Podcasts about nineteenth century america

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Best podcasts about nineteenth century america

Latest podcast episodes about nineteenth century america

Dig: A History Podcast
Spectacle and Spiritualism in the Lives of Maggie and Kate Fox

Dig: A History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 44:57


Spiritualism Series, #1 of 4. The Fox sister's story has been told hundreds of times, in autobiography, newspaper stories, biographies, histories of Spiritualism, Victorian entertainment, women's rights movements, and many other contexts. Today we're going to share some insights into Maggie and Kate Fox's life, how their stories have been told, and why the way we tell these kinds of histories matter. For a complete bibliography and a transcript, visit digpodcast.org Select Bibliography Ann Braude, Radical Spirits: Spiritualism and Women's Rights in Nineteenth Century America (1989) Simone Natalie, Supernatural Entertainments: Victorian Spiritualism and the Rise of Modern Media Culture (Penn State University, 2016) Barbara Weisberg, Talking to the Dead: Kate and Maggie Fox and the Rise of Spiritualism Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Craft Podcast
Saidiya Hartman – Wayward Lives, Beautiful Experiments

Craft Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 30:29


A revolution took place in the United States after Emancipation. A great migration north of the formerly enslaved brought with it convulsive changes in the organisation of cities, the shape of communities, and the practices of everyday life. In Wayward Lives, Beautiful Experiments: Intimate Histories of Riotous Black Girls, Troublesome Women and Queer Radicals (2019), Saidiya Hartman charts the nature of those changes, tracking African American women and queer radicals who were pathologised in their time period and reframing them as revolutionaries, the avant-garde of new ways of living in the early twentieth century. In this final episode of our pilot season, Saidiya discusses her routes into the book, how it grew from her earlier work on Atlantic slavery, and how through it she sought to find life, agency, and vibrance through the gaps, holes, and absences in the historical archive. Saidiya is the author of Scenes of Subjection: Terror, Slavery, and Self-Making in Nineteenth-Century America (1997) and Lose Your Mother: A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route (2007). She has received the National Book Critics Circle Award for Criticism, the PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award for Nonfiction, the Mary Nickliss Prize from the Organization of American Historians, and a MacArthur Fellowship (2019). She is University Professor at Columbia University. 'I wanted to think about making and doing and the practices of everyday life that are so important not just to sustaining survival but to making another way in the context of the enclosure.' Craft is brought to you by Wasafiri, the magazine of international contemporary literature. Check out our website, www.wasafiri.org, for outtakes and a full transcript of this interview, and much more from writers all over the world. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Dig: A History Podcast
Ghosting the Patriarchy: Spiritualism and the Nineteenth-Century Women's Rights Movement

Dig: A History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 48:39


Spiritualism Series, Episode # 4 of 4. When Ann Braude published her groundbreaking book Radical Spirits in 1989, critics did not like that Braude prominently linked the women's rights movement, particularly during the antebellum period, with Spiritualism. And even now, thirty years on, many histories still gloss over these important connections. So today we are exploring the close association of Spiritualism and the women's rights movement of the nineteenth century. Bibliography Braude, Ann. Radical Spirits: Spiritualism and Women's Rights in Nineteenth-Century America. Second Edition. Indiana University Press, 2001. Cox, Robert S. Body and Soul: A Sympathetic History of American Spiritualism. University of Virginia Press, Reprint 2017.  Franzen, Trisha. Anna Howard Shaw: The Work of Woman Suffrage. University of Illinois Press, 2014.  Hewitt, Nancy A. Radical Friend: Amy Kirby Post and Her Activist Worlds. The University of North Carolina Press, 2018.  McGarry, Molly. Ghosts of Futures Past: Spiritualism and the Cultural Politics of Nineteenth-Century America. University of California Press, 2008.  Seeman, Erik R. Speaking with the Dead in Early America. University of Pennsylvania Press, 2019. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

On Religion
On American Jews on the Frontier

On Religion

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 46:22


Dr. Shari Rabin is a scholar of modern Judaism and American religions. Her first book, Jews on the Frontier: Religion and Mobility in Nineteenth-Century America (New York University Press, 2017), was the winner of the National Jewish Book Award in American Jewish Studies and a finalist for the Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature. Rabin is currently an assistant professor of Jewish studies and religion at Oberlin College. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in History
Xine Yao, "Disaffected: The Cultural Politics of Unfeeling in Nineteenth-Century America" (Duke UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 37:47


What is unfeeling? According to today's guest, Xine Yao, unfeeling includes “a broad range of affective modes, including withholding, disregard, growing a thick skin, refusing to care, opacity, numbness, dissociation, inscrutability, frigidity, insensibility, obduracy, flatness, insensitivity, disinterest, coldness, heartlessness, fatigue, desensitization, and emotional unavailability.”  In short, Xine argues in a new book from Duke University Press, titled Disaffected: The Cultural Politics of Unfeeling in Nineteenth-Century America, “people who are disaffected break from affectability and present themselves as unaffected” (11). Xine is a Lecturer of English before 1900 at University College London. Xine is a BBC Radio 3/AHRC New Generation Thinker and the co-host of the PhDivas Podcast which focuses on social justice and academia across the STEM/Humanities divide. Disaffected is an urgent book that examines how sentimentality was (and is) a part of the political architecture of white supremacy and governmentality—and the forms of unfeeling that writers of color used (and continue to use) to roil that architecture. John Yargo holds a Ph.D. in English from the University of Massachusetts Amherst. His specializations are early modern literature, the environmental humanities, and critical race studies. His dissertation explores early modern representations of environmental catastrophe, including The Tempest, Oroonoko, and the poetry of Milton. He has published in Studies in Philology, The Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in American Politics
Xine Yao, "Disaffected: The Cultural Politics of Unfeeling in Nineteenth-Century America" (Duke UP, 2021)

New Books in American Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 37:47


What is unfeeling? According to today's guest, Xine Yao, unfeeling includes “a broad range of affective modes, including withholding, disregard, growing a thick skin, refusing to care, opacity, numbness, dissociation, inscrutability, frigidity, insensibility, obduracy, flatness, insensitivity, disinterest, coldness, heartlessness, fatigue, desensitization, and emotional unavailability.”  In short, Xine argues in a new book from Duke University Press, titled Disaffected: The Cultural Politics of Unfeeling in Nineteenth-Century America, “people who are disaffected break from affectability and present themselves as unaffected” (11). Xine is a Lecturer of English before 1900 at University College London. Xine is a BBC Radio 3/AHRC New Generation Thinker and the co-host of the PhDivas Podcast which focuses on social justice and academia across the STEM/Humanities divide. Disaffected is an urgent book that examines how sentimentality was (and is) a part of the political architecture of white supremacy and governmentality—and the forms of unfeeling that writers of color used (and continue to use) to roil that architecture. John Yargo holds a Ph.D. in English from the University of Massachusetts Amherst. His specializations are early modern literature, the environmental humanities, and critical race studies. His dissertation explores early modern representations of environmental catastrophe, including The Tempest, Oroonoko, and the poetry of Milton. He has published in Studies in Philology, The Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in American Studies
Xine Yao, "Disaffected: The Cultural Politics of Unfeeling in Nineteenth-Century America" (Duke UP, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 37:47


What is unfeeling? According to today's guest, Xine Yao, unfeeling includes “a broad range of affective modes, including withholding, disregard, growing a thick skin, refusing to care, opacity, numbness, dissociation, inscrutability, frigidity, insensibility, obduracy, flatness, insensitivity, disinterest, coldness, heartlessness, fatigue, desensitization, and emotional unavailability.”  In short, Xine argues in a new book from Duke University Press, titled Disaffected: The Cultural Politics of Unfeeling in Nineteenth-Century America, “people who are disaffected break from affectability and present themselves as unaffected” (11). Xine is a Lecturer of English before 1900 at University College London. Xine is a BBC Radio 3/AHRC New Generation Thinker and the co-host of the PhDivas Podcast which focuses on social justice and academia across the STEM/Humanities divide. Disaffected is an urgent book that examines how sentimentality was (and is) a part of the political architecture of white supremacy and governmentality—and the forms of unfeeling that writers of color used (and continue to use) to roil that architecture. John Yargo holds a Ph.D. in English from the University of Massachusetts Amherst. His specializations are early modern literature, the environmental humanities, and critical race studies. His dissertation explores early modern representations of environmental catastrophe, including The Tempest, Oroonoko, and the poetry of Milton. He has published in Studies in Philology, The Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

Doth Protest Too Much: A Protestant Historical-Theology Podcast
The Evangelicals of Anglicanism (with Rev. Zac Neubauer of EFAC)

Doth Protest Too Much: A Protestant Historical-Theology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 67:13


Zac Neubauer, President of Evangelical Fellowship in the Anglican Communion-USA, joins the podcast again, this time with Andrew and James to talk about some of the leading Evangelicals from Anglicanism's recent past including Charles Simeon (pictured in episode artwork), Charles McIlvaine, and John Stott. We also catch up about EFAC-USA in recent years.  Visit EFAC-USA at https://efac-usa.org/ Zac has been president of EFAC-USA since 2018. He earned his M. Div from Trinity School for Ministry in 2017 and serves as Priest-in-Charge at St. Clement's Episcopal Church in Rancho Cordova, CA.  Shownotes *Zac mentioned the following resources in this episode that are good further reading for history of Evangelicalism in the Episcopal Church and Anglican Communion: (Book) Standing in the Whirlwind: Evangelical Episcopalians in Nineteenth-Century America by Diana Butler Bass https://www.amazon.com/Standing-Against-Whirlwind-Episcopalians-Nineteenth-Century/dp/0195085426?scrlybrkr=c3bf1423 (Essay) "The Strange Death of Evangelical Episcopalianism" by Gillis Harp in Anglican and Episcopal History, Vol. 74, No. 2 p. 180-206 *Andrew mentioned the book Christ in Conflict by John Stott: https://www.ivpress.com/christ-in-conflict Additionally, we recommend the following books about Charles Simeon: Charles Simeon by HCG Moule (Methuen, 1892- now published by Christian Focus Publications) Charles Simeon of Cambridge by Hugh Evan Hopkins (Hodder, 1977- now published by Wipf & Stock, USA)

New Books Network
Xine Yao, "Disaffected: The Cultural Politics of Unfeeling in Nineteenth-Century America" (Duke UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 37:47


What is unfeeling? According to today's guest, Xine Yao, unfeeling includes “a broad range of affective modes, including withholding, disregard, growing a thick skin, refusing to care, opacity, numbness, dissociation, inscrutability, frigidity, insensibility, obduracy, flatness, insensitivity, disinterest, coldness, heartlessness, fatigue, desensitization, and emotional unavailability.”  In short, Xine argues in a new book from Duke University Press, titled Disaffected: The Cultural Politics of Unfeeling in Nineteenth-Century America, “people who are disaffected break from affectability and present themselves as unaffected” (11). Xine is a Lecturer of English before 1900 at University College London. Xine is a BBC Radio 3/AHRC New Generation Thinker and the co-host of the PhDivas Podcast which focuses on social justice and academia across the STEM/Humanities divide. Disaffected is an urgent book that examines how sentimentality was (and is) a part of the political architecture of white supremacy and governmentality—and the forms of unfeeling that writers of color used (and continue to use) to roil that architecture. John Yargo holds a Ph.D. in English from the University of Massachusetts Amherst. His specializations are early modern literature, the environmental humanities, and critical race studies. His dissertation explores early modern representations of environmental catastrophe, including The Tempest, Oroonoko, and the poetry of Milton. He has published in Studies in Philology, The Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in African American Studies
Xine Yao, "Disaffected: The Cultural Politics of Unfeeling in Nineteenth-Century America" (Duke UP, 2021)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 37:47


What is unfeeling? According to today's guest, Xine Yao, unfeeling includes “a broad range of affective modes, including withholding, disregard, growing a thick skin, refusing to care, opacity, numbness, dissociation, inscrutability, frigidity, insensibility, obduracy, flatness, insensitivity, disinterest, coldness, heartlessness, fatigue, desensitization, and emotional unavailability.”  In short, Xine argues in a new book from Duke University Press, titled Disaffected: The Cultural Politics of Unfeeling in Nineteenth-Century America, “people who are disaffected break from affectability and present themselves as unaffected” (11). Xine is a Lecturer of English before 1900 at University College London. Xine is a BBC Radio 3/AHRC New Generation Thinker and the co-host of the PhDivas Podcast which focuses on social justice and academia across the STEM/Humanities divide. Disaffected is an urgent book that examines how sentimentality was (and is) a part of the political architecture of white supremacy and governmentality—and the forms of unfeeling that writers of color used (and continue to use) to roil that architecture. John Yargo holds a Ph.D. in English from the University of Massachusetts Amherst. His specializations are early modern literature, the environmental humanities, and critical race studies. His dissertation explores early modern representations of environmental catastrophe, including The Tempest, Oroonoko, and the poetry of Milton. He has published in Studies in Philology, The Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

New Books in Literary Studies
Xine Yao, "Disaffected: The Cultural Politics of Unfeeling in Nineteenth-Century America" (Duke UP, 2021)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 37:47


What is unfeeling? According to today's guest, Xine Yao, unfeeling includes “a broad range of affective modes, including withholding, disregard, growing a thick skin, refusing to care, opacity, numbness, dissociation, inscrutability, frigidity, insensibility, obduracy, flatness, insensitivity, disinterest, coldness, heartlessness, fatigue, desensitization, and emotional unavailability.”  In short, Xine argues in a new book from Duke University Press, titled Disaffected: The Cultural Politics of Unfeeling in Nineteenth-Century America, “people who are disaffected break from affectability and present themselves as unaffected” (11). Xine is a Lecturer of English before 1900 at University College London. Xine is a BBC Radio 3/AHRC New Generation Thinker and the co-host of the PhDivas Podcast which focuses on social justice and academia across the STEM/Humanities divide. Disaffected is an urgent book that examines how sentimentality was (and is) a part of the political architecture of white supremacy and governmentality—and the forms of unfeeling that writers of color used (and continue to use) to roil that architecture. John Yargo holds a Ph.D. in English from the University of Massachusetts Amherst. His specializations are early modern literature, the environmental humanities, and critical race studies. His dissertation explores early modern representations of environmental catastrophe, including The Tempest, Oroonoko, and the poetry of Milton. He has published in Studies in Philology, The Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books in Intellectual History
Xine Yao, "Disaffected: The Cultural Politics of Unfeeling in Nineteenth-Century America" (Duke UP, 2021)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 37:47


What is unfeeling? According to today's guest, Xine Yao, unfeeling includes “a broad range of affective modes, including withholding, disregard, growing a thick skin, refusing to care, opacity, numbness, dissociation, inscrutability, frigidity, insensibility, obduracy, flatness, insensitivity, disinterest, coldness, heartlessness, fatigue, desensitization, and emotional unavailability.”  In short, Xine argues in a new book from Duke University Press, titled Disaffected: The Cultural Politics of Unfeeling in Nineteenth-Century America, “people who are disaffected break from affectability and present themselves as unaffected” (11). Xine is a Lecturer of English before 1900 at University College London. Xine is a BBC Radio 3/AHRC New Generation Thinker and the co-host of the PhDivas Podcast which focuses on social justice and academia across the STEM/Humanities divide. Disaffected is an urgent book that examines how sentimentality was (and is) a part of the political architecture of white supremacy and governmentality—and the forms of unfeeling that writers of color used (and continue to use) to roil that architecture. John Yargo holds a Ph.D. in English from the University of Massachusetts Amherst. His specializations are early modern literature, the environmental humanities, and critical race studies. His dissertation explores early modern representations of environmental catastrophe, including The Tempest, Oroonoko, and the poetry of Milton. He has published in Studies in Philology, The Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

Quoi de Meuf
(Rediff) - Les copines d'abord

Quoi de Meuf

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 53:19


C'est le début des vacances, en couple, en famille, ou alors... entre copines ! À cette occasion, l'équipe de Quoi de Meuf vous propose de réécouter cet épisode sur l'amitié féminine sujet passionnant et inépuisable, tant il y a à dire…En proie aux représentations stéréotypées, elle fait l'objet tantôt d'appropriations, de fantasmes, avec un regard bien trop souvent hétéronormé et sexiste. Pourtant, elle est précieuse, complexe et d'une richesse incommensurable.Alors, Clémentine Gallot et Anne-Laure Pineau s'y attardent dans cet épisode long de Quoi de Meuf, et comptent bien dénoncer les préjugés, et rétablir les considérations qu'elle mérite.Les références entendues dans l'épisode :Amies, Ouvrage collectif, Nouvelles Questions Féministes Vol. 30 N2 (2011)Une histoire de l'amitié, Anne Vincent-Buffault, Bayard (2010)De l'amitié, Madame De Lambert, Rivages (2018)Love & Friendship de Whit Stillman (2016)What no one ever told you about people who are single, Bella DePaulo, Tedx Talk (2017)The Female World of Love and Ritual : Relations between Women in Nineteenth-Century America, Carroll Smith-Rosenberg (1975)The Bonds of Womanhood, Nancy F. Cott, Yall University Press (2020)There's a Divide in Even the Closest Interracial Friendships, Aminatou Sow et Ann Friedman, The Cut (2020)L'amitié entre hommes et femmes, la nouvelle frontière de la comédie romantique, Michael Atlan, Slate (2017)Surpassing the Love of Men, Lilian Faderman , The Women's Press Ltd (1981)Compulsory Heterosexuality and Lesbian Existence, Adrienne Rich (1981)Se dire lesbienne, Natacha Chetcuti, Payot (2021)The L World de Ilen Chaiken (2004)Sortir de l'hétérosexualité de Juliet Drouar, Collection sur la table (2021)Réinventer l'amour de Mona Chollet, La découverte (2021)Why Female Friendship Has Been The Greatest Love Of My Life, Emma Firth, Elle (2021)Mettre l'amitié au premier plan, Sasha Roseneil, Nouvelles Questions Féministes (2011)Les orageuses, Marcia Burnier, Cambourakis (2021)Violé.es une histoire de domination, Clémence Allezard, LSD La série documentaire, France Culture (2021)Big Friendship, Aminatou Sow et Ann Friedman, Virago (2020)The Friendship Season, Invisibilia (2021)A l'écart de la meute, Thomas Messias, Marabout (2021)Le deuxième sexe, Simonde De Beauvoir, Gallimard (1986)Bad feminist, Roxane gay, Denoël (2018)Nous devrions tous être féministes, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, TEDxEustonA brief history of squads, Arit John, The New York Times (2019)Les strates, Pénélope Bagieu, Gallimard (2019)Une chambre à soi, Virginia Woolf, Bibliothèque 10/18Divines de Houda Benyamina (2016)Tout ce qui brille de Géraldine Nakache (2009)Bande de filles de Céline Sciamma (2014)Thelma et Louise de Ridley Scott (1991)Baise-moi, Virginie Despentes, J'ai lu (2000)Insecure de Larry Wilmore et Issa Rae (2016)Adolescentes de Sébastien Lifshitz (2019)Les petites reines, Clémentine Beauvais, Sarbacane (2015)Desperate Housewives de Marc Cherry (2004)Frances Ha de Noah Baumbach (2012)L'amie prodigieuse, Elena Ferrante, Gallimard (2016)Les flingueuses de Paul Feig (2013)American predator, Maureen Callahan, Sonatine Eds (2021)Les suicidés du bout du monde, Leila Guerriero, Rivages (2021)Fungirl, Elizabeth Pich, Les requins marteaux (2021)Quoi de Meuf est une émission de Nouvelles Écoutes. Rédaction en chef : Clémentine Gallot. Journaliste chroniqueuse : Anne-Laure Pineau. Mixage et montage : Laurie Galligani. Prise de son par Thibault Delage à l'Arrière Boutique. Générique réalisé par Aurore Mahieu. Réalisation et coordination : Cassandra de Carvalho et Mathilde Jonin.Vous pouvez consulter notre politique de confidentialité sur https://art19.com/privacy ainsi que la notice de confidentialité de la Californie sur https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

New Books in History
On Religion and Photography in 19th-Century America

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 50:35


Dr. Rachel Lindsey is Assistant Professor in Saint Louis University's Department of Theological Studies. She has a Ph.D. and M.A. in American Religion from Princeton University, and a B.A. in Religious Studies from Missouri State University. She is the author of Communion of Shadows: Religion and Photography in Nineteenth Century America from University of North Carolina Press. We discussed Communion of Shadows and her fantastic projects, Lived Religion in the Digital Age and Arch City Religion. You can find Dr. Lindsey's projects at archcityreligion.org and religioninplace.org. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Christian Studies
On Religion and Photography in 19th-Century America

New Books in Christian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 50:35


Dr. Rachel Lindsey is Assistant Professor in Saint Louis University's Department of Theological Studies. She has a Ph.D. and M.A. in American Religion from Princeton University, and a B.A. in Religious Studies from Missouri State University. She is the author of Communion of Shadows: Religion and Photography in Nineteenth Century America from University of North Carolina Press. We discussed Communion of Shadows and her fantastic projects, Lived Religion in the Digital Age and Arch City Religion. You can find Dr. Lindsey's projects at archcityreligion.org and religioninplace.org. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/christian-studies

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society
On Religion and Photography in 19th-Century America

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 50:35


Dr. Rachel Lindsey is Assistant Professor in Saint Louis University's Department of Theological Studies. She has a Ph.D. and M.A. in American Religion from Princeton University, and a B.A. in Religious Studies from Missouri State University. She is the author of Communion of Shadows: Religion and Photography in Nineteenth Century America from University of North Carolina Press. We discussed Communion of Shadows and her fantastic projects, Lived Religion in the Digital Age and Arch City Religion. You can find Dr. Lindsey's projects at archcityreligion.org and religioninplace.org. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/science-technology-and-society

New Books in American Studies
On Religion and Photography in 19th-Century America

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 50:35


Dr. Rachel Lindsey is Assistant Professor in Saint Louis University's Department of Theological Studies. She has a Ph.D. and M.A. in American Religion from Princeton University, and a B.A. in Religious Studies from Missouri State University. She is the author of Communion of Shadows: Religion and Photography in Nineteenth Century America from University of North Carolina Press. We discussed Communion of Shadows and her fantastic projects, Lived Religion in the Digital Age and Arch City Religion. You can find Dr. Lindsey's projects at archcityreligion.org and religioninplace.org. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in Photography
On Religion and Photography in 19th-Century America

New Books in Photography

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 50:35


Dr. Rachel Lindsey is Assistant Professor in Saint Louis University's Department of Theological Studies. She has a Ph.D. and M.A. in American Religion from Princeton University, and a B.A. in Religious Studies from Missouri State University. She is the author of Communion of Shadows: Religion and Photography in Nineteenth Century America from University of North Carolina Press. We discussed Communion of Shadows and her fantastic projects, Lived Religion in the Digital Age and Arch City Religion. You can find Dr. Lindsey's projects at archcityreligion.org and religioninplace.org. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/photography

New Books Network
On Religion and Photography in 19th-Century America

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 50:35


Dr. Rachel Lindsey is Assistant Professor in Saint Louis University's Department of Theological Studies. She has a Ph.D. and M.A. in American Religion from Princeton University, and a B.A. in Religious Studies from Missouri State University. She is the author of Communion of Shadows: Religion and Photography in Nineteenth Century America from University of North Carolina Press. We discussed Communion of Shadows and her fantastic projects, Lived Religion in the Digital Age and Arch City Religion. You can find Dr. Lindsey's projects at archcityreligion.org and religioninplace.org. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

On Religion
On Religion and Photography in 19th-Century America

On Religion

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 50:35


Dr. Rachel Lindsey is Assistant Professor in Saint Louis University's Department of Theological Studies. She has a Ph.D. and M.A. in American Religion from Princeton University, and a B.A. in Religious Studies from Missouri State University. She is the author of Communion of Shadows: Religion and Photography in Nineteenth Century America from University of North Carolina Press. We discussed Communion of Shadows and her fantastic projects, Lived Religion in the Digital Age and Arch City Religion. You can find Dr. Lindsey's projects at archcityreligion.org and religioninplace.org. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Intellectual History
A Newly Discovered Essay by Fredrick Douglas: "Slavery" (1894-1895)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 38:43


Today's guest is Leslie Leonard, who received their doctorate in American Studies and 19th C. American Literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Their dissertation, The Burdens and Blessings of Responsibility: Duty and Community in Nineteenth-Century America, is a study of the emergent idea of personal responsibility as it conflicted with more established ideas of duty in the writings of Herman Melville, and Harriet Jacobs. Drawing on a range of sources –works of literature, theology, domestic manuals, labor pamphlets – their research shows how many Americans began to conceive of moral responsibility as distinct from both duty and rules of behavior prescribed by traditional social roles. Today, we are discussing Leslie's discovery of an unpublished text by Frederick Douglass, an essay titled “Slavery,” which appeared in the fall 2021 issue of J19: The Journal of Nineteenth-Century Americanists. John Yargo recently received his PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

Surviving Society
E157 Xine Yao: The Cultural Politics of Unfeeling

Surviving Society

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 56:13


Xine Yao joined us to discuss their book, Disaffected: The Cultural Politics of Unfeeling in Nineteenth-Century America. https://www.dukeupress.edu/disaffected https://www.redpepper.org.uk/subscribe/

New Books in African American Studies
A Newly Discovered Essay by Fredrick Douglas: "Slavery" (1894-1895)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 38:43


Today's guest is Leslie Leonard, who received their doctorate in American Studies and 19th C. American Literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Their dissertation, The Burdens and Blessings of Responsibility: Duty and Community in Nineteenth-Century America, is a study of the emergent idea of personal responsibility as it conflicted with more established ideas of duty in the writings of Herman Melville, and Harriet Jacobs. Drawing on a range of sources –works of literature, theology, domestic manuals, labor pamphlets – their research shows how many Americans began to conceive of moral responsibility as distinct from both duty and rules of behavior prescribed by traditional social roles. Today, we are discussing Leslie's discovery of an unpublished text by Frederick Douglass, an essay titled “Slavery,” which appeared in the fall 2021 issue of J19: The Journal of Nineteenth-Century Americanists. John Yargo recently received his PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

New Books Network
A Newly Discovered Essay by Fredrick Douglas: "Slavery" (1894-1895)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 38:43


Today's guest is Leslie Leonard, who received their doctorate in American Studies and 19th C. American Literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Their dissertation, The Burdens and Blessings of Responsibility: Duty and Community in Nineteenth-Century America, is a study of the emergent idea of personal responsibility as it conflicted with more established ideas of duty in the writings of Herman Melville, and Harriet Jacobs. Drawing on a range of sources –works of literature, theology, domestic manuals, labor pamphlets – their research shows how many Americans began to conceive of moral responsibility as distinct from both duty and rules of behavior prescribed by traditional social roles. Today, we are discussing Leslie's discovery of an unpublished text by Frederick Douglass, an essay titled “Slavery,” which appeared in the fall 2021 issue of J19: The Journal of Nineteenth-Century Americanists. John Yargo recently received his PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Literary Studies
A Newly Discovered Essay by Fredrick Douglass: "Slavery" (1894-1895)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 38:43


Today's guest is Leslie Leonard, who received their doctorate in American Studies and 19th C. American Literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Their dissertation, The Burdens and Blessings of Responsibility: Duty and Community in Nineteenth-Century America, is a study of the emergent idea of personal responsibility as it conflicted with more established ideas of duty in the writings of Herman Melville, and Harriet Jacobs. Drawing on a range of sources –works of literature, theology, domestic manuals, labor pamphlets – their research shows how many Americans began to conceive of moral responsibility as distinct from both duty and rules of behavior prescribed by traditional social roles. Today, we are discussing Leslie's discovery of an unpublished text by Frederick Douglass, an essay titled “Slavery,” which appeared in the fall 2021 issue of J19: The Journal of Nineteenth-Century Americanists. John Yargo recently received his PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books in History
A Newly Discovered Essay by Fredrick Douglas: "Slavery" (1894-1895)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 38:43


Today's guest is Leslie Leonard, who received their doctorate in American Studies and 19th C. American Literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Their dissertation, The Burdens and Blessings of Responsibility: Duty and Community in Nineteenth-Century America, is a study of the emergent idea of personal responsibility as it conflicted with more established ideas of duty in the writings of Herman Melville, and Harriet Jacobs. Drawing on a range of sources –works of literature, theology, domestic manuals, labor pamphlets – their research shows how many Americans began to conceive of moral responsibility as distinct from both duty and rules of behavior prescribed by traditional social roles. Today, we are discussing Leslie's discovery of an unpublished text by Frederick Douglass, an essay titled “Slavery,” which appeared in the fall 2021 issue of J19: The Journal of Nineteenth-Century Americanists. John Yargo recently received his PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in American Studies
A Newly Discovered Essay by Fredrick Douglas: "Slavery" (1894-1895)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 38:43


Today's guest is Leslie Leonard, who received their doctorate in American Studies and 19th C. American Literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Their dissertation, The Burdens and Blessings of Responsibility: Duty and Community in Nineteenth-Century America, is a study of the emergent idea of personal responsibility as it conflicted with more established ideas of duty in the writings of Herman Melville, and Harriet Jacobs. Drawing on a range of sources –works of literature, theology, domestic manuals, labor pamphlets – their research shows how many Americans began to conceive of moral responsibility as distinct from both duty and rules of behavior prescribed by traditional social roles. Today, we are discussing Leslie's discovery of an unpublished text by Frederick Douglass, an essay titled “Slavery,” which appeared in the fall 2021 issue of J19: The Journal of Nineteenth-Century Americanists. John Yargo recently received his PhD in English literature from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, specializing in the environmental humanities and early modern culture. His articles have been published or are forthcoming in the Journal for Early Modern Culture Studies, Studies in Philology, and Shakespeare Studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

Densely Speaking
S2E10 - Special Series on History and Urban Economics - Part II

Densely Speaking

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 69:04


Special Series on History and Urban Economics - Part II This episode is the second in a series based on a forthcoming special issue on Urban Economics and History, to be published in the journal Regional Science and Urban Economics. It contains a series of short conversations with multiple authors. Guests: Brian Beach is Assistant Professor of Economics at Vanderbilt University and Dan Bogart is Professor of Economics at the University of California Irvine. Robert Margo is Professor of Economics at Boston University. Alexander Whalley is Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Calgary Haskayne School of Business. Katherine Eriksson is Associate Professor of Economics at the University of California Davis and Allison Shertzer is Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Pittsburgh. Papers Discussed in Today's Episode: Water Infrastructure and Health in U.S. Cities by Brian Beach. Infrastructure and Institutions: Lessons from History by Dan Bogart. Industrialization and Urbanization in Nineteenth Century America by Jeremy Atack, Robert Margo, and Paul Rhode. 150 Years of the Geography of Innovation by Michael Andrews and Alexander Whalley. Immigrants and Cities during the Age of Mass Migration by Katherine Eriksson and Zachary Ward. Zoning and Segregation in Urban Economic History by Allison Shertzer, Tate Twinam, and Randy Walsh. Follow us on the web or on Twitter: @denselyspeaking, @jeffrlin, @greg_shill. Hosts: Jeff Lin and Greg Shill. Producer: Schuyler Pals. Our theme music is by Oleksandr Koltsov. Sounds from Ambience, London Street by InspectorJ. The views expressed on the show are those of the participants, and do not necessarily represent the views of the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, the Federal Reserve System, or any of the other institutions with which the hosts or guests are affiliated.

Before, Behind and Between
A Harmony of Worlds - The Episode Behind the Book

Before, Behind and Between

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 5:29


Seances, communing with the great beyond. This episode talks about the newest book by Mike O'Sullivan, A Harmony of Worlds: Spiritualism and the Quest for Community in Nineteenth-Century America. Spiritualism, as Mike describes in this major piece of research, was in the 1800s a very serious form of faith for many people - so many, in fact, that mainstream churches were forced to close as their congregations left and joined the Spiritualist movement. This movement also attracted quite a who's who of notable figures, as Mike writes, including political and business leaders. Listen to this episode of Before, Behind and Between to go behind the book, A Harmony of Worlds. For more information, you can also visit Henley Point or the official book website. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/steven-christianson/message

Humanities Now
Happy Anniversary to Women's and Gender Studies: Elissa Zellinger and Julie Willett in Conversation

Humanities Now

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 54:37


On our season finale, we wish a happy fortieth anniversary to Texas Tech's Women's and Gender Studies program by talking at length with two WGS-affiliated faculty members about their recent books.  Dr. Elissa Zellinger from the Department of English speaks with us her book Lyrical Strains and its attention to nineteenth-century American poetry and the figure of the "poetess."  Next, Dr. Julie Willett from the Department of History discusses her recent history of the male chauvinist pig--as a trope in American popular culture and as an influence on political discourse over the past few decades.For more on Elissa Zellinger's Lyrical Strains: Liberalism and Women's Poetry in Nineteenth-Century America, see https://uncpress.org/book/9781469659817/lyrical-strains/.For more on Julie Willett's The Male Chauvinist Pig: A History, see https://uncpress.org/book/9781469661070/the-male-chauvinist-pig/.

Breaking Down Patriarchy
Breaking Down Patriarchy and Polygamy - with Shannon Johnson

Breaking Down Patriarchy

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 36:36


This week Amy is joined by Shannon Johnson to help us zoom in even further to more fully unpack the practice of polygamous marriage in the LDS church and its impact on individual women. Not only do we learn some surprising and essential history, but Shannon trusts us with the story of her own journey coming-of-age within the church community and wrestling with polygamy on a personal level. Shannon Olena Hyatt Johnson (she/her) grew up mostly in Utah and went to BYU, where she met her husband, who was also an English major. She has taught conversational English in Japan and Cairo, and now works in admin at Stanford. She is currently writing a master's thesis on race, polygamy, and the Mormon family. Shannon has three daughters and a non-binary child, ranging in age from 11 to 21. Shannon likes hiking, yoga, British tv, and trashy romance novels. Recommended Reading & Listening Year of Polygamy (podcast) ~ Lindsay Hansen Park Sunstone Mormon History Podcast (podcast) ~ Lindsay Hansen Park and Bryan Buchanan Pioneers (poem read by author) ~ Carol Lynn Pearson Your Sister in the Gospel: The Life of Jane Manning James, a Nineteenth-Century Black Mormon (book) ~ Quincy D. Newell Sally in Three Worlds: An Indian Captive in the House of Brigham Young (book, also Audible) ~ Virginia Kerns More Wives than One (book) ~ Kathryn Danes “Heathen in Our Fair Land: Anti-Polygamy and Protestant Women's Missions to Utah, 1869–1910” (PhD Thesis) ~ Jana Riess The Mormon Question: Polygamy and Constitutional Conflict in Nineteenth-Century America (book) ~ Sarah Barringer Gordon “The family, morality and social science in Anglo-American cooperative thought, 1813-1890” (PhD Thesis) ~ Tara Westover (also, Educated) The Legacy of Adam-God in the Mormon Theology of Heteropatriarchy (blog post) ~ The Grand Scoobah Doing the Works of Abraham: Mormon Polygamy―Its Origin, Practice, and Demise (book) ~ B. Carmon Hardy Religion of a Different Color: Race and the Mormon Struggle for Whiteness (book) ~ W. Paul Reeve Race and the Making of the Mormon People (book) ~ Max Perry Mueller

Our Missouri
Episode 64: Imagining the Mississippi River – Thomas Ruys Smith (Water & Waterways, Part 4)

Our Missouri

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 44:26


This episode features Thomas Ruys Smith, Professor of American Literature and Culture at the University of East Anglia, discussing the cultural life of the Mississippi River and one of its most notable residents, Mark Twain. About the Guest: Thomas Ruys Smith is Professor of American Literature and Culture at the University of East Anglia. He is the author of several books, including “River of Dreams: Imagining the Mississippi Before Mark Twain,” “Southern Queen: New Orleans in the Nineteenth Century,” and “Deep Water: The Mississippi River in the Age of Mark Twain.” He is also the editor of several anthologies, including “Blacklegs, Card Sharps and Confidence Men: Nineteenth-Century Mississippi River Gambling Stories” and “Christmas Past: An Anthology of Seasonal Stories from Nineteenth-Century America.”

The Gilded Age and Progressive Era

European imperialism had an influence on American policy makers, changing the way they thought about overseas colonization and building a new world order. Prof. Andrew Priest joins the show to discuss his latest book Designs on Empire: America's Rise to Power in the Age of European Imperialism. Essential Reading:Andrew Priest, Designs on Empire: America's Rise to Power in the Age of European Imperialism (2021).Recommended Reading:Mary Ann Heiss, “The Evolution of the Imperial Idea and U.S. National Identity,” Diplomatic History 26 (October 2002): 511-540.A.G. Hopkins, American Empire: A Global History (2018)Michael H. Hunt, Ideology and U.S. Foreign Policy (2nd ed. 2009).Walter LaFeber, The New Empire: An Interpretation of American Expansion, 1860–1898 (Thirty-Fifth Anniversary edition, 1998)Frank Ninkovich, Global Dawn: The Cultural Foundation of American Internationalism, 1865-1890 (2009).Jay Sexton, The Monroe Doctrine: Empire and Nation in Nineteenth-Century America (2012). See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Weird Christmas Podcast
Christmas Past, American Xmas Literary History with Thomas Ruys Smith

Weird Christmas Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 54:40


I chat with Thomas Ruys Smith, editor of Christmas Past: An Anthology of Seasonal Stories from Nineteenth Century America and Professor of American Literature and Culture at the University of East Anglia. Links from the show: Christmas Past: An Anthology of Seasonal Stories from Nineteenth Century America [publisher] [Amazon] Thomas Ruys Smith's author website Bumper music: Usual opening: “O Holy Night” by Tiny Tim, “Christmas Doesn't Last” by Make Like Monkeys, “Santa Claus Boogie” by Hasil Adkins, “Space Age Santa” by Ross Christman Featured opening/bumper: "Christmas Past" by Holodelic Bumper/closing: "American Christmas" by Chris Dudley If you're feeling generous, check out my Patreon page here where you can get all kinds of bonuses throughout the year. You can also buy me a “coffee” ($3 gifts) at Ko-Fi.com. Or PLEASE LEAVE A WEIRD REVIEW ON APPLE PODCASTS OR YOUR FAVORITE PODCAST APP! Send me a note that you did (weirdxmas@gmail.com), and I'll send you a sticker!

Quoi de Meuf
#160 - Les copines d'abord

Quoi de Meuf

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 53:19


Tout d'abord, une bonne année 2022 à tous.tes ! On vous souhaite le meilleur ! Pour commencer l'année en beauté, Quoi de Meuf se penche sur l'amitié féminine, sujet passionnant et inépuisable, tant il y a à dire… En proie aux représentations stéréotypées, elle fait l'objet tantôt d'appropriations, de fantasmes, avec un regard bien trop souvent hétéronormé et sexiste. Pourtant, elle est précieuse, complexe et d'une richesse incommensurable.Alors, Clémentine Gallot et Anne-Laure Pineau s'y attardent dans ce nouvel épisode long de Quoi de Meuf, et comptent bien dénoncer les préjugés, et rétablir les considérations qu'elle mérite. Les références entendues dans l'épisode : Amies, Ouvrage collectif, Nouvelles Questions Féministes Vol. 30 N2 (2011) Une histoire de l'amitié, Anne Vincent-Buffault, Bayard (2010)De l'amitié, Madame De Lambert, Rivages (2018)Love & Friendship de Whit Stillman (2016)What no one ever told you about people who are single, Bella DePaulo, Tedx Talk (2017)The Female World of Love and Ritual : Relations between Women in Nineteenth-Century America, Carroll Smith-Rosenberg (1975) The Bonds of Womanhood, Nancy F. Cott, Yall University Press (2020)There's a Divide in Even the Closest Interracial Friendships, Aminatou Sow et Ann Friedman, The Cut (2020)L'amitié entre hommes et femmes, la nouvelle frontière de la comédie romantique, Michael Atlan, Slate (2017)Surpassing the Love of Men, Lilian Faderman , The Women's Press Ltd (1981)Compulsory Heterosexuality and Lesbian Existence, Adrienne Rich (1981)Se dire lesbienne, Natacha Chetcuti, Payot (2021)The L World de Ilen Chaiken (2004)Sortir de l'hétérosexualité de Juliet Drouar, Collection sur la table (2021)Réinventer l'amour de Mona Chollet, La découverte (2021)Why Female Friendship Has Been The Greatest Love Of My Life, Emma Firth, Elle (2021)Mettre l'amitié au premier plan, Sasha Roseneil, Nouvelles Questions Féministes (2011)Les orageuses, Marcia Burnier, Cambourakis (2021)Violé.es une histoire de domination, Clémence Allezard, LSD La série documentaire, France Culture (2021)Big Friendship, Aminatou Sow et Ann Friedman, Virago (2020)The Friendship Season, Invisibilia (2021)A l'écart de la meute, Thomas Messias, Marabout (2021)Le deuxième sexe, Simonde De Beauvoir, Gallimard (1986)Bad feminist, Roxane gay, Denoël (2018)Nous devrions tous être féministes, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, TEDxEuston A brief history of squads, Arit John, The New York Times (2019)Les strates, Pénélope Bagieu, Gallimard (2019)Une chambre à soi, Virginia Woolf, Bibliothèque 10/18Divines de Houda Benyamina (2016)Tout ce qui brille de Géraldine Nakache (2009)Bande de filles de Céline Sciamma (2014)Thelma et Louise de Ridley Scott (1991)Baise-moi, Virginie Despentes, J'ai lu (2000)Insecure de Larry Wilmore et Issa Rae (2016)Adolescentes de Sébastien Lifshitz (2019)Les petites reines, Clémentine Beauvais, Sarbacane (2015) Desperate Housewives de Marc Cherry (2004)Frances Ha de Noah Baumbach (2012) L'amie prodigieuse, Elena Ferrante, Gallimard (2016)Les flingueuses de Paul Feig (2013)American predator, Maureen Callahan, Sonatine Eds (2021)Les suicidés du bout du monde, Leila Guerriero, Rivages (2021) Fungirl, Elizabeth Pich, Les requins marteaux (2021)Quoi de Meuf est une émission de Nouvelles Écoutes. Rédaction en chef : Clémentine Gallot. Journaliste chroniqueuse : Anne-Laure Pineau. Mixage et montage : Laurie Galligani. Prise de son par Thibault Delage à l'Arrière Boutique. Générique réalisé par Aurore Meyer Mahieu. Réalisation et coordination : Cassandra de Carvalho et Mathilde Jonin.Le podcast Quoi de Meuf devient un livre : 100 oeuvres cultes à connaitre quand on est féministe ! Est-il possible de chérir des œuvres imparfaites ? Comment représenter les violences sexuelles ? Faut-il séparer l'homme de l'artiste ? Que faire des œuvres problématiques ? Quelles sont les films, séries, livres, albums indispensables à son éducation féministe ? Clémentine Gallot, Kaoutar Harchi, Anne-Laure Pineau, Pauline Verduzier et Emeline Amétis apportent leurs réponses (subjectives !) à ces questions en vous présentant une sélection d'œuvres qui les ont nourries et marquées dans la construction de leur féminisme ! Le livre est disponible en librairie depuis le 24 novembre, et il est possible de le commander ici : https://tidd.ly/3E2admVSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Conversations at the Washington Library
217. Exploring Star Territory with Dr. Gordon Fraser

Conversations at the Washington Library

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 50:38


In the 18th and 19th centuries, North Americans looked up at the sky in wonder at the cosmos and what lay beyond earth's atmosphere. But astronomers like Benjamin Banneker, Georgia surveyors, Cherokee storytellers, and government officials also saw in the stars ways to master space on earth by controlling the heavens above. And print technology became a key way for Americans of all stripes to find ways to understand their own place in the universe and their relationship to each other. On today's show, Dr. Gordon Fraser joins Jim Ambuske to discuss his new book, Star Territory: Printing the Universe in Nineteenth-Century America, published by the University of Pennsylvania Press in 2021. Fraser is a Lecturer and Presidential Fellow in American Studies, University of Manchester in England, and Fraser and Ambuske were joined today by Dr. Alexandra Montgomery as guest co-host, who is heading up the Washington Library's ARGO initiative. And yes, they talk about aliens. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mountvernon/message

The Gilded Age and Progressive Era

How did Americans celebrate Christmas in the Gilded Age and Progressive Era? This episode has a festive feel as I ask Thomas Ruys Smith about his new book Christmas Past: An Anthology of Seasonal Stories from Nineteenth Century America. We'll talk about household names such as Charles Dickens, Louisa May Alcott, and Harriet Beecher Stowe, as well as stories you may have never heard from slaves, immigrants, Native Americans, and non-Christians. Essential Reading:Thomas Ruys Smith, Christmas Past: An Anthology of Seasonal Stories from Nineteenth Century America (2021).Recommended Reading:Penn Restad, Christmas in America: A History (1995).Stephen Nissenbaum, The Battle for Christmas: A Social and Cultural History of Our Most Cherished Holiday (1997).Karal Ann Marling, Merry Christmas! Celebrating America's Greatest Holiday (2000).Tara Moore, Victorian Christmas in Print (2009).Robert May, Yuletide in Dixie: Slavery, Christmas, and Southern Memory (2019). See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Old Blood
The Dreadful Place

Old Blood

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 52:00


The Bastendorffs' home was considered one of the few respectable boarding homes in Victorian London...until the discovery of a corpse unleashed a sex scandal and murder mystery that has still gone unsolved. Who would want to murder the quirky, old Matilda Hacker? And how had no one discovered her corpse for so long?Sources:Gamber, Wendy. “Boarding and Lodging Houses.” Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia, 2017. https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/archive/boarding-and-lodging-houses/Gamber, Wendy. The Boardinghouse in Nineteenth-Century America. (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2007).Graham, Ruth. “Boardinghouses: Where the city  was born.” Boston Globe, January 13, 2013. https://www.bostonglobe.com/ideas/2013/01/13/boardinghouses-where-city-was-born/Hpstvjt0kj52ZMpjUOM5RJ/story.htmlGriffiths, Arthur. Victorian Murders: Mysteries of Police & Crime. (Charleston: The History Press, 2010).“HANNAH DOBBS.” The Proceedings of the Old Bailey: London's Central Criminal Court, 1674 to 1913. Old Bailey Online, June 30, 1879.Hester, Jessica. “A Brief History of Co-Living Spaces.” Bloomburg CityLab, February 22, 2016. https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-02-22/a-brief-history-of-co-living-spaces-from-19th-century-boarding-houses-to-millennial-compoundsKohn, Kari. “Boardinghouses of Yesterday and What they Mean for Today.” NYU Marron Institute of Urban Management, December 30, 2013. https://marroninstitute.nyu.edu/blog/boardinghouses-of-yesterday-and-what-they-mean-for-todayMcKay, Sinclair. The Lady in the Cellar: Murder, Scandal and Insanity in Victorian Bloomsbury. (London: White Lion Publishing, 2018).The Merthyr Telegraph. May 30, 1879.Monmouthshire Merlin. December 12, 1879.O'Neill, Joseph. The Secret World of the Victorian Lodging House. (Pen & Sword Books Ltd., 2014).“SIWERIN BASTENDORF.” The Proceedings of the Old Bailey: London's Central Criminal Court, 1674 to 1913. Old Bailey Online, November 24, 1879.South Wales Daily News, May 22, 1879.South Wales Daily News, November 10, 1879.The Western Mail. May 19, 1879.Music: Dellasera by Shane Ivers - https://www.silvermansound.comFor more information, visit www.oldbloodpodcast.com

Unsung History
Phrenology & Crime in 19th Century America

Unsung History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 43:07


In Nineteenth Century America there was a strong reformist push to know and improve the self. One key tactic Americans used to learn more about themselves was phrenological readings. They would pay practical phrenologists, like Orson Squire Fowler and his younger brother, Lorenzo Niles Fowler for readings of their skulls or their children's skulls.  In Lorenzo Fowler's reading of Emily Sawyer, he concluded a thirteen-page analysis by saying: “Cultivate as much as you can the organs marked smallest in your Chart + properly guide and exercise the stronger ones + thus produce a harmony of mental and physical action.” By using the phrenological readings of themselves or their children, Nineteenth Century Americans could apply the advice to become the best version of themselves. Practical phrenologists weren't interested only in reform of the self, but in larger societal reform as well. For practical phrenologists, prisons were the site of both research and reform; they argued for the elimination of capital punishment and the reform of prisons to include re-education instead of punishment.  Despite the reform impulse of phrenologists, phrenology was also used as a scientific reason to justify racism and gender stereotyping. American phrenologists were sympathetic to liberal causes including the antislavery movement, even while claiming the superiority of the European brain. By the early 20th century phrenology had been largely discredited in the public, but some of the concepts of phrenology, including propensities and physical localization in the brain of different characteristics have persisted. In this episode, Kelly briefly tells the story of phrenology in 19th Century America and interviews Courtney Thompson, Assistant Professor of History at Mississippi State University, and author of the February 2021 book, An Organ of Murder: Crime, Violence, and Phrenology in Nineteenth-Century America. Our theme song is Frogs Legs Rag, composed by James Scott and performed by Kevin MacLeod, licensed under Creative Commons. Episode image: “A head marked with images representing the phrenological faculties, with a key below. Coloured wood engraving, ca. 1845, after H. Bushea and O.S. Fowler.” Wellcome Collection. Public Domain.Transcript available at: https://www.unsunghistorypodcast.com/transcripts/transcript-episode-13. Sources: An Organ of Murder: Crime, Violence, and Phrenology in Nineteenth-Century America by Courtney E. Thompson "Facing a Bumpy History: The much-maligned theory of phrenology gets a tip of the hat from modern neuroscience," by Minna Scherlinder Morse, Smithsonian Magazine, October 1997. "Mesmerism and Phrenology in Antebellum Charleston: 'Enough of the Marvellous'" by Peter McCandless. The Journal of Southern History, 58(2), 199-230. doi:10.2307/2210860. The History of Phrenology on the Web by John van Wyhe Encyclopedia of medical history by Roderick E. McGrew and Margaret P. McGrew, 1985. Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/UnsungHistory) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Academic Life
The Social Constructions of Race: A Discussion with Brigitte Fielder

The Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 62:12


Welcome to The Academic Life. You are smart and capable, but you aren't an island, and neither are we. So we reached across our mentor network to bring you podcasts on everything from how to finish that project, to how to take care of your beautiful mind. Wish we'd bring in an expert about something? Email us at cgessler05(at)gmail.com or dr.danamalone(at)gmail.com or find us on Twitter: The Academic Life @AcademicLifeNBN. In this episode you'll hear about: the importance of expanding the boundaries of academic theory through interdisciplinary studies, why you need to build and acknowledge your own support network, the social construction of race and racism, and a discussion of the book Relative Races. Our guest is: Dr. Brigitte Fielder, an Associate Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is (with Jonathan Senchyne) co-editor of Against a Sharp White Background: Infrastructures of African-American Print and author of Relative Races: Genealogies of Interracial Kinship in Nineteenth-Century America. Her work has been published in various journals and edited collections. She is currently writing a book on racialized human-animal relationships in the long nineteenth century, which shows how childhood becomes a key site for (often simultaneous) humanization and racialization. Our host is: Dr. Christina Gessler, a historian of women and gender. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/academic-life

Arte INclusivo/INclusive Art
Episode 10: Edmonia Lewis

Arte INclusivo/INclusive Art

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2021 19:06


Let me tell you about the first African American and Native American female sculptor of the 19th and 20th centuries, the unstoppable Edmonia Wildfire Lewis! Bibliography American Civil War Music, Fives and Drums, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i8epv1Y25XA Anne Quincy Waterston, The Young Colored Woman Who has Successfully Modelled the Bust of Col. Shaw, Scholarly Editing, Originally published December 31st, 1864, https://scholarlyediting.org/2013/editions/aa.18641231.4.html Henderson & Henderson, The Indomitable Spirit of Edmonia Lewis, A Narrative Biography, Esquiline Hill Press, 2013 Nelson, Charmaine A. (2007). The Color of Stone: Sculpting the Black Female Subject in Nineteenth-Century America. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. Reno, Bobbie, Edmonia Lewis, An Artist of Determination and Courage, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-PEiDsaodOQ&t=11s Smithsonian American Art Museum, Edmonia Lewis, https://americanart.si.edu/artist/edmonia-lewis-2914 INclusive Art/Arte INclusivo Podcast Social Media: INstagram: https://www.instagram.com/arteinclusivopodcast/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/arteinclusivopodcast Twitter: @inclusivo_arte Email: arteinclusivopodcast@gmail.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Arte INclusivo/INclusive Art
Episodio 9: Edmonia “Wildfire” Lewis

Arte INclusivo/INclusive Art

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2021 20:50


Su nombre nativo americano era Wildfire, fuego incontrolado. Hija de un hombre afroamericano y una mujer nativa americana, Edmonia Lewis fue una guerrera incansable, escultora que inmortalizó personajes poco comunes en sus obras. Pásale a escuchar un poquito de su vida... Bibliografía: Anne Quincy Waterston, The Young Colored Woman Who has Successfully Modelled the Bust of Col. Shaw, Scholarly Editing, Originally published December 31st, 1864, https://scholarlyediting.org/2013/editions/aa.18641231.4.html Henderson & Henderson, The Indomitable Spirit of Edmonia Lewis, A Narrative Biography, Esquiline Hill Press, 2013 Nelson, Charmaine A. (2007). The Color of Stone: Sculpting the Black Female Subject in Nineteenth-Century America. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. Reno, Bobbie, Edmonia Lewis, An Artist of Determination and Courage, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-PEiDsaodOQ&t=11s Smithsonian American Art Museum, Edmonia Lewis, https://americanart.si.edu/artist/edmonia-lewis-2914 Arte INclusivo/INclusive Art Podcast Social Media: INstagram: https://www.instagram.com/arteinclusivopodcast/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/arteinclusivopodcast Twitter: @inclusivo_arte Email: arteinclusivopodcast@gmail.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

New Books in the History of Science
Courtney E. Thompson, "An Organ of Murder: Crime, Violence, and Phrenology in Nineteenth-Century America" (Rutgers UP, 2021)

New Books in the History of Science

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 19, 2021 51:49


An Organ of Murder: Crime, Violence, and Phrenology in Nineteenth-Century America (Rutgers UP, 2021) explores the origins of both popular and elite theories of criminality in the nineteenth-century United States, focusing in particular on the influence of phrenology. In the United States, phrenology shaped the production of medico-legal knowledge around crime, the treatment of the criminal within prisons and in public discourse, and sociocultural expectations about the causes of crime. The criminal was phrenology's ideal research and demonstration subject, and the courtroom and the prison were essential spaces for the staging of scientific expertise. In particular, phrenology constructed ways of looking as well as a language for identifying, understanding, and analyzing criminals and their actions. This work traces the long-lasting influence of phrenological visual culture and language in American culture, law, and medicine, as well as the practical uses of phrenology in courts, prisons, and daily life. Claire Clark is a medical educator, historian of medicine, and associate professor in the University of Kentucky's College of Medicine. She teaches and writes about health behavior in historical context. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Age of Jackson Podcast
123 Broken Hearts, Lost Souls, and Sexual Tumult in Nineteenth-Century America with Christine Leigh Heyrman

The Age of Jackson Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2021 53:01


From the winner of the Bancroft Prize and the Francis Parkman Prize in History, a lost episode rediscovered after almost two hundred years; a thwarted love triangle of heartbreak–two men and a woman of equal ambition–that exploded in scandal and investigation, set between America's Revolution and its Civil War, revealing an age in subtle and powerful transformation, caught between the fight for women's rights and the campaign waged by evangelical Protestants to dominate the nation's culture and politics.At its center–and the center of a love triangle–Martha Parker, a gifted young New England woman, smart, pretty, ambitious, determined to make the most of her opportunities, aspiring to become an educator and a foreign missionary.Late in 1825, Martha accepted a proposal from a schoolmaster, Thomas Tenney, only to reject him several weeks later for a rival suitor, a clergyman headed for the mission field, Elnathan Gridley. Tenney's male friends, deeply resentful of the new prominence of women in academies, benevolent and reform associations, and the mission field, decided to retaliate on Tenney's behalf by sending an anonymous letter to the head of the foreign missions board impugning Martha's character. Tenney further threatened Martha with revealing even more about their relationship, thereby ruining her future prospects as a missionary. The head of the board began an inquiry into the truth of the claims about Martha, and in so doing, collected letters, diaries, depositions, and firsthand witness accounts of Martha's character. The ruin of Martha Parker's hopes provoked a resistance within evangelical ranks over womanhood, manhood, and, surprisingly, homosexuality, ultimately threatening to destroy the foreign missions enterprise.-CHRISTINE LEIGH HEYRMAN is the Robert W. and Shirley P. Grimble Professor of American History at the University of Delaware.

Of Prurient Interest
Episode 3: Sex, Race, and Independence in Kate Chopin's "The Awakening"

Of Prurient Interest

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2021 82:18


In this episode of Of Prurient Interest, my dad and I explore themes of sexuality, female autonomy, race, and privilege in Kate Chopin's 1899 novel, The Awakening. You do not need to have read the book to enjoy the podcast, but there will be spoilers! I mean, it's been over a century since its publication sooooo.... Next episode will be on Anais Nin's A Spy in the House of Love. Bookstores Mentioned: Beach Town Books, San Clemente, California, USA Further Recommended Reading: Quicksand by Nella Larsen Nightwood by Djuna Barnes Sula by Toni Morrison Our Nig by Harriet Wilson Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave by Frederick Douglass I mentioned my old blog in which I covered The Awakening and made a meal thematically attuned to it. Those posts are here and here. What We're Reading Now: Noli Me Tángere by José Rizal When No One Is Watching by Alyssa Cole Braiding Sweetgrass by Robin Wall Kimmerer Resources Used: "Women in Nineteenth-Century America" by Dr. Graham Warder "The Classic Novel that Saw Pleasure as a Path to Freedom" by Claire Vaye Watkins "15 Facts about Kate Chopin's The Awakening" by Kristy Puchko Living a Feminist Life by Sara Ahmed Secrets and Lies: Race and Sex in The Awakening by James O'Rourke Edna the Oblivious Oppressor: An Intersectional Analysis of Privilege and Its Lack Thereof in The Awakening by Jessica L. Rosenthal "Unspeakable Things Unspoken: The Afro-American Presence in American Literature" by Toni Morrison J. Davis: The Whole Book Experience Leaves of Cha Donation-based Meditation Instagram: @leavesofcha Of Prurient Interest social media: Insta: @ofprurientinterest Twitter: @highlyprurient FB: /ofprurientinterest Litsy: @prurientinterest Email: ofprurientinterest@gmail.com Patreon: /ofprurientinterest Website: ofprurientinterest.com Kaelyn's Instagram: @lalatiburona Score by Rose Droll: @myhandsarepaws Logo by @irizofen If you like this podcast, consider becoming a patron either here on Anchor or on Patreon. You can also make a one-time donation through the website. Lastly, subscribe, rate, and review! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/ofprurientinterest/support

Body Politics: where history, medicine and society collide
Yellow Fever in the Deep South: Slavery and Infectious Disease in Nineteenth-Century America

Body Politics: where history, medicine and society collide

Play Episode Play 44 sec Highlight Listen Later Jan 13, 2021 39:34


The third decade of the twenty-first century has started with the 'worst years ever', right? For billions of people around the planet, our 'new normals' are unpleasant, uncomfortable and dangerous, made so by the pervasive effects of COVID-19. However, history tells us that our assumptions about what was normal - an absence of infectious disease - were aberrations; for thousands of years our ancestors regularly had their lives and social orders upended by an array of infections. In this first series of Body Politics, we examine this history, particularly by way of the politics that have emerged in parallel with and because of infectious diseases over the past two centuries or so. Episode 1 takes us to the United States and its experience of a deadly tropical disease, carried by mosquitos, called yellow fever. Although closer to our own times, this was a disease associated with America symbolising the spread of democracy around the world, not much further back in time, yellow fever was intertwined with the upholding of a brutal and pervasive slave economy, especially in the American Deep South. In conversation with Stanford University's Dr Kathryn Olivarius, this episode traces the twin histories of slavery and yellow fever through the city of New Orleans, also known as the city where blues music was born, which in and of itself was originally an expression of the anguish that slavery caused amongst African Americans. 

The American Vandal, from The Center for Mark Twain Studies
DEEP CUTS BOOK CLUB #1: Mark Twain's "Letter From Santa Claus" with Mark Dawidziak, Penne Restad, & Jana Tigchelaar

The American Vandal, from The Center for Mark Twain Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2020 63:35


This episode focuses on a letter Mark Twain composed for his three-year-old daughter on Christmas 1875. After actor Mark Dawidziak reads the letter, Matt Seybold hosts a book club style discussion with Penne Restad and Jana Tigchelaar, two scholars who have done extensive research on the development of Christmas traditions in Nineteenth-Century America. SPOILER WARNING: The discussion (begins around 11:00) includes frank discussions of Santa and therefore may not be appropriate for young children.

The Reclaim Podcast
Episode 5: Tim Tseng on Asian American Christian Leaders in History

The Reclaim Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2020 33:30


Raymond Chang welcomes Tim Tseng to talk about how churches and Christian organizations can better equip the next generation of Asian Americans to live out the gospel, particularly in our pursuit of justice. They also share about historical leaders in Asian American Christianity and what we can learn from their lives. As Pacific Area Director for InterVarsity Christian Fellowship's Graduate and Faculty Ministries (GFM), Tim Tseng is devoting the most important years of his life to raising up leaders who can make a positive impact for the Christian gospel; leaders who can be a leaven for the Kingdom of God (Luke 13:20-21). Called to ministry at Urbana 1981 and ordained by the American Baptist Churches USA, he pastored Asian immigrant churches and volunteered for my denomination. After earning his Ph.D. in the history of Christianity, he's taught at several seminaries, lectured, led workshops, and published about the history of Christianity, evangelicalism, Chinese and Asian American Christianity, and race. Because Asian American Christians have such a special place in his heart, he's also dedicated his life to supporting ministry leaders who serve Asian Americans. Resources from the conversation: Kingdom of God in America by H.R. Niebuhr   Facing West: American Evangelicals in an Age of World Christianity by David R. Swartz Asian American Christian Legacy Facebook Page In Search of Equality: The Chinese Struggle Against Discrimination in Nineteenth-Century America by Charles J. McClain  Chinatown's Suffragist, Pastor, and Community Organizer by Tim Tseng  Race, Religion, and Civil Rights: Asian Students on the West Coast Stephanie Hinnershitz The End of Empathy: Why White Protestants Stopped Loving Their Neighbors by John W. Compton Additional resources on Chinese and Asian American Christianity Stay connected with the AACC Instagram/Facebook/Twitter: @aachristcollab https://asianamericanchristiancollaborative.com Support our GoFundMe campaign https://www.gofundme.com/f/support-the-aacc Credits Host: Raymond Chang Sound Engineers: Ashley Hong, Sean Kim Coordinator: Grace Liu