Podcasts about summer olympics

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International multi-sport event

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Best podcasts about summer olympics

Show all podcasts related to summer olympics

Latest podcast episodes about summer olympics

Beyond the Culture
Life Lessons with Olympic Gold Medalist Andrea Bolder

Beyond the Culture

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 43:47


#067: In this episode of Beyond the Culture, Dr. Walker speaks with Olympic Gold Medalist Andrea BolderAndrea was a member of the USA 4x400 Relay team that competed at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney AustraliaAndrea is a businesswoman and founder of WomanpreneuHER UniversityWhat you will learn in this episode: ·      Andrea discusses her journey to fulfilling her dream to become an official member of the 2000 USA Olympic team ·      She details how her team was almost stripped of the gold medal due to alleged performance-enhancing drug use by a teammate. ·      Andrea talks about how she helps woman entrepreneurs to thrive in business with her WomanpreneuHER University Program.SUBSCRIBE to the show on Apple Podcasts or YouTube (Dr. David M. Walker) to be notified when new weekly episodes are available.Connect with Andrea BolderWebsite: www.andreabolder.comLinkedIn: @andreabolderFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/WomanpreneuHER Connect with Dr. Walker:LinkedIn: @drdavidmwalkerFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/drdavidmwalkerInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/drdavidmwalkerTwitter: https://www.twitter.com/drdavidmwalkerYoutube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcJVEX3YVJFW8ZTngumUYPASubscribe: https://www.beyondtheculturepodcast.com Leave a comment and a review

Sports Spectrum Podcast
Soccer star Mallory Pugh on faith, identity, marriage and growing in Jesus

Sports Spectrum Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 30:00


Mallory Pugh is a professional soccer player for the Chicago Red Stars of the National Women's Soccer League (NWSL). She's also a member of the United State women's national soccer team and in 2016, became the youngest female player to be selected and play for the U.S. national team during an Olympic qualifying tournament.  As a member of the US national soccer team, she participated in the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio and scored her first Olympic goal against Columbia and made her the youngest player to ever score a goal for the United States in an Olympic game. She also participated at the FIFA Women's World Cup in 2019.  Today on the podcast, Jon Ackerman talks to Mallory Pugh about her recent engagement to Braves shortstop Dansby Swanson, why 2021 was a year of growth in her relationship with God, what discipleship looks like for her and her desire to continue to play soccer at the highest level.  Receive our 10-day Sports Spectrum Devotional written by professional athletes for FREE when you sign up for our Sports Spectrum Weekly Email Newsletter. Sign up here.

National Day Calendar
May 14, 2022 - National Archery Day | National Dance Like A Chicken Day

National Day Calendar

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 3:30


Welcome to May 14, 2022 on the National Day Calendar. Today we celebrate breaking records in sports and dance. In the 2016 Summer Olympics, Im Dong Hyun broke the points record in the men's archery competition. The South Korean archer did this despite being legally blind. So how exactly does someone with impaired vision compete in a sport that normally requires such sharp eyesight? He says that the target “looks as if different color paints have been dropped in water” and he aims for the middle of the smallest drop. And by the way, the Olympic record he shattered was the one he also set in the 2012 Olympics. On National Archery Day, try a sport that looks deceptively simple. As soon as you hear the upbeat oom, pah, pah of the Chicken Dance song, you know what happens next. Everyone heads to the dance floor and spends the next few minutes dancing in unison. Since it debuted in the 1950s, this silly little song has become a mainstay at weddings and Oktoberfest celebrations. In 1996, fans of the song took things to the extreme, setting the record for world's largest Chicken Dance. 72,000 people were all flapping their arms and shaking their tail feathers at once. On National Dance Like A Chicken Day, shake things up with an impromptu dance. Even if you're a party of one, it's hard not to smile when you're pretending to be poultry. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

A Hoops Journey
Episode 88 - Deb Huband

A Hoops Journey

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 76:53


Longtime UBC Women's Basketball Head Coach Deb Huband joins us for Episode 88. A graduate of Bishop's and UBC (Master's of Science in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology), Huband was a three-time U SPORTS All-Canadian and was inducted into the Canadian Basketball Hall of Fame in 1994, and the Basketball BC Hall of Fame in 2017. Huband is one of the few Canadian basketball players to participate as both a player and coach in the Summer Olympics. One of the finest our country has ever produced, Huband joined the national team as a player in 1978, and was the starting point guard and captain of the Canadian squad that earned a fourth-place finish at the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics. She was also the starting point guard of the bronze medal-winning world championship teams in ‘79 and ‘86. Deb is also the all-time winning-est coach in Canada West history and she is the only Thunderbirds basketball head coach, male or female, to win to three U SPORTS championships. We got an amazing episode filled with great advice and stories, this is a must-listen for hoop fans!

Let's Meet For a Beer
Episode #135 - LEAD - Jasmine Mian Calgary City Councilor - Ward 3

Let's Meet For a Beer

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 56:30


I recently met up with Jasmine Mian, one of Calgary's newest City Councilors, to see what inspired her to get involved in city politics.Prior to politics, Jasmine was an elite athlete where she won a bronze medal representing Canada in the 2014 Commonwealth Games and placed 12th in the 2016 Summer Olympics.  We discuss how this experience helps to shape her perspective in her new political career.It was great to connect with Jasmine - she has a lot of energy and is committed to making a positive impact in our community.  I hope you enjoy our conversation!—The Kondrat Podcast:  website | instagram | facebook Jasmine Mian, Calgary City Councilor - Ward 3: website | instagram

Daily Mental fit bit with Aditi Surana
127. Guest insight - Performing well under pressure Ft. Neha Aggarwal Sharma

Daily Mental fit bit with Aditi Surana

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 4:09


How to perform at our best under pressure? Who better to learn this from than an Olympian. Neha Aggarwal Sharma is an Indian table tennis player who participated in the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing and she shares an inspiring thought in today's Daily mental fit bit.  

the only one in the room podcast
On My Nightstand: Mental Health Awareness Month-Why What Simone Biles Just Did Matters So Much To Black Women Like Me, by Laura Cathcart Robbins

the only one in the room podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 16:10


To honor Mental Health Awareness Month, I am reading a piece that I wrote last summer for Huffpost Personal about Simone Biles and her courageous but highly controversial decision to pull out of her event at the 2021 Summer Olympics.   Laura Cathcart Robbins is the host of the popular podcast, The Only One In The Room, and author of the forthcoming Atria/Simon & Schuster memoir, STASH (due out in spring of 2023). She has been active for many years as a speaker and school trustee and is credited for creating The Buckley School's nationally recognized committee on Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Justice. Her recent articles in Huffpo and The Temper on the subjects of race, recovery, and divorce have garnered her worldwide acclaim. She is a LA Moth StorySlam winner and currently sits on the advisory boards of the San Diego Writer's Festival and the Outliers HQ podcast Festival. Find out more about her on her website, or you can look for her on Facebook, and Instagram, and follow her on Twitter. You can read this article on Huffpost Special thanks to our sponsors: Year & Day: Year & Day is giving The Only One in the Room listeners a special offer. Visit yearandday.com/one and use code: ONE to get $25 off your first order of $150 or more. Also, receive Free shipping on orders of $150 or more. So drop whatever you're doing and go visit yearandday.com/one and use the code: ONE to get $25 off your first order of $150 or more! Carpe: Carpe is the #1 dermatologist recommended brand for sweat all over the body, scientifically tested and proven. Go to mycarpe.com, get free shipping plus TWENTY FIVE PERCENT OFF with the code ONE. That's 25% off when you use the code ONE at mycarpe. com. Completely risk free because Carpe offers a 100% money back guarantee, no questions asked! PATREON SHOUT OUTS: Mercedes Cusick LMFT, Website: www.mercedescusick.com, IG: @recoverhealbloom Check Out How To Do The Pot Thanks to Kathleen Hahn Cute Booty Lounge is made right here in the USA, by women and for women. The company is incredible, female, and minority-owned and all of their leggings make makes your booty look amazing. Go to https://cutebooty.com/ today! Embrace your body, love your booty! Join our Patreon: Become an Only One In The Room patron by joining us on Patreon! Starting at only $5.00 per month, you'll get bonus content, access to outtakes that the general public will NEVER see, extremely cool merch, and depending on what tier you get, monthly hang time with Scott and Laura. Join our Patreon today at https://www.patreon.com/theonlyonepodcast  Be sure not to miss our weekly full episodes on Tuesdays, Scott Talks on Wednesdays & Sunday Edition every Sunday by subscribing to the show wherever you listen to podcasts.  We love hearing from you in the comments on iTunes and while you're there don't forget to rate us, subscribe and share the show! All of us at The Only One In The Room wish you safety and wellness during this challenging time. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Time Sensitive Podcast
John Hoke on Technology as a Co-Conspirator in Creativity

Time Sensitive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 72:28


John Hoke, Nike's chief design officer, intimately understands how to move design from an object to a feeling. At the company over the past three decades, he has refined his approach to center around creating designs that serve wearers in practical yet unexpected ways, and that often redefine what sportswear can look like and do. Hoke often tells his team that “the goal is goosebumps”—to develop ideas so great that they can be physically felt. Hoke's role in Nike's legacy of innovation runs deep. He joined the Beaverton, Oregon–based company in 1992, at age 28, after studying architecture at the University of Pennsylvania and working as a model-maker for the late architect Michael Graves. Hoke, who is dyslexic, considers drawing his first language, his way of articulating the reactions he has to the things he sees. Connecting images with emotions is his portal to new ideas, which he has realized across many forward-thinking projects, ranging from singlets made from recycled polyester and water bottles, produced for the 2000 Summer Olympics; to Space Hippie, a footwear collection inspired by life on Mars; to the 2020 Nike Air Zoom Alphafly NEXT%, a shoe with a carbon-fiber plate that literally propels wearers forward. Even as Nike marks its 50th anniversary this year, Hoke has his sights set on the future, refusing to settle for what has worked in the past. Design, he believes, is a continual, iterative process of improvement. On this episode, Hoke talks with Andrew about how physical movement amplifies the senses, design as an act of optimism, and why perfection is a trap.Special thanks to our Season 5 sponsor, L'ÉCOLE, School of Jewelry Arts.Show notes:Full transcript[04:16] Nike[07:11] Nike Air Zoom Alphafly NEXT%[12:43] Nike FlyEase[13:06] Nike Air VaporMax [16:12] Nike's FY20 Impact Report [18:03] Space Hippie[19:36] Nike Considered Design[45:29] Michael Graves[01:02:19] Nike: Better Is Temporary[01:04:26] LeBron James Innovation Center[01:04:26] Serena Williams Building

WHOOP Podcast
Michael Phelps on his journey to Olympic greatness, his struggles with depression, and how WHOOP helps him be his best

WHOOP Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 60:29


Michael Phelps, the most decorated Olympian in history, joins the WHOOP Podcast for an in-depth discussion on his career, high performance, and mental health. Michael talks about his journey to winning 28 Olympic medals, but also details his struggle with depression and anxiety. He explains his mission to help those battling mental health challenges and also talks about how WHOOP plays a critical role in his own health and well-being. He sits down with Will Ahmed to discuss his early days in swimming (1:52), how he quickly discovered swimming was therapeutic for him (3:37), dealing with expectations and his burning desire to win (9:42), capturing his first gold medal (13:31), making sacrifices (16:47), the pursuit of perfection at the Beijing Olympics (19:36), his love of competition (23:25), experiencing emptiness after Beijing (25:04), recovery and sleep (27:48), why WHOOP (29:41), his mental health struggles and his darkest moments (34:02), showing the world the "real" Michael Phelps (39:37), trying to lower the suicide rate (45:56), flow states (48:22), diet and nutrition while training (55:17), and the Michael Phelps Foundation (56:55). Support the show

Level Playing Field - A LGBT sports podcast
Olympian Keith Frostad shares stories of homophobia and support around the 1992 Olympics - Five Rings To Rule Them All

Level Playing Field - A LGBT sports podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 39:54


Keith Frostad wasn't out publicly in the media around the 1992 Summer Olympics in Barcelona, but he was known to be gay in the elite swimming world. When he talked about all of this with Zachary Draves of Nuts & Bolts Sports, he shared publicly for the first time intimate details of being harassed repeatedly by male swimmers on Team USA and at the University of Texas. He also found strength in the support he received from some swimmers, including many on the women's teams. And his attempt to reach the 1996 Olympics gave him a heart-warming story of support that remains with him to this day. He shares with us details of his experiences, including apparent pressure from representatives of the US Olympic Committee to stay quiet about being gay at the Olympics. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Pal's Podcast
Penny Oleksiak

The Pal's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 103:45


Penny Oleksiak (@typicalpen) is a Canadian competitive swimmer. Having won 7 medals at the Summer Olympics, she is Canada's most decorated Olympian.   ———   Presented by Tiggy @tiggyapp Use promo code PALS30 for 30% your first 3 orders https://tiggy.onelink.me/vDPA/zwyddwvg   ———   Welcome to The Pal's Podcast hosted by George Boutsalis and Ricky Liorti. Two best friends, co-hosts, and co-founders talking about all things life, leisure, and levelling up! http://thepalspod.com/   Socials: @thepalspodcast -All Socials: @gcboutsalis - Twitter // @boutsalis - Instagram Socials: @yourpalrick - All thepalspodcast@gmail.com   ——   Music by @loudluxury

Day Fire Podcast
Kris Wheeler / Filmmaker

Day Fire Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 72:29


This week Clint and Dawson Talk with Kris Wheeler. Kris is an award-winning documentary filmmaker and commercial content creator. The professional journey of this North Georgia native is rooted in a foundation of journalism and storytelling. In recent years, Wheeler's film work has garnered coverage in national publications and media outlets, including: Billboard Magazine, USA Today, Garden & Gun Magazine, Paste Magazine and NPR World Cafe. In November 2018, his film, Revival: The Sam Bush Story, became a hit with Amazon viewers, quickly climbing into the “Top 10 Best Sellers” list for documentaries following its commercial release. Revival earned four “Best” film awards on the indie film festival circuit, including “Best Music Documentary” in its World Premiere at the Nashville Film Festival. Wheeler's storytelling skills were developed early in his career, in route to becoming an award-winning newspaper journalist and feature writer. After covering the Summer Olympic Games in Barcelona in 1992, he moved quickly through the publishing ranks, and was named the following year as Managing Editor at Rural Press USA, the world's largest publisher of agricultural magazines. At age 32, Wheeler kicked off his journey as an entrepreneur, publishing a series of magazines over the ensuing years, including Atlanta House & Home and Coastal Homes & Lifestyles. In 2008, he walked away from the publishing world to pursue a life-long dream of filmmaking. Since then, he has gone on to write, direct and produce three feature-length documentary films, two on-demand series. Wheeler's commercial work focuses on creating story-driven content for a diverse range of clients, including ad agencies, global corporations and national healthcare brands. Other projects currently streaming — available on Amazon — include the on-demand series, “Ride To Extraordinary,” and “Undiscovered.” Wheeler is currently in production on a feature-length documentary about the life of Grace Ragland.

Keep the Flame Alive
Episode 234: Author David Davis on Waterman Duke Kanahamoku

Keep the Flame Alive

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 62:35


Author David Davis returns to the show to talk about his book Waterman: The Life and Times of Duke Kahanamoku, about the legendary 3x Olympic medalist and surfing pioneer. David's book has been turned into a documentary that will air on PBS' American Masters in May.   Duke Kahanamoku won back-to-back gold medals in the 100m freestyle at the 1912 and 1920 Summer Olympics. He also won silver at the 1924 Summer Olympics, just losing out to Johnny Weissmuller, in an Olympic career that spanned a whopping 12 years.   If it weren't for Duke, surfing might not have become the sport it is today. Duke spread his love of surfing around the world, essentially starting surfing cultures in California and Australia.  Follow David on Twitter:  https://twitter.com/ddavisla Check out his website: http://www.ddavisla.com/.   You can get his books (and support the show) by shopping through our Bookshop.org storefront.   Also on today's show, we have: An Albertville 1992 Winter Olympic first News from TKFLASTAN Updates from Paris 2024 and Milan-Cortina 2026 For a transcript of this episode, please visit: https://wp.me/pbRtIx-1QV   Thanks so much for listening, and until next time, keep the flame alive! ***  Keep the Flame Alive: The Podcast for Fans of the Olympics and Paralympics with hosts Jill Jaracz & Alison Brown   Support the show: Tell a friend: http://flamealivepod.com Bookshop.org store: https://bookshop.org/shop/flamealivepod Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/flamealivepod   Hang out with us online: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/flamealivepod Insta: http://www.instagram.com/flamealivepod Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/flamealivepod Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/312069749587022   Newsletter: Sign up at http://flamealivepod.com VM/Text: (208) FLAME-IT / (208) 352-6348  

Losing Control
Episode 3: The Twisties

Losing Control

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 40:05


We've talked about the yips, but what about the twisties? The infamous variety of yips that afflicts aerial athletes, the twisties is a term which describes the experience of athletes who lose their sense of proprioception, or their awareness of where their bodies are in space. It was this unusual malady that led to Simone Biles stepping away from the 2020 Summer Olympics, and although she may be the best known athlete to have battled the twisties, Simone Biles is far from the only athlete who has experienced it. To better understand this strange and dangerous phenomenon, Justin sits down with Aimee Boorman, one of the top gymnastics coaches in the world and the former coach of Simone Biles herself. And for a look at how an athlete contends with the twisties–and triumphs in spite of it–you'll hear from Gary Hunt, one of the best cliff divers in the world and the nine-time Red Bull Cliff Diving World Series Champion.    Aimee Boorman, a veteran gymnastics coach who has worked with elite gymnasts for many years, and the former coach of Simone Biles Gary Hunt, an unrivaled cliff diver and nine-time Red Bull Cliff Diving World Series Champion  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Women of Golf
WOG: Dottie Ardina wins Epson Tour's - Copper Rock Championship + No B.S. Zone

Women of Golf

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 56:00


Welcome to the Women of Golf Show! Tune in Tuesdays - 9:00 AM Eastern Joining Ted & Cindy this week: Dottie Ardina, winner of the Epson Tour's, Copper Rock Championship. Plus the No B.S. Zone - Dave Stockton's all time top ten putting tips More on Dottie: Dottie born 1994, is a Filipino professional golfer. She won numerous amateur tournaments in Asia and represented the Philippines at the Espirito Santo Trophy (World Amateur Team Championships) in 2006 and 2010. Her 2006 appearance, at age 12, made her the youngest player ever to compete at the World Amateur Team Championships. She turned professional in 2013 and has played on the Epson Tour since 2014. She also played on the LPGA Tour in 2014. Also in 2014, she won the Thailand Singha-Sat LPGA Championship. Ardina qualified for the 2016 Summer Olympics. While initially it was thought she would compete, ultimately she declared herself unable to compete due to Zika virus threat. This past weekend she clinched her first Epson Tour win at the Copper Rock Championship in Utah.  Join LIVE Tuesdays 9:00 - 10:00AM Eastern http://www.blogtalkradio.com/womenofgolf Or listen on any of these social media platforms:  iTunes , Stitcher, Tunein, Castbox, TalkStreamLive & Spotify.

The Springen Equestrian Podcast
[EP84] New Perspectives with Noel Asmar

The Springen Equestrian Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 65:01


Noel Asmar is a Canadian designer, equestrian, and founder of the contemporary equestrian apparel brand, @AsmarEquestrian. Debuting in 2011 with the award-winning All-Weather Rider, Asmar Equestrian has continued to grow, receiving many accolades along the way. The brand was selected to uniform the Canadian Equestrian Team for the Rio 2016 Summer Olympics and has recently launched their Spring/Summer '22 Collection, available now. Use the code SPRINGEN10 to save 10% site wide when you shop at AsmarEquestrian.com https://bit.ly/3uGVI67 If you're interested in finding a position in the industry, visit www.hauteeq.com to see their equestrian specific job board. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/springeneq/message

高效磨耳朵 | 最好的英语听力资源
(Level 3)-Day_96 Fosbury Flop

高效磨耳朵 | 最好的英语听力资源

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2022 4:23


在喜马拉雅已支持实时字幕关注公众号“高效英语磨耳朵”获取文稿和音频词汇提示1.flop 跳高2.biomechanics 生物力学3.intuition 直觉4.prior 之前5.straddle 跨坐6.curve 曲线7.acceleration 加速8.rotates 旋转9.leaping 跳跃10.arches 拱起11.experimenting 实验原文Fosbury FlopAmerican athlete Dick Fosbury devised the high jump technique known as the “Fosbury Flop”.His new technique revolutionized one of the oldest events in track and field competition.While Fosbury never broke the world record using his new technique,other high jumpers were inspired by his gold medal at the 1968 Summer Olympic Games in Mexico City,where he introduced his new jumping technique.Fosbury was born in 1946 in Oregon and went to Oregon State University.He won the gold medal in the Olympic Games at the very young age of 21.It was assumed that his odd-looking new method for clearing the bar was based on a careful study of the physics and biomechanics of high jump technique.However,Fosbury claimed it was the product of pure intuition.Prior to Fosbury's invention,most high jumpers used a “straddle” technique.In this older style of jumping,the front leg led the jumper up and over the bar in a face down position.Fosbury's technique involves approaching the bar in a curve with a last second acceleration.Then,at the point of take-off,the body rotates,positioning the back to the bar and leaping backwards.The head faces the sky as the body arches over the bar with the mid-body and legs trailing behind.Fosbury had begun experimenting with a new technique when he was only sixteen years old.In a meet in 1968 in which Fosbury used his new technique,a local newspaper's headline read,“Fosbury flops over the bar”.Thus,the name of the newly invented technique was born.Since Fosbury's competitive days,his technique has been widely copied.Once experienced jumpers mastered the technique,records started to fall in the sport,due mostly to the Fosbury Flop,but also to better equipment and running surfaces.Dick Fosbury will always be known for his revolutionizing of the sport of high jump.翻译背越式跳高美国运动员迪克·福斯伯里发明了被称为“背越式跳高”的跳高技术。他的新技术彻底改变了这项田径比赛中最古老的项目。虽然福斯伯里从未用他的新技术打破世界纪录,但其他跳高运动员运受他启发在1968年墨西哥城夏季奥运会上获得的金牌,他在那里介绍了他的新跳高技术。1946年,福斯伯里出生于俄勒冈州,进入俄勒冈州州立大学学习。他在21岁时就获得了奥运会金牌。人们认为,他这种看起来很新奇的跳高方法是基于对跳高技术的物理和生物力学的仔细研究。然而,福斯伯里声称这纯粹是直觉的产物。在福斯伯里的发明之前,大多数跳高运动员都使用“跨坐”技术。在这种老式的跳跃方式中,跳跃者的前腿引导着跳跃者以面朝下的姿势越过横杆。福斯伯里的技术是以最后一秒的加速度接近曲线中的杆。然后,在起跳点,身体旋转,将背部定位到杆上并向后跳跃。头部面向天空,身体拱起,身体中部和腿部伸展跟在后面。福斯伯里在16岁时就开始试验这种技术。1968年,在一次会议上,福斯伯里使用了他的新技术,当地一家报纸的发言人在头条上写着,“福斯伯里跳过了横杆”。于是,新发明技术的名字(福斯伯里式跳高,即背越式)诞生了。自从福斯伯里参加比赛以来,他的技术已被广泛复制。一旦有经验的跳高运动员掌握了这项技术,这项运动的记录开始下降,主要原因是背越式跳高,但也得益于更好的设备和跑步场地。迪克·福斯伯里将永远以他对跳高运动的革命性而闻名。

Just a Good Conversation
Just a Good Conversation Jordan Larson

Just a Good Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 70:14


Jordan Larson is a three time (2012, 2016, 2021) USA Olympic Women's Volleyball player. Her 2021 Olympics win allowed her to complete the trifecta of winning an Olympic bronze, silver, and gold medal. Not bad for a kid from Hooper Nebraska. Jordan started her college volleyball career at the University of Nebraska. In 2006, she led the Huskers to the NCAA title and was named to the AVCA All-America First Team. In 2008, as a senior, she was named to the AVCA All-America First Team. She was also chosen as the Big 12 Player of the Year and the league's defensive player of the year; it was the first time that a player achieved both in the same year. Over her four-year college career, Larson had a total of 1,600 kills and 1,410 digs. Larson graduated from the University of Nebraska in 2008 with a degree in communications studies. On June 7, 2021, US National Team head coach Karch Kiraly announced Larson would be part of the 12-player Olympic roster for the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, her third straight Olympic Games. She has discussed how this would be her last Olympics, and she became the fifth oldest volleyball player in USA history to be named to an Olympic roster. We talk about how it all started, growing up a small mid west town of 800 people, leadership, marriage and coaching. In January 2022, Larson was named as an assistant coach for the University of Texas women's volleyball team, her first collegiate coaching role. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/matt-brown57/support

Chip Baker- The Success Chronicles
TSC S2 #128- Coach Van Chancellor

Chip Baker- The Success Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 13:52


Van Chancellor is a former college and professional basketball coach. He coached University of Mississippi women's basketball, LSU women's basketball, professional Houston Comets and the USA National Team. Chancellor served for 10 years as head coach of the Houston Comets from 1997 to 2006. During that time, Chancellor was named the WNBA Coach of the Year three times (1997, 1998, 1999) and he led the Comets to the league's first four championship titles (1997–2000). Under Chancellor, the Comets were the only team in the WNBA to make the playoffs in each of the first seven seasons of the league. His 1998 Houston Comets team holds the record for highest winning percentage in the history of both the NBA and WNBA basketball (27–3, .900). In 2001, Chancellor was elected to the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame. Chancellor has recorded an unblemished 38–0 record in international competition as head coach of the United States National Team. His teams won first place at the 2002 Opals World Challenge, a gold medal at the 2002 FIBA World Championships, and a gold medal at the 2004 Summer Olympics. Chancellor served as the head coach to the National team in the 2002 World Championships, held during September in three cities in China, including Nanjing, China.He was enshrined as a member of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in September 2007. Chancellor currently serves as an analyst for Southland Conference games on ESPN3. Social Media Links Youtube Channel youtube.com/c/ChipBakerTheSuccessChronicles LinkedIn http://linkedin.com/in/chip-baker-thesuccesschronicles-825887161 Facebook https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100014641035295 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/chipbakertsc/ Twitter twitter.com/chipbaker19 Linktree https://linktr.ee/ChipBakerTSC Online Store http://chip-baker-the-success-chronicles.square.site/ Chip Baker- The Success Chronicles Podcast https://anchor.fm/chip-baker

Spell of the Day
Kevlarbydupont

Spell of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 2:00


Kevlarbydupont is a fourth level abjuration with a range of touch, a duration of an hour, requires concentration to maintain, and has a material requirement of a pinch of diamond power which the spell consumes.  However, synthetic powder works just as well with less cost. Kevlarbydupont makes the flesh of a living creature resistant to cutting and piercing while still being sensitive and flexible. Discovered in 1965 in Delaware by Stephanie Kwolek, the spell has become a staple in manufacturing and law enforcement.  When used with the spell Aakasmikata (uh-cause-mit-kuh), today's spell will activate the instant the skin is touched.  Kevarbydupont is fast enough to stop a bullet and save a saw operator from losing a finger.  Researches found that the spell is slightly less effective when the skin is exposed to ultraviolet light, but the effect is not noticeable.  The spell does not protect against heat, and should the skin be exposed to a temperature above 350 degrees, the spell will fail.  If you watch the whitewater slalom event during the Summer Olympics, you will see each athlete cast Kevlarbydupont as it has been a safety requirement since the readoption of the sport in 1992.

Leave Your Mark
Curiosity is the Father of Innovation with Chris Gaviglio

Leave Your Mark

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 80:13


This EP features an innovative performance practitioner, Chris Gaviglio. Chris has been involved with Elite sport for over 20 years working across multiple Winter and Summer Olympic sports and professional football codes in both the northern hemisphere with Bath Rugby, and the southern hemisphere with Queensland "Maroons" Rugby League team, the Wallabies of the Australian National Rugby Union, and the Gold Coast SUNS of the AFL Aussie rules football league.  Chris still does train several winter and summer Olympic athletes, and currently consults with the Brisbane Broncos. During his time in the UK Chris was involved with UK Sport in multiple applied sports science projects. Chris has several papers already published as a result of this work and other collaborative work with other applied sports scientists. He is also an entrepreneur and enjoys designing training products that complement his strength and conditioning passion. The first two products he produced were back mobilization tools, the Thera-wedge, and the Backsak. More recently he designed the Sports Rehab Tourniquet to be used for Blood Flow Restriction (BFR) training. Above all his accomplishments he is a husband to Angela who was a 2000 Olympian in Indoor Volleyball and father to two kids Zara & Tristan.  Enjoy

Cup to Cup | The Comedy Podcast
How much luck is in baseball? 7MIH

Cup to Cup | The Comedy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 10, 2022 33:16


Sports Baby!   Opening day in baseball NFL is pushing for flag football to be in the Summer Olympics. Some thoughts from Mayor Adamson: Do you dare agree with The Mayor? Which sport would you like to see added to the Summer Olympics?  Also…someone take a peek at the Tournament Challenge and see who ended up winning  Cuptocuplife.com

KTUH Online
Let's Go 'Bows Radio Interview - Elyse Lemay - Lavoie

KTUH Online

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 10, 2022 24:01


Description: After having transferred from Canada to Hawaii, playing for the University's Water Polo team for three seasons, competing in many international competitions — including the 2020 Olympics — Elyse Lemay-Lavoie still isn't quite ready to hang up her jersey. At 27, Elyse will be graduating from the University with a degree in Women's, Gender and Sexuality studies. Her graduation marks the end of a chapter for her, but even then, Elyse still has huge aspirations that continue long after graduation, looking to 2024 where she hopes to compete at the international level again for the Summer Olympics in Paris. I had the opportunity to hear Elyse talk about her experiences and about her future plans for the next chapter in her life.

Sports Talk with Jason, Ed & B-DOE
4-6-22 Hour 1 Podcast

Sports Talk with Jason, Ed & B-DOE

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 40:08


The NFL wants to include Flag Football in the Summer Olympics, the NFL to be investigated over their conduct surrounding female employees, and the Los Angeles Lakers suck! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Insight with Chris Van Vliet
Overcoming Failure And Defeat With Olympic "Gold Medal Loser" Lolo Jones

Insight with Chris Van Vliet

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 50:22


Lolo Jones (@lolojones) is a 3-time, 2 sport Olympian and World Champion, social media influencer and reality show star. She joins Chris Van Vliet to talk about her podcast called "Gold Metal Loser", her career as a hurdler in the Summer Olympic Games and as a bobsledder in the Winter Olympic Games, the lessons she has learned from defeat, what a typical day of training looks like, why she wrote her book called Over It: How to Face Life's Hurdles with Grit, Hustle, and Grace and much more! For more information about Chris and INSIGHT go to: https://chrisvanvliet.com If you enjoyed this episode, could I ask you to please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcast/iTunes? It takes less than a minute and makes a huge difference in helping to spread the word about the show and also to convince some hard-to-get guests.  Follow CVV on social media: Instagram: instagram.com/ChrisVanVliet Twitter: twitter.com/ChrisVanVliet Facebook: facebook.com/ChrisVanVliet YouTube: youtube.com/ChrisVanVliet Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

LIVIN THE GOOD LIFE SHOW
Dr. Christopher Lee, Orthopedic Surgeon (Burbank, Ca)

LIVIN THE GOOD LIFE SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 3, 2022 10:38


Dr. Christopher S. Lee is a board certified orthopaedic surgeon specializing in sports medicine, arthroscopy, joint and cartilage preservation as well as shoulder and knee replacements. He is the team physician for the USA National Indoor Volleyball Team and will be traveling with the team to Tokyo for the 2020 Summer Olympics.Born and raised in Boston, Massachusetts, Dr. Lee attended Tufts University where he received awards for both academic and artistic achievements. While in college, he had the unique opportunity of studying abroad in China where he studied Mandarin Chinese and Chinese Literature at Peking University.​After graduating Tufts, Dr. Lee subsequently attended the Tufts University School of Medicine where he participated in the MD/MBA program. After completing the Tufts Combined Residency in Orthopaedic Surgery, he then received his fellowship training at the San Diego Arthroscopy and Sports Medicine Fellowship where he trained with international pioneers in sports medicine, arthroscopy and shoulder replacement surgery. As a fellow, he served as an assistant team physician for the San Diego State University Aztecs and the San Diego Padres Major League Baseball team. He is presently team physician for the USA National Indoor Volleyball Team, Rock N' Roll Sports Medicine, and Crescenta Valley High School. Dr. Lee has a longtime commitment to running. A track athlete in high school, he transitioned to distance running over the years and completed the Philadelphia Marathon in 2007, the Boston Marathon in 2008 and 2010 and the Chicago Marathon in 2013. As a healthcare provider, he has served as a member of the Rock 'n' Roll Marathon Series Medical Team since 2012. He presently has a passion for running, golf, volleyball, basketball and football.  A violinist since the age of 4, Dr. Lee has traveled internationally to Europe and South America to give both solo and ensemble performances. He attended the Tanglewood Music Institute on scholarship during the summer of 1996 and continued his musical studies while at Tufts, winning the University Concerto Competition in 1998 and 2001. He has been the fortunate recipient of the Jacob Swartz Young Artist Award for solo performance and the Eugene Lehner Chamber Music Award as a member of the Rackwick Quartet.Dr. Lee has several research interests and has published in major orthopaedic journals and presented at national meetings. He currently has active projects in ACL reconstruction, shoulder replacement surgery, shoulder arthroscopy, overhead athletes, post-operative pain management, MRI, meniscus repair and biceps pathology.

Live On Air with Steven Cuoco
2x Olympic Gold Medalist Swimmer Bobby Finke

Live On Air with Steven Cuoco

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2022 29:13


Robert Finke OLY is an American swimmer. He won two gold medals for the United States in the 2020 Summer Olympics: the men's 800-meter and 1500-meter freestyle swims. Finke is known to his friends by the nickname, Bobby. He currently swims for the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida. “Live On Air With Steven Cuoco” is a weekday syndicated satellite radio program produced and hosted by Steven Cuoco, who is a veteran expert in public relations, reality TV, media, broadcasting, and podcasting. The radio program is heard in 200 countries. Power985.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/steven-cuoco/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/steven-cuoco/support

高效磨耳朵 | 最好的英语听力资源
(Level 3)-Day_89 Michael Jordan

高效磨耳朵 | 最好的英语听力资源

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2022 6:04


在喜马拉雅已支持实时字幕关注公众号“高效英语磨耳朵”获取文稿和音频词汇提示1.breadth 广泛的2.endorsement 代言3.executive 高管4.drafted 选派5.rookie 新秀6.distinction 奖赏7.commodity 有用的商品8.elevated 提升9.prominence 出名10.aided 辅助11.leisure 休闲12.memorabilia 纪念品13.contractually 合同14.lapels 翻领15.affiliate 附属机构16.arguably 可以说是原文Michael JordanMichael Jordan is one of the most recognized sports figures in the world.To understand the breadth of his fame,it is probably best to think of Jordan in two senses:as a person and an athlete with incredible athletic prowess and skill,and as a cultural and media icon.The second way of think about Jordan is probably equal to the first.After all,it was his endorsement of dozens of commercial products,sports in movies,and in general his commercial-and market-produced image that made Jordan so famous worldwide.Jordan was born in 1963,one of three sons of a corporate executive.He attended North Caroline University from 1981-84,and was then drafted to the National Basketball Association's(NBA)Chicago Bulls.During the same year,he co-captained the U.S.A. basketball team to gold in the 1984 Summer Olympic Games in Los Angeles.Jordan's fame was quickly accelerated with the help of his agent and a marketing firm.After winning the NBA's Rookie of the Year distinction,Jordan quickly began signing a series of marketing contracts that would eventually create the iconic image known throughout the world.The most notable marketing endorsement contract came with Nike Corporate.Nike built much of its marketing and commercial strategy around Jordan in the 1980s and early 1990s.With his own line of Nike-Produced basketball shoes and clothing,Jordan established himself as a marketable commodity.The relationship between Nike and Jordan would be a mutually beneficial one.It elevated Jordan to international prominence,while helping push Nike to number one status as world sports merchandiser.Jordan's athletic status was also aided by the fact that his was a career with relatively little controversy,unlike many other superstar athletes.Social and political controversies surrounding Jordan were rare,and when they did occur these were minor.In 1992,he got himself into a bit of trouble when he did not allow his image to be used by the NBA for the licensing of leisure wear and memorabilia in the run-up to the Summer Olympic Games.In addition,once at the Games,Jordan,being contractually committed to Nike,refused to wear the official sponsor Reebok's warm-up suits.The issue was resolved when Jordan and his teammates wore the U.S. flag and extra long lapels to cover the Reebok logo.In 1993,Jordan made a surprise announcement of his retirement from the NBA at the age of thirty.He signed as a free agent to play Major League Baseball with the Chicago White Sox,and played-unsuccessfully as it turned out-with the White SOX minor league affiliate.Jordan then made a brief comeback in the NBA,only to retire soon after.History will recognize Jordan not only for his athletic prowess-arguably the best the sport of basketball has ever seen-and for his iconic status in the later-twentieth century world of sport's marketing and image production.翻译迈克尔·乔丹迈克尔·乔丹是世界上最知名的体育明星之一。要理解乔丹名声的广度,最好从两个方面来看待乔丹:一是作为一个人和一名运动员,拥有不可思议的运动能力和技巧,二是作为一个文化和媒体偶像。对乔丹的第二种看法可能与第一种看法相同。毕竟,正是他对几十种商业产品、电影中的体育运动的代言,以及他在商业和市场上塑造的形象,使乔丹在世界范围内如此出名。乔丹生于1963年,是一位企业高管的三个儿子之一。1981年至1984年,他就读于北卡罗琳大学,随后被美国国家篮球协会(NBA)芝加哥公牛队征召入伍。同年,他担任美国篮球队的联合队长,在1984年洛杉矶夏季奥运会上夺得金牌。在他的经纪人和一家营销公司的帮助下,乔丹的名声迅速提高。在赢得NBA年度最佳新秀奖后,乔丹很快开始签署一系列营销合同,最终创造出举世闻名的标志性形象。最著名的营销代言合同来自耐克公司。耐克在20世纪80年代和90年代初围绕乔丹制定了许多营销和商业战略。凭借耐克公司生产的篮球鞋和服装,乔丹使自己成为一种畅销商品。耐克和乔丹之间的关系将是互利的。它将乔丹提升到了国际知名度,同时帮助推动耐克成为世界体育用品采购商的头号人物。乔丹的体育地位也得益于这样一个事实:与其他许多超级明星运动员不同,他的职业生涯争议相对较小。围绕乔丹的社会和政治争议非常罕见,当它们确实发生时,这些争议都很小。1992年,当他不允许自己的形象被NBA用于夏季奥运会期间休闲服装和纪念品的授权时,他陷入了一点麻烦。此外,在奥运会上,乔丹与耐克签订合同,他拒绝了穿官方赞助商锐步的热身服。当乔丹和他的队友们佩戴美国国旗和超长翻领来遮盖锐步标志时,问题得到了解决。1993年,乔丹出人意料地宣布他在30岁时从NBA退役。他以自由球员的身份签约芝加哥白袜队打大联盟棒球赛,但在白袜队小联盟的附属机构打了一场失败的比赛。乔丹随后在NBA短暂复出,但很快就退休了。历史将会认可乔丹,不仅因为他的运动能力,可以说他是篮球运动史上最好的运动员,还因为他在20世纪末的体育营销和形象塑造领域的标志性地位。

Southern California Real Estate Report
Angles Landing- a new project coming to downtown Los Angeles

Southern California Real Estate Report

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 10:29


Today on the Southern California Real Estates Report we take a look at our neighbors towards the North... Los Angeles that is.Angles Landing is a new multi-family, condo, retail, high rise that will change the skyline of LA.The project in estimated to cost $1.6 billion.It will be 63 stories high.The project is projected to be completed by the Summer Olympics that are going to be held in LA in 2028.Article referenced:https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/california/story/2022-03-28/downtown-las-1-6-billion-angels-landing-project-advances

Longevity Muscle
028: Weightlifting Olympian & Pro Natural Bodybuilder - Moji Oluwa

Longevity Muscle

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 99:13


Joining us today is weightlifting Olympian turned Professional Natural Bodybuilder, Moji Oluwa. Moji competed in the 1994 CommonWealth Games and won 2 gold medals and 1 bronze medal and was the Captain of the Nigerian Weightlifting team at the 1996 Summer Olympics. On the bodybuilding side, he is an IPE Pro and has won over 50 titles, including the IFPA USA CHAMPIONSHIPS and the 2012 IFPA, Yorton Cup, Pro bodybuilding World Championships (Lightweight Title). He's been training since the 80's and is a prime example of someone who represents longevity with training, fitness and in natural bodybuilding!Timestamps:(00:11) Intro (01:03) transition between Olympic weightlifting to bodybuilding + experience at the 96 Olympics (12:10) How Moji's training evolved from when he first started bodybuilding to now at 49! (Tips for Training for longevity)(28:00) The social media gym culture vs the pumping iron gym culture  (31:49) contest history and competing in the NPC (39:00) Moji doesn't do numbers! His bodybuilding approach (40:00) Do numbers matter for bodybuilding?(49:06) Has natural bodybuilding gone to far with rewarding conditioning over all else?!(55:20) Are there natural bodybuilding organizations that don't put conditioning on a pedestal?(01:02:18) Impact that politics have in Natural Bodybuilding(01:09:00) Why Moji competes where he does (01:20:00) When will Moji step back on stage?(01:30:00) Dealing with adversity, PART 2 PREP,  where you can learn more from Moji + OutroThanks for listening! Please share and subscribe!Check out our Patreon Membership Page where you can become a Longevity Muscle VIP Supporter! To show our appreciation, we are offering you exclusive access to bonus interviews with your favourite guests! Get in touch with Moji:Follow Moji on InstagramGet in touch with Kenny and Longevity Muscle:Follow Kenny on InstagramFollow Longevity Muscle on Instagram Follow Longevity Muscle on Facebook Subscribe to Longevity Muscle on YoutubeJoin us in the Longevity Muscle Private Facebook Group Learn more about Longevity Muscle Coaching__________________________________________________________________If you're ready to begin with online coaching, please visit our website and fill out the application form: Longevity Muscle Coaching Application

This Life Ain't For Everybody
E296 - Kyle Dake - 3X World Champion & Olympic Medalist

This Life Ain't For Everybody

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 73:30


Kyle Dake is a freestyle wrestler and is a three-time and the reigning World Champion. Dake also claimed a bronze medal at the 2020 Summer Olympics held in Tokyo. In college, he became the third four-time NCAA Division I National Champion in history, and the only one to ever do so in four different weight classes, and without a redshirt season.

Acta Non Verba
Sara McMann: The Multifaceted Warrior

Acta Non Verba

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 49:27


Resilience develops through experience over time. This week Sara McMann reveals how her time spent as a wrestler, Olympian, and MMA competitor prepared her to be successful in the UFC. Listen in as Sara and I discuss how to identify and capitalize on natural skills, why being stubborn is a trait for success, and how being selective when having a competitive mindset can help you hone your abilities. Sara also explores how raising your personal standards attracts a higher caliber of people into your circle.   Sara McMann is an American Mixed Martial Artist who currently competes in the bantamweight division of the ultimate financial championship, the UFC, and is currently ranked number nine in that division.   McMann is a former Olympic wrestler and the first American woman in history to receive a silver medal at the Olympics, which she won in the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, Greece, the birthplace of wrestling. She's also a world silver medalist and two-time bronze medalist as well as a brown belt under the legendary Marcelo Garcia.   Follow Sara on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/saramcmann   Learn more about the gift of Adversity and my mission to help my fellow humans create a better world by heading to www.marcusaureliusanderson.com. There you can take action by joining my ANV inner circle to get exclusive content and information. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

In My Heart with Heather Thomson

Noel Asmar is a Canadian designer with an innate curiosity for the way people live. Her passion for cultural diversity and languages drew her overseas at a young age to pursue a career in international hotel management and marketing. Constantly inspired by the people around her, Noel continued her design journey after returning to Canada from her management days with international hoteliers. In 2002, Noel designed what came to be known as the first “designer spa uniform”. Her various designs have garnered international acclaim, features in Harpers Bazaar and Vogue, while her continuous pursuit to innovate and create has led her to be recognized as one of Canada's Top 20 Female Entrepreneurs. With a decade in luxury hospitality, Noel identified opportunities to heighten team morale through innovative and purpose-driven designs, creating a fresh, modern & elevated approach to uniforms. Her concept of spa uniforms was quickly adopted to replace the utilitarian and unflattering ones the industry had grown accustomed to. The natural evolution was to create a collection of a premium spa, wellness & hotel uniforms to elevate the look and feel for this growing industry. 20 years later, Noel and her team continue to set new industry trends and lead in the next generation of uniform concepts. Her continued commitment to empower people is expressed not only through her uniforms but also in her personal achievements and involvement in the spa and hospitality industries. Noel has sat on the Board of Directors for the International Spa Association (ISPA) for six years and was selected to uniform the Canadian Equestrian Team for the Rio 2016 Summer Olympics. Noel is a rider and has expanded her brand with the launch of her contemporary Equestrian Apparel label Asmar Equestrian in 2011. Noel is married with 3 children and lives in Vancouver, where she grew up. AARP: Go to www.AARP.org/INMYHEART to join for $12 your first year with automatic renewal. You'll get a second membership for free, plus AARP the Magazine and a free gift FEALS: Become a member today by going to www.Feals.com/INMYHEART and get 50% off your first order with free shipping. HAPBEE: Order today and save 25 percent and get 90-days free access to ALL their Signals. Take advantage of their 365 day guarantee today. Go to www.Hapbee.com/INMYHEART Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Attacking Third: A CBS Sports Soccer Podcast
Title IX Tuesdays: Former Oakland Raiders CEO Amy Trask and 2028 Summer Olympics CEO Kathy Carter on Title IX (Soccer 3/15)

Attacking Third: A CBS Sports Soccer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 59:46


Sandra Herrera and Lisa Roman roll out the fourth episode of their Title IX Tuesday Series. This June celebrates the 50th anniversary of the passing of Title IX - a federal civil rights law passed in 1972 prohibiting sex-based discrimination in any school or other educational program that receives funding from the federal government. Sandra and Lisa welcome trailblazer, CEO of LA28, bringing the Summer Olympics to LA in 2028. Kathy has a strong history with soccer as a former GK at William & Mary and even working for U.S. Soccer. She discusses being the only woman in a room, how she used sport and her experience as a student-athlete to make her a better executive professional. Plus, she talks about personal experiences of gender discrimination. In the second half of the episode, Sandra and Lisa welcome trailblazer, former Oakland Raiders CEO and panelist on “We Need to Talk” Amy Trask to the show to discuss Title IX. Passed during Amy's lifetime, she discusses how important the law is and how it changed the course of her career. Amy opens up about how hard she had to work to become CEO of an NFL organization, the goals she had starting as an intern, the biggest obstacles she faced and how her leadership skills differ from her male coworkers. This Title IX series is done in collaboration with CBS Sports' “We Need to Talk.” 'Attacking Third' is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Castbox and wherever else you listen to podcasts.  Follow the Attacking Third team on Twitter: @AttackingThird, @SandHerrera_, @LRoman32 Visit the Attacking Third YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/attackingthird You can listen to Attacking Third on your smart speakers! Simply say "Alexa, play the latest episode of the Attacking Third podcast" or "Hey Google, play the latest episode of the Attacking Third podcast." For more soccer coverage from CBS Sports, visit https://www.cbssports.com/soccer/ To hear more from the CBS Sports Podcast Network, visit https://www.cbssports.com/podcasts/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

General Witchfinders
24 - The Wicker Man

General Witchfinders

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2022 103:49


The Wicker Man is a 1973 British folk horror film directed by Robin Hardy and starring Edward Woodward, Britt Ekland, Diane Cilento, Ingrid Pitt, and Big Chris Lee. In his 7th appearance on The General Witchfinders. The screenplay by Anthony (frenzy) Shaffer, inspired by David Pinner's 1967 novel Ritual, centres on the visit of Police Sergeant Neil Howie to the isolated island of Summerisle in search of a missing girl. Howie, a devout Christian, is appalled to find that the inhabitants of the island have abandoned Christianity and now practice a form of Celtic paganism.The movie is well-regarded by critics. Film magazine Cinefantastique described it as "The Citizen Kane of horror movies", and in 2004, Total Film magazine named The Wicker Man the sixth greatest British film of all time, and during the 2012 Summer Olympics opening ceremony the film was included as part of a sequence that celebrated British cinema.In 1989, Shaffer wrote a script treatment for The Loathsome Lambton Worm, a direct sequel with fantasy elements. Hardy had no interest in the project, and it was never produced. In 2006, an ill-received American remake was released, from which Hardy and others involved with the original have dissociated themselves. In 2011, a spiritual sequel directed by Hardy entitled The Wicker Tree, was released and featured Lee in a cameo appearance.Television actor Edward Woodward was cast in the role of Sergeant Neil Howie after the part was declined by both Michael York and David Hemmings. In Britain, Woodward was best known for the role of Callan, which he played from 1967 to 1972. After The Wicker Man, Woodward went on to receive international attention for his roles in the 1980 film Breaker Morant and the 1980s TV series The Equalizer.The film was produced at a time of crisis for the British film industry. The studio in charge of production, British Lion Films, was in financial trouble and was bought by wealthy businessman John Bentley. To convince the unions that he was not about to asset-strip the company, Bentley needed to get a film into production quickly. This meant that The Wicker Man, a film set during spring, actually began filming in October 1972: artificial leaves and blossoms had to be glued to trees in many scenes. The production was kept on a small budget. Christopher Lee was extremely keen to get the film made; he and others worked on the production without pay,(Something he seems very keen to mention at every opportunity). While filming took place, British Lion was bought by EMI Films.Iron Maiden released a single called The Wicker Man from their Brave New World album in tribute to the classic film.$£$£$£$£$£$£$£$£$£$£$£$£$£$£$£$£$£$£$ Just in case anyone has too much money and wants to give a bit to us to help with our hosting n stuff. It would be amazing if you fancied sending us some pennies - thank you.https://supporter.acast.com/general-witchfinders $£$£$£$£$£$£$£$£$£$£$£$£$£$£$£$£$£$£$£ Get bonus content on PatreonSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/general-witchfinders. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Stroke Alert
Stroke Alert March 2022

Stroke Alert

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 35:03


On Episode 14 of the Stroke Alert Podcast, host Dr. Negar Asdaghi highlights two articles from the March 2022 issue of Stroke: “Natural Course of Cerebral Cavernous Malformations in Children” and “Direct Oral Anticoagulants Versus Warfarin in Cerebral Venous Thrombosis (ACTION-CVT).” She also interviews Dr. Mohammad Anadani about his article “Magnitude of Blood Pressure Change After Endovascular Therapy and Outcomes.” Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        1) Are direct oral anticoagulants a reasonable alternative to warfarin for treatments of patients with cerebral venous thrombosis? 2) What are the predictors of first and recurrent intracerebral hemorrhage in patients with cerebral cavernous malformation? 3) Is there an optimal blood pressure target after successful endovascular thrombectomy? We have the answers and much more in today's podcast. This is the latest in Stroke. Stay with us. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Welcome to another incredibly informing Stroke Alert Podcast. My name is Negar Asdaghi. I'm an Associate Professor of Neurology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and your host for the monthly Stroke Alert Podcast. The March 2022 issue of Stroke includes a number of papers published in conjunction with their oral presentation at the International Stroke Conference in New Orleans, from contemporary trends in the nationwide incidence of primary intracerebral hemorrhage, to disparities in Internet use among U.S. stroke survivors' implication for telerehabilitation during COVID-19 and beyond. I encourage you to review these timely topics in addition to listening to our podcast today. Later, in our interview section, I discussed the optimal blood pressure goal after endovascular therapy and the results of a subgroup analysis of the BP-TARGET randomized trials with Dr. Mohammad Anadani from the Department of Neurology at Washington University in St. Louis. But first with these two articles. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Cerebral cavernous malformations, also referred to as cavernous angiomas, cavernomas, cav mals, or CCMs, are angiographically occult, low flow, vascular lesions with no large arterial inflow or venous outflow vessels. These are clusters of dilated sinusoidal vascular channels that are aligned by a single layer of endothelium without the normal surrounding vascular smooth muscles, and they lack the normal tight junctions between their endothelial cells. Cavernomas can be found in both children and adults. So, the question is, how do these lesions present, especially in children, and what is their natural course? Now, before we answer these questions, let's review a few important points about cavernomas and what is known about these lesions in the literature. Number one, cavernomas are acquired lesions. Although initially thought to be congenital, they're now known to be acquired as comparing by many reports of patients with normal MRI findings, who later developed a CCM. Number two, they're not always benign. While most of them can have a benign course, cerebral cavernomas can be a cause for headaches, seizure disorders and intracerebral hemorrhage, which is, of course, their most feared complication. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Number three, though CCMs are rare vascular disorders with a prevalence of 0.6% in children and young adults, about a quarter of patients with a confirmed diagnosis of cerebral cavernous malformation are under the age of 18. And number four and finally, data seem to suggest that the risk of hemorrhage is potentially higher in the pediatric population than their adult counterparts. So, determining the natural course of CCMs and predictors of intracerebral hemorrhage is important for all patients, but especially important in the pediatric population. Now, in the current issue of the journal, in the paper titled "Natural Course of Cerebral Cavernous Malformations in Children: A Five-Year Follow-Up Study," a German group of investigators led by Dr. Alejandro Santos from the Department of Neurosurgery and Spine Surgery at University Hospital in Essen and colleagues studied the clinical presentation and predictors of intracerebral hemorrhage in their pediatric population over a 17-year study period. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        So, they identified 129 patients with a diagnosis of cerebral cavernous malformation that had baseline MRI imaging completed and at least one or more follow-ups during the study period. Now, some of these patients were treated surgically and some conservatively in the study. The mean age of their study was 10, and over 50% of their study population was male. Developmental venous anomalies, or DVAs, were detected in 15% of their study population, and 20% had brain stem cavernoma localization. Now, importantly, half of these kids, so that's 55.8% of their study population, presented with an intracerebral hemorrhage, and that's how their cavernomas were diagnosed. So, what were their top three findings? Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Number one, on the comparison of conservatively treated patients to those treated surgically, which was 37% of their cohort, they found that overall these two groups had comparable clinical characteristics and demographics with regards to sex, age, multiplicity of cavernomas, brain stem location, and family history of their lesions. But not surprisingly, those who were surgically treated were more likely to have presented with an intracerebral hemorrhage and less likely to be asymptomatic, meaning that their cavernoma was not an incidental finding as compared to those who were conservatively treated. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Number two, when they looked at predictors of presentation with intracerebral hemorrhage, they found that family history of cavernomas and brain stem cavernomas were significant predictors of presenting intracerebral hemorrhage. Number three, when they excluded those who underwent surgery, the annual risk of hemorrhage for the overall untreated participants was 4.1%. However, we should note that this rate significantly varied based on certain characteristics of the patients. The risk of hemorrhage, or rather the risk of re-hemorrhage, was double this baseline, that is 8.1%, for those cavernomas that presented with a bleed at presentation. The annual rate of hemorrhage was equally high at 7.1% for brain stem cavernomas, and then this rate gradually declined for familial form cavernomas at 6.2% annual risk of hemorrhage and multiple cavernomas at 4.8%. And it went all the way down to 0.4% annual risk of hemorrhage for asymptomatic incidentally found cerebral cavernomas. So, in the multivariate analysis, presentation with an ICH remained an independent predictor of re-hemorrhage and cavernomas with a high hazard ratio of 14. That is 14-fold higher risk of hemorrhage in cavernomas that present with a bleed as compared to those that did not. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Now, finally, on the association between DVAs and risk of hemorrhage, this study showed a possible reduced risk of hemorrhage in cavernomas that had associated DVAs, but this was not a statistically significant association. It is important to note that this finding is in keeping with the published studies in the adult population, but in contrast to the previously published data in the pediatric population. So, this association between presence of a developmental venous anomaly and cavernomas and the risk of subsequent hemorrhage needs to be furthered studied. So, what did we learn from this study? Pediatric patients with brain stem cavernomas and familial cavernomas have a higher risk of intracerebral hemorrhage as mode of presentation. The risk of re-hemorrhage is 14 times higher in cavernomas that present with an ICH as compared to cavernomas that did not bleed. And the probability of bleed tends to increase over time. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, or CVST, refers to thrombosis in the dural venous sinuses, cortical veins, deep cerebral veins, or a combination of these venous structures. CVST is an uncommon cause of stroke accounting for overall 1% of all strokes and can cause venous ischemic infarcts or intracerebral hemorrhage and importantly has a high morbidity and mortality if unrecognized and left untreated. Anticoagulation is generally the mainstay of therapy for CVST, which needs to be initiated as soon as possible, even in the presence of hemorrhage in the brain. The data regarding the choice of anticoagulation in CVST is generally extrapolated from randomized studies completed in patients with systemic venous thromboembolism, so conditions such as pulmonary emboli or deep venous thrombosis, and indicate that direct oral anticoagulants, or DOACs, are viable alternatives to traditional warfarin therapy in this patient population. This question was specifically studied in the RESPECT-CVT trial, which was a small European randomized trial that included 120 patients with cerebral vein thrombosis, randomized to either receiving dose adjusted warfarin or dabigatran at 150 milligram BID. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        The results of the study was published in JAMA Neurology in 2019 and showed that CVST patients treated with either dabigatran or warfarin were at low risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism, and they also showed a comparable safety profile in terms of risk of hemorrhage or mortality in patients treated with DOAC as compared to warfarin. But how do DOACs perform as compared to warfarin in routine practice is unknown. So, in this issue of the journal, in the study titled, "Direct Oral Anticoagulants Versus Warfarin in Cerebral Venous Thrombosis (ACTION-CVT): A Multicenter International Study," the ACTION-CVT investigators, led by Dr. Shadi Yaghi from the Department of Neurology at Brown University, aimed to compare the safety profile of DOACs to that of warfarin, in a multicenter international study that included 1025 imaging-confirmed CVST patients from multiple centers in the United States, Italy, Switzerland, and New Zealand. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        They had a number of exclusion criteria for this study, excluding patients with active cancer, those with a confirmed history of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and those who were not treated with an oral anticoagulant. And after excluding these patients, it gave them their study sample of 845 CVST patients. So, what were their main findings? Number one, in keeping with a prior literature on CVST, these patients were young, their mean age was 44, and majority of them were women, so that was 67% of their cohort. And they found that a third of these patients were actually treated with a DOAC, and, in addition, another 15% received a DOAC at some times during their treatment course. Finding number two, the most common DOAC used in this population was apixaban, that was 66% of cases treated with a direct oral anticoagulant, followed by rivaroxaban in 18% of cases, and then dabigatran used in 13.5% of DOAC-treated cases. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Important finding number three. A total of 27 patients had recurrent CVST, which also included patients with progression of their cerebral vein thrombosis on follow-up vascular imaging, and 17 patients had recurrent venous thromboembolism, and two had both. So, during their mean follow-up of 345 days, they had the rate of 5.68 recurrent venous thrombosis per 100 patient years. These rates were not different for DOAC-treated versus warfarin-treated patients in both unadjusted and adjusted models. Now, very important finding number four. When they looked at the rate of recanalization on follow-up imaging, for those in whom this information was available, partial or complete recanalization occurred in 86% of DOAC-treated patients versus 84% of warfarin-treated patients. This was not a statistically significant difference in the unadjusted or the adjusted models. Recanalization is, of course, an important determinant of outcomes in CVST and should be noted that recanalization is, of course, an important determinant of outcomes in CVST since persistent thrombosis through chronic raised ICP can potentially lead to a variety of neurological morbidities, such as chronic headache, chronic papilledema and increased risk of development of dural AV fistulas. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Now, finally, in terms of safety profile, they had 31 hemorrhages, 23 intracranial, majority were symptomatic and 9 extracranial hemorrhages. The hazard ratio for hemorrhage or death was similar for DOAC- and warfarin-treated patients, again in the unadjusted and adjusted models. So, bottom line, in this large international cohort of patients with CVST treated with an oral anticoagulant in routine practice, patients treated with DOACs had similar clinical and radiographic outcomes and had a similar favorable safety profile when compared to those treated with warfarin. So, we stay tuned for the results of the ongoing randomized trials on this subject. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        What is the optimal blood pressure target after endovascular therapy? This is a commonly encountered question in routine clinical practice with a not-so-straightforward and easy answer. After a successful endovascular treatment, high systolic blood pressure targets are thought to be associated with increased risk of reperfusion injury and development of intraparenchymal hemorrhage, leading to worsening of clinical outcomes. Conversely, low blood pressure targets may worsen the ischemic penumbra, especially in the setting of incomplete perfusion. The current stroke guidelines recommendations regarding blood pressure control after endovascular treatment are mostly extrapolated from the post-thrombolysis studies. The BP-TARGET trial was a recently completed randomized study in France that aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of intensive blood pressure lowering, that is systolic blood pressure of less than 130, as compared to standard of care, that is systolic blood pressure between 130 to 185, after successful endovascular therapy in acute ischemic stroke. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        This was a neutral study, and the main results of the trial was published in early 2021 in Lancet Neurology. And if you missed it, well, as always, we're here with the Stroke Alert Podcast to fill in the gaps. So, we'll review the trial results with our podcast guest today, Dr. Mohammad Anadani, from the Department of Neurology at Washington University in St. Louis, who's also the first author of a paper in the current issue of the journal titled "Magnitude of Blood Pressure Change After Endovascular Therapy and Outcomes: Insight From the Blood Pressure-TARGET Trial." This was a post hoc analysis of the BP-TARGET trial, looking at the extent of blood pressure reduction and its implications of clinical outcomes. Welcome, Mohammad, thank you for joining us on the podcast today. Dr. Mohammad Anadani:            Thank you for having me. It's a pleasure to be here with you today. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Thank you. So, blood pressure control is a really simple and yet extremely complicated topic when it comes to the collateral support before reperfusion therapies, and then, of course, the possibility of reperfusion injury post-thrombectomy in the setting of an ischemic stroke related to a large vessel occlusion. Can you please give our listeners an overview of the topic of blood pressure control in this setting? Dr. Mohammad Anadani:            Yes, absolutely. I totally agree. The topic of blood pressure control after, in patients with large vessel occlusion, is very complicated. And when we talk about blood pressure control, I think we should differentiate between pre-recanalization and post-recanalization. In the pre-recanalization period, the main focus should be to maintain adequate perfusion to ischemic penumbra to prevent infarct expansion. So, there is consensus that hypotension should be avoided at all costs pre-recanalization. When it comes to the post-reperfusion, here it gets a little bit more complicated. We do have a large body of evidence, as you mentioned, for the association between high blood pressure in the post-reperfusion period and the risk of poor outcome. What we don't know yet is if active reduction of blood pressure after reperfusion is beneficial. And that's why, as you mention, the American Heart Association guidelines just recommend a systolic blood pressure less than 180, just because of the lack of data to support the benefit of blood pressure reduction. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Perfect. So, this was definitely the topic that the BP-TARGET trial set out to investigate. What is the optimal blood pressure target after successful revascularization therapy? Can you please tell us a little bit about the trial, the design and the inclusion criteria? Dr. Mohammad Anadani:            The Blood Pressure-TARGET trial, or BP-TARGET trial, aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of intensive blood pressure lowering treatment. The trial enrolled patients with anterior circulation large vessel occlusion, that is M1 or ICA occlusion, or tandem occlusion, which is both M1 and ICA occlusion. The patients who were treated with endovascular therapy and achieved successful reperfusion, and they defined successful reperfusion as modified treatment cerebral ischemia 2b to 3. And then after enrollment, the patients were randomized in one-to-one ratio into intensive blood pressure control, which is systolic blood pressure less than 130, and standard blood pressure control, which is systolic blood pressure less than 185. Now, these two cutoffs came in from some evidence that systolic blood pressure less than 130 is beneficial in these patients or this is the optimal cutoff for patients with successful reperfusion. For the standard group, the design of the trial, at the time of the design of the trial, that was the standard or recommended European guidelines, blood pressure group. And the study was conducted in France between June 2017 and September 2019. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Thank you, Mohammad. So, I want to recap for our listeners, we're looking at a French study that was conducted in four centers, in France. And it's a very recent study, recently completed. The whole thing was completed over the past five years. So, very interesting because it's applicable to our current treatment models. And these were patients with a large vessel occlusion in the anterior circulation that had undergone thrombectomy. All have achieved a successful revascularization, as you defined, TICI 2b or C or TICI 3, and then they were randomized to either standard of care in terms of post-thrombectomy blood pressure control or the intensive group, which was under systolic blood pressure of 130. Did I recap that correctly? Dr. Mohammad Anadani:            Correct. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Perfect. So, now we're ready for the primary outcome. So, what was the primary outcome of the trial? Dr. Mohammad Anadani:            The primary outcome was any radiographic intraparenchymal hemorrhage that was seen on CT within 24 hours to 36 hours after successful reperfusion. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        This is interesting, Mohammad, this is a different primary outcome than we're used to in a usual randomized trial that commonly uses a modified Rankin scale of usually at 90 days. Do you have any insight as to why a radiographic outcome was chosen for this particular study, and obviously what would be fine as part of the trial? Dr. Mohammad Anadani:            Yes. So, the main reason why the study investigator chose this as a primary outcome was because really the benefit of, or at least what is thought to be the benefit from systolic blood pressure reduction, is to lower intraparenchymal hemorrhage or the risk of intraparenchymal hemorrhage. So, to assist the efficacy of this intensive blood pressure lowering, the first thing we expect to see is lower intraparenchymal hemorrhage. So, when you have your target as intraparenchymal hemorrhage, it truly requires much smaller sample size than having functional outcome as the primary outcome. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Okay, perfect. And I think we're ready to hear the results for the main BP-TARGET trial. Dr. Mohammad Anadani:            The results of the trial were disappointing for people who were interested in this topic. The primary outcome, which, again, was an intraparenchymal hemorrhage, occurred in 42% of patient intensive arm and 43% of patient the standard arm. And there was no difference in the risk of intraparenchymal hemorrhage between the two groups. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Well, I think you can phrase it as disappointing, or more room to understand the pathophysiology and also onto bigger and better trials. And so I want to now move on the current paper in this issue of the journal, which is a post hoc analysis of the trial. Can you tell us a little more about your study? Dr. Mohammad Anadani:            In our study, we wanted to study the blood pressure as dynamic target. So, we wanted to see if there is any association between blood pressure change from baseline with the functional and safety outcome after endovascular therapy. And also we wanted to understand the shape of the association. In other words, to see, is there a point after which the blood pressure reduction becomes helpful? So, to do that, we did this post hoc analysis of the BP-TARGET trial, and we only enrolled patients who had more than 50% of planned blood pressure measurements. And then we defined systolic blood pressure change as the difference in the mean achieved blood pressure in three different time points: zero to one hour, one to six hours, and six to 24 hours minus the baseline systolic blood pressure. And here we considered the end-of-procedure blood pressure as the baseline systolic blood pressure. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        All right. So, I want to recap what you mentioned before we hear what you found in the study. So, really, blood pressure, as you noted, is a dynamic factor. It's not just a target, but other words, is how fast you're reducing it, in what timeframe after endovascular thrombectomy, and also how much. So, as an example, as we were discussing this earlier, before we did the podcast recording, is if you started a systolic blood pressure at 190 and then reduced that patient quickly to 130, is that the same as if starting blood pressure was 150, and then you reduce it to, again, 130? So, delta, or the magnitude of change in blood pressure, and also time intervals, that how long after thrombectomy you were able to reduce that blood pressure, are all important factors in terms of determining the outcome. That's a nice summary of what this current study aimed to do. Perfect. So, with that, we're ready to hear the results of your study. Dr. Mohammad Anadani:            We included 267 patients, 137 in the intensive arm and 130 patients in the standard arm. And then, when we compared patients who had poor outcome at 90 days to patients who had good outcome at 90 days, we found that the patient who had poor outcome had less systolic pressure reduction, meaning these patients had less systolic pressure reduction compared to the baseline than the patient who had good outcome. And then, when we controlled for other confounders, their association remained significant, especially for the one- to six-hour period and six- to 24-hour period. And the same results were when we had our outcome as intraparenchymal hemorrhage, we found the same results. The patient who had intraparenchymal hemorrhage had less systolic blood pressure reduction than patients who did not have intraparenchymal hemorrhage. And, again, the association remained significant even after we adjusted for possible confounders, like age, the degree of recanalization, and the stroke severity. Dr. Mohammad Anadani:            And then we wanted to see, if we looked at the blood pressure change as categorical variable, meaning we want to see if there is a difference between large systolic blood pressure reduction compared to minimum or no systolic blood pressure reduction. So, we divided the systolic blood pressure reduction into three categories: the minimal, which was just zero to 10 systolic blood pressure reduction; the moderate, which was 10 to 20; and large, which was more than 20 millimeter mercury systolic blood pressure reduction. And when we looked at that, a patient who had more than 20 millimeter mercury systolic blood pressure reduction had significantly lower risk of poor outcome than patients who had no systolic blood pressure reduction or just minimal systolic blood pressure reduction. And the difference was striking. There were the patients who had more than 20 systolic blood pressure reduction, they had almost 62% lower risk or lower odds of having poor outcome than a patient who did not have significant systolic blood pressure reduction. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        These are some very interesting findings. Let me try and to summarize this for our listeners and make sure that I understood the study results correctly. So, in other words, if we had a patient that at the end of a successful revascularization treatment, say, had a systolic blood pressure of 150, and that was reduced to 140, so there's a 10 millimeter mercury difference, that patient, in this particular study, had a higher risk for development of intracerebral hemorrhage than the person that finished at 180, so finished endovascular therapy at 180 millimeter of mercury. But then with rapid reduction, we dropped the blood pressure to, say, for example, 140, so that 40 millimeter of mercury of reduction carried a higher weight or higher impact on reduction of intracerebral hemorrhage than the absolute target of blood pressure, because your results did not look at which category were these patients under, were they under intensive category or standard, but they looked at just the magnitude of that drop, which showed a bigger implication on effective blood pressure reduction on outcomes. Dr. Mohammad Anadani:            Yeah, that is correct. Now, the primary outcome for our study and really what we want to look at here is the functional outcome, more than the intraparenchymal hemorrhage. And, like you said, if we have, let's say, patients who started with 160 and they dropped to 120 or started with 180 and they dropped to 150, these patients had better functional outcome than patients who started, let's say, with 160 and remained 160 or even their blood pressure increased after reperfusion. We did not look at absolute numbers, but we did look at if the patients were presented, let's say, above 180 or patient presented less than 180, and both of these patients had the same, or both of these groups had the same results, meaning systolic blood pressure seems to be beneficial for both of these patients. And also we looked at the patients who were in the standard arm or in the patients who were in the intensive arm, also both of them have the same results. The systolic blood pressure reduction remained associated with poor outcome. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Mohammad, the current American Heart Association guidelines and also the European stroke guidelines both recommend a target systolic blood pressure of under 180 or 185 after successful recanalization. What do you think the optimal target blood pressure should be based on BP-TARGET trial and based on your post hoc analysis? Dr. Mohammad Anadani:            Yeah, that's a difficult question. We learn from the BP-TARGET trial, that's lowering systolic blood pressure is safe. And our study added to that, that significant reduction, especially in the first hour after reperfusion therapy, may be beneficial because patient had lower risk of poor outcome. However, I don't think we will have a one number that we will be able to say, this is the optimal blood pressure that fits all patients. I think the optimal blood pressure needs to be tailored to individual patient based on their admission blood pressure, based on their comorbidities, and also based on the degree of reperfusion. I don't think patients who have TICI 2b, for example, should be treated exactly the same as patients who had TICI 3. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        So, a lot still to come on this topic, and we are still learning. So, on that topic, can you tell us a little bit about the currently ongoing randomized trials on the topic of blood pressure controlled post-thrombectomy? Dr. Mohammad Anadani:            Yes. I think there are three main trials that are ongoing now and trying to assess the safety and efficacy also of intensive blood pressure reduction. The first trial is the Second Enhanced Control of Hypertension and Thrombectomy Stroke Study, or ENCHANTED2 study. And this study is being conducted now in China. And it's comparing systolic blood pressure less than 120 target to systolic blood pressure less than 180. And the study has the primary outcome here, is the shift in mRS score at 90 days. The study is estimated to be completed in 2023, so, hopefully next year, we will have some results. The second study is the Outcome in Patients Treated With Intraarterial Thrombectomy - optiMAL Blood Pressure Control, or OPTIMAL-BP. And this study is being conducted in South Korea, and it's comparing systolic blood pressure target of less than 140 to systolic blood pressure target of less than 180. Dr. Mohammad Anadani:            And the primary outcomes of this study are mRS zero to two at 90 days and symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage. The study here is estimated to be completed in 2024. And the last trial is the Blood Pressure After Endovascular Stroke Therapy-II, or the BEST-II trial. And this is being conducted here in the U.S. and comparing three different blood pressure cohorts: less than 160 and less than 140 as the experimental group to less than 180 as the standard group. And the primary outcome of this study is final infarct volume. And also the co-primary outcome is utility-weighted mRS at 90 days. And this study is estimated to be completed next year, in 2023. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        So, a diverse group of randomized trials from Korea, China, and the United States. Hopefully, we'll have a lot more answers in the next two years then on this topic. So, just the last few minutes of our recording here. Mohammad, can you please summarize for our listeners, what should be our top two takeaway messages from your study and what we know from collectively in the field on the topic of blood pressure control post-thrombectomy? Dr. Mohammad Anadani:            I think the main home message that one, we found a leaner association between blood pressure change after endovascular therapy and poor functional outcome, and two, effective and significant systolic blood pressure reduction, which we defined in our study as a more than 20 millimeter mercury in the first hour after endovascular therapy, is potentially beneficial, and these patients had significantly lower risk of poor outcome than the patient who did not have significant blood pressure reduction. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Thank you so much, Dr. Mohammad Anadani. Thank you for joining on the podcast today, and we look forward to having you back and covering more of your work in the future. Dr. Mohammad Anadani:            Thank you for having me, and I look forward to learning more about the Stroke studies from your podcast. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Thank you. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        And this concludes our podcast for the March 2022 issue of Stroke. Please be sure to check out this month's table of contents for the full list of publications, including a series of Focused Updates on the topic of health equity and reduction of disparities in stroke, organized by Dr. Bruce Ovbiagele. It's hard to believe that we're already in March, and coming off the heels of one of our largest cerebrovascular annual meetings, the International Stroke Conference, which coincidentally concurrently happened with one of the biggest sports events of the year, the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing. Now, what do these two very different events have in common? Well, I think they both represent the extraordinary stories of talent and grit on the world stage. So, let's end our Stroke podcast with an inspirational story of the Olympian swimmer Yusra Mardini. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        In August 2015, after her family home was invaded and destroyed in the Syrian civil war, the 17-year-old Yusra and her sister, Sarah, fled Syria to Beirut, Istanbul, and finally İzmir, in Turkey, where they managed to squeeze onto a dingey crossing the Mediterranean to the Greek island of Lesbos. Carrying 20 people, rather than just six or seven, they found their boat sinking less than 30 minutes into their journey. Yusra, Sara, and another woman were the only ones on board who knew how to swim. Fighting for their life and that of the other refugees on board, they would swim the cold open water of the heavy seas for three and a half hours before reaching the shore. Less than a year later, Yusra became one of the top 10 athletes worldwide to qualify and compete in the 2016 Summer Olympics, as part of the first refugee Olympic athletes team. She won the opening heat of women 100-meter butterfly race, but did not make it to the podium in the Olympic Games. And that is, of course, only part of her story. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Very much like the story of many scientists, doctors, engineers, and staff who make the international stroke meeting possible. Many stories are not celebrated on a podium, but nevertheless are the essence of the success of our stroke community. So, wherever you are in the field of neurosciences, whatever the challenge, and however cold the waters, know that while we don't share the same border, the same flag, or even a common language, together we push the field of cerebrovascular disorders forward. And, as always, we stay alert with Stroke Alert. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:         This program is copyright of the American Heart Association, 2022. The opinions expressed by speakers in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association. For more, visit AHAjournals.org.

Michigan Football – In the Trenches with Jon Jansen
Conqu'ring Heroes 53 - Myles Amine

Michigan Football – In the Trenches with Jon Jansen

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 15:32


Fresh off a Big Ten championship, Michigan wrestling star Myles Amine sits down with Jon Jansen to discuss the program's first league crown since 1973 (1:15), his experience at the Summer Olympics in Tokyo (6:45), and this weekend's opportunity in Detroit at the NCAA Championships (11:00).See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

BE with Champions
Christian Vande Velde - Retired American professional road racing cyclist - NBC Commentator

BE with Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2022 78:50


Christian Vande Velde raced bikes at the highest level throughout his 15-year professional career from 1998–2013, competing at the 2008 Summer Olympics and 18 Grand Tours. With two top-10 performances and multiple team victories including a 4th place in the Tour De France in 2008, and a year-out from retiring he had a brilliant win at the USA Pro Cycling Challenge.   Post-retirement, Christian has built a 'second life' in cycling through his role as an NBC sports commentator ... quote, "I rode bikes now I talk about them on NBC." Christian is also a celebrity Peloton instructor.   Timestamps 0:00 - Introduction to show. 1:55 - Interview starts 3:52 - COVID changed so many things in regard to broadcast commentary, particularly the ability to work from home studios via television feeds, Christian explains how he has adapted to this new way of working and how he feels it will be in the future for major international events. 7:39 - Christian's relationship with the late Paul Sherwen goes back decades to when they were both in grade school. He tells us some beautiful stories about Paul and his gift of language. 11:58 - Christian explains a not-so-typical day working commentary on the Tour de France. 13:57 - Greg turns the clock back with Christian and they talk about how he found his passion for cycling. 19:34 - Growing up in Chicago, at what point did Chris realise he had some talent for this cycling thing? 21:10 - Christian tells the story of winning his first junior worlds team race as he studied under a scholarship at a small arts school. This was a major turning point for him, but he was berated by the head coach for winning. 25:32 - The high amount of training miles back in the late 90's while in camp in Adelaide Australia had an impact on Christians entire career. He explains both the pros, and cons of the training and nutrition from back then. 29:07 - Being an elite athlete meant missing out on friend and family time back home ... Christian explains the sacrifices and the life of an athlete is not always as glamourous as it's perceived to be. 30:50 - Having so much success on the track, Christian explains why he switched to road racing. 32:07 - Christian describes the feeling of getting his first big pro contract. Wait till you hear how much it was worth! 34:24 - In road racing, a 'domestique' is a rider who works for the benefit of their team and leader, rather than trying to win the race. In French, domestique translates as "servant". Christian explains how this works within a pro cycling team, including his time riding with Lance Armstrong. 39:43 - Christian gives some insight in regard to Lance ... with, or without drugs, was Lance still the best rider in all those events? 43:26 - Christian's best grand tour was the 2008 Tour de France. He explains why, and how his mind and body turned up for this event. 51:55 - Christian has publicly stated that the worst event for his career was the 2005 Giro d'Italia - he explains in detail why and what happened before and during this event. 54:41 - What embarrassing moments stick out for Christian? 56:02 - Why did he decide to retire, and what was the transition into commentating for NBC like for Christian. 01:05:50 - Christian gives his view on the sport of professional cycling and explains some big factors that have changed the sport for the better. 01:08:30 - Who was the greatest cyclist you ever competed against? 01:10:49 - Who is Christian Vande Velde's G.O.A.T cyclist? 01:12:30 - If you could sit with any 3 people for dinner, who would they be, and why? 01:14:31 - What's one piece of advice that you could give to people now to help them optimize their lives? 01:16:02 - What's next for Christian Vande Velde? 01:18:18 - Interview ends.   Links Be sure and check out bennettendurance.com Find Greg on social media: Twitter Greg Bennett Show Instagram The Greg Bennett Show   Find Christian Vande Velde on social media: Twitter: https://twitter.com/ChristianVDV Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/christianvdv

RunRunLive 4.0 - Running Podcast
Episode 4-474 – Frank Shorter

RunRunLive 4.0 - Running Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 13, 2022 48:52


  The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-474 – Frank Shorter  (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4474.mp3] Link MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - Chris' other show à Intro: Hello my long suffering friends.  How are you?  Well it's been a busy two weeks since the last time we chatted.  And I truly missed.  I get lonely.  I worry.  Where have you been?  How do we know you're not dead in a ditch? Today I'm going to mess with the format again.  I managed to write a really funny piece about varmints that I'm going to perform for you, but it came out at 2000 + words so I'm going to push that after the interview, skip section one and use the intro here to talk about our guest. Frank Shorter.  Yes that Frank Shorter.  It was one of those interviews where I was hopelessly overwhelmed by content and just did my best to touch on a couple fun things with him.  But, the rich tapestry of Frank's life does not fit easily into a 20 minute conversation – so I'm going to fill in some of the blanks here. Frank was born, ironically in Munich Germany, where he would eventually return to win the Gold Medal in the marathon at the 1972 Olympics.  His Father was a physician in the army.  Frank grew up in a troubled home in upstate New York.  He started running to get away from an abusive father.  Running gave him the freedom we all know and love.  To get him away from his father, his mother arranged to have him sent to a prep school in Massachusetts where he was given the space to expand his running talents.  He went on to run at Yale for his undergraduate and won a number of NCAA titles.  He moved on to Gainesville Florida to study for his law degree – all the while training and racing at an elite level.  The thing about Franks journey in the 70's was that he showed up at all the marathon runner hotspots with all the legends.  He trained with that famous Florida track club with Jeff Galloway and crew.  He was in Oregon with Prefontaine.  Frank taught Steve how to Ski.  Frank was with Steve before he was killed.  Frank won the elite Fukuoka Marathon . He was the #1 ranked marathon runner in the USA for 5 straight years and in the world for 3. He won the gold medal at the Munich Olympics in 1972.  You may not remember 1972, but this was the Olympics where the world learned about terrorism.  A crew of Palestinians broke into athlete's village and held the Israeli Olympic team hostage, murdering some of them. Frank was sleeping on the balcony and heard the gunshots.  Coming full circle, Frank was right there on Boylston Street in Boston in 2013 when the bombs went off.  He won the silver medal in the 1976 games losing to an unknow East German athlete, who most likely was a drug cheat.  Frank has become instrumental in removing drugs from the Olympics – a battle that still rages. Through all this he trained himself with an uncanny mixture of speedwork and volume.  He managed to stay healthy and race across 100+ mile weeks for a decade.  Frank eventually ended up in Boulder where he was the founder of the iconic Boulder Boulder race.  He's an amazing athlete, a humble, kind and generous guy and I'm sure I'll be talking to him again. He even has an IMDB page for his roles in several movies!  Great guy, full life, enjoyed meeting him.  … What's going on in my world?  I'm still training for the Flying Pig in May.  My knee is still a mess, but I'm enjoying when I can. I try to get Ollie out, but the weather has been horrific and I'm at the point in my life where I see less and less merit in unnecessary misery. Hey – a quick heads up – did you see Steve Runner is podcasting again?  Yeah – Pheddipidations is back from the dead.  And it's not the angry political Steve.  It's the old runner Steve.  Give it a resubscribe and listen.  It's good to hear his rational voice. I did manage to get a couple of great training runs out in the woods.  We got a cold snap right after a heavy snow. With the pandemic traffic in my woods the trail was packed down and hard and great for running.  I got out and it was great.  I remembered some of the joy I used to feel being out alone in the woods with the dog.  The cold, crisp air and the packed trail.  Really good. I've been getting beaten up fairly well with my new role at work.  But I'm liking it.  I just focus on blocking the time and doing the work.  I'm at a point in my career where I don't have to worry about failure and that frees me up to be creative.  Makes the work an ecstasy versus a chore. And that's the secret, my friends.  Remember the gift. On with the show. About Zero ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action. Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations) … I'll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don't have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member's only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.   … The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  … Section one – Skipped Voices of reason – the conversation Farnk Shorter – Marathon Legend Running career Shorter first achieved distinction by winning the 1969 National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) six mile run title during his senior year at Yale. He won his first U.S. national titles in 1970 in the three mile and six mile events. He also was the U.S. national six mile/10,000 meter champion in 1971, 1974, 1975 and 1977.   After graduating from Yale, Shorter chose to pursue a Doctor of Medicine degree at the University of New Mexico. However, he dropped out after six weeks after classes began to impact his training regime. Soon, he moved to Florida to study for a Juris Doctor degree at the University of Florida in Gainesville because of the excellence of the environment and the opportunity to train with Jack Bacheler as members of the Florida Track Club (FTC), founded by Jimmy Carnes, then the head coach of the Florida Gators track and field team.[10] Bacheler was regarded as America's best distance runner, having qualified for the finals of the 5,000-meter race at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics.[11] The FTC's core nucleus of Shorter, Bacheler and Jeff Galloway qualified for the 1972 Olympics and their success made Gainesville the Mecca of distance running on the East Coast in the early 1970s.[12]   Shorter won the U.S. national cross-country championships four times (1970–1973). He was the U.S. Olympic Trials champion in both the 10,000-meter run and the marathon in both 1972 and 1976. He also won both the 10,000-meter run and the marathon at the 1971 Pan American Games. Shorter was a four-time winner of the Fukuoka Marathon (1971–1974), generally recognized as the most prestigious marathon in the world at that time and held on a very fast course. His career best of 2:10:30 was set at that race on December 3, 1972. Several months later, on March 18, 1973, Shorter won the elite Lake Biwa Marathon in 2:12:03. He won the prestigious 7-mile Falmouth Road Race on Cape Cod in 1975 and 1976 and Atlanta's 10-kilometer Peachtree Road Race in 1977.   Shorter achieved his greatest recognition in the marathon, and he is the only American athlete to win two medals in the Olympic marathon.[13] At the Munich Games—which coincidentally is Shorter's place of birth— he finished fifth in the 10,000-meter final, breaking the American record for the event that he had established in his qualifying heat.[8] A few days later, he won the gold medal in the marathon. This ultimate achievement was marred by an impostor, West German student Norbert Sudhaus,[14] who ran into Olympic Stadium ahead of Shorter. Shorter was not bothered by the silence from the crowd who had been duped into thinking that he was running for the silver medal. Shorter was confident that he was going to win the gold medal because he knew that no competing runner had passed him.[15] He received the James E. Sullivan Award afterwards as the top amateur athlete in the United States.[8] At the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal, Shorter dropped out of the 10,000 meters in order to concentrate exclusively on the marathon, winning the silver medal in the marathon[8] and finishing behind previously unheralded Waldemar Cierpinski of East Germany.[16] Cierpinski was later implicated as a part of the state-sponsored doping program by East German track and field research files uncovered by Werner Franke at the Stasi headquarters in Leipzig in the late 1990s. There were suspicions about other East German athletes during the Montreal Olympics, including the East German women's swimming team led by Kornelia Ender; the East German women won eleven of the thirteen events.[17]   From 2000 to 2003, Shorter was the chairman of the United States Anti-Doping Agency, a body that he helped to establish.[18]   Shorter was featured as a prominent character, played by Jeremy Sisto, in the 1998 film Without Limits. The film follows the life of Shorter's contemporary, training partner, Olympic teammate and sometime rival, Steve Prefontaine.[18] Shorter was the next to last person to see Prefontaine alive before he died in an automobile accident.   Shorter was inducted into the United States Olympic Hall of Fame in 1984, the USA National Track and Field Hall of Fame in 1989,[8] and the National Distance Running Hall of Fame in 1998.   A long-time resident of Boulder, Colorado, Shorter co-founded the Bolder Boulder in 1979. The annual 10k race is a popular Memorial Day event, which culminates with a tribute to U.S. Armed Forces at Folsom Field at the University of Colorado. A life-size bronze statue of Shorter stands outside the stadium. Section two –Varmint -   Outro Ok my friends that's episode 4-474 of the RunRunLive Podcast.   I still plan to limp through the Flying Pig marathon but my knee is not responding as I hoped it would.  It is weak, unstable and painful.  Basically, well I want to use a family unfriendly word here, but let's just say it's not good. Frank Shorter ran the 1976 Olympic Marathon with a bad knee and came in 2nd.  Oy! I have been having a lot of trouble finding the time and inspiration to write and produce this show.  I know it's getting stale, and you deserve better than that.  I'm considering ways to make it less of a lift for me.  Maybe break the sections up into individual, shorter shows that I could drop more frequently.  Maybe find a theme.  Or create multiple short shows from the various themes I cover here.  Then you could pick and choose what you wanted to listen to. We'll see how it goes.  One step at a time. I'm heading down to Dallas tomorrow morning and I just realized it's time change weekend here.  Meaning I'm going to have to roll out of bed at 3:30 AM body-clock time to start a long week with a nice dose of jetlag.  Heard an interesting comment on a call this week.  We were prepping for a executive meeting with one of our customers.  There were two senior executives from our side.  They were talking about a big deal that needed to close at this customer.  One of the Execs said to the other “You need to make it personal.”  That struck me.  After all the professionalism is sorted out every business transaction is personal.  I've always tried to avoid that.  Making business personal. But you can't.  It's personal whether you want it to be or not.  But making it personal allows you to leverage empathy – so it's not necessarily a bad thing.  How about that for a thing to try this week? Make it personal. And I'll see you out there. And I'll see you out there. MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - Rachel -> Coach Jeff ->  

RunRunLive 4.0 - Running Podcast
Episode 4-474 – Frank Shorter

RunRunLive 4.0 - Running Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 13, 2022 48:52


  The RunRunLive 4.0 Podcast Episode 4-474 – Frank Shorter  (Audio: link) audio:http://www.RunRunLive.com/PodcastEpisodes/epi4474.mp3] Link MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - Chris' other show à Intro: Hello my long suffering friends.  How are you?  Well it's been a busy two weeks since the last time we chatted.  And I truly missed.  I get lonely.  I worry.  Where have you been?  How do we know you're not dead in a ditch? Today I'm going to mess with the format again.  I managed to write a really funny piece about varmints that I'm going to perform for you, but it came out at 2000 + words so I'm going to push that after the interview, skip section one and use the intro here to talk about our guest. Frank Shorter.  Yes that Frank Shorter.  It was one of those interviews where I was hopelessly overwhelmed by content and just did my best to touch on a couple fun things with him.  But, the rich tapestry of Frank's life does not fit easily into a 20 minute conversation – so I'm going to fill in some of the blanks here. Frank was born, ironically in Munich Germany, where he would eventually return to win the Gold Medal in the marathon at the 1972 Olympics.  His Father was a physician in the army.  Frank grew up in a troubled home in upstate New York.  He started running to get away from an abusive father.  Running gave him the freedom we all know and love.  To get him away from his father, his mother arranged to have him sent to a prep school in Massachusetts where he was given the space to expand his running talents.  He went on to run at Yale for his undergraduate and won a number of NCAA titles.  He moved on to Gainesville Florida to study for his law degree – all the while training and racing at an elite level.  The thing about Franks journey in the 70's was that he showed up at all the marathon runner hotspots with all the legends.  He trained with that famous Florida track club with Jeff Galloway and crew.  He was in Oregon with Prefontaine.  Frank taught Steve how to Ski.  Frank was with Steve before he was killed.  Frank won the elite Fukuoka Marathon . He was the #1 ranked marathon runner in the USA for 5 straight years and in the world for 3. He won the gold medal at the Munich Olympics in 1972.  You may not remember 1972, but this was the Olympics where the world learned about terrorism.  A crew of Palestinians broke into athlete's village and held the Israeli Olympic team hostage, murdering some of them. Frank was sleeping on the balcony and heard the gunshots.  Coming full circle, Frank was right there on Boylston Street in Boston in 2013 when the bombs went off.  He won the silver medal in the 1976 games losing to an unknow East German athlete, who most likely was a drug cheat.  Frank has become instrumental in removing drugs from the Olympics – a battle that still rages. Through all this he trained himself with an uncanny mixture of speedwork and volume.  He managed to stay healthy and race across 100+ mile weeks for a decade.  Frank eventually ended up in Boulder where he was the founder of the iconic Boulder Boulder race.  He's an amazing athlete, a humble, kind and generous guy and I'm sure I'll be talking to him again. He even has an IMDB page for his roles in several movies!  Great guy, full life, enjoyed meeting him.  … What's going on in my world?  I'm still training for the Flying Pig in May.  My knee is still a mess, but I'm enjoying when I can. I try to get Ollie out, but the weather has been horrific and I'm at the point in my life where I see less and less merit in unnecessary misery. Hey – a quick heads up – did you see Steve Runner is podcasting again?  Yeah – Pheddipidations is back from the dead.  And it's not the angry political Steve.  It's the old runner Steve.  Give it a resubscribe and listen.  It's good to hear his rational voice. I did manage to get a couple of great training runs out in the woods.  We got a cold snap right after a heavy snow. With the pandemic traffic in my woods the trail was packed down and hard and great for running.  I got out and it was great.  I remembered some of the joy I used to feel being out alone in the woods with the dog.  The cold, crisp air and the packed trail.  Really good. I've been getting beaten up fairly well with my new role at work.  But I'm liking it.  I just focus on blocking the time and doing the work.  I'm at a point in my career where I don't have to worry about failure and that frees me up to be creative.  Makes the work an ecstasy versus a chore. And that's the secret, my friends.  Remember the gift. On with the show. About Zero ZERO — The End of Prostate Cancer is the leading national nonprofit with the mission to end prostate cancer. ZERO advances research, improves the lives of men and families, and inspires action. Link to my ZERO page: (for Donations) … I'll remind you that the RunRunLive podcast is ad free and listener supported.  What does that mean? It means you don't have to listen to me trying to sound sincere about Stamps.com or Audible.. (although, fyi, my MarathonBQ book is on audible) We do have a membership option where you can become a member and as a special thank you, you will get access to member's only audio. There are book reviews, odd philosophical thoughts, zombie stories and I curate old episodes for you to listen to.  I recently added that guy who cut off is foot so he could keep training and my first call with Geoff Galloway.   “Curated” means I add some introductory comments and edit them up a bit.  So anyhow – become a member so I can keep paying my bills.   … The RunRunLive podcast is Ad Free and listener supported.  … Section one – Skipped Voices of reason – the conversation Farnk Shorter – Marathon Legend Running career Shorter first achieved distinction by winning the 1969 National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) six mile run title during his senior year at Yale. He won his first U.S. national titles in 1970 in the three mile and six mile events. He also was the U.S. national six mile/10,000 meter champion in 1971, 1974, 1975 and 1977.   After graduating from Yale, Shorter chose to pursue a Doctor of Medicine degree at the University of New Mexico. However, he dropped out after six weeks after classes began to impact his training regime. Soon, he moved to Florida to study for a Juris Doctor degree at the University of Florida in Gainesville because of the excellence of the environment and the opportunity to train with Jack Bacheler as members of the Florida Track Club (FTC), founded by Jimmy Carnes, then the head coach of the Florida Gators track and field team.[10] Bacheler was regarded as America's best distance runner, having qualified for the finals of the 5,000-meter race at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics.[11] The FTC's core nucleus of Shorter, Bacheler and Jeff Galloway qualified for the 1972 Olympics and their success made Gainesville the Mecca of distance running on the East Coast in the early 1970s.[12]   Shorter won the U.S. national cross-country championships four times (1970–1973). He was the U.S. Olympic Trials champion in both the 10,000-meter run and the marathon in both 1972 and 1976. He also won both the 10,000-meter run and the marathon at the 1971 Pan American Games. Shorter was a four-time winner of the Fukuoka Marathon (1971–1974), generally recognized as the most prestigious marathon in the world at that time and held on a very fast course. His career best of 2:10:30 was set at that race on December 3, 1972. Several months later, on March 18, 1973, Shorter won the elite Lake Biwa Marathon in 2:12:03. He won the prestigious 7-mile Falmouth Road Race on Cape Cod in 1975 and 1976 and Atlanta's 10-kilometer Peachtree Road Race in 1977.   Shorter achieved his greatest recognition in the marathon, and he is the only American athlete to win two medals in the Olympic marathon.[13] At the Munich Games—which coincidentally is Shorter's place of birth— he finished fifth in the 10,000-meter final, breaking the American record for the event that he had established in his qualifying heat.[8] A few days later, he won the gold medal in the marathon. This ultimate achievement was marred by an impostor, West German student Norbert Sudhaus,[14] who ran into Olympic Stadium ahead of Shorter. Shorter was not bothered by the silence from the crowd who had been duped into thinking that he was running for the silver medal. Shorter was confident that he was going to win the gold medal because he knew that no competing runner had passed him.[15] He received the James E. Sullivan Award afterwards as the top amateur athlete in the United States.[8] At the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal, Shorter dropped out of the 10,000 meters in order to concentrate exclusively on the marathon, winning the silver medal in the marathon[8] and finishing behind previously unheralded Waldemar Cierpinski of East Germany.[16] Cierpinski was later implicated as a part of the state-sponsored doping program by East German track and field research files uncovered by Werner Franke at the Stasi headquarters in Leipzig in the late 1990s. There were suspicions about other East German athletes during the Montreal Olympics, including the East German women's swimming team led by Kornelia Ender; the East German women won eleven of the thirteen events.[17]   From 2000 to 2003, Shorter was the chairman of the United States Anti-Doping Agency, a body that he helped to establish.[18]   Shorter was featured as a prominent character, played by Jeremy Sisto, in the 1998 film Without Limits. The film follows the life of Shorter's contemporary, training partner, Olympic teammate and sometime rival, Steve Prefontaine.[18] Shorter was the next to last person to see Prefontaine alive before he died in an automobile accident.   Shorter was inducted into the United States Olympic Hall of Fame in 1984, the USA National Track and Field Hall of Fame in 1989,[8] and the National Distance Running Hall of Fame in 1998.   A long-time resident of Boulder, Colorado, Shorter co-founded the Bolder Boulder in 1979. The annual 10k race is a popular Memorial Day event, which culminates with a tribute to U.S. Armed Forces at Folsom Field at the University of Colorado. A life-size bronze statue of Shorter stands outside the stadium. Section two –Varmint -   Outro Ok my friends that's episode 4-474 of the RunRunLive Podcast.   I still plan to limp through the Flying Pig marathon but my knee is not responding as I hoped it would.  It is weak, unstable and painful.  Basically, well I want to use a family unfriendly word here, but let's just say it's not good. Frank Shorter ran the 1976 Olympic Marathon with a bad knee and came in 2nd.  Oy! I have been having a lot of trouble finding the time and inspiration to write and produce this show.  I know it's getting stale, and you deserve better than that.  I'm considering ways to make it less of a lift for me.  Maybe break the sections up into individual, shorter shows that I could drop more frequently.  Maybe find a theme.  Or create multiple short shows from the various themes I cover here.  Then you could pick and choose what you wanted to listen to. We'll see how it goes.  One step at a time. I'm heading down to Dallas tomorrow morning and I just realized it's time change weekend here.  Meaning I'm going to have to roll out of bed at 3:30 AM body-clock time to start a long week with a nice dose of jetlag.  Heard an interesting comment on a call this week.  We were prepping for a executive meeting with one of our customers.  There were two senior executives from our side.  They were talking about a big deal that needed to close at this customer.  One of the Execs said to the other “You need to make it personal.”  That struck me.  After all the professionalism is sorted out every business transaction is personal.  I've always tried to avoid that.  Making business personal. But you can't.  It's personal whether you want it to be or not.  But making it personal allows you to leverage empathy – so it's not necessarily a bad thing.  How about that for a thing to try this week? Make it personal. And I'll see you out there. And I'll see you out there. MarathonBQ – How to Qualify for the Boston Marathon in 14 Weeks - Rachel -> Coach Jeff ->  

Interesting People with Bob Brill
50 Years in Radio - 1988 Olympics Korea-Ben Johnson

Interesting People with Bob Brill

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2022 17:44


Bob was in Seoul for the Summer Olympics and watched Ben Johnson dominate and then flee the country after a failed drug test. This and the solemn moments at the border with North Korea and crossing the line into the North.

Vive Nutrition Radio
Metabolic Efficiency and Blood Sugar Management with sports dietitian Bob Seebohar

Vive Nutrition Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2022 54:34


In today's episode, we had the pleasure of interviewing a colleague of mine, Bob Seebohar, who is a fellow sports dietitian that helps athletes perform at their peak, but also assists non-athletes who are looking to live longer and healthier. Bob is a busy guy and not only has he created amazing food brands, he'd also worked with other to create great functional products.   In our conversation today we discussed the concept of metabolic efficiency. Using a case study scenario for a woman, Bob broke down the list of things he would implement to help her feel her best and lose weight in the process.   We covered: Blood Sugar regulation The Crossover Point Why protein is important for weight loss Different types of carbohydrates and how they impact blood sugar How you can lose weight eating carbs Superstarches and their benefits   About Bob Bob is a Board Certified Specialist in Sports Dietetics, the former Director of Sports Nutrition for the University of Florida, and served as a Sports Dietitian for the US Olympic Committee. Bob traveled to the 2008 Summer Olympic Games as a Sports Dietitian for the US Olympic Team and the personal Sports Dietitian/Exercise Physiologist for the Olympic Triathlon Team. Currently, Bob owns eNRG Performance and is the Personal Sports Dietitian for the University of Denver Women's Gymnastics Team and the Consulting Sports Dietitian for the University of Denver Athletics Program. Bob created the Nutrition Periodization and Metabolic Efficiency Training concepts and enjoys working with athletes of all ages, sports, and competition levels. In his “spare” time, he manages his two food companies, Birota Foods and All Around Snack Co.   Book Recommendations: Champions Minds by Jim Afremov, PhD Metabolic Efficiency Training by Bob Seebohar   How to connect with Bob Websites eNRG Performance Metabolic Efficiency Training Birota Foods All Around Snack Co. Social Media Facebook Instagram Twitter   TO CONNECT WITH ME    On Instagram: www.instagram.com/andresayesta On TikTok: https://vm.tiktok.com/tLLoyS/ On Youtube www.youtube.com/c/andresayesta Podcast IG page: www.instagram.com/planos_nutrition On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/planosnutrition Our Facebook Community: https://www.facebook.com/groups/notanotherdietcommunity     FREE RESOURCES To download my Macro Counting Guide tap here  To download my Macro friendly meal planning guide tap here   TO JOIN OUR PRIVATE FACEBOOK COMMUNITY  Not Another Diet Community - tap here   FOR NUTRITION COACHING Apply here at https://planosnutrition.com/nutrition-blueprint-method-np  

Intelligent Design the Future
Stuart Burgess: Biology's Designs Tutor Our Top Engineers

Intelligent Design the Future

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 14:13


Today's ID the Future spotlights a Bristol University engineer whose design work helped Great Britain's cycling team win gold in the most recent Summer Olympics. Stuart Burgess, currently on a visiting fellowship at the University of Cambridge and an expert on linkage mechanisms, discusses with host Eric Anderson how top engineering firms are paying big money to learn from the extraordinary designs found in biology so as to improve their own designs. Burgess has designed groundbreaking linkage mechanisms, but he says the human knee is still well ahead of what even the most advanced human engineers have managed in this area, even accounting for the fact that wear and tear and misuse can lead to knee problems. He walks listeners Read More › Source