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Geographical term that roughly encompasses Western Asia

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Best podcasts about near eastern

Latest podcast episodes about near eastern

In the Desert of Set
Episode 67: I Believe (Album)

In the Desert of Set

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 52:32


My second full-length album with vocals; a collection of Setian hymns to various Middle and Near Eastern gods.

Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer
Journeys of Discovery: History comes alive at U. Michigan's Archeology Museum

Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 16:51


Correspondent Tom Wilmer visits with Dr. Catherine Person, director of education at the University of Michigan's Kelsey Museum of Archeology in Ann Arbor , Michigan. The Kelsey specializes in Classical, Egyptian, and Near Eastern archeology and sponsors ongoing field research. The museum houses more than 100,000 ancient and medieval objects from the Mediterranean and the Near East. Community outreach is central to the Kelsey's mission, engaging the community from kindergarteners through retirees. The Kelsey is also home to the University of Michigan's graduate program in Classical Art and Archeology . This show was originally broadcast December 30, 2019 and is reposted as a Best-of-the-Best show from the archives of Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer in celebration of 32 years producing on-air and digital media shows for NPR affiliate KCBX. Underwriting support for Journeys of Discovery provided by Nashville's Big Back Yard economic initiative focused on rural communities in the

Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer
Journeys of Discovery: History comes alive at U. Michigan's Archeology Museum

Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 16:51


Correspondent Tom Wilmer visits with Dr. Catherine Person, director of education at the University of Michigan's Kelsey Museum of Archeology in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The Kelsey specializes in Classical, Egyptian, and Near Eastern archeology and sponsors ongoing field research.

Madlik Podcast – Torah Thoughts on Judaism From a Post-Orthodox Jew
turn! turn! turn! I hope it's not too late

Madlik Podcast – Torah Thoughts on Judaism From a Post-Orthodox Jew

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 39:47


Join a live recording of Madlik disruptive Torah on Clubhouse with Geoffrey Stern, Rabbi Adam Mintz and Rabbi Avraham Bronstein  as we use the book of Kohelet to explore the fundamental difference between the Torah given at Sinai and the Wisdom literature we share with our ancient Near Eastern neighbors. We explore the difference between linear and cyclical time and we wonder why we need a healthy dose of common sense, living in the moment and even cynicism after the Jewish New Year. Sefaria Source Sheet: www.sefaria.org/sheets/348859  Transcript: Geoffrey Stern  00:00 So welcome to Madlik disruptive Torah every week at four o'clock on clubhouse eastern time, we have a half an hour discussion of the Parsha. And by disruptive we mean we look at things maybe from a slightly different angle and hopefully help our participants look at it slightly differently as well. And this week is no exception. So Rabbi Adam challenged me last week to talk about Kohelet Ecclesiastes and that is what we're going to do. And we're going to start with the first verse because in that first verse is so much of what is to follow, and it raises so many questions about authorship and about the  sense of the message. So this is how it begins The words of Kohelet, Son of David king in Jerusalem. utter futility, said Kohelet, utter futility, all is futile." And of course, the Hebrew is "haval havalim" And that translation of utter futility, or "vanity all is vanity" is from the King James Bible, and probably we've all absorbed it. So the question that really comes up is Who was this guy? Kohelet? Was it a real person? Or is it a nom de plume for the writer? And then of course, the other question is, what does it mean that all of life is vanity? So why don't I start right there and open up to the discussion of what are you guys thoughts on who is Kohelet what is Kohelet? Avraham? Why don't you store   Avraham Bronstein  01:45 The words after Kohelt are "Ben David Melech Yerushalyim". So whoever Kohelet is, he's the son of David king in Jerusalem. That kind of narrows it down. That's why the tradition is that the author King Solomon.   Geoffrey Stern  02:00 So I think you're absolutely right. Of course, we're all called B'nai Yisrael And Yisrael is not my actual father. So that's not totally true, in terms of necessarily making it Shlomo. And then I mentioned a second ago that we all read "Vanity of Vanities", and that comes from the King James Bible. And I hardly doubt that King James translated the Bible. But what he did was he financed a group of people to translate the Bible. So all of a sudden, we have a lot of complication, when it says, somebody wrote a book, did he actually write it? Or did he support it? And when it says, We are a child, does it mean a follower? Does it mean an actual child? Rabbi, Adam, where do you come in on this?   Adam Mintz  02:50 So there are a couple things. First of all, I want to bring everyone's attention, there's an amazing English translation of the Bible, written by a professor from Berkeley by the name of Robert Alter, and generally he's good, and his introductions to Kohelet is especially good. The first thing he says is what Geoffrey says. And that is Kohelet Ben David doesn't mean that he's the son of David doesn't have to be Solomon. And it means that he came from the Davidic family. Now, that's one thing. So we could be many generations later. And the scholars all think it was later. The other thing is, and I think this is interesting to consider when you write a book, and there's some kind of competition, whether or not your book is going to be included in the Bible. You very often want to give yourself some credibility. It might be to give yourself some credibility. You say, I'm William Shakespeare, I wrote this play. Like it was 500 years ago. I don't know if William Shakespeare wrote it, or William Shakespeare didn't write. But if I say that I'm William Shakespeare, then I give myself credibility. So it is possible that the author of go hell it is not indeed the son of David or a descendant of David. But he knew that if he wanted to get his book into the Bible, he needed to call himself a son of David. That's a little cynical, but I think it's something to consider.   Geoffrey Stern  04:31 Well, it gets but it does get even better because it's not as though he said my name is Shlomo. Like he did for the Song of Songs that he said Shir HaShirim asher l'Shlomo" he took on a Nom de plume, and he engendered this whole conversation that we're talking about him so it is kind of fun that way.   Adam Mintz  04:55 Not only a name that we've never heard before, but the structure Kohelet is a very funny structure. That's not the way you say it. If the word Kohelet means the one who gathers people, there's a way to say that in Hebrew "make'el" "he gathers people"  Kohelet is a very strange form of the term to gather people. So Geoffrey, it's almost as if he chose a name for himself, a Nom de plume and it's not even real, meaning that he just chose a name for himself. So I think that's interesting. "vanities of vanities" of course, the King James made that famous. Alter points out and this has been pointed out by many, many people, the word has really means breath. And "hevel havalim hakol hevel" really means that everything is no more than breath. The same way when you breathe in the cold, and you can see your breath, but it's really nothing. That's what life is have, "hevel havalim amar Kohelet" All life is like that. It's like the breath that looks like it's something but it's really nothing.   Geoffrey Stern  06:19 So we don't have a dearth of material today, that's for sure. So the word that he took forgetting about who he was, as you point out, Kohelet means to gather. It's one who assembles and even in the translation into Latin Ecclesiastes, which literally means someone who gathers an ecclesiastical court is a gathering. It's an assembling an audience. It can also mean gathering ideas, gathering truth, and different opinions. If you look at Kings 1, here it says, "Oz yikahal Shlomo", that Solomon convoked, the elders of Israel, and this is when he read, dedicated or he dedicated the temple on Sukkot time, those of us and I said this in the pre party, who remember the episode two times ago about the revolution of the Aleph Beit, we know that in the time of Sukkot, was this "VaYakel" this commandment to publicly read the book of the Torah. So I will almost venture to say my pet name for Kohelet is Mr. Sukkot, in a sense, because what he's doing is he's bringing the themes together, that we've kind of been discussing for a while, and we're going to get into how deep that is this idea of this short breath, I absolutely love Alter says it. Also, Rabbi Sacks, talks about it. And he says, everything to do with life in Judaism refers to a breath. So there's a "Neshama", which comes from the word "Linshom" to breathe. There's Nefesh. there's Ruach, which is wind. And what he says "hevel" is, is a very short breath. It's a very superficial breath. It's that breath of the fleeting breath. And what he is saying is that the sense that we're going to get from the book that follows is the fleetingness of life. But it comes at a moment where maybe that's it's all we have. And so I think all of these kind of themes come together. And if we think about Sukkot, there are so many words that have to do with in gathering. It just occurred to me You know, they always say the Eskimos have so many words for snow. Here we have Ketzir, the "hag Hakazir or the Hag Ha'assaf" these are the gathering of the crops. We have the lulav in the Etrog and the Arba minim (four species) that have to be bound together. We have the very word for moed, which is a holiday, but as "Ohel Moed" It's a tent of meeting. It's a time to come all together. So all of these concepts of binding of coming together of gathering of welcoming other thoughts all come to the fore at this moment, and that's why I say that maybe Kohelet is Mr. Sukkak.   Adam Mintz  09:41 Great. I love it. Now the question is, why is that so? Why is Sukkot the holiday of gathering?   Geoffrey Stern  09:51 so I'm going to call on Avraham before he leaves because he started talking about something that I really want to get into. He talked about the difference between cyclical time and linear time. And that short little breath. That was momentary time, where does that fit in Avraham?   Avraham Bronstein  10:12 So before I say anything I want to riff on what you were saying a second ago, that connection between Hakel and Kohelet that was great. Because if you continue in Devarim, right, what we read a few weeks ago where the mitzvah of Hakel is first kind of spoken about. The whole point is, everyone has to be there to hear the Torah being read. . "Lman yishmau ve lilmadu l'yira et hashem Elokehchem" the point ultimately, to arrive at "yira" reverence of God, which is actually the point of the entire book of Kohelet when it comes down to the very end after everything is said and done. "sof Davar HaKol Nishma" The point of Hakel is to arrive at Yira, the point of Kohelt is to arrive at the same place... a connection I never ever saw before or thought about before, but I think now is actually very compelling. So first, thank you.   Geoffrey Stern  11:09 You're welcome.   Avraham Bronstein  11:11 That's great. The second thing is to address what you just asked, maybe we can unpack this a little bit more based on what you said. But the overall sense of what Kohelet is trying to say in the first several verses, and then you get back to it again, is that everything always stays the same that people try to do things that people build things and they accumulate things that they expend effort, and they do all these different things. But ultimately, everything kind of repeats itself everything, the same generation comes generation goes nothing really changes it and to a degree. You know, you're reading this at the end of the year, when one agricultural season is ending and the next one is starting at the same time, the ingathering festival. So last year's harvest is coming in. But the farmers are all getting ready to plant next year's crop. They're already praying for rain for next year's crop. So again, your sense of time moving in a circle where you've arrived at the end but even while you're ending you're beginning again and your in the same place you were a year ago.   Geoffrey Stern  12:22 There is this sense of do Rosh Hashannah and do Yom Kippur and then "repeat". And the thing that really struck me in reading some of the thoughts of Rabbi Sacks is he also discusses the difference between happiness and joy between Osher and Simcha and he makes the difference, that Simcha like that short breath is absolutely momentary, and Osher we talk about Ashray Yoshvey vetecha... all throughout Psalms and other writings we're trying to look for a life well lived. And what he points out and again it kind of touches upon their sense of cyclical or lineal is that we land at this moment between the end of the last year and the beginning of the new and of course, for a farmer that comes where you're pulling the crops and I'm not a farmer, but I know the second you pull in the crops The next thing you do is start preparing the land for the next crop. And it's this sense of simcha is what we call it zeman simchataynu. He says that the simcha that we feel, the absolute joy, unadulterated joy that we feel is of the moment...  is that short breath, if we read the rest of Kohelet we're gonna see a sense of eat, drink and be merry type type of Simcha. It's something that's very special and distinct from that kind of linear progression of slow growth over time over maybe a lifetime that we are so accustomed to. We've binged on Judaism for the last two, three weeks, maybe even a month and a half. And this is a very special time that I think Jewish tradition kind of understood that somehow Kohelet, which is from the Wisdom literature, and we're going to get into that in a second, was able to grasp and able to convey more than traditional types of linear Torah texts that have a beginning in Eden and an end in Redemption might have is that the kind of area that you're going to be talking about a little bit. Rabbi Avraham?   14:59 A little bit. Yeah, kind of you're doing the same thing over and over again. But what are you doing a little bit differently this year as opposed to last year?   Geoffrey Stern  15:08 Interesting, I would, I would say that the argument of Kohelet is "not so different". His argument is very humbling from the perspective of someone who believes that the life of us as an individual, and life of us as a people, is a long project is a struggle has a beginning, a middle and an end, and a slow evolution, and investment. I think much of what Kohelet is about and we're not going to be able to read the book today. But stay tuned, go to synagogue and listen to it. It's literally almost a rebellion against that, or at least an alternative side of the coin, in terms of "you know what, it's just a moment and when things are good, take the good and when things are bad look forward to when the sun will shine again." What do you think, Adam?   Adam Mintz  16:06 So I wonder about a slightly different point. And that is what do you make about Kohelet come coming a week after Yom Kippur. When we take life so seriously, "mi Yichiye, Mi Yamut" who will live and who will die, who by fire, who by water, everything is very serious. And all of a sudden comes King Solomon or whoever it is; Kohelet and says haveil havalim hakol hevel. That everything is Vanity of vanities or breath or whatever the word may be. What do you make of that reading kohelet right after Yom Kippur?   Geoffrey Stern  16:51 I think that no one can say it's unintentional. That's the one thing I think I can safely say. But I do believe the intention is rather strong. And I do believe that your question is a wonderful segue into what I'd like to spend the rest or at least a large portion of the discussion discussing, which is that co Kohelet comes from Wisdom Literature. We all know that King Solomon was not referred to as a Torah scholar. He was referred to as a wise man. And that is not simply an adjective or a description. It is a trigger. In the Ancient Near East, there is much literature that is called Wisdom Literature. And those of you who know Shai Held he's a Rosh Hayeshiva at Hadar. Well, I took a course from his father at Columbia, and his name was Moshe Held, and he was an expert in Ugaritic and Akkadian and he explained what the difference is between wisdom literature and Torah, and you will listen to these three rules, and it will make you listen and read differently. When you study Kohelet, when you study Ecclesiastes, or Proverbs, or even the Song of Songs or Job. Number one, it's only about the individual, nothing to do with a nation, it's about a single person. Number two, it's unhistorical. There's no nationalism, the name of Israel is never mentioned, the only difference and I underline only, between the wisdom literature of our neighbors, the Sumerians, the Mesopotamians, and the Egyptians and us is that when they cry out to god, they might cry out to three gods, we cry out to one ... it's monotheism. But otherwise, you couldn't find something more stark, then wisdom literature as something that was shared by every nation and society in our neighborhood. It's practical, and Professor Held ends by saying that anybody, anybody who studies a book like Kohelet or Ecclesiastes and doesn't understand this difference is operating with a false eyeglass. And, unfortunately, we tend to break down that barrier and homogenize Wisdom Literature with Torah. But as you all know Torah talks about the people of Israel Torah talks about history in terms of Egypt in terms of Sinai, none of those terms would ever find themselves in wisdom literature and the real key is when we say Eitz Hayim hi L'machazikim ba"; "that it is a tree of life to those hold on to it" that comes from Proverbs. And we have homogenized that I would say kidnapped it. And we talking about Torah. But it's not about Torah. It's about Wisdom. When we read Proverbs, and we say "listen to the "Torat Imecha" listen to the Torah of your mother. It doesn't mean Torah, it means the wisdom of your mother. So Held and other scholars need us to understand. And this really relates to the question that you asked Rabbi Adam, about why are we reading this book, it's not only reading this book, it's reading a book from a totally different tradition than the Torah tradition. And it is included in our, in our canon, we call it TaNaKh, Torah, Nevi'im veKetuvim. Ketuvim is the written books of Wisdom Literature. So they're probably accepted as different as they are because they were written in Hebrew, and they were part of our culture. But it's a stark difference. And I think I'd love to hear your comments on this. But I think what it does is it raises the stakes in your question. It's not simply Why did we pick one of the 24 books to read on Sukkot when we had other choices? It's why did we pick one of the most representative books of the common wisdom, the common practical guidelines? And yes, the cynical and I would say fatalistic viewpoint that was shared by all humanity to read after such a Jewish month?   Adam Mintz  21:52 So I just want to I want to strengthen your question. There's a rabbinic teaching in something called Masechet Sofrim that was written around the year 800. And it says that on Shabbat Hol HaMoed Pesach we read Shir HaShirim (the Song of Songs) because Shir Hashirim is about a love story. It's about spring time, it's perfect for Pesach. That we read the book of Ruth on Shavuot, because it's about acceptance of mitzvot. It's about conversion, whatever that means. And it's perfect for Shavuot.  We read Esther on Purim, we read a Eicha (Lamentations) on Tisha B'Av. What's amazing about that teaching in Masechet Sofrim is it does not mention that we read Kohelet on Sukkot. That seems to be a later tradition. That was not part of the original tradition. And it might be that there's something in that Geoffrey, it was it was more communal, the community felt after the heaviness of Rosh HaShannah and Yom Kippur that we needed a book like Kohelet.   Geoffrey Stern  23:10 I think so. I'd like to just for the purposes of sharing my discovery that goes back 40 years about Near Eastern Wisdom Literature, to read some parallel texts. So in Ecclesiastes 1: 2 we read "Hevel Havalim, which now we know is a short breath, a short breath, otter futility, utter futility what real value is there for a man in all the gains he makes beneath the sun, one generation goes another comes, but the earth remains the same forever." Here's from The Epic of Gilgamesh, "Who my friend can scale Heaven, only the gods live forever under the sun. As for mankind numbered are their days, whatever they achieve is but the wind, even here though art afraid of death." There are stories about and parallels to this concept of riches that comes up, or even scholarly pursuits. Gilgamesh goes on, "do we build a house forever? Do we seal contracts forever? Do brothers divide shares forever, does hatred persist forever in the land. Since the days of yore, there has been no permanence, the resting of the dead how alike are they? Do they not compose a picture of death, the commoner and the noble?" These themes about the difference between us is less than what we have in common the Pauper in the king both end up in the same place, that riches won't give you anything. These are themes that are shared by all of humanity, and didn't change as a result of the revolution of the Jewish people. And if anything, if anybody knows anything, I believe in the in the past six months of Madlik, I believe that there is much that's unique about Judaism and we contributed so much. But we get to this moment. And we say, you know, it's all said and done, we've changed the way we celebrate the New Year. The other nations they make their earthly King into their ruler, we make God into our ruler we change the way we read our texts, other traditions hide it in a holy of holies. And let only the priestly caste read it. We democratize it, all of the changes that we've discussed, all of the revolutions that were led by the Hebrew project, when it's all said and done in Yom Kippur and Rosh Hashannah are all over. I think what we do is we make a an amazing stop. And we say, but at the end of the day, we're still human. At the end of the day, all we have is that short breath. And I think that, too, is an amazingly humbling, but also liberating concept. And maybe that's where the simcha comes in.   Adam Mintz  26:30 I think that's great. I think that that's really a nice, you know, a nice explanation, kind of for the evolution of Kohelet as almost a continuation of Yom Kippur. It's interesting that right after Kohelet that we have Simchat Torah which is really a celebration of the whole process, right? It's a celebration of the whole month, and that you can't have the celebration without having both Yom Kippur. And Kohelet. They're both part of the celebration, one without the other isn't good enough.   Geoffrey Stern  27:09 I mean, I totally agree. And it also makes us look a little bit differently at Yom Kippur and Rosh Hashannah, which actually are not really in history, either. They're really about us, as a universal people (humankind). If you think about the themes that I described before that are unique to the wisdom literature and the wisdom world. It's kind of interesting. Now when you look back, that you can see that Rosh Hashannah is actually a very universal holiday, we celebrate the birth of the world, or some say the birth of man. We we discuss who rules us and who doesn't. And then on Sukkot, even though there's an attempt to tie it into the exodus from Egypt, and it's not a great attempt, you know, everybody argues and says, Did they really the Jews really live in thatched roof structures? Or did they live in actual tents. But the point is, that there's this temptation to try to bring so called back into the other Regalim, the other pilgrimage, holidays, and make it kind of historic, but on the other hand, it's in nature, it's out of the house. I mean, you have to believe even in the days of the temple, they moved out of the temple and went into this sukkah. It literally takes what makes us human. And it brings us outside and I have to say that one idea, one thought that I had you mentioned Simchat Torah. You know, I said a second ago that in wisdom literature, when you say to "torah", you don't mean the Torah that was revealed or given at Sinai. When you say "torat immecha", you mean the wisdom of your parents, of your elders, have prior generations of lives already lived? And I wonder whether we have the license to celebrate one or the other or both torot... meaning to say this this confluence of finishing the yearly public reading of the Torah which is an amazing democratizing event. But there's also simchat torah, Simcha as described by by Rabbi Sacks which is this momentary, just take life by the coattails and laugh when you can and cry when you have to. And that torah that wisdom the simchat torah.... I really just thought about it kind of this morning when I was thinking about simchat torah.  Do we have that license? Do you give me that license? Adam,   Adam Mintz  27:10 I give you that license. I love it.   Geoffrey Stern  30:09 So it's, it's, it's really an amazing book and amazing tradition and we Jews, who always talk about how distinctive we are and how different we are ... on the culmination.... And I think you really can refer to Sukkot as a combination as a climax. And the climax of the climax again, is shmini atzeret, which again, the word ottzer means to gather in to retain, to keep everybody around. But the climax at the end of the day is when all is said and done. And now I'm gonna sound like I wrote wisdom. Sof davar Hakol nishma... what do we have, we all have the same sun and sky over us, we have the same end. It's such a universal message. And it's such an unvarnished message because if you read the wisdom literature, whether it's Jewish or Sumerian, or Mesopotamian, it doesn't pull any punches ever. You know, we can beg for our lives and for rain on Yom Kippur. And Rosh Hashannah. But when you read the wisdom literature, it makes it very clear, you can beg all you want, but the God or the gods, they act using their own logic, and all we have is just what we can grasp in a breath.   Adam Mintz  31:40 I think that's great. I think that there are so many different pieces here. I think that that's great. You know, so many Roh hashannah and Yom Kippur piece. The idea of the breath, I think Rabbi Sacks really captures so much by talking about the fact that hevel means a breath, I think that's great.   Geoffrey Stern  32:00 So I couldn't finish without going to one of my favorite folk songs of the 60s, which is Pete Seeger's Turn, turn, turn. And it probably is the first, maybe only time that a writer literally took the words of Scripture, and turned them into a hit song, and turn turn turn really just captures both in the title. And also in the lyrics. You know what we're talking about, that when all is said and done, it's just a cycle in a sense. And all we have is the ability to go one step at a time, go forward, there's a time for love. There's a time for hate. There's a time for peace. And what he added was, "I hope it's not too late". And what what I was surprised to find out is that first of all why he wrote this song, his agent told him Pete, cut out the revolutionary songs, no one wants to hear any more about changing the world. And for some reason he had in his notebook, the words of Kohelet. And he submitted them, and in his mind, Kohelet was a guy with a long beard and sandals, who was definitely a rebel rouser. But the agent said, It's from Scripture. Finally, you gave me something that I want. And a few years ago, Pete gave 45% of the royalties from the song to the Israeli Committee Against House Demolitions. So he made a political statement. He kept 50%. And then he said, 5%, he added on because he added, "I hope it's not too late". So those were his own words. But this story gave me simcha when I read it, and it showed us how we have to take the words that we study and that we read, make them our own dance to them, clap to them. And I just want to wish everybody an amazing Simchat Torah, whatever torah you're celebrating, and that we should all savor the moment and be able to savor those small little breaths that we make. And I have to say, Rabbi, it's been a wonderful few months I reading the Torah  with you. And one of the things that I will be celebrating is our partnership here every Friday, thank you so much.   Adam Mintz  34:47 You know, what more can we say next Friday. We get together to study Bereshit. That's an amazing thing. Rabbi Avraham talked about cyclical time and linear time. What an amazing thing that we go back to the beginning isn't it?   Geoffrey Stern  35:02 We start all over Turn, turn, turn.   Adam Mintz  35:08 Shabbat shalom. We are going to post this as a podcast. And I used to end every podcast with some music so you guessed it. This week, I will add a recording of Pete Seager singing, turn, turn, turn. And let's hope it's not too late. Shabbat Shalom and Hag Samayach.

Hebrew Nation Online
Honor and Shame with Rico Cortes

Hebrew Nation Online

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 48:07


Rico Shares! Come join me as I chat with Rico Cortes from Wisdom in Torah Ministries. The topic is honor and shame! For many folks, shame is a deep well of toxicity rending one incapable  of becoming all their Creator desires them to be...many folks have lost their honor at a young age through childhood abuse, which leaves a deep wound in ones soul...shame and dishonor...so, come join Rico and I as we look at this topic from not only a Near Eastern perspective but of residual affects from abuse.

Oldest Stories
Elamite 1 - Back to the Beginning

Oldest Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 23:40


The Sumerians did not develop writing and urbanization in a vacuum. To their east, the land of Elam developed both at almost the exact same time. From the start of written history, the great cities and kingdoms of Elam were power players in Near Eastern politics. The premier Elamite cities of Anshan and Susa appear in the earliest Mesopotamian myths, and before Sumerian history fully bridged the gap between legend and fact, there were already stories of both sides invading and ruling one another. However, it was really at the time of Sargon of Akkad that Elam emerged as a full-fledged historical entity ruled from the city of Awan, and it was the end of the Akkadian Empire that opened the door for Elam to become a power in its own right. This is the first guest episode of the Oldest Stories hiatus, brought to you by the fantastic Trevor Culley of the History of Persia podcast, over at https://historyofpersiapodcast.com/ . Trevor's show is in a lot of ways the sequel to the Oldest Stories, picking up with the tale of the Persian empire right around the fall of the Neo-Babylonian one in 539BCE. Over in his own feed, he has done a fantastic job of bringing the history of that empire to life, both in the narratives of kings and conquests and in the leisurely walks through the internal shape, cultures, and lifestyles of the Persian Empire. I am a fan of this show, and I think you will be, too. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/oldeststories/message

Context Matters
Old Testament Controversies

Context Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 35:01


Dr. Longman has written prolifically about the book of Genesis, but there is an ongoing rub in Christian communities about how to handle the creation narratives in Genesis 1–2. Can we read "the simple meaning" of the text? Is it enough to "just have the Bible" and not take the time to dig deeper in the ancient Near Eastern text? Plus, the New Testament mentions figures like Adam and Eve, so is that proof of the literal first humans?Find out more about Dr. Tremper Longman III and read his book Confronting Old Testament Controversies.Contact me through Narrative of Place Learn more about me and sign up for upcoming tours of Israel/Palestine.Join Cyndi Parker's  Patreon Team! 

Global I.Q. with Jim Falk
Real Time Report - Afghanistan

Global I.Q. with Jim Falk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 59:46


Ambassador P. Michael McKinley Ambassador McKinley (Ret.) joined The Cohen Group as a Senior Counselor after a decorated 37-year career at the Department of State. Ambassador McKinley most recently served as Senior Advisor to the Secretary of State until October 2019, covering a wide range of global policy issues. This month he penned the sagacious "We All Lost Afghanistan" — a must-read piece published in Foreign Affairs. As a four-time ambassador, he led some of the largest and most sensitive U.S. embassies in the world as the U.S. Ambassador to Peru (2007-2010), Colombia (2010-2013), Afghanistan (2014-2016), and Brazil (2017-2018). Ambassador McKinley has also had extensive experience with regional conflicts and peace negotiations across three decades on three continents including Afghanistan, where he played a central role in shaping key policy decisions.

 Ambassador Anne W. Patterson is moderating this event. Like Ambassador Mckinley, Ambassador Patterson has led critical U.S. embassies around the world. In addition to being appointed as Assistant Secretary for Near Eastern and North African Affairs at the Department of State (2013-2017), she served as Ambassador to Egypt (2011-2013), Pakistan (2007-2010), Colombia (2000-2003), and El Salvador (1997-2000). Ambassador Patterson recently retired with the rank of Career Ambassador after more than four decades in the Foreign Service. Currently, she is a senior fellow at the Jackson Institute for Global Affairs at Yale and a member of the Commission on National Defense Strategy. . . Do you believe in the importance of international education and connections? The nonprofit World Affairs Council of Dallas/Fort Worth is supported by gifts from people like you, who share our passion for engaging in dialogue on global affairs and building bridges of understanding. While the Council is not currently charging admission for virtual events, we ask you to please consider making a one-time or recurring gift to help us keep the conversation going through informative public programs and targeted events for students and teachers. Donate: https://www.dfwworld.org/donate

New Books in Jewish Studies
Mika Ahuvia, "On My Right Michael, On My Left Gabriel: Angels in Ancient Jewish Culture" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books in Jewish Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 57:58


Angelic beings can be found throughout the Hebrew Bible, and by late antiquity the archangels Michael and Gabriel were as familiar as the patriarchs and matriarchs, guardian angels were as present as one's shadow, and praise of the seraphim was as sacred as the Shema prayer. Mika Ahuvia recovers once-commonplace beliefs about the divine realm and demonstrates that angels were foundational to ancient Judaism. Ancient Jewish practice centered on humans' relationships with invisible beings who acted as intermediaries, role models, and guardians. Drawing on non-canonical sources—incantation bowls, amulets, mystical texts, and liturgical poetry—Ahuvia shows that when ancient men and women sought access to divine aid, they turned not only to their rabbis or to God alone but often also to the angels. On My Right Michael, On My Left Gabriel: Angels in Ancient Jewish Culture (U California Press, 2021) spotlights these overlooked stories, interactions, and rituals, offering a new entry point to the history of Judaism and the wider ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern world in which it flourished. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/jewish-studies

New Books in History
Mika Ahuvia, "On My Right Michael, On My Left Gabriel: Angels in Ancient Jewish Culture" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 57:58


Angelic beings can be found throughout the Hebrew Bible, and by late antiquity the archangels Michael and Gabriel were as familiar as the patriarchs and matriarchs, guardian angels were as present as one's shadow, and praise of the seraphim was as sacred as the Shema prayer. Mika Ahuvia recovers once-commonplace beliefs about the divine realm and demonstrates that angels were foundational to ancient Judaism. Ancient Jewish practice centered on humans' relationships with invisible beings who acted as intermediaries, role models, and guardians. Drawing on non-canonical sources—incantation bowls, amulets, mystical texts, and liturgical poetry—Ahuvia shows that when ancient men and women sought access to divine aid, they turned not only to their rabbis or to God alone but often also to the angels. On My Right Michael, On My Left Gabriel: Angels in Ancient Jewish Culture (U California Press, 2021) spotlights these overlooked stories, interactions, and rituals, offering a new entry point to the history of Judaism and the wider ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern world in which it flourished. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Mika Ahuvia, "On My Right Michael, On My Left Gabriel: Angels in Ancient Jewish Culture" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 57:58


Angelic beings can be found throughout the Hebrew Bible, and by late antiquity the archangels Michael and Gabriel were as familiar as the patriarchs and matriarchs, guardian angels were as present as one's shadow, and praise of the seraphim was as sacred as the Shema prayer. Mika Ahuvia recovers once-commonplace beliefs about the divine realm and demonstrates that angels were foundational to ancient Judaism. Ancient Jewish practice centered on humans' relationships with invisible beings who acted as intermediaries, role models, and guardians. Drawing on non-canonical sources—incantation bowls, amulets, mystical texts, and liturgical poetry—Ahuvia shows that when ancient men and women sought access to divine aid, they turned not only to their rabbis or to God alone but often also to the angels. On My Right Michael, On My Left Gabriel: Angels in Ancient Jewish Culture (U California Press, 2021) spotlights these overlooked stories, interactions, and rituals, offering a new entry point to the history of Judaism and the wider ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern world in which it flourished. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies
Mika Ahuvia, "On My Right Michael, On My Left Gabriel: Angels in Ancient Jewish Culture" (U California Press, 2021)

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 57:58


Angelic beings can be found throughout the Hebrew Bible, and by late antiquity the archangels Michael and Gabriel were as familiar as the patriarchs and matriarchs, guardian angels were as present as one's shadow, and praise of the seraphim was as sacred as the Shema prayer. Mika Ahuvia recovers once-commonplace beliefs about the divine realm and demonstrates that angels were foundational to ancient Judaism. Ancient Jewish practice centered on humans' relationships with invisible beings who acted as intermediaries, role models, and guardians. Drawing on non-canonical sources—incantation bowls, amulets, mystical texts, and liturgical poetry—Ahuvia shows that when ancient men and women sought access to divine aid, they turned not only to their rabbis or to God alone but often also to the angels. On My Right Michael, On My Left Gabriel: Angels in Ancient Jewish Culture (U California Press, 2021) spotlights these overlooked stories, interactions, and rituals, offering a new entry point to the history of Judaism and the wider ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern world in which it flourished. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/middle-eastern-studies

Grace Community Church Ramona Podcast

Amos was from the southern kingdom of Judah. His hometown, Tekoa, was about five miles from Bethlehem. He was a sheep herder and a “dresser of sycamore figs (7:14). These trees are also called "fig-mulberry." The fruit is like a fig. Each fruit had to be pierced individually in order to ripen properly. This was a very important crop to the Near Eastern people. King David even appointed a special supervisor to oversee these crops (cf. I Chr. 27:28). Amos' agricultural knowledge is evident in his message.

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies
David Arnovitz, "Samuel: The Making of the Monarchy, Koren Tanakh of the Land of Israel" (Koren Publishers, 2021)

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 18:02


Samuel: The Making of the Monarchy, a volume of The Koren Tanakh of the Land of Israel with Koren Publishers, offers an innovative and refreshing approach to the Hebrew Bible. By fusing extraordinary findings by modern scholars on the ancient Near East with the original Hebrew text and a brand new English translation, The Koren Tanakh of the Land of Israel clarifies and explains the Biblical narrative, laws, events, and prophecies in context with the milieu in which it took place. The Koren Tanakh features stunning visuals of ancient civilizations including artifacts, archeological excavations, inscriptions, and maps, along with brief articles on ancient Near Eastern culture, geography, biblical botany, language, and more. Join us as we talk to David Arnovitz, Editor in Chief of the Koren Tanakh of the Land of Israel. Michael Morales is Professor of Biblical Studies at Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary, and the author of The Tabernacle Pre-Figured: Cosmic Mountain Ideology in Genesis and Exodus (Peeters, 2012), Who Shall Ascend the Mountain of the Lord?: A Biblical Theology of Leviticus(IVP Academic, 2015), and Exodus Old and New: A Biblical Theology of Redemption(IVP Academic, 2020). He can be reached at mmorales@gpts.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/middle-eastern-studies

New Books in History
David Arnovitz, "Samuel: The Making of the Monarchy, Koren Tanakh of the Land of Israel" (Koren Publishers, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 18:02


Samuel: The Making of the Monarchy, a volume of The Koren Tanakh of the Land of Israel with Koren Publishers, offers an innovative and refreshing approach to the Hebrew Bible. By fusing extraordinary findings by modern scholars on the ancient Near East with the original Hebrew text and a brand new English translation, The Koren Tanakh of the Land of Israel clarifies and explains the Biblical narrative, laws, events, and prophecies in context with the milieu in which it took place. The Koren Tanakh features stunning visuals of ancient civilizations including artifacts, archeological excavations, inscriptions, and maps, along with brief articles on ancient Near Eastern culture, geography, biblical botany, language, and more. Join us as we talk to David Arnovitz, Editor in Chief of the Koren Tanakh of the Land of Israel. Michael Morales is Professor of Biblical Studies at Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary, and the author of The Tabernacle Pre-Figured: Cosmic Mountain Ideology in Genesis and Exodus (Peeters, 2012), Who Shall Ascend the Mountain of the Lord?: A Biblical Theology of Leviticus(IVP Academic, 2015), and Exodus Old and New: A Biblical Theology of Redemption(IVP Academic, 2020). He can be reached at mmorales@gpts.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Jewish Studies
David Arnovitz, "Samuel: The Making of the Monarchy, Koren Tanakh of the Land of Israel" (Koren Publishers, 2021)

New Books in Jewish Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 18:02


Samuel: The Making of the Monarchy, a volume of The Koren Tanakh of the Land of Israel with Koren Publishers, offers an innovative and refreshing approach to the Hebrew Bible. By fusing extraordinary findings by modern scholars on the ancient Near East with the original Hebrew text and a brand new English translation, The Koren Tanakh of the Land of Israel clarifies and explains the Biblical narrative, laws, events, and prophecies in context with the milieu in which it took place. The Koren Tanakh features stunning visuals of ancient civilizations including artifacts, archeological excavations, inscriptions, and maps, along with brief articles on ancient Near Eastern culture, geography, biblical botany, language, and more. Join us as we talk to David Arnovitz, Editor in Chief of the Koren Tanakh of the Land of Israel. Michael Morales is Professor of Biblical Studies at Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary, and the author of The Tabernacle Pre-Figured: Cosmic Mountain Ideology in Genesis and Exodus (Peeters, 2012), Who Shall Ascend the Mountain of the Lord?: A Biblical Theology of Leviticus(IVP Academic, 2015), and Exodus Old and New: A Biblical Theology of Redemption(IVP Academic, 2020). He can be reached at mmorales@gpts.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/jewish-studies

New Books Network
David Arnovitz, "Samuel: The Making of the Monarchy, Koren Tanakh of the Land of Israel" (Koren Publishers, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 18:02


Samuel: The Making of the Monarchy, a volume of The Koren Tanakh of the Land of Israel with Koren Publishers, offers an innovative and refreshing approach to the Hebrew Bible. By fusing extraordinary findings by modern scholars on the ancient Near East with the original Hebrew text and a brand new English translation, The Koren Tanakh of the Land of Israel clarifies and explains the Biblical narrative, laws, events, and prophecies in context with the milieu in which it took place. The Koren Tanakh features stunning visuals of ancient civilizations including artifacts, archeological excavations, inscriptions, and maps, along with brief articles on ancient Near Eastern culture, geography, biblical botany, language, and more. Join us as we talk to David Arnovitz, Editor in Chief of the Koren Tanakh of the Land of Israel. Michael Morales is Professor of Biblical Studies at Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary, and the author of The Tabernacle Pre-Figured: Cosmic Mountain Ideology in Genesis and Exodus (Peeters, 2012), Who Shall Ascend the Mountain of the Lord?: A Biblical Theology of Leviticus(IVP Academic, 2015), and Exodus Old and New: A Biblical Theology of Redemption(IVP Academic, 2020). He can be reached at mmorales@gpts.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Biblical Studies
David Arnovitz, "Samuel: The Making of the Monarchy, Koren Tanakh of the Land of Israel" (Koren Publishers, 2021)

New Books in Biblical Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 18:02


Samuel: The Making of the Monarchy, a volume of The Koren Tanakh of the Land of Israel with Koren Publishers, offers an innovative and refreshing approach to the Hebrew Bible. By fusing extraordinary findings by modern scholars on the ancient Near East with the original Hebrew text and a brand new English translation, The Koren Tanakh of the Land of Israel clarifies and explains the Biblical narrative, laws, events, and prophecies in context with the milieu in which it took place. The Koren Tanakh features stunning visuals of ancient civilizations including artifacts, archeological excavations, inscriptions, and maps, along with brief articles on ancient Near Eastern culture, geography, biblical botany, language, and more. Join us as we talk to David Arnovitz, Editor in Chief of the Koren Tanakh of the Land of Israel. Michael Morales is Professor of Biblical Studies at Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary, and the author of The Tabernacle Pre-Figured: Cosmic Mountain Ideology in Genesis and Exodus (Peeters, 2012), Who Shall Ascend the Mountain of the Lord?: A Biblical Theology of Leviticus(IVP Academic, 2015), and Exodus Old and New: A Biblical Theology of Redemption(IVP Academic, 2020). He can be reached at mmorales@gpts.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biblical-studies

New Books in Israel Studies
David Arnovitz, "Samuel: The Making of the Monarchy, Koren Tanakh of the Land of Israel" (Koren Publishers, 2021)

New Books in Israel Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 18:02


Samuel: The Making of the Monarchy, a volume of The Koren Tanakh of the Land of Israel with Koren Publishers, offers an innovative and refreshing approach to the Hebrew Bible. By fusing extraordinary findings by modern scholars on the ancient Near East with the original Hebrew text and a brand new English translation, The Koren Tanakh of the Land of Israel clarifies and explains the Biblical narrative, laws, events, and prophecies in context with the milieu in which it took place. The Koren Tanakh features stunning visuals of ancient civilizations including artifacts, archeological excavations, inscriptions, and maps, along with brief articles on ancient Near Eastern culture, geography, biblical botany, language, and more. Join us as we talk to David Arnovitz, Editor in Chief of the Koren Tanakh of the Land of Israel. Michael Morales is Professor of Biblical Studies at Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary, and the author of The Tabernacle Pre-Figured: Cosmic Mountain Ideology in Genesis and Exodus (Peeters, 2012), Who Shall Ascend the Mountain of the Lord?: A Biblical Theology of Leviticus(IVP Academic, 2015), and Exodus Old and New: A Biblical Theology of Redemption(IVP Academic, 2020). He can be reached at mmorales@gpts.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/israel-studies

New Books in Literary Studies
Leonard Greenspoon, "Jewish Bible Translations: Personalities, Passions, Politics, Progress" (Jewish Publication Society, 2020)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2021 66:53


In his book Jewish Bible Translations: Personalities, Passions, Politics, Progress (Jewish Publication Society, 2020), Leonard Greenspoon is the first to examine thoroughly Jewish Bible translations from the third century BCE to our day. It is an overdue corrective of an important story that has been regularly omitted or downgraded in other histories of Bible translation. Examining a wide range of translations over twenty-four centuries, Greenspoon delves into the historical, cultural, linguistic, and religious contexts of versions in eleven languages: Arabic, Aramaic, English, French, German, Greek, Hungarian, Italian, Russian, Spanish, and Yiddish. He profiles many Jewish translators, among them Buber, Hirsch, Kaplan, Leeser, Luzzatto, Mendelssohn, Orlinsky, and Saadiah Gaon, framing their aspirations within the Jewish and larger milieus in which they worked. Greenspoon differentiates their principles, styles, and techniques—for example, their choice to emphasize either literal reflections of the Hebrew or distinctive elements of the vernacular language—and their underlying rationales. As he highlights distinctive features of Jewish Bible translations, he offers new insights regarding their shared characteristics and their limits. Additionally, Greenspoon shows how profoundly Jewish translators and interpreters influenced the style and diction of the King James Bible. Accessible and authoritative for all from beginners to scholars, Jewish Bible Translations enables readers to make their own informed evaluations of individual translations and to holistically assess Bible translation within Judaism. Leonard Greenspoon is Philip M. and Ethel Klutznick Chair in Jewish Civilization and a professor of theology and of classical and Near Eastern studies at Creighton University. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books in History
Leonard Greenspoon, "Jewish Bible Translations: Personalities, Passions, Politics, Progress" (Jewish Publication Society, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2021 66:53


In his book Jewish Bible Translations: Personalities, Passions, Politics, Progress (Jewish Publication Society, 2020), Leonard Greenspoon is the first to examine thoroughly Jewish Bible translations from the third century BCE to our day. It is an overdue corrective of an important story that has been regularly omitted or downgraded in other histories of Bible translation. Examining a wide range of translations over twenty-four centuries, Greenspoon delves into the historical, cultural, linguistic, and religious contexts of versions in eleven languages: Arabic, Aramaic, English, French, German, Greek, Hungarian, Italian, Russian, Spanish, and Yiddish. He profiles many Jewish translators, among them Buber, Hirsch, Kaplan, Leeser, Luzzatto, Mendelssohn, Orlinsky, and Saadiah Gaon, framing their aspirations within the Jewish and larger milieus in which they worked. Greenspoon differentiates their principles, styles, and techniques—for example, their choice to emphasize either literal reflections of the Hebrew or distinctive elements of the vernacular language—and their underlying rationales. As he highlights distinctive features of Jewish Bible translations, he offers new insights regarding their shared characteristics and their limits. Additionally, Greenspoon shows how profoundly Jewish translators and interpreters influenced the style and diction of the King James Bible. Accessible and authoritative for all from beginners to scholars, Jewish Bible Translations enables readers to make their own informed evaluations of individual translations and to holistically assess Bible translation within Judaism. Leonard Greenspoon is Philip M. and Ethel Klutznick Chair in Jewish Civilization and a professor of theology and of classical and Near Eastern studies at Creighton University. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Intellectual History
Leonard Greenspoon, "Jewish Bible Translations: Personalities, Passions, Politics, Progress" (Jewish Publication Society, 2020)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2021 66:53


In his book Jewish Bible Translations: Personalities, Passions, Politics, Progress (Jewish Publication Society, 2020), Leonard Greenspoon is the first to examine thoroughly Jewish Bible translations from the third century BCE to our day. It is an overdue corrective of an important story that has been regularly omitted or downgraded in other histories of Bible translation. Examining a wide range of translations over twenty-four centuries, Greenspoon delves into the historical, cultural, linguistic, and religious contexts of versions in eleven languages: Arabic, Aramaic, English, French, German, Greek, Hungarian, Italian, Russian, Spanish, and Yiddish. He profiles many Jewish translators, among them Buber, Hirsch, Kaplan, Leeser, Luzzatto, Mendelssohn, Orlinsky, and Saadiah Gaon, framing their aspirations within the Jewish and larger milieus in which they worked. Greenspoon differentiates their principles, styles, and techniques—for example, their choice to emphasize either literal reflections of the Hebrew or distinctive elements of the vernacular language—and their underlying rationales. As he highlights distinctive features of Jewish Bible translations, he offers new insights regarding their shared characteristics and their limits. Additionally, Greenspoon shows how profoundly Jewish translators and interpreters influenced the style and diction of the King James Bible. Accessible and authoritative for all from beginners to scholars, Jewish Bible Translations enables readers to make their own informed evaluations of individual translations and to holistically assess Bible translation within Judaism. Leonard Greenspoon is Philip M. and Ethel Klutznick Chair in Jewish Civilization and a professor of theology and of classical and Near Eastern studies at Creighton University. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in Jewish Studies
Leonard Greenspoon, "Jewish Bible Translations: Personalities, Passions, Politics, Progress" (Jewish Publication Society, 2020)

New Books in Jewish Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2021 66:53


In his book Jewish Bible Translations: Personalities, Passions, Politics, Progress (Jewish Publication Society, 2020), Leonard Greenspoon is the first to examine thoroughly Jewish Bible translations from the third century BCE to our day. It is an overdue corrective of an important story that has been regularly omitted or downgraded in other histories of Bible translation. Examining a wide range of translations over twenty-four centuries, Greenspoon delves into the historical, cultural, linguistic, and religious contexts of versions in eleven languages: Arabic, Aramaic, English, French, German, Greek, Hungarian, Italian, Russian, Spanish, and Yiddish. He profiles many Jewish translators, among them Buber, Hirsch, Kaplan, Leeser, Luzzatto, Mendelssohn, Orlinsky, and Saadiah Gaon, framing their aspirations within the Jewish and larger milieus in which they worked. Greenspoon differentiates their principles, styles, and techniques—for example, their choice to emphasize either literal reflections of the Hebrew or distinctive elements of the vernacular language—and their underlying rationales. As he highlights distinctive features of Jewish Bible translations, he offers new insights regarding their shared characteristics and their limits. Additionally, Greenspoon shows how profoundly Jewish translators and interpreters influenced the style and diction of the King James Bible. Accessible and authoritative for all from beginners to scholars, Jewish Bible Translations enables readers to make their own informed evaluations of individual translations and to holistically assess Bible translation within Judaism. Leonard Greenspoon is Philip M. and Ethel Klutznick Chair in Jewish Civilization and a professor of theology and of classical and Near Eastern studies at Creighton University. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/jewish-studies

New Books in Language
Leonard Greenspoon, "Jewish Bible Translations: Personalities, Passions, Politics, Progress" (Jewish Publication Society, 2020)

New Books in Language

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2021 66:53


In his book Jewish Bible Translations: Personalities, Passions, Politics, Progress (Jewish Publication Society, 2020), Leonard Greenspoon is the first to examine thoroughly Jewish Bible translations from the third century BCE to our day. It is an overdue corrective of an important story that has been regularly omitted or downgraded in other histories of Bible translation. Examining a wide range of translations over twenty-four centuries, Greenspoon delves into the historical, cultural, linguistic, and religious contexts of versions in eleven languages: Arabic, Aramaic, English, French, German, Greek, Hungarian, Italian, Russian, Spanish, and Yiddish. He profiles many Jewish translators, among them Buber, Hirsch, Kaplan, Leeser, Luzzatto, Mendelssohn, Orlinsky, and Saadiah Gaon, framing their aspirations within the Jewish and larger milieus in which they worked. Greenspoon differentiates their principles, styles, and techniques—for example, their choice to emphasize either literal reflections of the Hebrew or distinctive elements of the vernacular language—and their underlying rationales. As he highlights distinctive features of Jewish Bible translations, he offers new insights regarding their shared characteristics and their limits. Additionally, Greenspoon shows how profoundly Jewish translators and interpreters influenced the style and diction of the King James Bible. Accessible and authoritative for all from beginners to scholars, Jewish Bible Translations enables readers to make their own informed evaluations of individual translations and to holistically assess Bible translation within Judaism. Leonard Greenspoon is Philip M. and Ethel Klutznick Chair in Jewish Civilization and a professor of theology and of classical and Near Eastern studies at Creighton University. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/language

New Books in Biblical Studies
Leonard Greenspoon, "Jewish Bible Translations: Personalities, Passions, Politics, Progress" (Jewish Publication Society, 2020)

New Books in Biblical Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2021 66:53


In his book Jewish Bible Translations: Personalities, Passions, Politics, Progress (Jewish Publication Society, 2020), Leonard Greenspoon is the first to examine thoroughly Jewish Bible translations from the third century BCE to our day. It is an overdue corrective of an important story that has been regularly omitted or downgraded in other histories of Bible translation. Examining a wide range of translations over twenty-four centuries, Greenspoon delves into the historical, cultural, linguistic, and religious contexts of versions in eleven languages: Arabic, Aramaic, English, French, German, Greek, Hungarian, Italian, Russian, Spanish, and Yiddish. He profiles many Jewish translators, among them Buber, Hirsch, Kaplan, Leeser, Luzzatto, Mendelssohn, Orlinsky, and Saadiah Gaon, framing their aspirations within the Jewish and larger milieus in which they worked. Greenspoon differentiates their principles, styles, and techniques—for example, their choice to emphasize either literal reflections of the Hebrew or distinctive elements of the vernacular language—and their underlying rationales. As he highlights distinctive features of Jewish Bible translations, he offers new insights regarding their shared characteristics and their limits. Additionally, Greenspoon shows how profoundly Jewish translators and interpreters influenced the style and diction of the King James Bible. Accessible and authoritative for all from beginners to scholars, Jewish Bible Translations enables readers to make their own informed evaluations of individual translations and to holistically assess Bible translation within Judaism. Leonard Greenspoon is Philip M. and Ethel Klutznick Chair in Jewish Civilization and a professor of theology and of classical and Near Eastern studies at Creighton University. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biblical-studies

New Books Network
Leonard Greenspoon, "Jewish Bible Translations: Personalities, Passions, Politics, Progress" (Jewish Publication Society, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2021 66:53


In his book Jewish Bible Translations: Personalities, Passions, Politics, Progress (Jewish Publication Society, 2020), Leonard Greenspoon is the first to examine thoroughly Jewish Bible translations from the third century BCE to our day. It is an overdue corrective of an important story that has been regularly omitted or downgraded in other histories of Bible translation. Examining a wide range of translations over twenty-four centuries, Greenspoon delves into the historical, cultural, linguistic, and religious contexts of versions in eleven languages: Arabic, Aramaic, English, French, German, Greek, Hungarian, Italian, Russian, Spanish, and Yiddish. He profiles many Jewish translators, among them Buber, Hirsch, Kaplan, Leeser, Luzzatto, Mendelssohn, Orlinsky, and Saadiah Gaon, framing their aspirations within the Jewish and larger milieus in which they worked. Greenspoon differentiates their principles, styles, and techniques—for example, their choice to emphasize either literal reflections of the Hebrew or distinctive elements of the vernacular language—and their underlying rationales. As he highlights distinctive features of Jewish Bible translations, he offers new insights regarding their shared characteristics and their limits. Additionally, Greenspoon shows how profoundly Jewish translators and interpreters influenced the style and diction of the King James Bible. Accessible and authoritative for all from beginners to scholars, Jewish Bible Translations enables readers to make their own informed evaluations of individual translations and to holistically assess Bible translation within Judaism. Leonard Greenspoon is Philip M. and Ethel Klutznick Chair in Jewish Civilization and a professor of theology and of classical and Near Eastern studies at Creighton University. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

The John Batchelor Show
1474: Lebanon failed state. David Schenker, WashInstitute Malcolm Hoenlein @Conf_of_pres @mhoenlein1

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2021 10:50


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Lebanon failed state. David Schenker, WashInstitute Malcolm Hoenlein @Conf_of_pres @mhoenlein1 David Schenker @WashInstitute   David Schenker is the Taube Senior Fellow at The Washington Institute. From 2019 to January 2021, he served as assistant secretary of state for Near Eastern affairs.   Related articles https://www.jpost.com/middle-east/iran-news/what-role-will-hezbollah-play-in-lebanons-future-government-670314 https://www.timesofisrael.com/hamas-leader-haniyeh-meets-hezbollah-chief-nasrallah-in-beirut/ https://www.timesofisrael.com/moroccan-pm-congratulates-hamas-on-victory-over-israel-in-recent-fighting/ https://jewishinsider.com/2021/06/luria-zeldin-pursue-crackdown-on-hezbollah-in-lebanon/ https://www.washingtoninstitute.org/policy-analysis/preserving-lebanese-armed-forces-amid-state-decline https://jewishinsider.com/2021/07/house-foreign-aid-palestinians/   

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience
Episode 112: Women & Gender in the Qur'an, with Dr. Celene Ibrahim

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2021 106:31


Parvez and Omar discuss Dr. Celene Ibrahim's works on women and gender in the Qur'an About Dr. Celene Ibrahim Dr. Celene Ibrahim is the author of Women and Gender in the Qur'an from Oxford University Press (2020) and the editor of One Nation, Indivisible: Seeking Liberty and Justice from the Pulpit to the Streets from Wipf & Stock Publishers (2019). Her current book project on the concept of monotheism in the Qur'an and Islamic intellectual history is forthcoming from Cambridge University Press. Ibrahim holds a doctorate in Arabic and Islamic Civilizations and a master's degree in Women's and Gender Studies and Near Eastern and Judaic Studies from Brandeis University, a Masters of Divinity from Harvard University, and a bachelor's degree with the highest honors from Princeton University. As a trusted public voice on issues of religion and civic engagement, Dr. Ibrahim is deeply committed to counteracting bigotry and fostering values of pluralism, integrity, and civic responsibility. She offers lectures, workshops, and educational seminars around the world and is a graduate of the United World College of the American West.   About the Book Stories about gendered social relations permeate the Qur'an, and nearly three hundred verses involve specific women or girls. The Qur'an features these figures in accounts of human origins, in stories of the founding and destruction of nations, in narratives of conquest, in episodes of romantic attraction, and in incidents of family devotion and strife. Overall, stories involving women and girls weave together theology and ethics to reinforce central Qur'anic ideas regarding submission to God and moral accountability. Celene Ibrahim explores the complex cast of female figures in the Qur'an, probing themes related to biological sex, female sexuality, female speech, and women in sacred history. Ibrahim considers major and minor figures referenced in the Qur'an, including those who appear in narratives of sacred history, in parables, in descriptions of the eternal abode, and in verses that allude to events contemporaneous with the advent of the Qur'an in Arabia. Ibrahim finds that the Qur'an regularly celebrates the aptitudes of women in the realms of spirituality and piety, in political maneuvering, and in safeguarding their own wellbeing; yet, women figures also occasionally falter and use their agency toward nefarious ends. Women and Gender in the Qur'an outlines how women and girls - old, young, barren, fertile, chaste, profligate, reproachable, and saintly -enter Qur'anic sacred history and advance the Qur'an's overarching didactic aims.

Thoth-Hermes Podcast
Season 6-Episode 7 – Witches and Orpheus-Sara Mastros

Thoth-Hermes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2021 102:04


Please welcome this week's guest on the show, Sara Mastros from Pittsburgh who teaches witchcraft, Greek and Near Eastern mythology, Jewish Kabbalah, Pythagorean Mysticism, and practical sorcery online, and at festivals all over the East Coast. Sara grew up in the Amish part of Pennsylvania although not Amish herself within a family that merged Greek and Jewish cultural backgrounds. Magic was not exactly taboo but it seemed that some family members hoped Sara would eventually grow out of this ‘episode' which she was interested in from early age on. At age eight she ordered two books on witchcraft from a catalogue, namely ‘Buckland's Complete Book of Witchcraft' and ‘Encyclopedia of White Magic' by Paddy Slade. Those were the starting points of further explorations into the practice of witchcraft and magic which lead Sara to university libraries and further to the discovery of different grimoires. In the early 2000s, Sara began to work with the Greek Magical Papyri and then with the Orphic Hymns where some doubts arose on the accuracy of previous translations. Eager to understand the material in depth Sara went on to teaching herself Greek because this was the only way to satisfy her need for historical accuracy as well as for gaining the ability to dive deep into the material in terms of magical workings. The result was the publishing of the highly appraised ‘Orphic Hymns Grimoire' where Sara strives for accuracy in translation but at the same time takes the nature of the respective god/goddess into account. In this episode, we'll be talking about the definition of a witch, different categories of magic/witchcraft, and how the translation of words and practice from the distant past creates tension and ways to deal with it. Sara's teaching work will be also a subject along with some good advice for beginners and an outlook on her upcoming book project, ‘The Big Book of Magical Incense' which already open for pre-order. You can hire Sara's services and follow her personal blog at https://www.mastroszealot.com Music played in this episode This is the return of wonderful Heather Dale, who has been with us presenting her music already. This week again a selection of three quite different types of music she presents: GO TO HER WEBSITE AND CHECK IT OUT! www.heatherdale.com   1) SIR GAWAIN AND THE GREEN KNIGHT (Track starts at 5:21)   2) BONFIRE (Incantation) (Track starts at 52:16)   3) THE DREAM OF RHONABWY (Track starts at 1:32:27)     Intro and Outro Music especially written and recorded for the Thoth-Hermes Podcast by Chris Roberts

Believes Unasp - Sabbath School
1029 - Sabbath School - 28.May Fri

Believes Unasp - Sabbath School

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2021 12:15


Further Thought: Read Ellen G. White, pp. 968–970, in The SDABible Commentary, vol. 7; “The Observance of the Sabbath,” pp. 349–351, in Testimonies for the Church, vol. 6; “From the Red Sea to Sinai,”pp. 295–297, in Patriarchs and Prophets.The Ten Commandments define comprehensively and fundamentallythe divine-human and human-human relationships. The commandmentat the center of the Decalogue is the Sabbath commandment. It identi-fies the Lord of the Sabbath in a special way and indicates His sphere ofauthority and ownership. Note these two aspects: (1) the identity of theDeity: Yahweh (Lord), who is the Creator (Exod. 20:11, Exod. 31:17)and who thus holds a unique place; (2) the sphere of His ownership andauthority—“ ‘the heavens and the earth, the sea and all that is in them’ ”(Exod. 20:11, NASB; compare Exod. 31:17). In these two aspects, theSabbath commandment has the characteristics that are typi­cal of sealsof international, ancient Near Eastern treaty documents. These seals aretypically in the center of the treaty documents and also contain (1) theidentity of a deity (usually a pagan god) and (2) the sphere of owner­ship and authority (usually a limited geographical area).“The sanctification of the Spirit signalizes the difference betweenthose who have the seal of God and those who keep a spurious rest day.“When the test comes, it will be clearly shown what the mark of thebeast is. It is the keeping of Sunday. . . .“God has designated the seventh day as His Sabbath [Ex. 31:13, 17,16 quoted].“Thus the distinction is drawn between the loyal and the disloyal.Those who desire to have the seal of God in their foreheads must keepthe Sabbath of the fourth commandment.”—Ellen G. White Comments,The SDA Bible Commentary, vol. 7, pp. 980, 981.Discussion Questions: Read Leviticus 19:30. Notice how it links the sanctuary and theSabbath. Considering what we have learned so far about what theSabbath is a sign of, why does that linkage make so much sense? Ask yourself this question: Has Sabbath keeping helpedstrengthen my walk with the Lord? If not, what changes can youmake?Summary: The Sabbath is a covenant sign that reaches forward to thetime when the plan of salvation will be consummated. It points back toCreation, and as a sign of the covenant of grace, it points us to the finalre-creation, when God makes all things new.

Believes Unasp - Sabbath School
1029 - Sabbath School - Easy Reading - 28.May Fri

Believes Unasp - Sabbath School

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2021 6:34


Further Thought: Read Ellen G. White, pp. 968–970, in The SDABible Commentary, vol. 7; “The Observance of the Sabbath,” pp. 349–351, in Testimonies for the Church, vol. 6; “From the Red Sea to Sinai,”pp. 295–297, in Patriarchs and Prophets.The Ten Commandments define comprehensively and fundamentallythe divine-human and human-human relationships. The commandmentat the center of the Decalogue is the Sabbath commandment. It identi-fies the Lord of the Sabbath in a special way and indicates His sphere ofauthority and ownership. Note these two aspects: (1) the identity of theDeity: Yahweh (Lord), who is the Creator (Exod. 20:11, Exod. 31:17)and who thus holds a unique place; (2) the sphere of His ownership andauthority—“ ‘the heavens and the earth, the sea and all that is in them’ ”(Exod. 20:11, NASB; compare Exod. 31:17). In these two aspects, theSabbath commandment has the characteristics that are typi­cal of sealsof international, ancient Near Eastern treaty documents. These seals aretypically in the center of the treaty documents and also contain (1) theidentity of a deity (usually a pagan god) and (2) the sphere of owner­ship and authority (usually a limited geographical area).“The sanctification of the Spirit signalizes the difference betweenthose who have the seal of God and those who keep a spurious rest day.“When the test comes, it will be clearly shown what the mark of thebeast is. It is the keeping of Sunday. . . .“God has designated the seventh day as His Sabbath [Ex. 31:13, 17,16 quoted].“Thus the distinction is drawn between the loyal and the disloyal.Those who desire to have the seal of God in their foreheads must keepthe Sabbath of the fourth commandment.”—Ellen G. White Comments,The SDA Bible Commentary, vol. 7, pp. 980, 981.Discussion Questions: Read Leviticus 19:30. Notice how it links the sanctuary and theSabbath. Considering what we have learned so far about what theSabbath is a sign of, why does that linkage make so much sense? Ask yourself this question: Has Sabbath keeping helpedstrengthen my walk with the Lord? If not, what changes can youmake?Summary: The Sabbath is a covenant sign that reaches forward to thetime when the plan of salvation will be consummated. It points back toCreation, and as a sign of the covenant of grace, it points us to the finalre-creation, when God makes all things new.

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience
Episode 112: Women & Gender in the Quran, with Dr. Celene Ibrahim

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2021 107:17


Parvez and Omar discuss women and gender in the Qur'an with Dr. Celene Ibrahim. About Dr. Celene Ibrahim Dr. Celene Ibrahim is the author of Women and Gender in the Qur'an from Oxford University Press (2020) and the editor of One Nation, Indivisible: Seeking Liberty and Justice from the Pulpit to the Streets from Wipf & Stock Publishers (2019). Her current book project on the concept of monotheism in the Qur'an and Islamic intellectual history is forthcoming from Cambridge University Press. Ibrahim holds a doctorate in Arabic and Islamic Civilizations and a master's degree in Women's and Gender Studies and Near Eastern and Judaic Studies from Brandeis University, a Masters of Divinity from Harvard University, and a bachelor's degree with the highest honors from Princeton University. As a trusted public voice on issues of religion and civic engagement, Dr. Ibrahim is deeply committed to counteracting bigotry and fostering values of pluralism, integrity, and civic responsibility. She offers lectures, workshops, and educational seminars around the world and is a graduate of the United World College of the American West.

GTI Tours Podcast
#33 Contrasting Kingdoms — Interview with Jonathan Greer

GTI Tours Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2021 38:30


Jonathan Greer and his wife Jennifer have enjoyed learning and teaching the Story of the Bible together in a variety of contexts in the Middle East for nearly two decades. They are faculty members at Grand Rapids Theological Seminary where Jonathan serves as Associate Professor of Old Testament and Director of the Hesse Archaeological Lab and Jennifer as Adjunct Instructor of Bible with a New Testament focus. Together they lead an annual study tour course in cooperation with GTI to the lands of the Bible as well as courses in biblical interpretation and background studies. Jonathan holds M.A. degrees in Old Testament and Biblical Languages from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary and a Ph.D. from The Pennsylvania State University where he focused on Hebrew Bible, ancient Near Eastern studies, and archaeology. He is also the Associate Director of archaeological excavations at Tel Dan, Israel, and has published a number of works on the relationship of the Bible to the ancient world. The Greer's reside in Grand Rapids, Michigan with their three children.Each year, Dr. Greer and his wife Jennifer lead our Signature Tour of Egypt, Jordan & Israel. Follow the link below to learn more:Egypt Signature Tourhttps://gtitours.org/trip/signature-egyptEgypt Promo Videohttps://vimeo.com/304959706https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramesseum

Theocast - Reformed Theology
There Is No Christ in Your Genesis, Sir

Theocast - Reformed Theology

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2021


Is there any Christ in your Genesis? The book of Genesis is often mishandled. Peripheral things are over-emphasized and the main point is lost. Jon and Justin talk about Genesis from a redemptive-historical, covenantal, and Christ-centered perspective.Semper Reformanda Podcast: Jon and Justin take a deeper dive into covenant theology and the book of Genesis. It is our perspective that Genesis cannot be rightly understood apart from a covenantal framework. We aim to explain how and why.Resources:Our Covenant Theology teaching seriesBook study on Sam Renihan’s bookOur episode: Is Your Theological System Any Good?Ask Theocast: GENESIS: About Creation? A Science Book? NEITHER?!?! Book Giveaway: “Grace in Despair” by Dianna CarrollSUPPORT Theocast: https://theocast.org/give/ FACEBOOK: Theocast: https://www.facebook.com/Theocast.org TWITTER: Theocast: https://twitter.com/theocast_org INSTAGRAM: Theocast: https://www.instagram.com/theocast_org/  Podcast TranscriptJustin Perdue: Hi, this is Justin. Let me begin by asking you a question: is there any Jesus in your Genesis? Today on Theocast, Jon and I are going to be talking about the book of Genesis, the ways that it is often mishandled, and how we often miss the main point of that wonderful book. We’re going to look at Genesis today from a redemptive-historical perspective, from a covenantal perspective with Jesus at the center. We hope it’s encouraging for you.We’re going to take a deeper dive into covenant theology over in Semper Reformanda, and how that relates to our understanding of Genesis. We hope all of this is helpful and encouraging to you. Stay tuned.For those who listen to us all the time, you might be ready for what I’m going to say: we talk about redemptive-historical theology and the redemptive-historical framework of the Bible. We talk about covenant theology and we talk about a very Christ-centered way to understand the entirety of Scripture.Today, we’re going to put some of those tools to work, and we’re going to have a conversation about the very first book of the Bible—and that’s obviously none other than the book of Genesis. There are many takes on the book of Genesis in our day. There are a lot of things said about it that, we don’t want to bury the lead here, that Jon and I find to be a little bit less than helpful and confusing. And the main point of Genesis, we fear, is often lost because of some of these peripheral things that often become the focus. In particular, what we want to do today is be able to talk about Jesus from the book of Genesis.The episode title, if you’ve already looked at it, is There is No Jesus in Your Genesis, Sir, which is a reference to a Charles Spurgeon quote, a paraphrase of the Charles Spurgeon quote, where he said, “No Christ in your sermon, sir? Go home and never preach again until you have something worth saying.”So we’re going to talk about the book of Genesis today on a number of levels. We’re going to begin by just talking about some of the things that are often the focus of evangelicalism when it comes to the book of Genesis and hopefully have a little fun; we have a little fun in a gracious way and point out how that’s less than helpful.And then we’re going to pivot and talk about the ways that we think we should understand the book. I hope that this is mega encouraging for the listener as we think about how God the Son is all over the place in the book of Genesis.Jon Moffitt: What is the book of Genesis about? I asked this to my kids the other day just to test them out. Justin has his hands way up in the air. And the common answer is…Justin Perdue: Creation.Jon Moffitt: Creation. That’s right. What is interesting is Justin, you’re preaching through the book. I’ll throw you on the spot here. How many chapters are in Genesis?Justin Perdue: 50.Jon Moffitt: 50. And how many of those chapters are in reference to creation?Justin Perdue: Two.Jon Moffitt: That’s right.Justin Perdue: I’ve got my hand raised. Can I make some comments? Ask me what Genesis is about.Jon Moffitt: We’ll get there. We’ll get there.I grew up influenced by what’s called an evidentialist apologetic. For those of you that are new to Theocast, or maybe new to this whole idea, apologetics is to give an answer. You’re not apologizing for something because you feel sorry, but it’s to provide an answer. And there are two different categories of apologetics: you have evidentialist, meaning that with enough evidence you can provide solid truth so that someone can make a logical decision to follow Christ. So apologetic through evidence. And then Justin, what would be the opposite of an apologetic perspective?Justin Perdue: Presuppositionalist perspective? That means we understand that there are presuppositions that must be maintained and held if one is going to see these truths as legitimate and valid, and ultimately, given that we understand that God is the one who grants us true wisdom and sight by His grace, we understand that we’re not going to reason anybody into the kingdom of God and that God must do a work in someone’s life in order to cause them, help them, by His grace to see these things as true.Jon Moffitt: Right. Those are the two perspectives. The one I came from was an evidentialist perspective. We’re going to be as kind as we can be here, but this is the reality. We always try. We’re sinners and we often need to repent.Anyways, what you end up getting into is an evolution/creation debate, and we use the Bible—specifically the book of Genesis—as a science textbook, or as you like to say, a documentary on creation. We then go through and we try to prove the legitimacy of creation, which I understand and I would agree with, that we can look at science to see the glory of God and to strengthen and encourage our faith. There’s nothing wrong with that. But as we do with any text of the Bible, we need to always ask two very important questions: who is the audience and what’s the author’s intention of writing to that audience? And that will tell you the purpose of the book.Justin Perdue: And alongside that, as the divine Author of the entire Bible, what is God meaning for us to understand here too? And I know you agree.Jon Moffitt: Right. The hard part about when we’re thinking about Genesis is that we immediately focus on the scientific/historical side of it—and it is important. If you don’t have a historical Adam and Eve, you’re going to be falling off into heresy after chapter 2. So we have a problem.We understand the debate; this is not what this debate is about. We hold to a historic understanding of Adam and Eve, but when it comes down to our understanding of Genesis, because we have created such an evidentialist/this is an evolution-creation debate, we miss the whole point of why Genesis was written and the purpose of Genesis in modern day life. Our life today, as a believer—what is it supposed to be for us? There’s the Creation Museum, we’ve got the big ark over in Kentucky, and people would ask me what my thoughts are on that. I think there are some helpful things there for Christians. They can go there and be encouraged. It’s a lot of money. I don’t know if I would have spent all that money on that. So if someone wants to give me multi-millions of dollars, I probably will use it for something else. But I’m not here to judge—I don’t live far from Kentucky, so probably one day I’ll take my kids to go see it.Justin Perdue: I’ll even go so far as to say, in a slightly more joke-ish, punchy way, that if the initial thought bubbles that go up from your head when the book of Genesis is mentioned is creation versus evolution, if you immediately think Creation Museum and you immediately think Ark in Kentucky, then this podcast is for you. With all due respect, not that those things are bad. And like Jon said, there’s a time and a place for some of these debates and conversations. There are useful things, I’m sure. Going to the Creation Museum or going to the ark in Kentucky could be a great experience to have with your family. I also don’t think that Christians that don’t go are going to be missing out on something that is somehow just essential to our faith because the point of the book of Genesis is something entirely different.I’ll go ahead and say this really quickly before we get into more of the meat of the episode. When you read Genesis 1 and 2, your mind should immediately go to Revelation 21 and 22. Because in reading the account of creation, we are reading that in light of God’s promise of the consummation of redemption and restoration at the end of it. There are striking parallels between those respective chapters at the beginning and end of the Bible. I think this episode is going to maybe flesh out for us why and how that’s the case.It’s sad that we have sort of gotten lost in the weeds—and the concerns that are peripheral at best have become the main focus of our conversation about this book of the Bible. And we miss the main point and are robbed of really edifying and encouraging stuff.Jon Moffitt: Justin, if you don’t mind, I’d like to give the context to Genesis and why it was written, and then we’ll move from that to try and give us a fuller explanation, comparing to what most commentaries and what most people do with Genesis. Then, I think, we’re going to argue the way in which the Bible has used the book of Genesis and we’ll go from there.We need to think about the historical context at this point. I know that this is a little bit snarky, but Genesis was not written the day after creation. Adam didn’t have a pen out and was tracking along.Justin Perdue: It was actually written millennia after.Jon Moffitt: Yes. 2,500 plus years is the estimate of how much recorded history had passed in Genesis before it was given us. So you have to understand why then was it written so far down the line? Let’s just think about the history. To understand Genesis, I would say Genesis is the prologue to Exodus, and in many ways you would want to go read Exodus first because it explains why Genesis exists. I know that the order of the books come in Genesis, Exodus, but it is for this very reason: Moses is the author of the Pentateuch. Moses’ life and story explain the necessity of why these books were written. This is, I would say, the really fast prologue introductions to the whole explanation of Genesis. The people of Israel who had been enslaved in Egypt for 400 years, they have not only been there that long, but there is no recorded history other than the verbal history that’s been handed to them about Abraham and the promises of Abraham, and they have become flat out polytheists, and it becomes the plague of the nation for the rest of their existence. It’s just horrible. God talks about whoring after other gods and idols constantly with the prophets and even Moses. When they’re brought out, Moses is up on the mountain. He comes back and what are they doing? They’re worshiping another golden calf. So you have an issue of polytheism. When Moses leaves and he goes up on the mountain and brings back the 10 commandments, what’s the first commandment? “You should have no other gods before me”, which is the issue Israel is going to face. When Moses begins to write this, he’s not writing this with the absence of reality. In Egyptian history, the tradition was that there wasn’t one god who created everything; there were multiple gods.Justin Perdue: And that was true of all the ancient Near Eastern creation accounts.Jon Moffitt: So Moses is writing in such a way that it’s shocking to say that in the beginning, Yahweh, one God, created all things. You have to understand that there is definitely an apologetic going on. It’s polytheism, not evolution, that he’s going after. This is a monotheistic religion that Moses is introducing to a polytheistic people.Justin Perdue: Sure. A few comments here on not only Moses writing it, but what he’s doing. As we’ve already said, Genesis is historical and Moses is writing redemptive history, and it’s really important that we understand that. That’s why I say it’s not a documentary, it’s not a history textbook. It’s not written like that.Two things can be true at the same time, and I think this is worth mentioning: we can uphold the fact that even the account of creation is written in a very beautiful and literary way, and at the same time, uphold its historicity. Those things are not mutually exclusive. I know sometimes people lose their minds when we start to talk about the literary elements of the way Moses wrote the book, but he is writing redemptive history for the people of Israel. And like you said, Jon, if anything, the creation account in Genesis is written as a polemic against not only polytheism generally, but also specifically against other creation myths that would have existed. It’s very clear as you study it because there are very interesting distinctions between Genesis and these other accounts of creation, and those distinctions make all the difference. They’re too coincidental to be a coincidence. So Moses knows what he’s doing.Now, is Genesis—and the Bible in general—useful in speaking to atheism? Yeah, because in the Bible, it’s very clear that people have denied the existence of God forever. The fool says in his heart that there is no God and all that. So we’re not saying that one can’t use the Bible to argue against an atheistic worldview, but understand why Genesis was written to the people of Israel originally. I think it does matter.Jon Moffitt: I do not feel the necessity, at any moment, when I am dealing with unbelievers or even the atheist to prove to them the evidence of science or use science to prove Scripture. And the reason I have to say that is Paul is very clear that the fool has said in his heart that there is no God. That’s Proverbs. But Paul has also said that the unbeliever will look at the Word of God, specifically the gospel, and call it foolish.Justin Perdue: And the unbeliever will suppress the truth about God and unrighteousness. Romans 1. So, clearly, God has to do a work in a person’s heart and mind in order for the person to ever see God’s existence is true and good.Jon Moffitt: Now, does that mean that any efforts at apologetics, when it relates to creation and all that, is of no value? No.Justin Perdue: We want to clear up misunderstanding.Jon Moffitt: That’s right. I just think we need to be very careful that we don’t use Genesis in a way it was not intended to be used. If you think that God wrote that so that we could prove to the evolutionists they’re wrong, evolution didn’t come around until many, many, many years later.Justin Perdue: Let’s talk about Genesis and what it’s about. What is Genesis about? Short answer: Genesis is about redemption. Because that’s what the whole Bible is about. It is also more specifically about redemption accomplished through God the Son who took on flesh, and that is in view all throughout the book of Genesis.Let’s begin with the account of creation in Genesis 1:1 and following. Is Jesus in Genesis? Is God the Son in Genesis, even Genesis 1? Absolutely. He is. We should not read Genesis one without thinking of some other passages of Scripture. So when we read in Genesis 1:1, “In the beginning, God…” our mind should immediately go to John 1. “In the beginning,” the exact same construction, “was the Word,” who is the divine Word, God the Son, “and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God. All things were made through him, and without him was not anything made that was made.” So in that sense, God the Son is the beginning of all things in terms of this world, and he is the agent of creation through whom the whole thing is made.Jon Moffitt: I would say that we need to, I would say as the Reformers do, but I would argue as the apostles do, they use the New Testament in order to interpret and explain the Old Testament. This is a great example of that.Justin Perdue: A couple of other texts just for our encouragement: Colossians 1:16 about Jesus. “For by him all things were created, in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or authorities—all things were created through him and for him. And he is before all things, and in him all things hold together.”Jon Moffitt: Did the readers of Genesis, when Moses wrote the Pentateuch, fully understand that?Justin Perdue: Of course not. Did Moses understand it fully?Jon Moffitt: Probably not.Justin Perdue: This is an epic thought: the writer of the Hebrews, at the beginning of his letter, he says that God has spoken to us at various times in various ways through the prophets, etc. “But in these last days, he has spoken to us by his Son. . . through whom also he created the world. He is the radiance of the glory of God and the exact imprint of his nature, and he upholds the universe by the word of his power. After making purification for sins, he sat down at the right hand of the Majesty on high.” Think about that thought, that the one through whom all things were made is the very one who takes on flesh to go and live in that world, suffer in that world, bleed in that world, and die in that world in order to save sinners. I think it’s legit that we see that from the opening tip of Scripture. Genesis 1:1—there it is. “In the beginning, God….” We have God the Son present, and we need to think about God the Son and his redemptive work that he would do, connecting it to these other passages in the Bible.Jon Moffitt: I would say there are two ways in which Genesis has been read, but they come to the same conclusions. When the children of Israel would hear the law read over them constantly and they would memorize it, they would write it upon the tables of their heart—all of the commands that we have given to us and Deuteronomy—they would hear it as the same way: it is the history of redemption. The reason is that in Exodus, they just entered into a covenant with a God they really don’t know much about. And Moses says, “Here’s the God you just entered into covenant with. He is the creator. He’s also the one who made the promise to restore that which was broken.”So Moses, through the inspiration of the Spirit, is explaining how they got from creation to Egypt, and explaining the faithfulness of God along the way. I will say that the most important part of the story of Genesis is the fall, because the question then becomes, one, we know that there is sin because everyone experiences it. Moses just explains how it got here. And then the greatest part about Genesis is that you have the Creator of the universe, and now you’re going to have the restoration by the Creator.Justin Perdue: He’s the Restorer of the universe.Jon Moffitt: In the mind of the reader, the question has to be, “Who is the seed of Eve?” Because when he shows up, then all will be made right. That’s the question the reader has.Justin Perdue: And we’re going to get to that promise in just a minute. But I think you’re right. I think it’s important for people to see that the work of redemption is effectively the work of re-creation. That’s what God is about. We’re just going to pepper some stuff in here from the early chapters of Genesis. Even in verses three through five where God creates light, I think this is significant. And I think it preaches a sermon about Christ. Because there is light in the universe now, and light only comes from God—without God, there’s darkness—but there’s light that exists without the sun being created yet. And people sometimes lose their minds and wig out. How is there light without the sun? Have you read the book of Revelation? Have you read Revelation 21 where we’re told that the Heavenly City has no need of sun or moon to shine on it for the glory of God gives it light and its lamp is the Lamb.Jesus, also according to John’s gospel, in him, in the Word was life, and that life was the light of men, the true light that enlightens everyone who is coming into the world. So Christ is described that way. He’s going to literally be the light of the new heavens and the new earth. So we ought to see that in the early chapters of Genesis: there’s light that exists apart from the sun. It’s preaching Christ to us.Last thing, if you’ll allow me from the creation account early there. The seventh day, the Sabbath day; it’s a very unique day because all the other six days have this common refrain of “there was evening,” “there was morning,” “the first, second, third, etc. day.” The seventh day doesn’t have that refrain. Many Christians through history have understood that to be a pointer to Christ because that seventh day is awaiting its fulfillment, and that seventh day of our Sabbath rest finds its yes and amen in Christ. In particular, it’s fulfilled when Jesus would lay in a tomb outside Jerusalem. 1500 years after Moses wrote these words, he’s going to lay in a tomb outside Jerusalem on the seventh day of the week because his work is done. Redemption is over. Sin is atoned for. Righteousness fulfilled. And he’s going to get up from the dead on the next day to usher us into the new creation. And then the writer to the Hebrews picks up on that and tells us that we have entered into God’s Sabbath rest when we cease from our working, like God rested from His. And we know that Christ is the fulfillment of that rest that we are promised forever, but it’s already ours in Him.Genesis 1 and the early verses of Genesis two—we should read these in light of Christ and what God is going to do through him if we’re going to read Genesis like Christians.Jon Moffitt: Genesis is a Christian book, just to be clear. The Old Testament is a Christian book. I mentioned there are two ways to read it: first of all, it’s treated as an Israelite who understands that God is the one redeeming them and they’re looking forward to the seed of Eve, and then it comes through the seed of Abraham, and so we gain clarity. You have the promise and then you have the narrative of humanity about how they just constantly prove they are in desperate need of restoration, or I would say rescuing. You get to the flood and God says no one is righteous, and so He abolishes the world. And then just like anybody would ever think, if we could start all over and just get rid of all the bad people, God proved that won’t work. Because the problem is not with the current people on the earth; the problem is that it’s in the heart or in the seed of man—it’s passed down.Justin Perdue: If we’re going to talk about Adam and Noah, Noah is a type of Adam. God wipes humanity off the face of the earth because He sees that the inclinations of man’s heart is only evil continually in Genesis 6. After the flood, God has hit the reset button but the problem with Noah is that he’s too much like Adam. Basically, sin remains. We even see one of Noah’s sons is cursed, like God cursed humanity, the snake, and the whole creation in the garden. Just hitting the reset button and wiping people off the earth is not going to fix this. There’s something more fundamentally at issue here.Jon Moffitt: The second way it’s read, as modern day Christians, is that we have the whole Canon now, and we allow the New Testament interpretation of the book of Genesis to be the filter by which we then go back and read and say with full confidence that Genesis is the introduction of Jesus to us, not only of the Father, but Jesus, the Creator and Sustainer of the world. And not only that, but the Spirit that moved upon the water. So we allow the New Testament to be read now as redemptive as well, but we read it as seeing that it’s the fulfillment of Jesus and how we get Jesus to this point. I think, as an Israelite or as a modern day Christian, we both read Genesis from a redemptive historical understanding of Scripture because it’s how we get Jesus.Justin Perdue: It’s a great observation. You have the Trinity in the first two verses of Genesis 1, because you have the Father, and then the Son is the agent of creation, and the Spirit hovering over the face of the deep. That’s a pretty cool thought, too.Going back to the garden and thinking about Adam and Eve, covenants and promises, and the like… Jon, let’s not bury the lead here. We are convinced, and we’re going to talk about this in Semper Reformanda in detail, that it is impossible to rightly understand Genesis apart from a covenantal framework—and that’s a big deal. More on that over in Semper Reformanda. We’re going to talk a little bit about some of this stuff right now. So God makes Adam and Eve in His own image, and then God makes a covenant with Adam where He gives him things that he is to do, and He gives him prohibitions—one prohibition in particular that there’s a particular tree that he’s not to eat of, and He gives a sanction: “If you break this covenant that I’ve made with you, then in the day that you break it, you’ll surely die.” Adam, in that sense, is serving as the representative of the entire human race. And when he falls into sin, he plunges all of humanity and all of the creation into sin and ruin along with him.How do we know this is true? We could go a number of places, but we can go to the book of Romans where Paul connects all of these things for us, and we see that through one man’s disobedience, all of this wreckage and ruin has come upon us. But then through the obedience of the new Adam, the second Adam—Christ—that many will be made righteous. And so we can connect Adam and Christ that way, and see that God intended that if Adam had obeyed and had been righteous, that all would have been well with humanity. But because he fell and we fell in him, there now has to be another one who can represent us before God and actually accomplish all of the terms of the covenant that God made with Adam. He is perfectly obedient, he is sinless, he is completely righteous, and then his work is counted to us and he represents us for all of those who are united to him in faith. I don’t think it’s overstating it to say that that promise that God makes to Adam and Eve in the aftermath of the fall, that there will come a seed of the woman who will step on, who will crush the serpent’s head—that is the proto-euangelion, the first promise of the gospel, as it’s often referred to—that is the promise we would say of the covenant of grace.The rest of the entire Bible—it’s a big book, and Genesis 3:15 is only a few pages in—the rest of the entire Bible is the unfolding and the accomplishment of that promise.Jon Moffitt: That’s right. Yes, creation is a big part of it. But I would say I agree with Justin: the covenant of works, and I would call it the first Adam and the last Adam, or he’s also described as the second Adam in that Christ is the fulfillment where Adam failed. And you have Paul mentioning this language and using this language that Jesus is the second Adam. In many ways, that’s what you’re waiting for. You’re waiting for the federal head, meaning the representative of humanity. Federal head is a language that I was introduced to by Reformed theology, and a lot of people struggle with the concept of a federal head, but federal means representative. Because Adam sinned, we are all sinners. We inherited his sin. He is the representative of humanity. If you reject that theology, it’s kind of dangerous because that’s the very thing that Paul says: in Adam all died because he is the original human and his disobedience is now passed on to us. But it also says in Christ, all are made alive.So, you want federal headship because if you don’t have it, then Christ can’t be your representative for righteousness. This doctrine is introduced in the very beginning, in the very first book, and it really becomes the theme. Because you see the federal head and the representative of the effects of it in Genesis 3:16 and following, and all of a sudden, you see the curses that come forward, you see the fallout, and then you also see the promise of the federal head of Christ, the second Adam, which is in the seed. And you see the story of the two seeds, which we would argue is the two covenants—covenant of grace versus covenant of works—Christ being the promise of the covenant of grace. If you want to know what we mean by that, we did a whole five-part series on the covenant of grace or covenant theology. It’ll be in the show notes. So go down there and find that it’s free. Go listen to it. There’s a whole handout. We encourage you to do so.The reason why we mentioned this is that it helps you understand and really flow the narrative, where you’re not trying to find one evidence to prove somebody wrong about history. Number two, you’re not trying to find moral application. Can you find moral application in these texts? Sure. Don’t be like Adam and Eve and disobey God. But you’re missing what’s really happening and the superstar of the story, which is God using Jesus to redeem sinners. That’s the superstory, and there are these stories under that.I will say this: in the dispensational-evidentialist world, it seems like the superstar of the story, which should be Christ, is put down as a subset and everything else becomes a priority, whether it’s the evidence of creation or moralism, the “be like” whoever…Justin Perdue: I would argue that it’s not just in the evidentialist-dispensational world. I agree completely with what you assessed about that world, but I think in other streams within evangelicalism, there are still things that are inappropriate, like there’s an off-centered emphasis. For example, even in thinking about Genesis 2 and the covenant God makes with Adam, I think people are happy in a general sense, to say that Adam represents us and that in his fall he represents us. But there’s not always that obvious connection made with how everything that was lost in Adam and then some is going to be gained for us in Christ. We miss that connection or we emphasize things that are secondary application as though they’re the main takeaway. In Genesis 3 and the account of the fall, how many times have you heard sermons where the emphasis is Adam and Eve doubting God’s word? And that’s the problem. Or Adam didn’t lead Eve like he should have, and that’s the emphasis.I’m not saying that all of that is illegitimate to say at all, but the point of that text is the fall of humanity into sin because our first covenant head and federal head fell and failed in the covenant that God had made with him. And there was a promise immediately upon sin entering the world, and immediately upon us in Adam blowing it—there’s the promise of grace, there’s the promise of Christ in the gospel. And God went, “I’ve got this. I’m going to save a people. You guys, because you have such a thing as freedom of choice, right in the garden, you have blown this. But I’m a Redeemer and I always have been, and I’m good. And there’s one who’s coming.” that needs to be what we preach from Genesis 3. And then as we make our way through the rest of the book, we’re tracing those two lines of the seed of the woman and the seed of the serpent.And the question that you often will ask, Jon, that I think is a really good one: as we’re reading the rest of the Bible, we’re thinking who that promised seed is. When is he coming? That’s what we’re finding out as it unfolds through farther steps in Revelation, unfolds through the rest of the Old Testament, where we are primed and ready by the time the angels announce to Mary and to Joseph that there’s one coming who’s going to be named Jesus, because he’s going to save his people from their sins. Thank God he’s coming. He’s here.I think that we do people a tremendous disservice when we do not emphasize the redemptive plan of God accomplished through Christ, that has always been the plan not just from Genesis 1, but from before the world began.Jon Moffitt: I would even say what is great when you start having a Christocentric understanding or a redemptive-historical understanding of Scripture, you begin to see the connection. There’s a flow. There’s a cohesiveness to the text. One of the things I love about the grace that’s in the New Testament is absolutely seen in the Old Testament. Here’s a great example: God comes into the garden and says, “Hey, Adam! Where are you?” As if God does not know. It’s like, “Hey, buddy. I know you’re hiding. I know what you just did.” It’s like you caught the kid with the hand in the cookie jar, but it’s far worse than that. You caught them with a bloody knife and he just murdered. What does God do when He promises the seed? What requirement did He put on Adam and Eve?Justin Perdue: Nothing.Jon Moffitt: Nothing. He did one thing: He separated himself from their presence and then said, “Oh, and by the way, not have anything to do with you, but through my providence and my promises, I will then restore your presence back to me.” That’s grace, right? To receive unmerited favor. And it was seen right in the beginning. God not only promises Jesus, but promises Jesus with no strings attached. That’s good news.Justin Perdue: I could talk about this for a long time, but we got to get over to Semper Reformanda. I’ll make a couple of brief comments about something you just raised.What we’ve done today, I hope, with Genesis is maybe begin to show people how they can and should read their entire Old Testament. Because I do think a lot of people approach the Old Testament in a number of ways that are bad. We’ve touched on several. One, for many people, the Old Testament is just like a wasteland: it’s hard, it’s full of law and threats. There is maybe an occasional oasis because there’s a prophecy about the Messiah or some promise of grace or comfort or restoration. But generally speaking, the Old Testament is just hard. We ought not see it that way if we’re looking at it through this Christocentric, redemptive-historical lens. You already talked about our tendency to moralize the Old Testament, where we follow around these Old Testament saints and figure out how to be like them. That’s not a good way to approach the Old Testament.Lastly, I think people tend to approach the Old Testament, and this is probably especially true in a dispensationalist framework with an almost completely law-centered mentality. What are you doing with that? You’re mining through every text to find the things that we need to be doing or the things that we need to not do, and that becomes the point of the message. Here’s the issue: none of that squares with how Jesus understood the Scriptures and none of that squares with how the apostles understood the Scriptures. And remember that for Jesus and the apostles, the Scriptures were the Old Testament. That was their Bible at that time. They understand that whole thing, the Old Testament, to be a testimony about Christ. And so we should certainly understand the book of Genesis that way. And I think we’ve tried to do that this morning as we’ve recorded.So we’re about to make our way over to Semper Reformanda, which is a podcast for those who have partnered with Theocast and have joined the Reformation, as we like to say, to see this message and this theology spread as far and wide as possible. Because Jesus really is enough for us to have peace with God now and forever, and we want as many people to know that rest and that peace is possible. If you don’t even know what Semper Reformanda is, you could find out more information about it and the ways that you could partner with our ministry over at our website, the URL for that is theocast.org. We encourage you to go check out everything we got over there on the site, including how to become a member of Semper Reformanda.Jon Moffitt: And a big part of the membership is online and local groups where you can get together and discuss the podcast each week. So don’t miss out on that.Justin Perdue: Not only are you partnering with us, but we’re trying to create a community where you can love on each other and encourage each other and sharpen each other. So if that sounds good to you, go check it out.We will talk with many of you over there on SR. I think that’s the lingo we’re using these days.Jon Moffitt: And what are we talking about?Justin Perdue: How a covenantal framework is essential to our understanding of Genesis, and in a lot of ways the Bible, but especially Genesis.All right. We’ll see you over there guys. 

New Books in Biblical Studies
Robert D. Miller II, "Yahweh: Origin of a Desert God" (Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2021)

New Books in Biblical Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2021 26:14


Recognizing the absence of a God named Yahweh outside of ancient Israel, this study addresses the related questions of Yahweh's origins and the biblical claim that there were Yahweh-worshipers other than the Israelite people. Beginning with the Hebrew Bible, with an exhaustive survey of ancient Near Eastern literature and inscriptions discovered by archaeology, and using anthropology to reconstruct religious practices and beliefs of ancient Edom and Midian, this study proposes an answer. Yahweh-worshiping Midianites of the Early Iron Age brought their deity along with metallurgy into ancient Palestine and the Israelite people. Join us as we talk with Robert Miller about his latest book, Yahweh: Origin of a Desert God (Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2021). Robert Miller, II, O.F.S., Ph.D., is Ordinary Professor of Old Testament and Associate Dean for Graduate Studies at The Catholic University of America. Michael Morales is Professor of Biblical Studies at Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary, and the author of The Tabernacle Pre-Figured: Cosmic Mountain Ideology in Genesis and Exodus(Peeters, 2012), Who Shall Ascend the Mountain of the Lord?: A Biblical Theology of Leviticus(IVP Academic, 2015), and Exodus Old and New: A Biblical Theology of Redemption(IVP Academic, 2020). He can be reached at mmorales@gpts.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biblical-studies

New Books in History
Robert D. Miller II, "Yahweh: Origin of a Desert God" (Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2021 26:14


Recognizing the absence of a God named Yahweh outside of ancient Israel, this study addresses the related questions of Yahweh's origins and the biblical claim that there were Yahweh-worshipers other than the Israelite people. Beginning with the Hebrew Bible, with an exhaustive survey of ancient Near Eastern literature and inscriptions discovered by archaeology, and using anthropology to reconstruct religious practices and beliefs of ancient Edom and Midian, this study proposes an answer. Yahweh-worshiping Midianites of the Early Iron Age brought their deity along with metallurgy into ancient Palestine and the Israelite people. Join us as we talk with Robert Miller about his latest book, Yahweh: Origin of a Desert God (Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2021). Robert Miller, II, O.F.S., Ph.D., is Ordinary Professor of Old Testament and Associate Dean for Graduate Studies at The Catholic University of America. Michael Morales is Professor of Biblical Studies at Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary, and the author of The Tabernacle Pre-Figured: Cosmic Mountain Ideology in Genesis and Exodus(Peeters, 2012), Who Shall Ascend the Mountain of the Lord?: A Biblical Theology of Leviticus(IVP Academic, 2015), and Exodus Old and New: A Biblical Theology of Redemption(IVP Academic, 2020). He can be reached at mmorales@gpts.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Jewish Studies
Robert D. Miller II, "Yahweh: Origin of a Desert God" (Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2021)

New Books in Jewish Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2021 26:14


Recognizing the absence of a God named Yahweh outside of ancient Israel, this study addresses the related questions of Yahweh's origins and the biblical claim that there were Yahweh-worshipers other than the Israelite people. Beginning with the Hebrew Bible, with an exhaustive survey of ancient Near Eastern literature and inscriptions discovered by archaeology, and using anthropology to reconstruct religious practices and beliefs of ancient Edom and Midian, this study proposes an answer. Yahweh-worshiping Midianites of the Early Iron Age brought their deity along with metallurgy into ancient Palestine and the Israelite people. Join us as we talk with Robert Miller about his latest book, Yahweh: Origin of a Desert God (Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2021). Robert Miller, II, O.F.S., Ph.D., is Ordinary Professor of Old Testament and Associate Dean for Graduate Studies at The Catholic University of America. Michael Morales is Professor of Biblical Studies at Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary, and the author of The Tabernacle Pre-Figured: Cosmic Mountain Ideology in Genesis and Exodus(Peeters, 2012), Who Shall Ascend the Mountain of the Lord?: A Biblical Theology of Leviticus(IVP Academic, 2015), and Exodus Old and New: A Biblical Theology of Redemption(IVP Academic, 2020). He can be reached at mmorales@gpts.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/jewish-studies

New Books Network
Robert D. Miller II, "Yahweh: Origin of a Desert God" (Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2021 26:14


Recognizing the absence of a God named Yahweh outside of ancient Israel, this study addresses the related questions of Yahweh's origins and the biblical claim that there were Yahweh-worshipers other than the Israelite people. Beginning with the Hebrew Bible, with an exhaustive survey of ancient Near Eastern literature and inscriptions discovered by archaeology, and using anthropology to reconstruct religious practices and beliefs of ancient Edom and Midian, this study proposes an answer. Yahweh-worshiping Midianites of the Early Iron Age brought their deity along with metallurgy into ancient Palestine and the Israelite people. Join us as we talk with Robert Miller about his latest book, Yahweh: Origin of a Desert God (Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2021). Robert Miller, II, O.F.S., Ph.D., is Ordinary Professor of Old Testament and Associate Dean for Graduate Studies at The Catholic University of America. Michael Morales is Professor of Biblical Studies at Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary, and the author of The Tabernacle Pre-Figured: Cosmic Mountain Ideology in Genesis and Exodus(Peeters, 2012), Who Shall Ascend the Mountain of the Lord?: A Biblical Theology of Leviticus(IVP Academic, 2015), and Exodus Old and New: A Biblical Theology of Redemption(IVP Academic, 2020). He can be reached at mmorales@gpts.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Religion
Robert D. Miller II, "Yahweh: Origin of a Desert God" (Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2021)

New Books in Religion

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2021 26:14


Recognizing the absence of a God named Yahweh outside of ancient Israel, this study addresses the related questions of Yahweh's origins and the biblical claim that there were Yahweh-worshipers other than the Israelite people. Beginning with the Hebrew Bible, with an exhaustive survey of ancient Near Eastern literature and inscriptions discovered by archaeology, and using anthropology to reconstruct religious practices and beliefs of ancient Edom and Midian, this study proposes an answer. Yahweh-worshiping Midianites of the Early Iron Age brought their deity along with metallurgy into ancient Palestine and the Israelite people. Join us as we talk with Robert Miller about his latest book, Yahweh: Origin of a Desert God (Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2021). Robert Miller, II, O.F.S., Ph.D., is Ordinary Professor of Old Testament and Associate Dean for Graduate Studies at The Catholic University of America. Michael Morales is Professor of Biblical Studies at Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary, and the author of The Tabernacle Pre-Figured: Cosmic Mountain Ideology in Genesis and Exodus(Peeters, 2012), Who Shall Ascend the Mountain of the Lord?: A Biblical Theology of Leviticus(IVP Academic, 2015), and Exodus Old and New: A Biblical Theology of Redemption(IVP Academic, 2020). He can be reached at mmorales@gpts.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/religion

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies
Robert D. Miller II, "Yahweh: Origin of a Desert God" (Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2021)

New Books in Middle Eastern Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2021 26:14


Recognizing the absence of a God named Yahweh outside of ancient Israel, this study addresses the related questions of Yahweh's origins and the biblical claim that there were Yahweh-worshipers other than the Israelite people. Beginning with the Hebrew Bible, with an exhaustive survey of ancient Near Eastern literature and inscriptions discovered by archaeology, and using anthropology to reconstruct religious practices and beliefs of ancient Edom and Midian, this study proposes an answer. Yahweh-worshiping Midianites of the Early Iron Age brought their deity along with metallurgy into ancient Palestine and the Israelite people. Join us as we talk with Robert Miller about his latest book, Yahweh: Origin of a Desert God (Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2021). Robert Miller, II, O.F.S., Ph.D., is Ordinary Professor of Old Testament and Associate Dean for Graduate Studies at The Catholic University of America. Michael Morales is Professor of Biblical Studies at Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary, and the author of The Tabernacle Pre-Figured: Cosmic Mountain Ideology in Genesis and Exodus(Peeters, 2012), Who Shall Ascend the Mountain of the Lord?: A Biblical Theology of Leviticus(IVP Academic, 2015), and Exodus Old and New: A Biblical Theology of Redemption(IVP Academic, 2020). He can be reached at mmorales@gpts.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/middle-eastern-studies

New Books in Anthropology
Robert D. Miller II, "Yahweh: Origin of a Desert God" (Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2021)

New Books in Anthropology

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2021 26:14


Recognizing the absence of a God named Yahweh outside of ancient Israel, this study addresses the related questions of Yahweh's origins and the biblical claim that there were Yahweh-worshipers other than the Israelite people. Beginning with the Hebrew Bible, with an exhaustive survey of ancient Near Eastern literature and inscriptions discovered by archaeology, and using anthropology to reconstruct religious practices and beliefs of ancient Edom and Midian, this study proposes an answer. Yahweh-worshiping Midianites of the Early Iron Age brought their deity along with metallurgy into ancient Palestine and the Israelite people. Join us as we talk with Robert Miller about his latest book, Yahweh: Origin of a Desert God (Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2021). Robert Miller, II, O.F.S., Ph.D., is Ordinary Professor of Old Testament and Associate Dean for Graduate Studies at The Catholic University of America. Michael Morales is Professor of Biblical Studies at Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary, and the author of The Tabernacle Pre-Figured: Cosmic Mountain Ideology in Genesis and Exodus(Peeters, 2012), Who Shall Ascend the Mountain of the Lord?: A Biblical Theology of Leviticus(IVP Academic, 2015), and Exodus Old and New: A Biblical Theology of Redemption(IVP Academic, 2020). He can be reached at mmorales@gpts.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/anthropology

PDF feed of Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship
The Divine Handclasp in the Hebrew Bible and in Near Eastern Iconography

PDF feed of Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2021


Abstract: David Calabro explores what he describes as the “divine handclasp” in the Hebrew Bible. The term refers to a handclasp between God and his human servant that had a place in ancient Israelite temple worship. Calabro indicates it was a ritual gesture that was part of temple rite performance with a priest acting as […] The post The Divine Handclasp in the Hebrew Bible and in Near Eastern Iconography first appeared on The Interpreter Foundation.

ePub feed of Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship
The Divine Handclasp in the Hebrew Bible and in Near Eastern Iconography

ePub feed of Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2021


Abstract: David Calabro explores what he describes as the “divine handclasp” in the Hebrew Bible. The term refers to a handclasp between God and his human servant that had a place in ancient Israelite temple worship. Calabro indicates it was a ritual gesture that was part of temple rite performance with a priest acting as […] The post The Divine Handclasp in the Hebrew Bible and in Near Eastern Iconography first appeared on The Interpreter Foundation.

The Biblical Mind
The Church's Alarming Neglect of the Old Testament (Brent Strawn)

The Biblical Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2021 42:19


Is the church gradually abandoning the Old Testament? Surveys of Americans from all walks of life and church backgrounds show that we have grown less and less literate in the Hebrew Scriptures. This causes a host of problems, such as mistaken preconceptions of the text or belief that the Old Testament is outdated or unnecessary. Especially in a culture so far removed from the original world of the text, how can we learn to read the Bible empathetically and humbly? In this episode, Dru Johnson interviews Dr. Brent Strawn, Professor of Old Testament and Law at Duke Divinity School. They discuss the church's widespread neglect of the Old Testament, and how to overcome the resulting problems. We should read the entire New Testament as situated within the conceptual world of the Old. They conclude with remarks about how the texts and art of other ancient Near Eastern cultures can help us understand Scripture. Show notes: 0:00 The difficulties of reading the Hebrew Bible as modern people 3:54 Approaching texts with humility 7:17 Brent's book The Old Testament is Dying 11:14 Boosting Bible literacy 17:18 Using the Old Testament well 25:48 Avoiding "word pollution" 29:00 Reading the New Testament through the Old Testament 34:33 Ancient Near Eastern views of the divine 39:57 Art and iconography as a window into the text Brent's book The Old Testament is Dying: A Diagnosis and Recommended Treatment Show notes by Micah Long. Credits for the music used in TBM podcast can be found at: hebraicthought.org/credits.  

The Holy Post
Episode 453: Table-Flipping Jesus & Improvising Faith with Dr. Timothy Gombis

The Holy Post

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2021 86:25


There’s a popular cliche among evangelicals—“The Bible says it. I believe it. That settles it.” But is it really that simple? Not according to New Testament scholar, Dr. Timothy Gombis. Because we’re not ancient Near Eastern people living in a desert, he says it’s not possible to literally apply the Bible. Instead, any faithful Christian needs to learn how to improvise. Dr. Gombis talks with Skye about faithful improvisation, what cross-shaped cultural engagement looks like, and how idolatry destroys bodies. Also this week, Phil’s tweet about angry Christians using “table-flipping Jesus” to justify their bad behavior causes an uproar. Does the story mean it’s sometimes ok to be nasty and insult our enemies? Plus, Pat Robertson is “woke” on police violence, and a French pastry in a tree terrorizes Poland.   https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-56757956 https://www.relevantmagazine.com/culture/tv/famed-broken-clock-pat-robertson-says-police-need-to-open-their-eyes-to-the-reality-of-police-brutality/ https://mirrorofjustice.blogs.com/mirrorofjustice/2021/04/bearing-witness-to-the-pain.html https://twitter.com/philvischer/status/1381709523849773064 https://podcast.thedispatch.com/p/jesus-and-evangelical-politics/comments https://www.amazon.com/Mark-Story-God-Bible-Commentary/dp/0310327156

Success In Black And White - The Podcast
116: Learning To Reshape Your World View (w/ Kellie & Alicia)

Success In Black And White - The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2021 60:01


Dr. Kellie Gerbers and Dr. Alicia Cunningham-Bryant deliver a powerful message in today's episode.  The ability to absorb and learn from history, to approach individuals and experiences different from yours with empathy, and to be vulnerable in the face of things unknown to you are the best ways to be advocates for change.  These amazing women share their own journeys of learning, growth, and justice. They teach a college course together that explores graffiti as a form of expression, healing, and understanding (yes, you read that right...graffiti), and how this topic opens up conversations related to bias and misinformation.  We also talk about the outdoors as a recreational and social justice space.  Honestly, the conversation went in multiple directions and is worth every second to listen to!   Dr. Kellie Gerbers is an Assistant Professor of Outdoor Education and Leadership at Westminster College in Salt Lake City, Utah.  Prior to that role, she managed outdoor programs at The University of Georgia and Florida State University.  Personally and professionally, Kellie is working on identifying the spheres of influence where she can create positive change as it pertains to building more inclusive communities.  When she's not teaching, she's learning to do stuff and i seven considering writing a book called "Learning to Do Stuff in Your Thirties." She also really loves Arby's (give the girl a meat suit already).   Dr. Alicia Cunningham-Bryant holds the Kim T. Adamson Chair in the Honors College at Westminster College in Salt Lake City.  She has extensive experience as an archivist and curator at museums in Philadelphia and New Haven, Connecticut where she curated exhibits on Afhghan war rugs, Black comic book heroes, and Egyptomania.  She has also done archeological field work in Egypt, Jordan, and Mallorca.  Her research interests include public history, museum curation, digital humanities, East Africa, and decolonizing Egyptology and art  history, among other topics, Alicia earned a BA at University of California, San Diego (in both history and archeology), and her PhD in Near Eastern language and civilizations at Yale University. She was a US State Department Education and Cultural Affairs fellow at Cairo Museum and Nubia Museum and has worked at museums around the world gathering together collections that have been separated through time. She also does a lot of other things to serve her community and we honestly don't understand how she manages all the things while staying engaged and in-the-moment.   Follow us on your favorite podcast app or Subscribe to our weekly newsletter! You'll get our latest podcast episode and discover everything we've been reading, listening to, and watching that week! Find out more about us at successinblackandwhite.com

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed
Near Eastern Archaeology with Maria Diget Sletterød - Ruins 46

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2021 56:34


In this episode, we are pleased to introduce Maria Diget Sletterød, a Danish archaeologist studying the Pre-pottery Neolithic in the Near East at the University of Copenhagen. We start off with a brief introduction as to how the hosts found Maria which was through an Archaeologists in Quarantine episode with Carlton hosted by Tash. Then we delve into her diverse archaeological research and excavation projects and how she has worked all across the Near East and Europe. David and Maria swap stories about visiting/working in Israel. We follow up with a discussion on Maria's thesis work and where the discipline of archaeology fits in the Danish educational system and what exactly is the "Pre-pottery Neolithic". We close the episode out by asking Maria about what it's like to work in the Near East, a region that is known in the American media for being geopolitically tenuous. Contact For Guest: Maria's Instagram: @maria_archaeology Maria's Email: mariaconstanze@hotmail.dk Maria's Source Recommendations: The Agricultural Revolution in Prehistory: Why did Foragers become Farmers- by Graeme Barker The Archaeology of Mesopotamia - By Roger Matthews The Oxford History of Ancient Egypt - By Ian Shaw Contact Email: alifeinruinspodcast@gmail.com Instagram: @alifeinruinspodcast Facebook: @alifeinruinspodcast Twitter: @alifeinruinspod Website: www.alifeinruins.com Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular

Douglass Church - Douglass Blvd Christian Church

Don’t let anyone fool you. When Jesus went into the temple that day, it was an explicitly political act. It was an ancient Near Eastern version of John Lewis marching across the Edmund Pettis bridge. So, knowing that the people who are the most vulnerable are the ones getting fleeced by the folks in power, maybe the question shouldn’t be 'How can Jesus be angry?' but 'How could he not?' Subscribe to us on iTunes! Sermon text: [ web][1] | [ doc][2] [1]: [2]: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1vG_XvZjG0a_TlyRs7hwCaGLClH-nAJ3M/view?usp=sharing

TINW Torah Study
205. The Goring Ox - February 13, 2021

TINW Torah Study

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2021 7:23


There are laws that address the possible goring to death of a person by an ox that date to the 18th century BCE, long before the Israelite dating of the passage we read in Exodus 21. Penalties in other Near Eastern cultures required a monetary payment, but the ox was allowed to live and continue to provide value to the owner. In the Israelite law, an ox that gored a human must be killed. And maybe the owner would be, too!

The Biblical Mind
But Really, What's Up with Abraham Almost Sacrificing Isaac? (Aaron Koller)

The Biblical Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2021 43:59


The story of God's command to Abraham to sacrifice Isaac (also known as the Akedah) in Genesis 22 is one of the most challenging passages in Scripture. Only 19 verses long, it gives few details and even fewer explanations. Questions that we might naturally ask about this passage are not always the questions the author actually answers. Dr. Aaron Koller, Professor of Near Eastern and Jewish Studies at Yeshiva University, tackles this story in his recent book Unbinding Isaac. In this episode, he walks Dr. Dru Johnson through a close reading of the text and some of its historical context, asking how it might be viewed in the ancient Near East, medieval Jewish thought, and following the Holocaust. Additionally, he discusses Kierkegaard's interpretation of the story and why he finds its monopoly on modern Jewish thought to be harmful. He concludes by presenting his own interpretation of the story, continuing the tradition of wrestling with this text. Show notes: 0:00 The sacrifice of Isaac 5:17 Child sacrifice in the ancient Near East 9:33 A close reading of the Akedah 15:53 The binding of Isaac 20:52 Jewish martyrdom 28:00 Kierkegaard, ethics, and faith 34:06 The influence of the Holocaust on interpreting the story 36:36 The value of children Learn more about Dr. Aaron Koller and his work. Show notes by Micah Long. Credits for the music used in TBM podcast can be found here: hebraicthought.org/credits.