Podcasts about Siemens

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Latest podcast episodes about Siemens

Manufacturing Hub
Ep. 78 - [Yuri Chamarelli] Edge v. Cloud or Edge + Cloud?

Manufacturing Hub

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 73:57


Guest BioAutomation Specialist and Digital Transformation (IIoT) consultant. With over 10 years of experience across different industries and Machine manufacturing.Those are just a few of the questions we're going to answer with Yuri Chamarelli!Manufacturing Hub Episode 78. A special thank you to Siemens for sponsoring this theme and for your continued support of the community.Connect with Us Yuri Chamarelli Vlad Romanov Dave Griffith Manufacturing Hub Let Us Know What You ThinkIf you enjoyed the show, it would mean the world to us if you could leave us a review: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/manufacturing-hub/id1546805573#manufacturing #automation #digitaltransformation

The Hydrogen Podcast
Seimens Commissions Massive Electrolyzer. Also, A Fuel Cell That Will Take On Diesel Engines.

The Hydrogen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 11:54 Transcription Available Very Popular


Welcome to The Hydrogen Podcast!In episode 150, Siemens has a big announcement in Germany, and Loop Energy announces a fuel cell system that can directly take on diesel efficiency. All of this on today's hydrogen podcast.Thank you for listening and I hope you enjoy the podcast. Please feel free to email me at info@thehydrogenpodcast.com with any questions. Also, if you wouldn't mind subscribing to my podcast using your preferred platform... I would greatly appreciate it. Respectfully,Paul RoddenVISIT THE HYDROGEN PODCAST WEBSITEhttps://thehydrogenpodcast.comCHECK OUT OUR BLOGhttps://thehydrogenpodcast.com/blog/WANT TO SPONSOR THE PODCAST? Send us an email to: info@thehydrogenpodcast.comNEW TO HYDROGEN AND NEED A QUICK INTRODUCTION?Start Here: The 6 Main Colors of Hydrogen

Business Standard Podcast
Is a re-rating on the cards for capital goods stocks?

Business Standard Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 3:21


A 35% increase in the on-going fiscal year's capital budget outlay has been a catalyst for the capital goods companies this year.   On the bourses, Siemens, Thermax, Cummins India, BEL, and HAL have risen 25-100% so far in 2022 as compared to a 14% and 2.5% gain in the BSE Capital Goods and Sensex indices.  The government's capital expenditure push and the sustained demand momentum across industries continue to keep analysts upbeat on this space.  Rohit Khatri, Assistant Vice-President, Fundamental Research, Religare Broking says he's positive on capital goods over medium-to-long term. Increased govt spending key growth driver. Consumption picking up pace is another positive. All high-frequency indicators hint at robust economic growth A healthy revival in private sector spending is also taking place, which is leading to a higher intake in order inflows, analysts say.   According to HDFC Securities, private sector capex has lagged that of government's expenditure during FY20-22 but it will now outpace public capex due to increasing spending across sectors such as cement, metals, power, auto and others. Experts add that declining input costs are also lifting the prospects of companies, as margin pressures are likely to improve from the second half of FY23. Khadija Mantri, Assistant Vice-President, Research, Sharekhan by BPN Paribas say supply chain issues like chip shortage easing out. See FY23 sector earnings growth at 25-30% YoY. Multiple re-rating possible in L&T, KEC International, Va Tech Wabag and others. Sector to command higher valuation on multiple growth triggers That said, markets will react to the US Fed's rate hike decision and its commentary on the inflation trajectory today.  Monetary policy outcomes by England and Japan's central banks will also be tracked later today. 

DistributED with tED magazine
Meet The tED magazine "30 Under 35" with Brayan Garcia and Amanda White

DistributED with tED magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 16:07


Brayan Garcia and Amanda White are both Sales Engineers at Siemens.

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast
Episode 97: Industrial AI

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 47:41


Augmented reveals the stories behind the new era of industrial operations, where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. The topic is Industrial AI. Our guest is Professor Jay Lee, the Ohio Eminent Scholar, the L.W. Scott Alter Chair Professor in Advanced Manufacturing, and the Founding Director of the Industrial AI Center at the University of Cincinnati (https://www.iaicenter.com/). In this conversation, we talk about how AI does many things but to be applicable; the industry needs it to work every time, which puts additional constraints on what can be done by when. If you liked this show, subscribe at augmentedpodcast.co (https://www.augmentedpodcast.co/). If you liked this episode, you might also like Episode 81: From Predictive to Diagnostic Manufacturing Augmentation (https://www.augmentedpodcast.co/81). Augmented is a podcast for industry leaders, process engineers, and shop floor operators, hosted by futurist Trond Arne Undheim (https://trondundheim.com/) and presented by Tulip (https://tulip.co/). Follow the podcast on Twitter (https://twitter.com/AugmentedPod) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/75424477/). Trond's Takeaway: Industrial AI is a breakthrough that will take a while to mature. It implies discipline, not just algorithms. In fact, it entails a systems architecture consisting of data, algorithm, platform, and operation. Transcript: TROND: Welcome to another episode of the Augmented Podcast. Augmented brings industrial conversations that matter, serving up the most relevant conversations on industrial tech. Our vision is a world where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. In this episode of the podcast, the topic is Industrial AI. Our guest is Professor Jay Lee, the Ohio Eminent Scholar, and the L.W. Scott Alter Chair Professor in Advanced Manufacturing, and the Founding Director of the Industrial AI Center at the University of Cincinnati. In this conversation, we talk about how AI does many things but to be applicable, industry needs it to work every time, which puts on additional constraints on what can be done by when. Augmented is a podcast for industrial leaders, process engineers, and shop floor operators hosted by futurist Trond Arne Undheim and presented by Tulip. Jay, it's a pleasure to have you here. How are you today? JAY: Good. Thank you for inviting me to have a good discussion about industrial AI. TROND: Yeah, I think it will be a good discussion. Look, Jay, you are such an accomplished person, both in terms of your academics and your industrial credentials. I wanted to quickly just go through where you got to where you are because I think, especially in your case, it's really relevant to the kinds of findings and the kinds of exploration that you're now doing. You started out as an engineer. You have a dual degree. You have a master's in industrial management also. And then you had a career in industry, worked at real factories, GM factories, Otis elevators, and even on Sikorsky helicopters. You had that background, and then you went on to do a bunch of different NSF grants. You got yourself; I don't know, probably before that time, a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Columbia. The rest of your career, and you correct me, but you've been doing this mix of really serious industrial work combined with academics. And you've gone a little bit back and forth. Tell me a little bit about what went into your mind as you were entering the manufacturing topics and you started working in factories. Why have you oscillated so much between industry and practice? And tell me really this journey; give me a little bit of specifics on what brought you on this journey and where you are today. JAY: Well, thank you for talking about this career because I cut my teeth from the factory early years. And so, I learned a lot of fundamental things in early years of automation. In the early 1980s, in the U.S, it was a tough time trying to compete with the Japanese automotive industry. So, of course, the Big Three in Detroit certainly took a big giant step, tried to implement a very good manufacturing automation system. So I was working for Robotics Vision System at that time in New York, in Hauppage, New York, Long Island. And shortly, later on, it was invested by General Motors. And in the meantime, I was studying part-time in Columbia for my mechanical engineering, Doctor of Engineering. And, of course, later on, I transferred to George Washington because I had to make a career move. So I finished my Ph.D. Doctor of Science in George Washington later. But the reason we stopped working on that is because of the shortage of knowledge in making automation work in the factory. So I was working full-time trying to implement the robots automation in a factory. In the meantime, I also found a lack of knowledge on how to make a robot work and not just how to make a robot move. Making it move means you can program; you can do very fancy motion. But that's not what factories want. What factories really want is a non-stop working system so they can help people to accomplish the job. So the safety, and the certainty, the accuracy, precision, maintenance, all those things combined together become a headache actually. You have to calibrate the robot all the time. You have to reprogram them. So eventually, I was teaching part-time in Stony Brook also later on how to do the robotic stuff. And I think that was the early part of my career. And most of the time I spent in factory and still in between the part-time study and part-time working. But later on, I got a chance to move to Washington, D.C. I was working for U.S. Postal Service headquarters as Program Director for automation. In 1988, post service started a big initiative trying to automate a 500 mil facility in the U.S. There are about 115 number one facilities which is like New York handled 8 million mail pieces per day at that time; you're talking about '88. But most are manual process, so packages. So we started developing the AI pattern recognition, hand-written zip code recognition, robotic postal handling, and things like that. So that was the opportunity that attracted me actually to move away from automotive to service industry. So it was interesting because you are working with top scientists from different universities, different companies to make that work. So that was the early stage of the work. Later on, of course, I had a chance to work with the National Science Foundation doing content administration in 1991. That gave me the opportunity to work with professors in universities, of course. So then, by working with them, I was working on a lot of centers like engineering research centers and also the Industry-University Cooperative Research Centers Program, and later on, the materials processing manufacturing programs. So 1990 was a big time for manufacturing in the United States. A lot of government money funded the manufacturer research, of course. And so we see great opportunity, like, for example, over the years, all the rapid prototyping started in 1990s. It took about 15-20 years before additive manufacturing came about. So NSF always looks 20 years ahead, which is a great culture, great intellectual driver. And also, they're open to the public in terms of the knowledge sharing and the talent and the education. So I think NSF has a good position to provide STEM education also to allow academics, professors to work with industry as well, not just purely academic work. So we support both sides. So that work actually allowed me to understand what is real status in research, in academics, also how far from real implementation. So in '95, I had the opportunity to work in Japan actually. I had an opportunity...NSF had a collaboration program with the MITI government in Japan. So I took the STA fellowship called science and technology fellow, STA, and to work in Japan for six months and to work with 55 organizations like Toyota, Komatsu, Nissan, FANUC, et cetera. So by working with them, then you also understand what the real technology level Japan was, Japanese companies were. So then you got calibration in terms of how much U.S. manufacturing? How much Japanese manufacturing? So that was in my head, actually. I had good weighting factors to see; hmm, what's going on here between these two countries? That was the time. So when I came back, I said, oh, there's something we have to do differently. So I started to get involved in a lot of other things. In 1998, I had the opportunity to work for United Technologies because UTC came to see me and said, "Jay, you should really apply what you know to real companies." So they brought me to work as a Director for Product Environment Manufacturing Department for UTRC, United Technology Research Center, in East Hartford. Obviously, UTC business included Pratt & Whitney jet engines, Sikorsky helicopters, Otis elevators, Carrier Air Conditioning systems, Hamilton Sundstrand, et cetera. So all the products they're worldwide, but the problem is you want to support global operations. You really need not just the knowledge, what you know, but also the physical usage, what you don't know. So you know, and you don't know. So how much you don't know about a product usage, that's how the data is supposed to be coming back. Unfortunately, back in 1999, I have to tell you; unfortunately, most of the product data never came back. By the time it got back, it is more like a repair overhaul recur every year to a year later. So that's not good. So in Japan, I was experimenting the first remote machine monitoring system using the internet actually in 1995. So I published a paper in '98 about how to remotely use physical machine and cyber machine together. In fact, I want to say that's the first digital twin but as a cyber-physical model together. That was in my paper in 1998 in Journal of Machine Tools and Manufacture. TROND: So, in fact, you were a precursor in so many of these fields. And it just strikes me that as you're going through your career here, there are certain pieces that you seem to have learned all along the way because when you are a career changer oscillating between public, private, semi-private, research, business, you obviously run the risk of being a dilettante in every field, but you seem to have picked up just enough to get on top of the next job with some insight that others didn't have. And then, when you feel like you're frustrated in that current role, you jump back or somewhere else to learn something new. It's fascinating to me because, obviously, your story is longer than this. You have startup companies with your students and others in this business and then, of course, now with the World Economic Forum Lighthouse factories and the work you've been doing for Foxconn as well. So I'm just curious. And then obviously, we'll get to industrial AI, which is so interesting in your perspective here because it's not just the technology of it; it is the industrial practice of this new domain that you have this very unique, practical experience of how a new technology needs to work. Well, you tell me, how did you get to industrial AI? Because you got there to, you know, over the last 15-20 years, you integrated all of this in a new academic perspective. JAY: Well, that's where we start. So like I said earlier, I realized industry we did not have data back in the late 1990s. And in 1999, dotcom collapsed, remember? TROND: Yes, yes. JAY: Yeah. So all the companies tried to say, "Well, we're e-business, e-business, e-commerce, e-commerce," then in 2000, it collapsed. But the reality is that people were talking about e-business, but in the real world, in industrial setting, there's no data almost. So I was thinking, I mean, it's time I need to think about how to look at data-centric perspectives, how to develop such a platform, and also analytics to support if one-day data comes with a worry-free kind of environment. So that's why I decided to transition to an academic career in the year 2000. So what I started thinking, in the beginning, was where has the most data? As we all know, the product lifecycle usage is out there. You have lots of data, but we're not collecting it. So eventually, I called a central Intelligent Maintenance System called IMS, not intelligent manufacturing system because maintenance has lots of usage data which most developers of a product don't know. But if we have a way to collect this data to analyze and predict, then we can guarantee the product uptime or the value creation, and then the customer will gain most of the value back. Now we can use the data feedback to close-loop design. That was the original thinking back in the year 2000, which at that time, no cell phone could connect to the internet. Of course, nobody believed you. So we used a term called near-zero downtime, near-zero downtime, ZDT. Nobody believed us. Intel was my first founding member. So I made a pitch to FANUC in 2001. Of course, they did not believe it either. Of course, FANUC in 2014 adopted ZDT, [laughs] ZDT as a product name. But as a joke, when I talked to the chairman, the CEO of the company in 2018 in Japan, Inaba-san that "Do you know first we present this ZDT to your company in Michigan? They didn't believe it. Now you guys adopted." "Oh, I didn't know you use it." So when he came to visit in 2019, they brought the gift. [laughs] So anyway, so what happened is during the year, so we worked with the study of 6 companies, 20 companies and eventually they became over 100 companies. And in 2005, I worked with Procter & Gamble and GE Aircraft Engine. They now became GE Aviation; then, they got a different environment. So machine learning became a typical thing you use every day, every program, but we don't really emphasize AI at that time. The reason is machine learning is just a tool. It's an algorithm like a support-vector machine, self-organizing map, and logistic regression. All those are just supervised learning or now supervised learning techniques. And people use it. We use it like standard work every day, but we don't talk about AI. But over the years, when you work with so many companies, then you realize the biggest turning point was Toyota 2005 and P&G in 2006. The reason I'm telling you 2005 is Toyota had big problems in the factory in Georgetown, Kentucky, where the Camry factory is located. So they had big compressor problems. So we implemented using machine learning, the support-vector machine, and also principal component analysis. And we enable that the surge of a compressor predicted and avoided and never happened. So until today -- TROND: So they have achieved zero downtime after that project, essentially. JAY: Yeah. So that really is the turning point. Of course, at P&G, the diaper line continues moving the high volume. They can predict things, reduce downtime to 1%. There's a lot of money. Diaper business that is like $10 billion per year. TROND: It's so interesting you focus on downtime, Jay, because obviously, in this hype, which we'll get to as well, people seem to focus so much on fully automated versus what you're saying, which is it doesn't really, you know, we will get to the automation part, but it is the downtime that's where a lot of the savings is obviously. Because whether it's a lights out or lights on, humans are not the real saving here. And the real accomplishment is in zero downtime because that is the industrialization factor. And that is what allows the system to keep operating. Of course, it has to do with automation, but it's not just that. Can you then walk us through what then became industrial AI for you? Because as I've now understood it, it is a highly specific term to you. It's not just some sort of fluffy idea of very, very advanced algorithms and robots running crazy around autonomously. You have very, very specific system elements. And they kind of have to work together in some architectural way before you're willing to call it an industrial AI because it may be a machine tool here, and a machine tool there, and some data here. But for you, unless it's put in place in a working architecture, you're not willing to call it, I mean, it may be an AI, but it is not an industrial AI. So how did this thinking then evolve for you? And what are the elements that you think are crucial for something that you even can start to call an industrial AI? Which you now have a book on, so you're the authority on the subject. JAY: Well, I think the real motivation was after you apply all the machine learning toolkits so long...and a company like National Instruments, NI, in Austin, Texas, they licensed our machine learning toolkits in 2015. And eventually, in 2017, they started using the embedding into LabVIEW version. So we started realizing, actually, the toolkit is very important, not just from the laboratory point of view but also from the production and practitioners' point of view from industry. Of course, researchers use it all the time for homework; I mean, that's fine. So eventually, I said...the question came to me about 2016 in one of our industry advisory board meeting. You have so many successes, but the successes that happen can you repeat? Can you repeat? Can you repeatably have the same success in many, many other sites? Repeatable, scalable, sustainable, that's the key three keywords. You cannot just have a one-time success and then just congratulate yourself and forget it, no. So eventually, we said, oh, to make that repeat sustainable, repeatable, you have a systematic discipline. TROND: I'm so glad you say this because I have taken part in a bunch of best practice schemes and sometimes very optimistically by either an industry association or even a government entity. And they say, "Oh yeah, let's just all go on a bunch of factory visits." Or if it's just an IT system, "Let's just all write down what we did, and then share it with other people." But in fact, it doesn't seem to me like it is that easy. It's not like if I just explain what I think I have learned; that's not something others can learn from. Can you explain to me what it really takes to make something replicable? Because you have done that or helped Foxconn do that, for example. And now you're obviously writing up case studies that are now shared in the World Economic Forum across companies. But there's something really granular but also something very systemic and structured about the way things have to be explained in order to actually make it repeatable. What is the sustainability factor that actually is possible to not just blue copy but turn it into something in your own factory? JAY: Well, I think that there are basically several things. The data is one thing. We call it the data technology, DT, and which means data quality evaluation. How do you understand what to use, what not to use? How do you know which data is useful? And how do you know where the data is usable? It doesn't mean useful data is usable, just like you have a blood donation donor, but the blood may not be usable if the donor has HIV. I like to use an analogy like food. You got a fish in your hand; wow, great. But you have to ask where the fish comes from. [chuckles] If it comes from polluted water, it's not edible, right? So great fish but not edible. TROND: So there's a data layer which has to be usable, and it has to be put somewhere and put to use. It actually then has to be used. It can't just be theoretically usable. JAY: So we have a lot of useful data people collect. The problem is people never realized lots of them are not usable because of a lack of a label. They have no background, and they're not normalized. So eventually, that is a problem. And even if you have a lot of data, it doesn't mean it is usable. TROND: So then I guess that's how you get to your second layer, which I guess most people just call machine learning, but for you, it's an algorithmic layer, which is where some of the structuring gets done and some of the machines that put an analysis on this, put in place automatic procedures. JAY: And machine learning to me it's like cooking ware like a kitchen. You got a pan fry; you got a steamer; you got the grill. Those are tools to cook the food, the data. Food is like data. Cooking ware is like AI. But it depends on purpose. For example, you want fish. What do you want to eat first? I want soup. There's a difference. Do you want to grill? Do you want to just deep fry? So depending on how you want to eat it, the cooking ware will be selected differently. TROND: Well, and that's super interesting because it's so easy to say, well, all these algorithms and stuff they're out there, and all you have to do is pick up some algorithms. But you're saying, especially in a factory, you can't just pick any tool. You have to really know what the effect would be if you start to...for example, on downtime, right? Because I'm imagining there are very many advanced techniques that could be super advanced, but they are perhaps not the right tool for the job, for the workers that are there. So how does that come into play? Are these sequential steps, by the way? So once you figure out what the data is then, you start to fiddle with your tools. JAY: Well, there are two perspectives; one perspective is predict and prevent. So you predict something is going to happen. You prevent it from happening, number one. Number two, understand the root causes and potential root causes. So that comes down to the visible and invisible perspective. So from the visible world, we know what to measure. For example, if you have high blood pressure, you measure blood pressure every day, but that may not be the reason for high blood pressure. It may be because of your DNA, maybe because of the food you eat, because of lack of exercise, because of many other things, right? TROND: Right. JAY: So if you keep measuring your blood pressure doesn't mean you have no heart attack. Okay, so if you don't understand the reason, measuring blood pressure is not a problem. So I'm saying that you know what you don't know. So we need to find out what you don't know. So the correlation of invisible, I call, visible-invisible. So I will predict, but you also want to know the invisible reason relationship so you can prevent that relationship from happening. So that is really called deep mining those invisibles. So we position ourselves very clearly between visible-invisible. A lot of people just say, "Oh, we know what the problem is." The problem is not a purpose. For example, the factory manufacturing there are several very strong purposes, number one quality, right? Worry-free quality. Number two, your efficiency, how much you produce per dollar. If you say that you have great quality, but I spent $10,000 to make it, it is very expensive. But if you spend $2 to make it, wow, that's great. How did you do it? So quality per dollar is a very different way of judging how good you are. You got A; I spent five days studying. I got A; I spent two hours studying. Now you show the capability difference. TROND: I agree. And then the third factor in your framework seems to be platform. And that's when I think a lot of companies go wrong as well because platform is...at least historically in manufacturing, you pick someone else's platform. You say I'm going to implement something. What's available on the market, and what can I afford, obviously? Or ideally, what's the state of the art? And I'll just do that because everyone seems to be doing that. What does platform mean to you, and what goes into this choice? If you're going to create this platform for industrial AI, what kind of a decision is that? JAY: So DT is data, AT is algorithm, and PT is platform, PT platform. Platform means some common things are used in a shared community. For example, kitchen is a platform. You can cook. I can cook. I can cook Chinese food. I can cook Italian food. I can cook Indian food. Same kitchen but different recipe, different seasoning, but same cooking ware. TROND: Correct. Well, because you have a good kitchen, right? JAY: Yes. TROND: So that's -- JAY: [laughs] TROND: Right? JAY: On the platform, you have the most frequently used tool, not everything. You don't need 100 cooking ware in your kitchen. You probably have ten or even five most daily used. TROND: Regardless of how many different cuisines you try to cook. JAY: Exactly. That's called the AI machine toolkit. So we often work with companies and say, "You don't need a lot of tools, come on. You don't need deep learning. You need a good logistic regression and support-vector machine, and you're done." TROND: Got it. JAY: Yeah, you don't need a big chainsaw to cut small bushes. You don't need it. TROND: Right. And that's a very different perspective from the IT world, where many times you want the biggest tool possible because you want to churn a lot of data fast, and you don't really know what you're looking for sometimes. So I guess the industrial context here really constrains you. It's a constraint-based environment. JAY: Yes. So industry, like I said, the industry we talked about three Ps like I said: problems, purposes, and processes. So normally, problem comes from...the main thing is logistic problems, machine, and factory problems, workforce problems, the quality problems, energy problem, ignition problem, safety problems. So the problem happens every day. That's why in factory world, we call it firefighting. Typically, you firefight every day. TROND: And is that your metaphor for the last part of your framework, which is actually operation? So operation sounds really nice and structured, right? JAY: [chuckles] Yes. TROND: As if that was like, yeah, that's the real thing, process. We got this. But in reality, it feels sometimes, to many who are operating a factory; it's a firefight. JAY: Sometimes the reason lean theme work, Six Sigma, you turn a problem into a process, five Ss process, okay? And fishbone diagram, Pareto chart, and Kaizen before and after. So all the process, SOP, so doesn't matter which year workforce comes in, they just repeat, repeat, repeat, repeat, repeat. So in Toyota, the term used to be called manufacturing is just about the discipline. It's what they said. The Japanese industry manufacturing is about discipline, how you follow a discipline to everyday standard way, sustainable way, consistent way, and then you make good products. This is how the old Toyota was talking about, old one. But today, they don't talk that anymore. Training discipline is only one thing; you need to understand the value of customers. TROND: Right. So there are some new things that have to be added to the lean practices, right? JAY: Yes. TROND: As time goes by. So talk to me then more about the digital element because industrial AI to you, clearly, there's a very clear digital element, but there's so many, many other things there. So I'm trying to summarize your framework. You have these four factors: data, algorithms, platforms, and operations. These four aspects of a system that is the challenge you are dealing with in any factory environment. And some of them have to do with digital these days, and others, I guess, really have to do more with people. So when that all comes together, do you have some examples? I don't know, we talked about Toyota, but I know you've worked with Foxconn and Komatsu or Siemens. Can you give me an example of how this framework of yours now becomes applied in a context? Where do people pick up these different elements, and how do they use them? JAY: There's a matrix thinking. So horizontal thinking is a common thing; you need to have good digital thread including DT, data technology, AT, algorithms or analytics, PT, platform, edge cloud, and the things, and OT operation like scheduling, optimizations, stuff like that. Now, you got verticals, quality vertical, cost vertical, efficiency verticals, safety verticals, emission verticals. So you cannot just talk about general. You got to have focus on verticals. For example, let me give you one example: quality verticals. Quality is I'm the factory manager. I care about quality. Yes, the customer will even care more, so they care. But you have a customer come to your shop once a month to check. You ask them, "Why you come?" "Oh, I need to see how good your production." "How about you don't have to come? You can see my entire quality." "Wow, how do I do that?" So eventually, we develop a stream of quality code, SOQ, Stream Of Quality. So it's not just about the product is good. I can go back to connect all the processes of the quality segment of each station. Connect them together. Just like you got a fish, oh, okay, the fish is great. But I wonder, when the fish came out of water, when the fish was in the truck, how long was it on the road? And how long was it before reaching my physical distribution center and to my home? So if I have a sensor, I can tell you all the temperature history inside the box. So when you get your fish, you take a look; oh, from the moment the fish came out of the boat until it reached my home, the temperature remained almost constant. Wow. Now you are worry-free. It's just one thing. So you connect together. So that's why we call SOQ, Stream Of Quality, like a river connected. So by the time a customer gets a quality product, they can trace back and say, "Wow, good. How about if I let you see it before you come? How about you don't come?" I say, "Oh, you know what? I like it." That's what this type of manufacturing is about. It just doesn't make you happy. You have to make the customer happy, worry-free. MID-ROLL AD: In the new book from Wiley, Augmented Lean: A Human-Centric Framework for Managing Frontline Operations, serial startup founder Dr. Natan Linder and futurist podcaster Dr. Trond Arne Undheim deliver an urgent and incisive exploration of when, how, and why to augment your workforce with technology, and how to do it in a way that scales, maintains innovation, and allows the organization to thrive. The key thing is to prioritize humans over machines. Here's what Klaus Schwab, Executive Chairman of the World Economic Forum, says about the book: "Augmented Lean is an important puzzle piece in the fourth industrial revolution." Find out more on www.augmentedlean.com and pick up the book in a bookstore near you. TROND: So, Jay, you took the words out of my mouth because I wanted to talk about the future. I'm imagining when you say worry-free, I mean, you're talking about a soon-to-be state of manufacturing. Or are you literally saying there are some factories, some of the excellence factories where you've won awards in the World Economic Forum or other places that are working towards this worry-free manufacturing, and to some extent, they have achieved it? Well, elaborate for me a little bit about the future outlook of manufacturing and especially this people issue because you know that I'm engaged...The podcast is called Augmented Podcast. I'm engaged in this debate about automation. Well, is there a discrepancy between automation and augmentation? And to what extent is this about people running the system? Or is it the machines that we should optimize to run all the system? For you, it's all about worry-free. First of all, just answer this question, is worry-free a future ideal, or is it actually here today if you just do the right things? JAY: Well, first of all, worry-free is our mindset where the level of satisfaction should be, right? TROND: Yep. JAY: So to make manufacturing happen is not about how to make good quality, how to make people physically have less worry, how to make customers less worry is what is. But the reason we have a problem with workforce today, I mean, we have a hard time to hire not just highly skilled workers but even regular workforce. Because for some reason, not just U.S., it seems everywhere right now has similar problems. People have more options these days to select other living means. They could be an Uber driver. [laughs] They could be...I don't know. So there are many options. You don't have to just go to the factory to make earnings. They can have a car and drive around Uber and Lyft or whatever. They can deliver the food and whatever. So they can do many other things. And so today, you want to make workforce work environment more attractive. You have to make sure that they understand, oh, this is something they can learn; they can grow. They are fulfilled because the environment gives them a lot of empowerment. The vibe, the environment gives them a wow, especially young people; when you attract them from college, they'd like a wow kind of environment, not just ooh, okay. [laughs] TROND: Yeah. Well, it's interesting you're saying this. I mean, we actually have a lack of workers. So it's not just we want to make factories full of machines; it's actually the machines are actually needed just because there are no workers to fill these jobs. But you're looking into a future where you do think that manufacturing is and will be an attractive place going forward. That seems to be that you have a positive vision of the future we're going into. You think this is attractive. It's interesting for workers. JAY: Yeah. See, I often say that there are some common horizontal we have to use all the day. Vertical is the purpose, quality. I talked about vertical quality first, quality. But what are the horizontal common? I go A, B, C, D, E, F. What's A? AI. B is big data. C is cyber and cloud. D is digital or digital twin, whatever. E is environment ecosystem and emission reduction. What's F? Very important, fun. [laughs] If you miss that piece, who wants to work for a place there's no fun? You tell me would you work for...you and I, we're talking now because it's fun. You talk to people and different perspectives. I talk to you, and I say, wow, you've built some humongous network here in the physical...the future of digital, not just professional space but also social space but also the physical space. So, again, the fun things inspire people, right? TROND: They do. So talking about inspiring people then, Jay, if you were to paint a picture of this future, I guess, we have talked just now about workers and how if you do it right, it's going to be really attractive workplaces in manufacturing. How about for, I guess, one type of worker, these knowledge workers more generally? Or, in fact, is there a possibility that you see that not just is it going to be a fun place to be for great, many workers, but it's actually going to be an exciting knowledge workplace again? Which arguably, industrialization has gone through many stages. And being in a factory wasn't always all that rosy, but it was certainly financially rewarding for many. And it has had an enormous career progression for others who are able to find ways to exploit this system to their benefit. How do you see that going forward? Is there a scope, is there a world in which factory work can or perhaps in an even new way become truly knowledge work where all of these industrial AI factors, the A to the Fs, produce fun, but they produce lasting progression, and career satisfaction, empowerment, all these buzzwords that everybody in the workplace wants and perhaps deserves? JAY: That's how we look at the future workforce is not just about the work but also the knowledge force. So basically, the difference is that people come in, and they become seasoned engineers, experienced engineers. And they retire, and the wisdom carries with them. Sometimes you have documentation, Excel sheet, PPT in the server, but nobody even looks at it. That's what today's worry is. So now what you want is living knowledge, living intelligence. The ownership is very important. For example, I'm a worker. I develop AI, not just the computer software to help the machine but also help me. I can augment the intelligence. I will augment it. When I make the product happen, the inspection station they check and just tell me pass or no pass. They also tell me the quality, 98, 97, but you pass. And then you get your score. You got a 70, 80, 90, but you got an A. 99, you got an A, 91, you got an A, 92. So what exactly does A mean? So, therefore, I give you a reason, oh, this is something. Then I learn. Okay, I can contribute. I can use voice. I can use my opinion to augment that no, labeled. So next time people work, oh, I got 97. And so the reason is the features need to be maintained, to be changed, and the system needs to be whatever. So eventually, you have a human contribute. The whole process could be consisting of 5 experts, 7, 10, 20, eventually owned by 20 people. That legacy continues. And you, as a worker, you feel like you're part of the team, leave a legacy for the next generation. So eventually, it's augmented intelligence. The third level will be actual implementation. So AI is not about artificial intelligence; it is about actual implementation. So people physically can implement things in a way they can make data to decisions. So their decision mean I want to make an adjustment. I want to find out how much I should adjust. Physically, I can see the gap. I can input the adjustment level. The system will tell me physically how could I improve 5%. Wow, that's good. I made a 5% improvement. Your boss also knows. And your paycheck got the $150 increase this month. Why? Because my contribution to the process quality improved, so I got the bonus. That's real-world feedback. TROND: Let me ask you one last question about how this is going to play out; I mean, in terms of how the skilling of workers is going to allow this kind of process. A lot of people are telling me about the ambitions that I'm describing...and some of the guests on the podcasts and also the Tulip software platform, the owner of this podcast, that it is sometimes optimistic to think that a lot of the training can just be embedded in the work process. That is obviously an ideal. But in America, for example, there is this idea that, well, you are either a trained worker or an educated worker, or you are an uneducated worker. And then yes, you can learn some things on the job. But there are limits to how much you can learn directly on the job. You have to be pulled out, and you have to do training and get competencies. As you're looking into the future, are there these two tracks? So you either get yourself a short or long college degree, and then you move in, and then you move faster. Or you are in the factory, and then if you then start to want to learn things, you have to pull yourself out and take courses, courses, courses and then go in? Or is it possible through these AI-enabled training systems to get so much real-time feedback that a reasonably intelligent person actually never has to be pulled out of work and actually they can learn on the job truly advanced things? So because there are two really, really different futures here, one, you have to scale up an educational system. And, two, you have to scale up more of a real-time learning system. And it seems to me that they're actually discrepant paths. JAY: Sure. To me, I have a framework in my book. I call it the four P structure, four P. First P is principle-based. For example, in Six Sigma, in lean manufacturing, there's some basic stuff you have to study, basic stuff like very simple fishbone diagram. You have to understand those things. You can learn by yourself what that is. You can take a very basic introduction course. So we can learn and give you a module. You can learn yourself or by a group, principle-based. The second thing is practice-based. Basically, we will prepare data for you. We will teach you how to use a tool, and you will do it together as a team or as individual, and you present results by using data I give to you, the tool I give to you. And it's all, yeah, my team A presented. Oh, they look interesting. And group B presented, so we are learning from each other. Then after the group learning is finished, you go back to your team in the real world. You create a project called project-based learning. You take a tool you learn. You take the knowledge you learn and to find a project like a Six Sigma project you do by yourself. You formulate. And then you come back to the class maybe a few weeks later, present with a real-world project based on the boss' approval. So after that, you've got maybe a black belt but with the last piece professional. Then you start teaching other people to repeat the first 3ps. You become master black belt. So we're not reinventing a new term. It really is about a similar concept like lean but more digital space. Lean is about personal experience, and digital is about the data experience is what's the big difference. TROND: But either way, it is a big difference whether you have to rely on technological experts, or you can do a lot of these things through training and can get to a level of aptitude that you can read the signals at least from the system and implement small changes, perhaps not the big changes but you can at least read the system. And whether they're low-code or no-code, you can at least then through learning frameworks, you can advance, and you can improve in not just your own work day, but you can probably in groups, and feedbacks, and stuff you can bring the whole team and the factory forward perhaps without relying only on these external types of expertise that are actually so costly because they take you away. So per definition, you run into this; I mean, certainly isn't worry-free because there is an interruption in the process. Well, look, this is fascinating. Any last thoughts? It seems to me that there are so many more ways we can dig deeper on your experience in any of these industrial contexts or even going deeper in each of the frameworks. Is there a short way to encapsulate industrial AI that you can leave us with just so people can really understand? JAY: Sure. TROND: It's such a fundamental thing, AI, and people have different ideas about that, and industry people have something in their head. And now you have combined them in a unique way. Just give us one sentence: what is industrial AI? What should people leave this podcast with? JAY: AI is a cognitive science, but industrial AI is a systematic discipline is one sentence. So that means people have domain knowledge. Now we have to create data to represent our domain then have the discipline to solve the domain problems. Usually, with domain knowledge, we try with our experience, and you and I know; that's it. But we have no data coming out. But if I have domain become data and data become discipline, then other people can repeat our success even our mistake; they understand why. So eventually, domain, data, discipline, 3 Ds together, you can make a good decision, sustainable and long-lasting. TROND: Jay, this has been so instructive. I thank you for spending this time with me. And it's a little bit of a never-ending process. JAY: [laughs] TROND: Industry is not something that you can learn it and then...because also the domain changes and what you're doing and what you're producing changes as well. So it's a lifelong -- JAY: It's rewarding. TROND: Rewarding but lifelong quest. JAY: Yeah. Well, thank you for the opportunity to share, to discuss. Thank you. TROND: It's a great pleasure. You have just listened to another episode of the Augmented Podcast with host Trond Arne Undheim. The topic was Industrial AI. And our guest was Professor Jay Lee from University of Cincinnati. In this conversation, we talked about how AI in industry needs to work every time and what that means. My takeaway is that industrial AI is a breakthrough that will take a while to mature. It implies discipline, not just algorithms. In fact, it entails a systems architecture consisting of data, algorithm, platform, and operation. Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at augmentedpodcast.co or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. If you liked this episode, you might also like Episode 81: From Predictive to Diagnostic Manufacturing Augmentation. Hopefully, you'll find something awesome in these or in other episodes, and if so, do let us know by messaging us. We would love to share your thoughts with other listeners. The Augmented Podcast is created in association with Tulip, the frontline operation platform that connects the people, machines, devices, and systems used in a production or logistics process in a physical location. Tulip is democratizing technology and is empowering those closest to operations to solve problems. Tulip is also hiring. You can find Tulip at tulip.co. Please share this show with colleagues who care about where industry and especially where industrial tech is heading. To find us on social media is easy; we are Augmented Pod on LinkedIn and Twitter and Augmented Podcast on Facebook and YouTube. Augmented — industrial conversations that matter. See you next time. Special Guest: Jay Lee.

Forward Church Kitchener Sermons
Sent: Can I Get A Witness(Darryl Siemens)

Forward Church Kitchener Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 40:56


ETDPODCAST
Nr. 3515 Siemens Energy ersetzt ab sofort Hellofresh im Dax

ETDPODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 1:27


Siemens Energy ist wieder Teil des Dax. Das Energieunternehmen kehrt diese Woche in den deutschen Leitindex zurück. Dafür muss Hellofresh weichen. Web: https://www.epochtimes.de Probeabo der Epoch Times Wochenzeitung: https://bit.ly/EpochProbeabo Twitter: https://twitter.com/EpochTimesDE YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC81ACRSbWNgmnVSK6M1p_Ug Telegram: https://t.me/epochtimesde Gettr: https://gettr.com/user/epochtimesde Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EpochTimesWelt/ Unseren Podcast finden Sie unter anderem auch hier: iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/at/podcast/etdpodcast/id1496589910 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/277zmVduHgYooQyFIxPH97 Unterstützen Sie unabhängigen Journalismus: Per Paypal: http://bit.ly/SpendenEpochTimesDeutsch Per Banküberweisung (Epoch Times Europe GmbH, IBAN: DE 2110 0700 2405 2550 5400, BIC/SWIFT: DEUTDEDBBER, Verwendungszweck: Spenden) Vielen Dank! (c) 2022 Epoch Times

The Marketing Book Podcast
401 The Brand Positioning Workbook by Ulli Appelbaum

The Marketing Book Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 99:23 Very Popular


The Brand Positioning Workbook: A Simple How-To Guide To More Compelling Brand Positionings, Faster by Ulli Applebaum About the Book: The Brand Positioning Workbook outlines an easy-to-follow roadmap on how to successfully position or re-position a brand for success in the marketplace. The methodology described in this book is inspired by the analysis of over 1,200 case studies of effective brand building which led to the identification of the 26 universal and proven successful triggers of successful brand positionings. After reading the book you will be able to: Understand the secrets behind successful brand positionings Identify and use the 26 proven success triggers for brand perception Apply a simple and proven brand positioning methodology that actually works Create brands that are attractive, sustaining, and compelling The book invites you, through a series of inspiring questions, examples, and ideation exercises, to explore how the 26 success triggers, or a combination thereof, could be applied to her specific brand and help her create a truly differentiating and distinctive yet highly relevant brand positioning. The outcome is a more rigorous and more creative exploration of all relevant positioning solutions at your disposal while requiring less time than more traditional positioning development methodologies. This book is the right choice for you, if: You are working in a marketing department or a marketing agency You are studying or teaching marketing You are looking for a proven framework for creating compelling brand positioning You are about to position or re-position a brand for success in the marketplace The Brand Positioning Workbook is packed with easy-to-follow exercises and useful examples that will inspire your own thinking and allow you to overcome the mental biases that typically prevent truly original thinking. It can be used by marketers alone or in groups at marketing agencies or client workshops. The book can also be used to develop product concepts, messaging strategies, new product ideas, and even creative ideas! About the Author: Ulli Appelbaum is an award-winning marketing and brand strategy consultant. He has held senior strategy roles in Europe and the US at some of the leading advertising agencies in the world including BBDO, Leo Burnett, Fallon Worldwide, and SapientNitro before starting his own brand research and strategy firm First The Trousers Then The Shoes Inc. He has contributed to 7 Effies awards for marketing effectiveness and an Advertising Research Federation Ogilvy award for Excellence in Research and his insights and strategies have helped build brands including Wrigley, Mars, Harley Davidson, Hallmark, Nestle, Procter & Gamble, Chrysler, Unilever, Hallmark, Symantec, Siemens, and Land O Lakes. He is also the creator of the “Positioning Development Method Cards” and “Aha!, The Ultimate Insight Generation Toolkit”, which help marketers think smarter. He has blogged extensively for the Huffington Post, is a contributor to various trade publications in the US and Europe, and was a member of the Practitioner Council of the American Marketing Association. And, interesting fact – He lives in Minneapolis, was born in Germany, lived in Africa his first 10 years, and then lived in Brussells and moved back to Germany when he was 25! Click here for this episode's website page with the links mentioned during the interview... https://www.salesartillery.com/marketing-book-podcast/brand-positioning-workbook-ulli-appelbaum

Enerji Günlüğü Enerji Bülteni
Enerji Günlüğü 16 Eylül 2022 Enerji Bülteni

Enerji Günlüğü Enerji Bülteni

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 4:09


Enerji Günlüğü Haber Bülteni:Türkiye'nin ve Dünyanın Enerji Gündemienerjigunlugu.net

The Optimistic Outlook
Climate action: how to achieve ‘drawdown'

The Optimistic Outlook

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 20:13


Chad Frischmann is the co-author of the New York Times best-seller “Drawdown: The Most Comprehensive Plan Ever Proposed to Reverse Global Warming.” He also pioneered Project Drawdown and is now the founder of a new organization called Regenerative Intelligence. Barbara and Chad explore how to achieve a moment in time when the concentration of atmospheric greenhouse gases begins to decline annually and what a regenerative future looks like. Learn about the impact of tech solutions that can be immediately deployed, and the potential for further innovation.  Show Notes:  Regenerative Intelligence: https://regenintel.earth/  Project Drawdown: https://drawdown.org/  TED Talk (100 solutions to reverse global warming): https://www.ted.com/talks/chad_frischmann_100_solutions_to_reverse_global_warming?language=en  Siemens and Environmental Action: https://new.siemens.com/us/en/company/environmental-society-governance/environmental-action.html 

Manufacturing Hub
Ep. 76 - [Chris Liu] Introduction to Edge Devices, Siemens Ecosystem, IIoT Digital Transformation

Manufacturing Hub

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 79:10


Guest BioInnovative, hard-working, and self-driven Product Manager equipped with a bachelor's degree in Electrical Engineering and 7 years of experience in R&D, manufacturing, marketing, customer support, and product management.  Possessed with excellent communication and interpersonal skills, a strong understanding of manufacturing processes, safety standards, and compliance requirements, and extensive experience in project management, customer relationship, technical support, etc.Where are we currently using them?What will the next generation of devices look like? Those are some of the questions that Chris Liu of Siemens is going to answer as we kick off September!We're talking about Edge Devices all month long!Who has the best ecosystem? How are we using them in the field?What will the future hold?Stay tuned as Vlad, and I start to explore the devices that are connecting the world!Manufacturing Hub Episode 77. A special thank you to Siemens for sponsoring this theme and for your continued support of the community.Connect with Us Chris Liu Vlad Romanov Dave Griffith Manufacturing Hub Let Us Know What You ThinkIf you enjoyed the show, it would mean the world to us if you could leave us a review: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/manufacturing-hub/id1546805573#manufacturing #automation #edge

KI in der Industrie
AI for technical drawings

KI in der Industrie

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 43:57


Designers and engineers are faced with huge prints and are looking for technical specifications - this is the reality at many companies. Jochen Mattes from Werk24 wants to change that with AI. How? He explains it to us in an interview. His machine learning model is further trained every month with over 100,000 technical drawings. The idea behind it: The AI reads technical drawings and provides drawing legend, dimensions, tolerances, threads, chamfers, radii and surface quality. The podcast is growing and we want to keep growing. That's why our German-language podcast is now available in English. We are happy about new listeners. We thank our new partner [Siemens](https://new.siemens.com/global/en/products/automation/topic-areas/artificial-intelligence-in-industry.html) News part: Youtube Video A. Ng https://bit.ly/3qtDIJx Spurious correlations https://www.tylervigen.com/spurious-correlations Destroy an AI (German > translate with Google) https://www.legalvisio.de/zerstorung-ki/ Xbox Manager (German > translate with Google) https://winfuture.de/news,131687.html [More AI in the industry? (mostly German) ](https://kipodcast.de/podcast-archiv) [Or our book AI in Industry: (German) ](https://www.hanser-fachbuch.de/buch/KI+in+industry/9783446463455) [Contact our guest ](https://www.linkedin.com/in/jochenmattes/)

The Future Car: A Siemens Podcast
Technology with Purpose - Barbara Humpton - Part 2

The Future Car: A Siemens Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 39:00


“Competition makes us faster, collaboration makes us better.”For a company as big and diversified as Siemens, collaboration opens up a door to creating life-changing products. It allows the company to be at the forefront in tackling global issues such as climate change and degenerative diseases. It also allows the company to play a critical role in supporting the development of smart factories, eco-friendly planes, and autonomous vehicles.To continue elevating collaboration, Siemens has created an environment that nurtures the sharing of ideas and the spirit of innovation.In this episode, the second part of two, Ed Bernardon interviews Barbara Humpton, CEO of Siemens USA. She'll share with us how most organization charts limit collaboration and what can be done to increase collaboration in big companies. She'll also share some advice on how to achieve a work-life blend.Some Questions I Ask:How do you encourage collaboration in a big company? (05:46)How does your passion for math help you be a better corporate executive? (13:01)How did you navigate the engineering space at a time when there wasn't a lot of diversity? (15:19)What will our infrastructure be like 5 -10 years from now? (24:00)What You'll Learn in this Episode:Why all organization charts are wrong (00:50)Why Barbara joined the technology industry (10:00)Her advice on work-life blend (21:12)Why does the US not have a high-speed train yet (28:16)Connect with Barbara Humpton: LinkedInSiemens USAConnect with Ed Bernardon:LinkedInFuture Car: Driving a Lifestyle RevolutionMotorsports is speeding the way to safer urban mobilitySiemens Digital Industries Software Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Wichita Chamber Business Accelerator
From the Garage to SpaceX (Jorge Martinez & Patty Koehler - JR Custom Metal Products)

Wichita Chamber Business Accelerator

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 43:02


Come join us at the 2022 Wichita Business Expo at Century II on Thursday, September 29!  This is the premiere business-to-business trade show in Wichita.  No matter what you are looking for, you will find it at the Expo! Learn more now!It started humbly making metal products in the garage, but now JR Custom Metal Products has thrived to over 140 employees.  Hear from Jorge Martinez and Patty Koehler as they share with Don and Ebony how their father's legacy lives on in their business.  On this episode we discuss: Jesus Raul Martinez Sr. starting in the garage in 1978 Always wanting to start his own business Partnering with Spirit and SpaceX Selling during the factory tour Not focusing on a single industry How being Hispanic flows through their company culture Working with technical and trade schools for talent acquisition Being a second chance for employees The mentorship of Sam Marcus Being a family oriented (as well as owned) business Remembering where you came from The key of automation Building businesses in Wichita Learn more about JR Custom Metal Products:https://jrcmp.com/Facebook ProfileTwitter ProfileLinkedIn ProfilePatricia G. Koehler began working side-by-side with her father, Jesus Raul Martinez Sr., the founder of JR Custom Metal (JRCM), 48 years ago. She has held various positions within the family-owned business and served as General Manager for ten years prior to becoming President and CEO in August 1995. Under Patricia's leadership, the company became ISO 9001:2008 Certified in 2009 with SAI Global and upgraded to ISO 9001:2015 in 2018 with ISOQAR. A second multi-million dollar expansion was done in 2013.Born in San Luis Potosi, Mexico, Patricia grew up in Wichita, Kansas and graduated from South High School. She continued her education at Kansas State University and completed a mini MBA at Wichita State University. Patricia has a strong commitment to her community. She has served on numerous Boards, including Newman University, Via Christi Hospital, the Lord's Diner, Catholic Charities and Wichita Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. She is currently active with the WSU Tech Board of Directors and Exploration Place.Jorge Martinez was born and raised in Wichita. He graduated from Wichita South High School and attended Wichita Area Vo-Tech School. He is the co-owner of J R Custom Metal Products, Inc. Jorge has successfully managed national installations for Boeing, Alcoa, Henri-Line and Siemens. He is responsible for researching and purchasing all major equipment for JRCM. Jorge is involved in the Wichita community and has served on many boards including the American Red Cross and Starkey. He is a member of the West Wichita Sunrise Rotary Club, the Wichita Manufacturing Association, and the Kansas Family Business Forum. He is very involved with sports and served on the Board of Directors for Two Rivers Youth Club, and was Assistant and Hitting Coach for Friends University Softball.In 2011, JRCM received the Wichita Chamber of Commerce Small Business of the Year award, and the Siemens Energy Small Business Award for Supplier Excellence. In 2012, JRCM was one of five companies awarded Best in Business by the Wichita Business Journal. In March, 2013, Patricia was inducted into the Junior Achievement Wichita Business Hall of Fame.Other Resources:Join the Wichita Regional Chamber of Commerce! This podcast is brought to you by the Wichita Regional Chamber of Commerce and is powered by Evergy.  To send feedback on this show and/or send suggestions for future guests or topics please e-mail communications@wichitachamber.org. This show is part of the ICT Podcast Network.  For more information visit ictpod.net

Run Your Life Show With Andy Vasily
#210- Leadership, Trust and Building Organizations That Thrive with Charles Feltman

Run Your Life Show With Andy Vasily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 70:13


Charles Feltman joins me on my podcast today for a second time. Our first conversation in March 2022 took a deep dive into his book The Thin Book® of Trust: An Essential Primer for Building Trust at Work. In that conversation we unpacked the 4 assessment domains that he outlines in his book and why understanding these domains is necessary for leaders to increase team cohesion and effectiveness. The four assessment domains revolve deeply around the themes of care, sincerity, reliability and competence. Our conversation today can be looked at as a part 2 to that original chat back in March, but much more hands on as Charles provides us with real examples of what great leadership looks like in action and how the best leaders learn to navigate important discussions to not only build deep trust, but also create the conditions for high performance in their organization. Charles provides deep insight through his life lessons learned having worked in the arena of trust-building for more than three decades. Through the years Charles has partnered with client companies to design and deliver custom leadership development programs that are unique to each client's needs, culture and goals. These programs are all designed around the fundamental idea that organizations are networks of conversations, and the more effective leaders are at having the right conversations with the right people, at the right times, and in the right ways, the more successful their organizations will be.The inspiring author and speaker, Brene Brown, has had Charles on her own podcast and widely shares the fact that she has used his definitions of trust and distrust in every book she has written because these definitions are practical and actionable while at the same time deep and meaningful. It was an honor to have Charles back on my podcast. Wherever you are in the world listening to this, I hope you find lots of value in my discussion with Charles today.  About CharlesCharles Feltman has over 25 years of professional experience coaching, facilitating, consulting to, and training people who lead others. An overarching goal in all of his work is that his clients experience both success and wellbeing at work and in all areas of their lives. Prior to starting his coaching and consulting business he spent a decade in leadership roles in technology industry companies. Today Charles' work is concentrated in two main areas: Coaching Individual Leaders and Leadership Teams.Clients include executives, managers and teams from Aerospace Corp., Calstar Air Ambulance, CareMore Health Plan, Cognizant, Comfort Systems, Designit, Genpact, Intel, Siemens, ST Microelectronics, SealedAir, Teichert Construction, UCSF, NASA, US National Park Service, USDA, Heifer Project International and The Nature Conservancy.  Charles is the author of The Thin Book® of Trust: An Essential Primer for Building Trust at Work, based on three decades of experience working with individuals and teams to build,maintain, and when necessary restore trust.Connect With Charles:Website: https://insightcoaching.com/business-coaching/Buy Charles' Book: https://www.amazon.com/Thin-Trust-Essential-Primer-Building/dp/0966537394

The Automation Podcast
Siemens VFDs and Servo Drives (P119)

The Automation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 41:14


This week Jackie, Craig, and Rafael of Siemens update us on VFD and Servo Drives on Episode 119 of The Automation Podcast. For more information, check out the "Show Notes" located below the video. Watch the Podcast:  Listen via Apple, Google, Pandora, Spotify, iHeartRadio, TuneIn, YouTube, Amazon Music, Stitcher, RSS, or below: https://theautomationblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/TheAutomationPodcast-E119-Siemens-Drives-and-Motion.mp3 The Automation Podcast, Episode 119 Show Notes: Special thanks to Jackie, Craig, and Rafael from Siemens for coming on the show! You can now support our work and join our community at Automation.Locals.com! Thanks in advanced for your support! Vendors: Would you like your product featured on the Podcast, Show or Blog? If you would, please contact me at: https://theautomationblog.com/contact Sincerely, Shawn TierneyAutomation Instructor and Blogger Have a question? Join my community of automation professionals and take part in the discussion! You'll also find my PLC, HMI, and SCADA courses at TheAutomationSchool.com. Sponsor and Advertise: Get your product or service in front of our 75K followers while also supporting independent automation journalism by sponsoring or advertising with us! Learn more in our Media Guide here, or contact us using this form. (17 views)

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast
13 Sep 2022 | BMW introducing Plug & Charge With Multiple Contracts

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 23:01


Show #1592 Good morning, good afternoon, and good evening wherever you are in the world, welcome to EV News Daily, you trusted source of EV information. It's Tuesday 13th September, it's Martyn Lee here and I go through every EV story so you don't have to. EXCLUSIVE: AUDI R8 TO BE REINVENTED AS FLAGSHIP ELECTRIC SUPERCAR Original Source : https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/new-cars/exclusive-audi-r8-be-reinvented-flagship-electric-supercar FORD CEO OUT TO CONVINCE DEALERS TO OFFER TESLA-LIKE SELLING COSTS Original Source : https://insideevs.com/news/609726/ford-ceo-out-convince-dealers-offer-tesla-like-selling-costs BMW GROUP INTRODUCING PLUG & CHARGE WITH SUPPORT FOR MULTIPLE CHARGING CONTRACTS IN CAR Original Source : https://www.greencarcongress.com/2022/09/20220913-bmw.html RECURRENT AND BLACK BOOK AIM TO MAKE USED EV VALUES MORE PRECISE Original Source : https://chargedevs.com/newswire/recurrent-and-black-book-aim-to-make-used-ev-values-more-precise/ KIA TEAMS UP WITH DB'S ENCORE ON BATTERY STORAGE Original Source : https://www.automotivelogistics.media/battery-supply-chain/kia-teams-up-with-dbs-encore-on-battery-storage/43421.article 2025 FORD RANGER LIGHTNING: CAN LIGHTNING STRIKE TWICE? Original Source : https://cars.usnews.com/cars-trucks/features/ford-ranger-lightning TESLA PRESENTS PLANS TO FURTHER EXPAND GIGA BERLIN Original Source : https://www.electrive.com/2022/09/12/tesla-presents-plans-to-further-expand-grunheide-gigafactory/ VIETNAM'S VINFAST HANDS OVER FIRST ELECTRIC SUVS, EYES U.S. DELIVERIES Original Source : https://www.reuters.com/business/autos-transportation/vietnams-vinfast-hands-over-first-electric-suvs-eyes-us-deliveries-2022-09-10/ NEW CA RULES SAVE EV OWNERS MONEY, ENCOURAGE TIME-OF-USE RATE PROGRAMS Original Source : https://insideevs.com/news/609782/california-rules-save-ev-owners-money-energy-rates/ SIEMENS, DEUTSCHE BAHN CONDUCT MIREO PLUS H HYDROGEN TRAIN TRIAL Original Source : https://www.railway-technology.com/news/siemens-deutsche-bahn-hydrogen-train/ EVS AREN'T STRAINING THE ELECTRIC GRID — AND THEY JUST MIGHT SAVE IT Original Source : https://www.axios.com/2022/09/08/evs-electric-power-grid-strain-charging QUESTION OF THE WEEK QOTW is taking a break for a while. Email your answers to: hello@evnewsdaily.com It would mean a lot if you could take 2mins to leave a quick review on whichever platform you download the podcast. PREMIUM PARTNERS PHIL ROBERTS / ELECTRIC FUTURE BRAD CROSBY PORSCHE OF THE VILLAGE CINCINNATI AUDI CINCINNATI EAST VOLVO CARS CINCINNATI EAST NATIONAL CAR CHARGING ON THE US MAINLAND AND ALOHA CHARGE IN HAWAII DEREK REILLY FROM THE EV REVIEW IRELAND YOUTUBE CHANNEL RICHARD AT RSEV.CO.UK – FOR BUYING AND SELLING EVS IN THE UK OCTOPUS ELECTRIC UNIVERSE - GLOBAL PUBLIC CHARGING MADE SIMPLE WITH ONE APP AND ONE MAP. MILLBROOKCOTTAGES.CO.UK – 5* LUXURY COTTAGES IN DEVON, JUMP IN THE HOT TUB WHILST YOUR EV CHARGES

IoT For All Podcast
What is time series data? | InfluxData's Brian Gilmore | Internet of Things Podcast

IoT For All Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 27:10


Brian introduces himself, InfluxData, and what time series data is. He then talks about how it compares to other data and its unique value and benefits. Brian then connects it to the real world by telling us how customers engage with InfluxData's product and use cases with which time series data works well. Ryan and Brian then move into a high-level conversation around challenges in the IoT space and advice for companies trying to recognize where they need to improve.Brian Gilmore is Director of IoT and Emerging Technology at InfluxData, the creators of InfluxDB. He has focused the last decade of his career on working with organizations worldwide to drive the unification of industrial and enterprise IoT with machine learning, cloud, and other truly transformational technology trends.InfluxData is the creator of InfluxDB, the leading time series platform. They empower developers and organizations like Cisco, IBM, Siemens, and Tesla to build real-time IoT, analytics, and cloud applications with time-stamped data. Their technology is purpose-built to handle the massive volumes of data produced by sensors, systems, or applications that change over time. Easy to start and scale, InfluxDB gives developers time to focus on the features and functionalities that give their apps a competitive edge.

IoT: The Internet of Threats
What Keeps an Industrial Cybersecurity Expert up at Night? with Jonathan Tubb of Siemens Energy

IoT: The Internet of Threats

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 25:33


On this episode of the IoT: The Internet of Threats podcast, Jonathan Tubb, Director of Industrial Cyber Security, North America, at Siemens Energy, joins podcast host Eric Greenwald to explore the threats that keep industrial cybersecurity experts up at night, how today's energy and utility companies protect the U.S. power grid from terrorism and natural-disaster worst-case scenarios, the value of regulation as a catalyst for change in improving the industry's control environment, and how to get energy and utility companies committed to critical infrastructure protection.     Interview with Jonathan Tubb:    Jonathan Tubb is a leader for industrial cybersecurity in North America with Siemens Energy, one of the world's largest energy technology companies. In his role at Siemens Energy, Jonathan applies his extensive expertise to developing solutions to the company's biggest security challenges by identifying and mitigating threats in critical infrastructure environments. Jonathan earned his B.S. in Computer Engineering at Ohio State University and maintains a Professional Engineer (P.E.) license in Computer Engineering.      With more than 90,000 employees in over 90 countries, Siemens Energy's operations span nearly all of the energy value chain, from power generation to transmission to storage and includes both conventional and renewable energy technologies. Siemens Energy reported revenues of €28.5 billion for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2021.    In this interview, Eric and Jonathan discuss: The threats that put America's power grid at risk Protecting the power grid from catastrophic acts of terrorism and natural disasters The varied approaches energy and utility companies take toward critical infrastructure regulation How to get energy and utility companies to prioritize cybersecurity   How engineers approach cybersecurity when moonlighting a microbrewery start-up   Find Jonathan on LinkedIn: Jonathan Tubb: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jonathan-tubb/   Learn more about Siemens Energy: https://www.linkedin.com/company/siemens-energy/   Thank you for listening to this episode of the IoT: The Internet of Threats podcast, powered by Finite State — the leading supply chain cyber-security solution provider for connected devices and embedded systems.   If you enjoyed this episode, click subscribe to stay connected and leave a review to get the word out about the podcast.   To learn more about building a robust product security program, protecting your connected devices, and complying with emerging regulations and technical standards, visit https://finitestate.io/.

PCB Chat
PCB Chat 103: Stephen Chavez on Design Automation

PCB Chat

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 24:57


Stephen Chavez spent the past 12 years as a principal engineer and global subject matter expert of PCB design for Collins Aerospace and Raytheon. This year, he joined Siemens as a senior product marketing manager, where he focuses on methodologies for adopting a strategy for resilience and integrating the Design-to-Source Intelligence insights from Supplyframe.   He speaks with PCEA president Mike Buetow about automation in design, from autorouting to integrating component data in a timely fashion, to reduce design time.

Landed! Advice on Landing the Job of Your Dreams
Interview With Executive Recruiter Joe Mullings

Landed! Advice on Landing the Job of Your Dreams

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 26:55


Joe Mullings is the Chairman & CEO of The Mullings Group.  Joe provides hiring strategies for Fortune 100 companies including: Google, Johnson & Johnson, Medtronic, Abbott and Siemens, as well as emerging startup companies that are bringing to market futuristic technologies like surgical robotics, tele-robotics, artificial intelligence and Deep Learning.  Joe is also the Chief Visionary Officer of MRI Networks, the 3rd largest executive recruitment firm with 400 offices worldwide. Other links mentione on the show: LinkedIn Digital Transition 10-4-2 Strategy: https://youtu.be/62frEDEXNOs Subscribe to the Show On Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/landed-advice-on-landing-the-job-of-your-dreams/id1478513628 On Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/3OReMwjKcX89oMc1iWKtaR?si=8aeAsyuHS5q31txpjUqm8g On the Stitcher App: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/lee-silverstein/landed-advice-on-landing-the-job-of-your-dreams?refid=stpr. Follow Right Management Via Our Website: https://www.rightflorida.com/

Predictable B2B Success
Business exit strategy: How to build one out that drives growth

Predictable B2B Success

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 60:09


David Walters is the founder and CEO of Steam Powered Marketing. David and his team help business owners maximize the valuation of their company for a high payout exit. Over 98% of business exits are for zero value. This is a tragedy as 60% of business owners start their company with the plan to sell their business to fund their retirement and for most business owners 85% of their net worth is in their business. David and his team help business owners with the goal of a 10x increase in exit value within 2 years. Prior to starting Steam Powered Marketing, David was an Executive Officer Nuclear Submarine Disposal Group (Devonport) and Weapons Engineer Officer in the UK before working in nuclear emergency-related roles and crisis management types roles. He then went on to lead various projects for Siemens before launching his agency.  In this episode, he shares how we can build a business exit strategy that works for us while driving growth. Insights he shares include: What is a business exit strategy and why consider it?What should be considered In an exit strategyImportant questions to ask for your business exit strategyHow to maximize valuations of your business and diversify valuationsHow exit strategies impact marketing strategiesWhat questions to ask to determine whether we are ready to take our business to the next level Why an exit strategy requires an intentional culture in the organizationWhen to start looking at assets that could potentially form profit centersHow best to drive moonshot growth given the resources you currently haveand much much more ....

Where Today Meets Tomorrow
Thought Leadership Showcases Digital Innovation

Where Today Meets Tomorrow

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 11:42


What is the future of innovative technology and manufacturing? Siemens is on the pulse of groundbreaking technologies. In step with that objective, Siemens Digital Industry Software Thought Leadership Team provides podcasts, blogs, articles and white papers based on the knowledge of engineers and experts in their field, discussing what Siemens is doing and forecasting the landscape of many industries and technologies.We want to share a little about our team, its members, and our work. Our team focuses on emerging technologies in the next two to five years that Siemens is investing in and for which we are developing solutions.So, welcome you to our podcast to learn about our writing team. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

WDR 5 Profit
EU-Schuldenregeln - Charles III. - Pakistan - Wasserstoffzug 09.09.2022

WDR 5 Profit

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 20:38


Euro-Finanzminister: Diskussion über neue Schuldenregeln - Der Öko-König: Charles III. und sein Engagement für Klima und Ökologie - Stichtag Wirtschaft: Brand in pakistanischer Textilfabrik - Deutsche Bahn: Premierefahrt mit dem Wasserstoffzug - Moderation: Michael Westerhoff Von Michael Westerhoff.

Aurora Energy Research Podcast
EP.109 Green hydrogen, offshore wind and market design: Dan McGrail, Chief Executive at RenewableUK

Aurora Energy Research Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 40:13


In this week's episode of Energy Unplugged, our Managing Director for UK and Ireland, Dan Monzani is delighted to be joined by Dan McGrail, Chief Executive at RenewableUK. Dan joined RenewableUK as Chief Executive in May 2021. Previously, during his time as a senior leader at Siemens for close to two decades, Dan played a critical role in the innovation and manufacture of key energy technologies including wind turbine blades and efficient thermal engines. As well as being the CEO of Siemens Engines until last year, Dan was also the Chair of the Association for Decentralised Energy from 2016 to 2019. The main topics include: • How broadly should green hydrogen be defined • What is needed to hit the government's new offshore wind targets • The disruptions in the global supply chain • The current debates around market design

The Future Car: A Siemens Podcast
Technology with Purpose - Barbara Humpton - Part 1

The Future Car: A Siemens Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 35:16


“The value of innovation lies in its practical implementation.”Over the last 174 years of its existence, Siemens has implemented some of the world's most impactful innovations. Today, the company is a global leader in combining the real and the digital worlds to create value for its customers.Its ideal placement as a leader in software and hardware has helped it expand its sphere of influence tremendously. To maximize the impact of its innovative products, Siemens has been engaging stakeholders in decision-making positions and other industry leaders.In this episode, the first part of two, Ed Bernardon interviews Barbara Humpton, CEO of Siemens USA. She'll share with us some of the milestones that the company has achieved as well as some future goals. She'll also share about her recent meeting with President Biden and the major announcement that was made during that meeting. Some Questions I Ask:Why is what Siemens do necessary? (03:18)What is Siemens doing to help us take advantage of the Internet of Things (IoT)? (09:44)Why is it better to make factories more efficient instead of getting cheaper labor? (15:44)How would you describe President Biden based on your recent interaction? (19:57)Does Siemens use gaming technology to design some of its products? (27:30)What You'll Learn in this Episode:Why Siemens' capability to build both software and hardware is an advantage (05:02)One of the first inventions by Siemens (07:01)An example of a software-hardware connection created by Siemens that's in use today (08:04)Barbara's meeting with President Biden in the White House (10:58)Similarities between video games and the current engineering environment (24:40)Connect with Barbara Humpton: LinkedInSiemens USAConnect with Ed Bernardon:LinkedInFuture Car: Driving a Lifestyle RevolutionMotorsports is speeding the way to safer urban mobilitySiemens Digital Industries Software Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Building Geniuses Podcast
A conversation with Ryan Schlotfeldt

The Building Geniuses Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 41:50


Welcome to the Building Geniuses Podcast where we talk to geniuses throughout the commercial real estate and building automation industries asking them how they've gotten where they are, who's walked alongside them, and how they're helping others along the way. In today's episode we're speaking with Ryan Schlotfeldt of Siemens.

Relatable with Allie Beth Stuckey
Ep 673 | Biden Thinks You're a Threat. You are.

Relatable with Allie Beth Stuckey

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 65:01


Today we're taking a long look at Biden's prime-time address from last week and the many delusional, inflammatory statements within. In his speech, Biden claimed that "MAGA Republicans" are a threat to democracy, and seemed to broaden the definition of "MAGA Republican" to anyone who opposes abortion. He, along with Karine Jean-Pierre, White House Press Secretary, called Republicans "extreme" for going against the mainstream Democrat-held beliefs. We explain why these are absurd claims, and give some encouragement to you in the face of these bizarre statements. Biden also claimed Republicans are the ones who are anti-constitution and pro-violence. We cover why the opposite is true. Then, we'll discuss the Jackson water crisis, yet another example of Democrat failure. We finish off with a word of condolence for Eliza Fletcher, a young teacher, wife and mother who was kidnapped over the weekend. --- Timecodes: [01:06] Allie's 7th wedding anniversary! [07:15] Response to Biden's speech [53:14] Jackson water crisis [59:36] Memphis teacher kidnapping --- Today's Sponsors: Covenant Eyes — protect you and your family from the things you shouldn't be looking at online. Go to coveyes.com/ALLIE to try it FREE for 30 days! Carly Jean Los Angeles — use promo code 'ALLIEB' to save 20% off your first order at CarlyJeanLosAngeles.com! ExpressVPN — have more anonymity online. Go to ExpressVPN.com/ALLIE & get three extra months FREE. Bambee — You run your business. Let Bambee run your HR. Get your free HR audit at Bambee.com/ALLIE. --- Show Links: White House: "Remarks by President Biden on the Continued Battle for the Soul of the Nation" https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/speeches-remarks/2022/09/01/remarks-by-president-bidenon-the-continued-battle-for-the-soul-of-the-nation/ Newsweek: "The Biden Regime Collapses the 'Public'-'Private' Distinction | Opinion" https://www.newsweek.com/biden-regime-collapses-public-private-distinction-opinion-1739197 Forbes: "‘Destroying Democracy': Biden Doubles Down On ‘MAGA Republican' Criticism In Labor Day Speech" https://www.forbes.com/sites/alisondurkee/2022/09/05/destroying-democracy-biden-doubles-down-on-maga-republican-criticism-in-labor-day-speech/?sh=51b4259d12d5 WLBT 3 NBC: "Auditors: Jackson's Siemens settlement gone; city spent money based on revenues it knew wouldn't come in" https://www.wlbt.com/2022/05/16/auditors-jacksons-siemens-settlement-gone-city-spent-money-based-revenues-it-knew-wouldnt-come/ Fox News: "Eliza Fletcher kidnapping: Memphis heiress killed in suspected 'isolated attack by a stranger,' police say" https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/eliza-fletcher-abduction-memphis-kidnapping-suspect-cleotha-abston-to-appear-in-court/ar-AA11wzZh --- Buy Allie's book, You're Not Enough (& That's Okay): Escaping the Toxic Culture of Self-Love: https://alliebethstuckey.com/book Relatable merchandise – use promo code 'ALLIE10' for a discount: https://shop.blazemedia.com/collections/allie-stuckey Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Alles auf Aktien
Sparplan-Paradies für Anleger und Schock für Versorger-Aktien

Alles auf Aktien

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 17:19


In der heutigen Folge „Alles auf Aktien“ sprechen die Finanzjournalisten Anja Ettel und Daniel Eckert über den Countdown für die Porsche-Aktie, Streit um Nordstream 1 und was die neue Abgabe auf “Zufallsgewinne“ für Euer Depot bedeutet. Außerdem geht es um Volkswagen, Porsche Holding, Siemens, HeidelbergCement, Siemens Energy, Henkel, Apple, Regeneron, Bayer, RWE, EnBW, Encavis, iShares (WKN: A0RPWH), Lyxor (WKN: WKN: LYX0AG), Xtrackers MSCI Emerging Markets (WKN:A12GVR), iShares MSCI Emerging Markets IMI (WKN:A111X9), Vanguard FTSE All-World WKN:(A1JX52), BNP Paribas Easy MSCI World SRI, (WKN: A2DVEZ) und UBS MSCI World Socially Responsible (WKN: A1JA1R). Wir freuen uns an Feedback über aaa@welt.de. Disclaimer: Die im Podcast besprochenen Aktien und Fonds stellen keine spezifischen Kauf- oder Anlage-Empfehlungen dar. Die Moderatoren und der Verlag haften nicht für etwaige Verluste, die aufgrund der Umsetzung der Gedanken oder Ideen entstehen. Für alle, die noch mehr wissen wollen: Holger Zschäpitz können Sie jede Woche im Finanz- und Wirtschaftspodcast "Deffner&Zschäpitz" hören. Impressum: https://www.welt.de/services/article7893735/Impressum.html Datenschutz: https://www.welt.de/services/article157550705/Datenschutzerklaerung-WELT-DIGITAL.html

MaML - Medicine & Machine Learning Podcast
Chenyang Xu - AI Entrepreneurship in the US, China, and EU

MaML - Medicine & Machine Learning Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 85:22


Dr. Chenyang Xu is currently the President and Co-Chairman of PVmed Technologies, Co-Founding Partner of Silicon Valley Future Academy, Managing Partner of Brightway Future Capital, and an Advisory Board Member for the Johns Hopkins University BME department and formerly Advisory Board Member for the UC Berkeley EECS Department. He was formerly the Chief Business Officer of RSP Systems and the GM and CTO of Siemens Technology to Business (TTB) at Berkeley where he led the Siemens's North America's technology startup partnership and early-stage investment practice out of the Silicon Valley. As former head of Siemens Interventional Imaging Program, he led an R&D team that developed over 10 new computer vision-based medical imaging products (e.g. CartoMerge) and has achieved billion dollar scale new revenue stream. Follow us on Twitter! @TheMaMLPodcast Guest: Chenyang Xu Host: David Wu / Twitter: @davidjhwu Producer: Aaron Schumacher / Twitter: @a_schu95 Artwork & Video: Saurin Kantesaria Music: Caligula - Windows96. Used with Artist Permission. 01:00 - tell us about your path 11:00 - the internet + grad school in the 90s 22:00 - “career thinking” advice 30:30 - Siemens VC - looking at 10,000 startups 37:00 - PVMed - AI cancer treatment company in China 43:30 - AI startup ecosystem in China vs. US vs. Europe 56:30 - Potential downsides of implementing AI too quickly? 1:02:10 - Future of AI in medicine in 10-20 yrs? 1:13:00 - “Minority Report”-like AI to predict falls? 1:16:30 - Closing Questions

Dogodki in odmevi
Navijači v pričakovanju slovenskih zmag

Dogodki in odmevi

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 28:04


Oči slovenske javnosti bodo danes uprte zlasti v športna prizorišča, tako doma kot v tujini. Košarkarje bodo na evropskem prvenstvu v Kölnu zvečer čakali Madžari, odbojkarji pa se bodo v lovu na četrtfinale svetovnega prvenstva v Stožicah še enkrat pomerili z Nemci. Na tujem je v ospredju pogrebna slovesnost v Moskvi, na kateri so se poslovili od zadnjega sovjetskega voditelja in Nobelovega nagrajenca Mihaila Gorbačova. Ostali poudarki oddaje: Plinovod Severni tok 1 zaradi puščanja olja zaprt, po navedbah Siemens za ustavitev ni razlogov Bruselj za preprečitev novega vala epidemije covida najbolj ranljivim predlaga poživitveno cepljenje Reke v nemilosti narave in ljudi; nizki pretoki usodni za ribe, potapljači v Krki našli tudi prometni znak in nakupovalni voziček

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 54 – Unstoppable Innovator with Shampa Bagchi

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 66:31


Shampa Bagchi comes from a family of entrepreneurs who all value living life to the fullest as well as helping to improve our world. Shampa, born in India, moved to the United States after getting a Masters's degree in computers.   In the mid-1990s she saw a need to improve the way companies worked with customers and developed one of the first easy-to-use and inexpensive customer Resource management systems, CRM. Throughout her career, as she tells us in our episode, she has worked throughout her work life to improve processes and make products and systems to simplify systems.   Shampa's stories are fascinating and insightful. I believe you will come away from this episode realizing more than ever that being unstoppable is really something that is available to all of us if we choose the path to drive ourselves just a bit harder to accomplish goals.   About the Guest: Shampa Bagchi is the Founder and CEO of ConvergeHub (www.convergehub.com), a Customer Lifecycle Management CRM software that powers business growth. Shampa specializes in taking ideas from concept to reality and is passionate about helping businesses grow by utilizing the power of technology to solve complex business challenges.   She also founded Corelynx (www.corelynx.com), a boutique software development and strategy agency providing innovative business solutions to growing organizations.   Shampa holds a Master's degree in Computer Science and has been at the forefront of the technology revolution in Silicon Valley for more than two decades. She has worked with large enterprises such as Cisco Systems, Siemens, etc. as well as hundreds of small and medium businesses to build software products and applications that empower businesses and change lives.   Being a ‘woman in tech' long before #womenintech became a movement, Shampa is passionate about technology education for women. She has founded Onward Academy (www.onwardacademy.in), a software training institute in India, with the goal to increase the participation of women in the tech industry.   Shampa writes a blog called ‘The Spark' (www.thespark.work) where she explores the intersection between business, technology, and people… and the power of little things to make a massive difference in any of these areas.   She also writes and posts videos on a regular basis on LinkedIn and can be followed on https://www.linkedin.com/in/shampabagchi/         About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is an Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:20 Yep, it is that time again. Welcome to unstoppable mindset. I am Michael Hingson, your host glad to be here. Hope you are happy to be here probably are because you're here, right. So wherever you are welcome. And we really appreciate you and hope that you enjoy the next hour. We have a fascinating guest. We're actually starting the recording of this podcast 10 minutes late because we've just been sitting here chatting Shampa Bagchi  is a woman very involved in tech, she has formed a company called convergehub. And she, and actually convergehub is a software. Well, not a software product specifically, but it is a customer resource management tool. And she'll tell us about that. So I don't want to mess up my description more than I have. But she's also formed a company called core links, which is a system by which she helps other customers write software and do things that they need to do to make their company work the way it should. And she has a great amount of experience in the world of computer science. She's been involved in Silicon Valley Tech for a while. She has a master's degree in computer science. We're jealous, and lots of other things. So Shampa   Welcome to unstoppable mindset after all of that. And   Shampa Bagchi  02:42 Michael, thank you. Thank you. I'm glad to be here. Thank you so much for inviting me.   Michael Hingson  02:46 And you notice that I didn't use queen to the world, which I said I could use. And   Shampa Bagchi  02:51 then thank you for that too.   Michael Hingson  02:53 You're safe? Well, I really am fascinated to learn. Let's start with more about you and what you did growing up and how you got to the point of being so interested in involved in tech.   Shampa Bagchi  03:04 Yeah, of course, I actually started software programming in college. And like, Well, initially, I always had an interest in science and my initial interest, I wanted to go into nuclear physics. So physics was my first love. And then. And then   Michael Hingson  03:27 my master's degree is in physics. Oh, wow.   Shampa Bagchi  03:30 So I have a bachelor's in physics. And then I went on to do a master's in computer science. So wonderful. Yeah, it's a really great subject. That's   Michael Hingson  03:40 fair. Yeah.   Shampa Bagchi  03:42 And but then in a while, I know when I just started taking some computer courses. And once I wrote my first software program, I was totally hooked. And the main reason I really liked it is because it gave me this ability to take a complex problem. And then kind of, you know, break it down into little bits, and then solve it and kind of put the solution back together again. So I really, really was interested in that. And then that was a time when computers as a career, it was just opening up, it was just beginning. And I wasn't thinking so much as career itself. But more in terms of it was really because in that time when you go into a career, most of the time, you could only influence a certain amount of people, right? Only the people around you. But what I realized is using computers, you could build a program with somebody sitting on the other corner of the world use to solve this problem, which you probably won't even think about. And just that idea of being able to touch people whom you don't even know you know, whom you haven't heard of. It was so fascinating to me that I had to get into that, and I had really to do it so so and even today, even though I don't write software code anymore, but just that idea of building software products, which people all over the world use to solve their problems, it's, it's really interesting to me, I feel like I'm touching their lives.   Michael Hingson  05:14 There you go, Well, what do you do specifically today,   Shampa Bagchi  05:19 but today, I'm the CEO of convergehub. So I check of all trades, really in the company. So I'm handling the product development. I do oversee that I do some marketing, and even the other financial stuff that I have to do on a daily basis. So   Michael Hingson  05:39 not boring stuff. Yeah,   Shampa Bagchi  05:41 exactly. My very necessity.   Michael Hingson  05:44 Yes, yeah. It is part of what has to be done. And at least you Well, I don't know whether you have the patience or not. But you certainly seem to be able to, to put up with it all. Not always. But I tried, Does, does your coding experience help you in doing all the other things that that you have to do in the company? Or maybe a better question would be how does that past experience help you?   Shampa Bagchi  06:14 That's actually very interesting. Now that I think about it, it really does. Because when you are coding, you are taught to kind of look at a problem, I kind of step away from it, and just look at it as a problem and then start breaking it down or tinkering with it, you know that as a challenge itself, you cannot solve the whole thing. But when you break it down, and we address it one by one, you are able to solve it and you without really getting too involved with with taking a step back. So if you take that approach to any other work that you have to do any other experience or challenge that you're going through, I think that really helps you solve it in a better way.   Michael Hingson  06:58 Yeah, that's that's kind of what I was thinking that you would say I remember when I was in undergraduate physics, and of course it it then followed on but an undergraduate physics, oftentimes, professors would say, pay attention to the details. It's all about the details. It isn't just the math, for example, it's the units. And if the units don't work out, right, then you probably are doing something wrong. So you really need to look at the details. And I've always felt that that background in physics, even though I am not doing anything specifically in physics, the background has helped a great deal for me in everything that I do, because I've learned to pay attention to a lot of the details and appreciate the value in doing that.   Shampa Bagchi  07:47 Absolutely, absolutely. I think that's what it is. And I had, I had read somewhere that no education is what survives after what you learned has been forgotten. So I guess that what it is it kind of builds into you and then you know, you keep using it and other experiences in your life.   Michael Hingson  08:05 Yeah, I've talked to a number of people on this podcast who say, the reoccurring theme is you should never stop learning.   Shampa Bagchi  08:14 Absolutely. I totally agree. But yeah, it's   Michael Hingson  08:17 kind of one of those things that that one needs to do. Well, you went off and where do you get your Masters from? By the way?   Shampa Bagchi  08:24 Well, I did my masters from India. Okay. Yeah. And   Michael Hingson  08:28 then you then you came over here at some point. And, and you you started working now, did you code when you first came over? How did what brought you over here?   Shampa Bagchi  08:39 Yeah. So in India, after I did my masters, I started working in a company and that company was then I know, deploying some, you know, software programmers here. So I came as a part of that. And I literally landed in us with what, less than $150 or so. And a job of course, and went from there. So I know after I worked. Initially, I started working with a large enterprises like Cisco Systems, pyramid technologies, which was a part of Siemens. And yes, I was doing programming in Cisco Systems, I was part of the sales, the customer facing side of the software, really, you know, the sales, customer service. And in those days, there was no such thing as customer relationship management software, it didn't even exist. So what we were doing is we were taking Oracle Applications, the ERP package, and we were customizing it to build those pieces in and Cisco eventually, you know, it came it became the first company who did the online ordering the entire online ordering, where an order from a customer would go in and to be fulfilled without the touch of human hands. So and this was Very, very early days, and I was really fortunate to be a part of that big hole team.   Michael Hingson  10:05 What kind of what timeframe was that?   Shampa Bagchi  10:07 So this was kind of mid to late 90s, actually 9099 kind of timeframe. Yeah. So and then after that, I started working on a few startups, but then always wanted to open my own company. So that's when I launched core links. And well as part of callings, what we do is we build custom software. We are a software strategy firm. So we provide like a fractional CTO services, strategy services, software development for both products as well as software applications. So and we did that, and even while we were doing that kind of note, notice that a lot of the requests that we were getting for building the software center around the same thing about New Customer Relationship Management, how do I handle my customers war? How do I support my customers? How do I do lead management? So we were building constantly, we were building software for that for all our clients, and it began to occur to me, you know, I started digging in and found out that really, you know, there was no product in the market which suffice that need for customers, there were really two types of customer relationship products in the market at that time. One was really huge, big blood scale software, you need a PhD to implement that. And other than that, there was these no small little contact management systems really no dumbed down products, which really didn't suffice the need of, you know, small and medium businesses, because they had their complex processes, but at the same time, they can spend that kind of money, you know, to, to implement such a large scale software. So that's why we decided to build convergehub, which would service these kinds of customers. And yeah, so we started building convergehub, and which is right now, complete customer lifecycle management system, it serve right from the beginning of the customer journey, till the end is supported within convergehub.   Michael Hingson  12:18 So is it is a web based system then? Or?   Shampa Bagchi  12:21 Yes, it is. SAS product software as a service product? And yes, it's completely online.   Michael Hingson  12:28 Cool. How does it? Well, so now we have other things like Salesforce and so on, how does it compare with those kinds of products? Which of course didn't exist back in the early days?   Shampa Bagchi  12:40 Yes, no, when I was working in those, Cisco and those other large enterprises, Salesforce didn't exist. By the time I had to know founded convergehub, Salesforce did start up. But Salesforce was in that category of large scale software, which needs a lot of effort to implement, which small businesses didn't necessarily have. So yeah, so convergehub is kind of isn't the same space does similar things, but in a much more simpler way. So that you can get that you are able to, you know, establish you are able to serve your complex business processes, but you really didn't have to put in so much effort to implement them. The implementation is much simpler.   Michael Hingson  13:26 I remember when selling tape backup products for quantum Corporation and others before it, and so on, working with Wall Street, of course, they used both Oracle and Sybase and Sybase was very unformatted fields and so on. But those firms essentially created their own software within those database structures, to do the same kind of work in terms of managing customers, managing orders, managing all of the things related to that. And the Securities Exchange Commission required it of course of Wall Street, because they needed you to have a way where you track all your orders, which Wall Street firms would want to do anyway. And then to keep them for seven years off site. So we provided the tape backup products, and they would work with products like Elgato and other kinds of tools that would communicate between their systems and the backup products that we provided. So a lot of moving parts.   Shampa Bagchi  14:26 Yeah, yeah, absolutely. And, yeah, it's come a long way since then, but it's always fun to think back to how quickly we've changed how much   Michael Hingson  14:37 yeah, as I was saying to somebody not too long ago, I remember when a disk crash was a real disk crash. Yes. Where you had a 16 inch platter and they had was micro centimeters above it, and if it fell, it was a very noisy situation and all your data was lost. was pretty amazing. We've come a long way. And we'll continue to that's what kind of makes this technology era fun. On the other hand, even with you starting in India, and so on, tell me a little bit about how women were viewed in tech. And I would think that you were kind of a breakthrough person to deal with some of that.   Shampa Bagchi  15:19 Yeah, actually, when I started, in college, when I went into software, we didn't have that many, you know, women in technology at that time, but it's not like I faced a lot of resistance to it. But there just weren't that many software, it was a very new subject at the time. And, but then I was so fascinated with it, I wasn't really looking at the gender, I just wanted to build software. So I wasn't really looking at, you know, how many you know how easy or hard it would be for me to get in? But yeah, since then, even after coming, you'd be surprised, or even after coming into Silicon Valley, I did face some challenges. There. It's not so much as I don't think people really resist you, because you're a woman. It's not that people say that, okay, you know, she's a woman, I'm not going to listen to what it what she does, I'm not going to give credit or and I'm going to cause resistance, not really, but it's more sort of a mindset, you, there's this assumption kind of a thing, and that you probably aren't as good, you know, you probably won't be able to do it. And then you know, you have to keep proving yourself all the time. So and then, you know, it's when you prove yourself, it's not that people won't accept it, you know, people do. So I would think it's more a matter of just education and getting used to it, rather than you're actively making sure. Women don't get the chance.   Michael Hingson  16:47 But I think that's true of people who are, are different than what is viewed as the norm in general. I mean, in terms of blindness, for example. There's, there's resistance. And the general assumption is that if you're blind, you can't succeed nearly as well as sighted people can. And that that view has been around for a while, it does take a lot of educating. And you do have to continuously prove yourself to be able to accomplish tasks and and grow in the industry. It isn't that you can't, but it certainly tends to be harder, because, as you said, it's the mindset of what people believe you can and can't do. And unfortunately, in the case of well, and in some ways with women, too. But in the case of blind people, for example, the unemployment rate among employable blind people is still in the area around 70%. And it's not because people who are blind, who happen to be blind can't work. It said, others think they can't work in that prejudice still exists.   Shampa Bagchi  17:58 Oh, I totally don't get that. And, you know, interestingly, I had had an encounter, which this was, this was a while ago, I was in college at the time, and I was kind of, you know, I think I had gone down for some internship returning home, got down from the bus. And there was this blind person who had traveled with us who also kind of got on from the past, and there was this road to cross. And He was looking around and he asked for help. He said, Can somebody please help me cross the road? And the house was full of people. So so many people had not on boarded the bus, but it was kind of really strange that although he was asking, and he was asking confidently, but nobody, it's people were hearing it, obviously, they were hearing it, they were sort of pretending not to hear it and going their own way. And it took me by surprise, not just the people's reaction, but even that person's reaction because he was very confident he was not he, there was no kind of he was not submissive. He was not even if although he was asking for help. He was doing it so confidently. I thought it was the other side. The people who should have been more confident probably weren't not confident. They didn't even have the confidence to step forward and just helping him cross the road. So I watched that for a little while. And then I decided to step up. So I went to him. I said, Okay, come on. I took his hand, and I just had to cross the road I want I asked if he wanted help just getting home. And he said, Oh no, I live close by I can manage from here. I just needed help crossing the road and he just went about his way confidently. You couldn't even tell that he was blind unless you actually looked at his stake. So that experience really stayed with me that really, you know, this person was so confident why he was all he needed was a little bit of help, you know, why wouldn't I know anybody do that?   Michael Hingson  19:56 Chris, the other thing that would be helpful is he could You're out how to cross the road. I mean, I used to live in Winthrop, Massachusetts, and every day, both going to the bus and getting off the bus coming home. We had a bus stop that was across the road from the entrance to my apartment complex. And it was just in the middle of the road, right. So there wasn't like a major street that the bus stopped at, there was a bus stop, and it was right in the middle of the street. And there are tools to use it, it was a little bit daunting until I figured out that, hey, one thing I can do to cross the road is to follow other people and listen to them as they are crossing. And the other is to wait until the bus leaves so it's quieter, and then listen to traffic. And when I don't hear traffic coming across in front of me for at least a little bit a period of time, and I don't hear anything that sounds like it's close then to go across the road. But it it is a it is a process. And it can be it can. It can be scary. But it can be daunting if you really don't learn to you know, to do that. So I'm I'm a little bit curious why he had some issues with being able to cross the road. And perhaps he didn't have enough hearing to be able to do that. Who knows?   Shampa Bagchi  21:26 Oh, actually, I think I know, it's probably because of this. Was it India? Yeah, it's so loud and so noisy and so much traffic.   Michael Hingson  21:35 And there was no, no low in the noise.   Shampa Bagchi  21:39 Yes, exactly. Yeah. So that was very, very chaotic and very, very noisy the entire time. So he couldn't use noise as a as a market news   Michael Hingson  21:46 noises. Yeah. So the only thing he could possibly do if he could hear it is to just listen to other people. And as they're going across, stay right behind them. But still it's an issue. Did he use a cane or anything like that? Yeah, he   Shampa Bagchi  21:58 used a cane.   Michael Hingson  22:00 Good that because that would would certainly help. But you know, everyone is different. And certainly the noise factor is a big issue. I've been in New York, on street corners where there are well defined crosswalks and well defined ways to go. But it's so noisy, that it's even here hard to hear the traffic going the way I want to go. And you know, what we do is we listen, and when the traffic is going the way we want to go, then we cross. But sometimes the noise can be so loud around us. And even that's hard to hear. So there are always challenges. But it doesn't mean that we can and that's part of the problem is that sometimes people would go well, you just could never do that. Because you're lying. Well, I can but let's let's talk about the sun being in your eyes, and how well you're able to see when the sun's coming right at you. You know, we all have challenges, of course. So good for you for helping. Thank you. But it is an issue and it is a challenge that we have. Well, so you went off and you got your your master's degree in computer science and you came over to the US. That must have been maybe the the way I would put it is quite an adventure. Just getting here at all. Oh, yes. It was totally new for you.   Shampa Bagchi  23:20 Yes, it was absolutely new for me. And then yeah, getting into tech industry and immigrant brown woman starting to work in the tech industry. It wasn't easy. But then you learn as you go, it was you know, there are challenges, you know, you start looking at? Yeah, and then there are there are challenges. And then there are solutions. And it's, you know, people to help out. And it's just, I think a lot of it is also about how much you like the subject and how hard you're willing to work. And if you have that, I think all other challenges, you know, you're you're proud to be able to work out.   Michael Hingson  23:58 But you had a mindset that you were going to work it out you were going to try to do that as opposed to letting it all overwhelm you.   Shampa Bagchi  24:06 Oh, yeah, absolutely. That's, I think it's also a little bit about being able to know that yes, you will be able to do it. And ultimately, it's going to work out it maybe you can just try to look a little bit into the future and say, you know, here I am going to do it. This is just a process, you know, just a few challenges, which I will have to go through. Everybody has their own challenges. These are mine.   Michael Hingson  24:30 Yeah. And that's the real point, isn't it? Everyone has their own challenges and, and challenges aren't the same for everyone.   Shampa Bagchi  24:40 Absolutely. Yeah. Totally agree.   Michael Hingson  24:42 So you, you made it over you started and you started doing doing technology stuff and, and all that. So how how long was it before you started working essentially for yourself?   Shampa Bagchi  24:56 Oh, I started working for myself or Round, let's say 2000 to 2003, I think timeframe. So that's when I started kind of consulting, no going solo started working on smaller size project and a year or so after that I launched callings. So that's when, yeah, so slowly that grew. And we started getting more projects. And then I started having a team. We formed a team in India too. So, and I started off loading some of my work to them. And slowly the team grew. And yeah, so that's how things took off.   Michael Hingson  25:39 What were some of the early projects like that you started? And that you use core links to develop?   Shampa Bagchi  25:46 Well, we were always working in the beginning, we were mostly working on software applications or so yeah, one of the interesting one was in the insurance industry, I remember this was this was way back. But in a we were kind of, you know, comparing different insurance products. And this was for car insurance, if I remember correctly. And and it was really advanced for its time, too. And we were kind of, you know, giving there was some hundreds of points on which, you know, you could compare insurances. So usually, when you're reading an insurance, you don't even know you don't even look at the fine print. And this was kind of a technology where, which would help you compare insurance without really having to look at the fine print. So. So there's that that was one, there was another one for the FinTech industry that we were building the entire end to end process for fintech. So yeah, some for some very interesting projects. But in the beginning,   Michael Hingson  26:41 what kind of language or coding did you use to develop those?   Shampa Bagchi  26:45 At that time? We were using PHP, and we use MySQL, as a database,   Michael Hingson  26:52 SQL servers and all that. Yeah. What do you use now? How's it evolved over the years?   Shampa Bagchi  26:59 Yeah, now, I'm not coding anymore. But my team user uses Node we use young Angular. So yeah, there's MongoDB, we use. So a lot, it's changed significantly, even the way you code has significantly changed significantly, it's a lot more modular. And at that time used to write 1000s of line, of course, a lot of very, very monolithic kind of code. Now, it's so much more modular, it's a distributed, so things have changed completely. But it's kind of fun to watch my team, although, you know, I don't get fat involved into the day to day process anymore.   Michael Hingson  27:39 You do you have enough and you keep up with it. So you could if you needed to be involved in the process, I would assume?   Shampa Bagchi  27:45 Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. And, you know, I still have my, you know, kind of, you know, and in there, I'm have daily meetings with the team. But right now, my perspective is more from that of a user from that offer no customer how the customer experience, what will an user go through. So that's my perspective, rather than Wow, this is cool. You know, this is nice bit of technology, let's use it. I don't think of thinking of it like that anymore.   Michael Hingson  28:10 But it's good to be able to take the user perspective, and it's good to have that in a company, because then you, you really get to understand it from the standpoint of those who are going to be directly involved with an encounter of your products, as opposed to just creating them and pushing them out the door without having that understanding, I would think, Oh, yeah,   Shampa Bagchi  28:29 absolutely. And that's somehow you mature, because, in the beginning, that's how you kind of know, especially from from a tech background, you can do you not think, no, take a school, and, yeah, so just try to use anything, and I see my team, still trying to do that I have to push back on it, just because it's the user who is the most important person here, and you know, whatever that takes, technology is good, as long as it's serving the customer. And really, I would say, you know, we are we are coming up with a new release of convergehub. And what we are trying to do here, you know, I'm really trying to put in the human perspective into it more than anything else, because from my experience in the software industry from a very long time, what I'm seeing is there is really no b2b or b2c, or you know, anything like that anymore. It's really a matter of a human being using a product, it's a person using a product, you know, whatever else, you know, from whomever, to whomever, it's still ultimately your person using it. So that kind of knowledge really comes with experience. And that's what how we are building convergehub. So our idea is that using convergehub, you know, sales and marketing and customer service, all that is wonderful. And our users will be doing all of that the features are there, but more so what we would like our user to do is to be able to use the product to make a difference. So he is able to make a difference right Ah, where he is at, you know, whatever he or she is doing, he should be able to do it better do it in such a way that no maybe do it quicker and do it to build better businesses and I hope, better communities, ultimately,   Michael Hingson  30:13 one would hope. Yes. So when did you if you will graduate from quarter links, and so on to convergehub, although you do both, but when did when did converge on first come into existence?   Shampa Bagchi  30:29 converge jobs release was the first release was somewhere around I think we started getting customers around 2017 or so although it was released a little bit earlier in the market around 2015 2016. But that's when we were it was the very first release, we started ironing out all the bugs, I'm a bit of a perfectionist, so I didn't really wanted to push and sell the product until the bugs burning out the or the features were built in. So then we started getting customers in the 2016 2017 timeframe, and it went from there. And now we are getting into the next release the next version of convergehub.   Michael Hingson  31:06 I will bet however, that no matter how much you did to perfect it, and ironed out all the bugs, that once you actually released it, your users started finding things that you guys didn't discover.   Shampa Bagchi  31:20 Oh, yeah. You would have been that better. So yes, there was our software is basically a work in progress. You know, you can never have 100% Perfect software by the time you have the bugs and there are more features, you're building it and those new features will have some bugs. It's always work in progress. No, no company, no software ever built as an IT person. Everything all bugs ironed out. But you try. And what you really do really hope is that the bugs that you do still have aren't hampering the main activities of your users. So if it's, you know, really hampering their productivity with not letting them do what they would like to do in the software, that's that's when it takes priority. And that's how we prioritize bugs to know which ones to fix versus which ones to kind of put on the backburner.   Michael Hingson  32:14 You're now you're in California, right? You're in the Silicon Valley? Yes. So you watch some of the same TV commercials that I do if you watch TV at all. And actually, I saw it again this morning. There is someone who has been putting out some commercials that are just slamming Tesla, because they say that the autonomous vehicle software in Tesla is dangerous, and Congress should stop it and so on. And he's made that his primary focus in his Senate campaign. It's It's fascinating, not withstanding the fact that Tesla hasn't, as I understand it, at least the last time I checked, released a totally autonomous vehicle version of the software. But the reality is, it's always going to be a work in progress to do what Tesla has already done so much of to make their vehicle work in, in a way to greatly assist drivers. And it's just fascinating to see that kind of a mindset that just wants to put a stop to all of that kind of stuff, when that makes no sense at all.   Shampa Bagchi  33:20 Oh, yeah, absolutely. I totally agree with you there. Because if it's a software, there's always going to be bugs. So that's for sure. But it is true that in certain industries, those bugs have a bigger impact. Because if you are not careful, you know, when you're driving a car about code, you know, injure somebody, or worse. But at the same time, not similar to that is medical profession. And so anything, any software in the medical profession, you have to test very, very thoroughly because there are human lives involved. But at the same time, you at some point, you have to do your best, and you have to completely test thoroughly. And I think incrementally you do have to release the software, otherwise, it just doesn't happen. Right. So and knowing that it is software and there will be bugs, and we just do our level best to make sure that that bug doesn't have the worst kind of impact.   Michael Hingson  34:17 While being an equal opportunity abuser. Of course, my immediate reaction is if we're going to talk about what goes on with Tesla, let's talk about people driving in general, and there's some value in replacing them. Exactly. You know, the I don't know, my I'm amazed at my wife. Now my wife uses a wheelchair. She uses hand controls and she drives really well. We have had one accident in the almost 40 years that well. We've had a couple but there was one accident that we were probably more responsible for than anything else. We had one where we were actually going to anniversary dinner, and we came over a hill and there was a place where a car should not have been stopped on the road and there was no way to see it ahead of time. But this young lady who was a teenage driver had just stopped in the middle of the road. And we we bumped her before we could stop. So it was a brand new car and a dent in the car. But we had a time where we were driving, and actually, we, a gust of wind kind of blew us over. And we brushed against a piece of heavy equipment and then went back across the road. But partly she was also trying to avoid a trailer that had come up on us. We had we had, she saw the truck that was pulling the trailer but didn't see the trailer was in her blind spot. Well, anyway, but she but she dealt with it. But there are so many people on the road that are so impatient drive so aggressively. And I don't know how they survived because they they don't do anything to recognize the courtesy and that what we used to call in the world defensive driving, you know, we don't do that anymore. No. Yeah, yeah. So I'm all for taking the driving away from drivers. And in as soon as we can, putting it into a much more autonomous vehicle kind of environment, because too many crazy people are out there driving on the road.   Shampa Bagchi  36:14 Yeah. And I think you're absolutely right. So when once you know we get into that autonomous driving becomes the main thing. You know, what, what I see here, what kind of the research says that they are way safer than just these crazy people or drunk people is not driving a car, at least the machine want to drive drunk driving? You know,   Michael Hingson  36:35 we are kind of in the forefront of it. And we're new into it. But it's going to happen. It has to absolutely it has to happen. So in so there's a lot of artificial intelligence and machine learning that goes into all that. And speaking of that, how does that play into both you and convergehub, and quarter lengths and so on? Do you use much artificial intelligence to help in the development or testing of your software and so on?   Shampa Bagchi  37:03 Yes, it's not so much in the development itself. But we are planning the new version of convergehub, we are planning to put artificial intelligence in there and have this AI to do a lot of automated stuff, which initially would have to be manual. And then of course, now there is so much data, data analytics, and all of that is going to be built into the new version of convergehub. So all the definite features are not ironed out yet. And what we are going to give, but there is no one thing for sure is that we are going to have a completely channel, less conversations. So regardless of you know, like like today's users, they could be using one channel at one point of times, and you know, completely switch channels, the other point of time. So you know, from email, to phone, to Twitter, to, you know, to texting. So all of these channels should appear as if it's still a conversation as if it's a one conversation thread the whole time. So that's and there is so much insights that you can figure out from those conversations, and you know, many other companies have started working in it on it. It's not perfect, nobody has perfected it. But you know, we are definitely not going to work on that and see, you know, where that leads us. So, for me as a tech person, it's like both ways. And one is, of course, no, this is the latest technology, this is where we are going to be we have to be there. But that ain't the model remain the same, you know. So it's ultimately it's about how the technology will help you do a better job at whatever it is that you're doing. So as long as we can do that, we balance that, you know that that's the ideal way to go. I would say,   Michael Hingson  38:48 again, we're in a bleeding age environment, where so many of these things are new, and we're just learning about the minute you're in 100 years, it's gonna be a totally different world. And then we'll have other things that are new, but But what we're talking about today, as kind of in the formative era will all change. Yeah, yeah.   Shampa Bagchi  39:09 And it's, and the change is coming faster and faster. You know, it's exciting to see a little bit scary, too. But as time goes by, it's just it's the pace is accelerating. You know, you don't even know I mean, why 100 years, we don't really even know what's coming up in the next five or 10 years from now. So that's exciting and scary at the same time.   Michael Hingson  39:30 Sometime in the next 100 years. Somebody's going to probably develop antigravity and maybe we'll even get Star Trek transporters.   Shampa Bagchi  39:38 You know, I'm just waiting for that, you know, beat me up, Scotty.   Michael Hingson  39:42 Yeah, I'm waiting for that. That would certainly take care of a lot of the driving issues.   Shampa Bagchi  39:48 That's it. That's it. No more driving. I'd love that.   Michael Hingson  39:53 Oh, yeah. Well, we could use the roads for other things. Robert Heinlein wrote, a short story called The roads must roll back In the early 1950s, and instead of driving, roads all moved, and were long, almost like conveyor belts and even going from one end of California to the other. It was a it was a fascinating story. It's a it's a really interesting story to read, because everyone used rolling roads to go anywhere and off of the main roads. There were other roles that took you roads that road that took you where you needed to go. It's a fascinating story.   Shampa Bagchi  40:25 Yeah. Wow. That's an interesting concept. So cars don't need to drive. It's the roads that are doing the driving for you.   Michael Hingson  40:32 Right. Yeah. To go hunting. It's called the roads must roll by Robert Heinlein   Shampa Bagchi  40:37 definitely look at it. Yes.   Michael Hingson  40:39 It's a short story. You can read it in 15 minutes.   Shampa Bagchi  40:41 Oh, look it up. Yeah. I was reading about another fascinating concept to somewhere is that you know, a car start charging themselves as they drive. So you know, you have some sort of, you know, I don't even know if that's the real roads are going to be built such that in the cars while they're driving, they get charged. So you really don't need to charge the cars anymore.   Michael Hingson  41:02 I think? Well, I know, somewhere in this area around San Diego, I think it is there was a road that had some sort of cable going through it that helped provide guidance for the car. But I don't remember whether it charged or not. I think it was pre a lot of the electric vehicles. But I wouldn't be surprised if there wouldn't be a way coming along that charge cars could charge themselves. Of course, there's always solar, but you probably need more than what we can do with solar today on a small car.   Shampa Bagchi  41:34 Right, exactly. So yeah, I would say the technology problem getting it out into the world in a more cost effective way building the infrastructure, that would be the challenging part.   Michael Hingson  41:44 That's going to be a lot of what happens with software is it's all about making it more efficient, making a cost efficient and getting things out in an efficient way, isn't it?   Shampa Bagchi  41:53 Yes, yes. That's a hands on. Yeah, how how cost effective we can make it and in callings when our clients come in, that's what we tell them to, you know, we can do it very fast. We can you can build a huge, I don't know, aeroplane for you. But do you really need that? And how much budget do you have? So we have to build according to your needs and your budget, we do our best work, you know, otherwise, everything is possible.   Michael Hingson  42:17 You talk a lot both about convergehub and quarterlies. about efficiency, and the importance of that and what you do and what you're bringing to your customers.   Shampa Bagchi  42:29 Yeah, yeah, absolutely. I think efficiency is, especially you know, both in converge I've been calling so although you know, in different ways. But for convergehub, it's a matter of, I would say productivity. So it's it's how it's not just about what you can do, it's, I would say it's a matter of how well you can do it, how quickly you can do it, and what results you can get doing it. You know, that's what I would say no makes the software special. Otherwise, it's not about building a lot of features, a lot of new wonderful tools that nobody uses.   Michael Hingson  43:08 Where do you see, we talked about artificial intelligence? But where do you see that? And what other kinds of things do you see coming along in the next five or 10 years that you can look at and talk about in terms of how some of the ways we think of software, and some of the ways software will interact with our lives are going?   Shampa Bagchi  43:30 Yeah, that's that's an interesting question. I would say, software slowly will stop becoming something that you're kind of, you know, sitting at your desk or even you know, looking at it on the mobile phone, it's going to become everywhere, it's everything is going to be software. So your your and right now we do have that you know, your your TV has software, your Frasier software, but it's just going to become such that, and especially not you are going to be able to like not talk to it and redo it again, it's all there right now. But it's going to become ubiquitous, it's going to be you know, your car, your home, your, your washing machine, and every single thing that you do is going to become software, it's you, we won't call it software anymore, I think you'll just call it Life. So it's just there. And so, in terms of technology, if you will, I think voice as a technology, voice activation talking to your machines, you know, that's going to become you know, more and more important, the insights that it gives you in terms of, you know, sales software, or no customer software that we're looking at, even now, next conversion, that's our aim to, you know, bring about is that looking at your past data or whatever work that you're doing, it's telling you a future direction, and again, that is that efficiency that you talk about the productivity you talk about so there are this hunt 100 200 things that you could do today, but which 10 that you do will bring an impact which 10 of those should you focus on to get the maximum impact the maximum out of your day, so that those kinds of insights are going to become important and are right now, again, you know, everybody's trying to do it. I wouldn't say, you know, we are where we, you know, at where we should be. But we're getting there. And those are the kinds of things that I foresee, you know, happening other than the fact that, you know, we are going to probably have humanoid kind of, you know, robots and we are going to interact with then. Yeah, who knows? So those are on the rise and coming up soon.   Michael Hingson  45:40 We should have Ray Kurzweil who talks about the singularity, the time when computers, if you will, and humans merge, and we through our brains can access all of it directly. Yes.   Shampa Bagchi  45:56 The thought interface that sometimes we don't talk about, and yet those are, I don't know, it's exciting and scary at the same time, right? Just something we can't even think about. But it's slowly creeping upon us. It's happening so slowly, probably, that we are not even noticing. But we are getting there. And we just have to figure out ways and probably even laws to deal with it.   Michael Hingson  46:20 Well, and that's going to be part of it is, is the laws and trying to definitely put a standard to it, do you. But I but it seems to me and I mentioned the senator campaign, and so on, it strikes me that those kinds of, of commercials, and that kind of discussion really represents a fear of change and a fear of what these products are really bringing to us, which shouldn't be there, but it still is.   Shampa Bagchi  46:49 Yeah, absolutely. I would totally agree on that. I think it's more about the fear of the unknown in another form. So you don't really know where this is going, which is true. I mean, it's scary. But at the same time, you cannot ignore the enormous amount of value that is adding to our lives. So I would say that the way to get through this is to you know, not really ignore it, and not to shy away from it and say, hey, you know, Tesla software is buggy, so we never go autonomous, driving way. But to kind of look at it right now and say, what standards should we set to what law should we set? What is it that we need to do to make sure all of this works out? Well, for us, it doesn't end in disaster, it works out such that, you know, rather than, you know, being seen as a flaw it it's seen as something that saves lives? Because autonomous driving ultimately will save lives? If done, right.   Michael Hingson  47:48 How do we get people to go from where they are to recognizing what you just said, which is the value of a lot of these kinds of improvements? It seems like it's an ongoing battle, but how do we get people to move past? No to? Yes, if you will? Yeah, that's   Shampa Bagchi  48:06 an interesting question. I would say the only way to do it is with education, right? So it's always the fear of unknown and education is what's going to make that unknown unknown to you. So the more we can educate people, the more we kind of bring it a little more to the masses. And say that, you know, you bring it such that we can, you know, touch and feel it and see, there's really nothing to be afraid of. I think the more it works, I remember when I was in Cisco, I had, they had this big lab where they were testing out all these different things. And this was very, very initial days of, but I remember they were testing out things like technology, like you could order milk, you could ask your refrigerator to order milk for you. You know, you could turn on the oven while you're driving home, in your car, you could switch on your oven. At that time, that seems like Oh, my goodness, you know, what if my house burns down? Now, it doesn't seem so absurd anymore. So it's just a matter of education, how much we have accepted it. And it's a matter of time and education. I think it's a factor of both of them.   Michael Hingson  49:17 Yeah, and how we can get people educated more quickly, to be more adventurous. And that's what it really is, right? You You came over from India, into a pretty unknown situation. And I've experienced some of those things in my life, going from one side of the country to the other with no family and no support system and developing a whole new thing. But life is an adventure. And all too often we don't we don't think about the fact that it's an adventure and a great learning experience. And if we could get more people to view it that way, we probably would also have a lot less fear. Or at least we would be open to exploring new things even though the fear might be there. You know, again, it would be something that we can start to work to control.   Shampa Bagchi  50:03 Yeah, I would, I would totally agree with that. Because there is always risk. I mean, even in life, I mean, you don't know, you go out of the home, there is stress, you know, there's always a risk of facing. But how do you, it's just that somehow, you know, people think there is more risk in the unknown. But you know, maybe the rewards are greater in the unknown to, you just don't know that you just have to take that risk to find out what it is all about. And, to me, again, I think that's a lot about I call that the entrepreneurial mindset. And I've recently started talking about this too, because I think the entrepreneur mindset has that that thing to, you know, that spark where you can step up, you can take a little bit of risk, you can look at any challenges and say that, I'm going to solve this. It's not just about entrepreneurs, it's not that it's just in entrepreneurs, I think it's in it, regardless of what life situation isn't, whether you're in a business or whether you have are going solo or not, you know, whatever it is that you are doing right now you can bring that mindset into it. And, you know, experiment a little bit, you know, step up into it, take a little bit of risk and learn a little bit more. And that would, I think, would help, like, become a lot more interesting.   Michael Hingson  51:21 Well, tell me more about that you you are an entrepreneur, obviously by kind of any standard. But tell me more about your your thoughts about being an entrepreneur? How do we get more people to do that? How do we get more people to accept that they can possibly do the same sort of thing?   Shampa Bagchi  51:37 Yes, sure, yes, I have always been an entrepreneur, I think because I come from a family of entrepreneurs. And I always wanted to have my own company. And so it's, to me, it's more so because I love to build things, you know, whether it's a product, whether it's a company, I like to kind of you know, see the little bits coming together to form a hole, and then impacting, getting bigger than yourself. It becomes you know, initially when you're looking at it, you know, it's a vision, it's completely within you, and nobody else can see it. But slowly, when it comes out into the world, and then goes out into the world, it becomes so much so many other people get involved in this, start sharing your vision, and it becomes so much bigger than yourself. So I think it's just a matter of if somebody would like to become entrepreneur, and I think they're everyday entrepreneurs who don't necessarily have to, or have a company, they don't necessarily have to have, you know, go solo, or have their own startups raise venture capital, I think entrepreneurs are whoever are willing to step up. I think in there's this book, called I think, if I'm not mistaken, the name is daring, greatly by brainy Brown. And she said, she does really well, where you are kind of into the arena where you're willing to go into the arena, and, you know, face off your challenges. So that thought process I would think is more about becoming an entrepreneur than anything else. So if I think you are ready to take on responsibility, take ready to learn new things. That mindset is what we know people need to bring in   Michael Hingson  53:22 what excites you about going to work every day?   Shampa Bagchi  53:26 That's that's a really nice question. I think, I think what really excites me is that I have the tools to make a difference, that I can structure my day in such a way and build things that someday will probably, you know, touch somebody's life, with an especially probably will touch with somebody's life, even when I don't know about it. So that's why I often love hearing about, you know, convergehub from users, when users reach out to me saying, yeah, how do I solve this problem? Or, Hey, I used it, you know, in this particular case, and it worked for even saying that, you know, if you just improve this thing a little bit, it will help do this. So it's just kind of know people have taken something that we envision visualized, which was this small and they're using it in their own doing their own thing, which is completely different from what we visualized, and it still works. So that's really exciting. You know, how I'm able to touch people's life and improve their livelihood in whatever little bit   Michael Hingson  54:30 you know, a lot of people say, well, it's all about making money, we got to be more very successful because we make more money, but I'm not hearing you say that's the biggest priority. It's really   Shampa Bagchi  54:40 never been that really it's never been that because if so I would probably go out I'm here in the Silicon Valley. We started our company pretty early in the day would have gone out raised a lot of capital, you know, gone IDI pure road and not done that and made a lot of money, but it's a little more are in a complex than that to me. So I would like to go in my own pace, do my own thing and make my own mark in the   Michael Hingson  55:06 world view. You mentioned Brene Brown and her book, have you thought about writing a book?   Shampa Bagchi  55:11 I actually have Yes. I have thought about it. A lot of times haven't found the time yet. But someday, I'm going to read a book,   Michael Hingson  55:23 you have a lot of insights that I think people would like to hear, and which is one of the reasons I thought it would be great to have you on this podcast. But you do have a lot of insights that I think would inspire people and motivate people and the lessons that you have learned. And the things that you teach to your employees and your customers are all valuable insights that I would think, would make a fascinating book. And of course, I have written two books and working on our third now talking about fear. But I am a firm believer in something that you said, which is it's all about telling stories to. So it isn't just preaching at people, it's it's using stories to illustrate what you talked about. And you've done, you've told a number of those stories in what we're doing here, which I think is great, because it really shows in real life examples. What's happening.   Shampa Bagchi  56:20 Great. Yeah, thank you, Michael, I really, really appreciated that. And I'm so thankful you said that, because it's been on my mind for a long time, I would love to share my experiences in a book, I love writing to. So it's one of my passions. And if I find the time when I find the time, I don't have a blog, though. So I write very short blogs, whatever I can manage. But someday, hopefully, I'll be able to sit down and you know, you narrate these experiences,   Michael Hingson  56:48 and do you do videos or any other ways of communicating with people outside?   Shampa Bagchi  56:53 I recently started doing that. I actually yesterday, I put out my first video on LinkedIn. And I'm planning to do that and more and more, because what I'm seeing is, that's another really another different medium for somebody who was not that fond of reading to still be able to go out and, you know, put your ideas forward in front of that person. So I intend to do that more and more.   Michael Hingson  57:17 What was your first video about   Shampa Bagchi  57:18 entrepreneurship? Course I was actually talking about what it means to be an entrepreneur, believe it or not. So that was one topic very fresh. On my mind, when I started talking about Italy, well, it   Michael Hingson  57:29 makes makes perfect sense. And again, I think is you work toward a book, and you can always get people to, to help do some of the writing. But just just to save time, or free up some of yours. But in the books that I've written, I've worked with two writers and I'm working with the third professional writer in the book that we're writing now. And the working title of it is a guide dogs Guide to Being brave, because we're talking about controlling fear, which is of course what happened to me on September 11, being in the World Trade Center in escaping, it was all about for me be knowing in advance what to do in the case of an emergency and being as prepared as one could be, which kept the fear away. I was certainly always concerned about what might happen while we were going down the stairs because there was fire above us. And we had no idea it was an airplane or anything that hit the building at the time. None of us did. It wasn't a blindness issue. But clearly something was very seriously wrong. And at the same time, the preparation that I had made in advance was very helpful until we finally decided during the pandemic to write about that. And so I'm working with a writer Carrie, why can't and we're putting the book together. And what I find is that she does a lot of the writing, I do a lot of the writing. But I also because we want to put it in my story, even then take what she writes in and tweak it some, but it's still a whole lot less time than if if I did it all. So it's another another way to go. But for me, it does help to get the message out there to put it in a book form. And people have appreciated what we've written so far. So I guess it's a good thing.   Shampa Bagchi  59:15 Yeah, yeah, absolutely. And your story is is so so inspiring. I read about it and your website, I do plan to get your book and read all about it, you know, in more detail. But you know what you went through and how not with your dog, it's very, very inspiring story.   Michael Hingson  59:33 Yeah, what people often miss is that it's a team effort. The dog has a job to do, and I have a job to do that. The dog doesn't leave the dog guides and there's a big distinct difference between those two. But thunder dog is the title of the book and it it is out there and I think that it helps to teach people a lot about what blindness is really like as opposed to what we think it is. And it's the usual myth that people have Ms. conceptions, whether it's about blindness or technology or whatever, it is all about education and getting people to, to move forward and recognize that maybe we have the wrong idea about what this is about.   Shampa Bagchi  1:00:11 Yeah, I absolutely am going to read your book. And do you know, when your new book is coming out? Did you set a date yet?   Michael Hingson  1:00:20 The tentative date is, by the time all is done, we get it edited, and everything else is going to it's, it's a while away as a way yet, probably in the first, well, probably in the second quarter of 2024. So it's not going to be soon.   Shampa Bagchi  1:00:36 It's been a while. Yeah, it's going to be a while, but I'm looking forward to it already. Definitely going to read that one too.   Michael Hingson  1:00:42 Well, we were blessed to get a contract signed with a publisher. And so we're working with their timeframe. We've we've talked about when to publish it, and why to publish it then. So I think it'll be kind of fun. But we at this point where there's thunder dog and running with Roselle, so definitely get them and running Anthony center dog especially is also available in audio format, which is an easy way to get it if you do much driving here. Yeah, sure. Yeah, in an autonomous vehicle.   Shampa Bagchi  1:01:10 I was very good for that. But I just love reading. So I'm definitely going to get that and your book was bestseller too, right?   Michael Hingson  1:01:19 Yeah, it was the number one New York Times bestseller. Again, we were very blessed with that. So that's impressive. We like that. Well, Shamp, I'm going to let you go back to doing some of the creative things that you do. We've been talking for an hour, and it's been fun. already. I know. Isn't that fun? You are welcome. You are welcome to come back. Anytime. If you want to talk further. I would love to do that. And definitely I want to stay in touch. I love what you had to say about artificial intelligence and so on. And I'm glad that you did check out excessively we talked about that very briefly briefly. It's it's also a bleeding edge type of technology.   Shampa Bagchi  1:01:57 It is it is yes, it was I was very impressed with it. I did take a look at it. And I look forward to talking to them again. Well, we'll   Michael Hingson  1:02:04 help facilitate that and, and anytime that we can be of help them. And if you want to talk more to folks here, don't hesitate. We can even use some of these podcasts to help with your book.   Shampa Bagchi  1:02:17 Oh, yeah, that would be wonderful. Thank you so much, Michael, thank you for that idea. It's been a pleasure talking to you. It's been a lot of fun.   Michael Hingson  1:02:24 I've enjoyed it very much. And I hope all of you who are listening, have enjoyed it. Wherever you are, I hope that you enjoyed the last hour. If you would like I want to hear from you. But before I give you my contact information Shampo how can people find you and maybe learn more about what you're doing and about convergehub and so on?   Shampa Bagchi  1:02:44 Yeah, I have a bl

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Mark Fosdike CEO of Datch on Custom Voice Assistants for Manufacturers - Voicebot Podcast Ep 270

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Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 63:15


Mark Fosdike co-founded Datch in 2017 after spending several years as an aircraft systems design engineer at CAV aerospace. His co-founder also had experience in industrial manufacturing at Siemens and Transpower. Both are engineers, so they had a keen sense of the challenges of getting access to information and entering data while working with heavy equipment in industrial manufacturing.   Mark breaks down the key use cases, the tech stack for Datch, training the voice assistant, and much more in today's conversation. Custom voice assistants can do more than just play music and tell you the weather. 

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Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 26:17


Sujata begins by introducing Thread technology, its role in IoT, and how it compares to other technologies on the market. She then talks about recent trends in smart home technology, what needs to happen for mass adoption to occur and popular products in the industry. Ryan and Sujata wrap up the podcast with high-level conversations around commercial applications and advice for people looking to build a smart home. Sujata Neidig has 25 years of experience in the semiconductor industry and has served in various roles ranging from product engineering to marketing and business development. Sujata Neidig has over 25 years of experience in the semiconductor industry and has served in multiple roles ranging from product engineering to marketing and business development. She is currently the Director of Marketing for Wireless Connectivity. She also leads NXP's standards efforts for IoT connectivity. She represents NXP on the Thread Group and Connectivity Standards Alliance's Board of Directors and serves as Thread Group's VP of Marketing. She earned a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. Formed in 2013, the non-profit Thread Group is focused on making Thread the foundation for the internet of things in homes and commercial buildings. Thread is a low-power wireless networking protocol built on open standards that enable direct, end-to-end, secure, and scalable connectivity between IoT devices, mobile devices, and the internet. And, because Thread is IP-based, it seamlessly integrates with many environments, apps, devices, and clouds. The Thread Group provides a rigorous certification program to ensure device interoperability and a positive user experience. Thread is backed by industry-leading companies, including Amazon, Apple, Google/Nest, Lutron, Nordic Semiconductors, NXP Semiconductors, OSRAM, Qualcomm, Siemens, Silicon Labs, Samsung SmartThings, Somfy, and Yale Security.

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The Uptime Wind Energy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 54:53 Very Popular


Engineers at Mitsubishi Heavy Industries have created a solvent that has improved CO2 capture efficiency from 90% to nearly 100%. That changes the math for thermal fuel combustion and creates major implications for the energy transition. How and where will the solvent be used? And how soon will it really be ready to use? We have questions. Patent infringement may sound boring in comparison, but it causes plenty of trouble for everyone involved - and it looks like GE could be in trouble. Since a jury ruled that GE infringed on one of Siemens Gamesa's patents, Siemens is seeking permanent injunction against the use of Haliade-X turbines on offshore wind projects. What does that mean for Orsted's Ocean Wind in New Jersey? Will the US government step in? We'll find out. Meanwhile, off the Taiwanese coast, Orsted is seeding turbine tower foundations with baby coral. Orsted and scientists hope to create viable spawning populations by 2025. Visit Pardalote Consulting at https://www.pardaloteconsulting.com Sign up now for Uptime Tech News, our weekly email update on all things wind technology. This episode is sponsored by Weather Guard Lightning Tech. Learn more about Weather Guard's StrikeTape Wind Turbine LPS retrofit. Follow the show on Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Linkedin and visit Weather Guard on the web. And subscribe to Rosemary Barnes' YouTube channel here. Have a question we can answer on the show? Email us!  EP128 Allen Hall: Welcome to the Uptime Wind Energy Podcast. We have an excellent show ahead for you. Mitsubishi created a solvent that can remove almost a hundred percent of CO2 from large industry emissions and then GE and Siemens Ganesa have been in a court battle and it's coming to a close and GE is in trouble. Rosemary Barnes: And then we have a couple of projects from Orsted they're planning to reduce emissions from their steel supply. And also they have another interesting project with Newcastle university in Australia to seed coral on Taiwanese offshore, winter buyin found.  Allen Hall: Stay tuned. We'll be back after the music. Mitsubishi of all companies has created a solvent that takes CO2 out of the air. And they're calling the solvent Ks 21. It's a trademark actually Ks 21. And it's, it's, it's the summation of almost a decade's worth of work by researchers. And I think this is actually happening up in Norway. So they're testing this in Norway, but it improves carbon capture efficiency or carbon dioxide capture EF. From existing about 90% to practically a hundred percent which is remarkable. So the way this system works and there's a really cool YouTube video that explains it. They have the solvent and they have the emissions coming up. The flu is with the CO2, the solvent grabs the CO2 and it I'll use a chemical term precipitates. So it all falls to the bottom. And then they pull that solvent plus CO2. Out break the solvent and the CO2 apart using heat, it looks like, and then they, then, then they just capture the CO2 and store it and then eventually turn it into rock, bury it. So in a sense, they've created a system in which doesn't require added solvent. Once you have the solvent in place is totally recyclable and they can pull nearly 100% of CO2 from industrial sources. So, if you think about it a steel plant or places where you really have to use a lot of CO2 to make, to make things like steel, you could essentially bring the CO2 emissions almost down to zero. That's crazy. And they're saying that the, the it's holding the, looking at a couple places. Heavy transportation, steel and concrete as being the, the big drivers here. So if the system works, you could actually put it on trains or you could put it on in theory, like aircraft. That's crazy. Right. Is, is this something you ever heard of before? Because it's, it's completely new to me. Rosemary Barnes: I have a lot of questions more than answers. So I think the first thing to note is that you can alre...

Buildings of Tomorrow
#145 Is there space for data-driven progress in enterprise businesses?

Buildings of Tomorrow

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 16:04


In a recent study conducted by Siemens, 63% of respondents believed that the digitalization of buildings and power networks is lagging the progress of digitalization in most other industries. Join Jon Lester and Dave Hopping, CEO Solutions and Services at Siemens Smart Infrastructure, in conversation exploring “What is the actual potential in data for enterprise businesses?”

Startup Insider
Berliner Startup Industrial Analytics wird von Milliardenkonzern Infineon übernommen (IoT • Turbomachinery • Compressors

Startup Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 32:46


In der Mittagsfolge sprechen wir heute mit Anja Vedder, Co-Founder und Managing Director von Industrial Analytics, über die Übernahme durch den Milliardenkonzern Infineon Technologies. Industrial Analytics entwickelt Lösungen auf der Basis von Künstlicher Intelligenz, um beispielsweise Anlagen zu überwachen und kritische Entwicklungen frühzeitig zu erkennen. So werden unter anderem Schwingungssignaturen als empfindliche Indikatoren zur Aussage über den Zustand einer Anlage analysiert und ausgewertet. Das Event Management assistiert bei der Informationsaggregation und -klassifizierung und lernt dabei nach den Anforderungen der User dazu. Die Anwendenden können die Events im User Interface klassifizieren und zusammenfassen. Die KI-Lösungen von Industrial Analytics werten dabei nicht nur Daten für die vorausschauende Wartung von Anlagen aus, sondern geben auch klare Handlungsempfehlungen. Industrial Analytics arbeitet dafür mit Prof. Friedrich vom Hasso-Plattner-Institut zusammen, der sich auf Evolutionäre Algorithmen spezialisiert hat. Diese Art von Algorithmen ist dafür bekannt, sehr effektiv ein umfassendes Optimum zu finden. Industrial Analytics wurde im Jahr 2017 von Anja Vedder, Markus Schildhauer, Richard Büssow und Robert Strube in Berlin gegründet. Nun wurde bekanntgegeben, dass Infineon Technologies 100% der Anteile des Berliner Startups übernimmt und in die Infineon Gruppe eingliedert. Über die Höhe des Investments wurde Stillschweigen vereinbart. Infineon ist ein global agierender Anbieter von Halbleiterlösungen, die das Leben einfacher, sicherer und umweltfreundlicher machen sollen. Weltweit beschäftigt der Konzern mehr als 50.000 Mitarbeitende und erzielte im Geschäftsjahr 2021 einen Umsatz von über 11 Milliarden Euro. Das Unternehmen entstand im Jahr 1999 durch die Ausgliederung des Halbleitergeschäfts von Siemens. Im selben Jahr wurde Infineon an die Börse gebracht. Seit 2006 hält Siemens keine Anteile mehr an dem Milliardenkonzern. Mit der Übernahme von Industrial Analytics möchte Infineon seinen Industriekunden neue KI-Lösungen anbieten, die das Halbleiterportfolio ergänzen. One more thing wird präsentiert von OMR Reviews – Finde die richtige Software für Dein Business. Wenn auch Du Dein Lieblingstool bewerten willst, schreibe eine Review auf OMR Reviews unter https://moin.omr.com/insider. Dafür erhältst du einen 20€ Amazon Gutschein.

Lets Have This Conversation
Discovering Your Non Negotiables & Living with Deliberate Intentions with: Brant Menswar

Lets Have This Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 28:45


Cultivating the talent which lies within you starts by discovering what your non negotiables are and having the deliberate intention to remain true to those values. Which will hopefully propel you on a road towards endless prosperity. Brant Menswar is one of the country's Top 10 motivational speakers, a best-selling author, award-winning musician, creator of the fastest growing book discovery app in the world and a self-professed coffee snob. His books expand on his ground-breaking work around values-based leadership described as “disarmingly simple and incredibly powerful.” He has helped to change what's possible for industry-leading organizations like Netflix, Verizon, Anthem, Siemens, Microsoft, ESPN, Hilton, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, and dozens more. Brant will help you and your organization discover their 5 non-negotiable values and how to live with deliberate intentions. Passionate and engaging, Brant encourages audiences to discover their Black Sheep Values® and move forward with deliberate intention. His interactive and entertaining ways of defining what matters most enables audiences to develop the skills necessary to perform at the highest level. He joined me this week to tell me more. For more information: https://www.brantmenswar.com/ Twitter: @BrantMenswar

Additive Snack
The Pillar and Bridge of Energy: Gas Turbines and Hydrogen

Additive Snack

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 50:26


Global warming is dramatically altering the world around us. And, as the population of the world continues to increase so does the demand and consumption of global energy. The fascinating world of energy and how additive manufacturing (AM) will impact it in the future is inspiring. Let's jump into jointly investigating how these technologies work, what attributes they bring to provide energy for current and future generations, and the contributions of AM to help us transition to a carbon-free future by 2050. During today's episode, Fabian speaks with Quan Lac, VP of additive manufacturing at Siemens Energy, and Pierre Forêt, Head of AM at Linde about how AM is impacting the transition toward clean energy. Quan shares how Siemens Energy is utilizing AM-created pieces to further enhance gas turbines, supplement other necessary energy equipment, and how they are preparing to transition to green fuels. Pierre describes how Linde uses AM to release the full potential of hydrogen to increase volume and reduce the cost of green hydrogen. Comments about the show or wish to share your AM journey? Contact us at additive.snack@eos-na.com. The Additive Snack Podcast is brought to you by EOS.Key Takeaways:[0:44] Fabian describes the climate drivers ushering Additive Manufacturing deeper into the energy sector.[2:55] Fabian introduces the expert guests who participate in this conversation. [3:54] The history of natural gas as a fuel source for humans.[6:00] Quan Lac VP of AM at Siemens Energy explains how the company plans to energize society into an energy sustainable future and how AM fits into the mission. [13:21] Quan describes how Siemens plans to support decarbonization. [16:23] How gas turbines work and how AM contributes to the restoration of existing units and the development of new more efficient units.[25:50] Quan explains Siemens plans for the future including modifying gas turbines to include hydrogen.[30:52] Pierre Forêt, Head of AM at Linde Gas, describes how Linde produces and distributes industrial gas products and his role at the company.[33:18] Pierre defines green hydrogen and sheds light on the exciting opportunities it affords.[38:51] How Additive Manufacturing can drive down the cost of green hydrogen and increase the performance of existing processes.[43:05] Future opportunities for green hydrogen to assist industries to impact decarbonization.[46:16] Pierre describes the barriers and challenges to releasing the full potential of hydrogen. Shareables:“How do we transition humanity into carbon-free energy?” — Fabian Alefeld, Host, Additive Snack Pod