Podcasts about DBA

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Best podcasts about DBA

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Latest podcast episodes about DBA

The Tech Trek
Empowering DevOps teams with Quentin Hartman

The Tech Trek

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 26:04


In today's show, we have our guest, Quentin Hartman, VP of Infrastructure and DevOps Engineering, at Velocity Global, LLC. We cover a lot of DevOps ground... In this episode, we cover: What historically has been called the DevOps team. Balancing the DevOps engineers team and the value of splitting them. DevOps team structure Differences between tooling and operations DevOps pillars What's next with Quentin's team “Automation shelf life" DevOps career advice Connect with Quentin Hartman at: https://mastodon.social/@qhartman https://twitter.com/qhartman https://www.linkedin.com/in/qhartman About today's guest: Quentin has been living and breathing DevOps since before it had a name. He loves the tech, but he loves seeing how DevOps practices make software and the lives of people who build it better. Throughout his nearly 25-year career in technology, Quentin has worked in public education, higher education, non-profits, and private businesses from 3 to 300,000 employees. In those roles, he has managed telecom systems, data centers, and public and private clouds and acted as a sysadmin, a DBA, a network engineer, an incident responder, and a leader. That broad experience has given him an especially strong foundation for DevOps, which has been his primary focus since 2012. Wherever Quentin is, he puts people before tech and is only happy when working on a social-impact mission using Open Source tools. Quentin lives near Denver, Colorado, with his family and can often be found building things, cooking, and wandering in the woods. He can be reached as ‘qhartman' on many platforms, including Mastodon.social, Twitter, and LinkedIn ________ Thank you so much for checking out this episode of The Tech Trek, and if you enjoyed this episode, please take a minute and leave a quick rating and review on the Apple podcast app! Want to learn more about us? Head over at https://www.elevano.com Have questions or want to cover specific topics with our future guests? Please message me at https://www.linkedin.com/in/amirbormand (Amir Bormand)

Rede Poderosa de Intrigas
Lorem Ipsum - Sommelier de tradução (com notas) - part. Gisele Eberspächer

Rede Poderosa de Intrigas

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 36:15


O sommelier de tradução é um fenômeno que faz parte do imaginário popular e vem ganhando cada vez mais espaço. A bem da verdade, todos queremos saber um pouco mais. Mas o Lorem Ipsum é diferente e assume a responsabilidade e o fardo da transmissão do conhecimento, porque provoca uma imersão rumo a experiência da tradução no seu grau mais profundo. Sem tangentes. Nossa proposta é o diving até o máx da experiência pura! Então, a Gisele Eberspächer aceitou participar desse cercadinho da aleatoriedade na internet e contar um pouco sobre seu trabalho mais recente, a tradução do romance O Passageiro, do alemão Ulrich Alexander Boschwitz, que acabou de ser publicada pela editora DBA e muito mais. Vem com a gente! * Atenção: Contribua com o Rede Poderosa sendo nosso assinante! Acesso antecipado, séries exclusivas e muito mais! É muito fácil, é só se cadastrar na plataforma Orelo, nos seguir e escolher o seu apoio! Também estamos no YouTube! Se inscreva no nosso canal, curta, comente, compartilhe e vem com a gente! Para mais informações sobre este episódio e todos os outros, acessem nosso site www.centralredepoderosa.com.br. Para acompanhar e interagir conosco, nos sigam no Instagram @centralredepoderosa. Para sugestões, parcerias e tudo o mais, nosso e-mail redepoderosa@gmail.com também está disponível. Produção: Caio Lima (@caiorede) e Patricia Quartarollo (@poderosoresumao). Arte: Nátali Nuss (@nuss.art)

Who's On Content?!
Presenting 'Who's on Content?!' A Live Discussion: The Content of Fashion Inclusivity

Who's On Content?!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 38:45


Who's on Content hosted its first Live Discussion during this past September's, New York Fashion Week 2022. Who's on Content?! A Live Discussion: The Content of Fashion Inclusivity discussed how far the fashion industry has come and still needs to go in terms of truly being inclusive of everyone! Guests included DBA's own talent, Achieng Agatu; Nicolette Mason and Tenicka Boyd who each discussed the content of their platforms and how they continue to challenge stereotypes and bias in order to unite their communities.  Episode Highlights:  Being true to yourself allows you to challenge spaces and places that don't accept you, because your values and morals are worth more than any check.  Brands should establish a Creative Content Council in order to engage diverse content creators on what content will authentically and intentionally engage with their audiences - rather than treating diverse creators as guinea pigs when a brand is trying to be more inclusive  While there are still a long ways to go, there is community online that can collectively challenge and encourage diverse creators to keep striving for change.    Social Handles  Host: @iamejjames Guest: @noordinarynoire; @nicolettemason; @tenickab Show: whosoncontent | @therealdba   Produced by Dear Media.   Please note that this episode may contain paid endorsements and advertisements for products and services. Individuals on the show may have a direct or indirect financial interest in products or services referred to in this episode.

DBAOCM Podcast
EP493 - Preciso aprender PHP e PYTHON para ser um DBA?

DBAOCM Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 12:24


EP493 - Preciso aprender PHP e PYTHON para ser um DBA?   Entre no nosso canal do Telegram para receber conteúdos Exclusivos sobre Banco de dados Oracle:   https://t.me/joinchat/AAAAAEb7ufK-90djaVuR4Q

Your Money--Opus 111 Group
MONEY MANAGEMENT With Opus 111 Group's Mike Maehl

Your Money--Opus 111 Group

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 38:54


Every Saturday morning on KXLY, 920am in Spokane, Washington, Opus 111 Group's Mike Maehl hosts a one-hour radio show on all things economic and financial. This commercial-free episode is from his broadcast on September 17th, 2022. The Investment Advisor Representatives (IARs) use the trade name/DBA, Opus 111 Group. All securities & advisory services are offered through Commonwealth Financial Network©, Member FINRA/SIPC, a Registered Investment Adviser. For a current list of our IARs please visit our website. Fixed insurance products and services are separate from and not offered through Commonwealth Financial Network. This communication is strictly intended for individuals residing in AK, AZ, CA, CO, CT, DC, GA, ID, IL, IN, IO, KY, ME, MD, MA, MT, NV, NJ, NY, NC, OH, OR, PA, PR, RI, TX, VT, VA, & WA. No offers may be made or accepted from any resident outside this state due to various state requirements and registration requirements regarding investment products and services. Review our Terms of Use: http://www.commonwealth.com/termsofuse.html. Opus 111 Group is located at 111 Queen Anne Avenue North Suite 501 Seattle, WA 98109-4925. Reach us at (206) 283-2345 or info@opus111group.com

ManFred
Det' dyre tider

ManFred

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 79:32


Penge er ikke kun papir, og det kan mærkes på kontoen! I dagens afsnit snakker Lise og Sofie om inflationen, hvad det er for en størrelse og hvordan den påvirker deres hverdag. De kommer begge med deres bud på hvordan man som ung i København kan spare lidt på pengene - selv når man trænger til at forkæle sig selv med en lækker brunch (på budget). Desuden tester Lise Sofies viden om DBA annoncer gennem en hyggelig, men udfordrende quiz. Værter: Lise Hagen & Sofie Hagen Simonsen

She Did That.
Why I'll Always Be Here for Black Women

She Did That.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 30:11


This week on the show, we're switching it up a bit. Listen in as I chat it up with my brother EJ! You may know him as the Head of Special Projects for DBA, you may love him as host of the Who's on Content podcast here on Dear Media, but today he's inviting me into his hot seat to talk about why I do what I do. As a beautiful member of my tribe, EJ digs deep into my why and together, we unpack the meaning and purpose behind my work. We hope you enjoy the conversation as much as we enjoyed having it!  Produced by Dear Media

Cloud Champions
27. Gianluca Hotz (Presidente di UGISS)

Cloud Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 64:58


Livelli di servizio elevatissimi, scalabilità dinamica e istanze totalmente managed: quello tra database e cloud sembra un connubio perfetto, dove tutto funziona "automagicamente". C'è ancora un ruolo, in questo scenario, per il DBA? In caso affermativo, quale? Parliamo di questo ed altro con Gianluca Hotz, presidente di UGISS e Microsoft Most Valuable Professional per SQL Server.

Your Money--Opus 111 Group
MONEY MANAGEMENT With Opus 111 Group's Jim Harvey, filling in for Mike Maehl

Your Money--Opus 111 Group

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 35:23


Every Saturday morning on KXLY, 920am in Spokane, Washington, Opus 111 Group's Mike Maehl hosts a one-hour radio show on all things economic and financial. This week, Opus 111 Group President Jim Harvey pinch-hits for Mike in this commercial-free episode is from our broadcast on September 10th, 2022. The Investment Advisor Representatives (IARs) use the trade name/DBA, Opus 111 Group. All securities & advisory services are offered through Commonwealth Financial Network©, Member FINRA/SIPC, a Registered Investment Adviser. For a current list of our IARs please visit our website. Fixed insurance products and services are separate from and not offered through Commonwealth Financial Network. This communication is strictly intended for individuals residing in AK, AZ, CA, CO, CT, DC, GA, ID, IL, IN, IO, KY, ME, MD, MA, MT, NV, NJ, NY, NC, OH, OR, PA, PR, RI, TX, VT, VA, & WA. No offers may be made or accepted from any resident outside this state due to various state requirements and registration requirements regarding investment products and services. Review our Terms of Use: http://www.commonwealth.com/termsofuse.html. Opus 111 Group is located at 111 Queen Anne Avenue North Suite 501 Seattle, WA 98109-4925. Reach us at (206) 283-2345 or info@opus111group.com

The Savage Podcast
Datos y tips para tu Negocio

The Savage Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 46:07


En esta ocasión tenemos como invitada a Brissa Chapa, consultora de impuestos y dueña de Chapa Services. Tienes dudas de que es un DBA o un LLC y cuales son las diferencias o beneficios de cada uno? Ella nos explica! Además nos cuenta como fue que ella inició su negocio de impuestos y lo que a aprendido de ser emprendedora y crear sus propias oportunidades. Esta es su historia… www.intagram.com/brisachapa www.instagra.com/chapaservices

CT Expert Insights
What to Know When Naming Your Business

CT Expert Insights

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 12:26


Naming your business involves a lot more than coming up with something your customers will remember. CT Corporation Manager of Customer Service Tim Jensen explains what the government will require from you in a business name, why you might not get to use your first choice, and what words you can and cannot use. He also explains how to reserve a name before your business opens and how to proceed if you do business in multiple states.For additional information and resources: https://www.wolterskluwer.com/en/expert-insights/entity-naming-requirements-for-corporations-llcs

Your Money--Opus 111 Group
MONEY MANAGEMENT With Opus 111 Group's Mike Maehl

Your Money--Opus 111 Group

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 39:05


Every Saturday morning on KXLY, 920am in Spokane, Washington, Opus 111 Group's Mike Maehl hosts a one-hour radio show on all things economic and financial. This commercial-free episode is from his broadcast on September 3rd, 2022. The Investment Advisor Representatives (IARs) use the trade name/DBA, Opus 111 Group. All securities & advisory services are offered through Commonwealth Financial Network©, Member FINRA/SIPC, a Registered Investment Adviser. For a current list of our IARs please visit our website. Fixed insurance products and services are separate from and not offered through Commonwealth Financial Network. This communication is strictly intended for individuals residing in AK, AZ, CA, CO, CT, DC, GA, ID, IL, IN, IO, KY, ME, MD, MA, MT, NV, NJ, NY, NC, OH, OR, PA, PR, RI, TX, VT, VA, & WA. No offers may be made or accepted from any resident outside this state due to various state requirements and registration requirements regarding investment products and services. Review our Terms of Use: http://www.commonwealth.com/termsofuse.html. Opus 111 Group is located at 111 Queen Anne Avenue North Suite 501 Seattle, WA 98109-4925. Reach us at (206) 283-2345 or info@opus111group.com

Anderson Business Advisors Podcast
The Top Tax Benefits For Short-Term Rentals

Anderson Business Advisors Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 79:30


If you are into Airbnb or VRBO, what are the top tax benefits and loopholes for short-term rentals? Toby Mathis and Jeff Webb of Anderson Advisors answer your tax questions. Submit your tax question to taxtuesday@andersonadvisors. Highlights/Topics: We have to clean the short-term rental the first year to get the hours necessary for active/material participation. It is a 90-to-120 (minute or mile) drive one way. Since we will be working, can we stay in the unit that night without counting it as personal use? You can include the travel time. However, staying the night will not count toward working on it. It definitely counts as personal use. I have a beach house that I'm starting to rent out, so I got a DBA business name. I've been renovating and fixing it up to make it more attractive. I have a regular job and was told that if I made more than $150,000, I would not be able to write off my expenses and costs associated with my rental. Is this true? It depends on if it's a rental or residential investment. Also, in some states and counties, the DBA is a fictitious name, and it offers no kind of protection or benefit at all. Can you explain the short-term rental tax benefit and how to get 100 hours of material participation? If short-term rentals are seven days or less, it's a business. Determine if it's 1245 or 1250 property and passive or active/material participation income. I have a four-unit that I want to live in and rent out the other three units. What are all the tax deductions and write-offs I can use to zero out earnings? Bifurcate it into two properties. One unit would be your personal residence and the other 75% would be rental properties. Any expenses related to your rental unit would go against your real estate taxes and mortgage interest. For all questions/answers discussed, sign up to be a Platinum member to view the replay! Go to iTunes to leave a review of the Tax Tuesday podcast. Resources: Next Level Real Estate Asset Protection by Clint Coons https://www.amazon.com/Next-Level-Estate-Asset-Protection/dp/1950863883 Cost Segregation Authority https://aba.link/CSA Real Estate Professional Status https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-utl/33-Real%20Estate%20Professionals.pdf Capital Gains, Losses, and Sale of Home https://www.irs.gov/faqs/capital-gains-losses-and-sale-of-home 26 U.S. Code 121 Exclusion https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/26/121 Schedule E https://www.irs.gov/forms-pubs/about-schedule-e-form-1040 Anderson Business Advisors https://andersonadvisors.com/ Anderson Business Advisors on YouTube http://aba.link/YouTube Anderson Business Advisors on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AndersonBusinessAdvisors/ Anderson Business Advisors Podcast https://andersonadvisors.com/podcast/

Your Money--Opus 111 Group
MONEY MANAGEMENT With Opus 111 Group's Mike Maehl

Your Money--Opus 111 Group

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 39:10


Every Saturday morning on KXLY, 920am in Spokane, Washington, Opus 111 Group's Mike Maehl hosts a one-hour radio show on all things economic and financial. This commercial-free episode is from his broadcast on August 27th, 2022. The Investment Advisor Representatives (IARs) use the trade name/DBA, Opus 111 Group. All securities & advisory services are offered through Commonwealth Financial Network©, Member FINRA/SIPC, a Registered Investment Adviser. For a current list of our IARs please visit our website. Fixed insurance products and services are separate from and not offered through Commonwealth Financial Network. This communication is strictly intended for individuals residing in AK, AZ, CA, CO, CT, DC, GA, ID, IL, IN, IO, KY, ME, MD, MA, MT, NV, NJ, NY, NC, OH, OR, PA, PR, RI, TX, VT, VA, & WA. No offers may be made or accepted from any resident outside this state due to various state requirements and registration requirements regarding investment products and services. Review our Terms of Use: http://www.commonwealth.com/termsofuse.html. Opus 111 Group is located at 111 Queen Anne Avenue North Suite 501 Seattle, WA 98109-4925. Reach us at (206) 283-2345 or info@opus111group.com

Timing Research Podcasts
⏰ AYT #196: Samantha LaDuc & The Option Professor -- Analyze Your Trade for September 1st

Timing Research Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 52:12


TimingResearch.com's Analyze Your Trade Episode #196, recorded at 4PM ET on September 1st, 2022. The full video, timeline, special offers, show notes, and other information for this episode is available here: https://timingresearch.com/blog/2022/analyze-your-trade-episode-196/   Lineup for this Episode: - Sunny Harris of MoneyMentor.com - The Option Professor of OptionProfessor.com (moderator)   Symbols discussed today: $NVDA, $XLE, $MSFT, $NIO, $CCJ, $USO, $ENVX, $PBR, $TGT, $USO, $XOM, $BJ, $TSLA, $UNH, $DIA, $DBA, $EWZ, $KWEB, $PDD, and more!   ⚡ eBook: 10 Recession Trading Strategies https://timingresearch.com/LR2POD   TimingResearch Disclaimer, Terms, and Policies: https://timingresearch.com/policies/  

La Encerrona
La Resistencia se burla de Harvey Colchado #LaEncerrona

La Encerrona

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 21:37


¿Cómo murió Rodrigo Ventosilla? De la mano de la familia y de chats enviados por el cónsul peruano en Indonesia, reconstruimos los últimos días de nuestro compatriota en Bali. MIENTRAS TANTO: Siguen los aprietos de Harvey Colchado... para felicidad no solo del gobierno, sino también de La Resistencia. ADEMÁS: Clases con dibujitos para congresistas DBA. Y... Hoy iniciamos una alianza con Perú Check para verificar las declaraciones y promesas de los candidatos de estas elecciones. Esta es la primera entrega. **** ¿Te gustó este episodio? ¿Buscas las fuentes de los datos mencionados hoy? Entra a http://patreon.com/ocram para acceder a nuestros grupos exclusivos de Telegram y WhatsApp. También puedes UNIRTE a esta comunidad de YouTube aquí https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCP0AJJeNkFBYzegTTVbKhPg/join **** Visita a Tkambio en sus redes sociales: Facebook: https://bit.ly/3mAqABP Instagram: https://bit.ly/3Drkj19 Youtube: https://bit.ly/2XXFmYV Y obtén el mejor tipo de cambio de verdad.

Daily Crypto Report
"OptiFi locks $661k in USDC due to programming error" August 30, 2022

Daily Crypto Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 2:41


Today's blockchain and cryptocurrency news Brought to you by watchthiscards.com Bitcoin is up slightly at $20,398 Ethereum is up slightly at $1586 and Binance Coin down slightly at $289 OptiFi locks 661k in USDC, will shutter. Xterio raises 40M Thai SEC fines Bitkub exec 235k. Funds on the raise — DBA crypto seeks 500M. 776 seeks 177.6M.

Your Money--Opus 111 Group
MONEY MANAGEMENT With Opus 111 Group's Mike Maehl

Your Money--Opus 111 Group

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 39:14


Every Saturday morning on KXLY, 920am in Spokane, Washington, Opus 111 Group's Mike Maehl hosts a one-hour radio show on all things economic and financial. This commercial-free episode is from his broadcast on August 20th, 2022. The Investment Advisor Representatives (IARs) use the trade name/DBA, Opus 111 Group. All securities & advisory services are offered through Commonwealth Financial Network©, Member FINRA/SIPC, a Registered Investment Adviser. For a current list of our IARs please visit our website. Fixed insurance products and services are separate from and not offered through Commonwealth Financial Network. This communication is strictly intended for individuals residing in AK, AZ, CA, CO, CT, DC, GA, ID, IL, IN, IO, KY, ME, MD, MA, MT, NV, NJ, NY, NC, OH, OR, PA, PR, RI, TX, VT, VA, & WA. No offers may be made or accepted from any resident outside this state due to various state requirements and registration requirements regarding investment products and services. Review our Terms of Use: http://www.commonwealth.com/termsofuse.html. Opus 111 Group is located at 111 Queen Anne Avenue North Suite 501 Seattle, WA 98109-4925. Reach us at (206) 283-2345 or info@opus111group.com

OVERSKUD
Gode råd til genbrug

OVERSKUD

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 56:25


Dagens udsendelse står i genbrugets tegn. Udover at skåne miljøet ved for eksempel at købe brugt tøj, så har genbrug også den åbenlyse fordel, at det kan hjælpe os med at spare mange penge. Derfor har Sofie inviteret tre gæster i studiet, der alle deler ud af deres erfaringer og tips til at købe og sælge brugt. Derudover får vi et indblik i, hvordan vi blandt andet kan give os selv lidt mere luft i madbudgettet ved at gendyrke planterne i vores hjem. Medvirkende: Julie Schoen, talsperson for DBA og genbrugsekspert Persille Ingerslev, hjemmedyrker og foredragsholder Mille Skjold Madsen, stifter og ejer af magasinet ØkonomistaSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Cara & Sello Podcast
EL DEBATE / Antauro suelto en plaza, Habla Cerrón, Plebiscito a la Chilena

Cara & Sello Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 17:05


Mientras la DBA tiembla ante la sorpresiva puesta en libertad de Antauro Humala, Vladimir Cerrón desenvaina su espada contra Pedro Castillo y los Caviares. Chile a su turno, vive momentos de incertidumbre porque las encuestas indican que su nueva Constitución sería desaprobada con imprevisibles consecuencias.

Voice of the DBA
DBA to Data Engineer

Voice of the DBA

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 3:52


When I was starting my career, I expected to be a programmer. That's what people who wrote the software were called. At some point they adopted "developer" instead, shunning the programmer label. Now I see software engineers has replaced developer in many organizations. I'm not sure the job is much different than it was in 1990, other than the specific technologies used. The DBA used to do a lot of system administration-type work on database instances. Check logs, set security, run backups, and maybe look at some queries. However, in many cases, their work was limited to things running inside the database software, or the database software itself (patches, related configuration for the host OS, etc.). I saw recently that DBAs have started to adopt the data (or database) engineer label as a new job title. Presumably, this pays more because, well, it sounds like it should. Data Professional sounds more comprehensive and skilled than Database Administrator. Database Engineer sounds better than both. Read the rest of DBA to Data Engineer

52 Pearls: Weekly Money Wisdom
Episode 129: Understanding the Racial Wealth Gap with Renee Baker

52 Pearls: Weekly Money Wisdom

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 32:05


The median white American household has ten times the net worth of the median black American household. This is known as the racial wealth gap. This podcast conversation is a follow-up to an episode of 52 Pearls from the summer of 2020 when Melissa Joy and Renee Baker, DBA, RCC Head of Advisor Inclusion Networks at Raymond James, discussed “Closing the Racial Wealth Gap”. Additional Resources:Federal Reserve research on the Racial Wealth Gap.Recent episode, Financial Wellness Through Community Work.Camille York Adrien to discusses income inequality.Renee TedX Talk “What we get wrong about the racial wealth gap”Links are being provided for information purposes only. The information herein is general and educational in nature and should not be considered legal or tax advice. Tax laws and regulations are complex and subject to change, which can materially impact investment results. Pearl Planning cannot guarantee that the information herein is accurate, complete, or timely. Pearl Planning makes no warranties with regard to such information or results obtained by its use and disclaims any liability arising out of your use of, or any tax position taken in reliance on, such information. Consult an attorney or tax professional regarding your specific situation. Please note, changes in tax laws or regulations may occur at any time and could substantially impact your situation. Pearl Planning financial advisors do not render advice on tax matters. You should discuss any tax matters with the appropriate professional. Historical performance results for investment indices, benchmarks, and/or categories have been provided for general informational/comparison purposes only, and generally do not reflect the deduction of transaction and/or custodial charges, the deduction of an investment management fee, nor the impact of taxes, the incurrence of which would have the effect of decreasing historical performance results. 

Protégé to Pro
Is Your Small Business Riding Dirty?

Protégé to Pro

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 48:22


Small Business start-up and formation does not stop at DBA vs. LLC. How you operate your business day-to-day could be leaving you open to legal troubles. If you are a small business owner, this discussion with Attorney Marina Banks from Banks Solutions, PLLC is for you. From methods of accepting payments, to contracts, protecting your intellectual property (IP) via copywriting, trademarking, patents, and more - you will want to tune in!

Dance Studio Empire with Jen Dalton
16. Social Media Chat with Claire O'Shea

Dance Studio Empire with Jen Dalton

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 27:42


Claire's back!!.... Yes, in this episode Claire shares her experience & knowledge about using social media as a studio owner and gives us some time-saving tips on how to stay relevant and visible. Claire is a business & mindset coach who works with dance studio entrepreneurs eager to grow & scale. You can follow her on IG: @assembledancestudiocoaching or listen to her podcast: Assemble Dance Studio Coaching ...................................................................... Plus: there is still time to sign up for Dance Business Academy and receive the incredible bonuses, click here to join: https://danceteachercentral.newzenler.com/courses/dance-business-academy-launch Or, If you want to book in for a quick chat to see if DBA will be worth the investment for you, click here: https://bit.ly/3QztR05

Streaming Audio: a Confluent podcast about Apache Kafka
What Could Go Wrong with a Kafka JDBC Connector?

Streaming Audio: a Confluent podcast about Apache Kafka

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 41:10 Transcription Available


Java Database Connectivity (JDBC) is the Java API used to connect to a database. As one of the most popular Kafka connectors, it's important to prevent issues with your integrations. In this episode, we'll cover how a JDBC connection works, and common issues with your database connection. Why the Kafka JDBC Connector? When it comes to streaming database events into Apache Kafka®, the JDBC connector usually represents the first choice for its flexibility and the ability to support a wide variety of databases without requiring custom code. As an experienced data analyst, Francesco Tisiot (Senior Developer Advocate, Aiven) delves into his experience of streaming Kafka data pipeline with JDBC source connector and explains what could go wrong. He discusses alternative options available to avoid these problems, including the Debezium source connector for real-time change data capture. The JDBC connector is a Java API for Kafka Connect, which streams data between databases and Kafka. If you want to stream data from a rational database into Kafka, once per day or every two hours, the JDBC connector is a simple, batch processing connector to use. You can tell the JDBC connector which query you'd like to execute against the database, and then the connector will take the data into Kafka. The connector works well with out-of-the-box basic data types, however, when it comes to a database-specific data type, such as geometrical columns and array columns in PostgresSQL, these don't represent well with the JDBC connector. Perhaps, you might not have any results in Kafka because the column is not within the connector's supporting capability. Francesco shares other cases that would cause the JDBC connector to go wrong, such as: Infrequent snapshot timesOut-of-order eventsNon-incremental sequencesHard deletesTo help avoid these problems and set up a reliable source of events for your real-time streaming pipeline, Francesco suggests other approaches, such as the Debezium source connector for real-time change data capture. The Debezium connector has enhanced metadata, timestamps of the operation, access to all logs,  and provides sequence numbers for you to speak the language of a DBA. They also talk about the governance tool, which Francesco has been building, and how streaming Game of Thrones sentiment analysis with Kafka started his current role as a developer advocate. EPISODE LINKSKafka Connect Deep Dive – JDBC Source ConnectorJDBC Source Connector: What could go wrong?Metadata parser Debezium DocumentationDatabase Migration with Apache Kafka and Apache Kafka ConnectWatch the video version of this podcastFrancesco Tisiot's TwitterKris Jenkins' TwitterStreaming Audio Playlist Join the Confluent CommunityLearn more on Confluent Developer

UNITED State of Women
132 - Transformative Power of Communication with Colleen Kendrick

UNITED State of Women

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 20:01


Words have power. Colleen Kendrick joins Julie Deem to share the science of communication and how it can transform your life. Colleen Kendrick, DBA, FACHE, has more than 20 years of experience crafting and implementing strategies in marketing, management, and communications with healthcare organizations, some of the nation's largest nonprofits, and for-profit corporations large and small. An experienced entrepreneur in her own right, Colleen understands both the challenges of limited resources and big dreams, and the needs of a large business with many divisions, partners and budgets. Delicately balancing consulting and education, Colleen attributes her success to building collaborative relationships that have resulted in a proven track record of growth and positive transformation in a variety of industries. Additionally, Colleen has earned her FACHE credential with the American College of Healthcare Executives. She currently serves as a Senior Lecturer in the Marketing Department at Rowan University in Glassboro, NJ. More about Kendrick & Company at - https://kendrickcompany.com/ Complimentary resources - https://kendrickcompany.com/resources/ Instagram: USW Podcast @uswkokomo Kalena James @yesitskalenajames Julie Deem @indymompreneur USW Kokomo Website Production by The Business Podcast Editor --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/united-state-of-women/message

Dance Studio Empire with Jen Dalton
15. The Secret To Loyal, Devoted & Respectful Dance Parents

Dance Studio Empire with Jen Dalton

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 25:08


If there is one conversation that's lighting up the dance teacher forums, it's that many of us are struggling with challenging dance parents. During this episode, I talk about ways for you to identify, control and eliminate parents that don't compliment your studio or no longer spark joy :). There are many deeper levels to this topic which are major discussions and masterclass trainings in Dance Business Academy...If you want to know more about DBA, click the link: https://danceteachercentral.newzenler.com/courses/dance-business-academy-launch

Explicit Measures Podcast
131: Do You Still Need a DBA?

Explicit Measures Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 66:57


Mike, Seth, & Tommy discuss the following article and if a Database Administrator is still a required role on its own, or if the DBA is merging with other skillsets in the world of Power BI. https://medium.com/@fpatano/architecting-for-performance-on-databricks-sql-6a02c0539ab1 Get in touch: Send in your questions or topics you want us to discuss by tweeting to @PowerBITips with the hashtag #empMailbag or submit on the PowerBI.tips Podcast Page. Visit PowerBI.tips: https://powerbi.tips/ Watch the episodes live every Tuesday and Thursday morning at 730am CST on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/powerbitips Subscribe on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/230fp78XmHHRXTiYICRLVv Subscribe on Apple: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/explicit-measures-podcast/id1568944083‎ Follow Mike: https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelcarlo/ Follow Seth: https://www.linkedin.com/in/seth-bauer/ Follow Tommy: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tommypuglia/

Leadership is Female
97: Burnout Cures with Jessica Dahl

Leadership is Female

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 50:51


Jessica Dahl is a MOBOT Ambassador, Life Coach, Podcast Host of “Say Yes Anyway”, and Wellness Guide who has started her own non profit, sole proprietor business, life coaching LLC, a couple other partnership businesses and DBA's, written a book, launched a podcast, host retreats & service trips locally and internationally, creates community and has helped coach many people in gaining clarity, prioritizing their wellness and launching their dream and purpose to reality to create impact. Jessica offers a unique, global perspective to her coaching practice and specializes helping people get “unstuck” due to burnout. Want to show up as your best self and lead a purposeful life? Who doesn't?! Listen in and follow Jessica at: www.jessdahl.com https://www.instagram.com/jessdahl_ Follow Leadership is Female at: https://www.instagram.com/leadershipisfemale/www.leadershipisfemale.com Follow Emily: https://www.instagram.com/emilyjaenson/ Get 15% off MOBOT at https://mobot.com/discount/LEADERSHIPISFEMALE

Screaming in the Cloud
Cloud-Hosted Database Services with Benjamin Anderson

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 35:39


About BenjaminBenjamin Anderson is CTO, Cloud at EDB, where he is responsible for developing and driving strategy for the company's Postgres-based cloud offerings. Ben brings over ten years' experience building and running distributed database systems in the cloud for multiple startups and large enterprises. Prior to EDB, he served as chief architect of IBM's Cloud Databases organization, built an SRE practice at database startup Cloudant, and founded a Y Combinator-funded hardware startup.Links Referenced: EDB: https://www.enterprisedb.com/ BigAnimal: biganimal.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.I come bearing ill tidings. Developers are responsible for more than ever these days. Not just the code that they write, but also the containers and the cloud infrastructure that their apps run on. Because serverless means it's still somebody's problem. And a big part of that responsibility is app security from code to cloud. And that's where our friend Snyk comes in. Snyk is a frictionless security platform that meets developers where they are - Finding and fixing vulnerabilities right from the CLI, IDEs, Repos, and Pipelines. Snyk integrates seamlessly with AWS offerings like code pipeline, EKS, ECR, and more! As well as things you're actually likely to be using. Deploy on AWS, secure with Snyk. Learn more at Snyk.co/scream That's S-N-Y-K.co/screamCorey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Fortinet. Fortinet's partnership with AWS is a better-together combination that ensures your workloads on AWS are protected by best-in-class security solutions powered by comprehensive threat intelligence and more than 20 years of cybersecurity experience. Integrations with key AWS services simplify security management, ensure full visibility across environments, and provide broad protection across your workloads and applications. Visit them at AWS re:Inforce to see the latest trends in cybersecurity on July 25-26 at the Boston Convention Center. Just go over to the Fortinet booth and tell them Corey Quinn sent you and watch for the flinch. My thanks again to my friends at Fortinet.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. This promoted guest episode is brought to us by our friends at EDB. And not only do they bring us this promoted episode, they bring me their CTO for Cloud, Benjamin Anderson. Benjamin, thank you so much for agreeing to suffer the slings and arrows that I will no doubt throw at you in a professional context, because EDB is a database company, and I suck at those things.Benjamin: [laugh]. Thanks, Corey. Nice to be here.Corey: Of course. So, databases are an interesting and varied space. I think we can all agree—or agree to disagree—that the best database is, of course, Route 53, when you misuse TXT records as a database. Everything else is generally vying for number two. EDB was—back in the days that I was your customer—was EnterpriseDB, now rebranded as EDB, which is way faster to say, and I approve of that.But you were always the escalation point of last resort. When you're stuck with a really weird and interesting Postgres problem, EDB was where you went because if you folks couldn't solve the problem, it was likely not going to get solved. I always contextualized you folks as a consulting shop. That's not really what you do. You are the CTO for Cloud.And, ah, interesting. Do databases behave differently in cloud environments? Well, they do when you host them as a managed service, which is an area you folks have somewhat recently branched into. How'd you get there?Benjamin: Ah, that's interesting. So, there's a bunch of stuff to unpack there. I think EDB has been around for a long time. It's something like 13, 14, 15 years, something like that, and really it's just been kind of slowly growing, right? We did start very much as a product company. We built some technology to help customers get from Oracle database on to Postgres, way back in 2007, 2008.That business has just slowly been growing. It's been going quite well. Frankly, I only joined about 18 months ago, and it's really cool tech, right? We natively understand some things that Oracle is doing. Customers don't have to change their schemas to migrate from Oracle to Postgres. There's some cool technology in there.But as you point out, I think a lot of our position in the market has not been that product focused. There's been a lot of people seeing us as the Postgres experts, and as people who can solve Postgres problems, in general. We have, for a long time, employed a lot of really sharp Postgres people. We still employ a lot of really sharp Postgres people. That's very much, in a lot of ways, our bread and butter. That we're going to fix Postgres problems as they come up.Now, over the past few years, we've definitely tried to shift quite a bit into being more of a product company. We've brought on a bunch of people who've been doing more enterprise software product type development over the past few years, and really focusing ourselves more and more on building products and investing in ourselves as a product company. We're not a services company. We're not a consulting company. We do, I think, provide the best Postgres support in the market. But it's been a journey. The cloud has been a significant part of that as well, right? You can't get away.Corey: Oh, yeah. These days, when someone's spinning up a new workload, it's unlikely—in most cases—they're going to wind up spinning up a new data center, if they don't already have one. Yes, there's still a whole bunch of on-prem workloads. But increasingly, the default has become cloud. Instead of, “Why cloud?” The question's become, “Why not?”Benjamin: Right, exactly. Then, as people are more and more accepting of managed services, you have to be a product company. You have to be building products in order to support your database customers because what they want his managed services. I was working in managed databases and service, something like, ten years ago, and it was like pulling teeth. This is after RDS launched. This was still pulling teeth trying to get people to think about, oh, I'm going to let you run my database. Whereas, now obviously, it's just completely different. We have to build great products in order to succeed in the database business, in general.Corey: One thing that jumped out at me when you first announced this was the URL is enterprisedb.com. That doesn't exactly speak to, you know, non-large companies, and EDB is what you do. You have a very corporate logo, but your managed service is called BigAnimal, which I absolutely love. It actually expresses a sense of whimsy and personality that I can no doubt guess that a whole bunch of people argued against, but BigAnimal, it is. It won through. I love that. Was that as contentious as I'm painting it to be, or people actually have a sense of humor sometimes?Benjamin: [laugh]. Both, it was extremely contentious. I, frankly, was one of the people who was not in favor of it at first. I was in favor of something that was whimsical, but maybe not quite that whimsical.Corey: Well, I call it Postgres-squeal, so let's be very clear here that we're probably not going to see eye-to-eye on most anything in pronunciation things. But we can set those differences aside and have a conversation.Benjamin: Absolutely, no consider that. It was deliberate, though, to try to step away a little bit from the blue-suit-and-tie, enterprise, DB-type branding. Obviously, a lot of our customers are big enterprises. We're good at that. We're not trying to be the hip, young startup targeting business in a lot of ways. We have a wide range of customers, but we want to branch out a little bit.Corey: One of the challenges right now is if I spin up an environment inside of AWS, as one does, and I decide I certainly don't want to take the traditional approach of running a database on top of an EC2 instance—the way that we did in the olden days—because RDS was crappy. Now that it's slightly less crappy, that becomes a not ideal path. I start looking at their managed database offerings, and there are something like 15 distinct managed databases that they offer, and they never turn anything off. And they continue to launch things into the far future. And it really feels, on some level, like 20 years from now—what we call a DBA today—their primary role is going to look a lot more like helping a company figure out which of Amazon's 40 managed databases is the appropriate fit for this given workload. Yet, when I look around at what the industry has done, it seems that when we're talking about relational databases. Postgres has emerged back when I was, more or less, abusing servers in person in my data center days, it was always MySQL. These days, Postgres is the de facto standard, full stop. I admit that I was mostly keeping my aura away from any data that was irreplaceable at that time. What happened? What did I miss?Benjamin: It's a really good question. And I certainly am not a hundred percent on all the trends that went on there. I know there's a lot of folks that are not happy about the MySQL acquisition by Oracle. I think there's a lot of energy that was adopted by the NoSQL movement, as well. You have people who didn't really care about transactional semantics that were using MySQL because they needed a place to store their data. And then, things like MongoDB and that type of system comes along where it's significantly easier than MySQL, and that subset of the population just sort of drifts away from MySQL.Corey: And in turn, those NoSQL projects eventually turn into something where, okay, now we're trying to build a banking system on top of it, and it's, you know, I guess you can use a torque wrench as a hammer if you're really creative about it, but it seems like there's a better approach.Benjamin: Yeah, exactly. And those folks are coming back around to the relational databases, exactly. At the same time, the advancements in Postgres from the early eight series to today are significant, right? We shouldn't underestimate how much Postgres has really moved forward. It wasn't that long ago that replication was hardly a thing and Postgres, right? It's been a journey.Corey: One thing that your website talks about is that you accelerate your open-sourced database transformation. And this is a bit of a hobby horse I get on from time to time. I think that there are a lot of misunderstandings when people talk about this. You have the open-source purists—of which I shamefully admit I used to be one—saying that, “Oh, it's about the idea of purity and open and free as in software.” Great. Okay, awesome. But when I find that corporate customers are talking about when they say open-source database, they don't particularly care if they have access to the source code because they're not going to go in and patch a database engine, we hope. But what they do care about is regardless of where they are today—even if they're perfectly happy there—they don't want to wind up beholden to a commercial database provider, and/or they don't want to wind up beholden to the environment that is running within. There's a strategic Exodus that's available in theory, which on some level serves to make people feel better about not actually Exodus-ing, but it also means if they're doing a migration at some point, they don't also have to completely redo their entire data plan.Benjamin: Yeah, I think that's a really good point. I mean, I like to talk—there's a big rat's nest of questions and problems in here—but I generally like talk to about open APIs, talk about standards, talk about how much is going to have to change if you eliminate this vendor. We're definitely not open-source purists. Well, we employ a lot of open-source purists. I also used to be an open—Corey: Don't let them hear you say that, then. Fair enough. Fair enough.Benjamin: [laugh] we have proprietary software at EDB, as well. There's a kind of wide range of businesses that we participate in. Glad to hear you also mention this where-it's-hosted angle, as well. I think there's some degree to which people are—they figured out that having at least open APIs or an open-source-ish database is a good idea rather than being beholden to proprietary database. But then, immediately forget that when they're picking a cloud vendor, right? And realizing that putting their data in Cloud Vendor A versus Cloud Vendor B is also putting them in a similar difficult situation. They need to be really wary of when they're doing that. Now, obviously, I work at an independent software company, and I have some incentive to say this, but I do think it's true. And you know, there's meaningful data gravity risk.Corey: I assure you, I have no incentive. I don't care what cloud provider you're on. My guidance has been, for years, to—as a general rule—pick a provider, I care about which one, and go all in until there's a significant reason to switch. Trying to build an optionality, “Oh, everything we do should be fully portable at an instance notice.” Great. Unless you're actually doing it, you're more or less, giving up a whole bunch of shortcuts and feature velocity you could otherwise have, in the hopes of one day you'll do a thing, but all the assumptions you're surrounded by baked themselves in regardless. So, you're more or less just creating extra work for yourself for no defined benefit. This is not popular in some circles, where people try to sell something that requires someone to go multi-cloud, but here we are.Benjamin: No, I think you're right. I think people underestimate the degree to which the abstractions are just not very good, right, and the degree to which those cloud-specific details are going to leak in if you're going to try to get anything done, you end up in kind of a difficult place. What I see more frequently is situations where we have a big enterprise—not even big, even medium-sized companies where maybe they've done an acquisition or two, they've got business units that are trying to do things on their own. And they end up in two or three clouds, sort of by happenstance. It's not like they're trying to do replication live between two clouds, but they've got one business unit in AWS and one business unit and Azure, and somebody in the corporate—say enterprise architect or something like that—really would like to make things consistent between the two so they get a consistent security posture and things like that. So, there are situations where the multi-cloud is a reality at a certain level, but maybe not at a concrete technical level. But I think it's still really useful for a lot of customers.Corey: You position your cloud offering in two different ways. One of them is the idea of BigAnimal, and the other—well, it sort of harkens back to when I was in sixth grade going through the American public school system. They had a cop come in and talk to us and paint to this imaginary story of people trying to push drugs. “Hey, kid. You want to try some of this?” And I'm reading this and it says EDB, Postgres for Kubernetes. And I'm sent back there, where it's like, “Hey, kid. You want to run your stateful databases on top of Kubernetes?” And my default answer to that is good lord, no. What am I missing?Benjamin: That's a good question. Kubernetes has come a long way—I think is part of that.Corey: Oh, truly. I used to think of containers as a pure story for stateless things. And then, of course, I put state into them, and then, everything exploded everywhere because it turns out, I'm bad at computers. Great. And it has come a long way. I have been tracking a lot of that. But it still feels like the idea being that you'd want to have your database endpoints somewhere a lot less, I guess I'll call it fickle, if that makes sense.Benjamin: It's an interesting problem because we are seeing a lot of people who are interested in our Kubernetes-based products. It's actually based on—we recently open-sourced the core of it under a project called cloud-native PG. It's a cool piece of technology. If you think about sort of two by two. In one corner, you've got self-managed on-premise databases. So, you're very, very slow-moving, big-iron type, old-school database deployments. And on the opposite corner, you've got fully-managed, in the cloud, BigAnimal, Amazon RDS, that type of thing. There's a place on that map where you've got customers that want a self-service type experience. Whether that's for production, or maybe it's even for dev tests, something like that. But you don't want to be giving the management capability off to a third party.For folks that want that type of experience, trying to build that themselves by, like, wiring up EC2 instances, or doing something in their own data center with VMware, or something like that, can be extremely difficult. Whereas if you've go to a Kubernetes-based product, you can get that type of self-service experience really easily, right? And customers can get a lot more flexibility out of how they run their databases and operate their databases. And what sort of control they give to, say application developers who want to spin up a new database for a test or for some sort of small microservice, that type of thing. Those types of workloads tend to work really well with this first-party Kubernetes-based offering. I've been doing databases on Kubernetes in managed services for a long time as well. And I don't, frankly, have any concerns about doing it. There are definitely some sharp edges. And if you wanted to do to-scale, you need to really know what you're doing with Kubernetes because the naive thing will shoot you in the foot.Corey: Oh, yes. So, some it feels almost like people want to cosplay working for Google, but they don't want to pass the technical interview along the way. It's a bit of a weird moment for it.Benjamin: Yeah, I would agree.Corey: I have to go back to my own experiences with using RDS back at my last real job before I went down this path. We were migrating from EC2-Classic to VPC. So, you could imagine what dates me reasonably effectively. And the big problem was the database. And the joy that we had was, “Okay, we have to quiesce the application.” So, the database is now quiet, stop writes, take a snapshot, restore that snapshot into the environment. And whenever we talk to AWS folks, it's like, “So, how long is this going to take?” And the answer was, “Guess.” And that was not exactly reassuring. It went off without a hitch because every migration has one problem. We were sideswiped in an Uber on the way home. But that's neither here nor there. This was two o'clock in the morning, and we finished in half the maintenance time we had allotted. But it was the fact that, well, guess we're going to have to take the database down for many hours with no real visibility, and we hope it'll be up by morning. That wasn't great. But that was the big one going on, on an ongoing basis, there were maintenance windows with a database. We just stopped databasing for a period of time during a fairly broad maintenance window. And that led to a whole lot of unfortunate associations in my mind with using relational databases for an awful lot of stuff. How do you handle maintenance windows and upgrading and not tearing down someone's application? Because I have to assume, “Oh, we just never patch anything. It turns out that's way easier,” is in fact, the wrong answer.Benjamin: Yeah, definitely. As you point out, there's a bunch of fundamental limitations here, if we start to talk about how Postgres actually fits together, right? Pretty much everybody in RDS is a little bit weird. The older RDS offerings are a little bit weird in terms of how they do replication. But most folks are using Postgres streaming replication, to do high availability, Postgres in managed services. And honestly, of course—Corey: That winds up failing over, or the application's aware of both endpoints and switches to the other one?Benjamin: Yeah—Corey: Sort of a database pooling connection or some sort of proxy?Benjamin: Right. There's a bunch of subtleties that get into their way. You say, well, did the [vit 00:16:16] failover too early, did the application try to connect and start making requests before the secondaries available? That sort of thing.Corey: Or you misconfigure it and point to the secondary, suddenly, when there's a switchover of some database, suddenly, nothing can write, it can only read, then you cause a massive outage on the weekend?Benjamin: Yeah. Yeah.Corey: That may have been of an actual story I made up.Benjamin: [laugh] yeah, you should use a managed service.Corey: Yeah.Benjamin: So, it's complicated, but even with managed services, you end up in situations where you have downtime, you have maintenance windows. And with Postgres, especially—and other databases as well—especially with Postgres, one of the biggest concerns you have is major version upgrades, right? So, if I want to go from Postgres 12 to 13, 13 to 14, I can't do that live. I can't have a single cluster that is streaming one Postgres version to another Postgres version, right?So, every year, people want to put things off for two years, three years sometimes—which is obviously not to their benefit—you have this maintenance, you have some sort of downtime, where you perform a Postgres upgrade. At EDB, we've got—so this is a big problem, this is a problem for us. We're involved in the Postgres community. We know this is challenging. That's just a well-known thing. Some of the folks that are working EDB are folks who worked on the Postgres logical replication tech, which arrived in Postgres 10. Logical replication is really a nice tool for doing things like change data capture, you can do Walter JSON, all these types of things are based on logical replication tech.It's not really a thing, at least, the code that's in Postgres itself doesn't really support high availability, though. It's not really something that you can use to build a leader-follower type cluster on top of. We have some techs, some proprietary tech within EDB that used to be called bi-directional replication. There used to be an open-source project called bi-directional replication. This is a kind of a descendant of that. It's now called Postgres Distributed, or EDB Postgres Distributed is the product name. And that tech actually allows us—because it's based on logical replication—allows us to do multiple major versions at the same time, right? So, we can upgrade one node in a cluster to Postgres 14, while the other nodes in the clusters are at Postgres 13. We can then upgrade the next node. We can support these types of operations in a kind of wide range of maintenance operations without taking a cluster down from maintenance.So, there's a lot of interesting opportunities here when we start to say, well, let's step back from what your typical assumptions are for Postgres streaming replication. Give ourselves a little bit more freedom by using logical replication instead of physical streaming replication. And then, what type of services, and what type of patterns can we build on top of that, that ultimately help customers build, whether it's faster databases, more highly available databases, so on and so forth.Corey: Let's face it, on-call firefighting at 2am is stressful! So there's good news and there's bad news. The bad news is that you probably can't prevent incidents from happening, but the good news is that incident.io makes incidents less stressful and a lot more valuable. incident.io is a Slack-native incident management platform that allows you to automate incident processes, focus on fixing the issues and learn from incident insights to improve site reliability and fix your vulnerabilities. Try incident.io, recover faster and sleep more.Corey: One approach that I took for, I guess you could call it backup sort of, was intentionally staggering replication between the primary and the replica about 15 minutes or so. So, if I drop a production table or something like that, I have 15 short minutes to realize what has happened and sever the replication before it is now committed to the replica and now I'm living in hell. It felt like this was not, like, option A, B, or C, or the right way to do things. But given that meeting customers where they are as important, is that the sort of thing that you support with BigAnimal, or do you try to talk customers into not being ridiculous?Benjamin: That's not something we support now. It's not actually something that I hear that many asks for these days. It's kind of interesting, that's a pattern that I've run into a lot in the past.Corey: I was an ancient, grumpy sysadmin. Again, I'm dating myself here. These days, I just store everything at DNS text records, and it's way easier. But I digress.Benjamin: [laugh] yeah, it's something that we see a lot for and we had support for a point-in-time restore, like pretty much anybody else in the business at this point. And that's usually the, “I fat-fingered something,” type response. Honestly, I think there's room to be a bit more flexible and room to do some more interesting things. I think RDS is setting a bar and a lot of database services out there and kind of just meeting that bar. And we all kind of need to be pushing a little bit more into more interesting spaces and figuring out how to get customers more value, get customers to get more out of their money for the database, honestly.Corey: One of the problems we tend to see, in the database ecosystem at large, without naming names or companies or anything like that, is that it's a pretty thin and blurry line between database advocate, database evangelist, and database zealot. Where it feels like instead, we're arguing about religion more than actual technical constraints and concerns. So, here's a fun question that hopefully isn't too much of a gotcha. But what sort of workloads would you actively advise someone not to use BigAnimal for in the database world? But yes, again, if you try to run a DNS server, it's probably not fit for purpose without at least a shim in the way there. But what sort of workloads are you not targeting that a customer is likely to have a relatively unfortunate time with?Benjamin: Large-scale analytical workloads is the easy answer to that, right? If you've got a problem where you're choosing between Postgres and Snowflake, you're seriously considering—you actually have as much data that you seriously be considering Snowflake? You probably don't want to be using Postgres, right? You want to be using something that's column, or you want to be using a query planner that really understands a columnar layout that's going to get you the sorts of performance that you need for those analytical workloads. We don't try to touch that space.Corey: Yeah, we're doing some of that right now with just the sheer volume of client AWS bills we have. We don't really need a relational model for a lot of it. And Athena is basically fallen down on the job in some cases, and, “Oh, do you want to use Redshift, that's basically Postgres.” It's like, “Yeah, it's Postgres, if it decided to run on bars of gold.” No, thank you. It just becomes this ridiculously overwrought solution for what feels like it should be a lot similar. So, it's weird, six months ago or so I wouldn't have had much of an idea what you're talking about. I see it a lot better now. Generally, by virtue of trying to do something the precise wrong way that someone should.Benjamin: Right. Yeah, exactly. I think there's interesting room for Postgres to expand here. It's not something that we're actively working on. I'm not aware of a lot happening in the community that Postgres is, for better or worse, extremely extensible, right? And if you see the JSON-supported Postgres, it didn't exist, I don't know, five, six years ago. And now it's incredibly powerful. It's incredibly flexible. And you can do a lot of quote-unquote, schemaless stuff straight in Postgres. Or you look at PostGIS, right, for doing GIS geographical data, right? That's really a fantastic integration directly in the database.Corey: Yeah, before that people start doing ridiculous things almost looks similar to a graph database or a columnar store somehow, and yeah.Benjamin: Yeah, exactly. I think sometimes somebody will do a good column store that's an open-source deeply integrated into Postgres, rather than—Corey: I've seen someone build one on top of S3 bucket with that head, a quarter of a trillion objects in it. Professional advice, don't do that.Benjamin: [laugh]. Unless you're Snowflake. So, I mean, it's something that I'd like to see Postgres expand into. I think that's an interesting space, but not something that, at least especially for BigAnimal, and frankly, for a lot of EDB customers. It's not something we're trying to push people toward.Corey: One thing that I think we are seeing a schism around is the idea that some vendors are one side of it, some are on the other, where on the one side, you have, oh, every workload should have a bespoke, purpose-built database that is exactly for this type of workload. And the other school of thought is you should generally buy us for a general-purpose database until you have a workload that is scaled and significant to a point where running that on its own purpose-built database begins to make sense. I don't necessarily think that is a binary choice, where do you tend to fall on that spectrum?Benjamin: I think everybody should use Postgres. And I say not just because I work in a Postgres company.Corey: Well, let's be clear. Before this, you were at IBM for five years working on a whole bunch of database stuff over there, not just Postgres. And you, so far, have not struck me as the kind of person who's like, “Oh, so what's your favorite database?” “The one that pays me.” We've met people like that, let's be very clear. But you seem very even-handed in those conversations.Benjamin: Yeah, I got my start in databases, actually, with Apache CouchDB. I am a committer on CouchDB. I worked on a managed at CouchDB service ten years ago. At IBM, I worked on something in nine different open-source databases and managed services. But I love having conversations about, like, well, I've got this workload, should I use Postgres, rr should I use Mongo, should I use Cassandra, all of those types of discussions. Frankly, though, I think in a lot of cases people are—they don't understand how much power they're missing out on if they don't choose a relational database. If they don't understand the relational model well enough to understand that they really actually want that. In a lot of cases, people are also just over-optimizing too early, right? It's just going to be much faster for them to get off the ground, get product in customers hands, if they start with something that they don't have to think twice about. And they don't end up with this architecture with 45 different databases, and there's only one guy in the company that knows how to manage the whole thing.Corey: Oh, the same story of picking a cloud provider. It's, “Okay, you hire a team, you're going to build a thing. Which cloud provider do you pick?” Every cloud provider has a whole matrix and sales deck, and the rest. The right answer, of course, is the one your team's already familiar with because learning a new cloud provider while trying not to run out of money at your startup, can't really doesn't work super well.Benjamin: Exactly. Yeah.Corey: One thing that I think has been sort of interesting, and when I saw it, it was one of those, “Oh, I sort of like them.” Because I had that instinctive reaction and I don't think I'm alone in this. As of this recording a couple of weeks ago, you folks received a sizable investment from private equity. And default reaction to that is, “Oh, well, I guess I put a fork in the company, they're done.” Because the narrative is that once private equity takes an investment, well, that company's best days are probably not in front of it. Now, the counterpoint is that this is not the first time private equity has invested in EDB, and you folks from what I can tell are significantly better than you were when I was your customer a decade ago. So clearly, there is something wrong with that mental model. What am I missing?Benjamin: Yeah. Frankly, I don't know. I'm no expert in funding models and all of those sorts of things. I will say that my experience has been what I've seen at EDB, has definitely been that maybe there's private equity, and then there's private equity. We're in this to build better products and become a better product company. We were previously owned by a private equity firm for the past four years or so. And during the course of those four years, we brought on a bunch of folks who were very product-focused, new leadership. We made a significant acquisition of a company called 2ndQuadrant, which they employed a lot of the European best Postgres company. Now, they're part of EDB and most of them have stayed with us. And we built the managed cloud service, right? So, this is a pretty significant—private equity company buying us to invest in the company. I'm optimistic that that's what we're looking at going forward.Corey: I want to be clear as well, I'm not worried about what I normally would be in a private equity story about this, where they're there to save money and cut costs, and, “Do we really need all these database replicas floating around,” and, “These backups, seems like that's something we don't need.” You have, at last count, 32 Postgres contributors, 7 Postgres committers, and 3 core members. All of whom would run away screaming loudly and publicly, in the event that such a thing were taking place. Of all the challenges and concerns I might have about someone running a cloud service in the modern day. I do not have any fear that you folks are not doing what will very clearly be shown to be the right thing by your customers for the technology that you're building on top of. That is not a concern. There are companies I do not have that confidence in, to be clear.Benjamin: Yeah, I'm glad to hear that. I'm a hundred percent on board as well. I work here, but I think we're doing the right thing, and we're going to be doing great stuff going forward.Corey: One last topic I do want to get into a little bit is, on some level, launching in this decade, a cloud-hosted database offering at a time when Amazon—whose product strategy of yes is in full display—it seems like something ridiculous, that is not necessarily well thought out that why would you ever try to do this? Now, I will temper that by the fact that you are clearly succeeding in this direction. You have customers who say nice things about you, and the reviews have been almost universally positive anywhere I can see things. The negative ones are largely complaining about databases, which I admit might be coming from me.Benjamin: Right, it is a crowded space. There's a lot of things happening. Obviously, Amazon, Microsoft, Google are doing great things, both—Corey: Terrible things, but great, yes. Yes.Benjamin: [laugh] right, there's good products coming in. I think AlloyDB is not necessarily a great product. I haven't used it myself yet, but it's an interesting step in the direction. I'm excited to see development happening. But at the end of the day, we're a database company. Our focus is on building great databases and supporting great databases. We're not entering this business to try to take on Amazon from an infrastructure point of view. In fact, the way that we're structuring the product is really to try to get the strengths of both worlds. We want to give customers the ability to get the most out of the AWS or Azure infrastructure that they can, but come to us for their database.Frankly, we know Postgres better than anybody else. We have a greater ability to get bugs fixed in Postgres than anybody else. We've got folks working on the database in the open. We got folks working on the database proprietary for us. So, we give customers things like break/fix support on that database. If there is a bug in Postgres, there's a bug in the tech that sits around Postgres. Because obviously, Postgres is not a batteries-included system, really. We're going to fix that for you. That's part of the contract that we're giving to our customers. And I know a lot of smaller companies maybe haven't been burned by this sort of thing very much. We start to talk about enterprise customers and medium, larger-scale customers, this starts to get really valuable. The ability to have assurance on top of your open-source product. So, I think there's a lot of interesting things there, a lot of value that we can provide there.I think also that I talked a little bit about this earlier, but like the box, this sort of RDS-shaped box, I think is a bit too small. There's an opportunity for smaller players to come in and try to push the boundaries of that. For example, giving customers more support by default to do a good job using their database. We have folks on board that can help consult with customers to say, “No, you shouldn't be designing your schemas that way. You should be designing your schemas this way. You should be using indexes here,” that sort of stuff. That's been part of our business for a long time. Now, with a managed service, we can bake that right into the managed service. And that gives us the ability to kind of make that—you talk about shared responsibility between the service writer and the customer—we can change the boundaries of that shared responsibility a little bit, so that customers can get more value out of the managed database service than they might expect otherwise.Corey: There aren't these harsh separations and clearly defined lines across which nothing shall pass, when it makes sense to do that in a controlled responsible way.Benjamin: Right, exactly. Some of that is because we're a database company, and some of that is because, frankly, we're much smaller.Corey: I'll take it a step further beyond that, as well, that I have seen this pattern evolve a number of times where you have a customer running databases on EC2, and their AWS account managers suggests move to RDS. So, they do. Then, move to Aurora. So, they do. Then, I move this to DynamoDB. At which point, it's like, what do you think your job is here, exactly? Because it seems like every time we move databases, you show up in a nicer car. So, what exactly is the story here, and what are the incentives? Where it just feels like there is a, “Whatever you're doing is not the way that it should be done. So, it's time to do, yet, another migration.”There's something to be said for companies who are focused around a specific aspect of things. Then once that is up and working and running, great. Keep on going. This is fine. As opposed to trying to chase the latest shiny, on some level. I have a big sense of, I guess, affinity for companies that wind up knowing where they start, and most notably, where they stop.Benjamin: Yeah, I think that's a really good point. I don't think that we will be building an application platform anytime soon.Corey: “We're going to run Lambda functions on top of a database.” It's like, “Congratulations. That is the weirdest stored procedure I can imagine this week, but I'm sure we can come up with a worse one soon.”Benjamin: Exactly.Corey: I really want to thank you for taking the time to speak with me so much about how you're thinking about this, and what you've been building over there. If people want to learn more, where's the best place to go to find you?Benjamin: biganimal.com.Corey: Excellent. We will throw a link to that in the show notes and it only just occurred to me that the Postgres mascot is an elephant, and now I understand why it's called BigAnimal. Yeah, that's right. He who laughs last, thinks slowest, and today, that's me. I really want to thank you for being so generous with your time. I appreciate it.Benjamin: Thank you. I really appreciate it.Corey: Benjamin Anderson, CTO for Cloud at EDB. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry comment that you then wind up stuffing into a SQLite database, converting to Base64, and somehow stuffing into the comment field.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The Yield
The Growth and Future of Money

The Yield

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 33:41


There are growing trends within the finance and investing world. From new and improved ways to invest to a widening generational wage gap, Michael Schnur, DBA, Assistant Professor of Economics at University of Lynchburg joins The Yield to discuss these topics and what you can expect in the future to come.Key Takeaways:[2:35] Teaching economics in this volatile, post-pandemic environment. [5:16] Textbook answers about the drivers of inflation and how it plays out in the real world. [7:15] The influence of the Fed on supply and demand. [9:34] The real cause behind major supply issues over the last year. [12:20] Is inflation actually just a self-fulfilling prophecy? [14:36] Solve inflation or deal with growing the economy? [16:15] Why aren't more people working in the face of inflation? [18:51] Negotiating wages in light of a possible recession. [21:17] Crypto is now playing a role in money laundering. [28:16] Should you invest in mortgages or treasury bonds? Mentioned in This Episode:Yieldstreet

Voice of the DBA
Which Work Is Suited for In-Person?

Voice of the DBA

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 3:18


In this article on flexible working plans, number four makes a good point. What work is suited for live, in-person interaction? Which aspects of your job benefit from seeing others face-to-face? Today I'm asking data professionals to think about it. I know we can do all our jobs remotely, after all, many of us have been doing that for at least a couple of years, and some for far longer. I can't remember the last time I actually needed to look at a physical server I wrote code for? Probably when I self-hosted SQL Server Central back in 2002-2003 and went to reboot a machine or add a disk drive. Even then, those weren't DBA or developer jobs, but really Operations hardware tasks. Read the rest of Which Work Is Suited for In-Person?

Screaming in the Cloud
Technical Lineage and Careers in Tech with Sheeri Cabral

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 35:50


About SheeriAfter almost 2 decades as a database administrator and award-winning thought leader, Sheeri Cabral pivoted to technical product management. Her super power of “new customer” empathy informs her presentations and explanations. Sheeri has developed unique insights into working together and planning, having survived numerous reorganizations, “best practices”, and efficiency models. Her experience is the result of having worked at everything from scrappy startups such as Guardium – later bought by IBM – to influential tech companies like Mozilla and MongoDB, to large established organizations like Salesforce.Links Referenced: Collibra: https://www.collibra.com WildAid GitHub: https://github.com/wildaid Twitter: https://twitter.com/sheeri Personal Blog: https://sheeri.org TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Fortinet. Fortinet's partnership with AWS is a better-together combination that ensures your workloads on AWS are protected by best-in-class security solutions powered by comprehensive threat intelligence and more than 20 years of cybersecurity experience. Integrations with key AWS services simplify security management, ensure full visibility across environments, and provide broad protection across your workloads and applications. Visit them at AWS re:Inforce to see the latest trends in cybersecurity on July 25-26 at the Boston Convention Center. Just go over to the Fortinet booth and tell them Corey Quinn sent you and watch for the flinch. My thanks again to my friends at Fortinet.Corey: Let's face it, on-call firefighting at 2am is stressful! So there's good news and there's bad news. The bad news is that you probably can't prevent incidents from happening, but the good news is that incident.io makes incidents less stressful and a lot more valuable. incident.io is a Slack-native incident management platform that allows you to automate incident processes, focus on fixing the issues and learn from incident insights to improve site reliability and fix your vulnerabilities. Try incident.io, recover faster and sleep more.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud, I'm Corey Quinn. My guest today is Sheeri Cabral, who's a Senior Product Manager of ETL lineage at Collibra. And that is an awful lot of words that I understand approximately none of, except maybe manager. But we'll get there. The origin story has very little to do with that.I was following Sheeri on Twitter for a long time and really enjoyed the conversations that we had back and forth. And over time, I started to realize that there were a lot of things that didn't necessarily line up. And one of the more interesting and burning questions I had is, what is it you do, exactly? Because you're all over the map. First, thank you for taking the time to speak with me today. And what is it you'd say it is you do here? To quote a somewhat bizarre and aged movie now.Sheeri: Well, since your listeners are technical, I do like to match what I say with the audience. First of all, hi. Thanks for having me. I'm Sheeri Cabral. I am a product manager for technical and ETL tools and I can break that down for this technical audience. If it's not a technical audience, I might say something—like if I'm at a party, and people ask what I do—I'll say, “I'm a product manager for technical data tool.” And if they ask what a product manager does, I'll say I helped make sure that, you know, we deliver a product the customer wants. So, you know, ETL tools are tools that transform, extract, and load your data from one place to another.Corey: Like AWS Glue, but for some of them, reportedly, you don't have to pay AWS by the gigabyte-second.Sheeri: Correct. Correct. We actually have an AWS Glue technical lineage tool in beta right now. So, the technical lineage is how data flows from one place to another. So, when you're extracting, possibly transforming, and loading your data from one place to another, you're moving it around; you want to see where it goes. Why do you want to see where it goes? Glad you asked. You didn't really ask. Do you care? Do you want to know why it's important?Corey: Oh, I absolutely do. Because it's—again, people who are, like, “What do you do?” “Oh, it's boring, and you won't care.” It's like when people aren't even excited themselves about what they work on, it's always a strange dynamic. There's a sense that people aren't really invested in what they do.I'm not saying you have to have this overwhelming passion and do this in your spare time, necessarily, but you should, at least in an ideal world, like what you do enough to light up a bit when you talk about it. You very clearly do. I'm not wanting to stop you. Please continue.Sheeri: I do. I love data and I love helping people. So, technical lineage does a few things. For example, a DBA—which I used to be a DBA—can use technical lineage to predict the impact of a schema update or migration, right? So, if I'm going to change the name of this column, what uses it downstream? What's going to be affected? What scripts do I need to change? Because if the name changes other thing—you know, then I need to not get errors everywhere.And from a data governance perspective, which Collibra is data governance tool, it helps organizations see if, you know, you have private data in a source, does it remain private throughout its journey, right? So, you can take a column like email address or government ID number and see where it's used down the line, right? GDPR compliance, CCPA compliance. The CCPA is a little newer; people might not know that acronym. It's California Consumer Privacy Act.I forget what GDPR is, but it's another privacy act. It also can help the business see where data comes from so if you have technical lineage all the way down to your reports, then you know whether or not you can trust the data, right? So, you have a report and it shows salary ranges for job titles. So, where did the data come from? Did it come from a survey? Did it come from job sites? Or did it come from a government source like the IRS, right? So, now you know, like, what you get to trust the most.Corey: Wait, you can do that without a blockchain? I kid, I kid, I kid. Please don't make me talk about blockchains. No, it's important. The provenance of data, being able to establish a almost a chain-of-custody style approach for a lot of these things is extraordinarily important.Sheeri: Yep.Corey: I was always a little hazy on the whole idea of ETL until I started, you know, working with large-volume AWS bills. And it turns out that, “Well, why do you have to wind up moving and transforming all of these things?” “Oh, because in its raw form, it's complete nonsense. That's why. Thank you for asking.” It becomes a problem—Sheeri: [laugh]. Oh, I thought you're going to say because AWS has 14 different products for things, so you have to move it from one product to the other to use the features.Corey: And two of them are good. It's a wild experience.Sheeri: [laugh].Corey: But this is also something of a new career for you. You were a DBA for a long time. You're also incredibly engaging, you have a personality, you're extraordinarily creative, and that—if I can slander an entire profession for a second—does not feel like it is a common DBA trait. It's right up there with an overly creative accountant. When your accountant has done a stand-up comedy, you're watching and you're laughing and thinking, “I am going to federal prison.” It's one of those weird things that doesn't quite gel, if we're speaking purely in terms of stereotypes. What has your career been like?Sheeri: I was a nerd growing up. So, to kind of say, like, I have a personality, like, my personality is very nerdish. And I get along with other nerdy people and we have a lot of fun, but when I was younger, like, when I was, I don't know, seven or eight, one of the things I really love to do is I had a penny collection—you know, like you do—and I love to sort it by date. So, in the states anyway, we have these pennies that have the date that they were minted on it. And so, I would organize—and I probably had, like, five bucks worth a pennies.So, you're talking about 500 pennies and I would sort them and I'd be like, “Oh, this is 1969. This was 1971.” And then when I was done, I wanted to sort things more, so I would start to, like, sort them in order how shiny the pennies were. So, I think that from an early age, it was clear that I wanted to be a DBA from that sorting of my data and ordering it, but I never really had a, like, “Oh, I want to be this when I grew up.” I kind of had a stint when I was in, like, middle school where I was like, maybe I'll be a creative writer and I wasn't as creative a writer as I wanted to be, so I was like, “Ah, whatever.”And I ended up actually coming to computer science just completely through random circumstance. I wanted to do neuroscience because I thought it was completely fascinating at how the brain works and how, like, you and I are, like, 99.999—we're, like, five-nines the same except for, like, a couple of genetic, whatever. But, like, how our brain wiring right how the neuron, how the electricity flows through it—Corey: Yeah, it feels like I want to store a whole bunch of data, that's okay. I'll remember it. I'll keep it in my head. And you're, like, rolling up the sleeves and grabbing, like, the combination software package off the shelf and a scalpel. Like, “Not yet, but you're about to.” You're right, there is an interesting point of commonality on this. It comes down to almost data organization and the—Sheeri: Yeah.Corey: —relationship between data nodes if that's a fair assessment.Sheeri: Yeah. Well, so what happened was, so I went to university and in order to take introductory neuroscience, I had to take, like, chemistry, organic chemistry, biology, I was basically doing a pre-med track. And so, in the beginning of my junior year, I went to go take introductory neuroscience and I got a D-minus. And a D-minus level doesn't even count for the major. And I'm like, “Well, I want to graduate in three semesters.”And I had this—I got all my requirements done, except for the pesky little major thing. So, I was already starting to take, like, a computer science, you know, basic courses and so I kind of went whole-hog, all-in did four or five computer science courses a semester and got my degree in computer science. Because it was like math, so it kind of came a little easy to me. So taking, you know, logic courses, and you know, linear algebra courses was like, “Yeah, that's great.” And then it was the year 2000, when I got my bachelor's, the turn of the century.And my university offered a fifth-year master's degree program. And I said, I don't know who's going to look at me and say, conscious bias, unconscious bias, “She's a woman, she can't do computer science, so, like, let me just get this master's degree.” I, like, fill out a one page form, I didn't have to take a GRE. And it was the year 2000. You were around back then.You know what it was like. The jobs were like—they were handing jobs out like candy. I literally had a friend who was like, “My company”—that he founded. He's like, just come, you know, it's Monday in May—“Just start, you will just bring your resume the first day and we'll put it on file.” And I was like, no, no, I have this great opportunity to get a master's degree in one year at 25% off the cost because I got a tuition reduction or whatever for being in the program. I was like, “What could possibly go wrong in one year?”And what happened was his company didn't exist the next year, and, like, everyone was in a hiring freeze in 2001. So, it was the best decision I ever made without really knowing because I would have had a job for six months had been laid off with everyone else at the end of 2000 and… and that's it. So, that's how I became a DBA is I, you know, got a master's degree in computer science, really wanted to use databases. There weren't any database jobs in 2001, but I did get a job as a sysadmin, which we now call SREs.Corey: Well, for some of the younger folks in the audience, I do want to call out the fact that regardless of how they think we all rode dinosaurs to school, databases did absolutely exist back in that era. There's a reason that Oracle is as large as it is of a company. And it's not because people just love doing business with them, but technology was head and shoulders above everything else for a long time, to the point where people worked with them in spite of their reputation, not because of it. These days, it seems like in the database universe, you have an explosion of different options and different ways that are great at different things. The best, of course, is Route 53 or other DNS TXT records. Everything else is competing for second place on that. But no matter what it is, you're after, there are options available. This was not the case back then. It was like, you had a few options, all of them with serious drawbacks, but you had to pick your poison.Sheeri: Yeah. In fact, I learned on Postgres in university because you know, that was freely available. And you know, you'd like, “Well, why not MySQL? Isn't that kind of easier to learn?” It's like, yeah, but I went to college from '96 to 2001. MySQL 1.0 or whatever was released in '95. By the time I graduated, it was six years old.Corey: And academia is not usually the early adopter of a lot of emerging technologies like that. That's not a dig on them any because otherwise, you wind up with a major that doesn't exist by the time that the first crop of students graduates.Sheeri: Right. And they didn't have, you know, transactions. They didn't have—they barely had replication, you know? So, it wasn't a full-fledged database at the time. And then I became a MySQL DBA. But yeah, as a systems administrator, you know, we did websites, right? We did what web—are they called web administrators now? What are they called? Web admins? Webmaster?Corey: Web admins, I think that they became subsumed into sysadmins, by and large and now we call them DevOps, or SRE, which means the exact same thing except you get paid 60% more and your primary job is arguing about which one of those you're not.Sheeri: Right. Right. Like we were still separated from network operations, but database stuff that stuff and, you know, website stuff, it's stuff we all did, back when your [laugh] webmail was your Horde based on PHP and you had a database behind it. And yeah, it was fun times.Corey: I worked at a whole bunch of companies in that era. And that's where basically where I formed my early opinion of a bunch of DBA-leaning sysadmins. Like the DBA in and a lot of these companies, it was, I don't want to say toxic, but there's a reason that if I were to say, “I'm writing a memoir about a career track in tech called The Legend of Surly McBastard,” people are going to say, “Oh, is it about the DBA?” There's a reason behind this. It always felt like there was a sense of elitism and a sense of, “Well, that's not my job, so you do your job, but if anything goes even slightly wrong, it's certainly not my fault.” And to be fair, all of these fields have evolved significantly since then, but a lot of those biases that started early in our career are difficult to shake, particularly when they're unconscious.Sheeri: They are. I'd never ran into that person. Like, I never ran into anyone who—like a developer who treated me poorly because the last DBA was a jerk and whatever, but I heard a lot of stories, especially with things like granting access. In fact, I remember, my first job as an actual DBA and not as a sysadmin that also the DBA stuff was at an online gay dating site, and the CTO rage-quit. Literally yelled, stormed out of the office, slammed the door, and never came back.And a couple of weeks later, you know, we found out that the customer service guys who were in-house—and they were all guys, so I say guys although we also referred to them as ladies because it was an online gay dating site.Corey: Gals works well too, in those scenarios. “Oh, guys is unisex.” “Cool. So's ‘gals' by that theory. So gals, how we doing?” And people get very offended by that and suddenly, yeah, maybe ‘folks' is not a terrible direction to go in. I digress. Please continue.Sheeri: When they hired me, they were like, are you sure you're okay with this? I'm like, “I get it. There's, like, half-naked men posters on the wall. That's fine.” But they would call they'd be, like, “Ladies, let's go to our meeting.” And I'm like, “Do you want me also?” Because I had to ask because that was when ladies actually might not have included me because they meant, you know.Corey: I did a brief stint myself as the director of TechOps at Grindr. That was a wild experience in a variety of different ways.Sheeri: Yeah.Corey: It's over a decade ago, but it was still this… it was a very interesting experience in a bunch of ways. And still, to this day, it remains the single biggest source of InfoSec nightmares that kept me awake at night. Just because when I'm working at a bank—which I've also done—it's only money, which sounds ridiculous to say, especially if you're in a regulated profession, but here in reality where I'm talking about it, it's I'm dealing instead, with cool, this data leaks, people will die. Most of what I do is not life or death, but that was and that weighed very heavily on me.Sheeri: Yeah, there's a reason I don't work for a bank or a hospital. You know, I make mistakes. I'm human, right?Corey: There's a reason I work on databases for that exact same reason. Please, continue.Sheeri: Yeah. So, the CTO rage-quit. A couple of weeks later, the head of customer service comes to me and be like, “Can we have his spot as an admin for customer service?” And I'm like, “What do you mean?” He's like, “Well, he told us, we had, like, ten slots of permission and he was one of them so we could have have, like, nine people.”And, like, I went and looked, and they put permission in the htaccess file. So, this former CTO had just wielded his power to be like, “Nope, can't do that. Sorry, limitations.” When there weren't any. I'm like, “You could have a hundred. You want every customer service person to be an admin? Whatever. Here you go.” So, I did hear stories about that. And yeah, that's not the kind of DBA I was.Corey: No, it's the more senior you get, the less you want to have admin rights on things. But when I leave a job, like, the number one thing I want you to do is revoke my credentials. Not—Sheeri: Please.Corey: Because I'm going to do anything nefarious; because I don't want to get blamed for it. Because we have a long standing tradition in tech at a lot of places of, “Okay, something just broke. Whose fault is it? Well, who's the most recent person to leave the company? Let's blame them because they're not here to refute the character assassination and they're not going to be angling for a raise here; the rest of us are so let's see who we can throw under the bus that can't defend themselves.” Never a great plan.Sheeri: Yeah. So yeah, I mean, you know, my theory in life is I like helping. So, I liked helping developers as a DBA. I would often run workshops to be like, here's how to do an explain and find your explain plan and see if you have indexes and why isn't the database doing what you think it's supposed to do? And so, I like helping customers as a product manager, right? So…Corey: I am very interested in watching how people start drifting in a variety of different directions. It's a, you're doing product management now and it's an ETL lineage product, it is not something that is directly aligned with your previous positioning in the market. And those career transitions are always very interesting to me because there's often a mistaken belief by people in their career realizing they're doing something they don't want to do. They want to go work in a different field and there's this pervasive belief that, “Oh, time for me to go back to square one and take an entry level job.” No, you have a career. You have experience. Find the orthogonal move.Often, if that's challenging because it's too far apart, you find the half-step job that blends the thing you do now with something a lot closer, and then a year or two later, you complete the transition into that thing. But starting over from scratch, it's why would you do that? I can't quite wrap my head around jumping off the corporate ladder to go climb another one. You very clearly have done a lateral move in that direction into a career field that is surprisingly distant, at least in my view. How'd that happen?Sheeri: Yeah, so after being on call for 18 years or so, [laugh] I decided—no, I had a baby, actually. I had a baby. He was great. And then I another one. But after the first baby, I went back to work, and I was on call again. And you know, I had a good maternity leave or whatever, but you know, I had a newborn who was six, eight months old and I was getting paged.And I was like, you know, this is more exhausting than having a newborn. Like, having a baby who sleeps three hours at a time, like, in three hour chunks was less exhausting than being on call. Because when you have a baby, first of all, it's very rare that they wake up and crying in the midnight it's an emergency, right? Like they have to go to the hospital, right? Very rare. Thankfully, I never had to do it.But basically, like, as much as I had no brain cells, and sometimes I couldn't even go through this list, right: they need to be fed; they need to be comforted; they're tired, and they're crying because they're tired, right, you can't make them go to sleep, but you're like, just go to sleep—what is it—or their diaper needs changing, right? There's, like, four things. When you get that beep of that pager in the middle of the night it could be anything. It could be logs filling up disk space, you're like, “Alright, I'll rotate the logs and be done with it.” You know? It could be something you need snoozed.Corey: “Issue closed. Status, I no longer give a shit what it is.” At some point, it's one of those things where—Sheeri: Replication lag.Corey: Right.Sheeri: Not actionable.Corey: Don't get me started down that particular path. Yeah. This is the area where DBAs and my sysadmin roots started to overlap a bit. Like, as the DBA was great at data analysis, the table structure and the rest, but the backups of the thing, of course that fell to the sysadmin group. And replication lag, it's, “Okay.”“It's doing some work in the middle of the night; that's normal, and the network is fine. And why are you waking me up with things that are not actionable? Stop it.” I'm yelling at the computer at that point, not the person—Sheeri: Right,right.Corey: —to be very clear. But at some point, it's don't wake me up with trivial nonsense. If I'm getting woken up in the middle of the night, it better be a disaster. My entire business now is built around a problem that's business-hours only for that explicit reason. It's the not wanting to deal with that. And I don't envy that, but product management. That's a strange one.Sheeri: Yeah, so what happened was, I was unhappy at my job at the time, and I was like, “I need a new job.” So, I went to, like, the MySQL Slack instance because that was 2018, 2019. Very end of 2018, beginning of 2019. And I said, “I need something new.” Like, maybe a data architect, or maybe, like, a data analyst, or data scientist, which was pretty cool.And I was looking at data scientist jobs, and I was an expert MySQL DBA and it took a long time for me to be able to say, “I'm an expert,” without feeling like oh, you're just ballooning yourself up. And I was like, “No, I'm literally a world-renowned expert DBA.” Like, I just have to say it and get comfortable with it. And so, you know, I wasn't making a junior data scientist's salary. [laugh].I am the sole breadwinner for my household, so at that point, I had one kid and a husband and I was like, how do I support this family on a junior data scientist's salary when I live in the city of Boston? So, I needed something that could pay a little bit more. And a former I won't even say coworker, but colleague in the MySQL world—because is was the MySQL Slack after all—said, “I think you should come at MongoDB, be a product manager like me.”Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate. Is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other; which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability: it's more than just hipster monitoring. Corey: If I've ever said, “Hey, you should come work with me and do anything like me,” people will have the blood drain from their face. And like, “What did you just say to me? That's terrible.” Yeah, it turns out that I have very hard to explain slash predict, in some ways. It's always fun. It's always wild to go down that particular path, but, you know, here we are.Sheeri: Yeah. But I had the same question everybody else does, which was, what's a product manager? What does the product manager do? And he gave me a list of things a product manager does, which there was some stuff that I had the skills for, like, you have to talk to customers and listen to them.Well, I've done consulting. I could get yelled at; that's fine. You can tell me things are terrible and I have to fix it. I've done that. No problem with that. Then there are things like you have to give presentations about how features were okay, I can do that. I've done presentations. You know, I started the Boston MySQL Meetup group and ran it for ten years until I had a kid and foisted it off on somebody else.And then the things that I didn't have the skills in, like, running a beta program were like, “Ooh, that sounds fascinating. Tell me more.” So, I was like, “Yeah, let's do it.” And I talked to some folks, they were looking for a technical product manager for MongoDB's sharding product. And they had been looking for someone, like, insanely technical for a while, and they found me; I'm insanely technical.And so, that was great. And so, for a year, I did that at MongoDB. One of the nice things about them is that they invest in people, right? So, my manager left, the team was like, we really can't support someone who doesn't have the product management skills that we need yet because you know, I wasn't a master in a year, believe it or not. And so, they were like, “Why don't you find another department?” I was like, “Okay.”And I ended up finding a place in engineering communications, doing, like, you know, some keynote demos, doing some other projects and stuff. And then after—that was a kind of a year-long project, and after that ended, I ended up doing product management for developer relations at MongoDB. Also, this was during the pandemic, right, so this is 2019, until '21; beginning of 2019, to end of 2020, so it was, you know, three full years. You know, I kind of like woke up from the pandemic fog and I was like, “What am I doing? Do I want to really want to be a content product manager?” And I was like, “I want to get back to databases.”One of the interesting things I learned actually in looking for a job because I did it a couple of times at MongoDB because I changed departments and I was also looking externally when I did that. I had the idea when I became a product manager, I was like, “This is great because now I'm product manager for databases and so, I'm kind of leveraging that database skill and then I'll learn the product manager stuff. And then I can be a product manager for any technical product, right?”Corey: I like the idea. Of some level, it feels like the product managers likeliest to succeed at least have a grounding or baseline in the area that they're in. This gets into the age-old debate of how important is industry-specific experience? Very often you'll see a bunch of job ads just put that in as a matter of course. And for some roles, yeah, it's extremely important.For other roles it's—for example, I don't know, hypothetically, you're looking for someone to fix the AWS bill, it doesn't necessarily matter whether you're a services company, a product company, or a VC-backed company whose primary output is losing money, it doesn't matter because it's a bounded problem space and that does not transform much from company to company. Same story with sysadmin types to be very direct. But the product stuff does seem to get into that industry specific stuff.Sheeri: Yeah, and especially with tech stuff, you have to understand what your customer is saying when they're saying, “I have a problem doing X and Y,” right? The interesting part of my folly in that was that part of the time that I was looking was during the pandemic, when you know, everyone was like, “Oh, my God, it's a seller's market. If you're looking for a job, employers are chomping at the bit for you.” And I had trouble finding something because so many people were also looking for jobs, that if I went to look for something, for example, as a storage product manager, right—now, databases and storage solutions have a lot in common; databases are storage solutions, in fact; but file systems and databases have much in common—but all that they needed was one person with file system experience that had more experience than I did in storage solutions, right? And they were going to choose them over me. So, it was an interesting kind of wake-up call for me that, like, yeah, probably data and databases are going to be my niche. And that's okay because that is literally why they pay me the literal big bucks. If I'm going to go niche that I don't have 20 years of experience and they shouldn't pay me as big a bucks right?Corey: Yeah, depending on what you're doing, sure. I don't necessarily believe in the idea that well you're new to this particular type of role so we're going to basically pay you a lot less. From my perspective it's always been, like, there's a value in having a person in a role. The value to the company is X and, “Well, I have an excuse now to pay you less for that,” has never resonated with me. It's if you're not, I guess, worth—the value-added not worth being paid what the stated rate for a position is, you are probably not going to find success in that role and the role has to change. That has always been my baseline operating philosophy. Not to yell at people on this, but it's, uh, I am very tired of watching companies more or less dunk on people from a position of power.Sheeri: Yeah. And I mean, you can even take the power out of that and take, like, location-based. And yes, I understand the cost of living is different in different places, but why do people get paid differently if the value is the same? Like if I want to get a promotion, right, my company is going to be like, “Well, show me how you've added value. And we only pay your value. We don't pay because—you know, you don't just automatically get promoted after seven years, right? You have to show the value and whatever.” Which is, I believe, correct, right?And yet, there are seniority things, there are this many years experience. And you know, there's the old caveat of do you have ten years experience or do you have two years of experience five times?Corey: That is the big problem is that there has to be a sense of movement that pushes people forward. You're not the first person that I've had on the show and talked to about a 20 year career. But often, I do wind up talking to folks as I move through the world where they basically have one year of experience repeated 20 times. And as the industry continues to evolve and move on and skill sets don't keep current, in some cases, it feels like they have lost touch, on some level. And they're talking about the world that was and still is in some circles, but it's a market in long-term decline as opposed to keeping abreast of what is functionally a booming industry.Sheeri: Their skills have depreciated because they haven't learned more skills.Corey: Yeah. Tech across the board is a field where I feel like you have to constantly be learning. And there's a bit of an evolve-or-die dinosaur approach. And I have some, I do have some fallbacks on this. If I ever decide I am tired of learning and keeping up with AWS, all I have to do is go and work in an environment that uses GovCloud because that's, like, AWS five years ago.And that buys me the five years to find something else to be doing until a GovCloud catches up with the modern day of when I decided to make that decision. That's a little insulting and also very accurate for those who have found themselves in that environment. But I digress.Sheeri: No, and I find it to with myself. Like, I got to the point with MySQL where I was like, okay, great. I know MySQL back and forth. Do I want to learn all this other stuff? Literally just today, I was looking at my DMs on Twitter and somebody DMed me in May, saying, “Hi, ma'am. I am a DBA and how can I use below service: Lambda, Step Functions, DynamoDB, AWS Session Manager, and CloudWatch?”And I was like, “You know, I don't know. I have not ever used any of those technologies. And I haven't evolved my DBA skills because it's been, you know, six years since I was a DBA.” No, six years, four or five? I can't do math.Corey: Yeah. Which you think would be a limiting factor to a DBA but apparently not. One last question that [laugh] I want to ask you, before we wind up calling this a show. You've done an awful lot across the board. As you look at all of it, what is it you would say that you're the most proud of?Sheeri: Oh, great question. What I'm most proud of is my work with WildAid. So, when I was at MongoDB—I referenced a job with engineering communications, and they hired me to be a product manager because they wanted to do a collaboration with a not-for-profit and make a reference application. So, make an application using MongoDB technology and make it something that was going to be used, but people can also see it. So, we made this open-source project called o-fish.And you know, we can give GitHub links: it's github.com/wildaid, and it has—that's the organization's GitHub which we created, so it only has the o-fish projects in it. But it is a mobile and web app where governments who patrol waters, patrol, like, marine protected areas—which are like national parks but in the water, right, so they are these, you know, wildlife preserves in the water—and they make sure that people aren't doing things they shouldn't do: they're not throwing trash in the ocean, they're not taking turtles out of the Galapagos Island area, you know, things like that. And they need software to track that and do that because at the time, they were literally writing, you know, with pencil on paper, and, you know, had stacks and stacks of this paper to do data entry.And MongoDB had just bought the Realm database and had just integrated it, and so there was, you know, some great features about offline syncing that you didn't have to do; it did all the foundational plumbing for you. And then the reason though, that I'm proud of that project is not just because it's pretty freaking cool that, you know, doing something that actually makes a difference in the world and helps fight climate change and all that kind of stuff, the reason I was proud of it is I was the sole product manager. It was the first time that I'd really had sole ownership of a product and so all the mistakes were my own and the credit was my own, too. And so, it was really just a great learning experience and it turned out really well.Corey: There's a lot to be said for pitching in and helping out with good causes in a way that your skill set winds up benefitting. I found that I was a lot happier with a lot of the volunteer stuff that I did when it was instead of licking envelopes, it started being things that I had a bit of proficiency in. “Hey, can I fix your AWS bill?” It turns out as some value to certain nonprofits. You have to be at a certain scale before it makes sense, otherwise it's just easier to maybe not do it that way, but there's a lot of value to doing something that puts good back into the world. I wish more people did that.Sheeri: Yeah. And it's something to do in your off-time that you know is helping. It might feel like work, it might not feel like work, but it gives you a sense of accomplishment at the end of the day. I remember my first job, one of the interview questions was—no, it wasn't. [laugh]. It wasn't an interview question until after I was hired and they asked me the question, and then they made it an interview question.And the question was, what video games do you play? And I said, “I don't play video games. I spend all day at work staring at a computer screen. Why would I go home and spend another 12 hours till three in the morning, right—five in the morning—playing video games?” And they were like, we clearly need to change our interview questions. This was again, back when the dinosaurs roamed the earth. So, people are are culturally sensitive now.Corey: These days, people ask me, “What's your favorite video game?” My answer is, “Twitter.”Sheeri: Right. [laugh]. Exactly. It's like whack-a-mole—Corey: Yeah.Sheeri: —you know? So, for me having a tangible hobby, like, I do a lot of art, I knit, I paint, I carve stamps, I spin wool into yarn. I know that's not a metaphor for storytelling. That is I literally spin wool into yarn. And having something tangible, you work on something and you're like, “Look. It was nothing and now it's this,” is so satisfying.Corey: I really want to thank you for taking the time to speak with me today about where you've been, where you are, and where you're going, and as well as helping me put a little bit more of a human angle on Twitter, which is intensely dehumanizing at times. It turns out that 280 characters is not the best way to express the entirety of what makes someone a person. You need to use a multi-tweet thread for that. If people want to learn more about you, where can they find you?Sheeri: Oh, they can find me on Twitter. I'm @sheeri—S-H-E-E-R-I—on Twitter. And I've started to write a little bit more on my blog at sheeri.org. So hopefully, I'll continue that since I've now told people to go there.Corey: I really want to thank you again for being so generous with your time. I appreciate it.Sheeri: Thanks to you, Corey, too. You take the time to interview people, too, so I appreciate it.Corey: I do my best. Sheeri Cabral, Senior Product Manager of ETL lineage at Collibra. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice or smash the like and subscribe buttons on the YouTubes, whereas if you've hated it, do exactly the same thing—like and subscribe, hit those buttons, five-star review—but also leave a ridiculous comment where we will then use an ETL pipeline to transform it into something that isn't complete bullshit.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

MacTalk·夜航西飞
Vol.014 冯大辉:万物之中,希望至美

MacTalk·夜航西飞

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 81:15


你好,欢迎来到 MacTalk·夜航西飞,我是老池。这期节目邀请到了我的老朋友,无码科技创始人、公众号小众消息作者冯大辉老师做客夜航西飞。冯大辉是一位非常早期的 blogger,2003 年就开始在自己的博客上写文章,后来在推特、微博、微信公众号亦有大量有价值的信息输出。他还是支付宝早期员工,花名西毒,支付宝首席 DBA,2016 年创建无码科技,希望构建一款医疗操作系统,改进医疗领域信息不对称问题。无码科技目前最重要的产品是“就诊问问”。就诊问问既是一款基于语音的医疗问答应用,也是一款医疗搜索工具,还是一款医疗和健康的数据库。由于冯老师在网络世界里言辞锋利,直指人心,有时候会有争议,再加上他是东北人,很多人会认为他是一个非常犀利的东北大汉。但现实世界里的 Fenng 是非常温和的,外表忠厚,内心……也同样忠厚。今天我就和冯老师一起聊聊互联网现状、写作与分享、信息处理,以及他独特的成长和创业故事。收听提示

Smoke Screen
Smoke Screen Podcast Presents “Keep The Sand” ft. Dr. Trenessa L. Williams, MBA, DBA

Smoke Screen

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 77:06


On today's episode of Smoke Screen Podcast we have Dr. Trenessa Williams, MBA, DBA. Dr. Williams is the PROUD Owner of Kizzy's Books & More. Kizzy's Books & More is an online bookstore that meets all readers needs. Enjoy as Dr. Williams talks about her journey through FAMU, Entrepreneurship, and of course Kizzy's Books & More. You can visit Dr. William's Bookstore at: https://kizzysbooksandmore.indiecommerce.com Thank you to our Sponsor: Creative Designs N More: Tik Tok: https://www.tiktok.com/@seewandab OR Visit Wanda on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/creativedesignsnmore2/ Make sure you Like Share & Subscribe

DBAOCM Podcast
EP463 - Qual a melhor área? Desenvolvedor ou DBA?

DBAOCM Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2022 10:12


EP463 - Qual a melhor área? Desenvolvedor ou DBA?   Entre no nosso canal do Telegram para receber conteúdos Exclusivos sobre Banco de dados Oracle:   https://t.me/joinchat/AAAAAEb7ufK-90djaVuR4Q

DBAOCM Podcast
EP459 - Tem limite de idade para ser um DBA?

DBAOCM Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 8:02


EP459 - Tem limite de idade para ser um DBA?   Entre no nosso canal do Telegram para receber conteúdos Exclusivos sobre Banco de dados Oracle:   https://t.me/joinchat/AAAAAEb7ufK-90djaVuR4Q

Who's On Content?!
Writer & Advocate, Jazzmyne Jay on the content of unity and why she hates the words, “Body Positivity”

Who's On Content?!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 22:53


DBA talent, writer and advocate, Jazzmyne Jay discusses how she challenges in the spirit of unity through her content and platforms, while hoping to change the narrative around diversity needs in order to create truly inspiring content.  Social Handles  Host: @iamejjames Guest: @jazzmynejay Show: whosoncontent | @therealdba   Produced by Dear Media.

Vitality Health Show
JENNILYN PRIOR: Struggle, Striving, and Soul Stretching Dreams

Vitality Health Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 60:00


Jennilyn Prior was born on April 26, 1974 in Springville, UT. She was raised on a dairy farm and has fond memories of her childhood upbringing. She currently resides in Provo, and her greatest joy in life is being the mother of four beautiful children. Jennilyn is a certified yoga instructor and has taught yoga and meditation for over two decades. She especially enjoys teaching Christ-centered meditation for those of her faith. She loves working with people of all walks of life and has extensive leadership experience in several corporations and organizations, including as a Nu Skin Training manager, Platinum Executive at Zija international, Founder and President of the Soaring with Hope Foundation, and Founder of the Sister Angel program DBA under TURN community services, and one of the Founders of Get REAL Foundation. She is passionate about creating art that inspires others. Her artwork has been displayed in local galleries, Broke Restaurant, the Provo Library Gallery, bookstores, and currently in the James E. Talmage building on the Brigham Young University, Provo campus. She furthering her artistic talent by currently attending Beaux Arts academy (rated as one of the top five art schools in the nation by Blue Review Magazine), where she is privileged to learn from renowned artists and sculptors. Jennilyn was chosen as the 2011 AMI Utah Valley Young Mother of the year. She is an avid speaker for women and loves teaching play, creativity, life balance, delighting in daily duties, discovering our divine purpose, and finding joy in the journey.

Empowered to Grow
Ep. 126 - Unchartered Discussions - Soha El Baklawy

Empowered to Grow

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 29:41


The conversation with Soha El Baklawy continues to unchartered waters...Analyzing the entrepreneurial mindset. Explaining how to increase your productivity and achieve work-life balance Soha El Baklawy is a Business Mentor, A Trainer, A mindset and self-educator, A Change Maker, A Startup and Strategy consultant. TIAW board member, Startup Grind Chapter director, Founder & CEO of Businessita. A DBA holder, passionate about Women Empowerment and finally a Top 50 influential women in Egypt for 2022. Don't forget to subscribe, rate, and of course SHARE! And above all, reflect and enjoy!

Voice of the DBA
Better Communication of Information

Voice of the DBA

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 2:43


Many of us work with data in some way that helps a customer better understand data, use it to make a decision, or support a some conclusion. The way we present data (or help others present data) can impact how well a consumer understands the information represented by the data. There are people whose job it is to design visualizations and ensure the final product communicates well, but often I find a developer or DBA is the person that gets asked for help. What do we recommend when looking at a set of data and deciding how to format it? A few posts I saw recently help with decisions (when should I use a map) or basic knowledge (what is a square chart). I've seen presentations that help me understand the impact of my decisions and how to better design my informative reports for more people. In fact, I hope more people produce content on how and why they have built reports. It's helpful for many of us that would like to do a better job. Read the rest of Better Communication of Information

The Tech Addicts Podcast
Tech Addicts Podcast - Sunday 19th June - S22 FE Cancelled

The Tech Addicts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 105:20


With Gareth Myles and Ted SalmonJoin us on Mewe RSS Link: https://techaddicts.libsyn.com/rss Direct Download iTunes | Google Podcasts | Stitcher | Tunein | Spotify  Amazon | Pocket Casts | Castbox | PodHubUK   Feedback and Contributions Martyn Dix Just a quick note Ted to say how much I'm enjoying your Tech Addicts podcasts with the Irish fella :-) 2+ hours is perfectly fine with me. Thanks. -------------- Harkback Special! Matt Jones on Raleigh Vektar Another great walk down memory lane. Thanks! I was recently reminded of the Vektar when the owner of my local childhood bike shop passed away and this old photo was shared. If you look in the window on the right you can see a shiny new Vektar, along with promotional graphics. I remember this vividly as I spent many an hour with my nose pressed up against the window lusting after it! 13 year olds like me had just been introduced to an 8-bit Trans Am (Knight Rider), Motorcycles (Street Hawk) and Helicopters (Airwolf) so when they told us about a computerised bike, we didn't think they meant a cheap radio and a siren! We were young and naive enough to think we were getting AI and self driving ability! As soon as we learned it couldn't talk, and you still had to pedal it we soon lost interest, and I think the spoilt brats that got them for Christmas were all gravely disappointed! ------------------ Ian Barton on Google Might Be Going To Scupper Ad blockers -------------------- Jeremy Harpham on the Sony Neckband SRS-NB10 bluetooth headset I was getting ear troubles with continued use of in-ear or over ear headphones on too many Teams/Zoom calls. Like many, my working world has reversed since the pandemic. Instead of 80% office I'm now 80% home. This headset would not make sense in an office environment. Comfort - Superb. All day wearable to an extent that you don't notice it. Sound quality - fabulous for listening to voice calls, podcasts, casual radio listening. Don't bother if for music. Call clarity is excellent. Does pick up louder background noise. Battery life is a full 5 days working-week (so 40 hours?). And USB-C charging too with quick top-up. Couple of hours for a full charge. Build quality is typical Sony, so great. Bluetooth never drops. Multipoint to 2 devices. Exceeded my expectations and is definitely now my main device for work calls. Excellent value for money. --------------------- Logitech MX Master 3 Mouse  Ted's new monitor… MSI Optix AG321CQR Curved Gaming Monitor  Hardline on the hardware: Marshall widens the soundstage on its new home speaker lineup Ikea, Swedish House Mafia collab on beefy turntable for new fall collection Poco F4 Pro reportedly cancelled as more Poco F4 details are confirmed Anker 625 Solar Panel released with 100 W power output and USB-C port Anbernic RG353P is a retro gaming handheld that dual boots Android and Linux Motorola Razr 3's price leaks 1,149 Euros Apple fined for slowing down old iPhones Samsung is getting sued for predicting remaining battery life New report reaffirms Samsung Galaxy S22 FE cancellation rumours A cheaper Samsung Galaxy S21 FE 4G is coming with the Snapdragon 720G at the helm Three pay-as-you-go prices to rise by up to 250% for thousands of users ZTE Axon 40 Ultra goes global, sales begin on June 21 - Specs Samsung Galaxy Xcover6 Pro - Full phone specifications Xiaomi Book S 12.4 Photo Leaks Flap your trap about an App: Last chance to browse using Microsoft's Internet Explorer is this week Samsung launches Samsung Wallet, a one-stop shop to manage your digital identity Microsoft Defender brings online and local protection to all platforms Vivaldi launches its own email client with integrated calendar and RSS reader Windows 11 'Restore Apps' feature will make it easier to set up new PCs Microsoft leaks Windows 11 23H2 desktop app folders feature ChromeOS News Chrome OS will mimic Windows 11 with Partial Split Chromebook windows Chrome OS could let you split your screen in different ways Simple Notepad Extension for Chrome The killer calendar app your Chromebook's been missing - Business Calendar 2 Hark Back:  The Royal Silver Reed Portable Typewriter  Bargain Basement: Best UK deals and tech on sale we have spotted Microsoft 365 Personal 15 Months subscription - Was: £139.99 Now: £39.99 Samsung Galaxy Z Flip3 5G Smartphone Sim Free Android Folding phone 128GB Black (UK Version) £599 down from £949 AKG Pro Audio Ara Professional USB-C Condenser Microphone - Now £74.60 Was: £99.00 HUAWEI Sound Joy Portable Bluetooth Speaker £69.99 down from £129.99, 79 dBA @2 m Devialet Quad Speakers, 26 Hour Playback, Shake Stereo Link Up, Spruce Green Nokia XR20 £100 off, now £299 - beware this is the 64GB/4GB not 128GB/6GB   Main Show URL: http://www.techaddicts.uk | PodHubUK Contact:: gareth@techaddicts.uk | @techaddictsuk Gareth - @garethmyles | garethmyles.com | Gareth's Ko-Fi Ted - tedsalmon.com | Ted's PayPal | Ted's Amazon | tedsalmon@post.com YouTube: Tech Addicts

Artrepreneurs
Do you need a DBA for your Sole Proprietorship business?

Artrepreneurs

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 8:37


EP 77:  DBA's, also known as Doing Business As, can be a brand-building decision for your business, but is it all that it's cracked up to be?  What is it and why do people get them?  Support the show

The Contractor Fight with Tom Reber
TCF602: Contractor Q&A: “What is the Easiest Way to Get Work?”

The Contractor Fight with Tom Reber

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 23:20


Tom answers your questions about the 50% GP rule, charging labor costs, the breakeven point of new locations, applying Shin Fu principles to commercial business, hiring, advice on getting contractor licenses, and more.   In this episode, we talk about…  Question1: What's the easiest and fastest way to pass the builders test and get work? The easiest way to pass the test is to study to put in the work If you're looking for an easy button, you're not cut out on your business.   Question2: According to commercial sense, you cannot apply Shin Fu teachings. You submit the bid to 50 to 70% GP and hope they choose you. What is your take on this? They can be used once relationships have been established.  You should not just submit bids as there is nothing unique about it — there is no positioning and branding etc   Question3: How do I deal with trolls who just want to knock your work or tell them you're doing it all wrong on social media?  Don't care about people ripping on your work. Build your brand, create content, be the publisher, be the editor, be the educator   Question4: What is the key difference between LLC and DBA. And what should we choose when starting our business depending on trade? Hire a CPA and an attorney Do not be a sole proprietorship because you are not protected.    Resources:  Submit your questions to help@thecontractorfight.com with the subject “Podcast” and Tom and Dan will try to answer them on an upcoming show.   Visit our sponsors of this episode, NiceJob. NiceJob is Reputation Marketing software that will help your business collect 2-3 times more reviews on Google, Facebook, and the platforms that matter. Don't forget to use code “Fight” for $50 off the first month on new accounts! https://www.TheContractorFight.com/nicejob    Are you stealing money from your family because you aren't charging enough for your services? Discover what you SHOULD be charging. Download our 50% Gross Profit cheat sheet: https://thecontractorfight.com/50   == Join us in BATTLEGROUND == Everything your contracting business needs in one comprehensive program with three main focus areas: Leadership, Communication, and Numbers. For more info check out: https://TheContractorFight.com/Battleground    == Order your free copy of Tom's book Winning the Contractor Fight (Just pay to ship) == https://thecontractorfight.com/book    == Grab the Gear == https://gear.thecontractorfight.com/    == Find Us on Social Media == YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TomReber  Instagram: https://thecontractorfight.com/ig

Empowered to Grow
125 - Soha El Baklawy – The healing process never ends

Empowered to Grow

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 19:48


Chatting with Soha El Baklawy brings up a lot of good vibes and commitment of oneself and others. Analyzing wellbeing and balance. Explaining women's empowerment and why hardships can be a blessing in disguise Soha El Baklawy is a Business Mentor, A Trainer, A mindset and self-educator, A Change Maker, A Startup and Strategy consultant. TIAW board member, Startup Grind Chapter director, Founder & CEO of Businessita. A DBA holder, passionate about Women Empowerment and finally a Top 50 influential women in Egypt for 2022. Don't forget to subscribe, rate, and of course SHARE! And above all, reflect and enjoy!

Personal Injury Marketing Mastermind
126. Brett Sachs, MVP Accident Attorneys - Crushing a Rebrand: Seamless Intake, Authentic Social, and Core Value Guidance

Personal Injury Marketing Mastermind

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 37:01


Brett Sachs, founder at MVP Accident Attorneys, has evaluated thousands of personal injury cases, and recovered millions for his clients. But to win cases - you have to have the right clients. Brett is an expert in human connection and emphasizes the importance of a successful intake system to grow a firm. Named a National Trial Lawyers Top 40 under 40, Brett wanted to build a firm larger than the founders. Guided by core values - and a touch of personality - he successfully rebranded Sachs Law to MVP Accident Attorneys. Today Mike and I caught up to discuss how to build streamlined intake systems, how to rebrand for the most impact, and how commitment to core values drives business. What's in This Episode? Who is Brett Sachs? How can firms use DBA for a stronger brand? How can firms create a successful intake program that generates more clients? Where did Brett find inspiration for the Sachs Law rebrand? How has shifting brand positioning from Sachs Law to MVP Accident Attorneys empowered the firm to be bigger than the founders? How can a firm maintain personal connections to clients at scale? How can core values guide a firm to success?

LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast
What's In A Name?

LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 14:09 Transcription Available


In this episode, Hardin answers an audience question and explains how he chose the name for his business.This episode is brought to you by:www.madeindena.comFor more information about LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast, visit:www.lifeofaboss.netClick to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast on Apple Podcasts:https://podcasts.apple.com/.../life-of-a.../id1587842889Click to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast on Spotify:https://open.spotify.com/show/4sw9u9v5nZSYgg5wb115p6For more places to listen to LIFE OF A BOSS The Podcast:https://lifeofaboss.buzzsprout.com/To browse and purchase official gear, visit:www.hardwayenterprise.com/bossshop Support the show

2.5 Admins
2.5 Admins 92: End to End to End

2.5 Admins

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 29:24


End-to-end encryption is under threat again, Broadcom is buying VMware, prison time for an angry DBA, and backing up your photos with encryption.   Plugs Evaluating FreeBSD-CURRENT for Production Use BSDCan 2022 – Online June 1-4th Support us on patreon   News “War upon end-to-end encryption”: EU wants Big Tech to scan private messages Broadcom […]

Skydeck
Bidding Up

Skydeck

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 22:01


2022 Alumni Achievement Award recipient Bob Wilson (MBA 1961, DBA 1963) on his journey from Depression-era Nebraska to a 2020 Nobel Prize

The Cloudcast
Scalable, Serverless Database Platforms

The Cloudcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 40:29


Sam Lambert (@isamlambert, CEO @PlanetScaledata) talks about building a cloud-native SQL database from first principles, and how to eliminate the things people hate about database operations. This is cool stuff! SHOW: 620CLOUD NEWS OF THE WEEK - http://bit.ly/cloudcast-cnotwCHECK OUT OUR NEW PODCAST - "CLOUDCAST BASICS"SHOW SPONSORS:CloudZero - Cloud Cost Intelligence for Engineering TeamsNew Relic (homepage)Services down? New Relic offers full stack visibility with 16 different monitoring products in a single platform.Spot by NetAppMore Cloud, Less Cost (Spot by NetApp)SHOW NOTES:PlanetScale - The Databases for DevelopersVitess - open source databasePlanetScale Rewind - Zero Downtime RevertsTopic 1 - Welcome to the show. In less than 10 years, you've had quite a career rise from “MySQL DBA” to some very high-profile roles. Tell us a little bit about your background, and where you focus now as CEO of PlanetScale. Topic 2 - There have been an explosion of “Internet-scale” databases over the last 5 years. Where is the market today for these technologies?  Topic 3 - Scaling databases is difficult. Scaling them while still allowing compatibility with known skills is even harder. PlanetScale builds upon a project called Vitess.  Walk us through the journey of how Vitress got started to where it is today. Topic 4 - What do developers want to know about databases? What do they wish they could ignore or not worry about?  Topic 5 -  In today's world, what's the right balance between what developers want and what's needed under the covers (e.g. Ops, scaling, security, etc.) to make sure the data is always available? What are some of the quantum leaps that PlanetScale has taken to eliminate previous problems? Topic 6 - What are some (customer) examples of things that PlanetScale does now that you wish you had in your previous DBA roles? FEEDBACK?Email: show at the cloudcast dot netTwitter: @thecloudcastnet