Podcasts about Wild Thing

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Best podcasts about Wild Thing

Latest podcast episodes about Wild Thing

Moon Harbor Heroes
SABRE Academy Issue 1: Welcome to SABRE Academy

Moon Harbor Heroes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 50:40


In this crossover with Paradigm Academy, several of our heroes find themselves in a horrifying place none of them every wanted to return to: school. This issue was GMed by Thomas. Allie was played by Icy Sheets. Insectivore was played by DJ. Echo was played by Elliot Peterson. Light Hammer was played by Tess Huth. The Wild Thing was played by Rose Hahn.

Momtourage
Finding Sasquatch

Momtourage

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 32:47


This week we are talking Laura Krantz, author, podcaster and relative of one of the most famous Sasquatch researchers EVER! Her podcast WILD THING, as well as her book, has been fun for our whole family to listen to and read. Then, we talk one of Keri's favorite subjects CRYPTOZOOLOGY. We got your Jersey Devil, your Chupacabra and more! As always have your #TITSANDSHITS your #SWAGBAG so stay tuned!Don't forget to LEAVE US A REVIEW! For more info: Laura Krantz Wild Thing This week's #SwagBag picks: Ashley & Keri: P.S.- We Made This! Super Fun Crafts That Grow Smarter and Happier Kids Thanks to our sponsor Athletic Greens Use code: MOMTOURAGE and get a FREE 1 year supply of immune-supporting Vitamin D AND 5 FREE travel packs with your first purchase Come find us on PATREON ! We have hotter than hot, uncensored Goss plus lots of behind the scenes content, perks and SWAG! Send us your child or partners YELP REVIEW at: hello@momtouragepodcast.com ASK US ANYTHING! HAPPY TO GIVE ADVICE. Email us at hello@momtouragepodcast.com For more Momtourage:  iTunes: https://tinyurl.com/y6xrpx8e Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/y5f6ahn4 Instagram: www.instagram.com/momtouragepodcast  Facebook: www.facebook.com/MomtouragePodcast  YouTube: https://tinyurl.com/y4re9sca Website: www.MomtouragePodcast.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Bigfoot and Beyond with Cliff and Bobo
Ep. 181 - Laura Krantz

Bigfoot and Beyond with Cliff and Bobo

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 58:25 Very Popular


Cliff Barackman and James "Bobo" Fay speak with Laura Krantz! Laura is a journalist, editor, author, and producer/host of the successful podcast Wild Thing! Laura is also a relative of the legendary Dr. Grover Krantz. Read more about her work (including her new book) here: https://www.laura-krantz.com 

The Mad Scientist Podcast
Bonus: Nuclear Weirdness with Laura Krantz

The Mad Scientist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 53:12


This bonus episode we are joined by Laura Krantz, host of the Wild Thing podcast. The show covers topics such as Bigfoot, Aliens, and this season Nuclear disasters! Check out the show here: https://www.foxtopus.ink/wildthing and take a listen. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

WILD THING(メジャーリーグMLB野球トーク)
EP094: シーズン2022 プレイオフ開幕特集!

WILD THING(メジャーリーグMLB野球トーク)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 36:46


みなさんご無沙汰しています! 予告通りプレイオフシーズンなったので復活しました! エピソード内でもお話ししてる通り、毎週の配信は難しいのですがまたどこかのタイミングで配信しようと思っています! 【1週間のハイライト】 ・カズとワタの近況報告 ・CLE vs TB ・SEA vs TOR ・PHI vs STL (WBCに関して) ・NYM vs SD ・ワタ激おこマンフレッド許すまじ ・優勝予想 ・MVP予想 Ohtani or Judge? 【Wild Thing特製Tシャツ発売中!】 通販サイトはコチラ! https://wildthingmlb.official.ec/ 【WILD THINGのE-Mail】 wildthingmlb@gmail.com 【WILD THINGのツイッター】 https://twitter.com/WildThingMLB 【ワタのインスタグラム】 https://www.instagram.com/masapiy8/ 【ワタのTwitter】 https://twitter.com/itadaki_Nabebe 【ワタのnote】 https://note.com/nabeyakiu 【カズのTwitter】 https://twitter.com/Kazallica 【Wild Thing特製Tシャツ発売中!】 通販サイトはコチラ! https://wildthingmlb.official.ec/ 【WILD THINGのE-Mail】 wildthingmlb@gmail.com 【WILD THINGのツイッター】 https://twitter.com/WildThingMLB 【ワタのインスタグラム】 https://www.instagram.com/masapiy8/ 【ワタのTwitter】 https://twitter.com/itadaki_Nabebe 【ワタのnote】 https://note.com/nabeyakiu 【カズのTwitter】 https://twitter.com/Kazallica

Chicken Dinner
Wild Thing feat. Alex Smith | Ep. 210

Chicken Dinner

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 36:20


In this episode of the "Chicken Dinner" podcast, Sam Panayotovich discusses The Bartender's 0-3 weekend and Bill Belichick against Jacoby Brissett. Special guest Alex Smith from The Ice Guys joins the show to talk about Bruins-Capitals and his favorite bet to win the Stanley Cup.SUBSCRIBE! "Chicken Dinner" on iTunes, Google Play, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn, and wherever else you listen to your podcastsFOLLOW! @chickenxdinner @spshoot

X is for Podcast: An Uncanny X-Men Experience
MC2.5 – Spider-Girls Of The Multiverse, Unseen MC2 Stories, & Asgardians Of The Galaxy!

X is for Podcast: An Uncanny X-Men Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 102:08


The MC2 Crew can't stop, won't stop, and definitely don't stop on an all new XI4P: AU! Kicking things off is a look back at the same thing that we started this project with -- Spider-Girl! Nico and TK examine the history of AU Spider-Girls, how they compare to May Day, and more! Featuring Ashley Barton from Old Man Logan, Anya better-known-as-Arana, Mary Jane from Exiles, and even a May Parker from a universe created by Tom DeFalco from back in 1984 with her very own co-starring Wild Thing (0:00:00)! Then, take a look at the unreleased, unfinished, and unrealized stories from the MC2 (0:32:00)! Finally, get ready for the ever-promised-and-only-almost-here Asgardians Of The Galaxy, first planned for our 17th XI4P, and now in our 23rd episode, we get close. Explore the history of Angela, Infinity Warps, and War Of The Realms with a look at what makes Asgardians Of The Galaxy work (1:03:00)! Get ready for an all new AU:MC2 on XI4P – we hope you survive the experience!

X is for Podcast: An Uncanny X-Men Experience
Wolverina (Logana), Wild Thing (Rina), & Wolverine (Laura) - The Curious Case of Female Wolverines, featuring What If #9, 11, 15, 20 & Wild Thing #0-5 & All New Wolverine #1-35

X is for Podcast: An Uncanny X-Men Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 93:37


The breakout hit of the MC2 line for Nico and TK has been Wild Thing -- Wolverine and Elektra's daughter, Rina. But she is far from the first or last, female version of Wolverine, and yet, unlike Spider-Man and his many alternate versions, or even the alternate male versions of Wolverine, these characters aren't one-for-one female versions of Wolverine, but rather, unique characters connected to their respective universes' Logans. The MC2 Crew deep dive into the three different women and just what makes them fascinating, stopping off in What The #9, 11, 15, & 20, Wild Thing #0-5, & All New Wolverine #1-35. All this and more on an all new XI4P!

WretroMania : Pro Wrestling Podcast Network
Cool Truth 2022.11 ”AEW Talk, PWI-500 Review and The Wild Thing”

WretroMania : Pro Wrestling Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 133:39


Daddy Cool AC, Wild Thing Whitehouse and Hollywood Jeff Edwards are beak with more talk of the free falling upstart AEW, A fun break down of the PWI-500 list and "The Wild Thing Whitehouse" @cooltruthpp

Ten Cent Takes
Dollar Bin Discoveries: Wild Thing and Lola XOXO

Ten Cent Takes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 14:40


Welcome back to Dollar Bin Discoveries, the sub-series where we talk about interesting comics we've come across while digging through dollar bins. This week, we're talking about Marvel UK's WildThing (or Nikki Doyle: WildThing, it's a little unclear) and Lola XOXO. ----more---- Transcripts are coming soon! We're in the process of putting together a new site, which will have a dedicated transcripts section.  Email: tencenttakes@gmail.com Twitter: @Tencenttakes Instagram: @Tencenttakes Facebook: /Tencenttakes   Our banner art is original work by Sarah Frank  (https://www.lookmomdraws.com/)

Wild Thing
Introducing the new Wild Thing book

Wild Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 11:10


Announcing "The Search For Sasquatch", a middle-grade, non-fiction book based on the first season of Wild Thing! Both the hardcover book and the audiobook (narrated by Laura Krantz), will be out on October 11, 2022. Here's a sneak listen to the first chapter. The audiobook is available for preorder here and there's also a beautifully illustrated hardcover edition!

D.j. Guero Podcast
Wild Thing FlashBack Mix

D.j. Guero Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 66:04


For That Kick Back Old School Jams. On ( iTunes ) & (SoundCloud) Completely free...Don't Forget To Subscribe,Follow,Like, and.....Click on your Notification for the NEW Uploads have a Great Day. New Music Every Friday

The Corner Podcast
The 'Wrestling on a Corner when a Punk gets Squashed by a Wild Thing' Episode

The Corner Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 69:00


Andreas, Kel and Producer Coale Bay Bay talk about the rumors of turmoil in AEW, CM Punk vs. Moxley, the in-ring ability of Will Ospreay, WWE's continued success and much more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week
An Innovative Erection, Secret Oyster Rules, Nuking Hurricanes

The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 54:26 Very Popular


The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week is a podcast by Popular Science. Share your weirdest facts and stories with us in our Facebook group or tweet at us! Click here to learn more about all of our stories!  Click here to follow our sibling podcast, Ask Us Anything!  Check out Laura Krantz's show, Wild Thing! -- Follow our team on Twitter Rachel Feltman: www.twitter.com/RachelFeltman Popular Science: www.twitter.com/PopSci Produced by Jess Boddy: www.twitter.com/JessicaBoddy Theme music by Billy Cadden: https://open.spotify.com/artist/6LqT4DCuAXlBzX8XlNy4Wq?si=5VF2r2XiQoGepRsMTBsDAQ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 151: “San Francisco” by Scott McKenzie

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022


We start season four of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs with an extra-long look at "San Francisco" by Scott McKenzie, and at the Monterey Pop Festival, and the careers of the Mamas and the Papas and P.F. Sloan. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on "Up, Up, and Away" by the 5th Dimension. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources As usual, all the songs excerpted in the podcast can be heard in full at Mixcloud. Scott McKenzie's first album is available here. There are many compilations of the Mamas and the Papas' music, but sadly none that are in print in the UK have the original mono mixes. This set is about as good as you're going to find, though, for the stereo versions. Information on the Mamas and the Papas came from Go Where You Wanna Go: The Oral History of The Mamas and the Papas by Matthew Greenwald, California Dreamin': The True Story Of The Mamas and Papas by Michelle Phillips, and Papa John by John Phillips and Jim Jerome. Information on P.F. Sloan came from PF - TRAVELLING BAREFOOT ON A ROCKY ROAD by Stephen McParland and What's Exactly the Matter With Me? by P.F. Sloan and S.E. Feinberg. The film of the Monterey Pop Festival is available on this Criterion Blu-Ray set. Sadly the CD of the performances seems to be deleted. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript Welcome to season four of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs. It's good to be back. Before we start this episode, I just want to say one thing. I get a lot of credit at times for the way I don't shy away from dealing with the more unsavoury elements of the people being covered in my podcast -- particularly the more awful men. But as I said very early on, I only cover those aspects of their life when they're relevant to the music, because this is a music podcast and not a true crime podcast. But also I worry that in some cases this might mean I'm giving a false impression of some people. In the case of this episode, one of the central figures is John Phillips of the Mamas and the Papas. Now, Phillips has posthumously been accused of some truly monstrous acts, the kind of thing that is truly unforgivable, and I believe those accusations. But those acts didn't take place during the time period covered by most of this episode, so I won't be covering them here -- but they're easily googlable if you want to know. I thought it best to get that out of the way at the start, so no-one's either anxiously waiting for the penny to drop or upset that I didn't acknowledge the elephant in the room. Separately, this episode will have some discussion of fatphobia and diet culture, and of a death that is at least in part attributable to those things. Those of you affected by that may want to skip this one or read the transcript. There are also some mentions of drug addiction and alcoholism. Anyway, on with the show. One of the things that causes problems with rock history is the tendency of people to have selective memories, and that's never more true than when it comes to the Summer of Love, summer of 1967. In the mythology that's built up around it, that was a golden time, the greatest time ever, a period of peace and love where everything was possible, and the world looked like it was going to just keep on getting better. But what that means, of course, is that the people remembering it that way do so because it was the best time of their lives. And what happens when the best time of your life is over in one summer? When you have one hit and never have a second, or when your band splits up after only eighteen months, and you have to cope with the reality that your best years are not only behind you, but they weren't even best years, but just best months? What stories would you tell about that time? Would you remember it as the eve of destruction, the last great moment before everything went to hell, or would you remember it as a golden summer, full of people with flowers in their hair? And would either really be true? [Excerpt: Scott McKenzie, "San Francisco"] Other than the city in which they worked, there are a few things that seem to characterise almost all the important figures on the LA music scene in the middle part of the 1960s. They almost all seem to be incredibly ambitious, as one might imagine. There seem to be a huge number of fantasists among them -- people who will not only choose the legend over reality when it suits them, but who will choose the legend over reality even when it doesn't suit them. And they almost all seem to have a story about being turned down in a rude and arrogant manner by Lou Adler, usually more or less the same story. To give an example, I'm going to read out a bit of Ray Manzarek's autobiography here. Now, Manzarek uses a few words that I can't use on this podcast and keep a clean rating, so I'm just going to do slight pauses when I get to them, but I'll leave the words in the transcript for those who aren't offended by them: "Sometimes Jim and Dorothy and I went alone. The three of us tried Dunhill Records. Lou Adler was the head man. He was shrewd and he was hip. He had the Mamas and the Papas and a big single with Barry McGuire's 'Eve of Destruction.' He was flush. We were ushered into his office. He looked cool. He was California casually disheveled and had the look of a stoner, but his eyes were as cold as a shark's. He took the twelve-inch acetate demo from me and we all sat down. He put the disc on his turntable and played each cut…for ten seconds. Ten seconds! You can't tell jack [shit] from ten seconds. At least listen to one of the songs all the way through. I wanted to rage at him. 'How dare you! We're the Doors! This is [fucking] Jim Morrison! He's going to be a [fucking] star! Can't you see that? Can't you see how [fucking] handsome he is? Can't you hear how groovy the music is? Don't you [fucking] get it? Listen to the words, man!' My brain was a boiling, lava-filled Jell-O mold of rage. I wanted to eviscerate that shark. The songs he so casually dismissed were 'Moonlight Drive,' 'Hello, I Love You,' 'Summer's Almost Gone,' 'End of the Night,' 'I Looked at You,' 'Go Insane.' He rejected the whole demo. Ten seconds on each song—maybe twenty seconds on 'Hello, I Love You' (I took that as an omen of potential airplay)—and we were dismissed out of hand. Just like that. He took the demo off the turntable and handed it back to me with an obsequious smile and said, 'Nothing here I can use.' We were shocked. We stood up, the three of us, and Jim, with a wry and knowing smile on his lips, cuttingly and coolly shot back at him, 'That's okay, man. We don't want to be *used*, anyway.'" Now, as you may have gathered from the episode on the Doors, Ray Manzarek was one of those print-the-legend types, and that's true of everyone who tells similar stories about Lou Alder. But... there are a *lot* of people who tell similar stories about Lou Adler. One of those was Phil Sloan. You can get an idea of Sloan's attitude to storytelling from a story he always used to tell. Shortly after he and his family moved to LA from New York, he got a job selling newspapers on a street corner on Hollywood Boulevard, just across from Schwab's Drug Store. One day James Dean drove up in his Porsche and made an unusual request. He wanted to buy every copy of the newspaper that Sloan had -- around a hundred and fifty copies in total. But he only wanted one article, something in the entertainment section. Sloan didn't remember what the article was, but he did remember that one of the headlines was on the final illness of Oliver Hardy, who died shortly afterwards, and thought it might have been something to do with that. Dean was going to just clip that article from every copy he bought, and then he was going to give all the newspapers back to Sloan to sell again, so Sloan ended up making a lot of extra money that day. There is one rather big problem with that story. Oliver Hardy died in August 1957, just after the Sloan family moved to LA. But James Dean died in September 1955, two years earlier. Sloan admitted that, and said he couldn't explain it, but he was insistent. He sold a hundred and fifty newspapers to James Dean two years after Dean's death. When not selling newspapers to dead celebrities, Sloan went to Fairfax High School, and developed an interest in music which was mostly oriented around the kind of white pop vocal groups that were popular at the time, groups like the Kingston Trio, the Four Lads, and the Four Aces. But the record that made Sloan decide he wanted to make music himself was "Just Goofed" by the Teen Queens: [Excerpt: The Teen Queens, "Just Goofed"] In 1959, when he was fourteen, he saw an advert for an open audition with Aladdin Records, a label he liked because of Thurston Harris. He went along to the audition, and was successful. His first single, released as by Flip Sloan -- Flip was a nickname, a corruption of "Philip" -- was produced by Bumps Blackwell and featured several of the musicians who played with Sam Cooke, plus Larry Knechtel on piano and Mike Deasey on guitar, but Aladdin shut down shortly after releasing it, and it may not even have had a general release, just promo copies. I've not been able to find a copy online anywhere. After that, he tried Arwin Records, the label that Jan and Arnie recorded for, which was owned by Marty Melcher (Doris Day's husband and Terry Melcher's stepfather). Melcher signed him, and put out a single, "She's My Girl", on Mart Records, a subsidiary of Arwin, on which Sloan was backed by a group of session players including Sandy Nelson and Bruce Johnston: [Excerpt: Philip Sloan, "She's My Girl"] That record didn't have any success, and Sloan was soon dropped by Mart Records. He went on to sign with Blue Bird Records, which was as far as can be ascertained essentially a scam organisation that would record demos for songwriters, but tell the performers that they were making a real record, so that they would record it for the royalties they would never get, rather than for a decent fee as a professional demo singer would get. But Steve Venet -- the brother of Nik Venet, and occasional songwriting collaborator with Tommy Boyce -- happened to come to Blue Bird one day, and hear one of Sloan's original songs. He thought Sloan would make a good songwriter, and took him to see Lou Adler at Columbia-Screen Gems music publishing. This was shortly after the merger between Columbia-Screen Gems and Aldon Music, and Adler was at this point the West Coast head of operations, subservient to Don Kirshner and Al Nevins, but largely left to do what he wanted. The way Sloan always told the story, Venet tried to get Adler to sign Sloan, but Adler said his songs stunk and had no commercial potential. But Sloan persisted in trying to get a contract there, and eventually Al Nevins happened to be in the office and overruled Adler, much to Adler's disgust. Sloan was signed to Columbia-Screen Gems as a songwriter, though he wasn't put on a salary like the Brill Building songwriters, just told that he could bring in songs and they would publish them. Shortly after this, Adler suggested to Sloan that he might want to form a writing team with another songwriter, Steve Barri, who had had a similar non-career non-trajectory, but was very slightly further ahead in his career, having done some work with Carol Connors, the former lead singer of the Teddy Bears. Barri had co-written a couple of flop singles for Connors, before the two of them had formed a vocal group, the Storytellers, with Connors' sister. The Storytellers had released a single, "When Two People (Are in Love)" , which was put out on a local independent label and which Adler had licensed to be released on Dimension Records, the label associated with Aldon Music: [Excerpt: The Storytellers "When Two People (Are in Love)"] That record didn't sell, but it was enough to get Barri into the Columbia-Screen Gems circle, and Adler set him and Sloan up as a songwriting team -- although the way Sloan told it, it wasn't so much a songwriting team as Sloan writing songs while Barri was also there. Sloan would later claim "it was mostly a collaboration of spirit, and it seemed that I was writing most of the music and the lyric, but it couldn't possibly have ever happened unless both of us were present at the same time". One suspects that Barri might have a different recollection of how it went... Sloan and Barri's first collaboration was a song that Sloan had half-written before they met, called "Kick That Little Foot Sally Ann", which was recorded by a West Coast Chubby Checker knockoff who went under the name Round Robin, and who had his own dance craze, the Slauson, which was much less successful than the Twist: [Excerpt: Round Robin, "Kick that Little Foot Sally Ann"] That track was produced and arranged by Jack Nitzsche, and Nitzsche asked Sloan to be one of the rhythm guitarists on the track, apparently liking Sloan's feel. Sloan would end up playing rhythm guitar or singing backing vocals on many of the records made of songs he and Barri wrote together. "Kick That Little Foot Sally Ann" only made number sixty-one nationally, but it was a regional hit, and it meant that Sloan and Barri soon became what Sloan later described as "the Goffin and King of the West Coast follow-ups." According to Sloan "We'd be given a list on Monday morning by Lou Adler with thirty names on it of the groups who needed follow-ups to their hit." They'd then write the songs to order, and they started to specialise in dance craze songs. For example, when the Swim looked like it might be the next big dance, they wrote "Swim Swim Swim", "She Only Wants to Swim", "Let's Swim Baby", "Big Boss Swimmer", "Swim Party" and "My Swimmin' Girl" (the last a collaboration with Jan Berry and Roger Christian). These songs were exactly as good as they needed to be, in order to provide album filler for mid-tier artists, and while Sloan and Barri weren't writing any massive hits, they were doing very well as mid-tier writers. According to Sloan's biographer Stephen McParland, there was a three-year period in the mid-sixties where at least one song written or co-written by Sloan was on the national charts at any given time. Most of these songs weren't for Columbia-Screen Gems though. In early 1964 Lou Adler had a falling out with Don Kirshner, and decided to start up his own company, Dunhill, which was equal parts production company, music publishers, and management -- doing for West Coast pop singers what Motown was doing for Detroit soul singers, and putting everything into one basket. Dunhill's early clients included Jan and Dean and the rockabilly singer Johnny Rivers, and Dunhill also signed Sloan and Barri as songwriters. Because of this connection, Sloan and Barri soon became an important part of Jan and Dean's hit-making process. The Matadors, the vocal group that had provided most of the backing vocals on the duo's hits, had started asking for more money than Jan Berry was willing to pay, and Jan and Dean couldn't do the vocals themselves -- as Bones Howe put it "As a singer, Dean is a wonderful graphic artist" -- and so Sloan and Barri stepped in, doing session vocals without payment in the hope that Jan and Dean would record a few of their songs. For example, on the big hit "The Little Old Lady From Pasadena", Dean Torrence is not present at all on the record -- Jan Berry sings the lead vocal, with Sloan doubling him for much of it, Sloan sings "Dean"'s falsetto, with the engineer Bones Howe helping out, and the rest of the backing vocals are sung by Sloan, Barri, and Howe: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "The Little Old Lady From Pasadena"] For these recordings, Sloan and Barri were known as The Fantastic Baggys, a name which came from the Rolling Stones' manager Andrew Oldham and Mick Jagger, when the two were visiting California. Oldham had been commenting on baggys, the kind of shorts worn by surfers, and had asked Jagger what he thought of The Baggys as a group name. Jagger had replied "Fantastic!" and so the Fantastic Baggys had been born. As part of this, Sloan and Barri moved hard into surf and hot-rod music from the dance songs they had been writing previously. The Fantastic Baggys recorded their own album, Tell 'Em I'm Surfin', as a quickie album suggested by Adler: [Excerpt: The Fantastic Baggys, "Tell 'Em I'm Surfin'"] And under the name The Rally Packs they recorded a version of Jan and Dean's "Move Out Little Mustang" which featured Berry's girlfriend Jill Gibson doing a spoken section: [Excerpt: The Rally Packs, "Move Out Little Mustang"] They also wrote several album tracks for Jan and Dean, and wrote "Summer Means Fun" for Bruce and Terry -- Bruce Johnston, later of the Beach Boys, and Terry Melcher: [Excerpt: Bruce and Terry, "Summer Means Fun"] And they wrote the very surf-flavoured "Secret Agent Man" for fellow Dunhill artist Johnny Rivers: [Excerpt: Johnny Rivers, "Secret Agent Man"] But of course, when you're chasing trends, you're chasing trends, and soon the craze for twangy guitars and falsetto harmonies had ended, replaced by a craze for jangly twelve-string guitars and closer harmonies. According to Sloan, he was in at the very beginning of the folk-rock trend -- the way he told the story, he was involved in the mastering of the Byrds' version of "Mr. Tambourine Man". He later talked about Terry Melcher getting him to help out, saying "He had produced a record called 'Mr. Tambourine Man', and had sent it into the head office, and it had been rejected. He called me up and said 'I've got three more hours in the studio before I'm being kicked out of Columbia. Can you come over and help me with this new record?' I did. I went over there. It was under lock and key. There were two guards outside the door. Terry asked me something about 'Summer Means Fun'. "He said 'Do you remember the guitar that we worked on with that? How we put in that double reverb?' "And I said 'yes' "And he said 'What do you think if we did something like that with the Byrds?' "And I said 'That sounds good. Let's see what it sounds like.' So we patched into all the reverb centres in Columbia Music, and mastered the record in three hours." Whether Sloan really was there at the birth of folk rock, he and Barri jumped on the folk-rock craze just as they had the surf and hot-rod craze, and wrote a string of jangly hits including "You Baby" for the Turtles: [Excerpt: The Turtles, "You Baby"] and "I Found a Girl" for Jan and Dean: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "I Found a Girl"] That song was later included on Jan and Dean's Folk 'n' Roll album, which also included... a song I'm not even going to name, but long-time listeners will know the one I mean. It was also notable in that "I Found a Girl" was the first song on which Sloan was credited not as Phil Sloan, but as P.F. Sloan -- he didn't have a middle name beginning with F, but rather the F stood for his nickname "Flip". Sloan would later talk of Phil Sloan and P.F. Sloan as almost being two different people, with P.F. being a far more serious, intense, songwriter. Folk 'n' Roll also contained another Sloan song, this one credited solely to Sloan. And that song is the one for which he became best known. There are two very different stories about how "Eve of Destruction" came to be written. To tell Sloan's version, I'm going to read a few paragraphs from his autobiography: "By late 1964, I had already written ‘Eve Of Destruction,' ‘The Sins Of A Family,' ‘This Mornin',' ‘Ain't No Way I'm Gonna Change My Mind,' and ‘What's Exactly The Matter With Me?' They all arrived on one cataclysmic evening, and nearly at the same time, as I worked on the lyrics almost simultaneously. ‘Eve Of Destruction' came about from hearing a voice, perhaps an angel's. The voice instructed me to place five pieces of paper and spread them out on my bed. I obeyed the voice. The voice told me that the first song would be called ‘Eve Of Destruction,' so I wrote the title at the top of the page. For the next few hours, the voice came and went as I was writing the lyric, as if this spirit—or whatever it was—stood over me like a teacher: ‘No, no … not think of all the hate there is in Red Russia … Red China!' I didn't understand. I thought the Soviet Union was the mortal threat to America, but the voice went on to reveal to me the future of the world until 2024. I was told the Soviet Union would fall, and that Red China would continue to be communist far into the future, but that communism was not going to be allowed to take over this Divine Planet—therefore, think of all the hate there is in Red China. I argued and wrestled with the voice for hours, until I was exhausted but satisfied inside with my plea to God to either take me out of the world, as I could not live in such a hypocritical society, or to show me a way to make things better. When I was writing ‘Eve,' I was on my hands and knees, pleading for an answer." Lou Adler's story is that he gave Phil Sloan a copy of Bob Dylan's Bringing it All Back Home album and told him to write a bunch of songs that sounded like that, and Sloan came back a week later as instructed with ten Dylan knock-offs. Adler said "It was a natural feel for him. He's a great mimic." As one other data point, both Steve Barri and Bones Howe, the engineer who worked on most of the sessions we're looking at today, have often talked in interviews about "Eve of Destruction" as being a Sloan/Barri collaboration, as if to them it's common knowledge that it wasn't written alone, although Sloan's is the only name on the credits. The song was given to a new signing to Dunhill Records, Barry McGuire. McGuire was someone who had been part of the folk scene for years, He'd been playing folk clubs in LA while also acting in a TV show from 1961. When the TV show had finished, he'd formed a duo, Barry and Barry, with Barry Kane, and they performed much the same repertoire as all the other early-sixties folkies: [Excerpt: Barry and Barry, "If I Had a Hammer"] After recording their one album, both Barrys joined the New Christy Minstrels. We've talked about the Christys before, but they were -- and are to this day -- an ultra-commercial folk group, led by Randy Sparks, with a revolving membership of usually eight or nine singers which included several other people who've come up in this podcast, like Gene Clark and Jerry Yester. McGuire became one of the principal lead singers of the Christys, singing lead on their version of the novelty cowboy song "Three Wheels on My Wagon", which was later released as a single in the UK and became a perennial children's favourite (though it has a problematic attitude towards Native Americans): [Excerpt: The New Christy Minstrels, "Three Wheels on My Wagon"] And he also sang lead on their big hit "Green Green", which he co-wrote with Randy Sparks: [Excerpt: The New Christy Minstrels, "Green Green"] But by 1965 McGuire had left the New Christy Minstrels. As he said later "I'd sung 'Green Green' a thousand times and I didn't want to sing it again. This is January of 1965. I went back to LA to meet some producers, and I was broke. Nobody had the time of day for me. I was walking down street one time to see Dr. Strangelove and I walked by the music store, and I heard "Green Green" comin' out of the store, ya know, on Hollywood Boulevard. And I heard my voice, and I thought, 'I got four dollars in my pocket!' I couldn't believe it, my voice is comin' out on Hollywood Boulevard, and I'm broke. And right at that moment, a car pulls up, and the radio is playing 'Chim Chim Cherie" also by the Minstrels. So I got my voice comin' at me in stereo, standin' on the sidewalk there, and I'm broke, and I can't get anyone to sign me!" But McGuire had a lot of friends who he'd met on the folk scene, some of whom were now in the new folk-rock scene that was just starting to spring up. One of them was Roger McGuinn, who told him that his band, the Byrds, were just about to put out a new single, "Mr. Tambourine Man", and that they were about to start a residency at Ciro's on Sunset Strip. McGuinn invited McGuire to the opening night of that residency, where a lot of other people from the scene were there to see the new group. Bob Dylan was there, as was Phil Sloan, and the actor Jack Nicholson, who was still at the time a minor bit-part player in low-budget films made by people like American International Pictures (the cinematographer on many of Nicholson's early films was Floyd Crosby, David Crosby's father, which may be why he was there). Someone else who was there was Lou Adler, who according to McGuire recognised him instantly. According to Adler, he actually asked Terry Melcher who the long-haired dancer wearing furs was, because "he looked like the leader of a movement", and Melcher told him that he was the former lead singer of the New Christy Minstrels. Either way, Adler approached McGuire and asked if he was currently signed -- Dunhill Records was just starting up, and getting someone like McGuire, who had a proven ability to sing lead on hit records, would be a good start for the label. As McGuire didn't have a contract, he was signed to Dunhill, and he was given some of Sloan's new songs to pick from, and chose "What's Exactly the Matter With Me?" as his single: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "What's Exactly the Matter With Me?"] McGuire described what happened next: "It was like, a three-hour session. We did two songs, and then the third one wasn't turning out. We only had about a half hour left in the session, so I said 'Let's do this tune', and I pulled 'Eve of Destruction' out of my pocket, and it just had Phil's words scrawled on a piece of paper, all wrinkled up. Phil worked the chords out with the musicians, who were Hal Blaine on drums and Larry Knechtel on bass." There were actually more musicians than that at the session -- apparently both Knechtel and Joe Osborn were there, so I'm not entirely sure who's playing bass -- Knechtel was a keyboard player as well as a bass player, but I don't hear any keyboards on the track. And Tommy Tedesco was playing lead guitar, and Steve Barri added percussion, along with Sloan on rhythm guitar and harmonica. The chords were apparently scribbled down for the musicians on bits of greasy paper that had been used to wrap some takeaway chicken, and they got through the track in a single take. According to McGuire "I'm reading the words off this piece of wrinkled paper, and I'm singing 'My blood's so mad, feels like coagulatin'", that part that goes 'Ahhh you can't twist the truth', and the reason I'm going 'Ahhh' is because I lost my place on the page. People said 'Man, you really sounded frustrated when you were singing.' I was. I couldn't see the words!" [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "Eve of Destruction"] With a few overdubs -- the female backing singers in the chorus, and possibly the kettledrums, which I've seen differing claims about, with some saying that Hal Blaine played them during the basic track and others saying that Lou Adler suggested them as an overdub, the track was complete. McGuire wasn't happy with his vocal, and a session was scheduled for him to redo it, but then a record promoter working with Adler was DJing a birthday party for the head of programming at KFWB, the big top forty radio station in LA at the time, and he played a few acetates he'd picked up from Adler. Most went down OK with the crowd, but when he played "Eve of Destruction", the crowd went wild and insisted he play it three times in a row. The head of programming called Adler up and told him that "Eve of Destruction" was going to be put into rotation on the station from Monday, so he'd better get the record out. As McGuire was away for the weekend, Adler just released the track as it was, and what had been intended to be a B-side became Barry McGuire's first and only number one record: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "Eve of Destruction"] Sloan would later claim that that song was a major reason why the twenty-sixth amendment to the US Constitution was passed six years later, because the line "you're old enough to kill but not for votin'" shamed Congress into changing the constitution to allow eighteen-year-olds to vote. If so, that would make "Eve of Destruction" arguably the single most impactful rock record in history, though Sloan is the only person I've ever seen saying that As well as going to number one in McGuire's version, the song was also covered by the other artists who regularly performed Sloan and Barri songs, like the Turtles: [Excerpt: The Turtles, "Eve of Destruction"] And Jan and Dean, whose version on Folk & Roll used the same backing track as McGuire, but had a few lyrical changes to make it fit with Jan Berry's right-wing politics, most notably changing "Selma, Alabama" to "Watts, California", thus changing a reference to peaceful civil rights protestors being brutally attacked and murdered by white supremacist state troopers to a reference to what was seen, in the popular imaginary, as Black people rioting for no reason: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "Eve of Destruction"] According to Sloan, he worked on the Folk & Roll album as a favour to Berry, even though he thought Berry was being cynical and exploitative in making the record, but those changes caused a rift in their friendship. Sloan said in his autobiography "Where I was completely wrong was in helping him capitalize on something in which he didn't believe. Jan wanted the public to perceive him as a person who was deeply concerned and who embraced the values of the progressive politics of the day. But he wasn't that person. That's how I was being pulled. It was when he recorded my actual song ‘Eve Of Destruction' and changed a number of lines to reflect his own ideals that my principles demanded that I leave Folk City and never return." It's true that Sloan gave no more songs to Jan and Dean after that point -- but it's also true that the duo would record only one more album, the comedy concept album Jan and Dean Meet Batman, before Jan's accident. Incidentally, the reference to Selma, Alabama in the lyric might help people decide on which story about the writing of "Eve of Destruction" they think is more plausible. Remember that Lou Adler said that it was written after Adler gave Sloan a copy of Bringing it All Back Home and told him to write a bunch of knock-offs, while Sloan said it was written after a supernatural force gave him access to all the events that would happen in the world for the next sixty years. Sloan claimed the song was written in late 1964. Selma, Alabama, became national news in late February and early March 1965. Bringing it All Back Home was released in late March 1965. So either Adler was telling the truth, or Sloan really *was* given a supernatural insight into the events of the future. Now, as it turned out, while "Eve of Destruction" went to number one, that would be McGuire's only hit as a solo artist. His next couple of singles would reach the very low end of the Hot One Hundred, and that would be it -- he'd release several more albums, before appearing in the Broadway musical Hair, most famous for its nude scenes, and getting a small part in the cinematic masterpiece Werewolves on Wheels: [Excerpt: Werewolves on Wheels trailer] P.F. Sloan would later tell various stories about why McGuire never had another hit. Sometimes he would say that Dunhill Records had received death threats because of "Eve of Destruction" and so deliberately tried to bury McGuire's career, other times he would say that Lou Adler had told him that Billboard had said they were never going to put McGuire's records on the charts no matter how well they sold, because "Eve of Destruction" had just been too powerful and upset the advertisers. But of course at this time Dunhill were still trying for a follow-up to "Eve of Destruction", and they thought they might have one when Barry McGuire brought in a few friends of his to sing backing vocals on his second album. Now, we've covered some of the history of the Mamas and the Papas already, because they were intimately tied up with other groups like the Byrds and the Lovin' Spoonful, and with the folk scene that led to songs like "Hey Joe", so some of this will be more like a recap than a totally new story, but I'm going to recap those parts of the story anyway, so it's fresh in everyone's heads. John Phillips, Scott McKenzie, and Cass Elliot all grew up in Alexandria, Virginia, just a few miles south of Washington DC. Elliot was a few years younger than Phillips and McKenzie, and so as is the way with young men they never really noticed her, and as McKenzie later said "She lived like a quarter of a mile from me and I never met her until New York". While they didn't know who Elliot was, though, she was aware who they were, as Phillips and McKenzie sang together in a vocal group called The Smoothies. The Smoothies were a modern jazz harmony group, influenced by groups like the Modernaires, the Hi-Los, and the Four Freshmen. John Phillips later said "We were drawn to jazz, because we were sort of beatniks, really, rather than hippies, or whatever, flower children. So we used to sing modern harmonies, like Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross. Dave Lambert did a lot of our arrangements for us as a matter of fact." Now, I've not seen any evidence other than Phillips' claim that Dave Lambert ever arranged for the Smoothies, but that does tell you a lot about the kind of music that they were doing. Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross were a vocalese trio whose main star was Annie Ross, who had a career worthy of an episode in itself -- she sang with Paul Whiteman, appeared in a Little Rascals film when she was seven, had an affair with Lenny Bruce, dubbed Britt Ekland's voice in The Wicker Man, played the villain's sister in Superman III, and much more. Vocalese, you'll remember, was a style of jazz vocal where a singer would take a jazz instrumental, often an improvised one, and add lyrics which they would sing, like Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross' version of "Cloudburst": [Excerpt: Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross, "Cloudburst"] Whether Dave Lambert ever really did arrange for the Smoothies or not, it's very clear that the trio had a huge influence on John Phillips' ideas about vocal arrangement, as you can hear on Mamas and Papas records like "Once Was a Time I Thought": [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "Once Was a Time I Thought"] While the Smoothies thought of themselves as a jazz group, when they signed to Decca they started out making the standard teen pop of the era, with songs like "Softly": [Excerpt, The Smoothies, "Softly"] When the folk boom started, Phillips realised that this was music that he could do easily, because the level of musicianship among the pop-folk musicians was so much lower than in the jazz world. The Smoothies made some recordings in the style of the Kingston Trio, like "Ride Ride Ride": [Excerpt: The Smoothies, "Ride Ride Ride"] Then when the Smoothies split, Phillips and McKenzie formed a trio with a banjo player, Dick Weissman, who they met through Izzy Young's Folklore Centre in Greenwich Village after Phillips asked Young to name some musicians who could make a folk record with him. Weissman was often considered the best banjo player on the scene, and was a friend of Pete Seeger's, to whom Seeger sometimes turned for banjo tips. The trio, who called themselves the Journeymen, quickly established themselves on the folk scene. Weissman later said "we had this interesting balance. John had all of this charisma -- they didn't know about the writing thing yet -- John had the personality, Scott had the voice, and I could play. If you think about it, all of those bands like the Kingston Trio, the Brothers Four, nobody could really *sing* and nobody could really *play*, relatively speaking." This is the take that most people seemed to have about John Phillips, in any band he was ever in. Nobody thought he was a particularly good singer or instrumentalist -- he could sing on key and play adequate rhythm guitar, but nobody would actually pay money to listen to him do those things. Mark Volman of the Turtles, for example, said of him "John wasn't the kind of guy who was going to be able to go up on stage and sing his songs as a singer-songwriter. He had to put himself in the context of a group." But he was charismatic, he had presence, and he also had a great musical mind. He would surround himself with the best players and best singers he could, and then he would organise and arrange them in ways that made the most of their talents. He would work out the arrangements, in a manner that was far more professional than the quick head arrangements that other folk groups used, and he instigated a level of professionalism in his groups that was not at all common on the scene. Phillips' friend Jim Mason talked about the first time he saw the Journeymen -- "They were warming up backstage, and John had all of them doing vocal exercises; one thing in particular that's pretty famous called 'Seiber Syllables' -- it's a series of vocal exercises where you enunciate different vowel and consonant sounds. It had the effect of clearing your head, and it's something that really good operetta singers do." The group were soon signed by Frank Werber, the manager of the Kingston Trio, who signed them as an insurance policy. Dave Guard, the Kingston Trio's banjo player, was increasingly having trouble with the other members, and Werber knew it was only a matter of time before he left the group. Werber wanted the Journeymen as a sort of farm team -- he had the idea that when Guard left, Phillips would join the Kingston Trio in his place as the third singer. Weissman would become the Trio's accompanist on banjo, and Scott McKenzie, who everyone agreed had a remarkable voice, would be spun off as a solo artist. But until that happened, they might as well make records by themselves. The Journeymen signed to MGM records, but were dropped before they recorded anything. They instead signed to Capitol, for whom they recorded their first album: [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "500 Miles"] After recording that album, the Journeymen moved out to California, with Phillips' wife and children. But soon Phillips' marriage was to collapse, as he met and fell in love with Michelle Gilliam. Gilliam was nine years younger than him -- he was twenty-six and she was seventeen -- and she had the kind of appearance which meant that in every interview with an older heterosexual man who knew her, that man will spend half the interview talking about how attractive he found her. Phillips soon left his wife and children, but before he did, the group had a turntable hit with "River Come Down", the B-side to "500 Miles": [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "River Come Down"] Around the same time, Dave Guard *did* leave the Kingston Trio, but the plan to split the Journeymen never happened. Instead Phillips' friend John Stewart replaced Guard -- and this soon became a new source of income for Phillips. Both Phillips and Stewart were aspiring songwriters, and they collaborated together on several songs for the Trio, including "Chilly Winds": [Excerpt: The Kingston Trio, "Chilly Winds"] Phillips became particularly good at writing songs that sounded like they could be old traditional folk songs, sometimes taking odd lines from older songs to jump-start new ones, as in "Oh Miss Mary", which he and Stewart wrote after hearing someone sing the first line of a song she couldn't remember the rest of: [Excerpt: The Kingston Trio, "Oh Miss Mary"] Phillips and Stewart became so close that Phillips actually suggested to Stewart that he quit the Kingston Trio and replace Dick Weissman in the Journeymen. Stewart did quit the Trio -- but then the next day Phillips suggested that maybe it was a bad idea and he should stay where he was. Stewart went back to the Trio, claimed he had only pretended to quit because he wanted a pay-rise, and got his raise, so everyone ended up happy. The Journeymen moved back to New York with Michelle in place of Phillips' first wife (and Michelle's sister Russell also coming along, as she was dating Scott McKenzie) and on New Year's Eve 1962 John and Michelle married -- so from this point on I will refer to them by their first names, because they both had the surname Phillips. The group continued having success through 1963, including making appearances on "Hootenanny": [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "Stack O'Lee (live on Hootenanny)"] By the time of the Journeymen's third album, though, John and Scott McKenzie were on bad terms. Weissman said "They had been the closest of friends and now they were the worst of enemies. They talked through me like I was a medium. It got to the point where we'd be standing in the dressing room and John would say to me 'Tell Scott that his right sock doesn't match his left sock...' Things like that, when they were standing five feet away from each other." Eventually, the group split up. Weissman was always going to be able to find employment given his banjo ability, and he was about to get married and didn't need the hassle of dealing with the other two. McKenzie was planning on a solo career -- everyone was agreed that he had the vocal ability. But John was another matter. He needed to be in a group. And not only that, the Journeymen had bookings they needed to complete. He quickly pulled together a group he called the New Journeymen. The core of the lineup was himself, Michelle on vocals, and banjo player Marshall Brickman. Brickman had previously been a member of a folk group called the Tarriers, who had had a revolving lineup, and had played on most of their early-sixties recordings: [Excerpt: The Tarriers, "Quinto (My Little Pony)"] We've met the Tarriers before in the podcast -- they had been formed by Erik Darling, who later replaced Pete Seeger in the Weavers after Seeger's socialist principles wouldn't let him do advertising, and Alan Arkin, later to go on to be a film star, and had had hits with "Cindy, O Cindy", with lead vocals from Vince Martin, who would later go on to be a major performer in the Greenwich Village scene, and with "The Banana Boat Song". By the time Brickman had joined, though, Darling, Arkin, and Martin had all left the group to go on to bigger things, and while he played with them for several years, it was after their commercial peak. Brickman would, though, also go on to a surprising amount of success, but as a writer rather than a musician -- he had a successful collaboration with Woody Allen in the 1970s, co-writing four of Allen's most highly regarded films -- Sleeper, Annie Hall, Manhattan, and Manhattan Murder Mystery -- and with another collaborator he later co-wrote the books for the stage musicals Jersey Boys and The Addams Family. Both John and Michelle were decent singers, and both have their admirers as vocalists -- P.F. Sloan always said that Michelle was the best singer in the group they eventually formed, and that it was her voice that gave the group its sound -- but for the most part they were not considered as particularly astonishing lead vocalists. Certainly, neither had a voice that stood out the way that Scott McKenzie's had. They needed a strong lead singer, and they found one in Denny Doherty. Now, we covered Denny Doherty's early career in the episode on the Lovin' Spoonful, because he was intimately involved in the formation of that group, so I won't go into too much detail here, but I'll give a very abbreviated version of what I said there. Doherty was a Canadian performer who had been a member of the Halifax Three with Zal Yanovsky: [Excerpt: The Halifax Three, "When I First Came to This Land"] After the Halifax Three had split up, Doherty and Yanovsky had performed as a duo for a while, before joining up with Cass Elliot and her husband Jim Hendricks, who both had previously been in the Big Three with Tim Rose: [Excerpt: Cass Elliot and the Big 3, "The Banjo Song"] Elliot, Hendricks, Yanovsky, and Doherty had formed The Mugwumps, sometimes joined by John Sebastian, and had tried to go in more of a rock direction after seeing the Beatles on Ed Sullivan. They recorded one album together before splitting up: [Excerpt: The Mugwumps, "Searchin'"] Part of the reason they split up was that interpersonal relationships within the group were put under some strain -- Elliot and Hendricks split up, though they would remain friends and remain married for several years even though they were living apart, and Elliot had an unrequited crush on Doherty. But since they'd split up, and Yanovsky and Sebastian had gone off to form the Lovin' Spoonful, that meant that Doherty was free, and he was regarded as possibly the best male lead vocalist on the circuit, so the group snapped him up. The only problem was that the Journeymen still had gigs booked that needed to be played, one of them was in just three days, and Doherty didn't know the repertoire. This was a problem with an easy solution for people in their twenties though -- they took a huge amount of amphetamines, and stayed awake for three days straight rehearsing. They made the gig, and Doherty was now the lead singer of the New Journeymen: [Excerpt: The New Journeymen, "The Last Thing on My Mind"] But the New Journeymen didn't last in that form for very long, because even before joining the group, Denny Doherty had been going in a more folk-rock direction with the Mugwumps. At the time, John Phillips thought rock and roll was kids' music, and he was far more interested in folk and jazz, but he was also very interested in making money, and he soon decided it was an idea to start listening to the Beatles. There's some dispute as to who first played the Beatles for John in early 1965 -- some claim it was Doherty, others claim it was Cass Elliot, but everyone agrees it was after Denny Doherty had introduced Phillips to something else -- he brought round some LSD for John and Michelle, and Michelle's sister Rusty, to try. And then he told them he'd invited round a friend. Michelle Phillips later remembered, "I remember saying to the guys "I don't know about you guys, but this drug does nothing for me." At that point there was a knock on the door, and as I opened the door and saw Cass, the acid hit me *over the head*. I saw her standing there in a pleated skirt, a pink Angora sweater with great big eyelashes on and her hair in a flip. And all of a sudden I thought 'This is really *quite* a drug!' It was an image I will have securely fixed in my brain for the rest of my life. I said 'Hi, I'm Michelle. We just took some LSD-25, do you wanna join us?' And she said 'Sure...'" Rusty Gilliam's description matches this -- "It was mind-boggling. She had on a white pleated skirt, false eyelashes. These were the kind of eyelashes that when you put them on you were supposed to trim them to an appropriate length, which she didn't, and when she blinked she looked like a cow, or those dolls you get when you're little and the eyes open and close. And we're on acid. Oh my God! It was a sight! And everything she was wearing were things that you weren't supposed to be wearing if you were heavy -- white pleated skirt, mohair sweater. You know, until she became famous, she suffered so much, and was poked fun at." This gets to an important point about Elliot, and one which sadly affected everything about her life. Elliot was *very* fat -- I've seen her weight listed at about three hundred pounds, and she was only five foot five tall -- and she also didn't have the kind of face that gets thought of as conventionally attractive. Her appearance would be cruelly mocked by pretty much everyone for the rest of her life, in ways that it's genuinely hurtful to read about, and which I will avoid discussing in detail in order to avoid hurting fat listeners. But the two *other* things that defined Elliot in the minds of those who knew her were her voice -- every single person who knew her talks about what a wonderful singer she was -- and her personality. I've read a lot of things about Cass Elliot, and I have never read a single negative word about her as a person, but have read many people going into raptures about what a charming, loving, friendly, understanding person she was. Michelle later said of her "From the time I left Los Angeles, I hadn't had a friend, a buddy. I was married, and John and I did not hang out with women, we just hung out with men, and especially not with women my age. John was nine years older than I was. And here was a fun-loving, intelligent woman. She captivated me. I was as close to in love with Cass as I could be to any woman in my life at that point. She also represented something to me: freedom. Everything she did was because she wanted to do it. She was completely independent and I admired her and was in awe of her. And later on, Cass would be the one to tell me not to let John run my life. And John hated her for that." Either Elliot had brought round Meet The Beatles, the Beatles' first Capitol album, for everyone to listen to, or Denny Doherty already had it, but either way Elliot and Doherty were by this time already Beatles fans. Michelle, being younger than the rest and not part of the folk scene until she met John, was much more interested in rock and roll than any of them, but because she'd been married to John for a couple of years and been part of his musical world she hadn't really encountered the Beatles music, though she had a vague memory that she might have heard a track or two on the radio. John was hesitant -- he didn't want to listen to any rock and roll, but eventually he was persuaded, and the record was put on while he was on his first acid trip: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I Want to Hold Your Hand"] Within a month, John Phillips had written thirty songs that he thought of as inspired by the Beatles. The New Journeymen were going to go rock and roll. By this time Marshall Brickman was out of the band, and instead John, Michelle, and Denny recruited a new lead guitarist, Eric Hord. Denny started playing bass, with John on rhythm guitar, and a violinist friend of theirs, Peter Pilafian, knew a bit of drums and took on that role. The new lineup of the group used the Journeymen's credit card, which hadn't been stopped even though the Journeymen were no more, to go down to St. Thomas in the Caribbean, along with Michelle's sister, John's daughter Mackenzie (from whose name Scott McKenzie had taken his stage name, as he was born Philip Blondheim), a pet dog, and sundry band members' girlfriends. They stayed there for several months, living in tents on the beach, taking acid, and rehearsing. While they were there, Michelle and Denny started an affair which would have important ramifications for the group later. They got a gig playing at a club called Duffy's, whose address was on Creeque Alley, and soon after they started playing there Cass Elliot travelled down as well -- she was in love with Denny, and wanted to be around him. She wasn't in the group, but she got a job working at Duffy's as a waitress, and she would often sing harmony with the group while waiting at tables. Depending on who was telling the story, either she didn't want to be in the group because she didn't want her appearance to be compared to Michelle's, or John wouldn't *let* her be in the group because she was so fat. Later a story would be made up to cover for this, saying that she hadn't been in the group at first because she couldn't sing the highest notes that were needed, until she got hit on the head with a metal pipe and discovered that it had increased her range by three notes, but that seems to be a lie. One of the songs the New Journeymen were performing at this time was "Mr. Tambourine Man". They'd heard that their old friend Roger McGuinn had recorded it with his new band, but they hadn't yet heard his version, and they'd come up with their own arrangement: [Excerpt: The New Journeymen, "Mr. Tambourine Man"] Denny later said "We were doing three-part harmony on 'Mr Tambourine Man', but a lot slower... like a polka or something! And I tell John, 'No John, we gotta slow it down and give it a backbeat.' Finally we get the Byrds 45 down here, and we put it on and turn it up to ten, and John says 'Oh, like that?' Well, as you can tell, it had already been done. So John goes 'Oh, ah... that's it...' a light went on. So we started doing Beatles stuff. We dropped 'Mr Tambourine Man' after hearing the Byrds version, because there was no point." Eventually they had to leave the island -- they had completely run out of money, and were down to fifty dollars. The credit card had been cut up, and the governor of the island had a personal vendetta against them because they gave his son acid, and they were likely to get arrested if they didn't leave the island. Elliot and her then-partner had round-trip tickets, so they just left, but the rest of them were in trouble. By this point they were unwashed, they were homeless, and they'd spent their last money on stage costumes. They got to the airport, and John Phillips tried to write a cheque for eight air fares back to the mainland, which the person at the check-in desk just laughed at. So they took their last fifty dollars and went to a casino. There Michelle played craps, and she rolled seventeen straight passes, something which should be statistically impossible. She turned their fifty dollars into six thousand dollars, which they scooped up, took to the airport, and paid for their flights out in cash. The New Journeymen arrived back in New York, but quickly decided that they were going to try their luck in California. They rented a car, using Scott McKenzie's credit card, and drove out to LA. There they met up with Hoyt Axton, who you may remember as the son of Mae Axton, the writer of "Heartbreak Hotel", and as the performer who had inspired Michael Nesmith to go into folk music: [Excerpt: Hoyt Axton, "Greenback Dollar"] Axton knew the group, and fed them and put them up for a night, but they needed somewhere else to stay. They went to stay with one of Michelle's friends, but after one night their rented car was stolen, with all their possessions in it. They needed somewhere else to stay, so they went to ask Jim Hendricks if they could crash at his place -- and they were surprised to find that Cass Elliot was there already. Hendricks had another partner -- though he and Elliot wouldn't have their marriage annulled until 1968 and were still technically married -- but he'd happily invited her to stay with them. And now all her friends had turned up, he invited them to stay as well, taking apart the beds in his one-bedroom apartment so he could put down a load of mattresses in the space for everyone to sleep on. The next part becomes difficult, because pretty much everyone in the LA music scene of the sixties was a liar who liked to embellish their own roles in things, so it's quite difficult to unpick what actually happened. What seems to have happened though is that first this new rock-oriented version of the New Journeymen went to see Frank Werber, on the recommendation of John Stewart. Werber was the manager of the Kingston Trio, and had also managed the Journeymen. He, however, was not interested -- not because he didn't think they had talent, but because he had experience of working with John Phillips previously. When Phillips came into his office Werber picked up a tape that he'd been given of the group, and said "I have not had a chance to listen to this tape. I believe that you are a most talented individual, and that's why we took you on in the first place. But I also believe that you're also a drag to work with. A pain in the ass. So I'll tell you what, before whatever you have on here sways me, I'm gonna give it back to you and say that we're not interested." Meanwhile -- and this part of the story comes from Kim Fowley, who was never one to let the truth get in the way of him taking claim for everything, but parts of it at least are corroborated by other people -- Cass Elliot had called Fowley, and told him that her friends' new group sounded pretty good and he should sign them. Fowley was at that time working as a talent scout for a label, but according to him the label wouldn't give the group the money they wanted. So instead, Fowley got in touch with Nik Venet, who had just produced the Leaves' hit version of "Hey Joe" on Mira Records: [Excerpt: The Leaves, "Hey Joe"] Fowley suggested to Venet that Venet should sign the group to Mira Records, and Fowley would sign them to a publishing contract, and they could both get rich. The trio went to audition for Venet, and Elliot drove them over -- and Venet thought the group had a great look as a quartet. He wanted to sign them to a record contract, but only if Elliot was in the group as well. They agreed, he gave them a one hundred and fifty dollar advance, and told them to come back the next day to see his boss at Mira. But Barry McGuire was also hanging round with Elliot and Hendricks, and decided that he wanted to have Lou Adler hear the four of them. He thought they might be useful both as backing vocalists on his second album and as a source of new songs. He got them to go and see Lou Adler, and according to McGuire Phillips didn't want Elliot to go with them, but as Elliot was the one who was friends with McGuire, Phillips worried that they'd lose the chance with Adler if she didn't. Adler was amazed, and decided to sign the group right then and there -- both Bones Howe and P.F. Sloan claimed to have been there when the group auditioned for him and have said "if you won't sign them, I will", though exactly what Sloan would have signed them to I'm not sure. Adler paid them three thousand dollars in cash and told them not to bother with Nik Venet, so they just didn't turn up for the Mira Records audition the next day. Instead, they went into the studio with McGuire and cut backing vocals on about half of his new album: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire with the Mamas and the Papas, "Hide Your Love Away"] While the group were excellent vocalists, there were two main reasons that Adler wanted to sign them. The first was that he found Michelle Phillips extremely attractive, and the second is a song that John and Michelle had written which he thought might be very suitable for McGuire's album. Most people who knew John Phillips think of "California Dreamin'" as a solo composition, and he would later claim that he gave Michelle fifty percent just for transcribing his lyric, saying he got inspired in the middle of the night, woke her up, and got her to write the song down as he came up with it. But Michelle, who is a credited co-writer on the song, has been very insistent that she wrote the lyrics to the second verse, and that it's about her own real experiences, saying that she would often go into churches and light candles even though she was "at best an agnostic, and possibly an atheist" in her words, and this would annoy John, who had also been raised Catholic, but who had become aggressively opposed to expressions of religion, rather than still having nostalgia for the aesthetics of the church as Michelle did. They were out walking on a particularly cold winter's day in 1963, and Michelle wanted to go into St Patrick's Cathedral and John very much did not want to. A couple of nights later, John woke her up, having written the first verse of the song, starting "All the leaves are brown and the sky is grey/I went for a walk on a winter's day", and insisting she collaborate with him. She liked the song, and came up with the lines "Stopped into a church, I passed along the way/I got down on my knees and I pretend to pray/The preacher likes the cold, he knows I'm going to stay", which John would later apparently dislike, but which stayed in the song. Most sources I've seen for the recording of "California Dreamin'" say that the lineup of musicians was the standard set of players who had played on McGuire's other records, with the addition of John Phillips on twelve-string guitar -- P.F. Sloan on guitar and harmonica, Joe Osborn on bass, Larry Knechtel on keyboards, and Hal Blaine on drums, but for some reason Stephen McParland's book on Sloan has Bones Howe down as playing drums on the track while engineering -- a detail so weird, and from such a respectable researcher, that I have to wonder if it might be true. In his autobiography, Sloan claims to have rewritten the chord sequence to "California Dreamin'". He says "Barry Mann had unintentionally showed me a suspended chord back at Screen Gems. I was so impressed by this beautiful, simple chord that I called Brian Wilson and played it for him over the phone. The next thing I knew, Brian had written ‘Don't Worry Baby,' which had within it a number suspended chords. And then the chord heard 'round the world, two months later, was the opening suspended chord of ‘A Hard Day's Night.' I used these chords throughout ‘California Dreamin',' and more specifically as a bridge to get back and forth from the verse to the chorus." Now, nobody else corroborates this story, and both Brian Wilson and John Phillips had the kind of background in modern harmony that means they would have been very aware of suspended chords before either ever encountered Sloan, but I thought I should mention it. Rather more plausible is Sloan's other claim, that he came up with the intro to the song. According to Sloan, he was inspired by "Walk Don't Run" by the Ventures: [Excerpt: The Ventures, "Walk Don't Run"] And you can easily see how this: [plays "Walk Don't Run"] Can lead to this: [plays "California Dreamin'"] And I'm fairly certain that if that was the inspiration, it was Sloan who was the one who thought it up. John Phillips had been paying no attention to the world of surf music when "Walk Don't Run" had been a hit -- that had been at the point when he was very firmly in the folk world, while Sloan of course had been recording "Tell 'Em I'm Surfin'", and it had been his job to know surf music intimately. So Sloan's intro became the start of what was intended to be Barry McGuire's next single: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "California Dreamin'"] Sloan also provided the harmonica solo on the track: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "California Dreamin'"] The Mamas and the Papas -- the new name that was now given to the former New Journeymen, now they were a quartet -- were also signed to Dunhill as an act on their own, and recorded their own first single, "Go Where You Wanna Go", a song apparently written by John about Michelle, in late 1963, after she had briefly left him to have an affair with Russ Titelman, the record producer and songwriter, before coming back to him: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "Go Where You Wanna Go"] But while that was put out, they quickly decided to scrap it and go with another song. The "Go Where You Wanna Go" single was pulled after only selling a handful of copies, though its commercial potential was later proved when in 1967 a new vocal group, the 5th Dimension, released a soundalike version as their second single. The track was produced by Lou Adler's client Johnny Rivers, and used the exact same musicians as the Mamas and the Papas version, with the exception of Phillips. It became their first hit, reaching number sixteen on the charts: [Excerpt: The 5th Dimension, "Go Where You Wanna Go"] The reason the Mamas and the Papas version of "Go Where You Wanna Go" was pulled was because everyone became convinced that their first single should instead be their own version of "California Dreamin'". This is the exact same track as McGuire's track, with just two changes. The first is that McGuire's lead vocal was replaced with Denny Doherty: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "California Dreamin'"] Though if you listen to the stereo mix of the song and isolate the left channel, you can hear McGuire singing the lead on the first line, and occasional leakage from him elsewhere on the backing vocal track: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "California Dreamin'"] The other change made was to replace Sloan's harmonica solo with an alto flute solo by Bud Shank, a jazz musician who we heard about in the episode on "Light My Fire", when he collaborated with Ravi Shankar on "Improvisations on the Theme From Pather Panchali": [Excerpt: Ravi Shankar, "Improvisation on the Theme From Pather Panchali"] Shank was working on another session in Western Studios, where they were recording the Mamas and Papas track, and Bones Howe approached him while he was packing his instrument and asked if he'd be interested in doing another session. Shank agreed, though the track caused problems for him. According to Shank "What had happened was that whe

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Place to Be Nation POP
Video Jukebox Song Of The Day #55 - ”Wild Thing” By Sam Kinison

Place to Be Nation POP

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 8:26


Welcome to PTBN Pop's Video Jukebox Song of The Day! Every weekday will be featuring a live watch of a great and memorable music video. On today's episode, Andy Atherton is watching “Wild Thing” by Sam Kinison from 1988.   The YouTube link for the video is below so you can watch along!   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3wAm2HAx7i0

X is for Podcast: An Uncanny X-Men Experience
XI4P AU: Spectacular Spider-Girl (v1) #9-11,Spectacular Spider-Girl (v2) #1-4, & Spider-Girl: The End

X is for Podcast: An Uncanny X-Men Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 112:16


This project began 222 issues ago. Nico and TK wanted to take a look at the MC2 to understand how such a promising line lost steam quickly in the larger perspective of comics but would go on in some form to be published for over 20 years. The journey took them from Spider-Girl and the initial line of J2 & A-Next to Fantastic Five and Wild Thing before coming to a sudden stop with Darkdevil and The Buzz. Spider-Girl lasted years by herself before the Last Standing double-header revitalized the line into an Amazing place with the return of Avengers Next & Fantastic Five, plus an American Dream mini. Now, the Spectacular era comes to an end – twice – before it is truly THE END for Spider-Girl. Kick things off with Spectacular Spider-Girl volume one's abrupt conclusions (0:00:00) before turning things over to the short-lived second era of Spectacular with the mini-series adaptation of what was clearly intended to be the final run of digital comics (0:40:30). Lastly, join the team as they almost say goodbye to Spider-Girl with Spider-Girl: The End, a tragic finale for Mayhem but a possibly promising new beginning for May Day (1:18:30) as the team begins to plan MC2.5, a look at all the relevant and connected stories from the 616 and beyond that bring it all back to 982. Strap in for one last trip to Earth 982 on an all new AU:MC2 on XI4P – we hope you survive the experience!

She Moves Mountains
Wild Thing Wannabe

She Moves Mountains

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 11:37


Ever think you're a Wild Thing trapped in a Good Girl's body? Kamala shares some stories from her childhood being a good girl and the identity she adopted. When Wild Thing came out, it awakened her own wild heart. These days, there may be a Wild Thing in us that needs to come out and shake us up and out of the doldrums we've been in. If you need permission to embrace your wild thing - permission granted!

Today In History
Today In History - The Troggs take their signature hit, “Wild Thing,” to #1

Today In History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022


https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/the-troggs-take-their-signature-hit-wild-thing-to-1Support the show on Patreon

Famous & Gravy
Wild Thing

Famous & Gravy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 58:51


This person died in 2012, age 83.   As he grew up – working class, Jewish, gay — he felt shunted to the margins. His book's characters were described as headstrong and sometimes obnoxious. In the second half of his career, he was renowned as a designer of theatrical sets. In 1963 he published the children's picture book sensation “Where the Wild Things Are.” Today's dead celebrity is Maurice Sendak.  Links: Transcript of this episode Maurice Sendak Obituary in the New York Times Famous & Gravy official website Follow the show on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn HPB.com Maurice Sendak books at Half Price Books Stephen Colbert interviews Maurice Sendak Maurice Sendak on Fresh Air Film trailer for Spike Jonze's adaptation of Where the Wild Things Are

Wild Thing
S3 Bonus Preview - Mutants

Wild Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 4:43


*Become a premium subscriber to Wild Thing! Premium subscribers get each new episode early, and exclusive access to all bonus episodes (like this one), not to mention the warm fuzzy feeling that comes from supporting the show. Go to https://wildthing.supportingcast.fm/ to find out more! A faulty reactor overheats, melting through its containment unit and poisoning a nearby town with radioactive gas. A spacecraft pushes further into deep space, exploring new galaxies, powered by a small nuclear reactor. An ordinary scientist is struck by cosmic rays—and finds he has new powers. Fiction? Or fact? Or a little of both? Stories of nuclear peril and promise permeate American media, and especially comic books. A preview of a special bonus episode, in which we explore atomic comics and why nuclear ideas captured artists' imaginations. *Season 3 of Wild Thing is produced by Laura Krantz and Scott Carney. Editing by Alicia Lincoln. Music and mixing by Louis Weeks. *Find us on social media - @wildthingpod - and on our website https://wildthingpodcast.com/

Wild Thing
S3 E9: An Atomic Future

Wild Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 34:08 Very Popular


What were the long-term effects of the SL-1 explosion? Nuclear power is a shrinking part of America's energy picture; accidents and fear have tarnished it, and the old reactor fleet is reaching its end. Yet nuclear energy could provide a bulwark against the looming threat of climate change. Is it something we can make work for us, in spite of ourselves? Are the costs worth it in the long run? Sixty years on, what do we know—and are we better prepared? *Become a premium subscriber to Wild Thing! Premium subscribers get each new episode early, and exclusive access to all bonus episodes, not to mention the warm fuzzy feeling that comes from supporting the show. Go to https://wildthing.supportingcast.fm/ to find out more! *Season 3 of Wild Thing is produced by Laura Krantz and Scott Carney. Editing by Alicia Lincoln. Music and mixing by Louis Weeks. *Find us on social media - @wildthingpod - and on our website https://wildthingpodcast.com/

make good: a knitting podcast
78: Yarn Twist

make good: a knitting podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 26:24 Very Popular


This week we're revisiting something that came up during our episode about ply week before last and talking about directional twist in yarn. What's on our needles this week: Oakmoss (https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/oakmoss) by Alicia Plummer Easy V (https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/easy-v-2) by Caitlin Hunter Podcasts we like to listen to! Jessica: * Love to Sew (https://lovetosewpodcast.com) * Sounds Like a Cult (https://www.soundslikeacult.com/about) * Spooked (https://spookedpodcast.org) Karen: * I Don't Even Own a Television (https://www.idontevenownatelevision.com) * Beach Too Sandy, Water Too Wet (https://www.beachtoosandy.com) * The Opportunist (https://kastmedia.com/podcasts/the-opportunist/) * Wild Thing (https://www.foxtopus.ink/wildthing) Summer Knitalong - CABLES! Anything you want... but make it with at least one cable! We hope you'll join us! #makegoodcables (no year, please!) Send us your letters! dearscratch@scratchsupplyco.com

I Like Beer The Podcast
Wild Thing - Naked Mole Rats. Need we say more.

I Like Beer The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 35:39


Fire Fighter Joe brings the team back new beers from his travels.  Then the Doctor takes the team on another Wild Thing adventure, this time with Naked Mole Rats.  Let the mental references begin.

Wild Thing
S3 E8: Risky Business

Wild Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 29:00 Very Popular


Incidents like Chernobyl and Fukushima are often what comes to mind when we think about nuclear energy. Thankfully, events like these actually very rare. So does that mean the risks we associate with atomic power are as bad as we think? How good are we at actually assessing those risks? And can we make things even less risky by removing humans from the equation? That's how some next generation projects hope to make nuclear energy safer. *Become a premium subscriber to Wild Thing! Premium subscribers get each new episode early, and exclusive access to all bonus episodes, not to mention the warm fuzzy feeling that comes from supporting the show. Go to https://wildthing.supportingcast.fm/ to find out more! *Season 3 of Wild Thing is produced by Laura Krantz and Scott Carney. Editing by Alicia Lincoln. Music and mixing by Louis Weeks. *Find us on social media - @wildthingpod - and on our website https://wildthingpodcast.com/

Podcast Playlist from CBC Radio
The hottest new podcasts to keep you enthralled this summer

Podcast Playlist from CBC Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 54:03


In Idaho, one January night in 1961, a small nuclear reactor known simply as the SL-1 exploded. It was part of an experiment run by the U.S. Army at a research facility near Idaho Falls. The blast was deadly, killing all three of the operators on site, making it the world's first fatal nuclear reactor accident. To this day, it remains the deadliest nuclear accident in U.S. history.  If you've never heard about this meltdown, you're not alone. Laura Krantz, the host of the podcast Wild Thing, grew up in Idaho Falls but didn't find out about the nuclear meltdown until she was an adult. So, when she learned her hometown may soon be getting its power from a new type of nuclear reactor she knew she'd found her focus for this season of Wild Thing. In this week's episode, she joins host Leah-Simone Bowen to share more about her experience with this latest production that hits close to home.  Plus, we've got more great podcast picks just in time for road trips, beach days, or whatever else you're getting up to this summer. From a closer look at legendary Cree singer, songwriter and activist Buffy Sainte-Marie, to a sneak peek of the surf rock musical adaptation of early 20th century Czech author and satirist Karel Čapek's final book about newts … we've got some fantastic new listens lined up. Featuring: Wild Thing, Not Lost, Buffy, Newts!, Class Action For links and more info on all the podcasts on today's show, head to http://cbc.ca/podcastplaylist.

X is for Podcast: An Uncanny X-Men Experience
XI4P AU: Spider-Girl Volume 14, OHOTMU: AU - MC2, Last Hero Standing!

X is for Podcast: An Uncanny X-Men Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 143:32


Spider-Girl gets ready to enter new territory – A LINE-WIDE CROSSOVER! As May Day and her title continue to close out older stories (the fight with Davida) and advance new ones (Black Tarantula), long forgotten faces and faves return. The Fantastic Four, Five, & Kids all show up to bring slam the heat and keep it loose (0:00:00). Then, the guys dive in on the MC2's Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe entry in the Alternate Universes edition (1:14:00) which was released right around…(1:26:15) LAST HERO STANDING! After hyping the miniseries event since the first episode of MC2 coverage, we finally arrive at a truly incredible moment for the fledging can-do-it universe. The event gives rise to heroes who have long deserved the spotlight (Wild Thing) and a fond farewell (AS WELL AS A WACKY AF ONE) to heroes we know and love from the MC1 proper. All this and more from the new format of XI4P – we hope you survive the experience!

Nerd Subculture
Once more with feeling-4x18 Where the wild thing are (Buffy the Vampire Slayer)

Nerd Subculture

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 38:57


The only way Edwina could convince her husband to watch Buffy the Vampire Slayer was to do a podcast about it. This week, we discuss the worst episode of season 4, Where The Wild Things Are.

Wild Thing
S3 E7: Half-Life

Wild Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 27:37 Very Popular


The aftermath of SL-1 highlighted a problem that we still haven't solved, despite decades of searching for a solution: what to do with the waste. Our plans to store nuclear waste inside Yucca Mountain in Nevada fell through. So now what? Can we safely contain these materials? Should the waste be in one location, or many? How do we warn future generations about the dangers these materials pose? *Become a premium subscriber to Wild Thing! Premium subscribers get each new episode early, and exclusive access to all bonus episodes, not to mention the warm fuzzy feeling that comes from supporting the show. Go to https://wildthing.supportingcast.fm/ to find out more! *Season 3 of Wild Thing is produced by Laura Krantz and Scott Carney. Editing by Alicia Lincoln. Music and mixing by Louis Weeks. *Find us on social media - @wildthingpod - and on our website https://wildthingpodcast.com/

Things I've Learned While Learning Other Things
Wild Thing! Purple Haze & Life of Jimi Hendrix

Things I've Learned While Learning Other Things

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 37:50


Wild life & timesReal life Guitar HeroDrugs sex &Rock & Roll27 Club founding memberShooting Star

Wild Thing
S3 E6: You Look Radiant

Wild Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 33:03


As firefighters and medical personnel staged operations at SL-1, a plume of radioactive gas silently made its way over the Idaho desert, creeping towards the nearby towns. How much of a risk did the explosion at SL-1 actually pose? And what does radiation actually do to the human body? We are constantly bathing in what's called background radiation—so where is the line? How much is safe and how much is too much? *Become a premium subscriber to Wild Thing! Premium subscribers get each new episode early, and exclusive access to all bonus episodes, not to mention the warm fuzzy feeling that comes from supporting the show. Go to https://wildthing.supportingcast.fm/ to find out more! *Season 3 of Wild Thing is produced by Laura Krantz and Scott Carney. Editing by Alicia Lincoln. Music and mixing by Louis Weeks. *Find us on social media - @wildthingpod - and on our website https://wildthingpodcast.com/

My Time Capsule
Ep. 199 - Andrew Lynford

My Time Capsule

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 51:29


Andrew Lynford is an actor, presenter, writer, director and casting director. As an actor he's best known for playing Simon Raymond in EastEnders, the brother of Martine McCutcheon's character Tiffany. His character made headlines in the British press, following a gay kiss with Tiffany's boyfriend, Tony. After leaving EastEnders, Andrew presented various shows for television, including Wild Thing, Taste Today, and the comedy quiz Arty Facts, which he also devised. He was a writer on the sketch show Tittybangbang and written gags for Dick and Dom for the Sky One quiz Are You Smarter Than a Ten-Year-Old? Lynford was a casting director at Center Theatre Group in Los Angeles and head of casting at leading UK theatre company Bill Kenwright Ltd. He continues to be a hugely successful casting director in LA. Andrew Lynford is guest 199 on My Time Capsule and he chats to Michael Fenton Stevens about the five things he'd like to put in a time capsule; four he'd like to preserve and one he'd like to bury and never have to think about again .Follow Andrew Lynford on Twitter: @LynfordTweets .Follow My Time Capsule on Twitter, Instagram & Facebook: @MyTCpod .Follow Michael Fenton Stevens on Twitter: @fentonstevens and Instagram @mikefentonstevens .Produced and edited by John Fenton-Stevens for Cast Off Productions .Music by Pass The Peas Music .Artwork by matthewboxall.com .This podcast is proud to be associated with the charity Viva! Providing theatrical opportunities for hundreds of young people. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Animal House Radio
AHR-6-6-2017 (RON WHITE)

Animal House Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 39:28


TODAY ON ANIMAL HOUSE RADIO WE ARE JOINED BY LEGENDARY FUNNYMAN RON WHITE ( BLUE COLLAR COMEDY TOUR)..LISTEN IN AS RON STOPS BY FOR A VISIT AND TALK ABOUT ALL THINGS COMEDY AND SO MUCH MORE...CHECK OUT RON WHITE'S WEBSITEhttps://tatersalad.com/FOLLOW RON WHITE ON TWITTER@Ron_WhiteANIMAL HOUSE RADIO INTRO PROVIDED BY BETTY BLOWTORCHhttps://www.facebook.com/bettyblowtorchofficialANIMAL HOUSE RADIO ON FACEBOOKhttps://www.facebook.com/theanimalhouseradioshowFOLLOW ANIMAL HOUSE RADIO ON TWITTER@theradioanimalsJOIN OUR INSTAGRAM FAMILY@animalhouseradioANIMAL HOUE RADIO CREWCARLO "WILD THING" BELLARIOJUSELLA BELLAPAUL VENIERTIM ELISupport the show

Rock N Roll Pantheon
*THIS DAY ROCKS* Wild Thing Reg: *THIS DAY ROCKS* Wild Thing Reg

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 4:25


Sadly today's show focusses on people no longer with who were all born on this day. And to tell a wonderful story about one of these you'll hear from a man who had a worldwide number 1 hit in the 60s!

MonsterTalk
Going Nuclear - Introducing Wild Thing S3

MonsterTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 33:36


A conversation with Laura Krantz about season 3 of her show Wild Thing. It's not monsters, but it's science, history, and the topic has a ton of overlap with Blake's personal life history. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Wild Thing
S3 E5: Trust Issues

Wild Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 25:42 Very Popular


The only three people who really knew what had transpired at SL-1 were dead, and it would take months to determine what likely happened—plenty of time for rumors and gossip to take hold. Was there a love triangle? A fight gone wrong? A murder suicide? A government cover-up? Or was all of this rumor and innuendo simply a distraction from the real problems? And, ultimately, what information could people trust? *Become a premium subscriber to Wild Thing! Premium subscribers get each new episode early, and exclusive access to all bonus episodes, not to mention the warm fuzzy feeling that comes from supporting the show. Go to https://wildthing.supportingcast.fm/ to find out more! *Season 3 of Wild Thing is produced by Laura Krantz and Scott Carney. Editing by Alicia Lincoln. Music and mixing by Louis Weeks. *Find us on social media - @wildthingpod - and on our website https://wildthingpodcast.com/

Press Play with Madeleine Brand
‘Squid Game' star Lee Jung-jae on season 2, stardom and disparity

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 50:21


Korean actor Lee Jung-jae reached global fame as Seong Gi-hun, or Player 456, in Netflix's “Squid Game.” He says he's grateful for so many fans and is eager to shoot season two.  The “millennial subsidy economy” is over, and many tech companies are changing their business models that have become unprofitable, says Atlantic writer Derek Thompson. The value of Bitcoin has fallen more than 65% from all-time high last year, while crypto companies Celsius and Binance have frozen its users' accounts in recent days. Lawmakers in Washington D.C. are eyeing a plan that would relieve thousands for student loan borrows. What would that mean for the U.S. economy? The Biden administration is embracing nuclear power as part of its climate change strategy. The latest season of “Wild Thing” explores whether this is the best way to go.

Vintage Rock Pod - Classic Rock Interviews
*THIS DAY ROCKS* Wild Thing Reg

Vintage Rock Pod - Classic Rock Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 4:25


Sadly today's show focusses on people no longer with who were all born on this day. And to tell a wonderful story about one of these you'll hear from a man who had a worldwide number 1 hit in the 60s!

Wild Thing
S3 E4: Chain Reaction

Wild Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 22:03 Very Popular


Two of the men working the reactor that night had personal problems. They hated each other. They fought with their bosses. And those problems could easily distract a man from his work—but what does that mean when you're working with nuclear materials? At a reactor that, although managed by the military, seemed to be falling apart due to infrastructure issues, mechanical failures, and lackluster maintenance? *Become a premium subscriber to Wild Thing! Premium subscribers get each new episode early, and exclusive access to all bonus episodes, not to mention the warm fuzzy feeling that comes from supporting the show. Go to https://wildthing.supportingcast.fm/ to find out more! *Season 2 of Wild Thing is produced by Laura Krantz and Scott Carney. Editing by Alicia Lincoln. Music and mixing by Louis Weeks. *Find us on social media - @wildthingpod - and on our website https://wildthingpodcast.com/

Tootie’s Tales
Episode 16: Where the Wild Things Are in Armenian

Tootie’s Tales

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 8:06


The story focuses on a young boy named Max who, after dressing in his wolf costume, wreaks such havoc through his household that he is sent to bed without his supper (after his mother calls him, "WILD THING!" to which he responds, "I'LL EAT YOU UP!"). The whole story is read in Armenian by our wonderful ToTalk Armenian teachers.Did you know ToTalk Armenian offers Eastern and Western Armenian class for children and adults?Click on the link below www.totalkarmenian.com Did you know you could get the accompanying literary labels from our online store?Literary labels are already translated & transliterated into Armenian. You can simply peel & stick them on your book. Click on the link below https://shop.totalkarmenian.com/collections/literary-labels Literary labels are offered in Eastern & Western Armenian. You can support us on Patreon.

Colorado Matters
June 1, 2022: New state law helps with fertility treatments; The debate over nuclear energy

Colorado Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 51:07


Fertility treatments like IVF can cost tens of thousands of dollars. A new state law may help couples with some of that hardship, but there will still be challenges. Then, what Colorado's doing to improve behavioral health care. Also, the podcast, Wild Thing, examines nuclear energy in the age of climate change. And, remembering Dusty Saunders.

Wild Thing
S3 E3: A New(clear) Hope

Wild Thing

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 26:05 Very Popular


The horrifying devastation of Hiroshima and Nagasaki proved the destructive capabilities of nuclear power. But, in the aftermath of World War II, we started to experiment with how we could use atomic energy for good. It was the dawn of a new era in science, and, in that spirit, thousands of men arrived in Idaho, including the men whose deaths would later signify the difficulty of achieving this atomic America. *Become a premium subscriber to Wild Thing! Premium subscribers get each new episode early, and exclusive access to all bonus episodes, not to mention the warm fuzzy feeling that comes from supporting the show. Go to https://wildthing.supportingcast.fm/ to find out more! *Season 2 of Wild Thing is produced by Laura Krantz and Scott Carney. Editing by Alicia Lincoln. Music and mixing by Louis Weeks. *Find us on social media - @wildthingpod - and on our website https://wildthingpodcast.com/

Wild Thing
S3 E2: Out Of Little Things

Wild Thing

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 29:01 Very Popular


How did we figure out that such a tiny particle—an atom—held all that power? For that matter, what is an atom? A primer on the basics of atomic energy—including its destructive capabilities—to help us better understand the events that unfolded roughly 20 years later at SL-1. We'll get a (basic!) lesson in nuclear physics from scientists, and explore some of the history that brought atomic power to the Idaho desert. *Become a premium subscriber to Wild Thing! Premium subscribers get each new episode early, and exclusive access to all bonus episodes, not to mention the warm fuzzy feeling that comes from supporting the show. Go to https://wildthing.supportingcast.fm/ to find out more! *Season 2 of Wild Thing is produced by Laura Krantz and Scott Carney. Editing by Alicia Lincoln. Music and mixing by Louis Weeks. *Find us on social media - @wildthingpod - and on our website https://wildthingpodcast.com/

Idaho Matters
Listen to the first episode of Wild Thing, Season 3: Going Nuclear

Idaho Matters

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 25:46


Wild Thing podcast host and creator Laura Krantz grew up in Idaho Falls, so maybe it's not shocking that the third season of her podcast starts with a little-known meltdown of an experimental reactor in Idaho Falls in 1961. We've got the entire first episode for you to listen to, right here.

Idaho Matters
Idaho Falls' nuclear history

Idaho Matters

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 32:26


Idaho Matters sits down with the creator of the Wild Thing podcast to discuss nuclear power and the 1961 meltdown of an experimental reactor in Idaho Falls.

CYBER
America's Complicated Relationship With Nuclear Power

CYBER

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 33:24 Very Popular


The atom. For a few brief years in the middle of the 20th century, America and the world was cowed by the awesome possibility and terrifying reality of nuclear energy. Nuclear power had the potential to revolutionize the world but nuclear bombs could destroy it. But still … for a brief moment it seemed like nuclear energy would save the world. Then came Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, and The China Syndrome. America fell out of love with nuclear energy.That might be changing. Climate change and scientific advances might just be the shot in the arm the flagging nuclear energy industry needs. But did the dangers actually go away?That's the subject of the excellent podcast Wild Thing. Its third season is all about the shifting landscape of nuclear energy. It's comprehensive, excellent, and it's produced and hosted by former NPR editor Laura Krantz. On this episode of Cyber, Krantz sits down with Matthew to discuss Going Nuclear.We're recording CYBER live on Twitch. Watch live during the week. Follow us there to get alerts when we go live. We take questions from the audience and yours might just end up on the show.Subscribe to CYBER on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen to your podcasts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Answers With Joe Podcast
Going Nuclear With Laura Krantz - Episode 12

Answers With Joe Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 74:40


Laura Krantz is the host of the Wild Thing Podcast which is just about to launch season 3, this one focusing on nuclear energy. The pros, the cons, and everything in between. So we talk about about what she learned along the way, the mixed bag that is nuclear energy in general, and learn a little bit about the background that gave her the tools to be a podcaster today.You can hear all three seasons of Wild Thing (yours truly makes an appearance in a bonus episode of season 2) at https://www.foxtopus.ink/wildthingSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

HauntedAF
Haunted AF Celebrates ONE MILLION DOWNLOADS with "Wild Thing" Host, Laura Krantz!

HauntedAF

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 14:15


We had to take a break from our vacation to say a great big THANK YOU to everyone for 1 million downloads of the Haunted AF podcast! We celebrated by chatting with one of our favorite podcasters, Laura Krantz, about Season 3 of her Wild Thing podcast, Going Nuclear! Find it HERE & remember to find more exclusive content on the Haunted AF Patreon page HERE! 

Wild Thing
S3 E1: Close To Home

Wild Thing

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 24:17 Very Popular


In Wild Thing: Going Nuclear, we'll use science, history and culture to probe the realities of atomic energy today, while analyzing our own fascination— and ambivalence—with all things atomic. What are the true risks? And what is the actual potential? Are we better at this than we were sixty years ago? And given our nature, are we humans even responsible enough to harness the power of the universe—and should we? *Become a premium subscriber to Wild Thing! Premium subscribers get each new episode early, and exclusive access to all bonus episodes, not to mention the warm fuzzy feeling that comes from supporting the show. Go to https://wildthing.supportingcast.fm/ to find out more! *Season 2 of Wild Thing is produced by Laura Krantz and Scott Carney. Editing by Alicia Lincoln. Music and mixing by Louis Weeks. *Find us on social media - @wildthingpod - and on our website https://wildthingpodcast.com/

Wild Thing
S3 Wild Thing: Going Nuclear Trailer

Wild Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 2:12


Back for its third season, Wild Thing uses science, history and culture to probe the realities of nuclear energy today, while analyzing our own fascination— and ambivalence—with all things atomic. What are the true risks? And what is the actual potential? Are we better at this than we were sixty years ago? And given our nature, are we humans even responsible enough to harness the power of the universe—and should we? Coming May 17, 2022