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Latest podcast episodes about ann arbor

Radio Free Flint with Arthur Busch
Poet Laurate Samaj Brown How Poetry Helps Heal Victims of the Flint Water Crisis

Radio Free Flint with Arthur Busch

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 25:27


Semaj Brown gives a spellbinding reading of her environmental injustice poems.  Brown also tells stories of working with the child victims of the Flint Water Crisis. Brown is on a mission to help heal the victims of trauma in Flint, Michigan.  Samaj Brown is an amazingly accomplished woman who is a poet, author, playwright, and educator, she was named the first poet laureate of Flint, Michigan, in 2019. In 2021, she received an Academy of American Poets Laureate Fellowship. During her time as Flint's first poet laurate she has been teaching children to write poetry at Flint's Freeman School, helping adults who privately write poetry as a form of healing and spread the good word about the value of the literary arts across the Flint area. In this episode she reads two of her amazing poems.  Her poems focus on Flint and social justice issues.  They address issues of loss and empowerment.   This podcast episode is dedicated to the memory of one of my best friends, Joseph M. Snow of Lansing, Michigan.  Joe passed away November 10, 2022 after a long illness.  Joe was a lawyer, former foundry worker, activist, and long time member of the Lansing areas Peace and Justice Coalition.  He was an advocate for the working class and social justice issues.  He was very fond of Samaj Brown's poetry. Special thanks to Mustards Retreat of Ann Arbor for providing the music for this podcast. Also special thanks to Libby Glover, Dave Tamolovich, David O. Norris and Dan Hall for their advice and encouragement of Radio Free Flint. To read more poetry or find books by Samaj Brown please visist Https://www.samajbrown.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/radiofreeflint/message

Michigan Football – In the Trenches with Jon Jansen
Defend the Block 114 - Erin Batth

Michigan Football – In the Trenches with Jon Jansen

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 22:01


Meet new women's basketball assistant coach Erin Batth on this week's episode! Coach Batth shares why she made the move from NC State to Michigan (2:30), describes her coaching and recruiting philosophies (6:30), and provides her early impressions of the program she is joining here in Ann Arbor (15:00).See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast
Disruption In Container Logistics With John Murnane

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 51:57


The North American inbound supply chain was well-run and extremely cheap before the pandemic brought disruption to the logistics and transportation space. Since the pandemic, the shipping industry had to adapt and is still adapting to this uncertainty. Prices are going up, congestion is at an all-time high, and these we won't recover from these challenges overnight. Join Joe Lynch as he talks to John Murnane about the disruption in container logistics. John is a senior partner at McKinsey & Company. At McKinsey, he is the leader of the logistics sector. So he covers everything from air & ocean carriers to warehousing & fulfillment. Listen and learn more about the shipping industry, shipper & carrier relationships, sustainability, end-to-end shipping, and much more. Find out about the disruption in container logistics and how it can be solved. Disruption In Container Logistics With John Murnane Thank you so much for joining us. Our topic is disruption and container logistics with my friend, John Murnane. How is it going, John.  I am doing great. Thanks for having me. How are you? Excellent. I am glad we are talking about this topic. Please introduce yourself, your company, and where you are? I am a Senior Partner at McKinsey. I am based in Atlanta. I lead McKinsey's Logistics Sector globally with a colleague named Martin Joerss, who is based in Hamburg. Tell us what you guys do over in that McKinsey's Logistics Practice. We call it a sector, but we serve the logistics industry. For us, that is all the different, interesting, fascinating parts of logistics throughout the global supply chain, ocean and air carriers, forwarders, folks doing container leasing, and Marine services. We do a lot of work in ground handling and transport, terminal operators, and rail trucks, both asset-based and brokerage. We also do a lot of work in the warehouse and fulfillment. I serve companies that operate fulfillment, real estate, and industrial developer. We also do Last Mile post and parcel returns, plus all the folks that are in and around that space doing data, transparency, tech, robotics, and all the fascinating, fun companies that are trying to knit it all together. Do you work more with shippers or the actual logistics providers? We work with both. In the group I lead, the logistics sector, we serve companies that make a living in moving stuff around. I have got a number of colleagues in a practice that is adjacent to ours that are in manufacturing and supply chain. Those consultants and partners serve the big retailers and manufacturers who pay to have the goods moved. I do not know what you guys did at McKinsey but it was not so long ago that there was no logistics practice. It was logistics and supply chain or supply chain and logistics or manufacturing supply chain and logistics. It was always the tail end of something else. We have arrived because we have a McKinsey partner who is responsible for watching over us. We have got 100 McKenzie partners that I do not know if we are responsible for it. [caption id="attachment_7990" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Container Logistics Disruption: The pandemic hit the shipping industry in many ways. People started buying a lot more, which meant more containers being moved while the staff was low. There was just a lot of congestion.[/caption]   The business needs some babysitters. Tell us a little bit about you. Where did you grow up? Where did you go to school? Give us some career highlights before you joined McKinsey. I grew up in California, pretty close to the ports of LA and Long Beach, but did not get into logistics. At a young age, I was a Mechanical Engineer at Duke. I worked in entertainment for many years at Disney and the NBA in finance and design roles, which was a lot of fun. It is not as entertaining as logistics. When I got into logistics, it was at McKinsey. I went to Business School at Michigan and then I joined McKinsey. You joke about logistics being the end. I got recruited into the travel and logistics practice because I knew a thing or two about travel. I started serving logistics companies back in the day. This is 2003 or 2004. It was not sexy. Logistics was not quite as hot as it is now, but I found the work fascinating. I liked the people. I got into rail, parcel, and trucking, and then I moved to South America to lead our logistics practice. I was in Chile for three years and then I got into the ocean space and Marine terminals. I have been hooked ever since. It has become more fascinating given all the things that we have seen in the last years, from the eCommerce boom to automation to the push for sustainability and what happened with the pandemic. It is fantastic that you have got that South America experience because I feel like we have had so much stuff in China for so long. I have nothing against China, but it makes more sense to ship stuff from Mexico or South America in general. We do not do nearly that much business with our South American partners who we fully understand compared to China. There are lots of bags coming in and out in a lot of air freight. I was in Chile, which does a lot of flowers and salmon, and exports a ton of copper and minerals. Let's talk about our topic, which is the disruption in container logistics. Why don't you take us back to before there was this disruption? Talk about what was going on in the space back in the day? You hear a lot about underinvestment in infrastructure and “failing” logistics infrastructure in the US. Many years ago, things were working well. If you were a manufacturer or a consumer, you probably had the lowest cost supply chain in the world that was able to get you products from anywhere in the world any time. The cost was quite low and the supply chain runs very well. It is smooth. As such, it was something that a lot of people took for granted. It seemed very opaque compared to now. Many years ago, if you were moving freight, your stuff disappeared into the ocean for three weeks or a month. There is also opaque because no one has looked into it. We have all learned how important it is. I used to serve clients and I did a lot of marketing and sales work, helping people with sales and pricing. I serve clients in logistics. I remember hearing sales executives complain to me. I can't make these value-based arguments. I can't talk about our value prop because I can't get access to anyone that matters. Ten years ago, people had a well-ran, extremely cheap North American inbound supply chain. And they took it for granted. I am talking to a procurement leader four levels down and they do not care about our value. It was opaque because, to some extent, there was not engagement on this topic at the highest levels, and certainly, there is now. Many years ago, you had a well-run, extremely cheap North American inbound supply chain. The infrastructure did not get bad overnight. The pandemic hit us in three ways. One is we all started buying a lot more stuff. We did not spend any less. We stopped spending on travel and restaurants. No new car, no vacation, but I can buy crap online. I can upgrade my house. I did some of that myself. I am in the house more and I invest in doing some things around the house. I got an indoor bike to stay in shape, but we spent 20% more money on stuff. I always call it not your grandparents or great-grandparents pandemic. In the 1920 pandemic, 50 million people died worldwide and there was poverty. We joke that the COVID-19 or 20 that we gained from sitting around eating and buying stuff. That is not to discount all of the misery that it brought, but most of the misery was isolation for us. When you have a situation where there is more volume being purchased, that means more containers and more trucks move. At the same time, global capacity fell by about 14% or 15% over a similar timeframe. If you have been paying attention, that probably feels intuitive. We had people that were sick so we could not stack. We had operations that were shut down at times. We had congestion because people were stacking and storing containers because they could not get them to the next place and they were waiting and also every stage in the value chain. We all saw the earnings releases that talked about, “I am 65% short of the team. I need to operate these warehouses.” They are open, but they are not running anywhere near full capacity. If it is 20% up in demand and 15% down in supply, you have got a congestion problem. On top of it, those increases weren't smooth. If those increases were smooth, our logistics industry might have had a chance, but it was overnight, then it stopped and started again. That made for some challenging times, and you ended up getting what you got, which is pretty poor service, long lines, congestion, delays, and uncertainty where things were. You also have price increases because the companies that were moving the goods were trying to manage to make sure that they were at least taking good care of the clients that were willing to pay the most. It became challenging for our shippers. I do not think it hit the biggest shippers, the Home Depots or the Lowe's. Those guys had contracted rates. They call them the bat phone when they call the shipping companies. They did not all of a sudden get double or triple the cost of a container. They were okay. It was a lot of the other smaller players. You mentioned this spike 20% up in demand, 15% less in capacity, but if you were 20% or 30% off in your headcount in your consulting practice, you could address that internally because you are all a team. This was across a whole bunch of supply chains that are spread out across the world. Communication was always difficult given time zones, languages, and the lack of computer systems. The coordination and fixes were all slow. I was talking to my daughter and she is in Portland. She was excited. She called and said, “The couch that I ordered in October 2021 is going to be here. I forgot what it looks like.” We are all getting used to waiting a little longer than we used to, but it is nice when they arrive.   We still seem to have these shocks every once in a while. Shanghai had more COVID. In the US, we are seeing shortages of headcount in a lot of places, especially in warehousing, dock workers, and trucking. There is a lack of capacity when it comes down to it. [caption id="attachment_7991" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Container Logistics Disruption: The two things to watch to know when congestion and prices will moderate are consumer spending on goods in North America and labor availability.[/caption]   I know everyone wants to know and figure out when this is going to be over. I do not think it is going to be overnight, partially because I do not think that the disruption is going to be over soon. The fact that we have got basically almost no trucking going on in China despite the manufacturing plants being open, but the trucking operation is pretty much ground to a halt. It means we have got days of inventory that are going to stack up and then need to be pushed through the system. The disruption and uncertainty are going to be a part of our new normal. With regard to when the average demand and supply get back closer to where they used to be, it is going to be a matter of consumer spending and labor. We love the idea of things normalizing and getting to a new normal, but we are seeing inflation and other problems. We see the war in Ukraine and the recurrence of issues in China with COVID. We have trade issues with China. In a lot of ways, the new normal is not normal. The new normal is going to change because of events outside of our control of weather or geopolitical. Change is going to be more prevalent in the coming decade than it was in the last few, which is why to some extent, I think we did have that false sense of security that everything was working. We did have a period of relative sanity, which allowed us to fine-tune the system despite its insufficient infrastructure. We talked about the way it used to be pre-COVID years ago and what happened. What is next? What is next is recovery. I think that, in time, we would expect to see supply improve and consumer spending on goods moderate a little bit. We are seeing an increase in consumption of services, which makes sense because there is the ability to do that. My wife works in travel and she has never been busier. People are eager to get back out and travel again. I do not think we are going to see the end of events and discontinuities. Those are two things to watch to tell us when congestion and prices are going to moderate are going to be consumer spending on goods in North America and labor availability. Talk about those shocks. There are many ways we can describe this. We could say our supply chains got a little brittle, meaning they broke rather than being bent. Another way to describe it is we have too many risks in there and a lack of resiliency, depending on how you want to talk about it. We know we are going to have some more shocks in this system. How do we deal with all that? There are a few things. A lot of this is ongoing. It is already happening. We need to stop looking at the supply chain as a simple commoditized part of the operation. It is not a simple call center. It is not something that should be managed by a small team in procurement focused on the cost lever. This is a C-level topic. The supply chain is and forever will be a C-level topic. Shippers need to be thinking about all the things that they can do to accept the fact that the logistics industry will always be more complicated than it used to be. Part of that is more safety stock. I know you are an auto guy. The old just-in-time Math assumed simple, easy commodity-priced trucking and logistics operation. The world is more complicated than that. Certainly, some companies are looking at how I can think about de-risking my supply chain, both in terms of the number of locations that I sourced from, to increase the number so I have more flexibility. If I lose one node, they will be looking at nearshoring and reshoring. The math on those deals is never easy, but they are certainly spending time thinking through that, especially thinking about that in light of new sustainability targets. All of my clients are hearing calls from their clients who are hearing calls from their customers to say, “How can I be more sustainable? How can I meet the new carbon aspirations?” You hit a whole bunch of topics. I want to break them down a little bit. It speaks to where we are at in this business. The first thing you said is this is no longer a small decision. When I used to sell logistics and supply chain services, the way I sold mostly less than truckload in some truckloads, but we had the technology. I remember I would call and say, “I want to talk to the owner, the CEO, the head of operations, or a general manager.” We impact finance because we are going to take some of those functions away. We do it as part of our service. We interface with the sales guys because they are the ones who are always saying, “Where is my stuff?” We work with your ops team on the inbound and we work with your logistics team. A lot of times, when I would call that C-level guy, they would say, “Talk to Tony in the back.” The disruption and uncertainty in the shipping industry will be a part of the new normal. It's not changing overnight. I would go see Tony and back, and he did not want to have a strategic discussion. He did not care if the finance guys had to audit the bills. I said, “We audit the bills because we have a TMS,” and I start my whole spiel. I am going to parody this a little bit. He was like, “Those guys got me Kid Rock tickets.” That is why he bought from that logistics company. He did not have that strategic focus that I wanted my customer to have. One of the things we have all been through is when you call that guy and say, “I want to manage all your freight. I want you to use our technology and you are going to see all of your shipments there. He says "I will give you an Excel spreadsheet with all our loads in it. You put your price in and if you are cheaper, I will give you those lanes tomorrow.” I was like, “I do not want to save you $50 on tomorrow's load. I want to save 10% on your annual spend.” It would be like, “What are you talking about?” The number might have been used to bend. We spend $500,000 a year, which is bad enough to leave it to somebody who does not care about the strategic function of logistics. Now that number got to $5 million, you go, “What the hell, guys?” There is a lot of change on both sides of that transaction that we are going to go through over the next few years. I have a good friend who is a former CEO of one of the container lines. He says, “Enough with this value base. I lose customers for $50 a box. It does not matter how much better we are.” That was the history. In that world, you do not have the right executives in the decision on the shipper side. You do not have the head of sales, marketing, or operations. You have someone in procurement. When you have someone in procurement, they have one metric, which is how they can get the unit costs down. You also need to get better on the sales side. The guys that I work with, the carriers, trucking companies, and railroads, now have an opening to say, “It was not so commodity-based,” but they have got to be able to deliver. They got to be able to go and articulate what they do that is different than the next guy and why that is worth it. I always use the same analogy back in the olden days when we had stockbrokers. They are transactional. You would always hear the term churn. They wanted to churn your account, “I want to sell your Dell stock and move you over to Apple.” They make money on both of those transactions. Those guys did not care about your overall financial picture. They cared about what you had in your investment account. Now we have moved to financial planners. You do not hear anybody say in their stockbroker. Financial planners are aligned with their clients. They say, “We are going to get paid 1% or 1.5% of what you have in your account. I want to make you rich so I can get 1% or 1.5% of that every year.” It is the same thing in this business. We have to switch out of this transactional thinking and move to that financial planner. A lot of companies want to do that. They do not want to be ringing the bell and having the siren go off that they made $1,000 on a transaction and celebrating at the office that day. That is a lack of alignment and it is yesterday's news. You will see more gain share partnerships and relationships like that between carriers and shippers. It takes real change on both sides. This will be the shock that gets the awareness to a place where those things are pursued. Not just between carriers and shippers, but to some extent, between different players in the logistics chains, carriers and ocean terminals, railroads and trucking lines, warehouse fulfillment operators and last-mile parcels. One of the things I want to touch on briefly is the timeout containers. We will get more back to the containers for a second. We started using containers a lot in the late ‘50s and ‘60s. There is a book, The Box That Changed the World. Prior to that, we could not even do global trade because the cost of logistics was so high. That was a tremendous innovation. We have seen this change the world. We would not be doing nearly the global trade we do now without it, but we have not seen a lot of innovation in that space. Now we are starting to see information technology. That is another piece of that. Speak to that and the sustainability that is important to us. The technology has come along in terms of tracking. It is available. You will see more adoption of that, especially in the reefer space, but also in dry boxes. I have seen a lot of startups and investments in foldable boxes and alternative equipment. The main way we are going to get better sustainability on our container fleet is by finding better ways to extend their lives.   I never heard that. We are throwing a lot of those out. [caption id="attachment_7992" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Container Logistics Disruption: 75-80% of containers are leaving LA empty so they can be filled up in China with more goods while there is a shortage. That's because the supply chain has always been an afterthought.[/caption]   We lose track of a lot of them because we do not know quite where they were. Telematics, tracking, and things like that will help there. How long does a container last? There are containers out there that have been in the fleet for twenty-some-odd years. The average is probably closer to 12 to 15. There are all sorts of uses. One of them is use for alternative storage. If anybody from the container ship lines is reading, give me a call and I will deliver you 50 containers. I live about 25 minutes out of Ann Arbor. There are some farms and not quite rural, but I always drive by and think, “What are you doing with that container?” They only need them where they need them. Our supply chain is imbalanced. They need them to pick up soybeans and send those to São Paulo. The fact that they are in Ann Arbor does not help them a whole lot because of the amount of money and time spent to get them down there. Managing that global fleet better and extending its life would be great from a sustainability standpoint. It comes up a little bit on my show about sustainability. Some people might be shaking their heads and say, “I do not believe that the man is causing global warming.” I always say, “I do not care what you think. It does not matter what I think.” This is what consumers and brands are asking for it. When one of those big brands says, “What are you doing?” you better have an answer. It is too late to do anything at that point. You do have to embrace it now. There are a lot of small ways. When it is over the road, we are trying to get rid of empty miles. That starts with measuring the empty miles, which brings me to another point. We were saying that 75% to 80% of containers are leaving LA and Long Beach empty so they can go be filled up in China with more goods for us. Meanwhile, we have a shortage and we have gone mad. It is illogical, but the understandable conclusion from the supply chain is an afterthought. The supply chain has always been an afterthought. It is not designed. It just happened. There are many forces well beyond the global supply chain that decide what is our import and export balance with China and where do we manufacture intermediate goods for auto? There is nothing logistics can do to account for the fact that there is that much import-export balance on goods. With empty backhaul and empty miles within the US, there are a lot of things that the logistics industry can do to help. There are smarter ways to reroute though there are still a lot of empty miles even in the US. I have become more aware of this. There is the empty truck that is moving from LA to New York, and you go, “That should never ever happen.” I do not think that happens nearly as often as it used to, but what is becoming more of a concern is the half-empty trucks and you go, “I had 10,000 half-empty trucks leave this location. Is there a way?” I know there are technologies and the guys over at flock freight and others are saying, “We can do something about it.” The main way of getting better sustainability on container fleets is by finding better ways to extend their lives. We will see more shared loads and multi loads where everyone will call multi-stop, where we are going to say, “That truck is full.” That is good for the environment and truckers. For the shippers, we are going to have to figure that out. We do not want to put I-can't-move-your-food onto a truck with auto parts. We have to be careful about how we manage it with the shippers but I think it is going to lower the price of shipping. Once we are fully loaded with the real cost of all of this stuff, whether it be the drivers, assets, new vehicles, or the autonomous and electric vehicles that we bring in to make a more sustainable fleet, the cost per unit is going to be higher. It is going to put the burden on us to figure out how we can make better use of each of the units. Maybe it is two hours later, but that allows me to share a load and double my density on the chunk move. All of those things can happen in time, but it takes great collaboration between carriers and shippers to make it work. The transparency and tools of the data exist to be able to do it, but it takes tremendous collaboration and trust to get it done. I am going to put you on the spot here. I know you work with a lot of different companies. I want to tick off some standard categories and what kind of work you are doing for these companies. Let's say an over-the-road carrier calls you. What do you tell them these days? What would be a typical project you would work on with them? Over the road, carriers were doing a lot of work and helping them think about how their network is going to change as manufacturers figure out a new supply chain or as we try to start to think about electric vehicles and ultimately autonomous vehicles. Not just how should you think about the timing of those technologies, but what are the network decisions you are making now that will feel sub-optimal in 5 or 10 years because the investments that those companies make in assets and infrastructure are not short-term. We are helping them think about sustainability in terms of how they can help their shippers with their sustainability targets. Those are some of the big themes. Do you talk to any brokers, 3PLs, and non-asset-based? What are you doing for them? Sustainability is a topic for them in terms of how I can provide. I am already helping them knit together. A lot of them are trying to figure out, “How can I knit together solutions across modes? How can I optimize those around sustainability targets?” We are doing a lot of work almost across the board in growth. How do companies find growth? There are a lot of new freight flows that are coming, not just because there are always new freight flows that are coming, but sustainability and the targets that all these companies are taking on are creating a whole lot of new goods to move. We are working with a lot of companies, whether they be asset-light, asset-heavy, broker, truckload, but also parcel and the like. It is like, “Where do you find freight? How do you get it? How do you leverage the tools today to find those companies?” Do you work with Final Mile or Last Mile guys? We do. We work with from a pallet and LTL Final Mile, and heavy goods Final Mile. We do a lot of post and parcel work. We have got a huge practice globally that has done tremendous work in helping drive efficiency in the postal space and parcel as well. They need it.   Those companies are struggling. [caption id="attachment_7993" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Container Logistics Disruption: Once the real cost of all these new things comes, the cost per unit will increase. It's going to take time to manage that. There needs to be a great collaboration between carriers and shippers to make it work.[/caption]   From what I understand, the Final Mile for home delivery to goods is the most expensive part of the journey. I was not being critical of the post office. We want it to be better, but we put a lot of constraints on it, and I think it is the hard part. I do not want a pallet delivered to my house and then distributed all of those parcels to my neighbors. I would like just my piece delivered to my house. Getting my piece delivered to my house is expensive. The costs are getting better relative to the pallet moves because the density of residential delivery has come up so much. Many years ago, the density of residential delivery was terrible. It was hard to make the economics work for the big parcel companies. As our volumes have gone up, that has improved the relative density, but it is still tough. What about warehousing and fulfillment? We have seen so much change in that space. What is going on when you work with them? First of all, permitting and getting sites are extremely challenging. The sites have to be closer to current consumers. If you want a site or the old model of three sites in the middle of nowhere, you can still get that. If you want the sites that people want now, which is one hour or maybe even less outside of every resident in the country, those sites are hard to come by. We do work with developers on construction and permitting on how to do that well and how to forecast and identify where the sites are going and where you need to be. We are also working with operators on how to drive productivity in those sites. We are doing a lot of work on how to refine, recruit, train and retain talent. That is a theme across all logistics. I was talking to somebody about a paint company and they said, “We do not have anyone retire from this location.” It was their DC. The reason they had no one retired from there is because it was a young man's game. He did not want to walk 10 miles picking stuff up and moving stuff around. We have to make that job in the warehouse easier so you are not breaking your back. If you walked by an auto assembly plant and walked through it, you would see that nobody was doing a job that was backbreaking or that required excessive strength, crouching, or reaching. We have eliminated those and we see that same mindset move into fulfillment. Those guys are going to become technicians rather than strong backs. We have had conversations for years about technology in the fulfillment space. Now it is happening. They made fun of us many years ago because it was early and no one had proven all the economics. It was whizzbang cool stuff, but is it having an impact now. There are certain functions that are being largely automated and you are seeing high ROIs. Also, you have got a lot of technology now that is more flexible than it used to be. Building the $10 million conveyance system just for this client and then hoping you retain them is a scary proposition for a fulfillment operator. Having flexible, robotic assets that can move seasonally or move to a new facility if you lose a client. We are also seeing longer contracts which helps. Fulfillment operators are saying, “I do not want to do a three-year deal.” You can't facilities for that and build a location if necessary for a bigger customer. We are trying robots now. This is becoming somewhat like automotive. In automotive, what we learned is if you give me one year, I am not going to invest in it. From a container line standpoint, a lot of people are trying to figure out how to facilitate end-to-end shipping better. The payback cycles on some of those technologies are getting shorter, but it is hard to make many of them work on a three-year contract. We are seeing a lot of fulfillment players and manufacturers agreeing to 5 or 7-year deals or agreeing to co-invest in the technology that they want to offer something that customers can't get elsewhere. Let's circle back to the beginning. What do you talk to about the container people, the guys with the ships, the rail, drayage, and the modal? From a container line standpoint, a lot of them are trying to figure out, “How can I better facilitate end-to-end shipping? I do not know if I want to own all those pieces of the operation.” It does not do me a whole lot of good to get it to the port if it sits in the port. Much worse is it does not do me a whole lot of good if I am sitting at the pilot station waiting to get into the port. A lot of the conversation and work in the container space is, “How do you collaborate with the terminal, the rail operation, and the consolidation or deconsolidation facility to get boxes and get them back?” The whole concept of end-to-end is probably the strongest when you think about container terminals, dray, rail, or trucks. Figuring out how to create more seamless, more partnerships, and share data to do that. In some of those, you see the metrics and the CMAs of the world that are investing quite a bit in buying companies to knit together that offering, They are buying over the road companies here. They made an extra $100 billion or something in those ship lines during COVID. To your point, they are investing in that end-to-end solution. Somebody said this to me and they work closely with one of these companies. They said, “Do not be surprised if we see single-use containers because we do have a trade imbalance with China.” If that container is only going one way and I have to ship it back on a boat that is filled with containers that are empty, somebody might say, “Why am I shipping it back there?” “It is because these are expensive containers.” Do they need to be expensive containers? Could they be less expensive and single-use? I know somebody is going to say, “What about recycling and all that?” There is a design that has to happen here. We got people like John and his team there. They will figure it out. From my perspective, we see it in automotive. Sometimes, you ship back the containers that brought your stuff. Sometimes, you do not because it does not make sense because it is one way. Do you guys work with air freight companies? We do but it has been a challenging and rewarding a couple of years for air freight. The belly players have been tough because they have not had the majority of their capacity with many of the passenger lines, much of the passenger capacity down. The pure freight players have done extremely well. Airfreight was a key enabler and one of the early winners in the pandemic and continues to be. I think the questions on air freight are how can they use advanced analytics to drive even better forecasting of volumes and, therefore, even better service levels and yield management? We think there is a lot of opportunity in the air freight space around advanced analytics and pricing. I heard it from Flexport and the guys over freight ways. One percent of all overseas volume is on air freight, but it is 30% of the revenue. What it speaks to is you are not shipping auto parts, usually on a plane. You are shipping electronics, chips, medicines, and stuff like that that is high value and small. Mostly high density. Value per cubic foot is off the charts. That ratio feels approximately right. I also heard that 50% of the air freight is passenger planes.   That is why air freight prices absolutely skyrocketed. [caption id="attachment_7994" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Container Logistics Disruption: A lot of the work in the container space today is how do you collaborate with the terminal, the rail operation, the consolidation & deconsolidation facilities? It's all about creating partnerships.[/caption]   They were flying anywhere. They moved up first. Ocean container rates have skyrocketed too, but in the air cargo, when your supply chain breaks down at some point, the only option you have is to get it there. It is the last resort for a lot of things and the first resort for high-value cargo. A lot of companies, for the release of the phone, will send enough phones for the first couple of months via air, and then they will send the backup to refill stock via ocean. In a pandemic, it was the first choice. The majority of the global air freight capacity is the belly of the passenger. When so much of our passenger fleet was grounded without anyone to pay for the international passenger move, you lost the belly cargo. I heard somebody use the term preighter, which is passenger freighter. They sometimes took the seats out of planes and filled them up. Other times, they put stuff on the seat that you might have been flying to a conference on. Now, it has got a stack of mobile phones on it. I am going to try and summarize all this and then I want to get some final thoughts before you go into what is new over at McKinsey. The topic is disruption and container logistics. John talked about the steady-state. We will talk about many years ago, pre-COVID, and what happened during COVID, that horrible time with demand spike, capacity down, sick people, and broken supply chains. We learned how brittle our supply chains were. You talked a little bit about what is next and where consumer spending is going. We are spending more on services and a little less on products. We are going to see how the industry reacts to what are still shocks and aftershocks of what happened. We do not even know the implications of the conflict in the Ukraine and inflation. We are better, but we will see. Lastly, we talked about what we learned during this time that logistics is not a commodity and that we have to insist on a seat at the table. We no longer be just a commodity service. John took us through all of the different things he and his team do with their clients. Any final thoughts on this big topic, John? A few final thoughts, two things we did not talk about and one thing I wanted to reinforce. We did not talk about the war in Ukraine. The near-term impact of that has not been huge on the global logistics industry. Carriers have pretty quickly rebalanced their networks in response to that. The long-term impacts could be significant. Ukraine and Russia are large exporters of commodities like wheat, oil and gas. I think we will see a lot of those supply chains shift around. While we are all watching the human tragedy and suffering through it, the near-term impact from a logistics standpoint has not been significant. We have been talking so much about eCommerce. It is going to be omni commerce. You have seen a bit of a drawdown and a correction back. We talked about ten years of eCommerce acceleration in two months. That was true. You have seen brick and mortar make a comeback. Some things are better are bought in person. My kids bought mattresses online and they are like, “We love it.” I was like, “I am going to have that mattress for ten years. I have to lay down on it.” I am not going to look at 5,000 reviews. I love eCommerce, but to your point, some of those shopping experiences are going to have to become experiences, not a pain in the ass experiences. Everyone wants to go to the Farmer's Market or a cool boutique. We have to get back to a cool experience if I am willing to leave the house. For shippers, many of them want to get to a place where they are managing more on Omni channel commerce supply chain. One of the most frustrating parts of the pandemic was when we had out-of-stock items on the website and obsolete items sitting in storerooms in the retail centers. That was painful and was a function of having two supply chains, which is the case for many shippers. They built their old brick and mortar supply chain, then they added a supply attender to eCommerce, and they did not talk to each other. You will see companies now figure out, “How do I have one more flexible Omni commerce supply chain?” There are going to be some variations. There will be times and products where you want to buy online or in-store. Certain companies will have a blend of the two. That is where we are going on that front, which we did not talk about but I think is important. It also needs to be designed. It has to be created. It can't be a bolt-on because we bolted on the gig economy and thought that, “We got an eCommerce solution.” Instacart, Shipt, and some of those solutions for grocery, from what I understand, the grocery store companies are losing money on those and they obviously do not like that. The gig economy stepped up. It is great. We are always going to have it. There's a lot of opportunity in the air freight space around advanced analytics and pricing. We are always going to use it in logistics, but it needs to be managed by logistics guys who are operational experts and good at routing and technology. It can't just be, “Bob down the street buys groceries for the neighborhood. It does not work as the way it needs to.” We are going to see those grocery stores become grocery store/fulfillment centers in some cases or maybe one fulfillment center in the Detroit Metro area that serves all of the eCommerce. Some of those business models will evolve. Even a company as great as Instacart or some of the early applications is adding cost on the top of the already existing flow and retail, brick and mortar, and all that stuff. The ideal way of doing that is to have dark stores that are designed for efficiency and pick, pack, and ship, not for the grocery experience that we have all grown to love. Tell us what is new over at McKinsey and how do we reach out? Do you have any webinars coming up or case studies? We love to have conversations. The best way to get in touch with us is on our website. It is easy to find me or any number of colleagues. You can send an email and we will respond. I will probably get the email. If I am not the right person to talk to, I will find someone else. On the site, we have got an interview with Sanne Manders, the COO of Flexport, which is great. We are putting up content all the time. What conferences are you guy going to?  I know we are excited about TPM in 2023. When is that? TPM is in Long Beach in the early spring every year. It is still a long way away. I do not know what the next conference we have got. We have coming up in May 2022 in Northwest Arkansas. I interviewed a professor from the University of Arkansas, the number one supply chain school carrying Gartner. John, thank you so much for taking the time. Thanks so much for having me. It was a pleasure talking to you. I look forward to keeping in touch. It was my pleasure.    Important Links John Murnane The Box That Changed the World Flexport Sanne Manders https://www.LinkedIn.com/In/JohnPMurnane/  – John Murnane https://www.LinkedIn.com/Company/Mcinsey/ – McKinsey & Company   About John Murnane John advises companies across a variety of industries and continents on their transformation and growth efforts. His broad cross-sector experience ranges from hospitality to global transport—including hotels and airlines, ocean and air freight, and trucking and distribution—and spans the value chain from capital-intensive real estate development to asset-light brokerage and distribution. He advises clients on growth at both a strategic and tactical level including M&A, new product development, value-based pricing, digital sales, and sales force effectiveness.  

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
Podcast #86: Realskiers.com Editor and 'Snowbird Secrets' Co-Author Jackson Hogen

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022


To support independent ski journalism, please consider becoming a free or paid subscriber. Starting in June, paid subscribers will receive podcasts three days before free subscribers.WhoJackson Hogen, Editor of Realskiers.com, author of Snowbird Secrets, and long-time industry jack of all trades: ski designer, binding and boot product manager, freestyle competitor, retail salesman, risk management lecturer, ski instructor, marketing director, resort feature writer, OLN and RSN television host, extreme camp ski coach, Desperate Measures co-creator, four-time Warren Miller screenwriter, and research and development chief.Recorded onMay 9, 2022Why I interviewed himA long time ago, ski writers used to write about ski instruction. They were quite good at it. A couple years back, I recounted the value of these dispatches to me as a novice skier in the 1990s:I met skiing like a lawnchair meets a tornado, flung and cartwheeled and disoriented and smashed to pieces. I was 14 with the coordination and dexterity of a lamppost. The mountain was merciless in its certainty of what to do with me. It hurt.I tried again and was met like an invader at the Temple of Doom, each run a stone-rope-and-pulley puzzle I could not solve – a puzzle that invariably ended with me smashed beneath a rock.When two years later I tried a third time I had grown into my body and could without turning or otherwise controlling myself descend the modest hill on most runs intact. The following Christmas I asked for skis and got them and the fabulous snowy north unrolled with purpose and mission before me.Now I just had to learn how to ski.This was a bigger problem than it sounds like. No one in my family skied. None of my friends knew how to ski either – at least not well enough to show me how to do it. Lessons were not happening. If you think a 17-year-old who makes $4.50 an hour bagging groceries is going to spend the equivalent of a week’s pay on what is essentially school on snow when school is not in session, then you have either never met a 17-year-old or have never been one. As it was, I could barely afford the lift tickets and gas to get me to the hill.What I could afford was ski magazines. And ski magazines in the nineties were glorious things, hundreds of pages long and stacked with movie reviews and resort news and adrenaline-laced 14-page feature stories.And there was ski instruction. Pages and pages of it in nearly every issue.This seems arcane now. Why not just watch a video? But this was the mid-nineties. There was no YouTube. Hell, there was barely an internet, and only the computer-savviest among us had the remotest idea how to access it.My first ski magazine was the December 1994 issue of Skiing. It cost $2.50 and it looked like this:The volume of ski instruction in just this one issue is staggering. A nearly-5,000 word piece by venerable ski writer Lito Tejada-Flores anchored a 19-page (!) spread on the art and importance of balance, which was in turn prefaced by a separate front-of-the-mag editorial outlining the whole package. An additional eight pages of ski instruction tiered from solid-green beginner to expert complemented this. And all this in an issue that also included a 13-page high-energy feature on roaming interior BC and 10-page write-ups of Squaw Valley and Whiteface.Each month I bought Skiing, and most months I also bought Ski and Snow Country. I also bought Powder but even then Powder could not be bothered with ski instruction. The instruction wasn’t the first thing I read but I always read it and I usually read it many times.This was a process. Ski instruction articles are often dense and deliberate and usually anchored to numbered photographs or drawings demonstrating movements and technique. Think of it as drill instruction in extreme slow motion. It wasn’t all useful but what was useful became essential.I doubt anyone knows how to write about ski instruction with this kind of clarity and detail anymore, just like no one knows how to build a covered wagon anymore – it is a lost art because it is now an unnecessary one.But this is how I learned how to ski. And because this is how I learned and because I re-read each of the pieces that resonated with me so many times, this written instruction formed the indelible framework around which I still think about skiing.Read the rest:I would like to retract one part of the above essay: “it is a lost art because it is now an unnecessary one.” Re-reading the articles referenced in the piece above, I admire the clarity with which each of these writers dissected the process of skiing trees or bumps or steeps. There is no equivalent, that I am aware of, in the realm of instructional ski videos. And there is a simple reason why: videos can show you what you should be doing, but the visual hegemony makes their creators overlook something even more important: what you should be feeling, and how you should be reacting as you feel those things.There is at least one remaining master of this craft: Jackson Hogen. He understands how to talk about aspects of skiing other than the fact that it’s rad. Snowbird Secrets is a written masterclass for the wannabee expert, the one who’s maybe dropped into the double blacks laced off the Cirque Traverse and survived to the bottom, but knows it wasn’t their best work. Examples:From Chapter 4 – On Anticipation:Your upper body stays ahead of the activities going on underfoot, as though your head and shoulders were in a time machine that is forever stuck on transporting you a few milliseconds into the future. As mental anticipation morphs into the events that both end it and redeem it, physical anticipation allows for the happy confluence between the two states. Anticipation feels like a form of time travel for if you do it well, it shifts you into the future. You take care of business before it happens.Chapter 5 – On Being Early:The single biggest differentiator between the advanced skier and the true expert is the latter’s ability to get to the next turn early. There are several components to being early, each of which moves in concert with the others. The upper body must continue its constant projection down the hill and into the turn, the existential lean of faith that is a prerequisite for performance skiing. The uphill hand cues a shift in weight to the ski below it by reaching for the fall line. And the uphill ski begins to tilt on edge early, at the top of the arc, supporting your hurtling mass as it navigates gravity’s stream.Chapter 12 – On Hands and Feet:Every element that makes up the entirety of the skier is linked to every other, but nowhere is the bond greater than between hands and feet. The primal importance of hand position is never more evident than when your feet fail you. …Even when you’re not about to eat it, your hands tell the rest of your body what to do while your feet are busy making turns. Your torso is attuned to your hands’ bossy attitude; it will always try to follow their lead. So keep them forward, point them where you want to go and don’t get lazy with the uphill hand. Generations of skiers have been taught to plant the pole on the inside of the turn, so that hand often is extended, as if in greeting, to the fall line, while the uphill hand takes a nap somewhere alongside the thigh. Until you are a skier of world-class capabilities, you cannot afford sleep hands. The uphill hand that you’ve left in a mini-coma will be called upon in a trice to reach again downhill; it should be in an on-call position, not on sabbatical. It should be carried no lower than it would be if you were about to draw a sidearm from a holster. You’re engaged in an athletic endeavor, so try to look like it.You can tell how good someone is at writing about skiing by how self-conscious you feel as you read it. I’ll admit I clicked over to photos of myself skiing more than a few times as I made my way through Snowbird Secrets (I’d also recommend having the Snowbird trailmap handy). Great ski books are as rare as a Mountain Creek powder day. But great books on ski instruction are less common still, and this one’s worth your time:Instructional writing is not the point, however, of the Real Skiers website. It is, primarily, a gear-review and recommendation site. But there is no intelligent way to discuss ski gear without a foundational understanding of how to ski. It would be like trying to play hockey without understanding how to skate. The site, like Hogen’s knowledge, is voluminous, layered, cut with a direct and relentless wit. And it’s a tremendous resource in the online desert of ski media. As Hogen says in the interview, “I’d tell you that there are other places you could go to get the same information, but there isn’t.”What we talked aboutThis year in skiing; Mt. Rose; replacing the Snowbird trams; learning to ski at Bromley in the ‘50s; the evolution of sanctioned in-bounds air at ski areas; air as a natural part of good skiing; opening year at Copper Mountain; the life of a product sales rep; the early days of Snow Country magazine with industry legend John Fry; making bindings interesting; the novelty and courage of honest ski reviews; today’s “consequence-free environment for total b******t” in ski media; “there is no more complicated piece of footwear designed by man” than a ski boot; don’t ever ever ever buy ski boots online; the art of boot-fitting; the importance of custom footbeds to ski boots; how to keep warm in ski boots; how to pick skis; whether you should demo skis; the difference between skiing and ski testing; whether you should build a quiver; make friends at the ski shop; picking a binding; why you should avoid backcountry or hybrid bindings; thoughts on setting DIN; “nobody should take anything from the highest levels of the race world and applying it to alpine, regular skiing”; recounting every mistake that prefaced my spectacular leg break at Black Mountain of Maine in February; the problems created by grip-walk boot soles; how often we should be waxing and tuning our skis; the lifespan of skis and boots and how they break down over time; the importance of being present while skiing; ask for the mountain’s permission; Hogen’s incredible book, Snowbird Secrets; the writer’s trance; what makes Snowbird special and whether it has any equals; the mountain has already won; thoughts on Taos; the influence of population growth and the Ikon Pass on Little Cottonwood Canyon; the easiest path down the hill is a straight line; how to use your hands and feet while skiing; and the benefits of a Real Skiers subscription.   Why I thought that now was a good time for this interviewNot to be too self-referential, but I’ll again quote myself here. Specifically, my February post recounting the gear failure at Black Mountain of Maine that led to my three-months-and-counting couch sentence:On my final run of the season we swung skier’s right off the lift, seeking shade, tracked-out snow for easier turns. We found them in Crooked glade. Emerged on black-diamond Penobscot. Ungroomed. Snow heavy in the sunshine. A little sticky. As though someone had caulked the hillside. Try this or more glades? Let’s try this. It was my 13th run of the day. My 460th of the season. It was 1:22 p.m. I let my skis run. Gained speed. Initiated turns. I was leaning into a right turn at 18.9 miles per hour when I lost it.I don’t really know what happened. How I lost control. I know what didn’t happen: the binding on my left ski – 12-year-old Rossies I’d bought on spring clearance at Killington – did not release. Amazing pain in my leg. My body folded over backwards, bounced off the snow. A rattling through the shoulder where I’d had rotator cuff surgery last summer. I spun, self-arrested. Came to a stop on a steep section of trail, laying on my left side, my leg pinned into bent-knee position.I screamed. The pain. I could not get the ski off. I screamed again. Removed my helmet. Let it drop. It spun down the hill. Adrenaline kicked in. A skier appeared. He helped me take my ski off. DIN only at 8.5 but the binding was frozen. Finally it released. I tried to straighten my leg. Couldn’t. I assumed it was my knee. Isn’t it always a knee? More skiers arrived. Are you OK? No, I’m in a lot of pain. They left to get help. Patrol arrived with snowmobiles and sleds and bags of supplies. Michael came walking back up the hill.Everything after, rapid but in slow-motion. Does that make sense? Gingerly onto the sled, then the stretcher, then the Patrol-shack table. EMTs waiting. Amazing drugs incoming. Off, with scissors, my ski pants. Removing the boot, pain distilled. Not your knee – your leg. Broken bones. Did not penetrate the skin. Into the ambulance. Rumford Hospital: X-rays and more pain meds mainlined. A bed in the hallway. From the next room a woman, emphatic, that she don’t need no Covid vaccine in her body. All night there. The staff amazing. I would need surgery but there were no surgeons available until the next day. A room opened and they wheeled me in. In a druggy haze they splinted my leg. A train of drunks and incoherents as the bars emptied out. Sleep impossible.Here’s what I didn’t include in that essay: the moment, last August or September, when I’d dropped my skis for a tune at Pedigree Ski Shop in White Plains. “We just need your boots for a binding check,” the clerk had told me. Said boots, stowed at that moment in my closet in Brooklyn, were unavailable, forgotten in my hastening to beat rush-hour traffic. “I’ll bring them when I come back to pick up my skis,” I said. I didn’t. I hadn’t planned on skiing on those Rossies. But at some point in the season, I blew an edge on my Blizzards, couldn’t find a replacement pair, reached in my roof box and there were those old skis.So I’ve had a lot of time to think about that decision chain and how careless I’d been with my own safety, and how to reset my approach so I minimize the chances of a repeat. After nearly three decades of skiing without a major injury (and just two minor ones), I’d gotten arrogant and careless. I’d like this ski season to be the last one that ever ends early. But what else could I do besides remember my boots next time?I’ve been reading Hogen’s site for a few years now. I hadn’t been in explicit need of gear prior to blowing that edge, but he’s an entertaining writer and I enjoyed the regular emails. I figured he was the best-positioned thinker to guide me (and hopefully all of us), into better gear choices and maintenance over the next several years.There was one more thing, one that transcends the empirical realms in which I normally dwell: the notion of mountain as entity. From Snowbird Secrets Chapter 3, On Vibrations:… Hidden Peak is riddled with quartz. Quartz is a crystalline structure, and no ordinary crystal at that. Like all crystals, it not only responds to vibrations, it emits them. Quartz has piezoelectric properties that allow it to store electromagnetic energy and to conduct it. This mountain pulls a pulse from your energy stream and sends it back with interest, but it also skims off a transaction that it stores in its gargantuan energy vault.“So what does the mountain do with all this energy?” Jackson asks, before answering his own question:As it turns out, everyone has a story for how they came to discover Snowbird, but no one knows the reason. Some have the vanity to think they picked the place, but the wisest know the place picked them. This is the secret that Snowbird has slipped into our subconscious; deep down, we know we were summoned here.I’m skeptical but interested. Snowbird is special. No one who has skied there can doubt that. It is different. Incomparable. It is one of the few places where I ever feel genuinely scared on skis. But also reverential, awed, a little miffed and disbelieving the whole time I’m skiing. It’s something else. And I’ve never really been able to figure out why, other than the 600 inches of snow and relentless terrain and location within bowling lane distance of a major airport.Whether or not you’re willing to consider this anthropomorphization of the ski area, Hogen’s call to humility in its presence is inarguable. From Chapter 19, On Gratitude and Asking Permission:Everyone can learn humility before the mountain. Nowhere is this more important than at Snowbird, where if you don’t approach the mountain with the appropriate measure of humility, the mountain will be more than happy to supply some.My final run of the season was on an open trail, ungroomed buy modestly pitched. I was tired, my turns lazy. I wasn’t really paying attention. I wasn’t respecting the mountain. And while that mountain was quite a different thing from Snowbird, it had no issue reminding me that my carelessness was a mistake.Questions I wish I’d askedDespite the fact that this was one of the longest podcasts I’ve ever recorded, we didn’t get to half the questions I’d prepared. I wanted to discuss the devolution of ski shop culture in the maw of the internet, the decline of the industry trade show, the unconstructive nature of a competitive mindset to recreational skiing, the history of Real Skiers, the evolution of ski and boot technology over the past several decades, and how fortunate we are to be alive during this singular epoch in which we can reach the hazardous summits of our most forbidding mountains with a 10-minute lift ride. Hogen also made several interesting comments that would have been worthy of follow-up, from his nomination of Greg Stump to the National Ski & Snowboard Hall of Fame to what he sees as the decline of certain professional ski organization’s institutional integrity. I’ll save it all for next time.What I got wrongI referred to the boot-fitter I’d used in Hunter as “Keith from Sun and Snow Sports.” The boot-fitter’s name is Keith Holmquist, but the name of the shop is, in fact, The Pro Ski and Ride.Sun and Snow Sports is the name of the ski shop I frequented when I lived in Ann Arbor. You can visit their site here.Why you should follow Real SkiersI will admit that I am very bad at winnowing the best gear from the multitudes. I get overwhelmed by choice. This is one reason I don’t buy gear too often: if what I have works, then why change? And it’s why I know enough to use a boot fitter when I do finally decide an upgrade is in order.But maybe what I have – and what you have – doesn’t “work” so much as function. And that’s not the same thing as functioning optimally. Most of us could probably make better choices. And to do that, we need information. Good information. It may seem that the fecundity of the internet precludes the imperative to seek out the hyper-specialized knowledge of a professional. But the vast majority of ski and boot advice is garbage, as Hogen fearlessly reminds us. From a recent Real Skiers post:My methods for capturing skier feedback may not be succeeding to the degree I would like, but at least I’m trying. Most arms of mainstream media that choose to pose as ski experts no longer possess even a patina of credibility. To name two particularly odious examples of advertising posing as editorial, Men’s Journal published a top-10 “Most Versatile Skis of 2022” that was wall-to-wall b******t, assembled purely to incite a direct sale from the supplier. Whatever quality might be shared by their ten selections, “versatility” isn’t even a remote possibility. I could vilify each selection for its exceptional inappropriateness, but instead I’ll just mention that the “writer” admitted that their tenth selection hadn’t even been skied by whatever panel of nitwits they assembled to manufacture this fraud.The second slice of inanity that deserves your contempt is a ruse by Popular Mechanics titled, The 8 Best Ski Boots for Shredding Any Slope. Despite a long prelude about boot selection and how they “tested,” intended to establish a tone of credibility, when they finally got around to picking boots, the editors responsible for this transparent hoax cobbled together an incoherent jumble with but one goal: based on their nothing-burger of a review, the reader is expected to buy his or her boots online, preferably on Amazon. It’s hard to think of a worse disservice to the ski-boot buying public than this inane exercise.At least that’s what I thought until I was invited to peruse The Ski Girl. I can’t say how desperately incompetent all the advice dispensed on this site is, but I can assure you the people assigned to write about skis are the opposite of experts. I’ll let this one example stand as indictment of the whole shebang: someone so well-known she goes simply by the moniker “Christine,” selected as the best ski for an intermediate (woman, one presumes) none other than the ultra-wide Blizzard Rustler 11. It would be hard to make a completely random choice and do worse. There is NOTHING about this model that is right for an intermediate. Period. It’s not merely wrong, it’s dangerous, for reasons that I’m certain would elude “Christine.” On top of it all, she has the witless gall to add, “Every ski review here comes recommended, so you really can’t go wrong.” This is emblematic of everything that’s wrong about what remains of ski journalism. A gross incompetent merrily goes about dispensing advice unblushingly, so the site can collect a commission on a direct sale THAT SHOULD NEVER HAPPEN.Please note that The Ski Girl hasn’t taken down its moronic buying suggestions, suggesting a smug certainty that there will be no serious consequences for its gross negligence. Such is ski journalism today. That sort of raw honesty, that anti-stoke, that unapologetic calling out of b******t, is so rare in today’s ski media that I can’t even conjure another instance of it in the past 12 months. Skiing needs more of this, more blunt and informed voices. At least there’s one. Get in on it here by subscribing to the Real Skiers newsletter (as with The Storm, there are free and paid tiers):The Storm publishes year-round, and guarantees 100 articles per year. This is article 53/100 in 2022. Want to send feedback? Reply to this email and I will answer. You can also email skiing@substack.com. Get full access to The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast at www.stormskiing.com/subscribe

Business Beyond Usual
#612 - Looking Back, Looking Ahead to Post-MBA Life

Business Beyond Usual

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 49:45


In this episode, graduating Michigan Ross MBA students who are also members of the Business Beyond Usual team talk about what they'll miss about Ann Arbor, how their plans did or did not change over the course of their MBA experience, highlights of the Michigan Ross MBA program, advice for incoming students, and much more.Have thoughts about topics we should cover or just want to get in touch? Send us an email at bbupodcast@umich.edu.---Business Beyond Usual is brought to you by the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan.Episode Hosts and Producers: Eugenia Collins, Mikayla Terrell. Panelists: Christina Weiberg, Alexia Sabogal, Taylor Clark, Eric Hopfenbeck. Executive Producers: Eric Hopfenbeck, Christina Weiberg, and Bob Needham.Audio Engineer: Jonah Brockman.Copyright 2022 - University of Michigan

PT Profit Podcast
The Personal Side of Training with Chris Liddle

PT Profit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022


If you are new to the fitness and wellness space or just starting your own business, this episode might be for you.Today our guest is Edmonton, Alberta based, Chris Liddle. What stands out most about Chris is how he has leveraged his personality and authentic presence on social media to not only grow his professional network in ways that have benefited his personal development but also to connect with new clients and have strong connections in remote coaching.Chris is a very values-based coach that cares deeply about the people he works with and models himself after mentors who lead by example. There will be a lot you may relate to in this episode but the thing that might stand out to you most is that while it feels good to impress your colleagues, at the end of the day the person you owe your energy to is your clients and the people who support you directly.Enjoy this episode and be sure to share it with a friend!Don't forget to leave us a review on Apple Podcasts.About Today's GuestChris is a certified personal trainer and nutrition coach. His active certifications are CFSC and PN. ​Host of The Lifestyle Chase Podcast (where Beverley guested back in 2020), Chris has been networking with and learning from people all over the world for several years now. ​Based out of Edmonton, AB, operating his in-person business out of Evolve Strength South, Chris offers 1 on 1 personal training as well as partner training and group training and events. ​Chris works well with people as young as 12 to as old as 70 and has a very diverse client base.​In addition to training people locally, Chris also works with a handful of people remotely, delivering customized programs with video demonstrations and weekly check ins.Chris is also involved in a few other businesses at the moment.He is a social media contractor for an Edmonton social media company, an Online Coach and Podcast Producer for A-Team Fitness in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and he's a creative director with our team here at Beverley Simpson Fitness!WEBSITE     |      INSTAGRAM     |       LINKEDIN      |      SUBSTACKJoin the Facebook community!Are you a new fitness entrepreneur looking to attract clients? Maybe you're looking to dial in your messaging? Or perhaps you're experienced and looking to scale your business?Head on over to Facebook, and request access to my Online Marketing for Fitness Professionals group. Post an introduction about yourself, ask some questions, or let us celebrate your wins with you.BSimpsonFitnessLinks & Coaching Opportunities Beverley Simpson's PT Profit Formula & PT Profit Accelerator- PT Profit Formula is a 12-week step-by-step community coaching program utilizing a proven process to help you build an effective, repeatable system that consistently generates leads and customers inside your fitness business so that you can fill your client schedule and sell out your products.- If you're ready to take the next step, then PT Profit Accelerator is the program for you! Accelerator is 12-month coaching mastermind intensive designed for high performing health and wellness professionals who are ready to scale to multiple six figures without working harder. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit beverleysimpson.substack.com

The Unsophisticated Palate
179. Let's Talk About Liqueurs and Schnapps with Ann Arbor Distilling

The Unsophisticated Palate

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 36:40


If you're like Marc, you're not sure what what liqueurs and schnapps are, other than a very few cocktails or drinking them straight as a teenager. Fortunately Ann Arbor Distillery joins us this week to explain what they are, and how to best enjoy them, including as always some fun facts and great cocktails to try. Pour yourself a glass and enjoy! Cheers! Marc Website: www.theunsophisticatedpalate.com Music: Happy Clappy by John Bartmann Artwork: Marlon Kalis

Talking Hoosier Baseball – iubase.com
Talking Hoosier Baseball – 2022 – Week 12 – Michigan and Louisville

Talking Hoosier Baseball – iubase.com

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 35:10


Cass and Chris cover the Hoosiers' third straight series win in B1G play by Carl James • @jovian34 • May 12th, 2022 Indiana Baseball moved up to 7th in the B1G standings with a series win in Ann Arbor over the weekend. Cassady Palmer and Chris Feeny have the details and discuss what is left to do to get into the B1G Tournament. Video: Audio:

The afikra Podcast
NAOMI SHIHAB NYE | The Turtle of Oman & Michigan | Book Club

The afikra Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 57:42


Naomi Shihab Nye talked about her books ‘The Turtle of Oman' and ‘The Turtle of Michigan. The books are about Aref as he travels from Muscat, Oman, to Ann Arbor, Michigan.Naomi Shihab Nye was born in St. Louis, Missouri. Her father was a Palestinian refugee and her mother an American of German and Swiss descent, and Nye spent her adolescence in both Jerusalem and San Antonio, Texas. She earned her BA from Trinity University in San Antonio. Nye is the recipient of numerous honors and awards for her work, including the Ivan Sandrof Award for Lifetime Achievement from the National Book Critics Circle, the Lavan Award, the Paterson Poetry Prize, the Carity Randall Prize, the Isabella Gardner Poetry Award, the Lee Bennett Hopkins Poetry award, the Robert Creeley Prize, and many Pushcart Prizes. She has received fellowships from the Lannan Foundation, the Guggenheim Foundation, and she was a Witter Bynner Fellow. From 2010 to 2015 she served as a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets. In 2018 she was awarded the Lon Tinkle Award for Lifetime Achievement from the Texas Institute of Letters. Nye is the Poetry Foundation's Young People's Poet Laureate.Created and hosted by Mikey MuhannaEdited by: Ramzi RammanTheme music by: Tarek Yamani https://www.instagram.com/tarek_yamani/About Book Club:Book Club is an interview series that calls for afikra community members, who are interested in literature and reading, to spend time reading along with the entire community. Books in Arabic and English will be announced on afikra's reading list and the members will be asked to do the reading at home at their leisure and then join afikra for a conversation with the authors of those books. Every two weeks, a conversation will be held with an author to discuss their work and the book in particular. Individuals joining the call will be expected to have read the book and prepared questions regarding the context, motivation, and background stories. Following the interview, there is a moderated town-hall-style Q&A with questions coming from the live virtual audience ‎on Zoom.‎ Join the live audience: https://www.afikra.com/rsvp   FollowYoutube - Instagram (@afikra_) - Facebook - Twitter Support www.afikra.com/supportAbout afikra:‎afikra is a movement to convert passive interest in the Arab world to active intellectual curiosity. We aim to collectively reframe the dominant narrative of the region by exploring the histories and cultures of the region- past, present, and future - through conversations driven by curiosity. Read more about us on  afikra.com

Antioch Ann Arbor
Mothers Day // Releasers of Life

Antioch Ann Arbor

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 40:26


Pastor Jami shares a wonderful Mothers Day message accompanied by a panel of mothers in our church!    ********************************************  This message is from Antioch Community Church in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Follow Antioch Ann Arbor on Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/antiocha2 Follow Antioch Ann Arbor on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/antiocha2 Follow Antioch Ann Arbor on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzZTjIEyt8aMnYqJZOt5vWw    ******************************************* Music Credits: The Ground After A Summer Rain By At The End Of Times, Nothing

Vineyard Church of Ann Arbor Sermon Podcast
Resurrection Life: Episode 2

Vineyard Church of Ann Arbor Sermon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 30:48


Resurrection Life: Episode 2; by Marissa Jadrich Ortiz - a2vc.org. Like us on fb.com/vineyardannarbor or watch our livestream Sundays @ 10:45am - vimeo.com/annarborvineyard

Be Ye Lifted
A Booster Shot of Grace

Be Ye Lifted

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 25:55


Reflecting on a seldom read story from Luke, we ponder how circumstance influences our reactions to others and how we can rebuild relationships.Support our ministry:Send a text message to 833-950-1405 with the amount you would like to contribute. Thank you for your support!Other ways to engage:YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVWQGHpO3YV4aOKXH6ZK6QwPodcast: https://www.buzzsprout.com/456382Twitter:  https://twitter.com/LiftedYeInstagram:  https://www.instagram.com/beyelifted/Website:  https://kingofkingslutheran.org/?page=HomeSupport the show

Computer Architecture Podcast
Ep 8: Durable Security and Privacy-enhanced Computing with Dr. Todd Austin, University of Michigan

Computer Architecture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 60:47


Prof. Todd Austin is a Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. His research interests include robust and secure system design, hardware and software verification, and performance analysis tools and techniques. Todd has donned multiple hats, being a senior processor architect at Intel's Microprocessor Research Labs, a professor at the University of Michigan, serving as the director of research centers like C-FAR, and more recently serving as the CEO and co-founder of the startup Agita Labs. He is also an IEEE Fellow and received the ACM Maurice Wilkes Award for his work on SimpleScalar, and the DIVA and Razor architectures.

Michigan Football – In the Trenches with Jon Jansen
Conqu'ring Heroes 60 - Adam Steinberg

Michigan Football – In the Trenches with Jon Jansen

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 16:34


Fresh off the program's first Big Ten Tournament championship, men's tennis Head Coach Adam Steinberg details the title run from his perspective (1:00) and sets the scene for the NCAA Tournament, which starts on Friday in Ann Arbor against Western Michigan (8:00).See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Antioch Ann Arbor
Practicing Following Jesus // Mark

Antioch Ann Arbor

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 29:53


This week Pastor Jimmy concludes this series in Mark. Thanks for joining us!    ********************************************  This message is from Antioch Community Church in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Follow Antioch Ann Arbor on Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/antiocha2 Follow Antioch Ann Arbor on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/antiocha2 Follow Antioch Ann Arbor on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzZTjIEyt8aMnYqJZOt5vWw  ******************************************* Music Credits: The Ground After A Summer Rain By At The End Of Times, Nothing

Keen On Democracy
Scott Hershovitz: How to Nurture the Philosopher In All Our Kids

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 37:36


Hosted by Andrew Keen, Keen On features conversations with some of the world's leading thinkers and writers about the economic, political, and technological issues being discussed in the news, right now. In this episode, Andrew is joined by Scott Hershovitz, author of Nasty, Brutish, and Short: Adventures in Philosophy with My Kids. Scott Hershovitz is director of the Law and Ethics Program and professor of law and philosophy at the University of Michigan. He holds a BA in philosophy and politics from the University of Georgia, a JD from Yale Law School, and a D.Phil. from the University of Oxford, where he was a Rhodes Scholar. Professor Hershovitz served as a law clerk for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg of the U.S. Supreme Court. He is married to Julie Kaplan, a social worker, whom he met at summer camp. They live in Ann Arbor with their two children, Rex and Hank. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Vineyard Church of Ann Arbor Sermon Podcast
Resurrection Life: Episode 1

Vineyard Church of Ann Arbor Sermon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 34:13


Resurrection Life: Episode 1; by Sam Tidball - a2vc.org. Like us on fb.com/vineyardannarbor or watch our livestream Sundays @ 10:45am - vimeo.com/annarborvineyard

Passive Wealth Strategies for Busy Professionals
Does an MBA Help in Real Estate Investing? with David Kamara

Passive Wealth Strategies for Busy Professionals

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 40:57


David has been a real estate investor since buying his first duplex in 2006. Over time he has transformed the portfolio from residential, single-family, and duplex units to focus on larger multi-family investing including apartment buildings and townhouse communities. When David is not looking for the next investment opportunity he is a successful management consultant and highly sought-after advisor to C-suite executives and private equity investors. He has held a number of interim CIO and COO roles and has been involved in over 50 private equity, corporate and strategic transactions. David received his MBA from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. He holds a Master of Liberal Arts degree from the University of Chicago and a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. David speaks five languages.   [00:01 – 09:19] Opening Segment Get to know David Kamara David shares the story of how he got into the real estate investing space David's life after coming from Sierra Leon Networking in Business School   [09:20 – 19:03] Should You Invest in an MBA? Other opportunities versus real estate for David and his wife What Made David leave his corporate career Things You Have to Know About Business Schools to Get the Best Out of It How MBA Gives You an Edge Above Others   [19:04 – 32:24]  Looking at MBA in an economic sense The future of the real estate space Real estate is a reputation business and you want to deliver David shares about a deal where he had to use the leverage   [31:11 – 40:] Closing Segment Quick break for our sponsors The first step to growing your wealth is tracking your wealth, income spending and everything else about your finances, you can start tracking your wealth for free and get six free months of wealth advisor.  Learn more about Personal Capital at escapingwallstreet.com What is the best investment you've ever made other than your education? Old high school turned apartment for $850,00 David's worst investment First duplexes in Indiana Connect with David Kamara through https://capesierracapital.com/ and check out The Personal Cash Flow Formula. Invest passively in multiple commercial real estate assets such as apartments, self storage, medical facilities, hotels and more through https://www.passivewealthstrategy.com/crowdstreet/ Participate directly in real estate investment loans on a fractional basis. Go to www.passivewealthstrategy.com/groundfloor/ and get ready to invest on your own terms. Join our Passive Investor Club for access to passive commercial real estate investment opportunities. LEAVE A REVIEW + help someone who wants to explode their business growth by sharing this episode or click here to listen to our previous episodes                     Tweetable Quotes: “There is a ton of lessons that you can learn in business school but I don't think you need an MBA.” - David Kamara “Business school is more of what you make it.” - David Kamara “Sometimes it's tough to predict the future.  And with rates, you have to take a stance with where they're going.” - David Kamara  

Be Ye Lifted
Called to Love One Another: A Covenant of Life and Renewal

Be Ye Lifted

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 22:08


In this time of disconnectedness and bad behavior, we receive God's commandments and their call to build relationship in community.Support our ministry:Send a text message to 833-950-1405 with the amount you would like to contribute. Thank you for your support!Other ways to engage:YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVWQGHpO3YV4aOKXH6ZK6QwPodcast: https://www.buzzsprout.com/456382Twitter:  https://twitter.com/LiftedYeInstagram:  https://www.instagram.com/beyelifted/Website:  https://kingofkingslutheran.org/?page=HomeSupport the show (https://kingofkingslutheran.org/?page=Stewardship)

United Church of God Sermons
Staying the Course

United Church of God Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 50:11


By Mark Welch in Ann Arbor, MI - April 23, 2022 - What is it that will help you “stay the course” in regard to your faithfulness in God's Church as times become even more perilous? The love of God, His truth, and His way of life will keep you in good stead.

Italian Wine Podcast
Ep. 888 David Garrett | Uncorked

Italian Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 62:32


Welcome to episode 888 in which host Polly Hammond interviews David Garrett in this episode of Uncorked More about today's guest: David Garrett brings more than 25 years of expertise in the tech, wine and the finance industry globally to Club dVIN, the world's premier global non-fungible token (NFT) wine club. A passion-driven community builder who values authentic digital and real-life experiences and connections, Garrett believes NFTs and the blockchain have supercharged the way communities are created through technology. Through Club dVIN, Garrett and his co-founders have created the ultimate community of wine insiders; a group of 100 founding members who are the top names in wine's new guard, from Masters of Wine to Master Sommeliers to top winemakers, wine experts, wine collectors, and investors. Garrett demonstrated his drive for ingenuity early in his career with the development of IntraACTIVE, an Internet software company he co-founded in 1994. Highlighting the company's accomplishments, IntraACTIVE built the original Intranet for the US Navy. While serving as CEO, he was the lead author of “Intranets Unleashed,” published by Macmillan in 1995. His groundbreaking work in tech and love for wine and travel have taken Garrett around the world. A native of Ann Arbor, Michigan, Garrett has lived in Peru, Argentina, Hong Kong and now Spain. In 2004, he co-founded The Vines of Mendoza, a groundbreaking business model that brought wine tasting, travel and winemaking together. Garrett was responsible for creating and developing the private vineyard estate project, which spans more than 1,500 acres of prime vineyard land, a five-star resort and a Francis Mallmann restaurant. In addition, Garrett founded an iPad wine list business, Entaste, in 2011. From 2011 to 2012, Garrett spent time in Hong Kong building and licensing Entaste for Asian markets. In 2013, Garrett led a group of investors to buy the largest vineyard in Priorat, Spain. He served as the CEO of the turn-around until 2016. Learn more: winery site: https://mistycovewines.com/blog/ignore-the-subject personal site: https://www.marlboroughlights.com/about Insta: https://www.instagram.com/mistycovewines/ More about the host Polly Hammond: Polly is Founder and CEO of 5forests. She splits her time between Barcelona, Auckland, and Napa, consulting, writing, and speaking about the trends that impact today's wine businesses. She's an advisor to New Zealand Trade & Enterprise, host of Uncorked with the Italian Wine Podcast, cohost of the Real Business of Wine with Robert Joseph, and, occasionally, a knitter. Polly is a graduate of the University of Southern California, where she earned degrees in International Relations and French. Those studies led to a deep and abiding love affair with behavioural Economics, and her wine work is based on insights into all the crazy and irrational reasons consumers engage with brands. With over 20 years experience in growing successful companies, Polly knows first hand the challenges faced by independent businesses. She approaches each client experience with empathy and understanding for what it takes to adapt and thrive in the real world. To learn more about Polly Hammond visit: Twitter: @mme_hammond Instagram: @5forests website: https://5forests.com/ Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodcast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ Until next time, Cin Cin!

Special Sauce with Ed Levine
Devita Davidson, Food Lab Detroit and Ji Hye Kim

Special Sauce with Ed Levine

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 35:37


On this week's Special Sauce Detroit food activist and Food Lab Detroit founder Devita Davidson has a lot to say about how government, entrpreneurs, and the private sector can and should work together to form a better food system. Plus chef-restaurateur Ji Hye Kim of Miss Kim's in Ann Arbor tells us about how she has embraced Food Lab Detroit's methods to mutually benefit her business and the employees that work there.

Antioch Ann Arbor
Practicing Following Jesus // Mark

Antioch Ann Arbor

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 103:27


This week, Pastor John Shares from Mark 12 as part of our Practicing Following Jesus series!    ********************************************  This message is from Antioch Community Church in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Follow Antioch Ann Arbor on Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/antiocha2 Follow Antioch Ann Arbor on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/antiocha2 Follow Antioch Ann Arbor on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzZTjIEyt8aMnYqJZOt5vWw  ******************************************* Music Credits: The Ground After A Summer Rain By At The End Of Times, Nothing  

Cubicle Confidential
Why I Find You Irritating: Navigating Generational Friction at Work

Cubicle Confidential

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 33:00


Do generational differences at work have you perplexed? Annoyed? Confused? Do you look at other generations at work and think to yourself WTF? Well, Chris De Santis is here to help! In honor of his newly published book Why I Find You Irritating: Navigating Generational Friction at Work, Chris and Mary answer questions from multiple generations about how to deal with each other.Ants in My Pants in Ann Arbor wants to turn down a promotion in order to travel the world. After 4 years in the workforce, they feel they need a break. WTF? My Way or the Highway in Hawaii is frustrated that their young employees don't want to come into a physical office. Yet, they complain that they don't feel “connected” to the firm. WTF? He Who Has Had It with Them in Everywhere USA doesn't know what to make of the focus on pronouns. After 30 years of work experience, he is having trouble making sense of this “pronoun thing.” WTF? PS: Chris De Santis is giving away free books to anyone who sends in a question. Email us at: info@cubicleconfidential and get your free book. PPS: Mary says that Gen X is really the greatest generation ever!!!!Show us your love! Please give us a review wherever you listen to your podcasts. We're here to help you succeed! Send us your workplace dilemmas or career questions. Email us: info@cubicleconfidential.com or tweet us: @cubicleconfide1. All names will be changed to protect the guilty and innocent...

Michigan Football – In the Trenches with Jon Jansen
Defend the Block 111 - Hunter Dickinson

Michigan Football – In the Trenches with Jon Jansen

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 25:09


Just days after announcing his return to Michigan for the 2022-23 season, Hunter Dickinson chats with Brian Boesch about the decision to come back to Ann Arbor (3:30), his last 12 months as a player and the “Big Man on Campus” here at Michigan (9:30), and his preparations for the upcoming season (18:30).See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Maize n Brew: for Michigan Wolverines fans
Recruiting: What the addition of Cam Goode means for Michigan football

Maize n Brew: for Michigan Wolverines fans

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 36:12


On this week's Future Brew podcast, Von Lozon, Jon Simmons and Seth Berry discuss the latest addition to the Michigan Wolverines football program — former UCF defensive tackle Cam Goode. The graduate student comes to Ann Arbor via the transfer portal after compiling 24 tackles, four forced fumbles, three sacks and an interception in 13 games a season ago. Now that Goode is in the fold, the depth at the interior defensive line spot is strong with Mazi Smith, Kris Jenkins, Rayshaun Benny and more. Should fans expect strong contributions from Goode this season, or is this purely a depth addition for Michigan? After that, the discussion turns to the opening week of the spring evaluation period. The Michigan coaching staff traveled the country visiting recruit's high schools, so we discuss the most important players the Wolverines went to see this past week. All of our Maize n Brew podcasts are available wherever you get your shows! Subscribe, rate, and leave us a review: Apple | Spotify | Google | Stitcher | Megaphone Twitter: https://twitter.com/MaizenBrew Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/maizenbrewsbn/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/maizenbrewsbn YouTube:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZBJuf_eohVzbfZmZzMIdqA Discord: https://discord.com/invite/vZMsMTF Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

United Church of God Sermons
The Power of Remembrance

United Church of God Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 38:19


By Mike Phelps in Ann Arbor, MI, Detroit, MI, Flint, MI - April 22, 2022 - Multiple times in scripture, the Lord told the Israelites to “remember this day” that He brought them out of Egypt. God wanted them always to remember their past and what He had done for them. He wanted them to remember they had a rescuer who took them out of a terrible situation. One of the things we often do leading up to the Days of Unleavened Bread is to think back and remember the calling we received from God and consider what we have done with this calling. As we exit the Days of Unleavened Bread 2022, what will we remember about the past week we just observed? What lessons will we take with us? What insights will we continue to reflect upon? Remembrance is important to God, and therefore it should be important to us as well.

Be Ye Lifted
Where is the Good News in the Midst of So Much Bad News?

Be Ye Lifted

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 19:10


Rev. Dr. Carmelo Santos, Director for Theological Diversity & Ecumenical and Interreligious Engagement for the ELCA, offers an Earth Day sermon that speaks to the contradictions and challenges of our times. Consider how our holy communities sustain us and witness to truth.Support our ministry:Send a text message to 833-950-1405 with the amount you would like to contribute. Thank you for your support!Other ways to engage:YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVWQGHpO3YV4aOKXH6ZK6QwPodcast: https://www.buzzsprout.com/456382Twitter:  https://twitter.com/LiftedYeInstagram:  https://www.instagram.com/beyelifted/Website:  https://kingofkingslutheran.org/?page=HomeSupport the show (https://kingofkingslutheran.org/?page=Stewardship)

Doxa Church
SENT: Ann Arbor Commissioning

Doxa Church

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022


Depth Podcast
129. Trusting God in All the Things -- Ruth Schwenk

Depth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 38:20


Are you overwhelmed? Is there something going on in your life that just seems too big right now? I can totally relate. So, I am so excited to introduce you to the devotional: *Trusting God in All the Things: 90 Devotions for Finding Peace In Your Every Day. This is written by both Karen Ehman and Ruth Schwenk, and I am so excited to talk with Ruth on the podcast this week. We are going to dive deeper into what does it look like to trust God, not only in the good times, but also the storms of life. We are also going to talk about being overwhelmed. Those questions that I ask you at the beginning are actually the first two questions in the first devotional. So we are going to look at the life of Jesus and what he did when he was overwhelmed in the Garden of Gethsemane as well as David and how he felt alone in one of the Psalms and how we can lose perspective in the middle of trials. There is so much hope and encouragement on this episode today and I cannot wait for you to hear the truths from Ruth. Also, I am so excited for someone to win a copy of Ruth's book: *Trusting God in All the Things. All the details of the book giveaway are on my website at jodirosser.com or you can click this direct link: https://kingsumo.com/g/naai8z/trusting-god-in-all-the-things-book-giveaway Book Recommendations: *The Mission of Motherhood by Sally Clarkson *Humble Roots by Hannah Anderson *Valley of Vision by Arthur Bennett Click this link to join my Depth Podcast Facebook Community. Ruth Schwenk is the founder of the popular blog The Better Mom, and along with her pastor/author husband, Patrick, the podcast Rootlike Faith. She is the trusted author of several books, including The Better Mom Devotional and In a Boat in the Middle of a Lake. Ruth is a Michigan football superfan and self-proclaimed foodie. But her greatest joy is her family. She lives with her husband and four children in the beautiful college town of Ann Arbor, Michigan. Learn more at thebettermom.com *Note: If you are interested in purchasing this book or the books recommended, I would love for you to use the Amazon Affiliate link above to help support the podcast. Thank you!

SGSR Podcast Network
BASE Stomps the Herd; Columbus, Ann Arbor Split Rivalry Week Contests

SGSR Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 11:43


THE Ohio State of Mind - Ep. 39 Caleb and Tyler recap BASE's home victory against Marshall and preview a week of rivalry games for baseball, SB and MLAX against Michigan. Caleb Spinner - Instagram: @caleb_spinner Twitter: @CalebSpinner LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/caleb-s-spinner-241980189/ Tyler Danburg: Instagram: @tburg41 Twitter: @TylerDanburg LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tyler-danburg-7184a1222/ THE Ohio State of Mind releases a new episode twice a week (Monday and Friday) on scarletandgraysportsradio.com, SoundCloud and Apple Podcasts. Follow @StateofMindOSU on Twitter for episode release times and show information (https://twitter.com/StateofMindOSU). Stay up to date with this show and SGSR's other programs by following Scarlet and Gray Sports Radio on Instagram (@sgsr.osu) and Twitter (@SGSR_OSU). The SGSR Podcast Network is available on Spotify, Apple Podcasts and SoundCloud.

Spirit Filled Media
FIRE ON THE EARTH with Peter Herbeck - Become a Nomad of Faith - 4/18/22

Spirit Filled Media

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 30:48


Peter Herbeck is the Vice President and Director of Missions for Renewal Ministries. Peter oversees the work of lay mission teams throughout the world who work to equip Catholic lay people, bishops, priests, and religious to respond to Blessed Pope John Paul II's call for a new evangelization. He has traveled extensively in the U.S., Canada, Africa, and Eastern Europe for the past thirty years, assisting and training local churches in proclaiming the gospel of Jesus Christ and ministering through the exercise of spiritual gifts. Peter is the co-host of the weekly television show The Choices We Face, and the host of the daily radio show Fire on the Earth. Peter also is a co-host on Crossing the Goal, the popular show for men broadcast weekly on EWTN.He is a frequent conference speaker, and the author of books and audio tapes about discipleship and life in the Spirit. He has authored a book entitled When the Spirit Comes in Power and co-authored When the Spirit Speaks, Touched by God's Word, with his wife Debbie.Peter holds a B.A. in Philosophy from St. Thomas University in St. Paul, Minnesota and an M.A. in Theology from Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit, Michigan.Peter and his wife Debbie have four children, ages 18 to 25, and are members of Christ the King parish in Ann Arbor, Michigan.Fire On the Earth Airs weekdays at 5am and 2pm Pacific Time go to Spiritfilledevents.com you can also get our free app for your Android and Apple devices. Search Spirit Filled Radio to access our radio app.

Composers Datebook
Husa's "Apotheosis of This Earth"

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 2:00


Synopsis Today is Earth Day – an annual event started in 1970 by then-Senator Gaylord Nelson of Wisconsin as an environmental teach-in. Senator Nelson wasn't the only one concerned back then, either: the Czech-born composer Karel Husa had noticed dead fish floating on a lake located near a power plant. “The plant was producing hot thermal pollution which in turn killed all those fish,” Husa recalled. “In addition, I noticed more beer cans in the water and algae in greater quantities.” A wind band commission provided Husa with an opportunity to create a work he called “Apotheosis of This Earth.” In explaining its title, Karel Husa wrote: “Man's brutal possession and misuse of nature's beauty – if continued at today's reckless speed – can only lead to catastrophe. The composer hopes that the destruction of this beautiful earth can be stopped, so that the tragedy of destruction – musically projected here in the second movement—and the desolation of its aftermath – the “postscript” of this work – can exist only as fantasy, never to become reality.” “Apotheosis of this Earth” was commissioned by the Michigan School Band and Orchestral Association, and its premiere performance took place on April 1, 1970, with Husa himself conducting the University of Michigan Symphony Band at Hill Auditorium in Ann Arbor. It proved a powerful piece of music. “As the Postscript finished,” recalled the composer, “I saw that the students in the band were somehow moved – there were even some tears.” Music Played in Today's Program Karel Husa (b. 1921) — Apotheosis of This Earth (Ithaca College Wind Ensemble; Rodney Winther, cond.) Mark 3170

The Jayme Starr Podcast
Claire Crause is Always Up to Something

The Jayme Starr Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 38:10


Claire Crause is a professional dancer based in New York City. She grew up not too far from me, in Ann Arbor, Michigan and graduated from Pioneer High School. After high school. she then went on to pursue a dance degree from the University of Michigan. now, living in New York City, Crause has worked in promotional material for season 1 podcast guest, Diana DeGarmo. Plus, she was a dancer for the Jonas Brothers music video for their song "Only Human." Additionally, Crause made her professional theatre debut in the ensemble of Footloose at the Kennedy Center in Washington DC, where she had the privilege to star on stage beside the late Rebecca Luker before Luker's passing in 2020. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jayme-starr/support

Spirit Filled Media
FIRE ON THE EARTH with Peter Herbeck - The Just Judgment of God - 4/18/22

Spirit Filled Media

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 30:48


Peter Herbeck is the Vice President and Director of Missions for Renewal Ministries. Peter oversees the work of lay mission teams throughout the world who work to equip Catholic lay people, bishops, priests, and religious to respond to Blessed Pope John Paul II's call for a new evangelization. He has traveled extensively in the U.S., Canada, Africa, and Eastern Europe for the past thirty years, assisting and training local churches in proclaiming the gospel of Jesus Christ and ministering through the exercise of spiritual gifts. Peter is the co-host of the weekly television show The Choices We Face, and the host of the daily radio show Fire on the Earth. Peter also is a co-host on Crossing the Goal, the popular show for men broadcast weekly on EWTN.He is a frequent conference speaker, and the author of books and audio tapes about discipleship and life in the Spirit. He has authored a book entitled When the Spirit Comes in Power and co-authored When the Spirit Speaks, Touched by God's Word, with his wife Debbie.Peter holds a B.A. in Philosophy from St. Thomas University in St. Paul, Minnesota and an M.A. in Theology from Sacred Heart Seminary in Detroit, Michigan.Peter and his wife Debbie have four children, ages 18 to 25, and are members of Christ the King parish in Ann Arbor, Michigan.In this episode, he speaks about the judgement of God.Peter Herbeck show airs Weekdays at 5am and 2pm  Pacific Time at Spiritfilledevents.com or go to https://www.spiritfilledevents.com/radio-podcast

Antioch Ann Arbor
Easter // Signposts

Antioch Ann Arbor

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 36:57


Tune in this week for Pastor John's Easter message!    ********************************************  This message is from Antioch Community Church in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Follow Antioch Ann Arbor on Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/antiocha2 Follow Antioch Ann Arbor on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/antiocha2 Follow Antioch Ann Arbor on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzZTjIEyt8aMnYqJZOt5vWw    ******************************************* Music Credits: The Ground After A Summer Rain By At The End Of Times, Nothing

The Growth Equation Podcast
Habits Aren’t the Only Path to Health Behavior Change

The Growth Equation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 53:33


This week we are joined by Michelle Segar, who is a researcher at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, studying sustainable behavior change. The discussion revolves around when and why habits fail, and how you can still make the right choice in those moments. It is a great and actionable conversation on a framework for… The post Habits Aren't the Only Path to Health Behavior Change appeared first on The Growth Equation.

The Portfolio Composer
Danielle Kuntz on The Toolbox Sessions and Writing for Harp

The Portfolio Composer

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 36:38


As a new music harpist, Danielle Kuntz is dedicated to bringing new music to life. She has focused her career on connecting living composers with new audiences by commissioning them and performing their music. Danielle also works to make the harp a more accessible instrument for composers through lectures, workshops, and individual instruction. Danielle holds degrees from the University of North Texas and is currently based in Ann Arbor, Michigan.   This episode is sponsored by Dorico by Steinberg, the future of scoring. Visit www.steinberg.net/tpc for a free 30-day trial version.     Harpist and new music advocate Danielle Kuntz discusses why composers should write idiomatically and her new orchestration conference, The Toolbox Sessions. Topics discussed in this episode: Danielle's portfolio Coaching Creating content Fulfilling performances Creating opportunities Meet your audience Idiomatic writing Toolbox Sessions Websites: daniellekuntz.com toolboxsessions.com use coupon code TPC22 to get 10% off your ticket. Help composers find the podcast by giving The Portfolio Composer a review on iTunes!   This episode was edited by Studio184.

Michigan Football – In the Trenches with Jon Jansen
Defend the Block 110 - DeVante' Jones

Michigan Football – In the Trenches with Jon Jansen

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 28:01


Defend the Block is back with the start of our offseason content! We begin with now former Wolverine guard DeVante' Jones, who reflects on the wild ride of his one season in Ann Arbor (7:30), previews the future for Frankie Collins and the program as a whole (14:30), and details his preparation for the NBA Draft (19:00).See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Nebraska Athletics Podcast
NU Drops Battle to Michigan, 4-1

Nebraska Athletics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022


Ann Arbor, Mich. - The Nebraska women's tennis team (12-8, 5-3 Big Ten) defeated the Michigan Wolverines (12-5, 6-1 Big Ten) 4-1 Friday afternoon at the Varsity Tennis Center.

EntreArchitect Podcast with Mark R. LePage
EA452: Lisa Sauvé – Entrepreneurial Success Through Community-Driven Design

EntreArchitect Podcast with Mark R. LePage

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 42:31


Entrepreneurial Success Through Community-Driven Design Lisa Sauvé is the Co-Founding Principal and CEO of Synecdoche, an award winning interdisciplinary architecture and creative practice with studios in Ann Arbor and Detroit. The studio has set precedent as a woman-owned rm that integrates fabrication and real estate development into the operations and investments of the studio. The […] The post EA452: Lisa Sauvé – Entrepreneurial Success Through Community-Driven Design appeared first on EntreArchitect // Small Firm Entrepreneur Architects.

Closer Mentality
Ep. 62: Sack The Stigma

Closer Mentality

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 31:04


Episode 62 welcomed three representatives from the University of Michigan's Sack the Stigma initiative, which is aimed at engaging college students and student-athletes in mental health advocacy. Sack The Stigma is a collaborative effort between the University of Michigan's athletic department, specifically football players, Soho Youth Club, a advocacy-through-apparel brand, and Valiant, a sports marketing agency assisting Michigan's student-athletes with NIL opportunities. Speaking on behalf of the initiative are Brett Gray, Founder and CEO of Soho Youth Club, Carly Silverstein, Clinical Therapist and Mental Performance Fellow with Ann Arbor-based BLND Health, and Jared Wangler, Founder and CEO of Valiant. This episode is sponsored by BetterHelp. Get 10% off of your first month at betterhelp.com/closermentality Sack The Stigma Website: https://www.sohoyouthclub.com/pages/sack-the-stigma Sack The Stigma Merchandise: https://www.mden.com/search.html?S001=sack%20the%20stigma Closer Mentality UNCENSORED: www.youtube.com/channel/UCJuZfwIP9ny-WIqpcUaQnWA

sustainabiliME
Grist's 2022 Sustainability Fixers

sustainabiliME

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 23:26


Recently, Grist released their 2022 list of 50 fixers working on making the planet a better place. Today Jason and I will highlight 6 of them, but you can find the entire list here: https://grist.org/fix/grist-50/2022/  Thank you to Grist for putting this list together and for showing us that there are some amazing people doing amazing things for our planet! Check out the links below to learn more about the people we talk about in today's episode! 1.) Nina Ignaczak, Founder & Executive Editor of Planet Detroit 2.) Rollie Williams, Creator of Climate Town 3.) Bob Carswell, R&D Director at Material Return 4.) Julia Marsh, CEO and Co-Founder of Sway 5.) Missy Stults, Innovations & Sustainability Manager for the City of Ann Arbor 6.) Ugbaad Kosar, Carbon180 7.) Brett Isaac, Co-founder of Navajo Power 8.) Rev. Kyle Meyaard-Schaap, Evangelical Environmental Network Follow us on social media @sustainabiliME.pod

Fate of Fact
April 12th: The Polio Vaccine Is Approved

Fate of Fact

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 6:22


On April 12th, 1955, in Ann Arbor, Michigan, Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine for polio was approved. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Michigan Insider
A look back at Michigan star & NFL Draft prospect Aidan Hutchinson as a recruit

The Michigan Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 17:07


In the first of our three-part series ahead of the 2022 NFL Draft later this month, 247Sports national recruiting analyst Allen Trieu joins the show to look back at what Michigan star edge rusher Aidan Hutchinson, who some project as the No. 1 overall selection, was as a recruit, from the physical development and skill set, to his recruiting process and eventual collegiate success in Ann Arbor. Host: Blair Angulo  Guest: Allen Trieu Follow or Subscribe to the 247Sports Football Recruiting podcast feed on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. Find the 247Sports podcast for your favorite team here! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

247Sports Football Recruiting Podcast
A look back at Michigan star & NFL Draft prospect Aidan Hutchinson as a recruit

247Sports Football Recruiting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 17:07


In the first of our three-part series ahead of the 2022 NFL Draft later this month, 247Sports national recruiting analyst Allen Trieu joins the show to look back at what Michigan star edge rusher Aidan Hutchinson, who some project as the No. 1 overall selection, was as a recruit, from the physical development and skill set, to his recruiting process and eventual collegiate success in Ann Arbor. Host: Blair Angulo  Guest: Allen Trieu Follow or Subscribe to the 247Sports Football Recruiting podcast feed on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. Find the 247Sports podcast for your favorite team here! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices