不打算上市

商界早知道|一早速览商业事

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 6:21


今日聚焦【微信屏蔽淘宝购物车分享链接】据消息,购物车分享链接被微信屏蔽,暂时无法直接分享到微信。此前,10月27日,淘宝正式上线一键分享购物车功能。今年是互联网互联互通政策之后的第一个双十一,此前有消息显示,淘宝有关团队已对该功能分享到微信进行了内测。但记者根据购物车分享页面的操作提示,发现淘宝购物车仍无法直接分享到微信。【中消协提示快递单据销毁,带有个人信息】作为一部保护公民个人信息的专门法律,11月1日,《个人信息保护法》将正式实施。10月28日,中消协发布提示:未经消费者同意,经营者不得向消费者推送商业信息;小区物业、经营场所不能将人脸识别作为出入的唯一验证方式;快递单据等带有个人信息的单据和资料,使用完后应及时销毁,或是涂抹掉关键信息后再丢弃。企业动态【珠海官方回应网民称腾讯智慧校园违规收集人脸信息】网民在人民网向珠海市市长留言称,2021年9月香洲区九洲小学开学伊始,要求家长微信绑定“智慧校园”微信公众号,并收集全校师生人脸识别信息,学生进出校园需经人脸扫描。官方回应称:人脸识别及学生校园动态监测是智慧校园平台为师生提供的一重安全保障,学校可以随时查看学生进出校门情况,是学校安全监管的一项补充。【云南白药回应炒股亏损15亿元】10月28日,云南白药炒股亏了15亿登上热搜榜。对此,云南白药表示:“我们已经收到了来自各方的批评指正,其实,我们一直以来都是坚守主业的,至于证券投资这方面,当时入局主要是为了提升资金的使用效率,事情发展到如今这个局面,其实我们的持仓已经有所下调。目前,公司对待投资标的十分审慎,未来,我们会逐步优化投资结构,也会逐步退出证券投资。”【郭德纲称德云社不打算上市】10月27日,针对网传德云社20亿估值一事,郭德纲在接受专访时表示:德云社不考虑上市,“我小的时候要数学好,我就不至于干这行了。”“我对钱实在不感兴趣,给我20个亿我干嘛花呢”。【同花顺崩了,官方回应深表歉意】10月28日早间,同花顺App出现无法查看自选股、无法查看交易账户等情形,似乎出现“系统崩溃”。对此,同花顺官方微博表示,“因网络线路出现异常,同花顺APP部分用户出现登录异常,目前已经恢复。如有个别用户仍存在问题,请随时联系我们。由此对用户造成的不便深表歉意。”【通用CEO称四年后电动车销量赶上特斯拉】通用汽车董事长兼CEO玛丽·巴拉称,到2025年,通用在美国电动汽车的销售“完全”能赶上特斯拉。随着新车型发布,通用电动汽车的收入预计将从2023年的10亿美元增长到2030年的90亿美元。【链家回应北京望京某二房东跑路事件】据北京链家消息,“望京某二房东跑路”一事,经核查,其中涉及链家房源2套,我们将垫付该房源所涉客户的全部损失。再次向事件中的租户致以诚挚的歉意!我们将以此为鉴、加强核查,让每一单房产交易都不负所托。【极氪回应车主维权:请车主工厂参观体验】近日,极氪001车主EC天幕“黑变蓝”维权一事,极氪官方又再度进行了回应。极氪官方表示,后续将会邀请车主进行工厂参观以及EC天幕体验。体验后如果车主不想要该配置,可以联系相应人员沟通后续事。【微念成立新商贸公司】10月28日,上海微念商贸有限公司成立,注册资本100万人民币。股东信息显示,该公司由杭州微念品牌管理有限公司全资持股。此前,李子柒公司已起诉杭州微念品牌管理有限公司。【库克宣布苹果运营已实现碳中和】10月28日,苹果CEO库克在微博发文称,苹果在全球的公司运营已实现了碳中和。他表示苹果的目标是到2030年在供应链和整个产品生命周期中实现100%碳中和。产业纵深【商务部:中国已完全履行入世承诺】商务部副部长兼国际贸易谈判副代表王受文10月28日表示,自2001年加入世贸组织以来,中国在与世贸规则对接、开放市场、遵守规则等方面积极努力、践行承诺,目前已完全履行了“入世”承诺,得到世贸组织总干事和绝大多数成员的充分肯定和广泛认可。以关税为例,中国的关税总水平已由“入世”时的15.3%降至目前的7.4%,低于所有发展中成员,接近发达成员水平。【房地产税或将成市县级政府主要收入来源】专家表示,房地产税在一定程度上很难代替土地财政,但会改变过去地方政府过于依赖土地财政的现状。从长远来看,房地产税对房价的影响不大,或者不是决定性因素,因为其主要功能不是调节房价,而是筹集财政收入,作为地方政府的主体税种,成为市县级政府主要的收入来源。【年轻一代月均储蓄1624元】调查显示,养老储备日渐受到中国年轻一代(18-34岁)的重视,储蓄率创下2018年以来的新高,而年轻一代投资养老的观念仍待加强。报告显示,年轻一代每月的储蓄比例从2020年的20%跳升到今年的25%,每月储蓄金额达到平均1624元。年轻一代平均到31岁才开始启动养老储备启动,时间仍然偏晚,不利于他们的养老金累积。国际视野【美国拟建最大3D打印社区,包含100套住宅】3D打印建筑技术公司ICON,计划2022年在美国得州奥斯汀建造一个由100个3D打印房屋组成的社区,这是美国有史以来规模最大的3D打印房屋项目。迄今为止,ICON利用专有的Vulcan 3D打印机,已在美国建造了二十多个住宅。

Ten Cent Takes
Issue 18: Horror Comics & Terror, Inc.

Ten Cent Takes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 95:44


Happy Halloween! We're joined by comics scribe Daniel "D.G." Chichester to talk about the history of horror comics, Marvel's return to the genre in the early 1990s, and the macabre anti-hero Terror (whom Chichester co-created).  ----more---- Issue 18 Transcript   Mike: [00:00:00] It's small, but feisty, Mike: Welcome to Tencent Takes, the podcast where we dig up comic book characters' graves and misappropriate the bodies, one issue at a time. My name is Mike Thompson, and I am joined by my cohost, the Titan of terror herself, Jessika Frazer. Jessika: It is I. Mike: Today, we are extremely fortunate to have comics writer, Daniel, DG Chichester. Dan: Nice to see you both. Mike: Thank you so much for taking the time. You're actually our first official guest on the podcast. Dan: Wow. Okay. I'm going to take that as a good thing. That's great. Mike: Yeah. Well, if you're new to the show, the purpose of our [00:01:00] podcast as always is to look at the weirdest, silliest, coolest moments of comic books, and talk about them in ways that are fun and informative. In this case, we looking at also the spookiest moments, and how they're woven into the larger fabric of pop culture and history. Today, we're going to be talking about horror comics. We're looking at their overall history as well as their resurrection at Marvel in the early 1990s, and how it helped give birth to one of my favorite comic characters, an undead anti-hero who went by the name of Terror. Dan, before we started going down this road, could you tell us a little bit about your history in the comic book industry, and also where people can find you if they want to learn more about you and your work? Dan: Absolutely. At this point, people may not even know I had a history in comic books, but that's not true. Uh, I began at Marvel as an assistant in the mid-eighties while I was still going to film school and, semi quickly kind of graduated up, to a more official, [00:02:00] assistant editor position. Worked my way up through editorial, and then, segued into freelance writing primarily for, but also for DC and Dark Horse and worked on a lot of, semi-permanent titles, Daredevil's probably the best known of them. But I think I was right in the thick of a lot of what you're going to be talking about today in terms of horror comics, especially at Marvel, where I was fiercely interested in kind of getting that going. And I think pushed for certain things, and certainly pushed to be involved in those such as the Hellraiser and Nightbreed Clive Barker projects and Night Stalkers and, uh, and Terror Incorporated, which we're going to talk about. And wherever else I could get some spooky stuff going. And I continued on in that, heavily until about 96 / 97, when the big crash kind of happened, continued on through about 99 and then have not really been that actively involved since then. But folks can find out what I'm doing now, if they go to story maze.substack.com, where I have a weekly newsletter, which features [00:03:00] new fiction and some things that I think are pretty cool that are going on in storytelling, and also a bit of a retrospective of looking back at a lot of the work that I did. Mike: Awesome. Before we actually get started talking about horror comics, normally we talk about one cool thing that we have read or watched recently, but because this episode is going to be dropping right before Halloween, what is your favorite Halloween movie or comic book? Dan: I mean, movies are just terrific. And there's so many when I saw that question, especially in terms of horror and a lot of things immediately jumped to mind. The movie It Follows, the recent It movie, The Mist, Reanimator, are all big favorites. I like horror movies that really kind of get under your skin and horrify you, not just rack up a body count. But what I finally settled on as a favorite is probably John Carpenter's the Thing, which I just think is one of the gruesomest what is going to happen next? What the fuck is going to happen next?[00:04:00] And just utter dread. I mean, there's just so many things that combined for me on that one. And I think in terms of comics, I've recently become just a huge fan of, and I'm probably going to slaughter the name, but Junji Ito's work, the Japanese manga artist. And, Uzumaki, which is this manga, which is about just the bizarreness of this town, overwhelmed with spirals of all things. And if you have not read that, it is, it is the trippiest most unsettling thing I've read in, in a great long time. So happy Halloween with that one. Mike: So that would be mango, right? Dan: Yeah. Yeah. So you'd make sure you read it in the right order, or otherwise it's very confusing, so. Mike: Yeah, we actually, haven't talked a lot about manga on this. We probably should do a deep dive on it at some point. But, Jessika, how about you? Jessika: Well, I'm going to bring it down a little bit more silly because I've always been a fan of horror and the macabre and supernatural. So always grew up seeking creepy media as [00:05:00] a rule, but I also loves me some silliness. So the last three or so years, I've had a tradition of watching Hocus Pocus with my friend, Rob around Halloween time. And it's silly and it's not very heavy on the actual horror aspect, but it's fun. And it holds up surprisingly well. Mike: Yeah, we have all the Funkos of the Sanderson sisters in our house. Jessika: It's amazing watching it in HD, their costumes are so intricate and that really doesn't come across on, you know, old VHS or watching it on television back in the day. And it's just, it's so fun. How much, just time and effort it looks like they put into it, even though some of those details really weren't going to translate. Dan: How very cool. Mike: Yeah. Jessika: Yeah. So, but I also really like actual horror, so I'm also in the next couple of days is going to be a visiting the 1963 Haunting of Hill House because that's one of my favorites. Yeah. It's so good. And used to own the book that the movie was based on also. And seen all the [00:06:00] iterations and it's the same storyline the recent Haunting of Hill house is based on, which is great. That plot line has been reworked so many times, but it's such a great story, I'm just not shocked in the least that it would run through so many iterations and still be accepted by the public in each of its forms. Mike: Yeah. I really liked that Netflix interpretation of it, it was really good. Dan: They really creeped everything out. Mike: Yeah. There's a YouTuber called Lady Night, The Brave, and she does a really great summary breakdown explaining a lot of the themes and it's like almost two hours I think, of YouTube video, but she does these really lovely retrospectives. So, highly recommend you check that out. If you want to just think about that the Haunting of Hill House more. Jessika: Oh, I do. Yes. Mike: I'm going to split the difference between you two. When I was growing up, I was this very timid kid and the idea of horror just creeped me out. And so I avoided it like the plague. And then when I was in high [00:07:00] school, I had some friends show me some movies and I was like, these are great, why was I afraid of this stuff? And so I kind of dove all the way in. But my preferred genre is horror comedy. That is the one that you can always get me in on. And, I really love this movie from the mid-nineties called the Frighteners, which is a horror comedy starring Michael J. Fox, and it's directed by Peter Jackson. And it was written by Peter Jackson and his partner, Fran Walsh. And it was a few years before they, you know, went on to make a couple of movies based on this little known franchise called Lord of the Rings. But it's really wild. It's weird, and it's funny, and it has some genuine jump scare moments. And there's this really great ghost story at the core of it. And the special effects at the time were considered amazing and groundbreaking, but now they're kind of, you look at, and you're like, oh, that's, high-end CG, high-end in the mid-nineties. Okay. But [00:08:00] yeah, like I said, or comedies are my absolute favorite things to watch. That's why Cabin in the Woods always shows up in our horror rotation as well. Same with Tucker and Dale vs Evil. That's my bread and butter. With comic books, I go a little bit creepier. I think I talked about the Nice House on the Lake, that's the current series that I'm reading from DC that's genuinely creepy and really thoughtful and fun. And it's by James Tynion who also wrote Something That's Killing the Children. So those are excellent things to read if you're in the mood for a good horror comic. Dan: Great choice on the Frighteners. That's I think an unsung classic, that I'm going to think probably came out 10 years too early. Mike: Yeah. Dan: It's such a mashup of different, weird vibes, that it would probably do really, really well today. But at that point in time, it was just, what is this? You know? Cause it's, it's just cause the horrifying thing in it are really horrifying. And, uh, Gary Busey's son, right, plays the evil ghost and he is just trippy, off the wall, you know, horrifying. [00:09:00] Mike: Yeah. And it starts so silly, and then it kind of just continues to go creepier and creepier, and by the time that they do some of the twists revealing his, you know, his agent in the real world, it's a genuine twist. Like, I was really surprised the first time I saw it and I - Dan: Yeah. Mike: was so creeped out, but yeah. Dan: Plus it's got R. Lee Ermey as the army ghost, which is just incredible. So, Mike: Yeah. And, Chi McBride is in it, and, Jeffrey Combs. Dan: Oh, oh that's right, right. right. Mike: Yeah. So yeah, it's a lot of fun. Mike: All right. So, I suppose we should saunter into the graveyard, as it were, and start talking about the history of horror comics. So, Dan, obviously I know that you're familiar with horror comics, Dan: A little bit. Mike: Yeah. What about you, Jess? You familiar with horror comics other than what we've talked about in the show? Jessika: I started getting into it once you and I started, you know, talking more on the [00:10:00] show. And so I grabbed a few things. I haven't looked through all of them yet, but I picked up some older ones. I did just recently pick up, it'll be more of a, kind of a funny horror one, but they did a recent Elvira and Vincent Price. So, yeah, so I picked that up, but issue one of that. So it's sitting on my counter ready for me to read right now. Mike: Well, and that's funny, cause Elvira actually has a really long, storied history in comic books. Like she first appeared in kind of like the revival of House of Mystery that DC did. And then she had an eighties series that had over a hundred issues that had a bunch of now major names involved. And she's continued to have series like, you can go to our website and get autographed copies of her recent series from, I think Dynamite. Jessika: That's cool. Mike: Yeah. Jessika: Nice. Mike: Speaking of horror comedy Elvira is great. Jessika: Yes. Mike: I recently showed Sarah the Elvira Mistress of the Dark movie and she was, I think really sad that I hadn't showed it to her sooner. Jessika: [00:11:00] That's another one I need to go watch this week. Wow. Don't- nobody call me. I'm just watching movies all week. Dan: Exactly. Mike: It's on a bunch of different streaming services, I think right now. Well it turns out that horror comics, have pretty much been a part of the industry since it really became a proven medium. You know, it wasn't long after comics became a legit medium in their own, right that horror elements started showing up in superhero books, which like, I mean, it isn't too surprising. Like the 1930's was when we got the Universal classic movie monsters, so it makes a lot of sense that those kinds of characters would start crossing over into comic books, just to take advantage of that popularity. Jerry Siegel and Joel Schuster, the guys who created Superman, actually created the supernatural investigator called Dr. Occult in New Fun Comics three years before they brought Superman to life. And Dr. Occult still shows up in DC books. Like, he was a major character in the Books of Magic with Neil Gaiman. I think he may show up in Sandman later on. I can't remember. Jessika: Oh, okay. Dan: I wouldn't be surprised. Neil would find ways to mine that. [00:12:00] Mike: Yeah. I mean, that was a lot of what the Sandman was about, was taking advantage of kind of long forgotten characters that DC had had and weaving them into his narratives. And, if you're interested in that, we talk about that in our book club episodes, which we're currently going through every other episode. So the next episode after this is going to be the third episode of our book club, where we cover volumes five and six. So, horror comics though really started to pick up in the 1940s. There's multiple comic historians who say that the first ongoing horror series was Prized Comics, New Adventures of Frankenstein, which featured this updated take on the original story by Mary Shelley. It took place in America. The monster was named Frankenstein. He was immediately a terror. It's not great, but it's acknowledged as being really kind of the first ongoing horror story. And it's really not even that much of a horror story other than it featured Frankenstein's monster. But after that, a number of publishers started to put out adaptations of classic horror stories for awhile. So you had [00:13:00] Avon Publications making it official in 1946 with the comic Erie, which is based on the first real dedicated horror comic. Yeah. This is the original cover to Erie Comics. Number one, if you could paint us a word picture. Dan: Wow. This is high end stuff as it's coming through. Well it looks a lot like a Zine or something, you know it's got a very, Mac paint logo from 1990, you know, it's, it's your, your typical sort of like, ooh, I'm shaky kind of logo. That's Eerie Comics. There's a Nosferatu looking character. Who's coming down some stairs with the pale moon behind him. It, he's got a knife in his hand, so, you know, he's up to no good. And there is a femme fatale at the base of the stairs. She may have moved off of some train tracks to get here. And, uh, she's got a, uh, a low, cut dress, a lot of leg and the arms and the wrists are bound, but all this for only 10. cents. So, I think there's a, there's a bargain there.[00:14:00] Mike: That is an excellent description. Thank you. So, what's funny is that Erie at the time was the first, you know, official horror comic, really, but it only had one issue that came out and then it sort of vanished from sight. It came back with a new series that started with a new number one in the 1950s, but this was the proverbial, the shot that started the war. You know, we started seeing a ton of anthology series focusing on horror, like Adventures into the Unknown, which ran into the 1960s and then Amazing Mysteries and Marvel Tales were repurposed series for Marvel that they basically changed the name of existing series into these. And they started doing kind of macabre, weird stories. And then, we hit the 1950s. And the early part of the 1950s was when horror comics really seemed to take off and experienced this insane success. We've talked about how in the post-WWII America, superhero comics were kind of declining in [00:15:00] popularity. By the mid 1950s, only three heroes actually had their own books and that was Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman. Which, I didn't realize that until I was doing research. I didn't, I just assumed that there were other superhero comics at the time. But we started seeing comics about horror and crime and romance really starting to get larger shares of the market. And then EC Comics was one of those doing gangbuster business during this whole era. Like, this was when we saw those iconic series, the Haunt of Fear, the Vault of Horror, the Crypt of Terror, which was eventually rebranded to Tales from the Crypt. Those all launched and they found major success. And then the bigger publishers were also getting in on this boom. During the first half of the 1950s Atlas, which eventually became Marvel, released almost 400 issues across 18 horror titles. And then American Comics Group released almost 125 issues between five different horror titles. Ace comics did almost a hundred issues between five titles. I'm curious. I'm gonna ask both of you, what [00:16:00] do you think the market share of horror comics was at the time? Dan: In terms of comics or in terms of just like newsstand, magazine, distribution. Mike: I'm going to say in terms of distribution. Dan: I mean, I know they were phenomenally successful. I would, be surprised if it was over 60%. Mike: Okay. How about. Jessika: Oh, goodness. Let's throw a number out. I'm going to say 65 just because I want to get close enough, but maybe bump it up just a little bit. This is a contest now. Dan: The precision now, like the 65. Jessika: Yes. Mike: Okay. Well, obviously we don't have like a hard definite number, but there was a 2009 article from reason magazine saying that horror books made up a quarter of all comics by 1953. So, so you guys were overestimating it, but it was still pretty substantial. At the same time, we were also seeing a surge in horror films. Like, the 1950s are known as the atomic age and media reflected [00:17:00] societal anxiety, at the possibility of nuclear war and to a lesser extent, white anxiety about societal changes. So this was the decade that gave us Invasion of the Body Snatchers The Thing from Another World, which led to John Carpenter's The Thing eventually. Um, and the Creature from the Black Lagoon. Hammer horror films also started to get really huge during this time. So we saw the beginning of stuff like Christopher Lee's, Dracula series of films. So the fifties were like a really good decade for horror, I feel. But at the same time, violent crime in America started to pick up around this period. And people really started focusing on juvenile criminals and what was driving them. So, there were a lot of theories about why this was going on and no one's ever really come up with a definite answer, but there was the psychiatrist named Frederick Wortham who Dan, I yeah. Dan: Oh yeah, psychiatrist in big air quotes, yeah. Mike: In quotes. Yeah. [00:18:00] Yeah. And he was convinced that the rise in crime was due to comics, and he spent years writing and speaking against them. He almost turned it into a cottage industry for himself. And this culminated in 1954, when he published a book called Seduction of the Innocent, that blamed comic books for the rise in juvenile delinquency, and his arguments are laughable. Like, I mean, there's just no way around it. Like you read this stuff and you can't help, but roll your eyes and chuckle. But, at the time comics were a relatively new medium, you know, and people really only associated them with kids. And his arguments were saying, oh, well, Wonder Woman was a lesbian because of her strength and independence, which these days, I feel like that actually has a little bit of credibility, but, like, I don't know. But I don't really feel like that's contributing to the delinquency of the youth. You know, and then he also said that Batman and Robin were in a homosexual relationship. And then my favorite was that Superman comics were [00:19:00] un-American and fascist. Dan: Well. Mike: All right. Dan: There's people who would argue that today. Mike: I mean, but yeah, and then he actually, he got attention because there were televised hearings with the Senate subcommittee on juvenile delinquency. I mean, honestly, every time I think about Seduction of the Innocent and how it led to the Comics Code Authority. I see the parallels with Tipper Gore's Parent Music Resource Center, and how they got the Parental Advisory sticker on certain music albums, or Joe Lieberman's hearings on video games in the 1990's and how that led to the Electronic Systems Reading Board system, you know, where you provide almost like movie ratings to video games. And Wortham also reminds me a lot of this guy named Jack Thompson, who was a lawyer in the nineties and aughts. And he was hell bent on proving a link between violent video games and school shootings. And he got a lot of media attention at the time until he was finally disbarred for his antics. But there was this [00:20:00] definite period where people were trying to link video games and violence. And, even though the statistics didn't back that up. And, I mean, I think about this a lot because I used to work in video games. I spent almost a decade working in the industry, but you know, it's that parallel of anytime there is a new form of media that is aimed at kids, it feels like there is a moral panic. Dan: Well, I think it goes back to what you were saying before about, you know, even as, as things change in society, you know, when people in society get at-risk, you know, you went to Invasion of the Body Snatchers, Right. Which is classically thought to be a response to communism, you know, and the feelings of communist oppression and you know, the different, you know, the other, and it's the same thing. I think every single one of these is just a proof point of if you want to become, suddenly well-known like Lieberman or Wortham or anything, you know, pick the other that the older generation doesn't really understand, right? Maybe now there are more adults playing video games, but it's probably still perceived as a more juvenile [00:21:00] thing or comics or juvenile thing, or certain types of movies are a juvenile thing, you know, pick the other pick on it, hold it up as the weaponized, you know, piece, and suddenly you're popular. And you've got a great flashpoint that other people can rally around and blame, as if one single thing is almost ever the cause of everything. And I always think it's interesting, you know, the EC Comics, you know, issues in terms of, um, Wortham's witch hunt, you know, the interesting thing about those is yet they were gruesome and they are gruesome in there, but they're also by and large, I don't know the other ones as well, but I know the EC Comics by and large are basically morality plays, you know, they're straight up morality plays in the sense that the bad guys get it in the end, almost every time, like they do something, they do some horrific thing, but then the corpse comes back to life and gets them, you know, so there's, there's always a comeuppance where the scales balance. But that was of course never going to be [00:22:00] an argument when somebody can hold up a picture of, you know, a skull, you know, lurching around, you know, chewing on the end trails of something. And then that became all that was talked about. Mike: Yeah, exactly. Well, I mean, spring boarding off of that, you know, worth them and the subcommittee hearings and all that, they led to the comics magazine association of America creating the Comics Code Authority. And this was basically in order to avoid government regulation. They said, no, no, no, we'll police ourselves so that you don't have to worry about this stuff. Which, I mean, again, that's what we did with the SRB. It was a response to that. We could avoid government censorship. So the code had a ton of requirements that each book had to meet in order to receive the Comics Code Seal of Approval on the cover. And one of the things you couldn't do was have quote, scenes dealing with, or instruments associated with walking dead or torture, which I mean,[00:23:00] okay. So the latter half of the 1950's saw a lot of these dedicated horror series, you know, basically being shut down or they drastically changed. This is, you know, the major publishers really freaked out. So Marvel and DC rebranded their major horror titles. They were more focused on suspense or mystery or Sci-Fi or superheroes in a couple of cases, independent publishers, didn't really have to worry about the seal for different reasons. Like, some of them were able to rely on the rep for publishing wholesome stuff like Dell or Gold Key. I think Gold Key at the time was doing a lot of the Disney books. So they just, they were like, whatever. Dan: Right, then EC, but, but EC had to shut down the whole line and then just became mad. Right? I mean, that's that was the transition at which William, you know, Gains - Mike: Yeah. Dan: basically couldn't contest what was going on. Couldn't survive the spotlight. You know, he testified famously at that hearing. But had to give up all of [00:24:00] that work that was phenomenally profitable for them. And then had to fall back to Mad Magazine, which of course worked out pretty well. Mike: Yeah, exactly. By the end of the 1960s, though, publishers started to kind of gently push back a little bit like, Warren publishing, and Erie publications, like really, they didn't give a shit. Like Warren launched a number of horror titles in the sixties, including Vampirilla, which is like, kind of, I feel it's sort of extreme in terms of both sex and horror, because I mean, we, we all know what Vampirilla his costume is. It hasn't changed in the 50, approximately 50 years that it's been out like. Dan: It's like, what can you do with dental floss, Right. When you were a vampire? I mean, that's basically like, she doesn't wear much. Mike: No, I mean, she never has. And then by the end of the sixties, Marvel and DC started to like kind of steer some of their books back towards the horror genre. Like how some Mystery was one of them where it, I think with issue 1 75, that was when they [00:25:00] took away, took it away from John Jones and dial H for Hero. And they were like, no, no, no, no. We're going to, we're going to bring, Cain back as the host and start telling horror morality plays again, which is what they were always doing. And this meant that the Comics Code Authority needed to update their code. So in 1971, they revised it to be a little bit more horror friendly. Jessika: Scenes dealing with, or instruments associated with, walking dead or torture shall not be used. Vampires, ghouls and werewolves shall be permitted to be used when handled in the classic traditions, such as Frankenstein, Dracula, and other high caliber literary works written by Edgar Allen Poe, Saki, Conan Doyle, and other respected authors whose works are read in schools around the world. Mike: But at this point, Marvel and DC really jumped back into the horror genre. This was when we started getting books, like the tomb of Dracula, Ghost Rider, where will finite and son of Satan, and then DC had a [00:26:00] bunch of their series like they had, what was it? So it was originally The Dark Mansion of Forbidden Love, and then it eventually got retitled to Forbidden Tales of the Dark Mansion. Like, just chef's kiss on that title. Dan: You can take that old Erie comic and throw, you know, the Dark Mansion of Forbidden Love as the title on that. And it would work, you know. Mike: I know. Right. So Dan, I'm curious, what is your favorite horror comic or comic character from this era? Dan: I would say, it was son of Satan, because it felt so trippy and forbidden, and I think comics have always, especially mainstream comics you know, I've always responded also to what's out there. Right. I don't think it's just a loosening the restrictions at that point, but in that error, what's going on, you're getting a lot of, I think the films of Race with the Devil and you're getting the Exorcist and you're getting, uh, the Omen, you know, Rosemary's baby. right. Satanism, [00:27:00] the devil, right. It's, it's high in pop culture. So true to form. You know, I think Son of Satan is in some ways, like a response of Marvel, you know, to that saying, let's glom onto this. And for a kid brought up in the Catholic church, there was a certain eeriness to this, ooh, we're reading about this. It's like, is it really going to be Satanism? And cause I was very nervous that we were not allowed even watch the Exorcist in our home, ever. You know, I didn't see the Exorcist until I was like out of high school. And I think also the character as he looks is just this really trippy look, right. At that point, if you're not familiar with the character, he's this buff dude, his hair flares up into horns, he just wears a Cape and he carries a giant trident, he's got a massive pentacle, I think a flaming pentacle, you know, etched in his chest. Um, he's ready to do business, ya know, in some strange form there. So for me, he was the one I glommed on to the most. [00:28:00] Mike: Yeah. Well, I mean, it was that whole era, it was just, it was Gothic horror brought back and Satanism and witchcraft is definitely a part of that genre. Dan: Sure. Mike: So, that said, kind of like any trend horror comics, you know, they have their rise and then they started to kind of fall out of popularity by the end of the seventies or the early eighties. I feel like it was a definite end of the era when both House of Mystery and Ghost Writer ended in 1983. But you know, there were still some individual books that were having success, but it just, it doesn't feel like Marvel did a lot with horror comics during the eighties. DC definitely had some luck with Alan Moore's run of the Swamp Thing. And then there was stuff like Hellblazer and Sandman. Which, as I mentioned, we're doing our book club episodes for, but also gave rise to Vertigo Comics, you know, in the early nineties. Not to say that horror comics still weren't a thing during this time, but it seems like the majority of them were coming from indie publishers. Off the top of my head, one example I think of still is Dead World, which basically created a zombie apocalypse [00:29:00] universe. And it started with Aero comics. It was created in the late eighties, and it's still going today. I think it's coming out from IDW now. But at the same time, it's not like American stopped enjoying horror stuff. Like this was the decade where we got Friday the 13th, Nightmare on Elm street, Evil Dead, Hellraiser, Poltergeist, Child's Play, just to name a few of the franchises that we were introduced to. And, I mentioned Hellraiser. I love Hellraiser, and Dan, I know that you have a pretty special connection to that brand. Dan: I do. I put pins in my face every night just to kind of keep my complexion, you know? Mike: So, let's transition over to the nineties and Marvel and let's start that off with Epic Comics. Epic started in the eighties, and it was basically a label that would print, create our own comics. And they eventually started to use label to produce, you know, in quotes, mature comics. So Wikipedia says that this was your first editorial job at Marvel was with the [00:30:00] Epic Line. Is that correct? Dan: Well, I'll go back and maybe do just a little correction on Epic's mission if you don't mind. Mike: Yeah, yeah. Dan: You know, first, which is it was always creator owned, and it did start as crude. And, but I don't think that ever then transitioned into more mature comics, sometimes that just was what creator-owned comics were. Right. That was just part of the mission. And so as a creator-owned imprint, it could be anything, it could be the silliest thing, it could be the most mature thing. So it was always, you know, part of what it was doing, and part of the mission of doing creator-owned comics, and Archie Goodwin was the editor in chief of that line, was really to give creators and in to Marvel. If we gave them a nice place to play with their properties, maybe they would want to go play in the mainstream Marvel. So you might get a creator who would never want to work for Marvel, for whatever reason, they would have a great Epic experience doing a range of things, and then they would go into this. So there was always levels of maturity and we always looked at it as very eclectic and challenging, you know, sometimes in a good [00:31:00] way. So I'll have to go back to Wikipedia and maybe correct them. My first job was actually, I was on the Marvel side and it was as the assistant to the assistant, to the editor in chief. So I would do all of the grunt work and the running around that the assistant to the editor in chief didn't want to do. And she would turn to me and say, Dan, you're going to go run around the city and find this thing for Jim Shooter. Now, then I did that for about five or six months, I was still in film school, and then left, which everyone was aghast, you don't leave Marvel comics, by choice. And, but I had, I was still in school. I had a summer job already sort of set up, and I left to go take that exciting summer job. And then I was called over the summer because there was an opening in the Epic line. And they want to know if I'd be interested in taking on this assistant editor's job. And I said, it would have to be part-time cause I still had a semester to finish in school, but they were intrigued and I was figuring, oh, well this is just kind of guaranteed job. [00:32:00] Never knowing it was going to become career-like, and so that was then sort of my second job. Mike: Awesome. So this is going to bring us to the character of Terror. So he was introduced as a character in the Shadow Line Saga, which was one of those mature comics, it was like a mature superhero universe. That took place in a few different series under the Epic imprint. There was Dr. Zero, there was St. George, and then there was Power Line. Right. Dan: That's correct, yep. Mike: And so the Shadow Line Saga took his name from the idea that there were these beings called Shadows, they were basically super powered immortal beings. And then Terror himself first appeared as Shrek. He's this weird looking enforcer for a crime family in St. George. And he becomes kind of a recurring nemesis for the main character. He's kind of like the street-level boss while it's hinting that there's going to be a eventual confrontation between the main character of St. George and Dr. Zero, who is kind of [00:33:00] a Superman character, but it turns out he has been manipulating humanity for, you know, millennia at this point. Dan: I think you've encapsulated it quite well. Mike: Well, thank you. So the Shadow Line Saga, that only lasted for about what a year or two? Dan: Probably a couple of years, maybe a little over. There was about, I believe, eight to nine issues of each of the, the main comics, the ones you just cited. And then we segued those over to, sort of, uh, an omni series we call Critical Mass, which brought together all three characters or storylines. And then try to tell this, excuse the pun, epic, you know story, which will advance them all. And so wrapped up a lot of loose ends and, um, you know, became quite involved now. Mike: Okay. Dan: It ran about seven or eight issues. Mike: Okay. Now a couple of years after Terror was introduced under the Epic label, Marvel introduced a new Ghost Rider series in 1990 that hit that sweet spot of like nineties extreme with a capital X and, and, you know, [00:34:00] it also gave us a spooky anti heroes like that Venn diagram, where it was like spooky and extreme and rides a motorcycle and right in the middle, you had Ghost Rider, but from what I understand the series did really well, commercially for Marvel. Comichron, which is the, the comic sales tracking site, notes that early issues were often in the top 10 books sold each month for 91. Like there are eight issues of Ghost Rider, books that are in the top 100 books for that year. So it's not really surprising that Marvel decided to go in really hard with supernatural characters. And in 1992, we had this whole batch of horror hero books launch. We had Spirits of Vengeance, which was a spinoff from Ghost Rider, which saw a Ghost Rider teaming up with Johnny Blaze, and it was the original Ghost Writer. And he didn't have a hellfire motorcycle this time, but he had a shotgun that would fire hell fire, you know, and he had a ponytail, it was magnificent. And then there was also the Night Stalkers, [00:35:00] which was a trio of supernatural investigators. There was Hannibal King and Blade and oh, I'm blanking on the third one. Dan: Frank Drake. Mike: Yeah. And Frank Drake was a vampire, right? Dan: And he was a descendant of Dracula, but also was a vampire who had sort of been cured. Um, he didn't have a hunger for human blood, but he still had a necessity for some type of blood and possessed all the attributes, you know, of a vampire, you know, you could do all the powers, couldn't go out in the daylight, that sort of thing. So, the best and worst of both worlds. Mike: Right. And then on top of that, we had the Dark Hold, which it's kind of like the Marvel equivalent of the Necronomicon is the best way I can describe it. Dan: Absolutely. Yup. Mike: And that's showed up in Agents of Shield since then. And they just recently brought it into the MCU. That was a thing that showed up in Wanda Vision towards the end. So that's gonna clearly reappear. And then we also got Morbius who is the living vampire from [00:36:00] Spider-Man and it's great. He shows up in this series and he's got this very goth rock outfit, is just it's great. Dan: Which looked a lot like how Len Kaminsky dressed in those days in all honesty. Mike: Yeah, okay. Dan: So Len will now kill me for that, but. Mike: Oh, well, but yeah, so these guys were all introduced via a crossover event called Rise of the Midnight Sons, which saw all of these heroes, you know, getting their own books. And then they also teamed up with Dr. Strange to fight against Lilith the mother of demons. And she was basically trying to unleash her monstrous spawn across the world. And this was at the same time the Terror wound up invading the Marvel Universe. So if you were going to give an elevator pitch for Terror in the Marvel Universe, how would you describe him? Dan: I actually wrote one down, I'll read it to you, cause you, you know, you put that there and was like, oh gosh, I got to like now pitch this. A mythic manifestation of fear exists in our times, a top dollar mercenary for hire using a supernatural [00:37:00] ability to attach stolen body parts to himself in order to activate the inherit ability of the original owner. A locksmith's hand or a marksman, his eye or a kickboxer his legs, his gruesome talent gives him the edge to take on the jobs no one else can, he accomplishes with Savage, restyle, scorn, snark, and impeccable business acumen. So. Mike: That's so good. It's so good. I just, I have to tell you the twelve-year-old Mike is like giddy to be able to talk to you about this. Dan: I was pretty giddy when I was writing this stuff. So that's good. Mike: So how did Terror wind up crossing into the Marvel Universe? Like, because he just showed shows up in a couple of cameos in some Daredevil issues that you also wrote. I believe. Dan: Yeah, I don't know if he'd showed up before the book itself launched that might've, I mean, the timing was all around the same time. But everybody who was involved with Terror, love that Terror and Terror Incorporated, which was really actual title. Love the hell out of [00:38:00] the book, right. And myself, the editors, Carl Potts, who was the editor in chief, we all knew it was weird and unique. And, at one point when I, you know, said to Carl afterwards, well I'm just gonna take this whole concept and go somewhere else with it, he said, you can't, you made up something that, you know, can't really be replicated without people knowing exactly what you're doing. It's not just another guy with claws or a big muscle guy. How many people grab other people's body parts? So I said, you know, fie on me, but we all loved it. So when, the Shadowline stuff kind of went away, uh, and he was sort of kicking out there is still, uh, Carl came to me one day and, and said, listen, we love this character. We're thinking of doing something with horror in Marvel. This was before the Rise of the Midnight Sons. So it kind of came a little bit ahead of that. I think this eventually would become exactly the Rise of the Midnight Sons, but we want to bring together a lot of these unused horror characters, like Werewolf by Night, Man Thing, or whatever, but we want a central kind of [00:39:00] character who, navigates them or maybe introduces them. Wasn't quite clear what, and they thought Terror, or Shrek as he still was at that point, could be that character. He could almost be a Crypt Keeper, maybe, it wasn't quite fully baked. And, so we started to bounce this around a little bit, and then I got a call from Carl and said, yeah, that's off. We're going to do something else with these horror characters, which again would eventually become probably the Midnight Sons stuff. But he said, but we still want to do something with it. You know? So my disappointment went to, oh, what do you mean? How could we do anything? He said, what if you just bring him into the Marvel Universe? We won't say anything about what he did before, and just use him as a character and start over with him operating as this high-end mercenary, you know, what's he going to do? What is Terror Incorporated, and how does he do business within the Marvel world? And so I said, yes, of course, I'm not going to say that, you know, any quicker and just jumped into [00:40:00] it. And I didn't really worry about the transition, you know, I wasn't thinking too much about, okay. How does he get from Shadow Line world, to earth 616 or whatever, Marcus McLaurin, who was the editor. God bless him, for years would resist any discussion or no, no, it's not the same character. Marcus, it's the same character I'm using the same lines. I'm having him referenced the same fact that he's had different versions of the word terrors, his name at one point, he makes a joke about the Saint George complex. I mean, it's the same character. Mike: Yeah. Dan: But , you know, Marcus was a very good soldier to the Marvel hierarchy. So we just really brought him over and we just went all in on him in terms of, okay, what could a character like this play in the Marvel world? And he played really well in certain instances, but he certainly was very different than probably anything else that was going on at the time. Mike: Yeah. I mean, there certainly wasn't a character like him before. So all the Wikias, like [00:41:00] Wikipedia, all the Marvel fan sites, they all list Daredevil 305 as Terror's first official appearance in. Dan: Could be. Mike: Yeah, but I want to talk about that for a second, because that is, I think the greatest villain that I've ever seen in a Marvel comic, which was the Surgeon General, who is this woman who is commanding an army of like, I mean, basically it's like a full-scale operation of that urban myth of - Dan: Yeah. Mike: -the dude goes home with an attractive woman that he meets at the club. And then he wakes up in a bathtub full of ice and he's missing organs. Dan: Yeah. You know, sometimes, you know, that was certainly urban myth territory, and I was a big student of urban myths and that was the sort of thing that I think would show up in the headlines every three to six months, but always one of those probably friend of a friend stories that. Mike: Oh yeah. Dan: Like a razor an apple or something like that, that never actually sort of tracks back. Mike: Well, I mean, the thing now is it's all edibles in candy and they're like, all the news outlets are showing officially [00:42:00] branded edibles. Which, what daddy Warbucks mother fucker. Jessika: Mike knows my stand on this. Like, no, no, nobody is buying expensive edibles. And then putting them in your child's candy. Like, No, no, that's stupid. Dan: No, it's the, it's the, easier version of putting the LSD tab or wasting your pins on children in Snickers bars. Jessika: Right. Dan: Um, but but I think, that, that storyline is interesting, Mike, cause it's the, it's one of the few times I had a plotline utterly just completely rejected by an editor because I think I was doing so much horror stuff at the time. Cause I was also concurrently doing the Hellraiser work, the Night Breed work. It would have been the beginning of the Night Stalkers work, cause I was heavily involved with the whole Midnight Sons work. And I went so far on the first plot and it was so grizzly and so gruesome that, Ralph Macchio who was the editor, called me up and said, yeah, this title is Daredevil. It's not Hellraiser. So I had to kind of back off [00:43:00] and realize, uh, yeah, I put a little too much emphasis on the grisliness there. So. Mike: That's amazing. Dan: She was an interesting, exploration of a character type. Mike: I'm really sad that she hasn't showed back up, especially cause it feels like it'd be kind of relevant these days with, you know, how broken the medical system is here in America. Dan: Yeah. It's, it's funny. And I never played with her again, which is, I think one of my many Achilles heels, you know, as I would sometimes introduce characters and then I would just not go back to them for some reason, I was always trying to kind of go forward onto something new. Mike: Yeah. Jessika: Is there anything about Terror's character that you related to at the time, or now even. Dan: Um, probably being very imperious, very complicated, having a thing for long coats. Uh, I think all of those probably, you know, work then and now, I've kind of become convinced weirdly enough over time, that Terror was a character who [00:44:00] and I, you know, I co-created him with Margaret Clark and, and Klaus Janson, but I probably did the most work with him over the years, you know? So I feel maybe a little bit more ownership, but I've sort of become convinced that he was just his own thing, and he just existed out there in the ether, and all I was ultimately was a conduit that I was, I was just channeling this thing into our existence because he came so fully formed and whenever I would write him, he would just kind of take over the page and take over the instance. That's always how I've viewed him, which is different than many of the other things that I've written. Mike: He's certainly a larger than life personality, and in every sense of that expression. Jessika: Yes. Mike: I'm sorry for the terrible pun. Okay. So we've actually talked a bit about Terror, but I [00:45:00] feel like we need to have Jessika provide us with an overall summary of his brief series. Jessika: So the series is based on the titular character, of course, Terror, who is unable to die and has the ability to replace body parts and gains the skill and memory of that limb. So he might use the eye of a sharpshooter to improve his aim or the arm of an artist for a correct rendering. And because of the inability for his body to die, the dude looks gnarly. His face is a sick green color. He has spike whiskers coming out of the sides of his face, and he mostly lacks lips, sometimes he has lips, but he mostly lacks lips. So we always has this grim smile to his face. And he also has a metal arm, which is awesome. I love that. And he interchanges all of the rest of his body parts constantly. So in one scene he'll have a female arm and in another one it'll sport, an other worldly tentacle. [00:46:00] He states that his business is fear, but he is basically a paid mercenary, very much a dirty deeds, although not dirt cheap; Terror charges, quite a hefty sum for his services, but he is willing to do almost anything to get the job done. His first job is ending someone who has likewise immortal, air quotes, which involves finding an activating a half demon in order to open a portal and then trick a demon daddy to hand over the contract of immortality, you know, casual. He also has run-ins with Wolverine, Dr. Strange Punisher, Silver Sable, and Luke Cage. It's action packed, and you legitimately have no idea what new body part he is going to lose or gain in the moment, or what memory is going to pop up for him from the donor. And it keeps the reader guessing because Terror has no limitations. Mike: Yeah. Dan: was, I was so looking forward to hearing what your recap was going to be. I love that, so I just [00:47:00] want to say that. Jessika: Thank you. I had a lot of fun reading this. Not only was the plot and just the narrative itself, just rolling, but the art was fantastic. I mean, the things you can do with a character like that, there truly aren't any limits. And so it was really interesting to see how everything fell together and what he was doing each moment to kind of get out of whatever wacky situation he was in at the time.So. And his, and his quips, I just, the quips were just, they give me life. Mike: They're so good. Like there was one moment where he was sitting there and playing with the Lament Configuration, and the first issue, which I, I never noticed that before, as long as we ready this time and I was like, oh, that's great. And then he also made a St. George reference towards the end of the series where he was talking about, oh, I knew another guy who had a St. George complex. Dan: Right, right. Right, Mike: Like I love those little Easter eggs. Speaking of Easter eggs, there are a lot of Clive Barker Easter eggs throughout that whole series. Dan: [00:48:00] Well, That's it. That was so parallel at the time, you know. Mike: So around that time was when you were editing and then writing for the HellRaiser series and the Night Breed series, right? Dan: Yes. Certainly writing for them. Yeah. I mean, I did some consulting editing on the HellRaiser and other Barker books, after our lift staff, but, primarily writing at that point. Mike: Okay. Cause I have Hellraiser number one, and I think you're listed as an editor on it. Dan: I was, I started the whole Hellraiser anthology with other folks, you know, but I was the main driver, and I think that was one of the early instigators of kind of the rebirth of horror at that time. And, you know, going back to something you said earlier, you know, for many years, I was always, pressing Archie Goodwin, who worked at Warren, and worked on Erie, and worked on all those titles. You know, why can't we do a new horror anthology and he was quite sage like and saying, yeah. It'd be great to do it, but it's not going to sell there's no hook, right? There's no connection, you know, just horror for her sake. And it was when Clive Barker [00:49:00] came into our offices, and so I want to do something with Archie Goodwin. And then the two of them said, Hellraiser can be the hook. Right. Hellraiser can be the way in to sort of create an anthology series, have an identifiable icon, and then we developed out from there with Clive, with a couple of other folks Erik Saltzgaber, Phil Nutman, myself, Archie Goodwin, like what would be the world? And then the Bible that would actually give you enough, breadth and width to play with these characters that wouldn't just always be puzzle box, pinhead, puzzle box, pinhead, you know? And so we developed a fairly large set of rules and mythologies allowed for that. Mike: That's so cool. I mean, there really wasn't anything at all, like Hellraiser when it came out. Like, and there's still not a lot like it, but I - Jessika: Yeah, I was going to say, wait, what else? Mike: I mean, I feel like I've read other books since then, where there's that blending of sexuality and [00:50:00] horror and morality, because at the, at the core of it, Hellraiser often feels like a larger morality play. Dan: Now, you know, I'm going to disagree with you on that one. I mean, I think sometimes we let it slip in a morality and we played that out. But I think Hellraiser is sort of find what you want out of it. Right. You go back to the first film and it's, you know, what's your pleasure, sir? You know, it was when the guy hands up the book and the Centobites, you know, or angels to some demons, to others. So I think the book was at its best and the movies are at their best when it's not so much about the comeuppance as it is about find your place in here. Right? And that can be that sort of weird exploration of many different things. Mike: That's cool. So going back to Terror. Because we've talked about like how much we enjoyed the character and everything, I want to take a moment to talk about each of our favorite Terror moments. Dan: Okay. Mike: So Dan, why don't you start? What was your favorite moment for Terror [00:51:00] to write or going back to read? Dan: It's a great question, one of the toughest, because again, I had such delight in the character and felt such a connection, you know, in sort of channeling him in a way I could probably find you five, ten moments per issue, but, I actually think it was the it's in the first issue. And was probably the first line that sort of came to me. And then I wrote backwards from it, which was this, got your nose bit. And you know, it's the old gag of like when a parent's playing with a child and, you know, grabs at the nose and uses the thumb to represent the nose and says, got your nose. And there's a moment in that issue where I think he's just plummeted out of a skyscraper. He's, you know, fallen down into a police car. He's basically shattered. And this cop or security guard is kind of coming over to him and, and he just reaches out and grabs the guy's nose, you know, rips his arm off or something or legs to start to replace himself and, and just says, got your nose, but it's, but it's all a [00:52:00] build from this inner monologue that he's been doing. And so he's not responding to anything. He's not doing a quip to anything. He's just basically telling us a story and ending it with this, you know, delivery that basically says the guy has a complete condescending attitude and just signals that we're in his space. Like he doesn't need to kind of like do an Arnold response to something it's just, he's in his own little world moments I always just kind of go back to that got your nose moment, which is just creepy and crazy and strange. Mike: As soon as you mentioned that I was thinking of the panel that that was from, because it was such a great moment. I think it was the mob enforcers that had shot him up and he had jumped out of the skyscraper four and then they came down to finish him off and he wound up just ripping them apart so that he could rebuild himself. All right, Jessika, how about you? Jessika: I really enjoyed the part where Terror fights with sharks in order to free Silver Sable and Luke Cage. [00:53:00] It was so cool. There was just absolutely no fear as he went at the first shark head-on and, and then there were like five huge bloodthirsty sharks in the small tank. And Terror's just like, what an inconvenience. Oh, well. Mike: Yeah. Jessika: Like followed by a quippy remark, like in his head, of course. And I feel like he's such a solitary character that it makes sense that he would have such an active internal monologue. I find myself doing that. Like, you know, I mean, I have a dog, so he usually gets the brunt of it, but he, you know, it's, it is that you start to form like, sort of an internal conversation if you don't have that outside interaction. Dan: Right. Jessika: And I think a lot of us probably relate to that though this pandemic. Mike: Yeah. Jessika: But the one-liner thoughts, like, again, they make those scenes in my opinion, and it gave pause for levity. We don't have to be serious about this because really isn't life or death for Terror. We know that, and he just reminds us that constantly by just he's always so damn nonchalant. [00:54:00] Dan: Yeah. He does have a very, I'm not going to say suave, but it's, uh, you know, that sort of very, I've got this, you know, sort of attitude to it. Mike: I would, say that he's suave when he wants to be, I mean, like the last issue he's got his whiskers tied back and kind of a ponytail. Dan: Oh yeah. Jessika: Oh yeah. Dan: Richard Pace did a great job with that. Mike: Where he's dancing with his assistant in the restaurant and it's that final scene where he's got that really elegant tuxedo. Like. Dan: Yeah. It's very beautiful. Mike: I say that he can be suave and he wants to be. So I got to say like my favorite one, it was a visual gag that you guys did, and it's in issue six when he's fighting with the Punisher and he's got this, long guns sniper. And he shoots the Punisher point blank, and Terror's, like at this point he's lost his legs for like the sixth time. Like he seems to lose his legs, like once an issue where he's just a torso waddling around on his hands. And so he shoots him the force skids him back. [00:55:00] And I legit could not stop laughing for a good minute. Like I was just cackling when I read that. So I think all of us agree that it's those moments of weird levity that really made the series feel like something special. Dan: I'm not quite sure we're going to see that moment reenacted at the Disney Pavilion, you know, anytime soon. But, that would be pretty awesome if they ever went that route. Mike: Well, yeah, so, I mean, like, let's talk about that for a minute, because one of the main ways that I consume Marvel comics these days is through Marvel unlimited, and Terror is a pretty limited presence there. There's a few issues of various Deadpool series. There's the Marvel team up that I think Robert Kirkman did, where Terror shows up and he has some pretty cool moments in there. And then there's a couple of random issues of the 1990s Luke Cage series Cage, but like the core series, the Marvel max stuff, his appearance in books like Daredevil and Wolverine, they just don't seem to be available for consumption via the. App Like I had to go through my personal [00:56:00] collection to find all this stuff. And like, are the rights just more complicated because it was published under the Epic imprint and that was create her own stuff, like do you know? Dan: No, I mean, it wouldn't be it's choice, right. He's probably perceived as a, if people within the editorial group even know about him, right. I was reading something recently where some of the current editorial staff had to be schooled on who Jack Kirby was. So, I'm not sure how much exposure or, you know, interest there would be, you know, to that. I mean, I don't know why everything would be on Marvin unlimited. It doesn't seem like it requires anything except scanning the stuff and putting it up there. But there wouldn't be any rights issues. Marvel owned the Shadow Line, Marvel owns the Terror Incorporated title, it would have been there. So I'm not really sure why it wouldn't be. And maybe at some point it will, but, that's just an odd emission. I mean, for years, which I always felt like, well, what did I do wrong? I [00:57:00] mean, you can find very little of the Daredevil work I did, which was probably very well known and very well received in, in reprints. It would be like, there'd be reprints of almost every other storyline and then there'd be a gap around some of those things. And now they started to reappear as they've done these omnibus editions. Mike: Well, yeah, I mean, you know, and going back the awareness of the character, anytime I talk about Terror to people, it's probably a three out of four chance that they won't have heard of them before. I don't know if you're a part of the comic book historians group on Facebook? Dan: I'm not. No. Mike: So there's a lot of people who are really passionate about comic book history, and they talk about various things. And so when I was doing research for this episode originally, I was asking about kind of the revamp of supernatural heroes. And I said, you know, this was around the same time as Terror. And several people sat there and said, we haven't heard of Terror before. And I was like, he's great. He's amazing. You have to look them up. But yeah, it seems like, you know, to echo what you stated, it seems like there's just a lack of awareness about the character, which I feel is a genuine shame. And that's part of the [00:58:00] reason that I wanted to talk about him in this episode. Dan: Well, thank you. I mean, I love the spotlight and I think anytime I've talked to somebody about it who knew it, I've never heard somebody who read the book said, yeah, that sucks. Right. I've heard that about other things, but not about this one, invariably, if they read it, they loved it. And they were twisted and kind of got into it. But did have a limited run, right? It was only 13 issues. It didn't get the spotlight, it was sort of promised it kind of, it came out with a grouping of other mercenary titles at the time. There was a new Punisher title. There was a Silver Sable. There was a few other titles in this grouping. Everyone was promised a certain amount of additional PR, which they got; when it got to Terror. It didn't get that it like, they pulled the boost at the last minute that might not have made a difference. And I also think maybe it was a little bit ahead of its time in certain attitudes crossing the line between horror and [00:59:00] humor and overtness of certain things, at least for Marvel, like where do you fit this? I think the readers are fine. Readers are great about picking up on stuff and embracing things. For Marvel, it was kind of probably, and I'm not dissing them. I never got like any negative, you know, we're gonna launch this title, what we're going to dismiss it. But I just also think, unless it's somebody like me driving it or the editor driving it, or Carl Potts, who was the editor in chief of that division at that point, you know, unless they're pushing it, there's plenty of other characters Right. For, things to get behind. But I think again, anytime it kind of comes up, it is definitely the one that I hear about probably the most and the most passionately so that's cool in its own way. Mike: Yeah, I think I remember reading an interview that you did, where you were talking about how there was originally going to be like a gimmick cover or a trading card or something like that. Dan: Yeah. Mike: So what was the, what was the gimmick going to be for Terror number one? Dan: What was the gimmick going to be? I don't know, actually, I if I knew I [01:00:00] can't remember anymore. But it was going to be totally gimmicky, as all those titles and covers were at the time. So I hope not scratch and sniff like a, uh, rotting bodies odor, although that would have been kind of in-character and cool. Mike: I mean, this was the era of the gimmick cover. Dan: Oh, absolutely. Mike: Like,that was when that was when we had Bloodstrike come out and it was like the thermographic printing, so you could rub the blood and it would disappear. Force Works is my favorite one, you literally unfold the cover and it's like a pop-up book. Dan: Somebody actually keyed me in. There actually was like a Terror trading card at one point. Mike: Yeah. Dan: Like after the fact, which I was like, shocked. Mike: I have that, that's from Marvel Universe series four. Dan: Yeah. we did a pretty good job with it actually. And then even as we got to the end of the run, you know, we, and you can sort of see us where we're trying to shift certain aspects of the book, you know, more into the mainstream Marvel, because they said, well, we'll give you another seven issues or something, you know, to kind of get the numbers up. Mike: Right. Dan: And they pulled the plug, you know, even before that. So, uh, that's why [01:01:00] the end kind of comes a bit abruptly and we get that final coda scene, you know, that Richard Pace did such a nice job with. Mike: Yeah. I mean, it felt like it wrapped it up, you know, and they gave you that opportunity, which I was really kind of grateful for, to be honest. Dan: Yeah. and subsequently, I don't know what's going on. I know there was that David Lapham, you know, series, you did a couple of those, which I glanced at, I know I kind of got in the way of it a little bit too, not in the way, but I just said, remember to give us a little created by credits in that, but I didn't read those. And then, I know he was in the League of Losers at one point, which just didn't sound right to me. And, uh. Mike: It's actually. Okay. So I'm going to, I'm going to say this cause, it's basically a bunch of, kind of like the B to C listers for the most part. And. So they're called the Legal Losers. I think it's a really good story, and I actually really like what they do with Terror. He gets, she's now Spider Woman, I think it's, Anya Corazon, but it was her original incarnation of, Arana. And she's got that spider armor that like comes out of her arm. And so she [01:02:00] dies really on and he gets her arm. And then, Dan: That's cool. Mike: What happens is he makes a point of using the armor that she has. And so he becomes this weird amalgamation of Terror and Arana's armored form, which is great. Dan: Was that the Kirkman series? Is that the one that he did or. Mike: yeah. That was part of Marvel Team-Up. Dan: Okay. Mike: it was written by Robert Kirkman. Dan: Well, then I will, I will look it up. Mike: Yeah. And that one's on Marvel unlimited and genuinely a really fun story as I remembered. It's been a couple of years since I read it, but yeah. Dan: Very cool. Mike: So we've talked about this a little bit, but, so

mystery horror japanese books pr night haunt american america future spotify speaking children black halloween god terror lgbtq race netflix love magic hollywood vhs money spirits house diamond kickstarter disney dark child mcu batman marvel dc idw dark horse strange vampires hill house gothic ghost rider venom comixology swamp thing alan moore deadpool dynamite brave lee weeks frankenstein sci fi klaus janson superman luke cage cage zine lgbt thing oscar wilde dracula editor in chief ocean league evil marvel universe thor blade universal wonder woman hero xmen punisher werewolf mac adventures cape tales tale mist lake unknown bible ralph macchio accessibility shadows haunting spider man neil gaiman mary shelley hammer senate cabin fear vincent price readers penguin random house peter jackson lord of the rings sweet tooth arthurian devil epic hellraiser soapbox yup raimi cg john carpenter creatures catholic lsd mothman comics code daredevil galactus savage kirkman satan steam shrek vault black lagoon killing invasion seduction hashtags wikipedia it follows omen robert kirkman sandman nightmare on elm street happy halloween agents of shield hocus pocus senators losers venn worked saki dan they sanderson jim shooter crypt junji ito uzumaki wasn occult barker clive poltergeist necronomicon pdfs body snatchers evil dead mad magazine paul ryan powerline marvel team up re animator chichester spider woman conan doyle innocent joe lieberman exorcist jack kirby new adventures nosferatu vengeance clive barker erie edgar allen poe vertigo comics hellblazer marvel max jason aaron force works tbd harkness morbius elvira mistress christopher lee gary busey crypt keeper nightbreed satanism snickers handmaid ec petaluma theseus ns wolverines midnight sons jeffrey combs bernie wrightson null lieberman captain universe ec comics archie goodwin jerry siegel forbidden love terror inc david lapham man thing bloodstrike dwayne mcduffie carl potts warbucks approval critical mass michael j power pack marvel tales gothic horror comics code authority horror comics robbie reyes epic comics srb parental advisory purple planet music babadook kates buti suez canal premiumbeat tipper gore another world silver sable johnny blaze dan it gold key gamestop arana hannibal king aero green lantern green arrow dan so saint george surgeon general daniel d jack thompson frighteners mercs comichron mike oh james tynion shadowline lament configuration ron garney wortham new guardians mike they chi mcbride john jones mike awesome dan there mike it mike yeah dan you mike thompson brigman jr jr dan how substack mike no mike well mike so mike all dan oh wandavision bob layton danas nightstalkers wwii america dan yeah boss monster mike stay lee ermey mike right funkos mike thank dan well apocalypse soon dead world fran walsh nice house
The BBQ Central Show
Breaking Down Competitive Steak Cooking With 100% Assurity!

The BBQ Central Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 84:53


(October 26, 2021 - Hour Two) 10:14pm & 10:35pm - The Embedded Correspondents and I will start this monthly segment off by giving you a bunch of "100% Assurity Picks". Many of these came from listeners who wanted to get our take on certain items and we will DO IT LIVE tonight! Then, the EC's and I will begin to breakdown the National Steak Competition put on by the KCBS, we will go over the rules, talk about them and decide if this is something that will ultimately compete with the Steak Cookoff Association. Many different societies have tried to get a piece of this pie but the SCA has remained THEE dominant force in competitive steak for years now. Can the KCBS stack up??? Join us tonight for our take on it! BBQ Central Show Sponsors! The BBQ Guru Big Poppa Smokers Green Mountain Grills Cookin Pellets Fireboard Smithfield The Pit Barrel Cooker The Butcher Shoppe - Save 10% When You Mention "The BBQ Central Show" Primo Grills Yoder Smokers Vortic Watch Company Yukon Glory - Save 10% with code 10CENTRAL Patreon Ad-Free Podcast Feed

Hugo Lisoir Podcast
[FAQ] Anti-Etoile : Une étoile d'antimatière

Hugo Lisoir Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 11:21


Commandez notre livre sur Amazon : https://amzn.to/2K1womp Ou sur la Fnac : https://tidd.ly/37JegpJ Soutenez la chaîne avec Tipeee: https://www.tipeee.com/hugo-lisoir Ou si vous préférez uTip : https://utip.io/feed/hugolisoir Contact pro : contact.hugolisoir@gmail.com L'espace commentaire (EC) est un format où je répond aux questions qui ont été posées cette semaine sur la chaîne. Je m'excuse si je ne peux pas répondre à tout, le choix est effectué selon la fréquence et la pertinence des questions. Au programme de cette semaine, on va parler des antiétoiles.  

The Go Diaper Free Podcast
#165 Our Common Enemy

The Go Diaper Free Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 15:58


Our Common Enemy. We're gonna chat about how the cards are stacked against us in this diapering culture, and how best to WIN big with Elimination Communication, from as early as birth, despite this culture!   Get full show notes and add your comments or questions here:  https://godiaperfree.com/165 Get my free easy start guide for EC at https://godiaperfree.com/start Start EC with your baby today with Andrea's popular book, Go Diaper Free: https://godiaperfree.com/thebook 

Don't Red On Me
"Dead Man Walking!!!..."

Don't Red On Me

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 104:41


You heard it here folk!!! EC has called his shot...Ole is out by tomorrow morning...We're Back!!1 Do apologize about the last three weeks but we had some technical problems...After this weekend and the past few weeks matches Ole has to go...EC and I argue of course about how much blame comes to this point but we both agree Ole has to go....so grab a beer and tune in...

The EC method
Ep. 179 - Shift workers, emotional eating & body pump

The EC method

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 53:22


The EC method Fam Q&A We cover: - SHHANNNAACKS - Meal frequency options - Hunger - Barriers to eating -Energy intake over time - how to manage shift work - Body pump ( a lot) - Progressive overload - Hypertrophy Caloires - Emotional eating & much more! Enjoy! TheECmethod.co.uk

Tales from the Podcast
Bordello Of Blood w/Erik Russo

Tales from the Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 70:30


On this episode of Tales From the Podcast we discuss the film Bordello of Blood with our friend Erik Russo! join us as we chat about what we thought of the film especially about our dislike of Dennis Miller!Check out House of Mysterious Secrets @ HouseofMysteriousSecrets.com and use our discount code 4130 to save 10% on some awesome horror merch now!!!https://instagram.com/tales_from_the_podcasthttps://twitter.com/TalesFromThePodhttps://facebook.com/groups/talesfromthepodcastAnd can contact me through my website:http://talesfromthepodcast.comAnd email us here at talesfromthepodcast13@gmail.com

Practice Disrupted with Evelyn Lee and Je'Nen Chastain
056: Leading with Finance & Entrepreneurship

Practice Disrupted with Evelyn Lee and Je'Nen Chastain

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 59:42


Episode 056: Leading with Finance & EntrepreneurshipHow can architecture firms focus on elevating their financial management? This week we explore our love/hate relationship with numbers and discover tips and tricks that help keep projects and their budgets financially sound. Bolanle Williams-Olley is a CFO and partner at Mancini, but also an incredible entrepreneur managing multiple businesses in various stages of growth all at the same time. Our conversation with her will help you reframe your approach to accounting and bookkeeping tasks and leave you asking yourself what type of business you want to build next. You will also get a first look at her BOLD framework from her new book, Build Boldly launching early next month focused on how individuals can spark courageous action for grow and become leaders that inspire others to rise and be their best. Guest: Bolanle Williams-Olley sets a new standard of expectations for financial professionals. As Chief Financial Officer for https://www.manciniduffy.com/ (Mancini), Bolanle brings a unique vision to the firm's leadership team and thrives on building relationships between finance and management teams to ensure the overall financial success of projects and her firm.  At 36-years-old, she is a true multi-hyphenate. In addition to her C-suite role, she is also a mom of two and a dynamic leader in the built industry as the founder of several impact organizations for improving education in a low-income school in Nigeria (where she was raised), empowering women in the A/E/C industry and at small design firms, as well as creating awareness about NGOs across Nigeria.  Show Links:

Health, Happiness & Human Kind
HHHK 351: Postpartum, Parenting & Communication with Emma Maidment

Health, Happiness & Human Kind

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 54:23


In today's episode we are joined by Emma Maidment, as she shares with us more about her postpartum experience, including the world of elimination communication, or EC, as she calls it. You will learn about intuitive parenting, including the role of language, the importance of expressing your emotions as a parent, how to shape the world for your child and so much more. Head to https://www.stephlowe.com/podcasts/351 for show notes, episode transcripts and more.

Global News Podcast
Poland's PM accuses EU of 'blackmail' in row over rule of law

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 29:56


Mateusz Morawiecki made accusation during debate with EC chief Ursula von der Leyen. The clash followed a ruling by a top Polish court which rejected key sections of EU law. Also, crisis in Romania as it records one of the world's highest Covid mortality-rates, and we meet Eric Zemmour - the politician who may challenge Marine Le Pen for leadership of France's far-Right.

Un Mensaje a la Conciencia
«No siento ganas de vivir»

Un Mensaje a la Conciencia

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 4:01


En este mensaje tratamos el siguiente caso de una mujer que «descargó su conciencia» de manera anónima en nuestro sitio www.conciencia.net, autorizándonos a que la citáramos: «No siento ganas de vivir. He visto la muerte como una salida. Le pido a Dios que tenga misericordia de mí, que entre en mi corazón, y nada pasa... »Por favor, díganme qué puedo hacer. A veces siento que llego al límite.» Este es el consejo que le dimos: «Estimada amiga: »Uno de los hombres más sabios de la historia se sintió igual que usted. En medio de su desilusión, al reflexionar sobre lo vacía que puede ser la vida, dijo: «Y consideré más felices a los que ya han muerto que a los que aún viven.»1 A pesar de que este sabio escritor tuvo todas las riquezas y las oportunidades posibles, éstas no le bastaron para llenar su vacío interior. El libro de Eclesiastés es la historia de su búsqueda del sentido de la vida, y le recomendamos que lo lea a fin de que comprenda cuánto se parecen el peregrinaje de él y el suyo. »El Maestro de Eclesiastés experimentó placeres sensuales, tuvo posesiones materiales y alcanzó grandes logros en su búsqueda de satisfacción. Vivió alejado de Dios durante muchos años mientras probaba todo lo que el mundo le ofrecía. Pero en el ocaso de su vida, llegó finalmente a comprender cómo se halla el camino a la felicidad. «Nada hay mejor para el hombre que comer y beber, y llegar a disfrutar de sus afanes —concluyó—. He visto que también esto proviene de Dios, porque ¿quién puede comer y alegrarse, si no es por Dios?»2 Con esto el Maestro reconoció que sin una relación con Dios, no hay ninguna actividad humana que satisfaga, ni siquiera el comer y el beber. Luego reveló el secreto de cómo hallar la verdadera felicidad. «En realidad, Dios da sabiduría, conocimientos y alegría a quien es de su agrado —afirmó—; en cambio, al pecador le impone la tarea de acumular más y más, para luego dárselo todo a quien es de su agrado.»3 »El Maestro halló el sentido de la vida y la felicidad sólo en el marco de una relación constante con Dios. Descubrió que la manera de agradar a Dios es incluirlo en sus actividades diarias. ¿Acaso no queremos todos que alguien a quien amamos participe de nuestras actividades? Al hablar con Dios mediante la oración y escuchar su voz mediante la lectura de la Biblia, aprendemos más acerca de Él y de cómo agradarle. Y a medida que le agradamos, Él nos da la felicidad y ese sentido de la vida que buscamos con anhelo. »... El camino para llegar a conocer a Dios comienza con una oración en la que usted le pide que entre en su corazón, pero ahí no termina todo. Usted debe reconocer su santidad divina y seguir sus mandamientos todos los días. Sólo así logrará que se llene ese vacío que siente. Solo así sentirá que vale la pena vivir.... »Aprendamos del Maestro de Eclesiastés, »Carlos Rey y su esposa Linda.» El consejo completo, que por falta de espacio no pudimos incluir en esta edición, puede leerse con sólo pulsar el enlace que dice: «Caso 21» dentro del enlace en www.conciencia.net que dice: «Caso de la semana». Carlos ReyUn Mensaje a la Concienciawww.conciencia.net 1 Ec 4:2 2 Ec 2:24‑25 3 Ec 2:26

Hugo Lisoir Podcast
[DNDE] Comment lutter contre les débris spatiaux

Hugo Lisoir Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 11:24


Commandez notre livre sur Amazon : https://amzn.to/2K1womp Ou sur la Fnac : https://tidd.ly/37JegpJ Soutenez la chaîne avec Tipeee: https://www.tipeee.com/hugo-lisoir Ou si vous préférez uTip : https://utip.io/feed/hugolisoir Contact pro : contact.hugolisoir@gmail.com L'espace commentaire (EC) est un format où je répond aux questions qui ont été posées cette semaine sur la chaîne. Je m'excuse si je ne peux pas répondre à tout, le choix est effectué selon la fréquence et la pertinence des questions. Au programme de cette semaine, on regarde du côté du danger des débris spatiaux ! 

Home Church NJ
Renove Sua Esperança | Pr. Marcelo de Souza

Home Church NJ

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 44:34


#cultoonline #churchlive #live Você tem Esperança? “Quem está entre os vivos tem esperança; até um cachorro vivo é melhor do que um leão morto!” – Ec. 9:4 Deus quer e tem planos de Esperança para sua vida! “Porque sou eu que conheço os planos que tenho para vocês', diz o SENHOR, 'planos de fazê-los prosperar e não de lhes causar dano, planos de dar-lhes esperança e um futuro.” – Jr. 29:11. “ Por isso há esperança para o seu futuro", declara o SENHOR.” – Jr. 31:17

The Go Diaper Free Podcast
#164 Night-time EC: Tips & tricks to help you and your baby sleep better

The Go Diaper Free Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 12:20


Today's episode is a guest post from one of our certified coaches, Maja, and it's all about nighttime EC. Here's a snippet: “In one of the articles I stumbled upon when my daughter was around 6 months old, the author claimed that children pee in between the sleep cycles and that some babies dislike soiling themselves so much it makes them cry and fuss. I immediately felt that this could be it for us, but the idea of getting up to offer the potty at night, on top of everything else, seemed like a nightmare - and like a sure way to spend even less time sleeping. Little did I know that this was exactly what we needed to improve our sleep! I hit rock bottom at about 9 months old, recalled this article, and tried to give it a go - figuring out the how-to's as we went, which I'll lay out right now.”   Get full show notes and add your comments or questions here: https://godiaperfree.com/164 Get my free easy start guide for EC at https://godiaperfree.com/start Start EC with your baby today with Andrea's popular book, Go Diaper Free: https://godiaperfree.com/thebook 

SBC This Week
Floyd resigns as EC president; Committee on Cooperation named

SBC This Week

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 38:14


SBC Executive Committee President Ronnie Floyd announced he would be leaving the EC at the end of October. Also, the Committee on Cooperation members have been named by Rolland Slade and the Sex Abuse Task Force.

The Go Diaper Free Podcast
#163 Babyled Weaning - Interview with Katie Ferraro

The Go Diaper Free Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 30:59


Welcome to the show! So, if you've been here for any length of time, you know that I do NOT interview people on my podcast. However. Katie Ferraro interviewed me about elimination communication for her podcast, Baby-led Weaning Made Easy, a few weeks ago. It was SO Good that I felt compelled to share HER topic, babyled weaning or BLW, with y'all on my podcast! EC and BLW play very nicely together and fall under that same parenting umbrella of: hey, respect my natural biology and rhythms and listen to me, mom! Learn about Baby-led Weaning TODAY in our super-fun interview!   Get full show notes and add your comments or questions here:  https://godiaperfree.com/163   Get my free easy start guide for EC at https://godiaperfree.com/start Start EC with your baby today with Andrea's popular book, Go Diaper Free: https://godiaperfree.com/thebook 

Plane Talking UK's Podcast
Episode 387 - The One Matt NEARLY lost

Plane Talking UK's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 118:34


Join Carlos, Nev and Matt for this week's episode. In this week's show some spirit airline passengers smell burning, Matt takes a look at contactless food, and Nev has some exciting news about BA's Big Busses . In the military in the USAF's new replacement for the EC-130 COMPASS CALL makes its inaugural flight (it's a Gulfstream); Boeing's T-7 Jayhawk continues production; Sikorsky UH-60 BLACKHAWKs could be produced in the UK; and finally we see some amazing images and videos from Bones at Fairford and Globemasters Down Under. Captain Nick continues his chat with Mike Wildeman about his incredible flying career.

The Emerging Cricket Podcast
Scotland - T20 World Cup Preview

The Emerging Cricket Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 28:21


MacLeod and Munsey masterclasses? Maybe the class of Coetzer or the left-arm spin twins? Bes, Nick and EC writer Malhar Hathi discuss Scotland's chances of reaching the next round

Tales from the Podcast
Curiosity Killed - Tales From the Crypt S4E14

Tales from the Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 38:17


On this episode of Tales From the Podcast we discuss the episode Curiosity Killed and do our walkthrough and comparison to the original comic book !Check out House of Mysterious Secrets @ HouseofMysteriousSecrets.com and use our discount code 4130 to save 10% on some awesome horror merch now!!!https://instagram.com/tales_from_the_podcasthttps://twitter.com/TalesFromThePodhttps://facebook.com/groups/talesfromthepodcastAnd can contact me through my website:http://talesfromthepodcast.comAnd email us here at talesfromthepodcast13@gmail.com

SBC This Week
EC approves Guidepost contract; CP, LMCO, AAEO giving updates

SBC This Week

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 27:53


The SBC Executive Committee finalized a contract with Guidepost Solutions to begin work on an independent review of the EC. Also, there is some great news about giving around the SBC.

Marketers Take Flight Podcast
Selecting the Best CRM for A/E/C Firms, Part 1

Marketers Take Flight Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 35:50


How do you know if you need a CRM for your architecture, engineering, or construction (A/E/C) firm? How do you select the right CRM for your firm? How can you make sure you are getting the most out of your CRM?In the first part of this two-part series, I ask Jan Flesher, PMP and Courtney Kearney, CPSM these questions.  And, you may be surprised to hear that not every firm needs a CRM! We also discuss the tipping point of when a firm should think about getting a CRM. Jan and Courtney have some great advice on what firms should think about when researching CRMs, what is the number one thing your firm should consider before bringing on a CRM.This interview continues into the next episode but you don't want to miss this one. Jan and Courtney have great advice and loads of knowledge to share.Jan Flesher's Introduction - 1:59Courtney Kearney's Introduction - 8:51Jan's thoughts on when a firm should think about a CRM - 16:16Courtney's thoughts on when a firm should think about a CRM - 18:39Courtney's first piece of advice for a firm when considering a CRM - 24:00Jan's first piece of advice for a firm when considering a CRM - 26:40Become a Podcast MemberFor as little as $5/month you can get member-only podcast content, discounts and early access to training, and more access to me. Plus, you'll feel good knowing that you are supporting a show that brings you so much value, all for less than a cup of coffee. If you're interested in becoming a supporter, head over to marketerstakeflight.com/support to learn more and sign up.

Not Another Baptist Podcast
Episode 232: POTLUCK PODCAST 175: EC Meeting, OK Executive Director, and Annie Armstrong Record

Not Another Baptist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 18:53


Jared, Allen, and Matt sit down after members of the SBC Executive Committee voted to waive attorney client privilege for the independent third-party investigation of the EC concerning the handling of sexual abuse claims, plus a quick note on news out of OK and NAMB.BP Report: https://www.baptistpress.com/resource-library/news/ec-approves-guidepost-contract-agrees-to-waive-privilege/Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PotluckPodcastSBC

The Go Diaper Free Podcast
#162 Potty Liberation

The Go Diaper Free Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 10:09


Today's episode is a guest post from our Cerified Coach Emily in NY. A snippet: “Here's the thing. Putting babies on potties was common practice up until the 1950s. Way back when, parents did anything they could to avoid washing poopy cloth diapers. Although disposable diapers are undoubtedly the norm in the US today, I'd say it's also still pretty normal - not that “fringe” or “crunchy” - to want to avoid changing them. So on that basis alone, I contest that we need to bring EC back into the mainstream, where it belongs, and where it has traditionally and historically been.” Hear the rest of Emily's contribution to our podcast here today! Get full show notes and add your comments or questions here: https://godiaperfree.com/162 Get my free easy start guide for EC at https://godiaperfree.com/start Start EC with your baby today with Andrea's popular book, Go Diaper Free: https://godiaperfree.com/thebook 

The Go Diaper Free Podcast
#161 RIE + EC - do they mix

The Go Diaper Free Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 17:45


Over the years I've been approached by many, many parents who are practicing RIE - which is a form of respectful parenting that focuses on not interrupting a baby's play - about whether elimination communication complements or contradicts it.   Most of these parents were convinced that EC would be disrespectful, considered an unnecessary “interruption” to baby's play that would interfere with their proper development.   Hmm. Well, I disagree with this. I actually believe the two practices are quite compatible, so I decided to finally research RIE and lay it all out for y'all!   Today I'm going to go through, point by point, RIE's Basic Principles to demonstrate where EC and RIE align nicely...and where they may not.   I also want to introduce you to the lovely idea of RIE! If you haven't heard of it, I hope you learn something new today.   Get full show notes and add your comments or questions here: https://godiaperfree.com/161 Get my free easy start guide for EC at https://godiaperfree.com/start Start EC with your baby today with Andrea's popular book, Go Diaper Free: https://godiaperfree.com/thebook 

Baby-Led Weaning Made Easy
Elimination Communication: Can Your Baby Go Diaper Free? with Andrea Olson

Baby-Led Weaning Made Easy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 20:18


#164: Did you know babies can potty from birth? I had no idea until my guest Andrea Olson from @godiaperfree came on the podcast to educate us about Elimination Communication (EC). EC is a gentle, non-coercive way to respond to a baby's natural hygiene needs...and Andrea is the diaper free GURU here to teach us how and why!   Just like babies have the desire and ability to feed themselves solid food when the time is right, babies are instinctual when it comes to pottying. Andrea argues that pottying your baby can make baby-raising cleaner, easier, MUCH more connected to you plus it's better for the environment. If you think a self-feeding baby sounds exciting, I think you'll love hearing about your self-pottying baby's potential too!       If you're ready to raise an independent eater and prevent picky eating then let's get started learning about baby-led weaning together! Subscribe, rate and review the podcast here.   FREE BABY-LED WEANING FOR BEGINNERS ONLINE WORKSHOP: https://babyledweaning.co/workshop   FREE BABY-LED WEANING RECIPE IDEAS FACEBOOK GROUP: https://www.facebook.com/groups/babyledweaningrecipes/   FOLLOW @BABYLEDWEANTEAM ON INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/babyledweanteam/   SHOWNOTES FOR THIS EPISODE: https://blwpodcast.com/164