Podcasts about Old City

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Best podcasts about Old City

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Latest podcast episodes about Old City

Yalla Israel with Leontine & Alan
Episode 28: Places We Can't Talk About

Yalla Israel with Leontine & Alan

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 30:25


In this episode Leontine and Alan talk about places that are so top secret, they cannot talk about....unless they kill you. Just kidding, of course? Many listeners also want to know if the Old City of Jerusalem is accessible for people with disabilities.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
There's a new sheriff in the West Bank -- MK Bezalel Smotrich

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 17:58


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Settlements reporter Jeremy Sharon and news editor Amy Spiro join host Amanda Borschel-Dan in today's episode. Just before he stepped on a plane to Bahrain, diplomatic correspondent Lazar Berman briefs listeners on what we should expect from President Isaac Herzog's two-day visit to Israel's allies in the Persian Gulf region. On Thursday, details of the final terms of the coalition agreements with the Religious Zionism bloc were released. What do we know about what each party got? Head of the Religious Zionism party MK Bezalel Smotrich is often called a "zealot" or an "ideologue." How is that expected to affect his performance as head of the Civil Administration and COGAT? Sharon explains what kind of reactions we are hearing from settler leaders and well as opposition lawmakers and former high-ranking IDF officers. Spiro recently watched season 2 of “My Unorthodox Life” and spoke with its lead, Julia Haart. Buckle up. Discussed articles include: ‘Message of peace': Herzog lands in Bahrain for 1st state visit by Israeli president New Smotrich powers likely to see settlements flourish, Palestinian building limited Netanyahu gives Smotrich broad powers over settlements, Palestinian construction How Bezalel Smotrich rode unfiltered radicalism and unforgiving politics to power Former lawmakers, top soldiers blast deal giving Smotrich authority over West Bank Messy divorce, religious battles headline season 2 of Netflix's ‘My Unorthodox Life' Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. ILLUSTRATIVE IMAGE: MK Bezalel Smotrich, center, waves an Israeli flag during the annual 'Flags March' next to Damascus gate, outside Jerusalem's Old City, June 15, 2021. (AP Photo/Mahmoud Illean)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Maghrib in Past & Present | Podcasts
A Critical Analysis of Heritage Preservation in Libya

Maghrib in Past & Present | Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 28:57


Episode 150: A Critical Analysis of Heritage Preservation in Libya In this podcast, AIMS Cultural Heritage Fellow Reem Furjani discusses her research in the Old City of Tripoli, the field of critical heritage studies and her work bridging scholarly research and practice. Cultural heritage studies is a burgeoning academic field that seeks to contribute and expand classic work on heritage practices by introducing bottom-up approaches to preservation theory and practice. Reem's work specifically integrates the involvement, thoughts and practices of inhabitants in preserving sites and spaces. In this approach, heritage moves beyond a static condition and instead becomes a living, and dynamic area of focus. Furjani eloquently condenses this academic field into approachable terms, thereby putting her own work in critical heritage studies into practice. The debate on heritage is not and should not be approached as something exclusive and limited to a field of technical experts, but as an inclusive movement that takes into consideration those living and experiencing heritage every day. Furjani integrates examples and experiences from her own work, specifically her various projects in the Old city of Tripoli, throughout this talk. Reem Furjani is a cultural activist and researcher focused on critical heritage studies and cultural democracy. She is the founder and director of Scene, a non-profit that protects cultural heritage in Tripoli. She is completing her PhD and holds a Masters Degree in Architecture from Cardiff University. Furjani was the AIMS Libya Cultural Heritage Fellow and is currently a fellow at the Oxford Center for Islamic Studies. This podcast is part of "Libya Studies" series and was recorded at Centre d'Études Maghrébines à Tunis (CEMAT) on April 26, 2022 with Neely Egan, the CEMAT Cultural History of Tourism Researcher.  We thank Dr. Jonathan Glasser, Cultural Anthropologist at au College of William & Mary, for his istikhbar in sika on viola for the introduction and conclusion of this podcast.   Edited & Posted by: Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

Rabbi Daniel Glatstein Podcast
Journey to Jerusalem: The Old City- The "Cardo"; Heart of the Jewish People

Rabbi Daniel Glatstein Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 1:24


Rabbi Daniel Glatstein Podcast
Journey To Jerusalem: The Old City; The Ohr Hachaim Shul & the Astounding Machlokes Ohr Haschaim & R' Chaim Kanievsky

Rabbi Daniel Glatstein Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 4:34


Rabbi Daniel Glatstein Podcast
Live From The Old City 5783 - Kol B'rama Studios

Rabbi Daniel Glatstein Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 6:19


Rabbi Daniel Glatstein Podcast
Journey to Jerusalem: The Old City - The Chatzeir of the Shela Hakadosh

Rabbi Daniel Glatstein Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 3:00


The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Changes to Law of Return & a missed moment for Diaspora Jews

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 18:38


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Military correspondent Emanuel Fabian and Diaspora and Religions reporter Judah Ari Gross join Amanda Borschel-Dan on today's episode. Unfortunately, a second victim from Wednesday's attack succumbed to his injuries on Saturday, Tadese Tashume Ben Ma'ada. The 50-year-old immigrated to Israel from Ethiopia 21 years ago and leaves behind a wife and six children. Fabian updates on the status of the manhunt and how on Saturday, police shut a main entrance to Jerusalem after a suspected pipe bomb was found near the Chords Bridge. On Friday, the IDF suspended two soldiers who physically assaulted and taunted left-wing activists in Hebron, which is the latest in a series of incidents involving the Givati infantry brigade in the flashpoint West Bank city. What exactly happened here? Early last week, Chief Rabbi David Lau ask the incoming government to revoke the so-called “grandchild clause” from the Law of Return, which grants Israeli citizenship to anyone with at least one Jewish grandparent who does not practice another religion. What are the chances of this? Diaspora Minister Nachman Shai spoke with Gross last week and voiced several regrets. What are his parting words? Discussed articles include: Second person dies of injuries days after Jerusalem bombing attack In false alarm, entrance to Jerusalem briefly shut after suspected pipe bomb found IDF suspends soldiers for beating and taunting left-wing activists in Hebron Chief rabbi calls for government to change immigration law to keep non-Jews out Diaspora minister: ‘Not implementing Western Wall compromise was a historic failure' Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Head of the Likud party Benjamin Netanyahu visits at the Western Wall in Jerusalem's Old City, the night before the Israeli general elections, October 31, 2022. (Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Rabbi Daniel Glatstein Podcast
Journey to Jerusalem: Sanhedria Cemetary - The Kever of Rav Shlomo Dovid Kahana, Rav of Warsaw and the Old City

Rabbi Daniel Glatstein Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 1:05


Congregation of the Living Word, a Messianic Jewish Congregation
The Gates of Jerusalem   Part 10:   The Tanners' Gate.  -  English only

Congregation of the Living Word, a Messianic Jewish Congregation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 7:22


The Gates of Jerusalem   Part 10:   The Tanners' Gate.  -  English only.   It is a gate that is unknown to most tourists and even to many Israeli citizens.  It is the newest of the Old City's gates and it is also one of the oldest!  Join us as we visit the Tanners' Gate.  Recorded September 20, 2022.

The Scruffy Stuff
What can Knoxville learn from Durham's downtown stadium?

The Scruffy Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 29:50


Downtown reporter Ryan Wilusz and visual journalist Calvin Mattheis return to Knoxville to share what they learned from their trip to Durham, North Carolina, where a downtown baseball stadium opened in 1995 resembles the plans for downtown Knoxville, just east of the Old City.  As the Tennessee Smokies prepare to move downtown in 2025, visit knoxnews.com for more insight gathered from our trip, including video tours and stories on the lessons Durham Bulls officials learned about their downtown stadium over time. There are lots of takeaways for the Tennessee Smokies, downtown Knoxville stakeholders and taxpayers. "The Scruffy Stuff" is presented by Knox News. Want more downtown analysis? Sign up for the free weekly Urban Knoxville newsletter by clicking here, and join the downtown discussion by becoming part of the Urban Knoxville group on Facebook.

My 904 News
Kate Batzel sits in with us today to talk Old City Oil Drippers, and their upcoming fundraiser!

My 904 News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 24:44


Kate Batzel sits in with us today to talk Old City Oil Drippers, and their upcoming fundraiser!

CBRL Sound
Jerusalem: Old City Perspectives from W/out & Within I Matthew Teller & Bisan Abu Eisheh I Sept 2022

CBRL Sound

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 53:11


In Jerusalem, what you see and what is true are two different things. Maps divide the walled Old City into four quarters, yet that division doesn't reflect the reality of mixed and diverse neighbourhoods. Beyond the crush and frenzy of its major religious sites, much of the Old City remains little known to visitors, its people overlooked and their stories untold. This webinar highlights voices of the communities of the Old City by bringing into dialogue the writings of author/journalist Matthew Teller and artist/academic Bisan Abu Eisheh. Teller's latest book ‘Nine Quarters of Jerusalem' is a highly original ‘biography' of the Old City and its communities, evoking the city's depth and cultural diversity, from its ancient past to its political present. Abu Eisheh is a lifelong resident of the Old City, whose academic and artistic works investigate history, society and politics through the lost details of grand narratives. This webinar takes place on the occasion of the US release of ‘Nine Quarters of Jerusalem', and will feature a presentation on the book's findings, followed by a discussion led by Abu Eisheh exploring insider/outsider dynamics that shape understandings, policies and communities of Jerusalem. About the speakers: Matthew Teller writes for the BBC, Guardian, Independent, Times, Financial Times and other global media. He has produced and presented documentaries for BBC Radio 4 and World Service, and has reported for ‘From Our Own Correspondent' from around the Middle East and beyond. He is the author of several travel guides, including the Rough Guide to Jordan; his most recent book is Quite Alone: Journalism from the Middle East 2008–2019. Bisan Abu Eisheh is an artist and academic born and raised in the Old City of Jerusalem. His creative practices feature video performances, installations and interventions within gallery spaces and the public sphere that aim to generate dialogue around national identity, mobility, migration and socio-political justice. He has also just submitted his PhD thesis to the University of Westminster, which looks at visual art practices as a form of Palestinian knowledge production and distribution in conjunction with the post-1993 realities. He is currently CBRL's Jerusalem Research and Events Coordinator based at the Kenyon Institute.

The No-Till Market Garden Podcast
Introducing New Host Alex Ball of Old City Acres

The No-Till Market Garden Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 23:15


Welcome BACK to yet another exciting season of The No-Till Market Garden Podcast. As mentioned at the end of last season, I--Jesse--will not be hosting this year. My role now is more of a producer for the suite of podcasts and work we publish at No-Till Growers. I'm excited to introduce the second host, Alex Ball of Old City Acres! We are big fans of Alex's work and in this mini-interview we muse on the progression and evolution of our respective farms. He's gong to bring a lot to the host seat because of his interest in the details surrounding what it takes to run a successful farm business, which is something I felt was lacking in my own approach. Alex is someone you can listen to and talk to for hours, he's a lot of fun, and we can't wait for his contribution to the podcast. Alex's first interview will be coming out next Monday. As always, our work is powered by the folks who support us every month over at patreon.com/notillgrowers, you can pick up a copy of The Living Soil Handbook if you don't have one already, and you can ask you questions or share your insights into ecological market gardening on our brand new forum at notillgrowers.community.chat

Congregation of the Living Word, a Messianic Jewish Congregation
The Gates of Jerusalem  Part 7:  The Damascus Gate  -  English only

Congregation of the Living Word, a Messianic Jewish Congregation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 2:50


The Gates of Jerusalem  Part 7:  The Damascus Gate  -  English only.   The Damascus Gate is the largest of the Old City's gates.  Beneath it, you can see a gate that was built by a Roman Emperor 1000 years earlier. But why would we name this gate after the capital of Syria?  Recorded September 21, 2022.

The Economics of Well-Being
#101: The Path of Love: 30 Year Anniversary of my Journey to Jerusalem in 1992

The Economics of Well-Being

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 23:01


It was 30 years ago on October 13, 1992 that I returned from Jerusalem completing a 3 month vision quest and vocational journey to explore the question: What does God want me to do next in my life as an economist? That journey started in Stockholm delivering a paper on ecological economics, a journey through Germany and Austria (my father's and grandfather's homelands), Rome and Assisi, then an epic sail boat journey down the Nile in Egypt to the ancient Egyptian sites. Little did I know that my arrival in the ancient city of Jerusalem would change my life forever. It was in the Old City, where I spent two weeks in prayer and reflection, that I felt a deep calling to 'build a civilization and economy of love.' That journey continues 30 years later. Love I believe is the foundation of all our lives. Love is who we are. Love created us. In our current state of the world, following a global pandemic and now a protracted economic crisis and an unnecessary war in the Ukraine, the message that a civilization of love is both possible and within our capacities to manifest is more urgent than ever. Thanks for listening to my life story! Mark Anielski --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mark-anielski/message

Congregation of the Living Word, a Messianic Jewish Congregation
The Gates of Jerusalem   Part 5:   The New Gate.  -  English only

Congregation of the Living Word, a Messianic Jewish Congregation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 2:19


The Gates of Jerusalem   Part 5:   The New Gate.  -  English only.  Join us as we continue our tour of the gates of Jerusalem's Old City.  Today we visit the New Gate. This gate was constructed 350 years after Suleiman the Great built the walls around the Old City. How did this gate come into existence?  That story is a lesson for us all!   Recorded September 14, 2022.

Kefi L!fe
87. Kiki's Holy Land Trip Up Close & Personal

Kefi L!fe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 17:41


87. Kiki's Holy Land Trip Up Close & Personal  A glimpse at the Holy Land as experienced by Kiki! Kiki in Bethlehem Today's Lexi:  Περιπέτεια — Peripéteia (Adventure) In Today's Episode: Join Kiki on her pilgrimage to the Holy Land.  An adventurous spirit and the urge to feed her mind body and soul leads to travel to the mysterious Middle East to experience the other side of the world where three major religions persist and prevail. How do the land and the sea tie into the ethos of this spiritual place? What will you learn about the food and some of the traditions of the Jewish and Palestinian people?  What's so interesting about Jericho and certainly you will discover the Old City of Jerusalem when you tune in to this episode 87. Kiki also touches upon prayers, middle eastern dishes, people, traditions and the three Abrahamic groups. A Holy Land journey in science, faith, nature, God and feeding the soul during this episode of Kefi L!fe! Burqin, a town in the northern West Bank, is home to one of the oldest churches in the world, the Church of the Ten Lepers, where Jesus Christ is said to have performed a miracle of healing lepers who were confined in the church's cave.  This was one of Kiki's favorite stops on the pilgrimage.  Church of the Ten Lepers Today's Ola Kala Moment: For Today's Ola Kala Moment: Be all is well when you experience the cuisine of different cultures Resources: Map of Israel Church of the Holy Sepulchre Credits: Music: Spiro Dussias Vocals: Zabrina Hay Graphic Designer: Susan Jackson O'Leary

Congregation of the Living Word, a Messianic Jewish Congregation
The Gates of Jerusalem  Part 4:  The Dung Gate  -  English

Congregation of the Living Word, a Messianic Jewish Congregation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 4:46


The Gates of Jerusalem  Part 4:  The Dung Gate  -  English.  Join us as we continue our tour of the gates of Jerusalem's Old City.  Today, we visit the Dung Gate. While the name of the gate seems peculiar, it represents an important and fundamental aspect of life.  Recorded September 14, 2022.  

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Was Israel behind senior Lion's Den member's assassination?

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 17:09


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Editor David Horovitz and military correspondent Emanuel Fabian join host Amanda Borschel-Dan on today's episode. Lion's Den member Tamer Kilani, a member of the upstart Palestinian terror organization, was killed early Sunday by an explosive device attached to a motorcycle detonated in Nablus's Old City. Why or why not could Israel be behind the killing? Yesterday, the Kan television channel aired a recording of Religious Zionist head Bezalel Smotrich that was apparently made last year in which he sounded pretty disloyal to opposition head Benjamin Netanyahu. What was on the recording? We hear why Horovitz thinks that the November 1 elections will indeed be decisive. Three men from northern Israel were indicted on Thursday for allegedly sending a large volume of sensitive information to the Hamas terror group in Turkey, and for plans to sabotage Israel's cellular network in a future war. We hear why this is so dangerous to the IDF. Finally, Horovitz briefly compares Israel's chaotic electoral processes with that of England. Discussed articles include: Alleged assassination in Nablus may signal major Israeli policy change in West Bank Senior member of Palestinian terror group Lion's Den killed in Nablus explosion Smotrich: Netanyahu ‘lying through his teeth,' was desperate to ally with Ra'am Why this election is a defining moment for Israel, how it's run, what it stands for 3 Israelis charged in Hamas plot to sabotage telecom networks used by IDF during war Why the British public is not choosing its leader Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Mourners carry the body of Tamer al-Kilani, a top fighter in the Palestinian militant group Den of Lions, who the group said was killed by an explosive device planted in a motorcycle, during his funeral in the West Bank city of Nablus, October 23, 2022. (AP Photo/Majdi Mohammed)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

What's Cooking
Cochon et Cidre festival kicks off Philly Cider Week

What's Cooking

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 9:40


A new fall pig and cider festival in Old City kicks off Philly Cider Week. KYW Newsradio's Hadas Kuznits chats with organizer Brian Lofink about what to expect.

Congregation of the Living Word, a Messianic Jewish Congregation
The Gates of Jerusalem  Part 3:  The Zion Gate.  -  English only

Congregation of the Living Word, a Messianic Jewish Congregation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 5:04


The Gates of Jerusalem  Part 3:  The Zion Gate.  -  English only.  The Zion Gate, which connects Jerusalem's Old City to Mount Zion, has an exciting history.  The Scriptures record that this spot has a special significance for followers of Yeshua!  Recorded September 16, 2022.

The Scruffy Stuff
Which downtown Knoxville bars have the best pub grub?

The Scruffy Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 25:03


Simple bar food is great. There's nothing more classic than burgers or wings with beer, but bars on this podcast take it up a notch by offering high-quality flavors and unique ingredients. Then there's the more-unique side of bar food, where watering holes thrive by offering out-of-the-box items that seem totally reasonable when you're drinking and turn out to be quite tasty. Downtown reporter Ryan Wilusz is joined on this week's episode by growth and development reporter Silas Sloan and growth and development intern Keenan Thomas.  "The Scruffy Stuff" is presented by knoxnews.com. Want more downtown analysis? Sign up for the free weekly Urban Knoxville newsletter by clicking here, and join the downtown discussion by becoming part of the Urban Knoxville group on Facebook.

Daily News Brief by TRT World
October 11, 2022

Daily News Brief by TRT World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 2:36


*) UN fears Russian strikes to provoke more displacements The United Nations refugee chief has warned more people will be forced to flee their homes in Ukraine after Russian missiles rained down on Kiev and other Ukrainian cities. UN High Commissioner for Refugees Filippo Grandi said the bombing of civilians, of houses and of non-military infrastructure in an indiscriminate manner, means the war is becoming harder and more difficult for civilians. Grandi said he feared that the latest events will provoke more displacements. *) Iran enhances its ability on uranium enrichment — IAEA Iran is rapidly expanding its ability to enrich uranium with advanced centrifuges at its underground plant at Natanz, a confidential UN nuclear watchdog report has shown. While indirect talks between Iran and the US on reviving the 2015 Iran nuclear deal have stalled, Tehran has brought onstream an ever larger number of advanced centrifuges to produce enriched uranium. These machines are far more efficient than the first-generation IR-1, the only centrifuge that the deal lets Iran use to grow its stock of enriched uranium. *) Palestinians accuse Israelis of burning Quran as settlers storm Al Aqsa A Palestinian official has accused Israeli settlers of burning copies of the Quran, Islam's holy book, in the occupied West Bank city of Hebron. Nidal Al Jabari, the director of Waqf Department in Hebron, said burnt copies of the Quran were found near the Qaytoun mosque in Hebron's Old City. He suggested that the copies were burnt during celebrations of a Jewish holiday in recent days, calling for an investigation into the incident. *) Hurricane Ian death toll climbs above 100 in Florida alone The death toll from Hurricane Ian, one of the most powerful storms ever to hit the United States, has soared above 100 in Florida alone. Homes, restaurants and businesses were ripped apart when Ian roared ashore as a powerful Category 4 hurricane on September 26. The Florida Medical Examiners Commission confirmed that the number of storm-related fatalities rose to 102 statewide. *) Over 200 stranded pilot whales die on Pacific Ocean's remote Pitt Island New Zealand's conservation office has said that all 240 pilot whales stranded on the remote Pitt Island have died. Marine technical advisor at the Department of Conservation, said a technical team had assessed the situation and euthanised the surviving whales. He said the conservation department does not try to refloat whales in the area due to the risk of shark attack to both humans and whales.

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Victory for Temple Mount activists; Lebanon deal almost done

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 18:07


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Political correspondent Tal Schneider and settlements reporter Jeremy Sharon join host Amanda Borschel-Dan in today's Sukkot episode. We've been following the potential maritime border deal with Lebanon very closely on the Daily Briefing. This morning saw some very optimistic announcements from both sides. The world is following the latest deadly strikes throughout Ukraine following Saturday's bombing of a bridge connecting Russia with Ukraine. President Volodymyr Zelensky claims Russia used missiles and Iran-made drones to target civilians and Ukraine's energy infrastructure in a series of deadly strikes. What are the implications for Israel? Sharon fills us in on the recent brouhaha over an ongoing legal battle with the police over Temple Mount activists' efforts to blow the shofar at what is known as the Eastern Wall of the Temple Mount complex. Discussed articles include: Israel and Lebanon hail imminent ‘historic' maritime deal after latest US draft Zelensky: Russia used Iran-made drones, missiles in deadly strikes on several cities Report: Police chief says MK's shofar-blowing near flashpoint site could ignite war Temple Mount activists, police feud over shofar-blowing near flashpoint site Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: An Orthodox Jewish man walks past the Golden Gate, as he circles around all the gates to the Temple Mount while praying in Jerusalem's Old City, early morning on August 4, 2019. (Hadas Parush/Flash90See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Scruffy Stuff
Is downtown Knoxville living worth the cost?

The Scruffy Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 20:31


Downtown Knoxville living is a fantasy for many and a reality for few. No matter how you slice it, living in the center of the city almost always is more expensive than the suburbs. Listen as growth and development editor Brenna McDermott and downtown reporter Ryan Wilusz help guide you through the decision of whether it makes sense to give urban life a try. We break down amenities that are most important in a downtown environment, how lifestyles change upon moving downtown and which hidden costs you might not be considering.  For a guide to the most in-demand downtown apartments, check out this story from growth and development intern Keenan Thomas.  "The Scruffy Stuff" is presented by knoxnews.com. Want more downtown analysis? Sign up for the free weekly Urban Knoxville newsletter by clicking here, and join the downtown discussion by becoming part of the Urban Knoxville group on Facebook.

Meaningful People
R' Eitiel Goldwicht | The Rooftop Rabbi

Meaningful People

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 82:25 Very Popular


Rabbi Eitiel Goldwicht is the founder of Aish Israel, the Israeli division of Aish Hatorah, and the Associate Rabbi of Beit Knesset Hanassi in Yerushalayim. His deep understanding and passion for the Jewish people fuel his work across the religious spectrum. Tens of thousands visit the Aish World Center yearly and have experienced Rabbi Goldwicht's dynamic and engaging classes and programs.  He currently lectures both in Hebrew and English, constantly expanding the scope of his audience through radio appearances, video presentations, and social media.  ____________________________________ Re-Imagine Your Key Relationships with Rabbi Dovid M. Cohen's transformational new book. Available at rabbidovidmcohen.com, Amazon & bookstores. ____________________________________ This episode is brought to you by Touro University! To learn more about how you can excel at Touro University, Visit Touro.edu/more ____________________________________ Enter to win a $1,000,000  apartment in the heart of Jerusalem! Use code MPP for discounted tickets! thedreamraffle.com ____________________________________   Subscribe to Meaningful Minute on WhatsApp: https://wa.me/15166687800?text=Please%20subscribe%20me%20to%20Meaningful%20Min Ute ____________________________________   Subscribe to our Podcast Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2WALuE2 Spotify: https://spoti.fi/39bNGnO Google Podcasts: https://bit.ly/MPPGooglePodcasts Or wherever Podcasts are available!   Follow us on Instagram: https://instagram.com/meaningfulpeoplepodcast Like us on Facebook: https://bit.ly/MPPonFB Follow us on Twitter:https://twitter.com/MeaningfuPplPod Editor: Sruly Saftlas Podcast created by: Meaningful Minute For more info and upcoming news check out: https://Meaningfulminute.org #jew #jewish #podcast #frum #rabbi #frumpodcast #meaningfulpeople #torah #mitzvah #hashem #jewishmusic #jewishpodcast #israel #kumzitz #nachigordon #jewishpod

Congregation of the Living Word, a Messianic Jewish Congregation
The Gates of Jerusalem:  Part 2  The Jaffa Gate  -  English only.

Congregation of the Living Word, a Messianic Jewish Congregation

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 9:28


The Gates of Jerusalem:  Part 2  The Jaffa Gate  -  English only.   Join us on our tour of the gates of Jerusalem's Old City as we visit the Jaffa Gate, and study its history, architecture, and environs. The record of those who passed through the Jaffa Gate reveals a scriptural principle that we all need to keep in mind! September 14, 2022.

The Scruffy Stuff
What are the unspoken rules of downtown Knoxville?

The Scruffy Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 23:49


Some live by the philosophy that rules are meant to be broken, but what about non-rules that are meant to be followed? Residents and frequent visitors of downtown Knoxville know what we're talking about, even if they never publicly acknowledge these unspoken guidelines − the shortcuts to bar entries, the etiquette on sidewalks and the red light some people believe is totally OK to run through. On this week's episode, higher education reporter Becca Wright joins downtown reporter Ryan Wilusz to discuss which unspoken rules deserve to be said aloud.  "The Scruffy Stuff" is presented by knoxnews.com. Want more downtown analysis? Sign up for the free weekly Urban Knoxville newsletter by clicking here, and join the downtown discussion by becoming part of the Urban Knoxville group on Facebook.

The Watchman Newscast with Erick Stakelbeck
Israel ON ALERT as Hamas Threatens “Religious War” Over Jerusalem & Temple Mount | Watchman Newscast

The Watchman Newscast with Erick Stakelbeck

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 10:12


On today's Watchman Newscast, host Erick Stakelbeck breaks down the rising aggression ahead of Rosh Hashanah. The Palestinian terror group Hamas is threatening Israel over what it calls “violations against Jerusalem and the Al-Aqsa Mosque” ahead of the upcoming Jewish High Holidays. As thousands of Jews, Israelis and tourists make their way to Jerusalem's Old City, Israeli authorities have announced they would not limit Jewish visits to the Temple Mount. Will there be a showdown on the holiest site in Judaism? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Congregation of the Living Word, a Messianic Jewish Congregation
The Gates of Jerusalem:  Part 1  Why Study The Gates?  -  English only

Congregation of the Living Word, a Messianic Jewish Congregation

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 9:19


The Gates of Jerusalem:  Part 1  Why Study The Gates?  -  English only.   The Scriptures mention the gates of Jerusalem many times.  Why are the gates important?  Join us as we begin a new series and visit each of the gates of Jerusalem's Old City!   Recorded September 16, 2022.

Delicious City Philly
Episode 25: It's a Bitter Sweet Symphony

Delicious City Philly

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 72:01


This episode marks our first trip around the sun, which is a huge milestone for us, and we've had such an amazing first year with all of you! Grazie Mille! Here's what to look forward to in this episode: While it is our birthday episode, there's a sad announcement by one of our hosts that will change Delicious City forever

PRI: Science, Tech & Environment
Long before electricity, wind catchers of Persia kept residents cool. Climate-conscious architects are taking notes.

PRI: Science, Tech & Environment

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022


As a kid, radio producer Sima Ghadirzadeh spent her summers in one of the hottest places on earth — the desert city of Yazd, Iran. “Yazd was always to me this mysterious place that had miraculously escaped the process of modernization,” Ghadirzadeh said. Here, intricate wind-catching towers rise above the alleyways — they're boxy, geometric structures that take in cooler, less dusty air from high above the city and push it down into homes below.  An ab anbar or "water reservoir" with wind catchers (openings near the top of the towers) in the central desert city of Yazd, Iran. Credit: Diego Delso/CC BY-SA 4.0/Wikimedia Commons This 12th-century invention — known as badgir in Persian —  remained a reliable form of air-conditioning for Yazd residents for centuries. And as temperatures continue to rise around the world, this ancient way of staying cool has gained renewed attention for its emissions-free and cost-effective design. Wind catchers don't require electricity or mechanical help to push cold air into a home, just the physical structure of the tower — and the laws of nature. Cold air sinks. Hot air rises. Ghadirzadeh said she can remember as a child standing underneath one in her uncle's living room in Yazd. “Having been outside in the heat, and then suddenly, going inside and being right under the wind catcher and feeling the cool breeze on you, was so mysterious,” Ghadirzadeh said. Temperatures in Yazd can regularly reach 115 degrees Fahrenheit. But somehow, it was bearable, Ghadirzadeh said. She and her cousins spent their days exploring the city's shaded alleyways or in the basement. Evenings were spent on the rooftop under the stars. Mornings, back again in the thick-walled rooms and courtyards.Historians say wind catchers are at least 700 years old. Written records in travelers' diaries and poems reference the unique cooling structures. “From the 13th century, we have references to the wind catcher — by some estimates, they were in use in the 10th and 11th centuries,” said Naser Rabbat, director of the Aga Khan program for Islamic architecture at MIT. Most wind catchers only cooled the air by a few degrees, but the psychological impact was significant, Rabbat said. They soon appeared all over the medieval Muslim world, from the Persian Gulf to the seat of the Mamluk empire in Cairo, where they are called malqaf. In Iran, the wind catcher is a raised tower that usually opens on four sides because there's not a dominant wind direction, Rabat said. The ones in Cairo are “extremely simple in form,” usually with a slanted roof and a screen facing the direction of favorable wind, he added.Over time, wind catchers became symbols of wealth and success, growing increasingly elaborate. Homeowners would install intricate screens to keep out the birds. Water features and courtyard pools could bring the temperature down even more.  “They would even put water jars made out of clay underneath — that would cool the air further,” Rabbat said. “Or, you can put a wet cloth and allow the breeze to filter through, and carry humidity.” Many of the older techniques that kept life comfortable in the Persian Gulf fell out of favor after World War II, said New York and Beirut-based architect Ziad Jamaleddine. The leaders of these countries commissioned European architects to build cities in their image. “Partially demolishing or totally erasing the historic urban and dense fabric,” Jamaleddine said. Those shaded walkways, created by overhanging buildings and angled streets so beloved in historic cities like Yazd, were no longer considered desirable. “What they did is they substituted it with the gridded urban fabric city we are very familiar with today. Which perhaps, made sense in the cold climate of western Europe,” Jamaleddine said. But in a place like Kuwait or Abu Dhabi, mass quantities of cool air are necessary to make this type of urban planning comfortable. Attempts to re-create wind catchers occurred during the oil crisis of the 1970s and 1980s in cities like Doha, where the Qatar University campus incorporates several equally distributed wind towers. But these projects became less common when oil prices returned to normal.  Qatar University campus features new wind catcher design built into the architecture.  Credit: Sky2105, CC BY-SA 3.0/Wikimedia Commons Wind catchers are not easy to replicate without a deep understanding of the landscape and environment, Jamaleddine said. “It's closely related to the way people live, and how they inhabit a space. It can't simply be copied.”  Architects call this the principle of “passive solar design.” Today, air conditioners and fans make up more than 10% of global electricity use, according to the International Energy Agency. The air conditioners are leaking refrigerant into the atmosphere, which acts as a greenhouse gas. And they no longer function when the power goes out — as seen this summer during extreme heat waves across the world. Architect Sue Roaf thinks it's "almost criminal" to build structures that continue to rely on air-conditioning, knowing its impact on the climate. Roaf focuses on climate-adaptive building and chose to build her home using the same principles of ventilation and insulation that she learned while studying the wind catchers of Yazd. Strategically placed windows and thick, cave-like walls keep Roaf's home at a cool 69 degrees Fahrenheit without air-conditioning, even during Britain's historic heat wave this summer.“I have a vertical roof up the center of the house, and there's a roof light that I open up,” Roaf said. “So, you get the stack effect, drawing cooler air or warmer air through the house.”It's a passion project that demonstrates what's possible for building in a warming world. “The old thinking was more romantic – let us learn from the ancients,” Rabbat said. “The new thinking is [that] we have much more calibratable technology. Why don't we use it to harvest much more of the energy we can collect?” For example, mechanical pumps could spray vapor inside, cooling the air the same way the ceramic jugs of water once worked under the wind catchers of Yazd, he said. Today, Yazd is a bustling city full of motorcycles and high-rise buildings. But video editor Mohamed Bandekhoda said he likes the older parts best. “Whenever I'm sad or depressed, I go for a walk in the Old City,” he said. “The breeze in the alleys heals you.” Wind catchers dot the beautiful Yazd skyline, Bandekhoda said, but he's only seen ones that are restored and open for tourists. He's never been inside a home with one in use. “My grandmother's house, for example, has one — but no one knows where to open it,” Bandekhoda said. For now, it remains in wait, ready to inspire the next generation of climate-conscious architects.

The Gateway - A Podcast from the Middle East
Jerusalem Diary, by Nicholas Pritchard

The Gateway - A Podcast from the Middle East

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 11:31


In this episode, The Gateway's host Nicholas Pritchard reads from his Jerusalem Diary whilst sitting in a corner of the Old City. He asks how the travel industry interacts with Jerusalem's history.

The Times of Israel Podcasts
Counting Crows frontman says Israel 'tugs at me a lot'

The Times of Israel Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 19:26


Adam Duritz has waited decades to play in Israel, a place that he loves, said the Counting Crows frontman in this Times Will Tell podcast ahead of his band's Wednesday night show in Ra'anana, outside Tel Aviv. Duritz visited Israel several times in his teens, hiking through Sinai, working on a kibbutz and later learning Torah in Jerusalem, a "powerful place" for him, he says. Yet Duritz hadn't returned to Israel since then, as he built his career and band, waiting for the right opportunity to make it back to Israel and perform here. The lead singer of the California-founded band, known for hits such as "Mr. Jones," "Round Here," and "Accidentally In Love," credited the physical work he learned on the kibbutz as the foundation for the landscaping and construction jobs that he later did to support himself while building his musical career. He also spoke about his own struggles with religion and faith, and how those issues showed up in his music. The following transcript has been very lightly edited. The Times of Israel: Welcome Adam Duritz to the Times Will Tell, we are very honored to have you with us, and we appreciate you squeezing us into what I know is a busy schedule ahead of your Wednesday night performance in Ra'anana. Adam Duritz: I know I am. I'm very excited to play some place we've never played before. The Times of Israel: It's hard to believe. There's been a lot of preview interviews with you mentioning that you came here and you worked on the kibbutz when you were 18 and you came back to Jerusalem and did a little studying in the holy city. But it has been quite a few decades since you've been in Israel, correct? Adam Duritz: Four, I would think about. Four, yeah. It's been a really long time. The Times of Israel: Are you planning on traveling around for the next couple of days? Are you going to lay low and hang out at the beach? Adam Duritz: Well, I'd like to get a chance to travel around. I really want to go back to Jerusalem because that was someplace I really loved when I was a kid. But I don't really know. It depends on what kind of press and stuff they have us doing. That's the only thing that's going to take up the time. Except for our A gear, has all been in a locker in Liverpool for a year now. So we kind of have to go through that and make sure we have to do some pre-rehearsal with the band and the crew to make sure all the equipment gears. The Times of Israel: It got sent over for a concert that got canceled. And now you're basically doing the tour that you meant to do a while back. Adam Duritz: Because of Covid, I decided to leave it over there rather than bring it back on the risk that we would be able to reschedule the tour. I left it over there because especially nowadays, all the expenses for bands' prices haven't gone up at all, but the expenses are all doubled or tripled freight, airlines, flights, hotels, freight for your gear. All that is double or triple what it was. So I didn't want to waste the money by bringing it all back. There's a lot of things I'd like to do and hopefully I'll get to do some of them. But part of touring is realizing that the gig is everything. The Times of Israel: How is this tour going? I know that you were touring the US and now you're in Europe and you hopped over to Israel, and you have a lot of tour dates all over Europe. What does it feel like to be touring again? Adam Duritz: It's cool. I mean, this is the first gig of the European tour, so we haven't done that part yet. But the shows in America, we did a whole tour last summer and we've been playing gigs off and on this year. It's all been really cool. It's nice to be back playing. The Times of Israel: You've mentioned in a few interviews that it's been 30 years since your first album and that you feel, I guess, a sense of privilege that you guys are still together and that you perform these huge shows, [with] fans that are really excited to see you. Adam Duritz: Not so much that we're still together, but that people are still coming out to see us. You always worry about that because the shelf life of a band is very short, but especially after two years lay off, you really wonder whether things are going to pass you by. But we're still here. The Times of Israel: What was it like getting back onto those stages, getting back together, working together, performing together? Adam Duritz: Well, the same as it's always been. I mean, it's just performing. It's nice to play, you know, I think when you're in a band that was the longest I've ever gone without playing that period during Covid. In my entire adult life, I've never gone that long between gigs, so it was very strange. The Times of Israel: That must be incredibly strange. There are certain songs that are so familiar, so popular, that make people happy. "Mr Jones," "Big Yellow Taxi," "Roundhere." What is it like when you play these songs that you know are beloved by your fans, but that you have to keep on churning out all the time? What is it like to play those songs over again, knowing that your crowd wants to hear them, but knowing that maybe there's other things that you want to focus on more, or maybe not. Maybe those are the songs you always want to bring to your audience. Adam Duritz: If I want to play something else, I would just play it. There's nothing that has to get played every night. The only song that we play every night is "A Long December." And that's because for some reason, that's the only song I never ever get sick of. I don't think there's ever been a night where I didn't want to play that song. I don't know why that is, but I'm never tired of it. Everything else, if there's a night where I don't want to play it, I'm not going to play it. Because I think it would suck to play songs that you don't want to play. The Times of Israel: Really? You would do that to the audience? You would do that to the fans? Not play "Mr. Jones," for instance. Adam Duritz: Yeah, there's been lots of nights where we didn't play "Mr. Jones." I love that song. I love "Mr. Jones," but I want to keep loving "Mr. Jones." I don't want to hate the song. And I would think the quickest way to hating your own music is to play it on nights when you don't want to play it. The Times of Israel: Interesting, given that you've had this long-standing connection to Israel that it took so long to get back here. Adam Duritz: Bands want to go everywhere, but you can't go anywhere unless you have a promoter making you an offer that makes sense. The fact is, there's probably nowhere in the world we don't really want to go. But you just can't go until promoter gives you the right kind of offer. And I don't know that we've had those in the past. This offer was really good. The moment I heard it, I said, absolutely, let's do it. It's taking care of a lot of our European tour because some of the other gigs in Europe are smaller, not as well paying some of them. This is a great gig. I'd like to be able to come back here every few years because to go to a new country and find out that you have an audience where you can go right and play a 6,000-seat arena right off the bat, that's fantastic. I mean, not an arena, an amphitheater. So I don't know about the past, but I don't really remember offers from Israel. The only thing I say is, as soon as I heard this offer, I said, absolutely, let's do it. Okay. I love it here. The Times of Israel: I know it's always a little bit of a pain to come to Israel because of the fact that you have to ship everything over here and then ship it back to Europe. You're not playing in the countries that surround Israel, you're not going to Egypt, you're not going to Jordan, not going to Syria or Lebanon. You didn't get hit with any boycotts or sanctions, you didn't get hit with any criticism of coming to play in Israel. Adam Duritz: No. The only place I really heard about it were in the interviews. But, I mean, I will say that I've been pretty isolated this year because I haven't been out and about very much. Also, we're not exactly the center of the culture right now, so maybe it would be different in that situation, I don't know. But also, like, I'm a Jew. I understand the long tradition of, like, everything is the Jew's fault. I don't really buy it. The Times of Israel: So, talk about that a little bit. Now that you brought it up, what is it like to come back here and to bring the Counting Crows, to bring your people, to bring your band, to bring your bandmates to this place that you connected with a long time ago? What does that feel like? Adam Duritz: It feels pretty cool. It's a really long time ago for me, but there's some pretty powerful memories. I just think for the band, in a lot of ways, you expect your career to be shrinking. You expect to play less and less places every year, so a year where you can come and play, more places to go, someplace new for the first time. I don't think any of the guys in our band, except for me, have been here before, which is pretty rare. This tour,  we actually have three cities we've never played, Helsinki and Warsaw and Tel Aviv. And that's kind of great. It's the opposite direction you expect things to go in the later years of your career. So that always makes me really happy, especially if, considering how big the crowd could be here for us, it's someplace we could come back to. The Times of Israel: Can you share a memory? Adam Duritz: I mean, I was a kid, I went through the Sinai. It was still part of Israel back then. I spent a lot of time in Jerusalem. It was very powerful for me, that city, especially the Old City. I worked on a kibbutz for a little while, working in the apple orchard. I dug crap out of a grain silo. I really enjoyed the work. And it's funny because it kind of prepared me in some ways, because that kind of physical work is what I ended up doing to support myself all the years when I was in the band, at first and in different bands, I was a landscaper and I did construction work. And I think one of the reasons I knew that I was okay doing that kind of work is that I had done it. I had done it over here. I'd gotten up really early in the morning and done hard work all day, and that's kind of how I ended up supporting myself in the early days before the band was successful. But the first place I really did a lot of that was on the kibbutz here. Adam Duritz: I went back again a couple of years later when I was 18 and pretty much just spent time in Jerusalem in that time. A lot of it was also that I was a kid and I liked getting wasted and there was no drinking age over here, and I thoroughly appreciated that at the time. The Times of Israel: I don't know if this is too much of a stretch, but are there any of those early moments and early memories that made their way into your music at any point? Or is there any connection there between what you experienced and what you later started creating? Adam Duritz: Well, I think there's a lot of places where my struggle with religion and faith shows up in my music, and that certainly was a part of my time here. The Times of Israel: It's a pretty common theme coming to Israel, coming to Jerusalem, struggling with where you are in terms of faith. And of course, now you're here for work and you're here to perform and to give interviews and to maybe see a little bit of this country that you haven't seen in a while. But do you find that it tugs at you in a certain way or is that sort of in your past? Adam Duritz: Well, there are things about the country that tug at me a lot, like just the history and what part it plays in my own history. Being a Jew, that's a pretty powerful thing for any Jew. Being here is a very, what's the word? Intoxicating in that way. Israel is a heavy liquor for Jews, I would say. But no, the religion doesn't tug at me. I'm past believing things like that. The Times of Israel: Yeah, but the place, the scenery, what you're seeing outside your window, what you see when you drive from the airport, those kinds of things, the people on the street. Adam Duritz: The street, well, not as much from the airport to Tel Aviv, but just the knowledge of what it is and my memories, especially of Jerusalem, maybe if I went over to Jaffa, to the older parts of town. It's incredibly beautiful out the window, looking at the beach, but between me and the beach is a construction zone. I guess they're putting in a rapid transit system. I remember when they did that in LA. That always tears up for a bit. Yeah, I guess it's just like also, it's a country full of Jews, as opposed to being one in a crowd as you are in the rest of the world. In the rest of the world, you're one in a crowd and here you are, the crowd. That's a unique thing. The Times of Israel: Are you brushing up on any Hebrew for the show? Are we going to hear any? Adam Duritz: Yeah, if people are talking, I'll say, sheket. I remember sheket. I remember ken and lo. I remember shalom, which means aloha. I don't remember most of my Hebrew. I could sort of speak it back then, but yeah, I don't remember very much of it now. The Times of Israel: The crowd loves it when some beloved singer comes their way and throws a little shalom and a little sheket b'vakasha (please be quiet). I think they'll be happy on Wednesday night to hear that as well. Where are you in terms of new songs? In terms of new work? I know Covid, as we keep on saying, has been such a struggle for bands. Sometimes it's great for being inspired, and sometimes it has made it really difficult. Where is Counting Crows in terms of new music? Are we going to hear any? Adam Duritz: Well, I had written a second suite, but I threw it out. I sang on my friend's record and he sent me their record before it came out. They're this band called Gang of Youth. They have a new record called "Angel in Real Time." And when I listened to it, it was so good that for the first time, literally the first time in my entire career, I thought, oh, these songs aren't good enough, and I threw them out. So I have to rework.I mean, I'm reworking some of it, but his record was so much better, and that's not good enough. The Times of Israel: Okay, but the point is that you're working, we're going to hear more new music. You guys are going to keep on going for hopefully a very long time. Adam Duritz: The chances of us finding other jobs are pretty slim, so yeah. The Times of Israel: Well, you said landscape and construction. There's always something to fall back on. Right. Adam Duritz: I'm not falling back to that on that. I'll stick with my job. I loved it at the time, but I'm glad I like my new job better. The Times of Israel: The new job that you've been carrying out for a while, happily, for quite a few decades. Excellent. Well, we really thank you for being with us, Adam Duritz, it's great to have you here in Israel and looking forward to hearing you on stage on Wednesday night and hoping you have a great trip and that you get to do a few things and see a few places that you want to see while you're here. Adam Duritz: Absolutely. I hope so. But the main thing I really wanted to do was play here, so one way or another, I'll get it all. I really wanted to play here. Times Will Tell podcasts are available for download on iTunes, TuneIn, Pocket Casts, Stitcher, PlayerFM or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Counting Crows lead singer Adam Duritz at the band's September 14 show in Ra'anana, Israel (Courtesy Shlomi Pinto)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Scruffy Stuff
Will the Smokies stadium live up to Randy Boyd's vision of a new downtown Knoxville?

The Scruffy Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 36:49


As construction crews lay the groundwork for a new Tennessee Smokies stadium, team owner Randy Boyd's bold and ambitious vision for creating a new centerpiece of downtown Knoxville is off and running.  With public hurdles behind him, Boyd joins this week's episode amidst a deluge of million-dollar property transfers around the site, which already is undergoing transformations.  "The Scruffy Stuff" is presented by knoxnews.com. Want more downtown analysis? Sign up for the free weekly Urban Knoxville newsletter by clicking here, and join the downtown discussion by becoming part of the Urban Knoxville group on Facebook.

New Books in Jewish Studies
Matthew Teller, "Nine Quarters of Jerusalem: A New Biography of the Old City" (Other Press, 2022)

New Books in Jewish Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 51:40 Very Popular


Jerusalem's Old City is normally understood to be split into four quarters: the Jewish Quarter, the Armenian Quarter, the Christian Quarter, and the Muslim Quarter. Those designations can be found on maps, on guidebooks, on news articles, and countless other pieces of writing about the city. But as Matthew Teller points out in his latest book, Nine Quarters of Jerusalem: A New Biography of the Old City (Profile Books / Other Press, 2022): the idea of the “four quarters” is entirely a nineteenth century creation, invented by a couple of British mapmakers. Instead, Teller explores Jerusalem and all its myriad peoples–not just the Israelis and the Palestinians, but the Africans, Syrians, and other peoples that call the holy city their home. In this interview, Matthew and I talk about how we should actually think about Jerusalem, and all the different people that make the city what it is today. Matthew Teller writes for the BBC, The Guardian, Times of London, Financial Times, and other global media. He has produced and presented documentaries for BBC Radio and has reported for the BBC's From Our Own Correspondent program from around the Middle East and beyond. He is the author of several travel guides, including the Rough Guide to Jordan (Rough Guides: 2012). He is also the author of Quite Alone: Journalism from the Middle East 2008–2019. He can be followed on Twitter at @matthewteller. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Nine Quarters of Jerusalem. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at@nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/jewish-studies

OutKick 360
Hour 3 - College Football Kickoff - LIVE From Old City Sports Bar in Knoxville, TN, Clay Travis - Founder of Outkick, SEC Questions

OutKick 360

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 47:17


Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

OutKick 360
Hour 1 - College Football Kickoff - LIVE From Old City Sports Bar in Knoxville, TN - Heath Shuler - Former Vols & NFL QB, Brad Lampley - VFL & OutKick 360 Attorney.

OutKick 360

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 46:45


1993 SEC Player of the Year and Heisman Runner-Up Heath Shuler talks style and pace of play in UT's offense with Hutton and Chad. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

OutKick 360
Hour 2 - College Football Kickoff - LIVE From Old City Sports Bar in Knoxville, TN - Trey Wallace - OutKick SEC Columnist, Blake Beddingfield - Former NFL & Titans Scout

OutKick 360

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 47:12


Joined by OutKick SEC Columnist TreyWallace to break down tonight's game in Knoxville and the rest of week 1 in college football. Former NFL Scout Blake Beddingfield joins PK in studio to discuss the latest headlines around the NFL. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies
Matthew Teller, "Nine Quarters of Jerusalem: A New Biography of the Old City" (Other Press, 2022)

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 51:40


Jerusalem's Old City is normally understood to be split into four quarters: the Jewish Quarter, the Armenian Quarter, the Christian Quarter, and the Muslim Quarter. Those designations can be found on maps, on guidebooks, on news articles, and countless other pieces of writing about the city. But as Matthew Teller points out in his latest book, Nine Quarters of Jerusalem: A New Biography of the Old City (Profile Books / Other Press, 2022): the idea of the “four quarters” is entirely a nineteenth century creation, invented by a couple of British mapmakers. Instead, Teller explores Jerusalem and all its myriad peoples–not just the Israelis and the Palestinians, but the Africans, Syrians, and other peoples that call the holy city their home. In this interview, Matthew and I talk about how we should actually think about Jerusalem, and all the different people that make the city what it is today. Matthew Teller writes for the BBC, The Guardian, Times of London, Financial Times, and other global media. He has produced and presented documentaries for BBC Radio and has reported for the BBC's From Our Own Correspondent program from around the Middle East and beyond. He is the author of several travel guides, including the Rough Guide to Jordan (Rough Guides: 2012). He is also the author of Quite Alone: Journalism from the Middle East 2008–2019. He can be followed on Twitter at @matthewteller. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Nine Quarters of Jerusalem. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at@nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/middle-eastern-studies

New Books in History
Matthew Teller, "Nine Quarters of Jerusalem: A New Biography of the Old City" (Other Press, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 51:40


Jerusalem's Old City is normally understood to be split into four quarters: the Jewish Quarter, the Armenian Quarter, the Christian Quarter, and the Muslim Quarter. Those designations can be found on maps, on guidebooks, on news articles, and countless other pieces of writing about the city. But as Matthew Teller points out in his latest book, Nine Quarters of Jerusalem: A New Biography of the Old City (Profile Books / Other Press, 2022): the idea of the “four quarters” is entirely a nineteenth century creation, invented by a couple of British mapmakers. Instead, Teller explores Jerusalem and all its myriad peoples–not just the Israelis and the Palestinians, but the Africans, Syrians, and other peoples that call the holy city their home. In this interview, Matthew and I talk about how we should actually think about Jerusalem, and all the different people that make the city what it is today. Matthew Teller writes for the BBC, The Guardian, Times of London, Financial Times, and other global media. He has produced and presented documentaries for BBC Radio and has reported for the BBC's From Our Own Correspondent program from around the Middle East and beyond. He is the author of several travel guides, including the Rough Guide to Jordan (Rough Guides: 2012). He is also the author of Quite Alone: Journalism from the Middle East 2008–2019. He can be followed on Twitter at @matthewteller. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Nine Quarters of Jerusalem. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at@nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Islamic Studies
Matthew Teller, "Nine Quarters of Jerusalem: A New Biography of the Old City" (Other Press, 2022)

New Books in Islamic Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 51:40


Jerusalem's Old City is normally understood to be split into four quarters: the Jewish Quarter, the Armenian Quarter, the Christian Quarter, and the Muslim Quarter. Those designations can be found on maps, on guidebooks, on news articles, and countless other pieces of writing about the city. But as Matthew Teller points out in his latest book, Nine Quarters of Jerusalem: A New Biography of the Old City (Profile Books / Other Press, 2022): the idea of the “four quarters” is entirely a nineteenth century creation, invented by a couple of British mapmakers. Instead, Teller explores Jerusalem and all its myriad peoples–not just the Israelis and the Palestinians, but the Africans, Syrians, and other peoples that call the holy city their home. In this interview, Matthew and I talk about how we should actually think about Jerusalem, and all the different people that make the city what it is today. Matthew Teller writes for the BBC, The Guardian, Times of London, Financial Times, and other global media. He has produced and presented documentaries for BBC Radio and has reported for the BBC's From Our Own Correspondent program from around the Middle East and beyond. He is the author of several travel guides, including the Rough Guide to Jordan (Rough Guides: 2012). He is also the author of Quite Alone: Journalism from the Middle East 2008–2019. He can be followed on Twitter at @matthewteller. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Nine Quarters of Jerusalem. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at@nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/islamic-studies

New Books Network
Matthew Teller, "Nine Quarters of Jerusalem: A New Biography of the Old City" (Other Press, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 51:40


Jerusalem's Old City is normally understood to be split into four quarters: the Jewish Quarter, the Armenian Quarter, the Christian Quarter, and the Muslim Quarter. Those designations can be found on maps, on guidebooks, on news articles, and countless other pieces of writing about the city. But as Matthew Teller points out in his latest book, Nine Quarters of Jerusalem: A New Biography of the Old City (Profile Books / Other Press, 2022): the idea of the “four quarters” is entirely a nineteenth century creation, invented by a couple of British mapmakers. Instead, Teller explores Jerusalem and all its myriad peoples–not just the Israelis and the Palestinians, but the Africans, Syrians, and other peoples that call the holy city their home. In this interview, Matthew and I talk about how we should actually think about Jerusalem, and all the different people that make the city what it is today. Matthew Teller writes for the BBC, The Guardian, Times of London, Financial Times, and other global media. He has produced and presented documentaries for BBC Radio and has reported for the BBC's From Our Own Correspondent program from around the Middle East and beyond. He is the author of several travel guides, including the Rough Guide to Jordan (Rough Guides: 2012). He is also the author of Quite Alone: Journalism from the Middle East 2008–2019. He can be followed on Twitter at @matthewteller. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Nine Quarters of Jerusalem. Follow on Facebook or on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at@nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Krisha & Frank Show
Frank & Friends Show 0078

Krisha & Frank Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 48:08


Frank Murphy's friend Jeff Detrow is today's co-host. Jeff says Frank has an “higo problem.” Higo is the Spanish word for fig.  Frank and his wife Jere haven't had time to make jam or preserves with all the figs Frank has harvested. They started freezing figs on a cookie sheet to be processed later. Jeff is reminded of the dog meatballs that he prepares for his pets.  Frank wants to use the frozen figs to make smoothies. Jeff calls it the new açaí. Frank mentions that figs have a laxative effect. Jeff asks about the transitory time.  Jeff learned about transitory time after accidentally swallowing a dental crown. He once lost a crown during a radio interview with a celebrity but found it on the studio floor.  Frank appreciates that Jeff has a big vocabulary. Like Frank, Jeff solves the New York Times crossword puzzle daily. Frank recently solved a Monday puzzle in four minutes and 31 seconds. He and Jeff compare solve times for the weekend puzzles. Frank tends to overdo his hobbies and interests, which has been called “Franking it to eleven.”  Jeff thinks that Frank's improv experience helps him think quickly while solving the crossword and vice versa. Frank credits improv with helping him in many aspects of life.  Come to the Secret City Improv Festival on September 30 and October 1, 2022 at the Historic Grove Theater in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Use the discount code FRANK at checkout for 25% off when purchasing tickets at https://secretcityimprovfest.com/tickets  Frank and his wife Jere went to the Irish Fest on the Hill in mid-August. Frank was the only one in his group who was interested in eating Irish food. They encountered their friend Ida who now lives downtown and could list dozens of restaurant recommendations within walking distance. They walked to the Old City and decided to try a restaurant called Southern Grit, which Jeff has also enjoyed.  The host said there would be a 45 minute wait for a table and that the group should go take a walk until they got a text that their table was ready. Frank ordered medium-hot chicken rather than the full Nashville-hot. The waiter said he could bring Frank some emergency milk if necessary.  The next day Frank, Jere, and their houseguests went to First Watch for brunch. Frank sensed that a lady at the next table was looking at their food so Frank explained to her what he, Jere, and the others had ordered.  Jeff jokes that leftovers should be up for grabs at pizza restaurants. Frank and Jere have driven to Maryville to eat at Jaboni's, which is not far from where Jeff and Kristen live. Frank wanted to support a Facebook friend, Bart Fricks, who bought the Maryville location of Jaboni's from the previous owner.  Frank also wanted to support Dan Goss, who left Downtown Grill & Brewery to open Point b in West Knoxville, near Gettysvue Country Club. Frank, Jere, and Artie Rocket ordered the s'mores board for dessert. Jeff recommends making s'mores with marshmallows that have chocolate filling. Point B had a variety of candy bars to make the s'mores.  Jeff wonders if Frank can expound on any topic. Frank says there is an improv game in which someone delivers an extemporaneous monologue on a word that the audience suggests. Frank once went to an improv festival in Frederick, Maryland and was asked to give a monologue on a word. He then appeared in a scene based on the monologue.  Frank points out that Jeff would improvise and speak extemporaneously on the radio. A late-night talk show has a huge staff to write a ten-minute monologue. Radio hosts have to fill four hours a day without a staff of writers.  Jeff's birthday is October 1. Each year, Jeff told his Jeff & Jer Show listeners to say “Happy birthday Jeff” to get free admission to the San Diego Zoo on October 2 even though it was actually Founders Day and everyone got in free that day.  One time Jeff & Jer announc that their staff member Randy was going to jump a bus in the Jack Murphy Stadium parking lot. People imagined an Evel Knievel style stunt. Instead Randy used jumper cables to jump start the bus.  Support the Frank & Friends Show by purchasing some of our high-quality merchandise at https://frank-friends-show.creator-spring.com  Sign up for a 30-day trial of Audible Premium Plus and get a free premium selection that's yours to keep. Go to http://AudibleTrial.com/FrankAndFriendsShow  Find us online https://www.FrankAndFriendsShow.com/  Please subscribe to our YouTube channel at https://YouTube.com/FrankAndFriendsShow  and hit the bell for notifications.  Find the audio of the show on major podcast apps including Spotify, Apple, Google, iHeart, and Audible.  Find us on social media:  https://www.facebook.com/FrankAndFriendsShow  https://www.instagram.com/FrankAndFriendsShow  https://www.twitter.com/FrankNFriendsSh  Thanks!

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Why ToI continues to sound the alarm against MK Itamar Ben Gvir

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 20:32


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Editor David Horovitz and military correspondent Emanuel Fabian join host Amanda Borschel-Dan. Satellite images obtained by Fabian on Saturday showed heavily damaged structures at a Syrian weapons base near the northwestern city of Masyaf in a Thursday airstrike attributed to Israel. Fabian tells us more. Russia has shipped its advanced S-300 air defense system in Syria back home amid its invasion of Ukraine, an Israeli satellite intelligence firm said Friday. Is this significant for Israel? Former prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu has again brokered a cooperation deal between Otzma Yehudit and Religious Zionism that seems to assure that both parties will cross the electoral threshold. Horovitz speaks about the editorial choice of consistently raising the alarm against the Kahane-aligned party, as he did in a scathing op-ed last week. Late last week during Defense Minister Benny Gantz's trip to Washington, DC, Israel received “good hints” with regard to the US having a working offensive plan against Iran. What does this mean, in practical terms even as both Gantz and the current Prime Minister Yair Lapid are overtly attempting to speak with the US about this deal. The Maccabi Haifa soccer team has risen to the UEFA Champions League group stage for the first time in over a decade. The group was placed in group H of the Champion's League group stage, where it will face off against French powerhouse Paris Saint-Germain on September 14 in Haifa. Horovitz shares his perspective on Haifa's chances. Discussed articles include: Images show heavy damage to Syrian weapons base in airstrike attributed to Israel Russia sends S-300 back home from Syria amid Ukraine invasion, satellite images show Beware Itamar Ben Gvir, rising far-right star with a destructive vision for Israel Netanyahu brokers deal for far-right's Smotrich, Ben Gvir to join forces in election Meretz leader denounces merged far-right slate as ‘alliance of thugs' Understanding the ominous rise of Israel's most notorious ultra-nationalist US hints to Gantz it's preparing military option against Iran, Israeli official says Maccabi Haifa advances to Champions League group stage for first time since 2009 Maccabi Haifa to host PSG in Champions League clash on September 14 Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. Illustrative image: Israeli right-wing lawmaker Itamar Ben Gvir gestures to a Palestinian protester during a news conference at the Damascus Gate to Jerusalem's Old City, where he protested police preventing him from entering the Al Aqsa Mosque compound, Thursday, June 10, 2021. The (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Steve Gruber Show
Scot Bertram, A shooting attack outside Jerusalem's Old City has left five Americans hurt.

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 11:00


Live—from the campus of Hillsdale College in beautiful Hillsdale Michigan— this is Scot Bertram in for Steve on the Steve Gruber Show for –Augusat 15th 2022—   —Here are 3 big things you need to know—   One — Former President Trump is calling on the FBI to return documents protected by attorney-client and executive privileges reportedly taken from Mar-a-Lago.  Trump took to Truth Social Sunday to respectfully request that the documents be returned to the residence immediately.  Fox News reported Saturday that agents took five boxes from Mar-a-Lago that supposedly contained such documents.   Two—   A wildfire in Isle Royale National Park in the Upper Peninsula has closed several campgrounds and trails. The fire started Saturday and burned around ten acres. The National Park Services has not given an update on the status of the fire as yet. No one was hurt.     And number three— A shooting attack outside Jerusalem's Old City has left five Americans hurt.  At least eight people were injured in the early Sunday morning incident near the Western Wall.  Police say the gunman opened fire on a bus stop where two men were wounded before the suspect then fled to another area and opened fire again.    

The Steve Gruber Show
Scot Bertram, Five Americans are among at least eight people hurt following a shooting attack outside Jerusalem's Old City

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 11:00


Live—from the campus of Hillsdale College in beautiful Hillsdale Michigan— this is Scot Bertram in for Steve on the Steve Gruber Show for –Augusat 15th 2022—   —Here are 3 big things you need to know—   One — A wave of violence has been unleashed south of the border as drug cartel member attack Mexican cities along the Baja border.  Hundreds of Mexican National Guardsman were sent to Tijuana over the weekend as the city was gripped by fear.  aja officials say the cartel is demanding some members be released from prison.   Two—   Governor Whitmer has issued a state of emergency for Lapeer, Macomb, Oakland, and St. Clair counties due to a water main break on Saturday. The State Emergency Operation Center has also been activated after a 120-inch water transmission main broke, impacting 933-thousand initially, with that figure now a little over 130-thousand.     And number three— Five Americans are among at least eight people hurt following a shooting attack outside Jerusalem's Old City.  It happened early Sunday morning near the Western Wall, considered one of the holiest sites in Judaism.   Israeli police say the suspect eventually surrendered to authorities.