Podcasts about Mazda

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Latest podcast episodes about Mazda

Quick Spin
2023 Mazda CX-50 Review: Mazda's Off-Roader

Quick Spin

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 14:02


Off-roading and adventuring are as popular as ever and automakers have noticed. Extra cladding, more space and special off-road modes are becoming staples of compact and midsize crossovers. Naturally, Mazda isn't going to ignore this popular trend and drummed up the CX-50. While the CX-50 shares the same bones as the CX-50 it's larger, has extra cladding and now features a standard all-wheel-drive system. Powering this CX-50 is a 2.5-liter four-cylinder mill that mates to a six-speed automatic. In base trim, this 2.5-liter makes 187 hp and 186 lb-ft of torque. If that's not good enough, Mazda also offers its turbocharged 2.5-liter engine that makes 256 hp and 320 lb-ft of torque on premium fuel or 227 hp and 310 lb-ft of torque on 89 octane gasoline. On this episode of Quick Spin, host Wesley Wren hops behind the wheel of Mazda's latest crossover and puts it through its paces. Wren takes you on a guided tour of the Mazda CX-50 to show off its style, features and interior. After the tour, Wren takes you along for a live-recorded drive review. Expanding on his thoughts, Wren is joined by Patrick Carone, and the pair talk about the differences between this Mazda and its crossover stablemate the CX-5, off-roading crossovers and more. Closing the show, the two talk about what makes the 2023 Mazda CX-50 special.

Glitter and Gay
Money Honey

Glitter and Gay

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 37:57


Praise the Lord and Pass the Money! Glennda bought a Rolex with her first big paycheck, and within 6 months she had to sell it back. Then she bought a Mercedes… and wrecked it within two months. Now every time she makes a purchase she asks herself if she's trying to fill something that's missing, or if it's a really wise investment.Listen to hear Tyler and Glennda discuss investing in your business, top-of-mind gifting, and conspicuous consumption. As Glennda says, "It's a lot easier to arrive to your problems in a Mercedes than a Mazda!”  Want to reach out? Email us at glitterandgaypodcast.com!

Autoline Daily - Video
AD #3413 - EU Could Ban PHEVs; Tesla Model Y Has Best BEV Resale Value in China; Toyota Ends Production in Russia

Autoline Daily - Video

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 9:50


- EU Could Ban PHEVs - Gas Shortage May Force VW To Move Production Out of Germany   - Toyota Ends Production in Russia - Mazda In Talks to Sell Russian Joint Venture Stake - Audi Wants to Use More Recycled Plastic in Vehicles - Ford Focus ST Gets New Performance Pack in Europe - Citroen Creates Berlingo Van Inspired By 2CV Classic - VW Forms Battery Partnership with Umicore - Tesla Model Y Has Best BEV Resale Value in China - Wuling Launches Mini EV Convertible

Autoline Daily
AD #3413 - EU Could Ban PHEVs; Tesla Model Y Has Best BEV Resale Value in China; Toyota Ends Production in Russia

Autoline Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 9:51


- EU Could Ban PHEVs- Gas Shortage May Force VW To Move Production Out of Germany  - Toyota Ends Production in Russia- Mazda In Talks to Sell Russian Joint Venture Stake- Audi Wants to Use More Recycled Plastic in Vehicles- Ford Focus ST Gets New Performance Pack in Europe- Citroen Creates Berlingo Van Inspired By 2CV Classic- VW Forms Battery Partnership with Umicore- Tesla Model Y Has Best BEV Resale Value in China- Wuling Launches Mini EV Convertible

Eddy Warman de Noche
Escasez de mostaza; vino Parvada reserva; nuevos híbridos Mazda

Eddy Warman de Noche

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 29:21


Eddy nos habla acerca de la escasez de mostaza en el mundo debido a la guerra Rusia-Ucrania; Carlos Borboa, Sommeier creador del México Selection by Concours Mondial de Bruxelles, nos invita a catar vino Parvada reserva; nuestro colaborador Héctor Ocampo, Periodista Automotriz, nos cuenta más acerca de los nuevos modelos híbridos de Mazda que legarán a México, todo esto y más con Eddy Warman de Noche.

Podcast | BNR
BNR Auto-Update

Podcast | BNR

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 7:32


De Japanse autofabrikant Mazda overweegt nu ook een definitief vertrek uit Rusland. Het merk heeft één fabriek in Vladivostok, ver weg van de frontlinie.

All Torque Car Podcast
152: Tesla Fan Boy

All Torque Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 42:28


The boys are looking for new cars and explain the uncanny things dealers are telling them. Peter picked up his Tesla Model 3 Performance. Ross picked up his Maserati Levante Hybrid and finally figures out what the ICE button does.The boy's debate how much EV's are emission free. Halil discusses Mazda's new in line 6 cylinder diesel with Sky Active technology. Ross talks about his visit at Radiator Springs at Disneyland and how he felt he was in the movie. Follow us on Instagram and email us at alltorque@outlook.com.au

Ratgeber
Für wen eignet sich ein Auto-Abo?

Ratgeber

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 4:47


Ein Auto kann man kaufen oder leasen. Oder – seit ein paar Jahren – auch quasi im Abo beziehen. Das Prinzip des Auto-Abos ist ganz einfach. Allerdings ist es sehr teuer. Es eignet sich eigentlich nur für jemanden, der nur kurze Zeit ein Auto braucht oder für Bequeme. Wie funktioniert ein Auto-Abo? Ich bezahle dem Auto-Abo-Anbieter jeden Monat einen vereinbarten Betrag und bekomme dafür ein Auto zur Verfügung gestellt. Die Laufzeit des Vertrages kann nur ein Monat sein, mehrere Monate oder auch mehrere Jahre. Im Betrag inbegriffen sind sämtliche Kosten wie Strassensteuer, Versicherung, Service, Pneus und so weiter. Die Fahrerin oder der Fahrer bezahlt nur das Benzin. Was kostet ein Auto-Abo im Vergleich zum Leasing oder zum Autokauf? Je nach Anbieter, Automodell und Kilometer gibt es riesige Unterschiede. Ein grober Vergleich für eine erste Einschätzung: Einen Kleinwagen wie ein Ford Fiesta oder ein Mazda 2 gibt es im Abo ab rund 400 Franken pro Monat. Je grösser und luxuriöser das Auto, umso teurer wirds. So kostet ein Porsche Panamera pro Monat gut und gerne 4300 Franke. Ein Auto-Abo ist also teuer. Das zeigt auch ein Vergleich von «Kassensturz» und «Comparis». Einander gegenübergestellt wurden zum einen Auto-Abo und Auto-Leasing. Das Abo war in praktisch allen Fällen deutlich teurer. Der Unterschied Auto-Abo vs. Auto-Kauf fiel noch deutlicher aus. Ein Beispiel: Auto: Toyota Aygo 1.0, Kilometer pro Jahr: 7500, Laufzeit: 8 Jahre (so lang haben wir Schweizer Schweizer im Schnitt unser Auto). Das Auto-Abo kostet hier rund 73'000 Franken, der Auto-Kauf gerade einmal 29'000 Franken. Auto-Abos sind also teurer – vor allem bei langer Laufzeit. Details zum Test finden Sie hier . Für wen eignet sich denn ein Auto-Abo? Ein Auto-Abo kann für jene eine gute Lösung sein, die nur für kurze Zeit ein Auto benötigen – zum Beispiel für die Ferien. Denn ein solches Abo kann man teilweise auch nur für einen Monat abschliessen; was beim Leasing natürlich unmöglich ist. Und es kann für alle attraktiv sein, die das Geld nicht als Hauptkriterium sehen. Zum Beispiel bequeme Autofahrerinnen und -fahrer, die sich nicht gerne mit der Versicherung oder der Garage herumschlagen. Das übernimmt alles der Auto-Abo-Anbieter. Es kann auch für Autofans interessant sein, die gerne verschiedene Marken und Modelle fahren und ausprobieren. Oder für Leute, die im Sommer gerne ein Cabrio und im Winter lieber einen SUV fahren. Mit einem Auto-Abo ist das alles möglich. Allerdings bezahlt man diese Flexibilität mit teuren Abo-Gebühren.

Atraccion 360
Mazda CX-5 2023 ya disponible en México

Atraccion 360

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 1:12


La marca japonesa dio a conocer que a partir de este lunes 19 de septiembre estará disponible la Mazda CX-5 2023 con nuevo equipamiento y precios en sus tres versiones: i Sport, S Grand Touring y Signature.

Mastery Unleashed with Christie Ruffino
OM103 | Proven List Building Strategies by Hosting and Guesting on Podcasts with Hawk Mikado

Mastery Unleashed with Christie Ruffino

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 50:04


ABOUT OUR SHOW Mastery Unleashed (formerly Overcoming Mediocrity) is a podcast for success-driven women who want to empower their thoughts, design their dream businesses, and build beautiful lives that are aligned with their destinies—hosted by Bestselling Author and Business Strategist Christie Ruffino. Each episode features today's top influencers and entrepreneurs on the rise as they share empowering stories and ninja tips meant to become the FUEL that will ignite a positive change in YOUR life and the lives of others.   ABOUT TODAY'S SHOW On today's show, Hawk talks about how you can get paid to grow your list so that you can easily scale your business with high-ticket qualified leads.   ABOUT HAWK The Funnel Gamer, Hawk Mikado, is a 3 time International Best Selling Author, Speaker, and Publisher of Funnel Magazine. When you combine Mangoes, Marketing, Masterminding, and Mazda's… what do you get? Why Hawk Mikado of Course. He's the #1 Funnel Builder for coaches, consultants, speakers, and authors. Accredited as the Top ClickFunnels Certified Partner, a professional Neuro-Linguistic Communication Trainer, and skillful Business Strategist. With 10+ years of marketing, sales, and copywriting experience, Hawk has helped 12+ companies create a 7+ & 8+ figure funnel, interviewed 37+ of the world's leading millionaire and billionaire business leaders, and his launch formula has helped 100's of people create 6+ figure businesses. Hawk is on a mission to serve 100,000 Entrepreneurs, business owners, and company leaders so they can create a scalable business and add $100,000 in annual PROFIT through our Funnel Frameworks to ‘Make Your Mark…et!™' & become an Empire Builder His impressive Marketing background allows him to live the laptop lifestyle and travel the world while spending time with his wife Kate and daughter Alliwin.   LINKS SHARED ON THE SHOW https://getmeleadsnow.com https://joinfunneltopia.com   Access Our Free Gift Vault GET THIS GIFT AND MANY MORE!    

Auto Matin
Essai Mazda CX60 Hybride Rechargeable PHEV 2022

Auto Matin

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 16:35


Mazda annonce que le nouveau CX60 hybride rechargeable est la première pierre d'un repositionnement haut de gamme de la marque. Avant le lancement du CX60, cette annonce de montée en gamme n'était qu'un « élément de langage » pour moi. Mais il me reconnaître que la nouvelle gamme de moteur proposé en Europe à base de 6 cylindres a battu en brèche mes a priori.

AUTOSPORT web
マツダ、11月5〜6日に岡山国際サーキットで『MAZDA FAN FESTA 2022 IN OKAYAMA』を開催

AUTOSPORT web

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 0:27


 9月20日、マツダは11月5〜6日に岡山県の岡山国際サーキットで、『MAZDA FAN FESTA 2022 IN OKAYAMA』を開催すると発表し、10月5日からイベントの入場券販売を開始する。今年は“MAZDA SPIRIT RACING 共に始めよう”をテーマに、倶楽部MAZDA SPIRIT RACINGとして初めての参加型イベントとして開催する。

NINETYONEOCTANE: The Podcast
#232 - Ford's Dark Horse is Better than it Sounds and The Ashes of the Mazda Furai!

NINETYONEOCTANE: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 79:48


Headlines are dominated by the recent Ford Mustang launch. Jon asks Randy if the Nissan Z or the Ford Mustang is the 5 year better buy. Lastly, Jon profiles the Mazda Furai - a car that burned down on Top Gear.

Le Nouvel Automobiliste
Interview Matthias Sileghem, les nouveautés Mazda 2022 2023

Le Nouvel Automobiliste

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 8:58


A l'occasion du lancement du CX60 nous avons parlé des nouveautés Mazda à venir. 6 cylindres diesel et essence, Mx30 Wankel, CX80....

The Smoking Tire
Crew Show (Aston DBX 707; 240SX SR20; GSX driven; EV Cobra; Q&A)

The Smoking Tire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 83:24 Very Popular


Matt spent the weekend in the Aston Martin DBX 707 Edition and drove an electric Shelby Cobra. Zack had a ‘90s day and drove a crazy Frankenstein Eclipse GSX and a 400HP 240SX. And we answer questions about whether or not the newest car makes the best track car; is buying a German super sedan a good use of $40k; keep or upgrade: Mazda 2 commuter edition; $500 watches; and more!  Recorded September 12, 2022 Go to HelloFresh.com/smokingtire16 and use code smokingtire16 for 16 free meals across 7 boxes AND 3 free gifts! Use Off The Record! and ALWAYS fight your tickets! Enter code TST10 for a 10% discount on your first case on the Off The Record app, or go to http://www.offtherecord.com/TST Want your question answered? To listen to the episode the day it's recorded? Want to watch the live stream, get ad-free podcasts, or exclusive podcasts? Join our Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thesmokingtirepodcastTweet at us! https://www.Twitter.com/thesmokingtirehttps://www.Twitter.com/zackklapmanInstagram: https://www.Instagram.com/thesmokingtirehttps://www.Instagram.com/therealzackklapmanClick here for the most honest car reviews out there: https://www.youtube.com/thesmokingtire Want shorter podcasts? Subscribe to our new CLIPS channel! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCD4WGV-W5zD1MK4yHbNGwmw

Road Story Histoire d'Auto
Essai Mazda CX60 Hybride Rechargeable PHEV 2022

Road Story Histoire d'Auto

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 16:49


Mazda annonce que le nouveau CX60 hybride rechargeable est la première pierre d'un repositionnement haut de gamme de la marque. Avant le lancement du CX60, cette annonce de montée en gamme n'était qu'un « élément de langage » pour moi. Mais il me reconnaître que la nouvelle gamme de moteur proposé en Europe à base de 6 cylindres a battu en brèche mes a priori.

Nervous Laughter Podcast
Episode 46: Bucket of Mayo

Nervous Laughter Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 71:06


Hooters Cooters Wings brings up memories of Hooters. We have some strip club banter and Rob shares his Bachelor party experience with us! That led into some awkward porn conversation before hopping into some rounds of The Shame of Life.The game kicks off asking about the biggest lies they have told - spoiler alert! They all suck at lying and haven't lied about very many things. Jamie shares about sneaking into the movie theater to see Bridesmaids, getting kicked out and badly attempting to lie. The next question has them torn between breathing or eating with their buttholes. What would you do, dear fathead listener? Followed up by the discussions of:what the worst last row meal isthe worst public figure to watch seduce someone elsedicks for hands or hands for dickstheir spice girl names (Creepy Spice, Ugly Spice, and Piggy Spice)what's quiet sticky and ashamedwhat the day in the life with a possessed child is likeThe most off-putting sound effect for penetrationWhat is the least risky brain to pilot your meat suitWhich one of us would make a cool video gameWhat annoys computers about us?What animal would we splice our DNA with?If we could train our buttholes to say one thing what would it be?Disturbing characters to make into sexy cosplayWhat pose would you have your dead body stuffed in?They wrap up with some high school cringe, which relates to the previous episode. Check out episode 45 if you enjoyed this one, thanks to Rob for joining for 2 episodes!Write us some of your cringe stories at nervouslaughterpodcast@gmail.comThe socials: Instagram | Facebook | Twitter

Le Nouvel Automobiliste
Interview de Laurent Thézée à l'occasion du lancement du Mazda CX60

Le Nouvel Automobiliste

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 8:24


Nous faisons un point avec le président de Mazda Automobiles France des ambitions du CX60 et des nouveautés à venir chez Mazda en 2022 et 2023

Auto Matin
Interview de Laurent Thézée à l'occasion du lancement du Mazda CX60

Auto Matin

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 8:36


Nous faisons un point avec le président de Mazda Automobiles France des ambitions du CX60 et des nouveautés à venir chez Mazda en 2022 et 2023

AutoExpert
Dealers say Mazda has stopped selling the 2.0-litre atmo engine

AutoExpert

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 8:37


For reasons known only to itself, Mazda Australia has decided to stop selling the 2-liter atmo engine - the stalwart of the base model CX-5 and Mazda3 (and also the CX-30, I think). This is, of course, quite the let down if you've had one on order and you've been waiting patiently for several months now. Here's what happened... OLIGHT DISCOUNT! (These are awesome.) Get 12% off here >> Use code AEJC On Bullshit by Harry G Frankfurt >> F*#king Apostrophes textbook: https://amzn.to/3IpskpA Save thousands on any new car (Australia-only) by contacting me via AutoExpert.com.au here >> Help support my independent reporting, securely, via Patreon here >> AutoExpert discount roadside assistance package (with no joining fees) here >> Did you like this report? You can help support the channel, securely via PayPal here >>

Car Talk
#2274: Never Listen to Your Brother

Car Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 34:38 Very Popular


Tanya from Virginia has the good fortune to have a brother advising her on whether or not to junk her seven-year-old Mazda. Unfortunately, her brother is also a car salesman. Does the sibling bond overcome the sleaze factor in this situation? Click and Clack try to find out on this episode of the Best of Car Talk.

90.9 Jazzy rádió - Jazzy Street

Vendégünk Együd Tibor a Mazda márka ügyvezető igazgatója

Le Nouvel Automobiliste
Essai Mazda CX60 Hybride Rechargeable PHEV 2022

Le Nouvel Automobiliste

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 16:23


Mazda annonce que le nouveau CX60 hybride rechargeable est la première pierre d'un repositionnement haut de gamme de la marque. Avant le lancement du CX60, cette annonce de montée en gamme n'était qu'un « élément de langage » pour moi. Mais il me reconnaître que la nouvelle gamme de moteur proposé en Europe à base de 6 cylindres a battu en brèche mes a priori.

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast
Episode 96: The People Side of Lean

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 49:37


Augmented reveals the stories behind the new era of industrial operations, where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. The topic is "The People Side of Lean." Our guest is Jeffrey Liker, academic, consultant, and best-selling author of The Toyota Way (https://www.amazon.com/Toyota-Way-Management-Principles-Manufacturer/dp/B09BDC3525/ref=sr_1_1?crid=2JABTVWQBAZC8&keywords=the+toyota+way&qid=1661872838&sprefix=the+toyot%2Caps%2C107&sr=8-1). In this conversation, we talk about how to develop internal organizational capability and problem-solving skills on the frontline. If you liked this show, subscribe at augmentedpodcast.co (https://www.augmentedpodcast.co/). If you liked this episode, you might also like Episode 84 on The Evolution of Lean (https://www.augmentedpodcast.co/84). Augmented is a podcast for industry leaders, process engineers, and shop floor operators, hosted by futurist Trond Arne Undheim (https://trondundheim.com/) and presented by Tulip (https://tulip.co/). Follow the podcast on Twitter (https://twitter.com/AugmentedPod) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/75424477/). Trond's Takeaway: Lean is about motivating people to succeed in an industrial organization more than it is about a bundle of techniques to avoid waste on a factory production line. The goal is to have workers always asking themselves if there is a better way. Transcript: TROND: Welcome to another episode of the Augmented Podcast. Augmented brings industrial conversations that matter, serving up the most relevant conversations on industrial tech. Our vision is a world where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. In this episode of the podcast, the topic is the People Side of Lean. Our guest is Jeffrey Liker, academic, consultant, and best-selling author of The Toyota Way. In this conversation, we talk about how to develop internal organizational capability, problem-solving skills on the frontline. Augmented is a podcast for industry leaders, process engineers, and shop floor operators, hosted by futurist Trond Arne Undheim and presented by Tulip. Jeffrey, how are you? Welcome to the podcast. JEFFREY: Thank you. TROND: So I think some people in this audience will have read your book or have heard of your book and your books but especially the one that I mentioned, Toyota. So I think we'll talk about that a little bit. But you started out as an engineering undergrad at Northeastern, and you got yourself a Ph.D. in sociology. And then I've been reading up on you and listening to some of the stuff on the musical side of things. I think we both are guitarists. JEFFREY: Oh, is that right? TROND: Yeah, yeah, classical guitar in my case. So I was wondering about that. JEFFREY: So I play also a classical guitar now. I played folk and rock earlier when I was young. But for the last more than ten years, I've been only studying classical guitar. TROND: Well, so then we share a bunch of hours practicing the etude, so Fernando Sor, and eventually getting to the Villa-Lobos stuff. So the reason I bring that up, of course, beyond it's wonderful to talk about this kind of stuff with, you know, there aren't that many classical guitarists out there. But you said something that I thought maybe you could comment on later. But this idea of what happened to you during your studies of classical guitar actually plays into what you later brought into your professional life in terms of teaching you something about practicing in particular ways. So I hope you can get into that. But obviously, you've then become a professor. You are a speaker and an advisor, and an author of this bestseller, The Toyota Way. Now you run some consulting. And I guess I'm curious; this was a very, very brief attempt at summarizing where you got into this. What was it that brought you into manufacturing in the first place? I mean, surely, it wasn't just classical guitar because that's not a linear path. [laughs] JEFFREY: No. So for undergraduate, I had basically studied industrial engineering because I didn't really know what I wanted to do with my life. And my father was an engineer. And then I literally took a course catalog and just started reading the descriptions of different kinds of engineering. And industrial engineering was the only one that mentioned people. And in theory, industrial engineering is a systems perspective which integrates people, materials, methods, machines, the four Ms. And in the description from Northeastern University, they said it's as much about human organization as it is about tools and techniques. So that appealed to me. When I got to Northeastern...I was not a particularly good high school student. So I didn't have a lot of choices of what colleges I went to, so Northeastern was pretty easy to get into. But they had a cooperative education program where you go to school, and you work. You go back and forth between school and work and had a pretty elaborate system for setting you up with jobs. I got one of the better jobs, which was at a company called General Foods Corporation at the time, and they make things like Jell-O, and Gravy Train dog food, and Birds Eye vegetables, and a lot of other household names, Kool-Aid, all automated processes, even at that time in the 1970s. And they had been experimenting with something called socio-technical systems, which is supposed to be what I was interested in, which is bringing together the social and technical, which no one at Northeastern University had any interest in except me. But I was very interested in this dog food plant where they were written up as a case study pioneer. And the basic essence of it was to give groups of people who are responsible, for example, for some automated processes to make a certain line of Gravy Train dog food, give them responsibility for all their processes, and they called them autonomous workgroups. And what we try to do is as much as possible, give them all the responsibility so they can work autonomously without having to go and find the engineer or deal with other support functions, which takes time and is kind of a waste. So that fascinated me. I studied it. I wrote papers about it even in courses where it didn't fit. But the closest I could get to the social side was through sociology courses which I took as soon as I was able to take electives, which was about my third year. And I got to know a sociology professor closely and ultimately decided to get a Ph.D. in sociology and did that successfully, published papers in sociology journals at a pretty high level. And then discovered it was really hard to get a job. TROND: Right. [laughs] JEFFREY: And there happened to be an advertisement from an industrial engineering department at University of Michigan for someone with a Ph.D. in a social science and an undergraduate degree in industrial engineering. And I was probably the only person in the world that fit the job. And they were so excited to hear from me because they had almost given up. And I ended up getting that job quickly then getting to Michigan excited because it's a great university. I had a low teaching load. They paid more than sociology departments. So it was like a dream job. Except once I got there, I realized that I had no idea what I was supposed to be doing [chuckles] because it wasn't a sociology department. And I had gotten away from industry. In fact, I was studying family development and life's course development, and more personal psychology and sociology stuff. So I was as far away as I could be. So I had to kind of figure out what to do next. And fortunately, being at Michigan and also being unique, a lot of people contacted me and wanted me to be part of their projects. And one of them was a U.S.-Japan auto study comparing the U.S.-Japan auto industry going at the same time as a study at MIT and Harvard that ultimately led to the book The Machine That Changed the World, which defined lean manufacturing. So this was sort of a competitive program. And they asked me to be part of it, and that's what led to my learning about Toyota. I mean, I studied Toyota, Nissan, Mazda mainly and compared them to GM, Ford, and Chrysler. But it was clear that Toyota was different and special. And ultimately, then I learned about the Toyota Production System. And from my perspective, not from people in Toyota, but from my perspective, what they had done is really solve the problem of socio-technical systems. Because what I was seeing at General Foods was workers who were responsible for technical process and then were given autonomy to run the process, but there was nothing really socio-technical about it. There was a technical system, and then there was social system autonomous work groups and not particularly connected in a certain way. But the Toyota Production System truly was a system that was designed to integrate people with the technical system, which included things like stamping, and welding, and painting, which were fairly automated as well as assembly, which is purely manual. And Toyota had developed this back in the 1940s when it was a lone company and then continued to evolve it. And the main pillars are just-in-time and built-in quality. They have a house, and then the foundation is stable and standardized processes. And in the center are people who are continuously improving. Now, the socio-technical part the connection is that just-in-time for Toyota means that we're trying to flow value to the customer without interruption. So if what they do is turn raw materials into cars that you drive, then anything that's turning material into a component or car physically is value-added, and everything else is waste. And so things like defects where you have to do rework are waste. And machines are shut down, so we have to wait for the machines to get fixed; that's waste. And inventory sitting in piles doing nothing is waste. So the opposite of waste is a perfect process. And Toyota also was smart enough, and all that they figured out was more like folk learning or craft learning. It was learning from doing and experience and common sense. And they didn't particularly care about linking it to academic theories or learning from academic theories, for that matter. So their common sense view is that the world is complicated. Humans are really bad at predicting the future. So the best we can do is to get in the ballpark with what we think is a good process and then run it and see how it fails. And then the failures are what lead to then the connection of people who have to solve the problems through creative thinking. So that was the integration that I did not see before that. TROND: Just one thing that strikes me...because nowadays, comparing the U.S. or Europe and Asia in terms of business practices, it's sort of like, oh, of course, you have to compare them because they are culturally different. But it strikes me that in the automotive industry, was it immediately really clear to you at the outset that there would be such striking differences between the Japanese and the U.S. auto industry? Or is that actually something that had to be studied? Or was it something that was known, but no one really knew exactly what the differences were? JEFFREY: So it wasn't like the American auto companies figured out that if they get good at using chopsticks, they'll be good at making cars. They weren't looking for something peculiar in Japanese culture. But they were addressing the more general problem, which was that Japanese companies were making small fuel-efficient cars at low cost with high quality. And none of the American companies could do that. The costs were higher. The quality was terrible compared to Japan. They took a long time to do everything, including developing cars. So somehow, the Japanese were purported, they weren't convinced this was true, but according to the evidence, the Japanese were purported to be better at just about everything. And the Americans wanted to know why particularly. And at that time, there had been an oil crisis, and there was a demand for small cars. The real question they were interested in is how could they make small cars that were competitive with the Japanese? So they had to understand what the Japanese were doing. Now, they realized that some of what the Japanese were doing were purely technical things that had nothing to do with culture. And then there was also a level of attention to detail and motivation that maybe was, for some reason, peculiar to Japan. But they needed to figure out how to replicate it in the United States. And then, in addition to that, they had Americans like Dr. Deming, who had gone to Japan and taught the Japanese supposedly quality control methods. And Japanese companies had taken quality control methods that were created in the United States more seriously than the American companies. So part of it was relearning what came from America to Japan and got done better. So it wasn't necessarily this kind of strange place, and how can we emulate this strange culture? TROND: Right. But that becomes then your challenge then, right? Because what you then discover is that your field is immensely important to this because what you then went on to do is...and I guess part of your consulting work has been developing internal organizational capability. These are skills that particular organizations, namely Toyota, had in Japan. So you're thinking that this then became...it's like a learning process, the Japanese learned some lessons, and then the whole rest of the automotive industry then they were trying to relearn those lessons. Is that sort of what has been happening then in the 30 years after that? JEFFREY: Yeah, the basic question was, why are they so good? Why are we so bad? And how can we get better in America? Then there were lots of answers to that question coming from different people in different places. My particular answer was that Toyota especially had developed a socio-technical system that was extremely effective, that was centered on people who were developed to have the skills of problem-solving and continuous improvement. And while the study was going on, they were doing a study out of MIT that led to The Machine That Changed the World. And around that same time, a joint venture between Toyota and General Motors had been formed called NUMMI. It was in California. And in their first year, it was launched in 1983, and in the first year, they had taken what was the worst General Motors plant in the world, with the worst attendance, the worst morale, workers who were fighting against supervisors every day, including physically fighting with them, terrible quality, and General Motors had closed the plant because it was so bad. And then, in the joint venture, they reopened the plant and took back 80% of the same workers who were like the worst of the worst of American workers. And within a year, Toyota had turned the plant around so that it was the best in North America with the best workers. TROND: That's crazy, right? Because wouldn't some of the research thesis in either your study or in the MIT study, The Machine That Changed the World, would have to have been around technology or at least some sort of ingenious plan that these people had, you know, some secret sauce that someone had? Would you say that these two research teams were surprised at finding that the people was the key to the difference here or motivating people in a different way? JEFFREY: Well, frankly, I think I probably had a better grasp that people were really the key than most other researchers because of my background and my interest in human-centered manufacturing. So I was kind of looking for that. And it was what the Toyota people would say...whenever they made a presentation or whenever you interviewed them, they would say, "People are kind of distracted by the tools and methods, but really at the center are people." And generally, most people listening to them didn't believe it, or it didn't register. Because Toyota did have cool stuff, like, for example, something called a kanban system, which is how do you move material around in the factory? They have thousands of parts that have to all be moved and orchestrated in complicated ways. And Toyota did it with physical cards. And the concept was a pulse system that the worker; when they see that they're getting low on parts, they take a card and they post it. They put it in a box, and then the material handler picks it up. And they said, okay, they need another bin of these. On my next route, I'll bring a bin of whatever cards I get. So they were replenishing the line based on a signal from the operator saying, "I need more." So it was a signal from the person who knows best what they need. And it also, from Toyota's point of view, put the employee in the driver's seat because now they're controlling their supply in addition to controlling their work process. And it didn't require that you predict the future all the time because who knows what is happening on the line and where they're backed up, and where they maybe have too many parts, and they don't need more? But the worker knows. He knows when he needs it and when he doesn't. It was kind of an ingenious system, but the fact that you had these cards moving all over the factory and thousands of parts are moving just to the right place at the right time based on these cards, that was fascinating. So a lot of the consumers were more interested in that than they were in the people aspect, even though Toyota kept talking about the people aspect. TROND: But so this is my question, then there was more than one element that they were doing right. JEFFREY: There were multiple elements, yeah. TROND: There were multiple elements. Some of them were structural or visual, famously. JEFFREY: Right. TROND: But you then started focusing, I guess, on not just the people aspect, but you started structuring that thinking because the obvious question must have been, how can we do some of this ourselves? And I guess that's my question is once you and the team started figuring out okay, there are some systematic differences here in the way they motivate people, handle the teams, but also structure, honestly, the organizational incentives minute by minute, how then did you think about transferring this? Or were you, at this point, just really concerned about describing it? JEFFREY: Like I said, I was kind of unusual in my background, being somewhere between industrial engineering and sociology and being in industrial engineering departments. So maybe I wasn't as constrained by some of the constraints of my academic colleagues. But I never believed this whole model that the university gathers information structures that formulates it, then tells the world what to do. I never thought that made any sense. And certainly, in the case of lean, it didn't, and it wasn't true. So the way that companies were learning about this stuff was from consultants, largely, and from people who had worked for Toyota. So anybody who had worked for Toyota, even if they were driving a forklift truck, in some cases, suddenly became a hot commodity. I consulted to Ford, and they were developing the Ford Production System. They were using a consulting firm, and all their consulting firm's business was to poach people from Toyota and then sell them as consultants to other companies. And that company literally had people every day of the week who were in their cars outside the gates of Toyota. And as people came out, they would start talking to them to try to find people that they could hire away from Toyota. TROND: It's funny to hear you talking about that, Jeff, right? Because in some way, you, of all people, you're a little bit to blame for the fame of Toyota in that sense. I mean, you've sold a million books with The New Toyota -- JEFFREY: Well, that was -- TROND: I'm just saying it's a phenomenon here that people obsess over a company, but you were part of creating this movement and this enormous interest in this. [laughs] JEFFREY: I didn't feel that that was...I personally had a policy because I had a consulting company too. So I personally had a policy that I would not hire somebody away from Toyota unless they were leaving anyway. That was my personal policy. But the important point was that there were a lot of really well-trained people coming out of Toyota who really understood the whole system and had lived it. And they could go to any other company and do magic, and suddenly things got better. [laughs] And what they were doing was setting up the structures and the tools, and they also were engaging the people and coaching the people. They were doing both simultaneously, and that's how they were trained. Toyota had sent an army of Japanese people to America. So every person who was in a leadership position had a one-on-one coach for years, a person whose only reason for being in the United States was to train them. So they got excellent training, and then they were able to use that training. And then other people once they had worked with a company and then that company got good at lean, then, within that company, you'd spawn more consultants change agents. Like, there was a company that I was studying called Donnelly Mirrors that made exterior mirrors for cars. And one of the persons that was trained by a Toyota person became a plant manager. And he ended up then getting offered a job as the vice president of manufacturing for Merillat Kitchen Cabinets. And now he's the CEO of the parent company that owns Merillat. And he's transformed the entire company. So little by little, this capability developed where most big companies in the world have hired people with lean experience. Sometimes it's second generation, sometimes third generation. And there are some very well-trained people. So the capability still resides within the people. And if you have someone who doesn't understand the system but they just set up a kanban system or they set up quality systems, and they try to imitate what they read in a book or what they learned in a course; usually, it doesn't work very well. TROND: Well, that was going to be my next question. Because how scalable is this beyond the initial learnings of Toyota and the fact that it has relied so heavily on consulting? Because there is sort of an alternate discourse in a lot of organizational thinking these days that says, well, not just that the people are the key to it but actually, that as a leader, however much you know or how aware you are of people processes, it is the organization itself that kind of has to find the answers. So there's perhaps some skepticism that you can come in and change a culture. Aren't there organizations that have such strong organizational practices, whether they are cultural in some meaningful way or they're simply this is the way they've done things that even one person who comes in has a hard time applying a Toyota method? What do you think about that kind of challenge? JEFFREY: Okay, so, anyway, I think what you said is...how I would interpret it is it's a gross oversimplification of reality. So first of all, in the second edition of The Toyota Way, because I realized from the first edition, which was fairly early back in the early 2000s, I realized that some people were taking my message as copy Toyota, even though I didn't say that in the book. And I specifically said not to do that, but I said it in the last chapter. So I put out the second edition a year ago, and I say it in the first page or first few pages. I say, "Don't copy Toyota," and explain why. And then, throughout the book, I say that, and then, in the end, I say, "Develop your own system." So it's probably repeated a dozen times or more with the hope that maybe somebody would then not ask me after reading it, "So, are we supposed to copy Toyota?" So the reason for that is because, as you said, you have your own culture. And you're in a different situation. You're in a different industry. You're starting in a different place. You're drawing on different labor. You have maybe plants around the world that are in different situations. So the other thing I said in the book, which is kind of interesting and counterintuitive, is I said, "Don't copy Toyota; even Toyota doesn't copy Toyota." TROND: So what does that mean? Did they really not? JEFFREY: What it means is that...because Toyota had this dilemma that they had developed this wonderful system in Japan that worked great, but they realized that in auto, you need to be global to survive. So when they set up NUMMI, that was the first experiment they did to try to bring their system to a different culture. And in reality, if you look at some of the cultural dimensions that make lean work in Japan, the U.S. is almost opposite on every one of them, like, we're the worst case. So if you were a scientist and you said, let's find the hardest place in the world to make this work and see if we can make it work, it would be the United States, particularly with General Motors workers already disaffected and turned off. So Toyota's perspective was, let's go in with a blank sheet of paper and pretend we know nothing. We know what the total production system is and what we're trying to achieve with it. But beyond that, we don't know anything about the human resource system and how to set it up. And so they hired Americans, and they coached them. But they relied a lot on Americans, including bringing back the union leader of the most militant union in America. They brought him back. TROND: Wow. JEFFREY: And said, "You're a leader for a reason. They chose you. We need your help. We're going to teach you about our system, but you need to help make it work." So that created this sort of new thing, a new organizational entity in California. And then what Toyota learned from that was not a new solution that they then brought to every other plant, whether it was Czechoslovakia, or England, or China. But rather, they realized we need to evolve a cultural system every time we set up a plant, starting with the local culture. And we need to get good at doing that, and they got good at doing it. So they have, I don't know, how many plants but over 100 plants around the world and in every culture you can imagine. And every one of them becomes the benchmark for that country as one of their best plants. And people come and visit it and are amazed by what they see. The basic principles are what I try to explain in The Toyota Way. The principles don't change. At some level, the principle is we need continuous improvement because we never know how things are going to fail until they fail. So we need to be responding to these problems as a curse. We need people at every level well trained at problem-solving. And to get people to take on that additional responsibility, we need to treat people with a high level of respect. So their model, The Toyota Way, was simply respect for people and continuous improvement. And that won't change no matter where they go. And their concept of how to teach problem-solving doesn't change. And then their vision of just-in-time one-piece flow that doesn't change, and their vision of building in quality so that you don't allow outflows of poor quality beyond your workstation that doesn't change. So there are some fundamental principles that don't change, but how exactly they are brought into the plant and what the human resource system looks like, there'll be sort of an amalgam between the Japanese model and the local model. But they, as quickly as possible, try to give local autonomy to people from that culture to become the plant managers, to become the leaders. And they develop those people; often, those people will go to Japan for periods of time. TROND: So, Jeff, I want to move to...well, you say a lot of things with Toyota don't change because they adapt locally. So my next question is going to be about future outlook. But before we get there, can we pick up on this classical guitar lesson? So you were playing classical guitar. And there was something there that, at least you said that in one interview that I picked up on, something to do with the way that guitar study is meticulous practice, which both you and I know it is. You literally will sit plucking a string sometimes to hear the sound of that string. I believe that was the example. So can you explain that again? Because, I don't know, maybe it was just me, but it resonated with me. And then you brought it back to how you actually best teach this stuff. Because you were so elaborate, but also you rolled off your tongue all these best practices of Toyota. And unless you either took your course or you are already literate in Toyota, no one can remember all these things, even though it's like six different lessons from Toyota or 14 in your book. It is a lot. But on the other hand, when you are a worker, and you're super busy with your manager or just in the line here and you're trying to pick up on all these things, you discovered with a colleague, I guess, who was building on some of your work some ways that had something in common with how you best practice classical guitar. What is that all about? JEFFREY: Well, so, first of all, like I said, the core skill that Toyota believes every person working for Toyota should have is what they call problem-solving. And that's the ability to, when they see a problem, to study what's really happening. Why is this problem occurring? And then try out ideas to close the gap between what should be happening and what is happening. And you can view that as running experiments. So the scientific mindset is one of I don't know. I need to collect the data and get the evidence. And also, I don't know if my idea works until I test it and look at what happens and study what happens. So that was very much central in Toyota. And they also would talk about on-the-job development, and they were very skeptical of any classroom teaching or any conceptual, theoretical explanations. So the way you would learn something is you'd go to the shop floor and do it with a supervisor. So the first lesson was to stand in a circle and just observe without preconceptions, kind of like playing one-string guitar. And the instructor would not tell you anything about what you should be looking for. But they would just ask you questions to try to dig deeper into what's really going on with the problems or why the problems are occurring. And the lesson length with guitar, you might be sweating after 20 minutes of intense practice. This lesson length was eight hours. So for eight hours, you're just on the shop floor taking breaks for lunch and to go to the bathroom and in the same place just watching. So that was just an introductory lesson to open your mind to be able to see what's really happening. And then they would give you a task to, say, double the productivity of an area. And you would keep on trying. They would keep on asking questions, and eventually, you would achieve it. So this on-the-job development was learning by doing. Now, later, I came to understand that the culture of Japan never really went beyond the craftsman era of the master-apprentice relationship. That's very central throughout Japan, whether you're making dolls, or you're wrapping gifts, or you're in a factory making a car. So the master-apprentice relationship system is similar to you having a guitar teacher. And then, if you start to look at modern psychology leadership books, popular leadership books, there's a fascination these days with the idea of habits, how people form habits and the role of habits in our lives. So one of my former students, Mike Rother, who had become a lean practitioner, we had worked together at Ford, for example, and was very good at introducing the tools of lean and transforming a plant. He started to observe time after time that they do great work. He would check in a few months later, and everything they had done had fallen apart and wasn't being followed anymore. And his ultimate conclusion was that what they were missing was the habit of scientific thinking that Toyota put so much effort into. But he realized that it would be a bad solution to, say, find a Toyota culture -- TROND: Right. And go study scientific thinking. Yeah, exactly. JEFFREY: Right. So he developed his own way in companies he was working with who let him experiment. He developed his own way of coaching people and developing coaches inside the company. And his ultimate vision was that every manager becomes a coach. They're a learner first, and they learn scientific thinking, then they coach others, which is what Toyota does. But he needed more structure than Toyota had because the Toyota leaders just kind of learned this over the last 25 years working in the company. And he started to create this structure of practice routines, like drills we would have in guitar. And he also had studied mastery. There's a lot of research about how do you master any complex skill, and it was 10,000 hours of practice and that idea. But what he discovered was that the key was deliberate practice, where you always know what you should be doing and comparing it to what you are doing, and then trying to close the gap. And that's what a good instructor will do is ask you to play this piece, realize that you're weak in certain areas, and then give you an exercise. And then you practice for a week and come back, and he listens again to decide whether you've mastered or not or whether he needs to go back, or we can move to the next step. So whatever complex skill you're learning, whether it's guitar, playing a sport, or learning how to cook, a good teacher will break down the skill into small pieces. And then, you will practice those pieces until you get them right. And the teacher will judge whether you got them right or not. And then when you're ready, then you move on. And then, as you collect these skills, you start to learn to make nice music that sounds good. So it turns out that Mike was developing this stuff when he came across a book on the martial arts. And they use the term kata, which is used in Japanese martial arts for these small practice routines, what you do repeatedly exactly as the master shows you. And the master won't let you move on until you've mastered that one kata. Then they'll move to the second kata and then third. And if you ask somebody in karate, "How many katas do you have?" They might say, "46," and you say, "Wow, you're really good. You've mastered 46 kata, like playing up through the 35th Sor exercise. So he developed what he called the improvement kata, which is here is how you practice scientific thinking, breaking it down into pieces, practicing each piece, and then a coaching kata for what the coach does to coach the student. And the purpose of the scientific thinking is not to publish a paper in a journal but to achieve a life goal, which could be something at work, or it could be that I want to lose weight. It could be a personal goal, or I want to get a new job that pays more and is a better job. And it becomes an exploration process of setting the goal. And then breaking down the goal into little pieces and then taking a step every day continuously toward, say, a weekly target and then setting the next week's target, and next week's target and you work your way up the mountain toward the goal. So that became known as Toyota Kata. He wrote a book called Toyota Kata. And then, I put into my model in the new Toyota Way; in the center of the model, I put scientific thinking. And I said this is really the heart and soul of The Toyota Way. And you can get this but only by going back to school, but not school where you listen to lectures but school where you have to do something, and then you're getting coached by someone who knows what they're doing, who knows how to be a coach. TROND: So my question following this, I think, will be interesting to you, or hopefully, because we've sort of gone through our conversation a little bit this way without jumping to the next step too quickly. Because the last question that I really have for you is, what are the implications of all of this? You have studied, you know, Toyota over years and then teaching academically, and in industry, you've taught these lessons. But what are the implications for the future development of, I guess, management practice in organizations, in manufacturing? Given all that you just said and what you've previously iterated about Toyota's ideas that not a lot of things change or necessarily have to change, how then should leaders go about thinking about the future? And I'm going to put in a couple of more things there into the future. I mean, even just the role of digital, the role of technology, the role of automation, all of these things, that it's not like they are the future, but they are, I guess, they are things that have started to change. And there are expectations that might have been brought into the company that these are new, very, very efficient improvement tools. But given everything that you just said about katas and the importance of practicing, how do you think and how do you teach preparing for the future of manufacturing? JEFFREY: And I have been working with a variety of companies that have developed what you might call industry 4.0 technologies, digital technologies, and I teach classes where a lot of the students are executives from companies where in some cases, they have a dual role of lean plus digitalization. So they're right at the center of these two things. And what I learned going back to my undergraduate industrial engineering days and then to my journey with Toyota, I was always interested in the centrality of people, whatever the tools are. And what I was seeing as an undergraduate was that most of the professors who were industrial engineers really didn't have much of a concept of people. They were just looking at techniques for improving efficiency as if the techniques had the power themselves. And what I discovered with people in IT, and software development, and the digital movement is often they don't seem to have a conception of people. And people from their point of view are basically bad robots [laughs] that don't do what they're supposed to do repeatedly. So the ultimate view of some of the technologists who are interested in industry 4.0 is to eliminate the people as much as possible and eliminate human judgment by, for example, putting it into artificial intelligence and having the decisions made by computers. I'm totally convinced from lots of different experiences with lots of different companies that the AI is extremely powerful and it's a breakthrough, but it's very weak compared to the human brain. And what the AI can do is to make some routine decisions, which frees up the person to deal with the bigger problems that aren't routine and can also provide useful data and even some insight that can help the person in improving the process. So I still see people as the ultimate customer for the insights that come out of this digital stuff, Internet of Things, and all that. But in some cases, they can control a machine tool and make an automatic adjustment without any human intervention, but then the machine breaks down. And then the human has to come in and solve the problem. So if you're thinking about digitalization as tools to...and sometimes have a closed loop control system without the person involved. But in addition, maybe, more importantly, to provide useful data to the human, suddenly, you have to think about the human and what makes us tick and what we respond to. And for example, it's very clear that we're much better at taking in visual information than text information. And that's one of the things that is part of the Toyota Production System is visual management. So how can you make the results of what the AI system come up with very clear and simple, and visual so people can respond quickly to the problem? And most of these systems are really not very good. The human user interface is not well designed because they're not starting with the person. And the other thing is that there are physical processes. Sometimes I kind of make a sarcastic remark, like, by the way, the Internet of Things actually includes things. TROND: [laughs] JEFFREY: And there's a different skill set for designing machines and making machines work and repairing machines than there is for designing software. There are a lot of physical things that have to go on in a factory, changing over equipment, be it for making different parts. And the vision of the technologists might be we'll automate all that, which may be true. Maybe 30 years from now, most of what I say about people will be irrelevant in a factory. I doubt it. But maybe it's 100 years from now, but it's going to be a long time. And there was an interesting study, for example, that looked at the use of robots. And they looked at across the world jobs that could be done by a human or could be done by a robot. And they found that of all the jobs that could be done by a human or a robot, 3% were done by robots, 97%...so this kind of vision of the robots driven by artificial intelligence doing the work of people is really science fiction. It's mostly fiction at this point. At some point, it might become real, but it's got a long way to go. So we still need to understand how to motivate, develop people. But particularly, the more complex the information becomes and the more information available, the more important it is to train people first of all in problem-solving and scientific thinking to use the data effectively and also to simplify the data because we're actually not very good at using a lot of data. We actually can't handle a lot of bits of data at a time like a computer can. So we need simple inputs that then allow us to use our creativity to solve the problem. And most of the companies are not doing that very well. They're offering what they call digital solutions, and I hate that term, on the assumption that somehow the digital technology is the solution. And really, what the digital technology is is just information that can be an input to humans coming up with solutions that fit their situation at that time, not generic solutions. TROND: It's fascinating that you started out with people. You went through all these experiences, and you are directly involved with digital developments. But you're still sticking to the people. We'll see how long that lasts. I think people, from the people I have interviewed, maybe self-selected here on the podcast, people and processes seem enormously important still in manufacturing. Thank you for your perspective. It's been a very rich discussion. And I hope I can bring you back. And like you said if in X number of years people are somehow less important...well, I'm sure their role will change, will adjust. But you're suspecting that no matter what kind of technology we get, there will be some role, or there should be some role for people because you think the judgment even that comes into play is going to be crucial. Is that what I'm -- JEFFREY: There's one more thing I want to add. If you look at industry 4.0, it'll list these are the elements of industry 4.0, and they're all digital technologies. But there's something that's becoming increasingly popular called industry 5.0, where they're asking what's beyond industry 4.0? Which has barely been implemented. But why not look beyond it? Because we've talked about it enough that it must be real. Once we kind of talk about something enough, we kind of lose interest in it. We want to go on to the next thing. So none of these things necessarily have been implemented very well and very broadly. But anyway, so industry 5.0 is about putting people back in the center. So I call it a rework loop. Uh-oh, we missed that the first time. Let's add it back in. TROND: So then what's going to happen if that concludes? Are we going to then go back to some new version of industry 4.0, or will it -- JEFFREY: Well, industry 4.0 is largely a bunch of companies selling stuff and then a bunch of conferences. If you go and actually visit factories, they're still making things in the same way they've always made them. And then there's a monitor that has information on a screen. And the IT person will show you that monitor, and the person on the floor may not even know what it is. But there's a disconnect between a lot of these technologies and what's actually happening on the shop floor to make stuff. And when they do have a success, they'll show you that success. You know, there's like hundreds of processes in the factory. And they'll show you the three that have industry 4.0 solutions in there. And so it's a long way before we start to see these technologies broadly, not only adopted but used effectively in a powerful way. And I think as that happens, we will notice that the companies that do the best with them have highly developed people. TROND: Fantastic. That's a good ending there. I thank you so much. I believe you've made a difference here, arguing for the continued and continuing role of people. And thank you so much for these reflections. JEFFREY: Welcome. Thank you. My pleasure. TROND: You have just listened to another episode of the Augmented Podcast with host Trond Arne Undheim. The topic was the People Side of Lean. Our guest was Jeffrey Liker, academic, consultant, and best-selling author of The Toyota Way. In this conversation, we talked about how to develop internal organizational capability. My takeaway is that Lean is about motivating people to succeed in an industrial organization more than it is about a bundle of techniques to avoid waste on a factory production line. The goal is to have workers always asking themselves if there is a better way. Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at augmentedpodcast.co or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. If you liked this episode, you might also like Episode 84 on The Evolution of Lean. Hopefully, you will find something awesome in these or in other episodes. And if you do, let us know by messaging us, and we would love to share your thoughts with other listeners. The Augmented Podcast is created in association with Tulip, the frontline operation platform that connects people, machines, devices, and systems used in a production or logistics process in a physical location. Tulip is democratizing technology and empowering those closest to operations to solve problems. Tulip is also hiring, and you can find Tulip at tulip.co. Please share this show with colleagues who care about where industry and especially where industrial tech is heading. To find us on social media is easy; we are Augmented Pod on LinkedIn and Twitter and Augmented Podcast on Facebook and YouTube. Augmented — industrial conversations that matter. See you next time. Special Guest: Jeffrey Liker.

Supporting Champions
106: Abbie Eaton on women's motor racing, injury and pushing boundaries

Supporting Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 43:46


Abbie Eaton is a racing driver having competed in a range of Series' including the Mazda supercup, Super 2 series, 2 x British Champion and notably in the W series. She is also a test driver on the series The Grand tour. In this discussion Abbie talks about carving out a career as a woman in a male dominated sport, she shares her drive, personal ambitions to not only compete but to manage everything, from sponsors, to training, recovering from serious injury, to earning an income away from racing as a driving coach. This really encapsulates where the women's sport is at the moment with top talent having to cope themselves, make things work as best they can, while staying competitive. For me this is an insight into the mind and pursuit of a pioneer. I listen to many of the lionesses recently thank all of the women who grafted to make their current rise in popularity possible and I think of people like Abbie - making it happen for herself but also taking the sport forward.   Follow Abbie on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/abbieeaton44 and twitter https://twitter.com/AbbieEaton44 and take a look at her website https://www.abbieeaton.com/   Hi, I'm Steve Ingham Sports and Performance Scientist co-founder at Supporting Champions. I have the privilege of supporting over 1000 athletes of which over 200 have gone on to win World or Olympic medals. For the last 25 years I've been fascinated by, researched and applied innovative ideas to help people succeed  and now I want to share those performance strategies with you.    I help aspiring and professional Performance Science and Support Staff improve their skills, experience and mindset for working with sports performers through a range of online courses and an exclusive community hub https://www.supportingchampions.co.uk/onlinecourse   If you're working in sports performance or business and want to get support to develop your team and systems - take a look at what I offer here - https://www.supportingchampions.co.uk/speaking/   Listen to the podcast https://www.supportingchampions.co.uk/category/podcast/   Links Twitter at https://twitter.com/ingham_steve https://www.tiktok.com/@supportingchampions Supporting Champions on Twitter www.twitter.com/support_champs Supporting Champions on Linkedin, www.linkedin.com/company/supporting-champions https://www.instagram.com/supportingchampions/

Unnamed Automotive Podcast
Episode 285: 2022 Hyundai Kona N, Sami's RWD Mazda SUV Adventure, Grand Wagoner Towing Disaster

Unnamed Automotive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 48:26


Whoa now, are you looking for more automotive shenanigans and blabber? Then you came to the right place, as Sami and Benjamin are eager to share their thoughts on the latest happenings in the automotive industry. First Benjamin talks about the 2022 Hyundai Kona N, a high-performance, yet front-wheel-drive crossover that may have spelled doom for the first Hyunda N product. Hear how a capital-E enthusiast like Ben feels about a FWD, automatic-only performance car, and then take a trip back in time with him to when weird spicy crossovers were all the rage. Then flyboy Sami talks about his bizarre mission from Europe, where he tested out the not-for-America 2023 Mazda CX-60. The CX-60 features the same platform and powertrain of the upcoming CX-90, just in a smaller package, so now Sami and you, our odeal listener, have an idea of what's going on behind the doors at Mazda. It's easy to forget that this automaker worked on such wild ideas as the compression ignition engine, rotary engine and DEF-less diesel engine, so what can go wrong with another weird change of pace? Benjamin also provides an interesting update on his Grand Wagoneer, and explains why he won't be towing with it anytime soon. For more fun stuff like this weeks episode, head on over to unnamedautomotivepodcast.com, or engage with our guys (@huntingbenjamin and @Sami_HA) on your favorite social media platform."

El Garaje Hermético de Máximo Sant
¡No me gustan los coches japoneses!

El Garaje Hermético de Máximo Sant

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 21:28


Algunos de vosotros me han acusado de que no me gustan los coches japoneses… otros de que no sé ni decir el nombre de alguna de las marcas japonesas… ¿Queréis saber la verdad, toda la verdad y nada más que la verdad? Los coches japoneses son distintos, han sido aún más distintos y espero que sigan siendo distintos… ya veréis los motivos, que los hay y poderosos. Japón, un país muy particular… Japón es un país más pequeño que España, 377 mil, contra 500 mil km2, pero mientras España somos 47 millones de habitantes, habitante arriba, habitante abajo, en Japón son… ¡casi 4 veces más! En Japón hay 333 habitantes por Km2, mientras en España somos 94. Si lo comparas con México, con 64 o con tu tierra, Chile, con 25 o con Argentina, con solo 16, Japón esta que se sale… ¿Qué tiene que ver esto con los coches? Pero esa falta de territorio conlleva que están muy apretados, pero también una falta acuciante de materias primas que perdura hasta nuestros días. Como potencia industrial Japón tiene muchas ventajas: Mano de obra eficiente, disciplinada y en otros tiempos, barata; excelentes ingenieros; y una mentalidad de grupo y de competencia con otros países difícil de entender para los occidentales. Un poco de historia. La historia del automóvil en Japón arranca más tarde y con menos fuerza que en Occidente y, para entender todo bien, tiene un origen humilde. Como el país es muy pequeño, y los japoneses no es que sean muy grandes, los coches son muy pequeños. Y como no tienen petróleo, desde el principio, muy económicos de consumo. Invasión de coches USA. El mundo al revés. Porque en 1930 los fabricantes estadounidenses implantados en Japón, entre ellos Ford que construyo los modelos T y A, producían 20.000 coches al año en territorio japones mientras que todos los fabricantes japonese juntos manufacturaban apenas 500. Y el gobierno de Japón se defiende y en 1936 aprueba la Ley de Industrias de Fabricación de Automóviles, con el objetivo de romper el monopolio del coche americano. Las empresas constituidas con arreglo a esta Ley 1936 incluyen Toyota y Datsun, que acabará siendo la actual Nissan. La Guerra lo cambia todo. Parece que perder una guerra es un drama. Y lo es. Pero tiene sus ventajas, ventajas que aprovecharon tanto Alemania como Japón: La limitación o directamente la prohibición de tener un ejército. Tras la Segunda Guerra Mundial mientras Occidente y la extinta URSS gastaban recursos y dinero, muchísimo dinero, muchisísimo dinero, en mantener sus ejércitos y mantener carreras espaciales, alemanes y japoneses iban a lo suyo, a desarrollar su industria y su economía. El caso Toyoda. Sí, Toyoda y no Toyota, no es un error. Me voy a detener en esto. Toyoda la funda Sakichi Toyoda en 1918 como fabricante de maquinaria textil. Kiichiro, el hijo del fundador, hace un viaje por Europa y EE.UU. y vuelve entusiasmado con coches y su industria, y propone a su padre fabricar coches. Toyoda en japones significa “campo de arroz fértil” y además entendían que era difícil de pronunciar para los extranjeros y como la idea era exportar, deciden cambiar el nombre por Toyota. Producción disparada. En 1960 solo el 15 por ciento de los hogares japoneses tenía coche, pero 15 años después ya era el 75 por ciento. Las fábricas de automóvil se automatizan, se mejora la productividad y exportar se convierte en una cuestión de vida o muerte. Invasión…de coches. Y en esta tormenta perfecta, llega la crisis del petróleo de 1973, que da un impulso decisivo a los coches japoneses. Los coches americanos del momento eran grandes y gastaban mucha gasolina. Además, habían perdido en gran parte su capacidad de sorprender, tras años de una estrategia de más es mejor. Los defectos. Los coches japoneses eran fruto de las circunstancias de su país y de sus compradores japoneses y tenían sus peculiaridades. Vamos a verlas. -Lo más moderno es lo mejor. Esto es norma para los japoneses… -Su habitabilidad era escasa… -Estética o muy simplona o muy manga. -Interiores sosos, muy sosos. -Depósitos de combustible pequeños. -Motores económicos, pero poco potentes al principio... ¿Y qué es lo mejor? Sin duda, de lejos, lo mejor de los coches japoneses en su calidad de fabricación. ¿Me gustan o no me gustan? Por supuesto que me gustan los coches japoneses. He tenido varios y tengo uno en la actualidad. Curiosamente las marcas que más me gustan, por orden alfabético, son Honda, Mazda y Toyota. Pero no he tenido ni un Honda ni un Toyota… y me encantaría porque son marcas para mí con mucho encanto y en el caso de Toyota, de las pocas que sigue ofreciendo modelos coupé muy a tener en cuenta. Coche del día. No fue mi primer “japo” pero sí el que más ilusión me hizo. Me refiero a mi precioso Nissan 350Z, “el Porsche de los pobres” como le llamó una amiga mía con ánimo de ofender… y sin conseguirlo.

Stêrka Ciwan
09/2022 Stêrka Ciwan - Gedenken - Jede Sekunde für ihre Hervals - Mazda Maria

Stêrka Ciwan

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 6:44


Bizler de Stêrka Ciwan Dergisi olarak Zap'ta, Metîna'da Avaşîn'de ve tüm direniş alanlarında sergilenen direnişin, Kürdistan gençliğinde nasıl karşılık bulması gerektiğini ve bu çerçevede Devrimci Halk Savaşı'nın, “Werin Cenga Azadiyê” hamlesi kapsamında, gençliğin tüm alanlarında, nasıl ele alınması gerektiği üzerinde durduk. Değerli Yoldaşlar, Zap, Avaşîn, Metina ve tüm direniş alanlarında yaşanan muazzam mücadeleye karşın Kürdistan gençliği olarak rol ve misyonumuzu oynamanın ve Devrimci Halk Savaşı ile görev ve sorumluluklarımızı üstlenmenin zamanı gelmiştir.” --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sterka-ciwan/message

Eddy Warman de Noche
Nueva Mazda 2 Hatchback 2023; mezcales de SLP galardonados por el Concours Mondial de Bruxelles

Eddy Warman de Noche

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 40:31


Eddy nos lleva a una prueba de manejo con Miguel Barbeyto, Presidente de Mazda en México, quien nos presenta la nueva Mazda 2 Hatchback 2023, un híbrido con mucho estilo y funcionalidad; Eddy nos presenta una charla con la Secretaria de Turismo de SLP, Patricia Véliz, y productores de mezcal de San Luis Potosi galardonados por el México Selection by Concours Mondial de Bruxelles, todo esto y más con Eddy Warman de Noche.

The Bizarre Files
The Bizarre Files #1295

The Bizarre Files

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 15:29


A bull with flaming horns gored a man in Spain... Man in Ghana cuts off his penis while having a dream of slaughtering a goat... Man got Mazda stuck on stairs after stealing it... & more.

TechStuff
Tech News: Twitter and Facebook Shut Down Pro-US Propaganda Campaign

TechStuff

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 34:23 Very Popular


Facebook and Twitter have been shutting down fake accounts spreading pro-US narratives in the Middle East and Asia. Google warns us of a hacking tool that can download your entire email inbox. And in most of the world it's about to get more expensive to buy a new PS5.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Autoboutique 1/4 de Milla Podcast
93. Dodge Charger Daytona SRT, Italika Cafe Racer, Actualización Mazda 3

Autoboutique 1/4 de Milla Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 46:34


Dodge Charger electrico con ruido artificial, Italika Cafe Racer en México, Mazda 3 2023 con ligera actualizacion en EU.

BJ & Jamie
Full Show

BJ & Jamie

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 75:42


Jamie is out sick so today the boys are holding it down. SMH Dil has to pay 3k in car repairs on his new Mazda. The cost of raising a child from birth to 17 years old is now $300k on average. A bus driver in Georgia has been charged for driving a bus full of 40 kids under the influence. Mail theft is up in Colorado. Experts say when the government sends out checks mail theft sky rockets. The Game of Thrones spinoff had 10 Million people log in to watch it. 

RoadWorthy Drive Moments
REVIEW: 2022 Mazda CX-30

RoadWorthy Drive Moments

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 9:58


Replacing the CX-3 in the lineup, Mazda has doubled down on the subcompact crossover SUV segment with its introduction of the CX-30.  Ride with me as we discover the new Mazda's capabilities. 

Ramsey Mazda's Sundays with Sinatra
Ramsey Mazda Sundays with Sinatra | 8-21-2022

Ramsey Mazda's Sundays with Sinatra

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 111:24


Oh yeah we are swinging my friend! On tonight's show Joe Piscopo is going Back to Budokan, Baby!' He pulled out some Gems from Frank Sinatra performing in Japan, that you are going to love! 

Crown Unfiltered - Car Design Podcast
Car Design Podcast - JORDAN MEADOWS | Crown Unfiltered Ep #82

Crown Unfiltered - Car Design Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 87:30


VIDEO VERSION OF THIS: https://youtu.be/nGOYnZYY8Sghttps://youtu.be/VYCKfqi3AV8   FOLLOW ME ON INSTAGRAM FOR MORE CONTEXT ON MY GUESTS: https://www.instagram.com/crownunfiltered/   ABOUT JORDAN: We have an absolute legend on the show this week and if he's slipped through your radar, it's because he's too busy executing in the shadows and not putting any energy into self-promotion, like the rest of us on IG!   Jordan was a key member of the design team that did the 2015 Ford Mustang. Prior to this, he was a Design Manager at Mazda in California during an insane period in the mid to late 2000's where the brand was producing by far the coolest concepts in the industry. These included the Furai, Taiki, and Nagare. Jordan's team produced the latter.   Prior to this, Jordan was a team leader at VW's Advanced Design Center in Potsdam. This was in the studio's legendary heyday where you would find people like Daniel Simon, Christian Felske, Achim Anscheidt, and, for a brief period, Anders Warming, walking the halls.   As a designer, Jordan was one of the pioneers in developing complete volumes in Alias. It has become commonplace now, but it certainly was not standard practice then. To the best of my knowledge, there were only a couple of people in the world doing this at the time and he had a profound influence on many designers.   Jordan's thinking is incredibly unique and there are many reasons for this, including his origins at the Rhode Island School of Design. He also did a brief stint at CCS and eventually went on to do the Vehicle Design program at the Royal College of Art.   Last, but not least, Jordan is a faculty member of the prestigious Art Center in California and has also published a book titled: ‘Vehicle Design: Aesthetic Principles in Transportation Design', which can be found on Amazon (This is not a paid partnership, promise!!!

Talking Cars (HQ)
#373 2023 Honda HR-V

Talking Cars (HQ)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 18:25 Very Popular


This week we share our first impressions of the 2023 Honda HR-V. We discuss how the HR-V improved over the first generation model and why it feels more robust in comparison to competing small SUVs. Plus, we answer an audience question that compares an all-wheel drive Mazda 3 to the new Acura Integra.  SHOW NOTES: 0:00-10:39: 2023 Honda HR-V 10:39-18:08: Question: Which would you choose; the Mazda 3 AWD or the new Acura Integra?  LINKS: Redesigned 2023 Honda HR-V Grows in Size and Sophistication: https://www.consumerreports.org/suvs/2023-honda-hr-v-review-a5649305775/ 2022 Mazda 3: https://www.consumerreports.org/cars/mazda/3/2022/overview/ 2023 Acura Integra Tries to Recapture ‘80s and ‘90s Magic With Help of Civic Si: https://www.consumerreports.org/small-cars/2023-acura-integra-review-a1115778934/

Talking Cars (MP3)
#373 2023 Honda HR-V

Talking Cars (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 18:25 Very Popular


This week we share our first impressions of the 2023 Honda HR-V. We discuss how the HR-V improved over the first generation model and why it feels more robust in comparison to competing small SUVs. Plus, we answer an audience question that compares an all-wheel drive Mazda 3 to the new Acura Integra. SHOW NOTES: 0:00-10:39: 2023 Honda HR-V 10:39-18:08: Question: Which would you choose; the Mazda 3 AWD or the new Acura Integra?  LINKS: Redesigned 2023 Honda HR-V Grows in Size and Sophistication: https://www.consumerreports.org/suvs/2023-honda-hr-v-review-a5649305775/ 2022 Mazda 3: https://www.consumerreports.org/cars/mazda/3/2022/overview/ 2023 Acura Integra Tries to Recapture ‘80s and ‘90s Magic With Help of Civic Si: https://www.consumerreports.org/small-cars/2023-acura-integra-review-a1115778934/

The Clean Energy Show
Tainted Backyard Chickens, Biden EV Details, Japan's Offshore Wind Potential

The Clean Energy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 40:04


We dig into why Japan is not making use of their abundant wind resources. Tesla will begin shipping their electric semi truck this year. We look at the details for EVs in the new Biden climate bill. Mazda sold only 8 electric vehicles in the month of July. It's a headline and punchline all in one! An update to the US sending oil to Germany, F150 lightning towing range for my specific situation of a tent trailer, as big as the Biden climate bill is, it's still less then Europe and China, it's not just Volkswagen cheating on emissions. A chinese automaker is upping what supercharing speed can be and, it turns out backyard chickens lay tainted eggs, which was the name of an all-girl punk band at my high school. Thanks for listening to our show! Consider rating The Clean Energy Show on iTunes, Spotify or wherever you listen to our show. Follow us on TikTok! Check out our YouTube Channel! Follow us on Twitter! Your hosts: James Whittingham https://twitter.com/jewhittingham Brian Stockton: https://twitter.com/brianstockton Email us at cleanenergyshow@gmail.com Leave us an online voicemail at http://speakpipe.com/cleanenergyshow Transcript of this episode----------------------------------- Joe Biden: Progress does come. Your dad was right. And when it does, like today, people's lives are made better and the future becomes brighter and the nation can be transformed. That's what's happening happening now. Brian: Hello and welcome to episode 128 of the Clean Energy Show. I'm Brian Stockton. James: I'm James Whittingham. This week I dig into why Japan is not making use of their abundant wind resources. Turns out Godzilla is only partially to blame. Tesla will begin shipping their electric semi truck this year. No word yet if they'll be shipping them via Tesla semi truck. We look at the details for EVs and the new biden climate bill. Small detail not talked about. You have to wear aviators while driving any rebated car. Mazda sold only eight electric vehicles in the month of July. It's a headline and a punchline all in one. All that and more on this edition of the Clean Energy Show. Also this week we're going to talk about an update to the US sending oil to Germany F 150 Lightning towing range for my specific situation of Toyota dent trailer. As big as the biden climate bill is, it's still less than Europe and China. It's not just a Volkswagen cheating on emissions. A Chinese automaker is upping what supercharging speed can be. And it turns out backyard chickens like tasted eggs and Tatted Eggs was the name of the allgirl punk band in my high school. Brian, I just wanted to add something to last week. We were chatting about my new electric bicycle, the ride one up V, two roadster, gravel edition. It does have a smaller battery, which I was saying is one of the main the downsides of it, but you can buy an extra external battery from the company and it clicks into the kind of water bottle spot there on the bike. So for $240 you can buy an extra little battery. What are the stats of that battery, Brian? I do not know the status of the battery. How do I really care? Well, is it a nine volt that you took out of your smoke detector for $200? Or is it actually do something for you? Yeah, it does something. It's a battery the size of a water bottle a little bit bigger. I was talking to you that it was odd because we actually got a press release from Saudi Arabia, from Saudi Arabia arabian energy company boasting about their solar. We've been speculating for a long time because we keep charging in Saudi Arabia whose listed us in Saudi Arabia and if so, send us a message. No one has sent us a message, but someone is listening. By the way, I want to talk to you about shower heads. Why? It's because I just vacationed at your cottage and you're building a new one. And I was thinking all the decisions you have to make, it's like being in a film. What color do you want this car in the background? What color do you want this hat on this extra? Being a director means making countless decisions, actually, until the point where your brain is dead. But you're going to have to make decisions like that on your house because you're building a brand new house. You're going to have to say, I want a faucet. Now. You use your water from a tank, it's shipped in and probably replenished after my family has been there with our desire for showers and cleanliness. Yeah, there's no running water. Everybody has their own cistern, but your tap, when you turn on the tap in your washrooms, it comes out like a fire hydrant. There's nothing restraining it. So I'm thinking, well, first of all, you could probably if you were still going to live there, you could probably buy some sort of aerator to put on. That would be the simple thing to do, just to I mean, we did change the shower head in the guest house to a low flow one because it wasn't before. The showers are the most important. And the toilets, of course, because you want them to be efficient. It's really important. It's not just environmental. It's a matter of conserving water because it's hard to get water. You don't want to run out and keep filling it. Right? Yeah. And we think that we can use kind of a gray water system or we can maybe use rain water or something for the sinks in the toilets. And then I've always wanted I don't know if it's practical for us, but you can get clean drinking water out of the air. They have these things that run, like off the solar panel that just collects moisture from the air and goes through a filter. And that's a possible way to get your drinking water. Yeah. And you don't drink your water out there because you don't trust your tank, right? Yeah. We drink it separate from the water that runs through the house. So that might be a way of getting good drinking water. Hell, I felt my drinking water here in the house, and it's still not great. Is that right? It's still not great. We've got a good filter under the kitchen sink that it's supposed to take out lead. It's like it's the highest level of kind of home water thing, including lead. Oh, that's interesting. I've got an interesting story coming up on lead and chickens buckle up for that one. It's a good story, though. Yeah. So I don't know. And of course, lighting and a lot of people have exterior lighting on their architecture. It's nice to have but is it necessary as it causing light pollution in a provincial park? When you want to see the stars, your star gives it yourself. Are you going to have a driveway? Yeah. Are you going to like the driveway? Yeah. No, those are all great questions. Like, we renovated our kitchen five or six years ago, so we have some taste of what that is like. It's like, yeah, you got to make a decision about the light above the sink. You got to make a decision about the pole handles on the cupboards and the finishes for the cabinets and the flooring, like, what pattern for the flooring and all that. So, yeah, absolutely. Tons of questions to answer. So when I arrived at your cottage, it was a very hot day, and I kind of roasted my fat self a bit broiled, I guess, or deep cooked, or I don't know how you want to put it, a pressure cooked, but I was a bit uncomfortable thinking I got there's no overhangs in this house. The sun is just beating in, but there's no overhangs on my house. Yeah. At all. In fact, there's less overhangs on my house than there is in your cottage. And I seem to manage fine here. I think it's better insulated. I mean, that helps. The right kind of windows help, but the right reflectivity on modern windows helps keep the sun away in the summertime, lets it through in the winter when it's more lower in the sky and a more of a direct angle through the window. So, I don't know. Your architect has come up with a stunning design that is just I really look forward to seeing it like it's just incredibly cool. Yeah. Are you still doing a round window for the bedroom, by the way? I have to ask. No, at the moment it's not round. How come? Probably just matches better if it's not. It's also like, floor to ceiling windows and places. So that's going to be, I mean, in the future, as we said last week with our letter, electricity will be free. It'll be inconsequential that you could heat whatever you wanted to heat or cool whatever you wanted to cool, rather. But right now it could be hard to keep that place cool, depending on how it is in the summer. Yes, I think we're okay because the rest of the walls will be very thick and super insulated, so you kind of allowed a certain amount of glass area before you kind of screw up that envelope. So I think it'll be fine. And then you have presumably, in the round earth construction that you're considering or going ahead with. Is that fair to say? You're going ahead with round earth considering, hopefully. Okay. What's it going to look like? There's no ram, dearth. Then it's going to look like no, that would be a whole different plan. Yeah, we'll see. Well, it's very interesting, though, because the rand earth has sort of stored heat energy. It can take store the cool from the night and let it off slowly. It can store the heat from the day and sort of moderate the house. Now, regardless of how you're making it, if you chose, say, a concrete floor, that would be one way of having heat storage in the house. You might want to go down with a boiler, then that goes through the floor. That's what a lot of people do these days. But then boilers are complicated, as you found out for your rental house. As far as getting heat pumps for them. Yeah, in floor heating seems the most likely. But there are many different ways of heating the liquid that's in your in floor heating. So I don't see that as being a big problem. And then you got to build a podcast studio out there. A little sound booth with good airflow. Well, there's a little kind of home theater room. So I'm hoping that area will work for a podcast. Sure, as long as it has a good view of the lake. Yeah. Then you could shoot yourself as a backdrop then, if you wanted to. Maybe the whole house should be designed around that principle. Brian. I don't know. Anyway, I just wanted to mention that. And another thing I wanted to mention was I was just now looking at the local EV Facebook group as I scrolled through Facebook and I laughed my ass off at something. Somebody bought a brand new EV and they're asking the question that people often ask, where do I charge? What credit cards do I need? Do I need an account with people from different charges? And this is Western Canada, by the way. And Cam Roger responded to this person and said that you will likely find the flow card as being the most useful, as well as charge point to experience the reliability of a Petrol Canada charging session, purchase a lottery ticket. That is to say, your chances of it working are about the same as winning the lottery. I do like a bit of sarcasm, especially when you're angry at something. That really makes me feel good to read that. Some updates to some previously discussed stories. I wanted to mention to our listeners that Connecticut has a new law that EV chargers have to be repaired properly. However, I can't find any information on it. I saw it mentioned on Twitter by someone reliable and I can't find it again. So if you know about Connecticut having a recent law that ensures that EV chargers are repaired within a certain time frame, send me an email cleanenergyshow@gmail.com, because we'll talk about it later. Yeah, I'm sure we have at least one lesson in Connecticut. And my friend Mike mike Noblock bought his first EV. He bought me Ionic Five and I asked him how's it going? He had it for, I think about ten days or so now, and he says it's awesome. It's everything I hoped for and more. It's really fun to drive. Accelerating up to speed so quickly is fun every time you do it. And Mike is not a race car driver, but he's finding this fun. He's a reasonable guy. The ride is really smooth and the seating is very comfy. It's insanely quiet and love charging at home instead of going to a gas station, which is something that people don't realize. People worry about where you're going to charge it all the time. But the fact is you don't take your cellphone to a gas station to charge. It's really cool to do it at home. Imagine we didn't do that. Okay. An update to the ongoing dispute with Germany and Russia. There is a pipeline supplying oil from Russia to Germany, and this is kind of important for Germany. And we've just been keeping tabs on how that's going. There's a second tanker of crude oil coming from America to help kind of fill in the gaps. So 570,000 barrels is due in Germany soon. And this is the second shipment from the US. To help bridge the gap. And Germany is hoping to reduce their reliance on Russian oil and gas by about 90% this year. So let's hope they can manage that. Well, you know, inflation is starting to slow down, at least here in Canada. We had the latest numbers. Yeah. And the price of gas has come down. It's amazing how if everyone drove an EV, it wouldn't be affecting inflation as much. Right. You still have to pay for goods. Goods will go up in price because gas with trucking and so on, until we get long haul trucking sorted out with electrification, which is coming. And Biden is about to sign the inflation reduction as we speak, right? Yes. We've been talking about this for a couple of episodes now. This is a massive, massive bill in the US. I always forget what it's called. What's it called? The Inflation Reduction Act or the IRA. Yeah. And you expect it to be called something like the Carbon Reduction Act. Biden climate bill for is what some people call it, climate bill. But there's a nice article on Bloomberg this week, and it's called the Inflation Reduction Act is a Climate bill, just don't call it one. So it's just a nice little article here about the kind of the vagaries of politics and the importance of naming these bills. It's like governments can kind of force the conversation in certain directions by calling it something they used to just follow boring naming conventions for these kinds of things. But they realized some years ago that PR is an important part of this. It sort of reminded me of do you remember when Walmart was kind of coming into Canada? Like about 30 years ago, walmart came into Canada and really started kind of taking over town to town. They were building Walmarts and putting kind of our local stores out of business. And it was obviously a huge change and a huge thing. A lot of people were upset about it. And it's like this big, massive corporation moving in to take things over. And what did they do? They started these TV commercials. I don't know if you remember this, but it was like they started featuring individuals that worked at Walmart, the Walmart Greeters and the Walmart Cashiers. And they kind of made it sound like it was a small town store. Like it was like the people that work at Walmart are just like your neighbors because they are your neighbors. And there were commercials that focused on exactly the opposite of what Walmart actually is, which is a giant corporation. And it was kind of annoying and sickening. But it's like, well, that's the world of PR. That's kind of how this goes. So the other aspect of that I wanted to kind of mentioned, which we just touched on briefly is so, yes, it is called the Inflation Reduction Act. Is that what it's actually going to be or do? And so there was an analysis that suggested that 41% of our current inflation is attributable to fossil fuel prices. So if this can bring down the price of fossil fuels, bring down the demand of fossil fuels, then, yeah, it actually should reduce inflation. So as you were talking, I looked up a list of ridiculous US. Legislation names that have nothing to do with one, and the Zero Tolerance for Barbaric Cultural Practices Act was one. Okay, well, I think that was one in Canada. Actually. That is one in Canada. Serious time for the most Serious Crime act. The Unborn Victims of Crime Act. Yeah. So that was an abortion related one in the States. It gets weirder, too. And ultimately it's just the name of the bill. Whatever's in the bill obviously, is the important thing. So the other thing I just wanted to mention, which again comes from Bloomberg, our new best friends over there at BNEF, and they crunch the numbers in terms of this new climate bill in the US. And it's $374,000,000,000, which is a lot of money. But their conclusion and these numbers are always kind of difficult to calculate because what's being done by government, what's being done by private. So it's always a bit fuzzy on the numbers. But their conclusion was that this is a really good spend, but the EU and China are spending a bit more than the US. Is with this climate bill. Is that right? Well, that's interesting. Yeah. China being the biggest spender right now on clean energy transition. Getting back to the naming of this act, though, I think there was a column in the New York Times yesterday about how climate has become part of the culture wars. If you're woke, you care about the climate. I don't understand. A little bit worried about where the world is going. In fact, I'm a lot worried where the world is going. Also. I think just today people were sharing a Global mail article that was a Canadian national newspaper about the F 150 all electric lightning pickup trucks, two of them being owned in the prairies here where we live, including one here nearby, Brian and I, and we've mentioned him on the show before I assume the Globe listens to our show. I assume everybody does high ups in Saudi Arabia. Biden's probably listening right now. I know. Sure. So this guy's Lightning says he can this was interesting to me because I've been interested in facts about my own use scenario because I imagined only to pick up traffic and Holly, my tent trailer, my pop up camper, as some people call him, and he says he has one, he's got almost about as big as a Pawpaw trailer as you can have. He says he got 600 km driving around the city of Range, but 330 on the highway with that large pop up camper. So that gives me valuable information as a person who may want to do that in the future. Yeah, that's a good indication of the actual reality of it. Because towing reduces the range by a lot, apparently. But, you know, if I just drove our SUV, gas powered SUV, to the lake, if I towed my Camper, it would have half the range. It would have half the range as well. So that's not bad. I was thinking, oh, you'd have to charge every hour and maybe it'd be worth it because it costs so much, but that's every 3 hours. You don't want to stop that anyway, right? I stopped an hour and a half just to put more oil in my damn engine. Which you won't have to do in an EV. Praise the Lord. My God. I hate that. Yes. No, I had a Nissan Sentra where we had to drive it with a bunch of extra cans of oil, which I put in that movie where we shot at that gas station. I was thinking of putting a hose with a funnel on it inside the cabin so I could just add while I drive. That would be great. Oh, yeah, and one other personal update I forgot about. So I drove my Tesla up to Saskatoon, to the nearest Tesla service center because I had an issue. The suspension started squeaking and the steering wheel was squeaking. So, yeah, they replaced the I should find the exact name of it here. Just give me a second. Is duhickey and the wording at all schmengee. They told me that the left front upper control arm ball joint had seized. So they replaced that one and proactively replaced the other one as well, which it was still working fine. But I think this is probably an issue that they've experienced before. So they went and replaced the upper control arm ball joints, the left and right on the front. Yeah, it took about 3 hours. It's a two and a half hour drive to get up there to start with. But I got there first thing in the morning and they gave me a Tesla Model X as a loaner to drive around town while I was there. I may go up there this weekend. Do you think they'll give me one for no reason. No, I don't think they will. This is from Drive Tesla, Canada. And this is just our opportunity to mock Mazda or Mazda, depending on where you live in the world. Only sold eight of their electric cars in the US in July of 2022. This is a very sad and pathetic number, but it really is, I don't know, a compliance car. I don't know who would buy this or why. It's only got 100 miles, range 160 km. Somebody who really likes Mazda. Someone who really likes Mazda. And I could see it maybe, I don't know, certain business case situations where you're making short little trips or something, but this is not much range than your 25th. You should buy one just to sell because it's going to be such a rarity if they stop making yeah. Like the actual numbers. This is going to be one of the most rare cars you could possibly own. That's incredible. Yeah, they've got a very short range. The reminiscent of the early Leafs, right? Absolutely. No, this is similar range to your car. Yeah. Why would you do that nowadays? My car was made a lifetime ago. So I'm going to have some details here. But the inflation Reduction act for EVs, because we didn't get into details about this, consumer Reports broke it down the other day. So, among other provisions, the new bill will do the following. It offers a tax credit up to $4,000 on used EVs. This is new, but they have to be put into service after December 31 of next year. December 3118 months from now. The vehicles built and registered 18 months from now will be possible to buy them used with a $4,000 credit. So that's a ways off. It takes away the $200,000 vehicle cap on tax credits that made EVs and plug in hybrids from Tesla, GM and Toyota ineligible for tax cuts because they've sold more than 200,000 of those vehicles in the United States and have used up their tax credits. So, people, that's one reason why GM dropped the bolt price by $6,700, you asked or something to make up for that. Because Tesla doesn't care. Because they have way more demand than they can do. But it does away with tax credits for pricey EVs. This is something that we see criticized locally here in Canada in the news. Why are you giving tax credits to 150,000 more cars like the Model X or something? So it doesn't weigh with today's tax credits for price EV such as the Hummer EV, the Lucid Air, Model S and X, and Poll Star, I would imagine, and Porsche and stuff like that, it eliminates tax credits for vehicles not assembled in North America. This is a critical one here because this is going to eliminate the tax credit for the BMWs, the Hyundai Ionic five, the Kia EV six, the Toyota BZ four, X not assembled here. Maybe one day they will be because like Nissan with my car. They did two years in Japan and then they opened up a factory in Tennessee and one in the UK. Maybe they'll do that and maybe they'll be selling a lot more vehicles. But most important, the bill also immediately restricts the full tax credit on new EVs to vehicles with battery minerals sourced from countries that the US has a free trade agreement with, or recycled in North America. So you can buy a car that has recycled batteries if they're recycled in North America, but you can't buy Chinese ones. So starting in 2024, if any materials, minerals or components are sourced from foreign entities of concern, you know who you are, china and Russia, the vehicle will not qualify for tax credit. So that is tricky. We're going to continue to talk about that, Brian, because nobody seems to know how that's going to wash out. Yeah, because it could be difficult to ramp that up, because I think China in particular is kind of the world leader in sourcing these minerals and processing them. And so it does make sense that we often talk about energy security. I mean, if you've got to rely on shipments of oil from places like Russia, you realize suddenly when they go to war, oh, man, that was a really bad idea. All this stuff impacts the security of your country if you can't source it yourself locally and Russia start going to war. Stupid idiots. Yeah. Please stop that. The Tesla semi truck is going to ship this year, Elon Musk announced on Twitter, and it's going to have 500 miles of range. And the Tesla Cyber truck with 500 miles of range is going to start shipping next year. So this is a fairly definitive statement. We've been really wondering when electric semi trucks are going to finally start rolling. There's still not much in terms of semi truck charging infrastructure, so I'm still expecting to hear more about that. We've only heard of a handful of places that have the new Tesla semi charger infrastructure for charging. So this will be kind of a slow roll out, I think, because of that, because of the lack of charging infrastructure. But they can probably, in some cases, charge at the existing Tesla chargers. But trucking is a huge part of carbon emissions, so once semis all go electric, this is a massive step forward in carbon reduction. I'm looking forward to the next cyber truck event where they update the preproduction, what's actually going to really happen for real. And we'll notice back the costs. The cost might go up. Yeah. No, they pulled the prices down off their website several months ago amidst this massive inflation that's happening. But I wouldn't be surprised if the prices are double what they were originally close to. That so much for my order. Yeah. One day, Brian. One day. My son and I have often discussed Japan. I can't remember the details of why, but we have this long discussion. I said, well, one day I'm going to look into why Japan has no wind. He says, Why don't they do wind? Because he thinks they don't have any wind because nuclear is so great. While they shut down their nuclear, they're bringing it back tepidly a little bit at a time. But when they had their Fukushima disaster, they shut down a bunch of their nuclear. It's easy for us to say nuclear is safe, but when you're there and you're experiencing what they did, you're going to probably have a different opinion. So I looked at the reason. I finally found an interesting paper and article about this year and a half old. It says that there's limited understanding of the seabed conditions surrounding Japan, unlike other locations such as the United Kingdom, because they benefited from oil and gas exploration for decades. Right. So in that north coast there, off of Europe, lots of oil and gas exploration for decades. So they understand it. Now, there's another benefit to oil and gas, is just understanding the seabed for. So they have a limited understanding of what the seabed even is because they don't go down there looking because there's not oil and gas there. It is the 7th longest shoreline in the world. So there's lots of wind opportunity there. Another reason they've been slow is conservative government policies. Lots of different departments not working together. They actually permitted some wind projects that were three years long and kelsey breeze, there was no bitters. This is a 40 year thing, Brian. Another problem is their water gets very deep very quickly, down to 200 meters. It's only 50 meters close to the shore, but after a while it gets down to 200 meters, which is quite too deep for offshore wind. But there's new technology around that wasn't there ten years ago, including floating. So there's a huge opportunity for floating wind potential. And the wind potential, to my surprise, is not great on Japanese land. Not that great at all. So the best potential is in the ocean. Another setback or drawback is that most of the wind potentials in the north with is less population. So you have to unfortunately send that power. I wonder if they couldn't do it through the ocean. If you were in Japan and you had a whole bunch of wind in the north, all these countries are doing undersea DC high power cables, maybe because nothing gets disturbed. You just drop it on the seabed and you don't have to build towers and bridges and do land studies. You just drop it down there and nobody gets hurt. Not even a fish. Fishing concerns. They're concerned about fish. The nuclear disaster, as you said, they temporarily shut down 54 power plants, which is a lot I don't even know. They began shipping coal and natural gas. That's no way to go, but that's not good for the planet. So Fukushima was a turning point. For the nation's attitude towards nuclear power as the associated risks and costs and costs became apparent. We always talk about the cost of nuclear. And even though a limited number of reactors are being restarted, it's unlikely that nuclear power will ever return to such a dominant position in the Japanese energy mix. So, yeah, the water depth drops to 200 meters, around 20 offshore. So you have a little bit of space to work with. And nevertheless, Japan has a large resource potential. This is a study done with the potential of win of 61 gigawatts in relatively shallow waters. That's just the shallow water potential. It's not floating there or anything like that. And remember, a gigawatt is about a nuclear reactor, so you might say, James, the wind doesn't always blow well on the ocean. It does in some places. It does almost around the clock. And by the way, this is a bit of an aside, but the first North American freshwater offshore wind farm will be in Lake Erie. Did you hear about that? Yes, I did hear a little something, yeah. So, Lead Co asserts that the Great Lakes hold enough energy potential in wind to power the entire stinking United States. The winds of Lake Erie alone could meet over 10% of the electricity needs by 2030. Just in Lake Erie. Lake Erie is not a big lake. Lake Erie is a small lake. But, yes, Chicago, the Windy City and all these places, there's wind out there and terrible polluted waters that you could stick wind turbines in, and they're not so deep that you can't do it. That's interesting. I wondered when that's going to happen. Well, I would wonder about the I don't know, unsightliness of it. It makes more sense to me if they're off in the ocean. People might be annoyed if the Great Lakes are full of wind turbines, but I don't know. Hard to say. Now, I'd be interested to know what the distance is. Maybe one of our listeners can send in an answer to this. What is the distance where wind turbines start to fade? Not from the curvature of the Earth, but just the atmosphere sort of blurs them out? Because you see ships offshore in the ocean, they're kind of faded. They're barely visible because even on Toronto, off Toronto, you see them like that. So how far do you have to go before it's an ISO? I guess it's my basic question. Yeah. And farther out would be better. As long as it doesn't get too deep, I guess. Okay. There is a story here. I got this from CNET, and the story is a couple of weeks old, but I thought it was worth talking about it because we didn't mention it before, but Fiat Chrysler has been ordered to pay $300 million in fines over their diesel emissions fraud case. So it's not just Volkswagen that was cheating on emissions. Fiat Chrysler, which is now owned by Stallantis 300 million in fines for lying about the emissions of more than 100,000 Jeep and Ram diesel vehicles. So this was been going on since 2017. They were first accused of doing this, and it takes a long time for this kind of stuff to wind its way through the courts, but it has finally come down and they are guilty. And it's 300 million is the penalty. The US Department of justice this week announced that FCA has been sentenced in federal court to pay about 300 million in criminal penalties in addition to serving three years of organizational probation. What do you suppose that is? Organizational probation? Probation for the organization, I guess. Oh, wait, I think we have a clip. The time has come for someone to put his foot down, and that foot is me. Then as of this moment, they're on double secret probation. Ah, that's what it is. They're on double secret probation. What movie is that from? I was wondering if you would recognize it. Is it a Naked Gun related movie? No, it's Animal House. Oh. And it's extra fun because that's the great Vernon Agapsawitch, known to the world as John Vernon, who is from our city of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. Yeah, but yeah, I just always remembered that clip of double secret probation. He passed away a few years ago. Yes, not that long ago. And he ended up making a movie here and late in his career before he died, which was nice. I forget the name, but it had Molly Parker and Callum Keith Rennie was in it. It was shot. I visited the set one day. I actually took pictures of John Vernon on the set of this kind of western. That's really cool. But Brian, it's time. It's time. It's time for the clean energy show. Lightning around. A fast look of the rest of the week's headlines in clean energy and climate change. Brian, where has the time gone? China's CATL plans a massive 220 1 battery factory in East Hungary. Yeah, because why? It's Tuesday or Wednesday or Thursday. It doesn't matter. Because there's a new day, there's a new $7.5 million battery factory every week. The planet will be capable of outputting 100 gigawatt hours of batteries a year. That is 100 nuclear reactors powering for an hour per year from this battery factory. And Mercedes Benz has already gone on record stating that it will be its first customer. You know what the sound is? Time for a clean energy show. Fast fact. Charging your electric car at home costs equivalent of or less, which is about a dollar 20 a gallon. Tesla is reportedly going to build model wise with BYD blade batteries in a gigafactory Berlin. What do you think, Brian? Because I'm kind of curious. Yeah, this is interesting. This is a battery form factor that Tesla has never used before. But since Tesla's goal is to dominate the Earth, they're really buying and using whatever possible batteries they can get their hands on. So BYD has been making these blade batteries, which are not exactly blade shaped, but they come in these sort of flat panels and they're all kind of packed together in a battery pack. So, yeah, I guess Tesla has figured out how to stuff those into their vehicles. So I don't know. It should be good. More supply batteries, the better. Oh, it's another fast fact. And this brings us back to backyard hens, which I've been waiting to talk about. Yeah. Backyard hens eggs contain 40 times this is backyard hen in cities, okay, not in farms, contained 40 times more lead, on average, than shop eggs. You think you're growing your own eggs and they're healthier? No, that doesn't sound good. It depends on the lead levels of your soil, where you live, which vary across various cities and then vary within the city. In older homes, close to city centers, contaminated soils can greatly increase people's exposure to lead through eating eggs from backyard hens. And I was thinking, again, a chicken Brian, because they make good pets. Sorry. Most lead gets into the hens as they scratch the dirt and peck food from the ground. Can you imagine the lead levels where I live? I've got a refinery, I've got a smelter over yonder. I mean, it's not good at all. It's probably not good. And if any of our listeners, if you have hands and you're eating the eggs, maybe they're somewhere nearby where you can get them tested, maybe good advice, because I think that there probably is somebody listening to our show or some people, and they're going to be soiling their pants right now and not very happy about that because I know you don't want to talk about it. It's just that bad. It's one of those things that I came across that I thought was important from carbon tracker. The UK government's Oil and Gas Authority has estimated the total bill for Northeast oil decommissioning will be £51 billion. Now, because of the government's tax policy, the British taxpayer will be responsible for at least 40% of that cost over the coming decades. This is something we're going to be talking about a lot. It is. The reality of gas going away. We are going to get stuck with the bill, aren't we? Yeah. And there's been a lot of talk in the UK lately. There's some sweet tax deals for oil and gas companies in the UK. They're getting a bit of a free ride, which is unfortunate. California has adopted 2045 as an offshore wind target plans on installing 25 gigawatts by that time. That is, again, 25 nuclear reactors worth of almost I mean, not quite, but optimistically, if the wind never stopped, that's what they would be. And just as a comparison, it's not insignificant. That is a lot, a lot of power by 2045. So Xpeng is releasing its S four superchargers. This is a chinese EV manufacturer. They've just announced their S Four superchargers on Supercharger Day. That's not Tesla supercharger day. That's a Chinese company. They've opened 1000 superchargers so far in China, and they say, and they demonstrated this with their new model of car, 210 km, or 131 miles of charging in range and five minutes of charging. And they demonstrated that. So ten to 80% of a full modern large battery in as little as 20 minutes. This is an 800 volts class EV charger with a peak power output of 480 kw, which I think is probably around where we're going to stop as around there. I don't think we're going to go I don't think we need to, really? Yeah. And you always wonder at a certain point it will maybe degrade the batteries if you end up charging too quickly. But I think those figures are we probably don't need to go faster than that. And with new battery chemistries allowing for stronger and stronger charging and things like that, who knows what's going to happen? But that, Ryan, is our time for this week, for the summer show fires an email right now, cleanenergyshow@gmail.com. We're on Twitter, we're on TikTok or even on Instagram. We're everywhere you want us to be. We have two YouTube channels now, by the way. One for audio, one for everything else that has video. So go there, find us, watch the show, watch our clips, tell your friends. And if you're new to the show, remember subscribe, subscribe on your podcast app because we put out new shows every week and they'll be delivered right to you. And we look forward to talking to you. Bye for now. Next week. See you next week.

Quick Spin
2022 Mazda 3 Review: Did Mazda's Hot Hatch Grow Up?

Quick Spin

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 13:54


The Mazda Mazdaspeed3 is one of the coolest hatchbacks to roll out of a Mazda factory. It had all the attitude you'd want from a sporty hot hatch and more than enough power. Unfortunately, the Mazdaspeed banner is gone. Though, the good news is that Mazda's hatchbacks are still kicking. The latest generation Mazda 3 hatchback made its way to the streets in 2019 and has gone the last few years with few major changes. Though in 2021 the folks at Mazda dropped in the 2.5-liter turbocharged engine found in other Mazda products and turned its sensible hatchback into a sleeper hot hatch. The 2.5-liter turbocharged I4 has the same power as we've seen in its other products: 250 hp and 320 lb-ft of torque. Those numbers shrink when using non-premium fuel to a still peppy 227 and 310 lb-ft. Managing all that power is a six-speed automatic, which sends power to all four wheels. On this episode of Quick Spin, host Wesley Wren hops behind the wheel of the Mazda 3 to put it through its paces. Wren walks around the 2022 Mazda 3 Turbo and highlights its styling and exterior features before climbing inside the car to show off its interior. Later, he takes you along for a real-time drive review. Adding to the show, Wren chats with west coast editor Mark Vaughn about Mazda's hatchback history, the Mazda 3 and the current hatchback climate. The two talk about the Mazda 3's dynamics before discussing what makes the 2022 Mazda 3 special.

Smith and Sniff
The severe A-pillar gash

Smith and Sniff

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 65:04 Very Popular


The sight of a seriously damaged Mazda gives Jonny and Richard a brilliant car interior design idea. Also in this episode, Range Rover suspension collapse, a challenging local speed bump, carrying a wallet of CDs, a burnt-out combine harvester, driving like a flute because there's metal on the radio, confusing Japanese tourists in North Wales, Cold War cosplay, apologising to Audi, a Metro full of drums, crashing while waving to a mate, tales from a Norwegian driving instructor, car seats with removable covers, a fear of foam, more on the Dacia Jogger, why Tiff is the Sting of cars, and what if you were forced to be Pitbull? Get tickets for the Smith and Sniff live recording on Thursday 8 September - https://bit.ly/3pgFk92patreon.com/smithandsniff Get bonus content on Patreon Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Ramsey Mazda's Sundays with Sinatra
Ramsey Mazda Sundays with Sinatra 08-14-2022

Ramsey Mazda's Sundays with Sinatra

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 114:36


Joe Piscopo plays the greatest Frank Sinatra hits of all time!

Quick Charge
Quick Charge Podcast: August 8, 2022

Quick Charge

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 6:52


Listen to a recap of the top stories of the day from Electrek. Quick Charge is available now on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, TuneIn and our RSS feed for Overcast and other podcast players. New episodes of Quick Charge are recorded Monday through Thursday and again on Saturday. Subscribe to our podcast in Apple Podcast or your favorite podcast player to guarantee new episodes are delivered as soon as they're available. Stories we discuss in this episode (with links): Tesla launches new ‘Ownership Loyalty Program' with some significant discounts Tesla discloses lobbying effort for new factory in Canada Tesla (TSLA) secures deal for $5 billion worth of nickel in Indonesia, says official Stellantis achieves record first half 2022 earnings, BEV sales climb nearly 50% YOY Danger of building compliance EVs in 2022: Mazda sells single digits of MX-30 in July Canoo Q2 2022 report: $1 billion in sales pipeline, but only $33.8 million in cash left https://youtu.be/vuTPN2FaduM var postYoutubePlayer;function onYouTubeIframeAPIReady() { postYoutubePlayer = new YT.Player( "post-youtube-video" ); } Subscribe to the Electrek Daily Channel on Youtube so you never miss a day of news Follow Mikey: Twitter @Mikey_Electric Listen & Subscribe: Apple Podcasts Spotify TuneIn Share your thoughts! Drop us a line at tips@electrek.co. You can also rate us in Apple Podcasts or recommend us in Overcast to help more people discover the show!

Chakras & Cusswords
Reducing Burnout when Chasing Success with GiGi Diaz

Chakras & Cusswords

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 41:26


 Welcome back to Chakras & Cusswords today's guest is GiGi Diaz is a Mindset & Social Media Branding Coach, media personality, executive producer and host of the Chats with GiGi podcast, and multi-passionate entrepreneur. We are diving deep into the hustle and bustle of chasing success. However, we have to address how to reduce burnout while we are on the grind. So let's get into it.  Guest Bio & Links:  GiGi Diaz the founder of Seizing Happy®; a coaching organization dedicated to nurturing the business and the woman behind the business equally. While growing her first business, GiGi's Academy back in 2003, GiGi earned her Bachelor's degree in Sociology and Anthropology at Florida International University. It was during the pursuit for her Masters Degree in Communications that her life shifted entirely. She was working mornings as a radio host, evenings as a sports reporter, all while excelling in grad school, until the stress and exhaustion led her to an ER after losing her sight while driving. It was then that GiGi realized that the HUSTLE was not the way to the top and that success doesn't come from “doing all the things.” She learned how to create a customized blueprint with the type of action steps that get you farther, faster, with less burnout. After a lot of inner work and learning, GiGi became a Certified Life Coach, specializing in Mindset and Happiness Studies. She founded her coaching business, Seizing Happy and created her signature program the 3Rs System: Reevaluate, Restructure, Reset your Life for Success with Less Stress. GiGi's coaching has helped women heal their relationship with money, create more abundance and joy, boost their confidence and switch their mindset from HUSTLER to CEO so they can finally scale in life and business.  In addition to her coaching and entrepreneurial experience GiGi comes has a media and journalism background of 20 years starting as a writer for print publications at the age of sixteen, working with and being featured on networks like Univision, Telemundo, NBC, iHeartRadio and others. As an influencer she has worked with brands such as Mazda, Truist Bank, Xfinity, Pandora, Topo Chico, and many more. She's a leader, a motivator, and an inspiration.  Life Coach for Women  |  Media Personality Founder Seizing Happy Founder of GiGi's Academy  www.GiGiDiaz.com  www.SeizingHappy.com www.GiGisAcademy.com "La felicidad es una decision!" - G.D. Thank you for listening to Chakras & Cusswords Please comment, like, and Subscribe  Links:  Website:https://www.chakrascusswords.com https://www.instagram.com/chakras_cusswords/ Blog: https://www.chakrascusswords.com/blog Shop:https://www.chakrascusswords.com/shop?page=4 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/chakrascusswords/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/chakrascusswords/support

Ramsey Mazda's Sundays with Sinatra
Ramsey Mazda Sundays with Sinatra | 8-7-2022

Ramsey Mazda's Sundays with Sinatra

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 119:38


Joe Piscopo plays the greatest Frank Sinatra hits of all time!

Hablando de Autos
Mazda baja su precio para el Mazda 2

Hablando de Autos

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 56:14


Sergio y Beto hablan de la bajada de precio que Mazda aplicó al Mazda 2 en México además de que aumentó el equipo disponible. ¿Lo convierte en la mejor opción debajo de los 300 mil pesos? Aquí lo comentan.

The Mindful Experiment Podcast
EP#395 - Living In Control with Guest: Dr. Reza Abraham

The Mindful Experiment Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 43:00


------------------------------------------------- RSVP for Dr. Vic's FREE Online Workshop - Aug. 17th Optimizing Your Performance Through Spirituality www.EmpowerYourReality.com/webinar ------------------------------------------------- In this week's interview, I had the pleasure of interviewing Ultra-High Performance Coach Dr. Reza Abraham.   We discuss all things that relate to being an ultra-high performance individual while also discussing why we need to throw away the work/life balance concept and learn to step more into work/life harmony.   If you have not already, subscribe to the podcast so you don't miss another episode, as we release a minimum of 2 per week.   Now, enjoy the show!   ---------------------------------------------------- Connect with Today's Sponsor: Real Relatable Podcast Check them out: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/real-relatable/id1478491493?uo=4 ----------------------------------------------------   Who is Dr. Reza Abraham? Dr. Reza Abraham is a Persian Author, Speaker, Ultra-high-performance Coach & the founder of InControl Group. His first book is a result of 20 years of studying & working with different individuals. He been invited to speak on personal growth and leadership by global companies including AIA, Dell, DHL, Honda, KPMG, L'Oréal, Mazda, McDonald's, Nielsen, Petronas, Samsung, Shell, Toyota, and more. He is a graduate of The University of Science and Technology In Iran, Multimedia University in Malaysia, and MIT in the US. Dr. Reza lives in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.    How to Connect with Dr. Reza? Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drrezaabraham/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drrezaabraham LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dr-reza-abraham/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7Ik-kgcWHt8fyqlcC_efUQ   Dr. Reza's New Book: https://amzn.to/3vJRT0l   ----------------------------------------------------   Connect with Dr. Vic... Website: www.EmpowerYourReality.com Facebook: www.Facebook.com/drvicmanzo Instagram: www.Instagram.com/drvicmanzo LinkedIn: www.LinkedIn.com/in/drmanzo TikTok: www.TikTok.com/@drvicmanzo   To visit Dr. Vic's Book on Amazon, check out the link below: https://amzn.to/3y6Bxir   About Dr. Vic... I'm Dr. Vic Manzo Jr., a Business Mindset Coach, Self-Mastery Expert, Influential Author, Inspirational Speaker, and the host and creator of The Mindful Experiment Podcast and The Mindful Chiropractor Podcast.   I help business owners shift their mindsets to unleash their potential and manifest their dream life.   I go deeper to uncover their beliefs, blocks, behaviors, habits, and patterns of thinking that prevent them from living the life or creating the business they like to experience.    From there, I use a box of tools to help reprogram the mind, reshift focus, teach spiritual truths, and bring quantum physics into the mix to unveil their true potential and make that a reality.   Ready to change your life? www.CallWithDrVic.com