Podcast appearances and mentions of andrew huberman

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  • 124PODCASTS
  • 183EPISODES
  • 1h 6mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 29, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about andrew huberman

Latest podcast episodes about andrew huberman

Mark Bell's Power Project
MBPP EP. 631 - The Danger of Porn Addiction Pt. 2

Mark Bell's Power Project

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 80:10


Today we are following up on our conversation with Andrew Huberman about Porn Addiction. We received a ton of feedback from many men admitting their struggles with porn and even some women telling us how their husbands are addicted to porn. These issues can range from erectile disfunction to divorce. This is a much more serious issue than most of us had assumed or want to admit. Conversation with Andrew Huberman about Porn Addition: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X7RMGUl_zSc&t=6s Conversation with Anna Lembke about Porn Addiction: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-3rXfuRA-gQ&t=23s Special perks for our listeners below! ➢Vertical Diet Meals: https://verticaldiet.com/ Use code POWERPROJECT for free shipping and two free meals + a Kooler Sport when you order 16 meals or more! ➢Vuori Performance Apparel: Visit https://vuoriclothing.com/powerproject to automatically save 20% off your first order! ➢Magic Spoon Cereal: Visit https://www.magicspoon.com/powerproject to automatically save $5 off a variety pack! ➢8 Sleep: Visit https://www.eightsleep.com/powerproject to automatically save $150 off the Pod Pro! ➢Marek Health: https://marekhealth.com Use code POWERPROJECT15 for 15% off ALL LABS! Also check out the Power Project Panel: https://marekhealth.com/powerproject Use code POWERPROJECT for $101 off! ➢LMNT Electrolytes: http://drinklmnt.com/powerproject ➢Piedmontese Beef: https://www.piedmontese.com/ Use Code "POWERPROJECT" at checkout for 25% off your order plus FREE 2-Day Shipping on orders of $150 Subscribe to the Podcast on on Platforms! ➢ https://lnk.to/PowerProjectPodcast Subscribe to the Power Project Newsletter! ➢ https://bit.ly/2JvmXMb Follow Mark Bell's Power Project Podcast ➢ Insta: https://www.instagram.com/markbellspowerproject ➢ https://www.facebook.com/markbellspowerproject ➢ Twitter: https://twitter.com/mbpowerproject ➢ LinkedIn:https://www.linkedin.com/in/powerproject/ ➢ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/markbellspowerproject ➢TikTok: http://bit.ly/pptiktok FOLLOW Mark Bell ➢ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/marksmellybell ➢ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MarkBellSuperTraining ➢ Twitter: https://twitter.com/marksmellybell ➢ Snapchat: marksmellybell ➢Mark Bell's Daily Workouts, Nutrition and More: https://www.markbell.com/ Follow Nsima Inyang ➢ https://www.breakthebar.com/learn-more ➢YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/NsimaInyang ➢Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nsimainyang/?hl=en ➢TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@nsimayinyang?lang=en Follow Andrew Zaragoza on all platforms ➢ https://direct.me/iamandrewz #PowerProject #Podcast #MarkBell

Woke & Wired - Expanded Consciousness and Entrepreneurship
178. Sleep is A Skill – MOLLIE MCGLOCKLIN

Woke & Wired - Expanded Consciousness and Entrepreneurship

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 77:45


Mollie McGlocklin the host of The Sleep Is A Skill Podcast and the creator of Sleep Is A Skill, a company that optimizes people's sleep through a unique blend of technology, accountability, and behavioral change. After navigating insomnia while traveling internationally, she created what she couldn't find - a place to go to learn the skill set of sleep. Knowing the difference between a life with sleep and without, she's now dedicated her life to sharing the forgotten skill set of sleep. We discuss:  How does sleep affect our health? Why sleep is an important skill set for the modern society  How hormones are impacted by your quality of sleep The impacts of sleep deprivation How optimizing your sleep can contribute to your mental health What is chronobiology and circadian rhythm entrainment?  Why sun exposure first thing in the morning and at sunset important  Why creating a consistent sleep schedule is important  Practical tips to understanding and optimizing how you sleep  What are some of the most helpful sleep gadgets on the market? What is social jet lag, and how do we prevent it? Can creative bouts co-exist with healthy sleep?  Anticipatory anxiety and sleep  The kind of content that can interfere with your sleep and how to be mindful of what you consume before bed  Positive psychology and sleep Sleep ritual idea for couples What to do if it's time to go to bed and you can't get sleepy The shocking truth about mealtime and sleep Sleep rituals  How “gratitude emails” became Mollie's longest standing daily ritual  What it's like to get engaged at Amangiri in Utah The non-sleep deep rest protocol (NSDR) from Andrew Huberman that changes everything Mollie walks us through her morning and nighttime routines Top biohacks for sleep Related episodes: 177, 169, 161, 42,  Resources:  Ksenia on Sleep Is A Skill Podcast, episode 5 Motion activated red night lights Auto on/off red night lights Connect with Mollie:  Website: Sleep Is A Skill Connect with Ksenia:  kseniabrief.com Ksenia's email list Instagram @ksenia.brief YouTube Ksenia Brief TikTok @ksenia.brief Subscribe, rate and review the podcast on Apple Podcasts Follow the podcast on Spotify

The Story Box
Dr Andrew Huberman Unboxing Special | Drug Side Effects To Your Brain and Neuroplasticity

The Story Box

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 67:33


The Huberman Lab Podcast, hosted by Dr. Andrew Huberman, discusses neuroscience—how our brain and its connections with the organs of our body control our perceptions, our behaviors, and our health. The podcast also discusses tools for measuring and changing how our nervous system works.Dr. Andrew Huberman is a tenured professor of neurobiology and ophthalmology at Stanford University School of Medicine. His laboratory studies neural regeneration, neuroplasticity, and brain states such as stress, focus, fear, and optimal performance. For more than 20 years, Dr. Huberman has consistently published original research findings and review articles in top-level peer-reviewed journals, including Nature, Cell, Neuron, and Current Biology. He is a regular member of several National Institutes of Health review panels and a Fellow of the McKnight Foundation and the Pew Charitable Trusts. Dr. Huberman regularly consults for technology development companies, professional athletic organizations, and various units of the United States and Canadian Special Operations.Follow The Story Box on Social Media► INSTAGRAM ► TWITTER ► FACEBOOK ► WEBSITE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE! ► Apple Podcast ► Spotify WATCH HERE:► YouTube If you enjoyed this episode please subscribe to YouTube & Apple Podcasts, and leave a 5-star positive rating and review over on Apple Podcasts. Share it around with your friends and family.Support The Show Here:Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/thestorybox. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

My First Million
Dr. Andrew Huberman's Path to Fame, Money, and Total Human Optimization

My First Million

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 105:44


Dr. Andrew Huberman, Professor and Neuroscientist at Stanford University and host of the Huberman Lab podcast, joins MFM hosts Shaan Puri (@ShaanVP) and Sam Parr (@theSamParr) to talk about how he's been able to create a top 10 podcast in less than a year, his morning routine, the diet and fitness trends where he calls BS, and much more.  _____ * Do you love MFM and want to see Sam and Shaan's smiling faces? Subscribe to our Youtube channel. * Want more insights like MFM? Check out Shaan's newsletter. _____ Show Notes: (00:21) - A brief introduction to Dr. Andrew Huberman (02:40) - Dr. Huberman's punk rock background (16:47) - Dr. Huberman's mission statement (24:07) - Why he continues to be a professor even with a very lucrative podcast (29:12) - His morning routine (44:17) - The three easy things you can do to most improve your health and focus (59:45) - What Dr. Huberman is bad at (01:02:09) - The health fads that Dr. Huberman disagrees with (01:12:17) - Dr. Huberman's drugs of choice (01:32:00) - Whether being famous is enjoyable or not _____ Links: * Huberman Lab * Cal Newport books including Deep Work and So Good They Can't Ignore You

Monday Mindset
How to Improve Your Focus

Monday Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 30:54


Episode #75 Are you easily distracted? Do you struggle to focus on tasks? How’s your time management? In this week’s episode, Daisy shares an episode from Andrew Huberman’s podcast Huberman Lab - ADHD and How Anyone Can Improve Their Focus - and talks about possible ways to help improve these things. https://hubermanlab.com/adhd-and-how-anyone-can-improve-their-focus/ Please consider helping us make more episodes by supporting Daisy on Patreon. https://bit.ly/MondayMindsetPatreon If you have enjoyed listening to this episode, please leave us a review on iTunes or whichever platform you listen on. It really helps new people hear about the podcast. Connect with and follow us on Facebook, Instagram and YouTube: https://bit.ly/MondayMindsetFB https://bit.ly/MondayMindsetIG https://bit.ly/MondayMindsetYT

The Story Box
Dr Amishi Jha Unboxing | How To Own Your Attention & Avoid Distraction

The Story Box

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 48:15


Dr. Amishi Jha is a professor of psychology at the University of Miami. She serves as the Director of Contemplative Neuroscience for the Mindfulness Research and Practice Initiative, which she co-founded in 2010. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California–Davis and postdoctoral training at the Brain Imaging and Analysis Center at Duke University. Dr. Jha's work has been featured at NATO, the World Economic Forum, and The Pentagon. She has received coverage in The New York Times, NPR, TIME, Forbes, and more.Her new book 'Peak Mind' Buy it here: Connect with Dr Jha Here: Other resources: Andrew Huberman x The Story Box Follow The Story Box on Social Media► INSTAGRAM ► TWITTER ► FACEBOOK ► WEBSITE SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE! ► Apple Podcast ► Spotify WATCH HERE:► YouTube If you enjoyed this episode please subscribe to YouTube & Apple Podcasts, and leave a 5-star positive rating and review over on Apple Podcasts. Share it around with your friends and family.Support The Show Here:Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/thestorybox. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Model Health Show
TMHS 524: How Time Restricted Eating Transforms Your Brain & Biology - With Dr. Andrew Huberman

The Model Health Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 70:34


Emerging science shows a strong connection between our brains and our gut, or the gut-brain axis. While you might think that these two organs have very different structures and functions, they actually have more in common than you'd think. The gut and the brain are connected by the vagus nerve and neurotransmitters, and our gut microbes can even communicate with our brains.  When it comes to brain function and the science behind the gut-brain connection, Dr. Andrew Huberman is one of the world's foremost experts. Dr. Huberman is a highly-regarded neuroscientist and tenured professor at the Stanford University School of Medicine. He is the director of Huberman Lab at Stanford, and the host of the Huberman Lab Podcast.  In part two of this interview series, Dr. Huberman is sharing his expertise on the numerous benefits that fasting can have on the brain and the neurobiology behind overeating, hyper-palatable foods, and obesity. You're also going to learn about the gut-brain axis, the glymphatic system, and the role that stress plays in the brain, and so much more. Enjoy!  In this episode you'll discover: The many benefits of time-restricted feeding.  How fasting can create harmony in your brain's reward pathways. The ideal eating window for intermittent fasting. Why being inconsistent with fasting is like having jet lag. What you can learn from your own resistance.  How dopamine works.  What the gut-brain axis is, and how the neurons in those systems communicate. Why hidden sugars encourage overeating.  Three things you can do to improve your gut-brain axis.  What micro addictions are.  The benefits of eating 2-4 servings of low sugar fermented food per day. Why sleep and microbiome are two main pillars of health. How inflammation in the brain is unlike other types of inflammation. What the glymphatic system is and how to support it. The clinical definition of insomnia.  Why mouth breathing is detrimental to your well-being. The link between cortisol levels and immune health. How to determine the difference between short-term stress and long-term stress.  What a psychogenic fever is.  Items mentioned in this episode include: PaleoValley.com/model -- Use code MODEL for 15% off! Organifi.com/Model -- Use the coupon code MODEL for 20% off! Do These Things to Have More Energy with Dr. Andrew Huberman – Episode 523 Intermittent Fasting & The Principles of Stress with Ori Hofmekler – Episode 261 Breath by James Nestor Jaws: The Story of a Hidden Epidemic by Sandra Kahn & Paul R. Ehrlich  Connect with Dr. Andrew Huberman Podcast / Instagram  Join TMHS Facebook community - Model Nation  Be sure you are subscribed to this podcast to automatically receive your episodes:  Apple Podcasts Stitcher Spotify Soundcloud

Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes
Nutrients For Brain Health & Performance | Episode 42

Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 101:19


Huberman Lab Podcast Notes Key Takeaways Top three things that support nerve health in the short and long term: EPA, phosphatidylserine, cholineTo condition healthy food preferences: take something good for you, pair it with something that will increase blood sugar (not spike, but elevate slightly) for 7-10 days to rewire the dopamine reward systemFood impacts our brain and health but there's also a learned response to how our brain functions in response to foodsSome foods to enhance short and long term cognition: fish, blueberries, eggs, cottage cheese, cabbageThe goal is to get proper nutrients via food; use supplements as a backup as neededStart feeding window at least one hour after waking and end the window about 2-3 hours before sleepKeep feeding window consistent day to day without extreme shifts in either directionRead the full notes @ podcastnotes.orgThis episode I describe science-supported nutrients for brain and performance (cognition) and for nervous system health generally. I describe 10 tools for this purpose, including specific amounts and sources for Omega-3 fatty acids which make up the "structural fat" of neurons (nerve cells) and allow them to function across our lifespan. I also review data on creatine, phosphatidylserine, anthocyanins, choline, glutamine and how they each impact brain function in healthy people seeking to reinforce and improve their cognition and in those combatting cognitive decline. I describe both food-based and supplement-based sources for these compounds, and their effective dose ranges based on peer-reviewed literature. Then I review the 3 factors: gut-brain signaling, perceived taste, and learned associations that combine with the metabolic and blood-sugar-elevating effects of food to determine what foods we seek and prefer. Amazingly, it's not just about what tastes good to us. Next, I explore how we can leverage the neural circuits of learned food preference toward seeking and enjoying the right foods for brain health and performance. I also review new data on non-caloric sweeteners and why consuming them with glucose-elevating foods can be detrimental,  in some cases rapidly leading to insulin dysregulation. This episode covers more than 10 actionable tools for those seeking to improve and/or maintain brain function, and it explains modern neuroscience underlying of our sense of taste, our food seeking preferences and brain metabolism.   Thank you to our sponsors: ROKA - https://www.roka.com -- code: "huberman" InsideTracker - https://www.athleticgreens.com/huberman  Headspace - https://www.headspace.com/specialoffer    RETHINK EDUCATION: The Biology of Learning Featuring Dr. Andrew Huberman: https://youtu.be/Oo7hQapFe3M    Our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/andrewhuberman    Supplements from Thorne: http://www.thorne.com/u/huberman    Social: Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/hubermanlab  Twitter - https://twitter.com/hubermanlab  Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/hubermanlab Website - https://hubermanlab.com Newsletter - https://hubermanlab.com/neural-network    Links: Review on Anthocyanins & Cognition - https://www.mdpi.com/1420-3049/24/23/4255  Review on Creatine & Brain Health Studies - https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/13/2/586  Review on "Rethinking Food Reward" - www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-psych-122216-011643    Timestamps: 00:00:00 Food & Brain Function Introduction 00:02:08 Summary: Critical Aspects of Time Restricted Feeding/Fasting 00:04:19 Sponsors: ROKA, Athletic Greens, Headspace 00:08:24 Neuroplasticity Super Protocol (Zero-Cost Tools) Online 00:09:22 Eating to Enhance Brain Function & Foundational Aspects of Brain Health  00:13:00 Eating Fats for Brain Health, EFAs Phospholipids (Tool 1: 1-3g EPA Omega-3/day)  00:20:35 Phosphatidylserine (Tool 2: 300mg/day) 00:22:15 Choline, Egg Yolks (Tool 3: 1-2g/day Threshold) 00:28:26 Hydration & Electrolytes (Tool 4) 00:29:50 Liquid Fish Oil/Capsules (2-3g EPA per day; 300mg Alpha GPC 2-4X/week) 00:32:22 Creatine for Cognition (Tool 5: 5g/day)  00:36:28 Anthocyanins, Dark Skin Berries (Tool 6-10mg/day (Extract), 1-2 cups Berries)  00:41:19 L-Glutamine (Tool: 1-10g/day) & Offsetting Apnea & Inflammation 00:49:23 Neural Basis of Food Preference, Yum, Yuck, Meh; Taste, Guts, & Beliefs 00:55:25 Taste is 100% In your Head 00:59:50 Gut Neurons Controlling Food Preference: Neuropod Cells; (Tool 7: Fermented Foods)  01:06:14 Capsule Probiotics, Brain Fog  01:07:16 Learning to Like Specific Tastes: Sweetness & Brain Metabolism 01:12:11 Hard-Wiring & Soft-Wiring 01:13:25 Artificial & Non-Caloric Sweeteners: Safe or Harmful Depends on (Glucose) Context 01:18:15 Non-Caloric Sweetener & Insulin; (Tool 8: Don't Have w/Glucose Elevating Foods) 01:22:17 Beliefs & Thoughts; The Insula; (Tool 9: Pairing-Based Reshaping Food Preferences)  01:30:42 Liking Neuro-Healthy Foods & Bettering Brain Metabolism (Tool 10); Food Wars 01:36:05 Food Reward & Diabetes, Obesity; Important Review Article (See Caption) 01:38:28 Synthesis, Zero-Cost Support, Future Topic Suggestions, Sponsors, Supplements   Please note that The Huberman Lab Podcast is distinct from Dr. Huberman's teaching and research roles at Stanford University School of Medicine. The information provided in this show is not medical advice, nor should it be taken or applied as a replacement for medical advice. The Huberman Lab Podcast, its employees, guests and affiliates assume no liability for the application of the information discussed.   Title Card Photo Credit: Mike Blabac - https://www.blabacphoto.com 

Podcast Notes Playlist: Nutrition
Nutrients For Brain Health & Performance | Episode 42

Podcast Notes Playlist: Nutrition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 101:19


Huberman Lab Podcast Notes Key Takeaways Top three things that support nerve health in the short and long term: EPA, phosphatidylserine, cholineTo condition healthy food preferences: take something good for you, pair it with something that will increase blood sugar (not spike, but elevate slightly) for 7-10 days to rewire the dopamine reward systemFood impacts our brain and health but there's also a learned response to how our brain functions in response to foodsSome foods to enhance short and long term cognition: fish, blueberries, eggs, cottage cheese, cabbageThe goal is to get proper nutrients via food; use supplements as a backup as neededStart feeding window at least one hour after waking and end the window about 2-3 hours before sleepKeep feeding window consistent day to day without extreme shifts in either directionRead the full notes @ podcastnotes.orgThis episode I describe science-supported nutrients for brain and performance (cognition) and for nervous system health generally. I describe 10 tools for this purpose, including specific amounts and sources for Omega-3 fatty acids which make up the "structural fat" of neurons (nerve cells) and allow them to function across our lifespan. I also review data on creatine, phosphatidylserine, anthocyanins, choline, glutamine and how they each impact brain function in healthy people seeking to reinforce and improve their cognition and in those combatting cognitive decline. I describe both food-based and supplement-based sources for these compounds, and their effective dose ranges based on peer-reviewed literature. Then I review the 3 factors: gut-brain signaling, perceived taste, and learned associations that combine with the metabolic and blood-sugar-elevating effects of food to determine what foods we seek and prefer. Amazingly, it's not just about what tastes good to us. Next, I explore how we can leverage the neural circuits of learned food preference toward seeking and enjoying the right foods for brain health and performance. I also review new data on non-caloric sweeteners and why consuming them with glucose-elevating foods can be detrimental,  in some cases rapidly leading to insulin dysregulation. This episode covers more than 10 actionable tools for those seeking to improve and/or maintain brain function, and it explains modern neuroscience underlying of our sense of taste, our food seeking preferences and brain metabolism.   Thank you to our sponsors: ROKA - https://www.roka.com -- code: "huberman" InsideTracker - https://www.insidetracker.com/huberman Headspace - https://www.headspace.com/specialoffer    RETHINK EDUCATION: The Biology of Learning Featuring Dr. Andrew Huberman: https://youtu.be/Oo7hQapFe3M    Our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/andrewhuberman    Supplements from Thorne: http://www.thorne.com/u/huberman    Social: Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/hubermanlab  Twitter - https://twitter.com/hubermanlab  Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/hubermanlab Website - https://hubermanlab.com Newsletter - https://hubermanlab.com/neural-network    Links: Review on Anthocyanins & Cognition - https://www.mdpi.com/1420-3049/24/23/4255  Review on Creatine & Brain Health Studies - https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/13/2/586  Review on "Rethinking Food Reward" - www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-psych-122216-011643    Timestamps: 00:00:00 Food & Brain Function Introduction 00:02:08 Summary: Critical Aspects of Time Restricted Feeding/Fasting 00:04:19 Sponsors: ROKA, Athletic Greens, Headspace 00:08:24 Neuroplasticity Super Protocol (Zero-Cost Tools) Online 00:09:22 Eating to Enhance Brain Function & Foundational Aspects of Brain Health  00:13:00 Eating Fats for Brain Health, EFAs Phospholipids (Tool 1: 1-3g EPA Omega-3/day)  00:20:35 Phosphatidylserine (Tool 2: 300mg/day) 00:22:15 Choline, Egg Yolks (Tool 3: 1-2g/day Threshold) 00:28:26 Hydration & Electrolytes (Tool 4) 00:29:50 Liquid Fish Oil/Capsules (2-3g EPA per day; 300mg Alpha GPC 2-4X/week) 00:32:22 Creatine for Cognition (Tool 5: 5g/day)  00:36:28 Anthocyanins, Dark Skin Berries (Tool 6-10mg/day (Extract), 1-2 cups Berries)  00:41:19 L-Glutamine (Tool: 1-10g/day) & Offsetting Apnea & Inflammation 00:49:23 Neural Basis of Food Preference, Yum, Yuck, Meh; Taste, Guts, & Beliefs 00:55:25 Taste is 100% In your Head 00:59:50 Gut Neurons Controlling Food Preference: Neuropod Cells; (Tool 7: Fermented Foods)  01:06:14 Capsule Probiotics, Brain Fog  01:07:16 Learning to Like Specific Tastes: Sweetness & Brain Metabolism 01:12:11 Hard-Wiring & Soft-Wiring 01:13:25 Artificial & Non-Caloric Sweeteners: Safe or Harmful Depends on (Glucose) Context 01:18:15 Non-Caloric Sweetener & Insulin; (Tool 8: Don't Have w/Glucose Elevating Foods) 01:22:17 Beliefs & Thoughts; The Insula; (Tool 9: Pairing-Based Reshaping Food Preferences)  01:30:42 Liking Neuro-Healthy Foods & Bettering Brain Metabolism (Tool 10); Food Wars 01:36:05 Food Reward & Diabetes, Obesity; Important Review Article (See Caption) 01:38:28 Synthesis, Zero-Cost Support, Future Topic Suggestions, Sponsors, Supplements   Please note that The Huberman Lab Podcast is distinct from Dr. Huberman's teaching and research roles at Stanford University School of Medicine. The information provided in this show is not medical advice, nor should it be taken or applied as a replacement for medical advice. The Huberman Lab Podcast, its employees, guests and affiliates assume no liability for the application of the information discussed.   Title Card Photo Credit: Mike Blabac - https://www.blabacphoto.com 

The Model Health Show
TMHS 523: Do These Things To Have More Energy During The Day & Sleep Better At Night - With Dr. Andrew Huberman

The Model Health Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 77:58


The human brain is one of the most unique, powerful, and adaptive objects in the known universe. Up until a few decades ago, researchers believed that changes in the brain could only develop throughout infancy and childhood. We now know that no matter what age you are, your incredible brain is capable of change, creating new connections, and rewiring its pathways.  Dr. Andrew Huberman is a brilliant neuroscientist and tenured professor at the Stanford University School of Medicine. As the director of Huberman Lab at Stanford, he is a true expert on brain development, function, and plasticity. In part one of this interview series, Dr. Huberman is sharing incredible insights on upgrading your brain through sunlight exposure, cold therapy, and breathing techniques.  You're going to learn the science behind how the brain is constantly adapting to its environment, and what you can do to set your brain up for success. These clinically proven strategies for upgrading your brain are free, simple, and accessible to everyone. So listen in, take good notes, and enjoy the show!  In this episode you'll discover: How the brain is unlike any other organ in the body.  What neuroplasticity is.  The conditions that determine whether stress is good or bad for us. How the mind and the body respond to stress.   What you need to know about adrenaline and epinephrine.  How cortisol levels cycle throughout the day.  The importance of taking in morning sunlight.  Three main practices you can implement to anchor your stress response system. What ICU psychosis is.  How to optimize the time you spend on social media.  Why associating positive thoughts with behaviors can change your stress response.  Two simple tools you can use when you feel stressed.  The physiological similarities between deep breathing and exercise. How cold water impacts dopamine levels.  Which foundational movement is associated with brain and body longevity. How to work with your brain's reward system.  Items mentioned in this episode include: PaleoValley.com/model -- Use code MODEL for 15% off! Organifi.com/Model --Use the coupon code MODEL for 20% off! The Circadian Code with Satchin Panda, PhD Connect with Dr. Andrew Huberman Podcast / Instagram  Join TMHS Facebook community - Model Nation  Be sure you are subscribed to this podcast to automatically receive your episodes:  Apple Podcasts Stitcher Spotify Soundcloud

Huberman Lab
Nutrients For Brain Health & Performance | Episode 42

Huberman Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 101:19


This episode I describe science-supported nutrients for brain and performance (cognition) and for nervous system health generally. I describe 10 tools for this purpose, including specific amounts and sources for Omega-3 fatty acids which make up the "structural fat" of neurons (nerve cells) and allow them to function across our lifespan. I also review data on creatine, phosphatidylserine, anthocyanins, choline, glutamine and how they each impact brain function in healthy people seeking to reinforce and improve their cognition and in those combatting cognitive decline. I describe both food-based and supplement-based sources for these compounds, and their effective dose ranges based on peer-reviewed literature. Then I review the 3 factors: gut-brain signaling, perceived taste, and learned associations that combine with the metabolic and blood-sugar-elevating effects of food to determine what foods we seek and prefer. Amazingly, it's not just about what tastes good to us. Next, I explore how we can leverage the neural circuits of learned food preference toward seeking and enjoying the right foods for brain health and performance. I also review new data on non-caloric sweeteners and why consuming them with glucose-elevating foods can be detrimental,  in some cases rapidly leading to insulin dysregulation. This episode covers more than 10 actionable tools for those seeking to improve and/or maintain brain function, and it explains modern neuroscience underlying of our sense of taste, our food seeking preferences and brain metabolism.   Thank you to our sponsors: ROKA - https://www.roka.com -- code: "huberman" InsideTracker - https://www.athleticgreens.com/huberman  Headspace - https://www.headspace.com/specialoffer    RETHINK EDUCATION: The Biology of Learning Featuring Dr. Andrew Huberman: https://youtu.be/Oo7hQapFe3M    Our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/andrewhuberman    Supplements from Thorne: http://www.thorne.com/u/huberman    Social: Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/hubermanlab  Twitter - https://twitter.com/hubermanlab  Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/hubermanlab Website - https://hubermanlab.com Newsletter - https://hubermanlab.com/neural-network    Links: Review on Anthocyanins & Cognition - https://www.mdpi.com/1420-3049/24/23/4255  Review on Creatine & Brain Health Studies - https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/13/2/586  Review on "Rethinking Food Reward" - www.annualreviews.org/doi/10.1146/annurev-psych-122216-011643    Timestamps: 00:00:00 Food & Brain Function Introduction 00:02:08 Summary: Critical Aspects of Time Restricted Feeding/Fasting 00:04:19 Sponsors: ROKA, Athletic Greens, Headspace 00:08:24 Neuroplasticity Super Protocol (Zero-Cost Tools) Online 00:09:22 Eating to Enhance Brain Function & Foundational Aspects of Brain Health  00:13:00 Eating Fats for Brain Health, EFAs Phospholipids (Tool 1: 1-3g EPA Omega-3/day)  00:20:35 Phosphatidylserine (Tool 2: 300mg/day) 00:22:15 Choline, Egg Yolks (Tool 3: 1-2g/day Threshold) 00:28:26 Hydration & Electrolytes (Tool 4) 00:29:50 Liquid Fish Oil/Capsules (2-3g EPA per day; 300mg Alpha GPC 2-4X/week) 00:32:22 Creatine for Cognition (Tool 5: 5g/day)  00:36:28 Anthocyanins, Dark Skin Berries (Tool 6-10mg/day (Extract), 1-2 cups Berries)  00:41:19 L-Glutamine (Tool: 1-10g/day) & Offsetting Apnea & Inflammation 00:49:23 Neural Basis of Food Preference, Yum, Yuck, Meh; Taste, Guts, & Beliefs 00:55:25 Taste is 100% In your Head 00:59:50 Gut Neurons Controlling Food Preference: Neuropod Cells; (Tool 7: Fermented Foods)  01:06:14 Capsule Probiotics, Brain Fog  01:07:16 Learning to Like Specific Tastes: Sweetness & Brain Metabolism 01:12:11 Hard-Wiring & Soft-Wiring 01:13:25 Artificial & Non-Caloric Sweeteners: Safe or Harmful Depends on (Glucose) Context 01:18:15 Non-Caloric Sweetener & Insulin; (Tool 8: Don't Have w/Glucose Elevating Foods) 01:22:17 Beliefs & Thoughts; The Insula; (Tool 9: Pairing-Based Reshaping Food Preferences)  01:30:42 Liking Neuro-Healthy Foods & Bettering Brain Metabolism (Tool 10); Food Wars 01:36:05 Food Reward & Diabetes, Obesity; Important Review Article (See Caption) 01:38:28 Synthesis, Zero-Cost Support, Future Topic Suggestions, Sponsors, Supplements   Please note that The Huberman Lab Podcast is distinct from Dr. Huberman's teaching and research roles at Stanford University School of Medicine. The information provided in this show is not medical advice, nor should it be taken or applied as a replacement for medical advice. The Huberman Lab Podcast, its employees, guests and affiliates assume no liability for the application of the information discussed.   Title Card Photo Credit: Mike Blabac - https://www.blabacphoto.com 

Monday Mindset
We Can Influence Our Dopamine Activity

Monday Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 39:00


Episode #74 In this week’s episode, Terri shares some insights from one of her geek-crushes, Andrew Huberman. She clarifies how we can help increase our dopamine responses without overdoing it from what she learned listening to the episode: Change Your BRAIN By Using These Hacks to Increase Your Dopamine l Dr. Andrew Huberman from one of her favorite podcasts, Impact Theory. https://impacttheory.libsyn.com/change-your-brain-by-using-these-hacks-to-increase-your-dopamine-dr-andrew-huberman Please consider helping us make more episodes by supporting Daisy on Patreon. https://bit.ly/MondayMindsetPatreon If you have enjoyed listening to this episode, please leave us a review on iTunes or whichever platform you listen on. It really helps new people hear about the podcast. Connect with and follow us on Facebook, Instagram and YouTube: https://bit.ly/MondayMindsetFB https://bit.ly/MondayMindsetIG https://bit.ly/MondayMindsetYT

Goal billionaire

Hey my Wonderful RICHEST folks. We know you all are crushing

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes
Top Breathing Techniques To Ease Your Mind, Heal Your Body & Change Your Life! EP 1176

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 70:55


Today we've put together a powerful mashup all about the importance of breath work! We've had multiple guests on the show diving deep into the conversation about the power of breathing and how it affects your body to reduce stress, decrease inflammation, and how you can learn to regulate your body's response to anxiety with a few simple techniques. So stick around to hear from James Nestor, Andrew Huberman, Wendy Suzuki, Nicole LePera, and Wim Hof!For more go to: www.lewishowes.com/1176James Nestor full episode: www.lewishowes.com/1060 Andrew Huberman full episode: www.lewishowes.com/1072 Wendy Suzuki full episode: www.lewishowes.com/1160 Nicole LePera full episode: www.lewishowes.com/1083 Wim Hof full episode: www.lewishowes.com/799 See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Alcohol Recovery Podcast | The ODAAT Chat Podcast
Jolene Park - What is Gray Area Drinking & How To End the Back & Forth

Alcohol Recovery Podcast | The ODAAT Chat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 55:36


Please Subscribe For More Episodes!   iTunes: https://apple.co/30g6ALF Spotify: https://odaatchat.libsyn.com/spotify Stitcher: https://bit.ly/3n0taNQ YouTube Channel: https://bit.ly/2UpR5Lo Be sure to follow me on Instagram for daily inspiration: @odaatpodcast and @arlinaallen   Connect with Jolene Park Visit Jolene's Website: https://grayareadrinkers.com/ Follow Jolene on Instagram @jolene_park Watch Jolene's TEDx talk: https://www.healthydiscoveries.com/tedx-talk/      The Lightning Round    Book recommendations:  Drinking, A Love Story, by Caroline Knapp Many Roads, One Journey: Moving Beyond the Twelve Steps, by Charlotte Kasl Favorite Quote: “This too shall pass” Regular Self-Care Practice: Grounding - walking barefoot on the beach, breathwork, somatic work, and healthy eating. Transcript:  Arlina Allen  2:56   Jolene, thank you so much for joining me today.   Jolene Park  3:03   Thanks for having me I'm I'm really looking forward to chatting with you and getting to know you a little bit more in the studio.   Arlina Allen  3:09    Listen, I appreciate somebody who has done their own work and who has a lot of credibility. Can I just say that to you?   Unknown Speaker  3:20   Thank you. I received that and appreciate that and feel the exact same way so I'm with you. Yeah,   Arlina Allen  3:27   we were just okay, I'm not gonna go into a rant, but maybe just a tiny little soapbox. You know, little cautionary tale. There's, there's a while I love how open people are being with their recovery. I just really appreciate people who have done their own work, right? So and you'll hear it I listen, I can sniff it out in two seconds. If I'm talking to someone who has not done their own work. And I've listened, I've listened to your TED Talk, your other interviews, there's lots of really good quality stuff that you've been putting out that I really appreciate. Because you are rooted in logic, which is nice. You got a lot of science going on. I love me some science. So we'll talk about all the stuff all the things, but just for fun. Do you hear my dog barking? Yeah, one second. I'm so sorry.   Unknown Speaker  4:54   Oh, I think you're still muted. Ah, here we go.   Arlina Allen  5:02   Okay, I had to go. Let my I have an English bulldog named named Teddy had to let him out. Did you know that Dr. Andrew Huberman has an English bulldog?   Unknown Speaker  5:11   I mean, his dog is no castellet. Well, long videos watch. Yeah, yeah. Costello was Costello   Arlina Allen  5:18   okay. Yeah. Yeah. Okay, so we were totally   Unknown Speaker  5:23   embarrassed that I know that but I might make you vermin fans.   Arlina Allen  5:27   Me, too. Oh my God. He's talking about him all the time. I digress. Sorry about that, I will have to edit that little part out. What I where I thought we would start is just kind of a fun little lightning round. It's a fun little icebreaker. When you first started your journey to do you call it do how do you refer to it your alcohol free journey, your sobriety journey?   Unknown Speaker  5:53   alcohol free is what I use most. But you know, I'll interchange sobriety here and there, but in general, I, you know, I'll the term alcohol free is what I'm most comfortable with.   Arlina Allen  6:05   Okay, cool. Yeah. I mean, it's so interesting, you know, over the years, you know, when people were first talking about getting sober, it was all about alcoholism. Right. And you and I know now that the DSM five doesn't even recognize that term anymore. It's alcohol use disorder. So which I appreciate because that sort of speaks to the spectrum. Right? There's an Oh, you're going to talk about this too. I'm not gonna steal your thunder here. But um, but yes, so when you started your alcohol free journey, were there particular books that you found really helpful?   Unknown Speaker  6:42   Oh, what a fun question.   Arlina Allen  6:45   I am obsessive when it comes to books.   Unknown Speaker  6:48   Yeah. Because you know, when I started my journey, and Anna Grace's book was not out. Oh, okay. Unexpected joy of getting sober. You know, all of these these books, the sober diaries by Claire Pouliot. None of those. They all came after I quit drinking. Yeah, me too. So yeah, this is a really fun question. Kind of, you know, pre this big Instagram boom, about talking about alcohol free. I definitely read Carolyn naps book, the drinking love story. Have you? Have you read her memoir?   Arlina Allen  7:20   I haven't. That also came out after I got sober. I heard that people read the books that came out when they got sober, or became alcohol free.   Unknown Speaker  7:31   She wrote her book. I think it was in the 90s and the 90s. Yeah, okay. Yeah, she was an early, early one. And her writing is just exquisite. I mean, it's so visceral and it pulls you out. I mean, it almost it's called drinking a love story. And she really romanticizes the drink and she had an absolute 100% you know, drinking problem, but her writing is just mesmerizing. So I read her memoir a couple times. But you know, who I knew about early on to was Charlotte, I think it's castle, k s L, I never know how to say her last name. And she wrote the book moving beyond the 12 steps, many roads one journey,   Arlina Allen  8:18   I think wow. And   Unknown Speaker  8:21   and so she took a she looks at the physiology, which is you know, is a real core piece of my work and you know, potential things like blood sugar and, and allergies to alcohol and, and she, you know, she knew about that side as a psychologist, but, but were her work really, where she really anchored it was looking at the language of the bill Wilson's 12 steps. And so she wrote the 16 steps and more of a feminine kind of empowered approach, you know, she just turned the language and so I enjoyed her work and kind of her take on things. And I think that you know, her book came out probably in the 90s as well   Arlina Allen  9:03   in the 90s that is so interesting. So I grew up in the church where I was accustomed to reading patriarchal language of the Bible and things like that. And and I was accustomed to reading things and then interpreting it like I didn't realize I was I had like this interpretation filter, so that you know, when I got sober in 94, all there was really was the 12 steps. And I was so desperate to be different and I just happened to know some people who were going and so I just kind of got they call it getting Eskimos in the cold, I guess. Um, and so that that worked for me. But it's so fascinating that there were so many women that are just like, I'm not okay with this, like this whole patriarchal thing and, and so it's so interesting to hear that Charlotte was able to sort of translate To the 16 steps I'm totally gonna have to check that out so that was a book that you read early on as well   Unknown Speaker  10:06   it was because I I appreciated her comprehensive approach which is very much resonated with me about looking at the biochemistry looking at the emotional components and today's you know language around that is the somatic work the polyvagal work which Charlotte wasn't you know that's newer research but she was aware of that of that bigger comprehensive approach around the codependency is another you know term that was more traditional but that emotional sobriety and then the spiritual piece of it too and there's all different you know, currents to ride with that and and she helped me you know, have an appreciation too I've always been very neutral with with 12 steps I've been in and out of meetings you know, throughout the years and I certainly see from a nervous system standpoint the huge benefit of the community so being in a room with other human beings where you can be heard and seen and witnessed and you know, that your story is held and that's very healing to the nervous system. I understand the criticisms and I have you know, I respect you know, it's everybody has their different preference but speaking strictly from a nervous system standpoint community and the predictability the regular meetings the the support that that you know, there's a lot of dynamics in there that are very supportive to the nervous system now we can find them in you know, in churches or spiritual groups or movement groups like yoga communities or more knitting communities it doesn't have to be a recovery based community but in general community that's part of my acronym nourish uniting with others so   Arlina Allen  11:55   I thought we're gonna get to that I wrote   Unknown Speaker  11:58   and power code   Arlina Allen  12:01   is so good it okay so I don't want to jump ahead but I'm just I'm gonna ask you about all that cuz I was listening to and I was like writing this down I was like, Oh my god, how did I not hear about this before? It's so interesting that we can sort of sort of like package or position information in a way that is so consumable and easy to remember your whole nourish, and that a knack? Is it an acronym my does that sound weird? acronym, acronym? Sorry, dear, I laugh at my own jokes. Bear with me. Um, okay, so the books these are, these are really good books. Okay, so drinking a love story, and then moving beyond the 12 steps, which I totally appreciate. Like,   Unknown Speaker  12:45   let me let me throw one other in there that was very emotional. And we can as we get more into kind of the biochemistry of the book, seven weeks to sobriety was also very influential. And I can dig more into that but but the author, she has her PhD in nutrition. And she was inspired to write the book again in the 90s, I believe, is when it came out, because her teenage son, I think it was late teens, early 20s, went into to to traditional treatment, around the you know, mid 90s, and stayed sober, but was miserable. So emotionally, he came out of treatment and was still very depressed and he didn't drink but tragically then took his life because the alcohol had been removed. But the other pieces is like he didn't feel better, even though he was following you know, the program. And so his mother then said, there's something else we're not even talking about the physical side, there's this whole biochemical side and she got very interested in the nutrients and the amino acids and went on for her PhD to really learn that and then opened a treatment center in Minneapolis, called the health Recovery Center wrote a book called seven weeks to sobriety. And so that was an influential part as I was studying and learning functional medicine about that biochemical piece and and Charlotte wrote about that too. She understood some of the biochemical side but she really looked at kind of that psycho emotional spiritual. So those those were influential books to me while I was drinking like the you know, because I'm a I'm a nutritionist I'm a health coach, I have been for 20 years and so that stuff was always interesting to me. And I would read it and kind of chew on it and be like, this is kind of fascinating. It's a little bit off the traditional path. I still drink but it was planting seeds of where ultimately got me to my final stop what I used when I stopped and now what what I use in my work was was those early seeds.   Arlina Allen  14:41   Yeah, so good. I mean, listen, there's a period of time like I lived in this barn, the Self Help section at Barnes and Noble trying to like think my way into right living as they say. And just because I had as I want to ask you about this a little bit later, but once having the information wasn't like applying them formation is kind of my current obsession and so we'll talk about how to apply it and but I think that's really important that we'll we'll talk about that Do you have a sort of go to mantra or quote that you live by   Unknown Speaker  15:17   this too shall pass   Arlina Allen  15:18   whoo that's fine   Unknown Speaker  15:20   yeah or another one is you know all as well which comes from a Christian mystic in England Her name is Julian of Norwich. Yeah, I I like the Christian the feminine Christian mystics I draw a lot of wisdom from and that was that was one of her really well known quotes is well as well   Arlina Allen  15:43   yeah. I love that Oh, you know what I'm what I like is that just popped into my head was in the end everything will be okay. And if it's not okay, it's not the end.   Unknown Speaker  15:54   Yeah. Yeah. I often post that around New Year's, you know, turning up the calendar and kind of New Year's Eve and it feels like the end but it's you know, we're beginning   Arlina Allen  16:10   Yes, every and has a beginning. I love that. Let's see, do you have a regular your own personal self care routine? Like do you like a daily practice a weekly practice,   Unknown Speaker  16:24   I have a whole menu of nourishment that I have a bag of nourishment that goes Borg and self care. I'm admittedly i'm i'm not great about you know, hitting every single day. But I certainly have really favorite practices that and it changes you know, with different seasons, the time of the year as I grow and evolve and what my needs are, sometimes they're more physical, sometimes they're more emotional, sometimes more spiritual. So it shifts. Right now I'm in Charleston, right outside Charleston, South Carolina on purpose to be very close to the beach because walking barefoot on the beach scene at the beach regularly for me is a huge daily practice and regulator. So that's a biggie. Um, I like breathwork. So that's also very regulating and calming to me to do some kind of some. It's a little bit of Wim Hof. But it's not total Wim Hof.   Arlina Allen  17:26   Half every morning like Monday through Friday. We host this little it's like a 25 we do Wim Hof for 10 minutes and then Tara Brock reign meditation for 10 minutes. No chit chat. No messing around, in and out. Love   Unknown Speaker  17:39   Yeah, yeah. And so I find a grounding for me like literally feet on the earth and then kind of active breathwork both are very settling and soothing to me. And I like those a lot. So those are kind of my my key things saying, you know, really hydrated, sleep, regular, predictable bedtime and wake time is helpful for me. But yeah, you know, there's when I quit drinking, I was using more herbs. There's all kinds of stuff. I mean, we can all   Arlina Allen  18:13   I know that. Yeah. Do you know I am just so glad that you highlighted that there are many tools that you don't do them every single day, like super hard, like you're not militant about it, and that there are different things for different seasons. Because often I talk to people, I even the clients that I coach, they're like, Oh, I didn't do this every single day. And it's like, you don't have to do it every day because our needs actually change and fluctuate. And so it's okay to be flexible, right? And just pay attention. Yeah, pay attention to what your needs are that day. And I have a client who called it her smorgasbord of things. But she you know, she did she put a time limit on it. She's like, Okay, I'm not gonna spend more than an hour, right? She's retired, she's like, I'm not gonna spend because then it becomes this other thing you beat yourself up with, like, all different things. So I like I like the flexibility. And I think consistency can be viewed, let's say over a month period of time, right? If you did, if you did something like 20 days out, that's pretty consistent. Right? You don't have to do something every day to be that's extreme thinking of consistent. We're so funny.   Unknown Speaker  19:30   Yeah. And you know, he's a core philosophy of mind for myself and how I work with others, especially with women. I'm very interested in you know, the cycles and the rhythms. So in our own body within this is noticing nature, so noticing the seasons in nature, but we also have that those seasons within our own body. And so it's very linear and masculine, the masculine archetype to kind of a 24 hour cycle where it's like every morning, do a spin class. And there's nothing wrong with that. But more of the feminine Yin cycle is there's different times of the month depending if we're relating bleeding coming into oscillation, you know, out of our bleed time, our energy cycle is different. And even if you know women listening are menopausal had stopped bleeding or not bleeding for whatever reason, our bodies still sync with the moon. And so there's just times with whether the moon is full or dark a new moon, are as women, our bodies really sink in with that, and it's more about peak energy time versus a low energy time. And so it you know, you don't even have to let get militant about the moon or the moon. You know, this is my work of I'm always cueing clients of notice what feels really nourishing right now, not because you should or you have to, or somebody posted about on Instagram, but does it just feel nourishing to like, take a nap. And, and noticing that and giving yourself permission. So that's so much of my work of tracking, instead of beating ourselves with a whip, really noticing what can   Arlina Allen  21:11   we Yeah, I love that you are not shame based, I can already hear it, you know, it's more nurturing and supportive. And you It's really cool. You know, a lot of the stuff, I know that you're like in the corporate world, like you're very corporate friendly, like palatable. And when I was listening to a lot of your stuff, I was thinking of my friends, you know, I'm from Silicon Valley, I did, I was corporate for a very long time. And in sales, tech sales, and so very, like male dominated very robotic, I would say, and very, like, absent of feelings. It's like, No, no, we don't talk about failing, they can talk about, they'll talk about stress, like, but that's about it, like tired or stressed. Like, the language is very limited. And so it's so it's so interesting that you have it seems like a very unique capability, capacity for being able to speak the corporate language, right, meet people where they are, but then also introduce very practical ideas, you know, paying attention to, you know, the moon and stuff like that, that that was not I did not expect that. And I think it's so refreshing when you're able to sort of live, you know, straddle the, you know, the corporate world, which is so robotic and so shot like, shallow is that I don't know if that's fair. But you know, people are trying to survive in this very, you know, a, a type driven accomplishment, don't feel anything environment. Right? Yeah. I don't know, where alcohol   Unknown Speaker  22:45   comes in. Like, it makes so much sense then, when we drive ourselves at that level. Why alcohol is also so prevalent in   Arlina Allen  22:52   the corporate world. Yeah, big time.   Unknown Speaker  22:55   Yeah. You know, and that's where I really feel like I learned how to corporate minds love physiology. And they, they're fascinated by how the brain works, and that peak performance and, and how to manage stress, you know, that those are buzzwords. And so bringing that in, in kind of a fun inspiring, like, a little bit of a different angle. It's that's where I learned to, to really speak to this, that that was kind of a universal message. And so, you know, I certainly wouldn't lock in talking about the moon. I have, I have found that weird. You know, I'm interested in those aspects that I've found by building the rapport and laying the groundwork of when there's this gut brain connection and what the bacteria in your gut is doing. And this there's this nerve in the back of the cranium called poly vagal nerve, when it's not toned. And this dysregulation, like, which I mean, I level that too. I'm fascinated by it. I you know, I love kind of that logical, yeah, give me that, you know, what is this? Like? How does it work? Why does it work? And then building that rapport where people can be like, that's so fascinating. And then it's like, oh, and do you also know that it's our bodies are 70% water and the moon regulates the tides that the ocean water? Our body is also you know, there's a thing to that it's responding to it. Yeah. And so when we set it up in the physiology which all of this can can be backed in physiology, there's data for all of it, and then it doesn't sound so Whoo. And like, well, this is just nuts.   Arlina Allen  24:43   It's like well, I love how science is explaining why woo is so fascinating, right? It's like there are those of us that less I'm pretty open minded. You know, but I need some science behind it to, but I am I almost missed the whole we should highlight the fact that Do you really like this gray area drinking expert right that's that's really how I came to know you and I thought you know that is meeting people where they are in the corporate world like in the corporate world these people are so driven and there's this perfectionism that happens in the corporate world it's like don't show any of your any of your flaws you know it's like this very robotic it's pushed yourself you know endlessly this 80 Hour Workweek is celebrated and you know they claim work life balance but you know I would be on at sales you know, quarterly business reviews where the VP would be out drinking until like, you know six in the morning and show up for the eight o'clock meeting still a little bit drunk I'm I would imagine and so it's so interesting to sort of gently like we're avoiding words like alcoholism which you know, we don't we understand that that's not really a thing anymore. There's a spectrum but the gray area drinking seems to be seems to be a very nice entry point Can you explain to the listeners like people listening they're like what is this gray area drinking because I think once you explain it everyone goes Oh, yeah, I totally know what that is. Yeah, so   Unknown Speaker  26:15   I was teaching I was doing a lot of contract work from 2004 to 2011 in corporate America trip flying and traveling around the whole United States doing on site workshops being contracted to come in for exactly what you're speaking to us Can you come do these training programs for the employees on this work life balance, they're really stressed they're you know, we're watching the biometrics we're doing these health fairs and we want to have blood pressure kind of overall more in range and their cholesterol and their BMI and we realize it's more of a comprehensive approach so when you come teach them so that you know that was that's my foundation and the work I was doing and what we never talked about around blood pressure and weight and sleep issues and stress was alcohol but you know, bringing in then these resources these regulating resources of around food and around sleep and really practical things to do some regulation in the body which which employees loved and because you know, a lot of people would come into the workshop saying I know this stuff, I'm a marathon runner, you know this it's my hobby and and then we do these workshops and they're like, I didn't know this like I didn't know that about you know, grounding and what like the omega three fat actually does in my brain with my neuro chemicals and so again, people I work with, they're very well read, they're very smart they like this information, they're already reading books listening to podcasts, but then when we can apply it to peak performance and the challenges that come up because of the you know, the corporate deadlines and and a lot of people are drinking heavily and we're not talking about it. And so I would come in from the angle of your craving brain whatever your brain is craving. Here's some ways to you know, because you don't hang the hang the poster seven come to the alcohol class in the boardroom at noon, like people are not going to be alone, right? People are not going to you know, trip over themselves to get to that boardroom but when we talk about the craving brain and ways that you can regulate and work with you know, your innate body's rhythms and cycles and systems in the gut in the brain, people were really really fascinated by that. And then to your question about you know, what is gray area drinking it's that space where people are functioning really well my clients tell me this all the time, I saw it all the time in the corporate world, people function and they drink really heavily. And if they didn't fall into that those traditional definitions of like end stage, just kind of rock bottom the wheels fall off our life but they also weren't every now and again drinkers where they had a drink or two a couple times a year, they were in between this and it was this gray area where again slipping through the cracks it was the white elephant in the room that is how everybody was drinking and nobody was talking about it. And it's how I was drinking and teaching wellness you know, it's like I love this stuff I love about functional nutrition and with the body and regulating the body and then on the weekends I'd be out with my friends drinking like everybody else around me It's how we all drank but it was just you know, and then I would stop many many times and I can't keep drinking like this and I was able to stop it wasn't a problem for me to stop what was more of the problem was after a couple months saying why am I being so restrictive I can have a drink so I would go back to drinking this the staying stopped the same stop which is very characteristic of gray area drinkers because people will say you know, I don't drink every day I you know, go weeks and don't drink. I'm like that's really characteristic. But the hard thing is Sticking with that because it's this gray area of like but nothing bad has happened like I don't have this external kind of proof that there's a problem yet it's the 3am wake up the dry mouth that mentally beating ourselves up but nobody hears that conversation except us in our own head and then going through the gymnastics of okay I'm now I'm just going to drink on the weekend I'm not going to I'm not going to drink again I'm it's this whole thing that goes on for months and years that nobody ever talked about   Arlina Allen  30:31   this it seems there there's this whole other layer of insanity that goes around trying to manage it right like oh well I'm just gonna drink a glass of water between drinks or I'm gonna have a glass of water by the bedside with electrolytes in it so that when I wake up in the morning in the middle of the night just totally dehydrated or you know having the Advil and the by Xen and the charcoal things and the oh my god I'm exhausted just thinking about it right it's like this whole insanity to make make it okay from for the drinking part and it's the whole back and forth that is was so exhausting I wonder so and we were talking a little bit about like just having the information is not enough it's about applying the information but don't you feel like there had to you had to like make a decision like at some point you got sick of the back and forth and you what what was there like a tipping point for you that you were just like this is that I'm done for good this time?   Unknown Speaker  31:29   Well that was December 14 2014 which was the the solid in my bones resolute I'm done. This is it and you know, it wasn't a Cavalier decision It wasn't easy. Alcohol is a problem for me you know, it was very typical for me I'm just gonna have a glass I can just you know, I want to just open a bottle at home pour that glass and then I would drink it and be like, ah, screw it I'll have enough it was very easy to do you know finish the bottle that was that was my kind of typical pattern and knock on wood. Fortunately nothing you know, half bad happened like I didn't have a DUI or anything like that, but there was so much of that. That's how I drank and then I would stop many many times over the years under the wellness umbrella I'm going to do a paleo challenge I'm I'm doing a yoga you know challenge I I'm just not going to drink and people get used to that and and it worked because they knew I was in wellness they knew I was and it's like oh that makes sense like you're doing so I never really it was it I flew under the radar with it. But then I would say oh I can you know be a social drinker. I want to be a social drinker. So it really to your question, it was just so much of that back and forth which is exhausting. It never changes I would go right back to where I left off whether it was one month or seven months it didn't matter and it was just this resolute because I had bad you know back and forth so many times of just I'm tired of this. I don't want to keep doing this. I've been through different seasons with it I've been through different experiences with it. You know what I've been dating not dating really high stress with work or whatever, it just doesn't change and I had that real conversation with myself December 14 2014 going through those scenarios of like you know what if I go on this romantic holiday like what if and I was like no no, I'm just I'm done. And that was seven I'm coming up on my seven year anniversary this December.   Arlina Allen  33:40   Oh my gosh, that's so exciting. Congratulations that is not easy. That is not easy. Yeah, so Okay, so you know what I love about what you do is that the science behind it the science behind like the addiction of alcoholism or alcohol the science sort of depersonalized is that right? And so it takes out the shame takes out the gill and it's like well of course you're getting addicted to alcohol Look what it's doing to your brain right and so you talk about three the neurotransmitters and a way that I thought was so good it was like oh, that's why right so you talked about GABA, serotonin and dopamine and you're gonna be able to explain it much better but when I heard you talk about it the first time I was like that as the shit Oh my god, like people need to hear this. So what is your What is your explanation behind those three neuro chemicals and how they make us feel that sort of drive the compulsion to drink   Unknown Speaker  34:46   well, so that you know there's there's four major neural chemicals I hit on three of them in my TED talk, but there's four major ones. So two are the gas pedal for our body and then two are the brakes for us. So the gas pedal dopamine and serotonin. So dopamine is the drive that shapes that with the motivation to to move. To get up out of bed and produce we need that we need to be motivated. And then the acetylcholine is the other kind of gas pedal. And that's about focus and memory. And then serotonin and GABA are the brakes. So GABA is that relaxation feeling where the mind shuts off. And there's just that feeling of kind of that downshift. And serotonin is just the feeling of happiness, bliss, life is good, I'm not really needing or craving anything to fill a void right now I'm just I'm content I'm good. And so we need the balance of gas pedal what you know, we need to move and stay motivated and produce and we're, you know, accomplish and have that drive. And we need memory to have that memory bank and our focus and like these are, you know, important things just to biologically function. But then we need to balance that with rest and relaxation, and some happiness and some bliss and just contentment. And so when you know, those get out of balance for all kinds of reasons, sleep, you know, not sleeping, well, eating a lot of processed food and sugar, drugs and alcohol, trauma, stress, so all of those things can open up the valve, where's those neural chemicals just flush through us much quicker, because we're inside that's like who there's stress, there's, you know, all this sugar, all this alcohol. So we need to compensate open the valve and then all of a sudden, it's like, we're really depleted now and gabbeh or something, you know, we're going through that scenario, and the body just can't do the uptake enough to replenish and make it quick enough to fill it up. So we're the dumping it too fast, or not making it fast enough. And so when we come into baseline, the body can do what it knows to do, it can make adequate chemicals through real food, like omega three fish oil, you know, through the amino acids, those are the raw materials that then make these neural chemicals. And we can we can hold on to our neural chemicals and not just flesh them through our system so quickly, by you know, some different practices and movement and rest and good replenishing sleep. And so to me, it's it's where the rubber meets the road with all of the practices, exercises, theories, techniques, because you spoke to it a minute ago about how we can just kind of get into like this militant, like I need to do it, I should do it. I heard it's good. I heard it's bad. I heard it's like, no, it's about noticing, what are you needed to replenish right now what's deficient and depleted. And so the body's just trying to keep us in homeostasis, and that, and then we reach to alcohol. So it's like when we understand the physiology, it's like, Oh, interesting, something's depleted and deficient, physiologically, not psychologically. And so the body's just trying to compensate. So alcohol is a physical substance, our physical body is depleted, we and our physical body, and we get a physical effect very immediately. So the body's like, keep doing it, like i don't i, this, it seems to work immediately. So and that's been where that addictive loop gets in. So where I then work is, let's lift the hood, what's depleted in the first place, biochemically, emotionally, energetically, and let's replenish what's truly needing to be replenished. It's not because you're a bad person, or you did something wrong. It's just like going to be in the body detective, the body whisperer, which I love doing. And, and often, it's just, you know, it doesn't have to be really complicated. It's just going back to the basics. And I'd find this in the corporate world all the time, too. We want the shiny, you know, stuff, the shiny next thing, and nobody's hydrated. Nobody's sleeping regularly. And this is where the application comes down. Because it's, it's like, yeah, yeah, yeah, I should drink more water should get better slide,   Arlina Allen  39:12   isn't it, nobody wants to hear that.   Unknown Speaker  39:17   It's not sexy. It's not glamorous, and we're out the other. I'm the same way I get it. But what's really cool about this work is when you have the actual experience. So when you actually have a 10 hour night of deep restorative sleep, it's mind blowing, it's a 180 it's the same way with, you know, sewers,   Unknown Speaker  39:36   or certain things. And so I'm always working with clients of like, it's not about getting a gold star from me and checking the box and doing all these things to perform and achieve. That's what makes us want to drink because we're, we're exhausted. So now it's when you put something in when you add it in, what happens because when we drink something happens and so if you're not noticing an effect that's really Positive that you can, you know, like, again, when I do breath work, there's an effect. Like, I feel that I mean, there's this bliss and this calm that moves through my body by by, you know, consciously doing different practices with my breath. So it's like I want to do that again, like that almost feels like I just had a glass of wine, what I did with that breathwork so that's the work and it's it's exciting, it can be really inspiring. And it's very empowering to go back to the physiology because that's where all the secrets and the magic are. And it puts aside the psychological shame that we've kind of gotten tangled in that's really unnecessary. Yeah,   Arlina Allen  40:40   you know, you hit on something that kind of sparked a light me which is about adding in, because a lot of recovery is about taking away, right, we're taking away the one thing like listen, when I was still drinking, and I smoked a lot of weed. Taking I was I loved those things, those were the things that receiving me, right and I crashed and burned early, I was done at 25. Because I did not manage, because not managing well. But to let them go was so hard because it was I felt like the thing that was bringing me like that was saving me so to let it so deprivation, I you know is a big thing for people that are you know, going alcohol free, or getting sober or whatever. And I love the idea that you're presenting which is adding in, right, let's add in the things that give you the feeling that we wanted from the drugs or alcohol in the first place. So it's a totally different mindset instead of deprivation. It's about adding I love that idea.   Unknown Speaker  41:46   Yeah, I do too. deprivation doesn't work for me. So I'm not going to try to talk with somebody else or coach somebody else through deprivation, like I don't want to be deprived who does. Nobody wants that. It doesn't work. So I would   Arlina Allen  41:58   be there we would be broken alone.   Unknown Speaker  42:02   And we know from behavior change from behavior, psychology, that deprivation, it never works now, but I can put it back in the physiology. So what we're dealing with is the amygdala and the animal brain, the animal brain only concern it has one concern as to keep us alive, right? And so if there's a sense of deprivation, that signals it's a biological signal, we're gonna die. So who's gonna win? Is that animal, right? Every time. So we've got to give the message then to the amygdala, that alarm center in the body that we're not in this deprivation, like we're not going to die, you're, we want to give that animal something. And, and that animal kind of limbic brain, it doesn't understand language. So this is why you know, saying, Just relax.   Arlina Allen  42:51   Don't ever tell an angry woman to relax? Yeah,   Unknown Speaker  42:54   well, it's like, it's literally like saying to an animal, just relax. They don't understand words our animal brain does literally doesn't understand words. But what it understands is sensation. And so alcohol gives us sensation in the physical body, walking barefoot on the beach gives a physical sensation. If I take a gamma boosting herb, it gives us sensation. And so that's where it's like the rubber meets the road with these practices of what we're doing is we're working on the physiology to give us sensation, that then travels up the spinal cord from the body into the brain saying, Oh, that feels good. And the animal brain is like, Okay, I'm not deprived, I feel this comfort, I feel soothing, I feel contained, which is what we're ultimately looking for. So it's not you give up alcohol and jump off a cliff and just hold your breath and hope for the best. It's, you make a decision to stop alcohol, and then open up this door and explore all of these really cold processes that give a physiological effect that no one ever taught us. But   Arlina Allen  43:59   exactly nobody ever taught us that's why we're using reaching for things that are not good for us because you know, that's what's available. We don't know about all these other things. And this is really speaks to the I want to get to the nurse thing, don't let me forget. But I wanted to also point out something that you highlight, which is it used to be that we would talk about the brain first and then the body and you flip that around, you're talking about addressing the somatic experience and and you hit the nail on the head when you're talking about experience and feelings. Right? And so talk to me a little bit about how we you're we're looking at this differently now we're looking at somatic and then neuro chemistry.   Unknown Speaker  44:45   So you know, that's the latest neuroscience, where Bessel Vander kolk, who wrote the bought the book, the body keeps the score. Oh, Peter Levine, who is the grandfather of somatic experiencing. This is the current research and it's not their opinion. It's I mean, the data is there.   Arlina Allen  45:02   Yeah, there, we have empirical data, we've got the   Unknown Speaker  45:05   data, they're doing the studies, they're you know, they're measuring gabbeh levels, then they have a group of people do 60 minutes of yoga, and then they measure their data levels again, so they're really watching this kind of stuff. But where all of this kind of somatic new neuroscience, what they find from research, not opinion, is that it's bottom up, not top down. So we work with the body, which is kind of all the stuff I've been talking about when we shift the body and the body can start to feel a sensation of calm, and soothing and grounding. That message goes up the spinal cord to the brain. And then the brain can say, the animal brain can say, okay, we're, we're okay with that. Because, again, that animal brain doesn't understand language. So we can't talk to the animal brain. We have to have feel that sensations in the body in really practical ways. This is not esoteric. Whoo, whoo, whoo, whoo.   Arlina Allen  46:01   I like blue. But this is science.   Unknown Speaker  46:03   Yeah, yeah. So that it's, you know, it's where the neurosciences and so that's where I work I work with with physiology with   Arlina Allen  46:11   physiology. Okay. And that makes perfect sense. And that maybe this is a good segue Can we talk about your acronym for nourish because it was all   Unknown Speaker  46:21   good, thank you. So as a as a functional nutritionist, my just really kind of, to pick a word that embodies my work over 20 years, it's it's nourish, which is my strength, and also my shadow, because the work for me is continually nourishing myself and not just food. So what I teach is what I also learn and keep practice. Yeah, so I'm always you know, it's not like I just quit drinking and now I've arrived and tell everybody else what they need to do. Constant practice, alright, but but the word that anchors that for me is nourish and then I created an acronym out of that for for my TED Talk. And so and is notice nature. Oh is observe your breath. You is unite with others are replenished with food. I initiate movement. s sit in stillness, and h is harnessed creativity. And I'm working on my book right now all about that, oh, there's numerous, numerous options and resources and things within each of those categories. But it really brings that whole comprehensive approach biochemical, somatic, emotional, energetic routines, that different things work for different people for regulating and nourishing the nervous system.   Arlina Allen  47:51   You just said something in my eyes lit up, because everybody is different, right? There's so many different paths to this sort of recovery, sobriety, alcohol free life, right? Not there's no one solution that works for everybody. And I think that's largely what's so confusing, is, there are so many, like everybody is so different. And there are so many different tools, but I like the idea that this nourish actually can be applied no matter what your specific situation it is. Your situation is. So what are some of the you mentioned, different supplements and things to sort of regulate those? You know, the GABA, serotonin, dopamine, acetylcholine? What if someone's curious about like, what they should be using? Do you have a resource on your website? Or maybe you can just rattle off a few things that people might try?   Unknown Speaker  48:50   Yeah, yeah, I'm happy to kind of talk through some of those pieces. So I work with clients one on one to really customize this piece. And kind of piggyback on what you just said, I really work with biochemical individuality. So I can rattle off some things, but it surrounds snowflakes,   Arlina Allen  49:06   unique snowflakes, right? It doesn't   Unknown Speaker  49:09   mean everybody out there then needs to take this particular supplement or eat this particular food. And B, this is my functional medicine background of what is individual for your biochemistry. And there's different ways to test that. And we can do lab testing and things. But But you know, the easiest, most inexpensive way is when you eat something, when you take something when you do something, notice what happens next, and three things happen. And it can be a really profound like, wow, that helps so much. My mind is blown right now. Or it can be kind of a neutral, like didn't really feel anything one way or the other. Or it can be I hated that, and I don't like how I feel now. And so I'm always cueing people back to that and the more kind of regulated and grounded we are in our body when the body is Calm, and there's practices and ways to do that, the easier it is then to kind of notice, like, what just happened here. Whereas if we're always kind of up in our head and just running and you know, in that intellect mental, it's hard to be like, I don't even know if I liked it. I mean, I just did it. So that's the argument of kind of somatic work. But um, but going back to just kind of some things, you know, I recommend, so biochemically whole food is king is golden. eating real food is is a great place to start. So did it grow from the ground? Can you pick it? berries? You know, bananas off the tree? Can you know, can you hunt it? If you eat meat? Can you gather it like gathering fish, or eggs or cream from the cow. So actual real food, that there isn't a list of ingredients, you know, 43 letters long and a whole paragraph. Real Food. And this is what I would teach in corporate all the time is, it's actually really, really fascinating. You know, one of the most fascinating lectures I ever heard in functional medicine, was a medical doctor who lectured about broccoli for an hour, it was fascinating. Because the chemical breakdown in broccoli, and every fruit and every vegetable, some of that we are still discovering. Because it's like, yeah, yeah, eat your vegetables. But when you really break it down, it's mind blowing, like what that, again, it's physical food and our physical body, what that does. So going back to the basics of whole food, if there's anything I can inspire people with is eat real food. That's in season, it's local, it's colorful, if possible, sometimes that's not always possible. But starting there, you know, eating regularly, because then the body breaks down into amino acids that are the raw materials for the brain. When you eat real, healthy fats, those break down into the omega three fats, some of our omega six fats, those are those necessary fats, again, for the brain, you know, good vegetables, even fermented vegetables, like sauerkraut, that's that good bacteria that goes into the gut. So there's just, it's just endless. The benefits of, you know, the exciting, like, mechanisms within food. And so I like to start there and try to you know, inspire people, and you don't have to, like clear your cupboards. It doesn't have to be radical. Yeah, I'm never radical about any of this. But the idea of adding something in instead of trying to take a bunch of stuff out, add in real food,   Arlina Allen  52:39   and real food, that isn't it? Yeah. And I think you were, I think I heard you say that the amino acids and the proteins are the building blocks to these neuro chemicals that we need. And like, at the end of the day, when maybe your gamma is low, or serotonin, or whatever it may be, all of them are low at the end, is that true that it's low at the end of the day?   Unknown Speaker  53:00   That's a good question. Um, I think it's more kind of over time, you know, like a 30 day period, a snapshot of like, what are we, you know, kind of dumping in that period, although there are urine tests that we do a 24 hour urine collection, and they are seeing like, how much of the neurotransmitter were dumped into our urine in a 24 hour period. So I think it's both you know, just kind of seeing like, the pattern that the body is on but also it's interesting, like what happens over over a longer period too.   Arlina Allen  53:32   Yeah, the reason I asked about the end of the day because I feel like that's like the witching hour for a lot of people, you know, but I think it speaks to meeting like we're so jacked up all day trying to get stuff done, that in the evening we're trying to do was deregulate down regulate to regulate, yeah, just just regulate, yeah, emotion management thing.   Unknown Speaker  53:56   So biochemistry is a huge part of it, our neuro chemicals, our blood sugar, our you know, our thyroid, our gut bacteria, our adrenal function. So adrenals are closely connected with dopamine. So if we're running on cortisol and adrenaline, then we're also pulling down on dopamine as well. Every neural chemicals connected with a hormone. So progesterone and gabbeh are connected, which I find a lot of women who are in this gray area struggle with wine are low and progesterone and low and Gabba. And you know, a common kind of symptom complaint of those two chemicals being low is anxiety and difficulty sleeping. And so a lot of women that are reaching to wine to help them sleep and to help manage their anxiety and when we lift the physiological hood, it's low gabicce, low progesterone. So there's all of these kind of physiological pieces, we can start with food, there's different nutrients that can i Find a lot of women are low and gabbeh. Dopamine is the sexy neuro chemical that everybody's like, oh, the dopamine hit the dopamine hit but but in reality, if we're really trying to boost dopamine, we tend to be more interested in things like cocaine, ecstasy, espresso, a pot of coffee, where if we're cocaine or coffee is more low gabbeh, which I'm certainly have that predisposition to be low gabbeh that's been more reaching to things like marijuana, Cannabis, alcohol to hit that off switch. So it's interesting what people you know, reach to so that's the biochemical side, there's some herbs or some nutrients to boost GABA boost dopamine, but then there's also what you're talking about kind of the witching hour, at the end of the day, that then goes into some of just the nervous system fight flight freeze response. So it's not always biochemical, but they're all interconnected, they all work together. If we're in a constant flee response, we're going to be dumping a lot more, you know, of our gas, the dopamine they see, so it all connects. But the but the fight flee freeze response. And if we're, if that valve is always on, if we're always kind of in a flee or in a fight, or we've just in that frozen kind of immobilized, protective state, that's exhausting. Any of those states if the, if the on switch is always on. So by the end of the day, it's hard to continue, we're exhausted holding that dysregulated state. So now we want to regulate it with alcohol to kind of let the valve off constantly, you know, we're fleeing, we want to move we want to, and it's like, I want to stop and slow down. So it could be some of that polyvagal kind of stress response, as well. And then there's, you know, the, the energetic side of things. So this is acupuncture, you know, they talk about, like how the energy moves in the body. So, if there's an area that's, that's more stuck, or moving really fast, and that's where body work comes in acupuncture, you know, working with the energy system, so there's no one size fits all, but I work with people to get kind of the full story. And it's like, where do we want to kind of start here with what might be a missing piece? And what might be depleted? And it's so   Arlina Allen  57:17   good, how do people connect with you if they want to reach out and work with you.   Unknown Speaker  57:23   So gray area drinkers calm is my sites where all my info is, you can email me I work with clients, one on one, I have a coach training where I train other coaches on the nourish method. And my TED Talks, there are lots of interviews I've done. And then I have did a podcast as well called edit, editing, our drinking and our lives. And so all of that on gray area drinkers calm.   Arlina Allen  57:48   That is amazing. I leave all leave links, ever. I know people are probably taking notes or driving or whatever. So I'll leave all the links in the show notes. But this has been such a fascinating conversation. I could easily talk to you for the rest of the day. So many questions. And I just think this was so helpful. Thank you so much for joining me today. Thank you so much for having me. It's fun to meet you and chat with you. Thank you. Yeah, definitely. Thanks so much. And I'll leave all the show notes, links in the show notes how people can get a hold of you.   Unknown Speaker  58:20   Wonderful. Thank you.   Arlina Allen  58:22   Thanks.  

Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes
Effects of Fasting & Time Restricted Eating on Fat Loss & Health | Episode 41

Podcast Notes Playlist: Latest Episodes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 146:07


Huberman Lab Podcast Notes Key Takeaways Sleep-related fasting is particularly important for repair functions in the gut, brain, liver – and can be optimized by not eating 2-3 hours before bedTenants of ideal time-restricted feeding: (1) delay the first meal at least one hour after waking; (2) don't eat within 2-3 hours of bedtime; (3) stick to a consistent schedule every dayThe best target feeding window is 8 hours; shorter windows between 4-6 hours tend to lead to overeatingConsistency is best: a feeding window you can stick to in the context of social and life balance is best – if you're new, try a 12pm-8pm window where no calories are consumed before 12pm and after 8pmFrom a pure health objective standpoint, it would be best to keep feeding to the middle of the day, i.e., 10am-6pm but this is difficult to sustain sociallyOne meal per day eating seems to lend itself to weight loss but is less likely to be sustained over timeTo enhance muscle growth, consume protein early in the day – ideally by 10am (which can be difficult considering 8-hour target window)If you're feeling weak during fast, some salt in water can have a stabilizing effect on blood glucose and give you a boostRead the full notes @ podcastnotes.orgThis episode I discuss the science and practice of fasting also called time-restricted feeding. I review the data on how limiting food intake to specific portions of every 24-hour cycle (or fasting longer) impacts weight loss, fat loss specifically, liver health, mental focus, muscle, longevity and more. I explain how "fasted" is contextual, and relates to blood glucose levels and their downstream effects, and how the depth of fasting can be adjusted with behaviors such as different types of exercise, or with glucose disposal agents. I also discuss the optimal fasting protocol: and both the absolute (non-negotiable) and variable (contextual) features of a fasting/time-restricted-feeding protocol that will allow you to get the most benefits. I also discuss what does and does not break a fast, the effects of fasting on hormones like testosterone and cortisol and on fertility. I also review how different feeding windows of 8 or 10 or 4 hours differentially impact the effects of fasting, and why the classic 8 hour feeding window came to be but also might be ideal. I discuss mechanisms and offer tools to discern the optimal fasting duration and timing for you.   Thank you to our sponsors: ROKA - https://www.roka.com -- code: "huberman" InsideTracker - https://www.insidetracker.com/huberman Helix Sleep - https://www.helixsleep.com/huberman    RETHINK EDUCATION: The Biology of Learning Featuring Dr. Andrew Huberman https://youtu.be/Oo7hQapFe3M   Our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/andrewhuberman   Supplements from Thorne: http://www.thorne.com/u/huberman   Social: Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/hubermanlab  Twitter - https://twitter.com/hubermanlab Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/hubermanlab  Website - https://hubermanlab.com Newsletter - https://hubermanlab.com/neural-network    Links: Comprehensive Review On Fasting In Humans: https://bit.ly/3BwIyd7   Timestamps: 00:00:00 Introduction, Blood Glucose & Mortality, Mice Vs. Humans 00:06:02 Sponsors: Roka, InsideTracker, Helix 00:09:42 Neuroplasticity Protocols & Online Lecture https://youtu.be/Oo7hQapFe3M  00:11:20 Feeding, Fasting, Performance 00:13:50 Calories-In, Calories-Out (CICO); Perfect Diets 00:19:48 Feeding-Induced Health Conditions  00:25:33 Time Restricted Eating: When We Eat Is Vital 00:29:45 The Eight Hour Feeding Window  00:31:26 Feeding Deep Into the Night Is Bad (In Humans) 00:36:33 Liver Health 00:39:45 Time Restricted Feeding Protocol: Rules 00:41:35 When to Start & Stop Eating 00:45:38 Gastric Clearance, Linking Fasting to Sleep 00:52:35 Effects of Specific Categories of Food 00:55:40 Precision In Fasting: Protocol Build 00:59:30 4-6 Hour Feeding Windows 01:03:08 Protein Consumption & Timing for Muscle 01:08:13 How to Shift Your Eating Window 01:13:20 Glucose Clearing, Exercise & Compounds 01:22:37 Blood Glucose: Monitoring, mTOR & Related Pathways 01:27:40 Gut Health: Fasting, Clock Genes and Microbiota 01:29:15 Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver  01:32:00 Effects of Fasting on Hormones: Testosterone, Cortisol 01:38:40 Fertility 01:41:50 8-Hour Feeding Window: Weight Loss Without Calorie Counting 01:43:20 Eating Every-Other-Day  01:45:29 Adherence 01:47:15 Mental Focus & Clarity 01:49:12 Enhancing Weight Loss from Body Fat: Hepatic Lipase 01:53:15 What Breaks a Fast? Rules & Context 01:58:50 Artificial Sweeteners, Plant-Based Sweeteners 02:01:42 Glucose Clearing II, Cinnamon, Acidity, Salt 02:06:42 My Circadian Clock, Zero-App  02:08:20 Odd (But Common) Questions 02:09:23 Effects of Sauna & Dehydration on Blood Glucose 02:11:12 The Ideal Fasting Protocol  02:24:00 More Resources, Ways to Support Us, Supplements Please note that The Huberman Lab Podcast is distinct from Dr. Huberman's teaching and research roles at Stanford University School of Medicine. The information provided in this show is not medical advice, nor should it be taken or applied as a replacement for medical advice. The Huberman Lab Podcast, its employees, guests and affiliates assume no liability for the application of the information discussed.   Title Card Photo Credit: Mike Blabac - https://www.blabacphoto.com 

Podcast Notes Playlist: Nutrition
Effects of Fasting & Time Restricted Eating on Fat Loss & Health | Episode 41

Podcast Notes Playlist: Nutrition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 146:07


Huberman Lab Podcast Notes Key Takeaways Sleep-related fasting is particularly important for repair functions in the gut, brain, liver – and can be optimized by not eating 2-3 hours before bedTenants of ideal time-restricted feeding: (1) delay the first meal at least one hour after waking; (2) don't eat within 2-3 hours of bedtime; (3) stick to a consistent schedule every dayThe best target feeding window is 8 hours; shorter windows between 4-6 hours tend to lead to overeatingConsistency is best: a feeding window you can stick to in the context of social and life balance is best – if you're new, try a 12pm-8pm window where no calories are consumed before 12pm and after 8pmFrom a pure health objective standpoint, it would be best to keep feeding to the middle of the day, i.e., 10am-6pm but this is difficult to sustain sociallyOne meal per day eating seems to lend itself to weight loss but is less likely to be sustained over timeTo enhance muscle growth, consume protein early in the day – ideally by 10am (which can be difficult considering 8-hour target window)If you're feeling weak during fast, some salt in water can have a stabilizing effect on blood glucose and give you a boostRead the full notes @ podcastnotes.orgThis episode I discuss the science and practice of fasting also called time-restricted feeding. I review the data on how limiting food intake to specific portions of every 24-hour cycle (or fasting longer) impacts weight loss, fat loss specifically, liver health, mental focus, muscle, longevity and more. I explain how "fasted" is contextual, and relates to blood glucose levels and their downstream effects, and how the depth of fasting can be adjusted with behaviors such as different types of exercise, or with glucose disposal agents. I also discuss the optimal fasting protocol: and both the absolute (non-negotiable) and variable (contextual) features of a fasting/time-restricted-feeding protocol that will allow you to get the most benefits. I also discuss what does and does not break a fast, the effects of fasting on hormones like testosterone and cortisol and on fertility. I also review how different feeding windows of 8 or 10 or 4 hours differentially impact the effects of fasting, and why the classic 8 hour feeding window came to be but also might be ideal. I discuss mechanisms and offer tools to discern the optimal fasting duration and timing for you.   Thank you to our sponsors: ROKA - https://www.roka.com -- code: "huberman" InsideTracker - https://www.insidetracker.com/huberman Helix Sleep - https://www.helixsleep.com/huberman    RETHINK EDUCATION: The Biology of Learning Featuring Dr. Andrew Huberman https://youtu.be/Oo7hQapFe3M   Our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/andrewhuberman   Supplements from Thorne: http://www.thorne.com/u/huberman   Social: Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/hubermanlab  Twitter - https://twitter.com/hubermanlab Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/hubermanlab  Website - https://hubermanlab.com Newsletter - https://hubermanlab.com/neural-network    Links: Comprehensive Review On Fasting In Humans: https://bit.ly/3BwIyd7   Timestamps: 00:00:00 Introduction, Blood Glucose & Mortality, Mice Vs. Humans 00:06:02 Sponsors: Roka, InsideTracker, Helix 00:09:42 Neuroplasticity Protocols & Online Lecture https://youtu.be/Oo7hQapFe3M  00:11:20 Feeding, Fasting, Performance 00:13:50 Calories-In, Calories-Out (CICO); Perfect Diets 00:19:48 Feeding-Induced Health Conditions  00:25:33 Time Restricted Eating: When We Eat Is Vital 00:29:45 The Eight Hour Feeding Window  00:31:26 Feeding Deep Into the Night Is Bad (In Humans) 00:36:33 Liver Health 00:39:45 Time Restricted Feeding Protocol: Rules 00:41:35 When to Start & Stop Eating 00:45:38 Gastric Clearance, Linking Fasting to Sleep 00:52:35 Effects of Specific Categories of Food 00:55:40 Precision In Fasting: Protocol Build 00:59:30 4-6 Hour Feeding Windows 01:03:08 Protein Consumption & Timing for Muscle 01:08:13 How to Shift Your Eating Window 01:13:20 Glucose Clearing, Exercise & Compounds 01:22:37 Blood Glucose: Monitoring, mTOR & Related Pathways 01:27:40 Gut Health: Fasting, Clock Genes and Microbiota 01:29:15 Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver  01:32:00 Effects of Fasting on Hormones: Testosterone, Cortisol 01:38:40 Fertility 01:41:50 8-Hour Feeding Window: Weight Loss Without Calorie Counting 01:43:20 Eating Every-Other-Day  01:45:29 Adherence 01:47:15 Mental Focus & Clarity 01:49:12 Enhancing Weight Loss from Body Fat: Hepatic Lipase 01:53:15 What Breaks a Fast? Rules & Context 01:58:50 Artificial Sweeteners, Plant-Based Sweeteners 02:01:42 Glucose Clearing II, Cinnamon, Acidity, Salt 02:06:42 My Circadian Clock, Zero-App  02:08:20 Odd (But Common) Questions 02:09:23 Effects of Sauna & Dehydration on Blood Glucose 02:11:12 The Ideal Fasting Protocol  02:24:00 More Resources, Ways to Support Us, Supplements Please note that The Huberman Lab Podcast is distinct from Dr. Huberman's teaching and research roles at Stanford University School of Medicine. The information provided in this show is not medical advice, nor should it be taken or applied as a replacement for medical advice. The Huberman Lab Podcast, its employees, guests and affiliates assume no liability for the application of the information discussed.   Title Card Photo Credit: Mike Blabac - https://www.blabacphoto.com 

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Andrew Huberman - TRT, PEDs, Maxing Out Natural T, Supplements, Diet, Sleep & Hormones Deep Dive

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Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 202:37


Huberman Lab
Effects of Fasting & Time Restricted Eating on Fat Loss & Health | Episode 41

Huberman Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 146:07


This episode I discuss the science and practice of fasting also called time-restricted feeding. I review the data on how limiting food intake to specific portions of every 24-hour cycle (or fasting longer) impacts weight loss, fat loss specifically, liver health, mental focus, muscle, longevity and more. I explain how "fasted" is contextual, and relates to blood glucose levels and their downstream effects, and how the depth of fasting can be adjusted with behaviors such as different types of exercise, or with glucose disposal agents. I also discuss the optimal fasting protocol: and both the absolute (non-negotiable) and variable (contextual) features of a fasting/time-restricted-feeding protocol that will allow you to get the most benefits. I also discuss what does and does not break a fast, the effects of fasting on hormones like testosterone and cortisol and on fertility. I also review how different feeding windows of 8 or 10 or 4 hours differentially impact the effects of fasting, and why the classic 8 hour feeding window came to be but also might be ideal. I discuss mechanisms and offer tools to discern the optimal fasting duration and timing for you.   Thank you to our sponsors: ROKA - https://www.roka.com -- code: "huberman" InsideTracker - https://www.insidetracker.com/huberman Helix Sleep - https://www.helixsleep.com/huberman    RETHINK EDUCATION: The Biology of Learning Featuring Dr. Andrew Huberman https://youtu.be/Oo7hQapFe3M   Our Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/andrewhuberman   Supplements from Thorne: http://www.thorne.com/u/huberman   Social: Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/hubermanlab  Twitter - https://twitter.com/hubermanlab Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/hubermanlab  Website - https://hubermanlab.com Newsletter - https://hubermanlab.com/neural-network    Links: Comprehensive Review On Fasting In Humans: https://bit.ly/3BwIyd7   Timestamps: 00:00:00 Introduction, Blood Glucose & Mortality, Mice Vs. Humans 00:06:02 Sponsors: Roka, InsideTracker, Helix 00:09:42 Neuroplasticity Protocols & Online Lecture https://youtu.be/Oo7hQapFe3M  00:11:20 Feeding, Fasting, Performance 00:13:50 Calories-In, Calories-Out (CICO); Perfect Diets 00:19:48 Feeding-Induced Health Conditions  00:25:33 Time Restricted Eating: When We Eat Is Vital 00:29:45 The Eight Hour Feeding Window  00:31:26 Feeding Deep Into the Night Is Bad (In Humans) 00:36:33 Liver Health 00:39:45 Time Restricted Feeding Protocol: Rules 00:41:35 When to Start & Stop Eating 00:45:38 Gastric Clearance, Linking Fasting to Sleep 00:52:35 Effects of Specific Categories of Food 00:55:40 Precision In Fasting: Protocol Build 00:59:30 4-6 Hour Feeding Windows 01:03:08 Protein Consumption & Timing for Muscle 01:08:13 How to Shift Your Eating Window 01:13:20 Glucose Clearing, Exercise & Compounds 01:22:37 Blood Glucose: Monitoring, mTOR & Related Pathways 01:27:40 Gut Health: Fasting, Clock Genes and Microbiota 01:29:15 Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver  01:32:00 Effects of Fasting on Hormones: Testosterone, Cortisol 01:38:40 Fertility 01:41:50 8-Hour Feeding Window: Weight Loss Without Calorie Counting 01:43:20 Eating Every-Other-Day  01:45:29 Adherence 01:47:15 Mental Focus & Clarity 01:49:12 Enhancing Weight Loss from Body Fat: Hepatic Lipase 01:53:15 What Breaks a Fast? Rules & Context 01:58:50 Artificial Sweeteners, Plant-Based Sweeteners 02:01:42 Glucose Clearing II, Cinnamon, Acidity, Salt 02:06:42 My Circadian Clock, Zero-App  02:08:20 Odd (But Common) Questions 02:09:23 Effects of Sauna & Dehydration on Blood Glucose 02:11:12 The Ideal Fasting Protocol  02:24:00 More Resources, Ways to Support Us, Supplements Please note that The Huberman Lab Podcast is distinct from Dr. Huberman's teaching and research roles at Stanford University School of Medicine. The information provided in this show is not medical advice, nor should it be taken or applied as a replacement for medical advice. The Huberman Lab Podcast, its employees, guests and affiliates assume no liability for the application of the information discussed.   Title Card Photo Credit: Mike Blabac - https://www.blabacphoto.com 

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Andrew Huberman's EXACT Diet And Supplement Routine To Stay Dialed In

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Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 17:34


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Andrew Huberman's Testosterone Levels After TRT & Ideal Free Testosterone Levels

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Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 12:06


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TEENS TAKING TREN | Will They PERMANENTLY Alter Their Brain Chemistry? Ft. Andrew Huberman

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Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 8:34


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Andrew Huberman Describes His TRT Protocol And What Effects He Noticed

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Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 17:32


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QUADRUPLING Of Natural Testosterone Levels Using These Supplements Ft. Andrew Huberman

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Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 24:30


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My Secret Last Name, Mike Mentzer's Steroid Advice To Andrew Huberman & Unique Research

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Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 13:03


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Andrew Huberman On How To Fix Your Sleep - Supplements, Time You Go To Sleep & Protocols

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Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 19:41


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Dr. Andrew Huberman Measures My Digit Ratio

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Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 13:00


PowerFall Project
Top 5 NEW impact people! Episode: 62 + Sex Ed & Wardrobe Malfunctions

PowerFall Project

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 85:26


Welcome to the PowerFall Project!We are known for our TOP 5 lists!  We discuss everything from top 5 movies, athletes, cars and sometimes venture into hypothetical lists such as top 5 things we'd want for the zombie apocalypse.A handsome, mild mannered, ex motocross, former fitness coach and media production entrepreneur...Nick Powers!A goof ball, former athlete, coach and serial entrepreneur...Addy Drip DaddyThis week:  Top 5 NEW impact people!Last week:  Top 5 People we'd like to throat punch!Next week: Top 5 NEW impact people!Also Discussed:  Questions with Nick, Only Fans, Sex Ed, Fast & The Furious, Rapid Fire Questions, Adam's List:Jen SinseroRyan MicklerJason WilsonJesse ItzlerDavid GogginsNick's List:Billy CorbenEvan HaferShane GillisAndrew HubermanKyle Larson If you have an idea for a list you would like us to discuss, send us a message!Be sure to follow us on Instagram!>>> PowerFallProject

Transformator
Uge 39: Vi kigger hackerne over skulderen på det mørke internet. Her flyder det bl.a. med personlige og fortrolige data, som hackere havde stjålet fra en dansk virksomhed

Transformator

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 28:56


Vært: Henrik Heide Medvirkende: Mads Lorenzen I denne uges Transformator tager vi på en guidet tur på det mørke internet, som man ellers gør klogt i at holde sig fra. Her handler kriminelle med våben, narko og børneporno, og her faldt Version2's journalist Mads Lorenzen over mere end 100 pas og en masse andre personlige og fortrolige oplysninger om medarbejdere i den danske legepladsvirksomhed Kompan. Den slags oplysninger er guf for identitetstyve, og de stammer fra et hackerangreb fra forsommeren, hvor Kompan nægtede at betale de kriminelle løsesum efter angrebet. Men hvordan browser man et mørkelagt net, der kun er sporadisk indekseret, og hvor man skal vide, hvad man leder efter, for at finde det? Og hvordan skal politiet have en chance for at gribe ind, når alle brugere er anonymiseret og maskeret via Tor-browseren? Til slut får du en anbefaling af en helt anden podcast, Huberman Lab, der har som ambition at omsætte hjerneforskningens resultater til noget, vi kan bruge i hverdagen. For eksempel hvordan dopamin virker i kroppen, og hvorfor nogle bliver så afhængige af det. Podcasten drives af Andrew Huberman, der er en amerikansk neurovidenskabelig professor ved Institut for Neurobiologi ved Stanford Universitetet. Links

Food School: Smarter Stronger Leaner.

TUNE IN TO LEARN:This morning as I'm recording this podcast I'm finishing my weekly 42-hour fast.I always wondered, why after my fasting day do I feel so much happier and at the same time motivated to get off my ass and make sh*t happen?Dopamine seems to be the answer according to Andrew Huberman and Hubermanlab podcast.Tune in to learn how it all works, and how fasting can help you to get up, makethings happen, and get lots of joy doing it! SUBMIT YOUR QUESTION HERE - https://form.typeform.com/to/tKPDKsegProduced by Angela Shurina,CERTIFIED NUTRITIONIST, COACHI help you look and feel amazing at any age! Skills and Habits VS Diets.IG: @1000yearyoungGET MY FREE 10-DAY EMAIL HEALTH COURSE. THE FOUNDATION SERIES. JOIN TEAM LEAN!

Mark Bell's Power Project
Power Bite: Dangers of Porn ft. Andrew Huberman

Mark Bell's Power Project

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 13:31


Andrew Huberman explains just how serious the dangers of porn addiction actually are. Dr. Andrew Huberman is an award-winning professor of neurobiology and ophthalmology at Stanford University, as well as the founder of the Huberman Lab. His lab focuses on researching brain function and brain regeneration. The lab's goals are to discover strategies for halting and reversing vision loss in blinding diseases, and understand how visual perceptions and autonomic arousal states are integrated to impact behavioral responses. Full episode here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m_9r2lc_6sY&t=1114s Special perks for our listeners below! ➢Magic Spoon Cereal: https://www.magicspoon.com/powerproject to automatically save $5 off a variety pack! ➢8 Sleep: Visit https://www.eightsleep.com/powerproject to automatically save $150 off the Pod Pro! ➢Marek Health: https://marekhealth.com Use code POWERPROJECT15 for 15% off ALL LABS! Also check out the Power Project Panel: https://marekhealth.com/powerproject Use code POWERPROJECT for $101 off! ➢LMNT Electrolytes: http://drinklmnt.com/powerproject ➢Piedmontese Beef: https://www.piedmontese.com/ Use Code "POWERPROJECT" at checkout for 25% off your order plus FREE 2-Day Shipping on orders of $150 Subscribe to the Podcast on on Platforms! ➢ https://lnk.to/PowerProjectPodcast Subscribe to the Power Project Newsletter! ➢ https://bit.ly/2JvmXMb Follow Mark Bell's Power Project Podcast ➢ Insta: https://www.instagram.com/markbellspowerproject ➢ https://www.facebook.com/markbellspowerproject ➢ Twitter: https://twitter.com/mbpowerproject ➢ LinkedIn:https://www.linkedin.com/in/powerproject/ ➢ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/markbellspowerproject ➢TikTok: http://bit.ly/pptiktok FOLLOW Mark Bell ➢ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/marksmellybell ➢ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MarkBellSuperTraining ➢ Twitter: https://twitter.com/marksmellybell ➢ Snapchat: marksmellybell ➢Mark Bell's Daily Workouts, Nutrition and More: https://www.markbell.com/ Follow Nsima Inyang ➢ https://www.breakthebar.com/learn-more ➢YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/NsimaInyang ➢Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nsimainyang/?hl=en ➢TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@nsimayinyang?lang=en Follow Andrew Zaragoza on all platforms ➢ https://direct.me/iamandrewz #PowerProject #Podcast #MarkBell

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu
Change Your BRAIN By Using These Hacks to Increase Your DOPAMINE | Dr. Andrew Huberman

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 75:34


Check out our sponsors:  Better Help: Get 10% off your first month at https://betterhelp.com/impacttheory LMNT: Go to drinkLMNT.com/Impact to try their brand NEW flavor - Watermelon Salt. Real Good Foods: Click the link for $25 OFF any order of $25 or more! https://realgoodfoods.com/discount/IMPACTTHEORY Novo:  banknovo.com/IMPACT ChiliSleep: Get 20% off at chilisleep.com/IMPACT Dopamine is not a new topic. People have been obsessing and hearing about dopamine and its role in human behavior for years. You may think of it as the feel-good happy hormone, or you may associate it with addiction, love, lust and sex. As our lives convert over to a totally digital experience that is with us everywhere we are in the form of a cell phone, dopamine detox has even started gaining in popularity. Dr. Andrew Huberman from the Huberman Lab is back again to unpack some of the more surprising discoveries and uses of dopamine. He cleverly relates dopamine to being a biological currency that has a role to play in human desire for more. Dopamine is the catalyst pushing humanity forward exploring things like cryptocurrency and pushing our limitations and what is possible, but is all of that for the sake of pleasure and feeling good? Dr. Huberman breaks down the eternal balance of pain and pleasure, arousal and relaxation and gives you the insight you need to start regulating your body's dopamine release. If you thought dopamine was all about feeling good, Dr. Huberman is about to reveal why it's more about what motivates you in the pursuit of something greater.   SHOW NOTES:   0:00 | Introduction Dr. Andrew Huberman 0:56 | Dopamine the Biological Currency 6:51 | Releasing Dopamine 10:38 | Hormonal Signaling 14:34 | Can We Spike Dopamine? 21:00 | Value the Pursuit & the Dips 25:40 | Balance of Pain and Pleasure 31:23 | Self Regulation of Dopamine 38:28 | Dopamine and Time Perception 44:31 | Dopamine and Overindulging 49:05 | Action Based Denial 52:42 | Using Rules & Dopamine 58:27 | Ways to Get Motivated   QUOTES:   “When I say dopamine is the universal currency of everything, what I mean is, it's driving the motivation to develop new currencies.” [3:08]   “Celebrating the win more than the pursuit, it actually sets you up for failure in the future.” [16:00]   “If you can start to register that craving, and that friction and that desire, that almost kind of low level of agitation, sometimes high level of agitation [...] that's dopamine...” [17:54]   “Your capacity to tap into dopamine as a motivator, not just seeking dopamine rewards, that is infinite.” [19:34]   “It's the craving that makes me feel alive. So it's the state of wanting that is in and of itself, the pleasurable act.” [22:37]   “It doesn't matter if it's Bitcoin or aetherium, it doesn't matter if it's putting rockets on other planets, it doesn't matter if it's building the first automobile, it's the same currency.” [25:27]   “Dopamine itself is not the reward. It's the build up to the reward, and the reward has more of a kind of opioid bliss like property,” [29:51]   “The more pain you experience, the more dopamine you can achieve. If you get back on the avenue of pursuit.” [30:58]   “I would say addiction is a progressive narrowing of the things that bring you pleasure, and I don't like to comment too much on enlightenment, [...] but a good life is a progressive expansion of the things that bring you pleasure, and even better is a good life is a progressive expansion of the things that bring you pleasure and includes pleasure through motivation and hard work. “ [32:55]   “If you think about most of the growth in life comes from these rigidly externally imposed schedules and we hate them. But they are where we learn restraint” [52:42]     Follow Andrew Huberman: Website: https://hubermanlab.com/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/andrewhubermanlab Twitter: https://twitter.com/hubermanlab Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hubermanlab/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hubermanlab Podcast: https://hubermanlab.com/  

Health Theory with Tom Bilyeu
Change Your BRAIN By Using These Hacks to Increase Your DOPAMINE | Dr. Andrew Huberman

Health Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 75:34


Check out our sponsors:  Better Help: Get 10% off your first month at https://betterhelp.com/impacttheory LMNT: Go to drinkLMNT.com/Impact to try their brand NEW flavor - Watermelon Salt. Real Good Foods: Click the link for $25 OFF any order of $25 or more! https://realgoodfoods.com/discount/IMPACTTHEORY Novo:  banknovo.com/IMPACT ChiliSleep: Get 20% off at chilisleep.com/IMPACT Dopamine is not a new topic. People have been obsessing and hearing about dopamine and its role in human behavior for years. You may think of it as the feel-good happy hormone, or you may associate it with addiction, love, lust and sex. As our lives convert over to a totally digital experience that is with us everywhere we are in the form of a cell phone, dopamine detox has even started gaining in popularity. Dr. Andrew Huberman from the Huberman Lab is back again to unpack some of the more surprising discoveries and uses of dopamine. He cleverly relates dopamine to being a biological currency that has a role to play in human desire for more. Dopamine is the catalyst pushing humanity forward exploring things like cryptocurrency and pushing our limitations and what is possible, but is all of that for the sake of pleasure and feeling good? Dr. Huberman breaks down the eternal balance of pain and pleasure, arousal and relaxation and gives you the insight you need to start regulating your body's dopamine release. If you thought dopamine was all about feeling good, Dr. Huberman is about to reveal why it's more about what motivates you in the pursuit of something greater.   SHOW NOTES:   0:00 | Introduction Dr. Andrew Huberman 0:56 | Dopamine the Biological Currency 6:51 | Releasing Dopamine 10:38 | Hormonal Signaling 14:34 | Can We Spike Dopamine? 21:00 | Value the Pursuit & the Dips 25:40 | Balance of Pain and Pleasure 31:23 | Self Regulation of Dopamine 38:28 | Dopamine and Time Perception 44:31 | Dopamine and Overindulging 49:05 | Action Based Denial 52:42 | Using Rules & Dopamine 58:27 | Ways to Get Motivated   QUOTES:   “When I say dopamine is the universal currency of everything, what I mean is, it's driving the motivation to develop new currencies.” [3:08]   “Celebrating the win more than the pursuit, it actually sets you up for failure in the future.” [16:00]   “If you can start to register that craving, and that friction and that desire, that almost kind of low level of agitation, sometimes high level of agitation [...] that's dopamine...” [17:54]   “Your capacity to tap into dopamine as a motivator, not just seeking dopamine rewards, that is infinite.” [19:34]   “It's the craving that makes me feel alive. So it's the state of wanting that is in and of itself, the pleasurable act.” [22:37]   “It doesn't matter if it's Bitcoin or aetherium, it doesn't matter if it's putting rockets on other planets, it doesn't matter if it's building the first automobile, it's the same currency.” [25:27]   “Dopamine itself is not the reward. It's the build up to the reward, and the reward has more of a kind of opioid bliss like property,” [29:51]   “The more pain you experience, the more dopamine you can achieve. If you get back on the avenue of pursuit.” [30:58]   “I would say addiction is a progressive narrowing of the things that bring you pleasure, and I don't like to comment too much on enlightenment, [...] but a good life is a progressive expansion of the things that bring you pleasure, and even better is a good life is a progressive expansion of the things that bring you pleasure and includes pleasure through motivation and hard work. “ [32:55]   “If you think about most of the growth in life comes from these rigidly externally imposed schedules and we hate them. But they are where we learn restraint” [52:42]     Follow Andrew Huberman: Website: https://hubermanlab.com/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/andrewhubermanlab Twitter: https://twitter.com/hubermanlab Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hubermanlab/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hubermanlab Podcast: https://hubermanlab.com/  

The Nathan Barry Show
048: Ali Abdaal - Building Multiple Income Streams as a Content Creator

The Nathan Barry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 72:25


Ali Abdaal is a Doctor, writer, podcaster, entrepreneur, and YouTube sensation. Ali has grown his YouTube subscriber base to over 2 million, and writes a weekly newsletter titled Sunday Snippets. Sunday Snippets covers productivity tips, practical life advice, and the best insights from across the web.Ali studied medicine at Cambridge University. He worked as a Doctor in the United Kingdom before taking time off to explore his other interests. His YouTube channel covers medicine, tech, lifestyle, and productivity. Ali also co-hosts a weekly podcast with his brother, called Not Overthinking.After learning to code at age 12, Ali started doing freelance web design and development. He enjoys playing piano, guitar, and singing covers of mainstream pop songs. You can find occasional videos of Ali's music prowess on his Instagram page.In this episode, you'll learn: Ali's savvy insights for growing your YouTube subscriber base A proven formula for writing content titles that get clicks Ali's playbook for taking your podcast to a whole new level Links & Resources The Nathan Barry Show on Apple Podcasts The Nathan Barry Show on Spotify Sean McCabe Pat Flynn ConvertKit Ibz Mo Casey Neistat Sara Dietschy Chris Guillebeau Tim Ferriss Derek Sivers School of Greatness podcast Lewis Howes Dave Ramsey Michael Hyatt Cal Newport Crash Course John Green Hank Green Daily Content Machine Andrew D. Huberman Reboot Dan Putt Tiago Forte David Perell Jim Collins The Flywheel Effect Impact Theory podcast The Tim Ferriss show Seth Godin Scrivener James Clear Ali Abdaal's Links Follow Ali on Twitter Watch Ali on YouTube Check out Ali on Instagram Ali's newsletter Ali's website Episode Transcript[00:00:00] Ali:YouTube can change your life, but you have to put out a video every single week for the next two years. If you do that, I guarantee you it'll change your life. I can't put any numbers on it. I can't tell you how many subscribers you'll have, or how much revenue you have, like a hundred percent guarantee.You will change your life at the very least in terms of skills or connections or friends, or opportunities that will come your way as a result of posting consistently.[00:00:30] Nathan:In this episode, I talk to Ali Abdaal. Over the last four and a half years he's built his YouTube channel from zero to 2 million subscribers.He's who all of my friends who are into YouTube turn to for advice. He's got a paid course. He's got a substantial email newsletter. He started out as a doctor and then has made the switch into a full-time YouTuber. So anyway, I'll get out of the way, but, before we dive into the show, if you could do me a favor after the show: if you could go and subscribe on Spotify, iTunes, wherever you listen.That helps with downloads. If you could also write a review, I really appreciate it.Now it's on to the show, with Ali.Ali, welcome to the show.[00:01:17] Ali:Thanks for having me. This is really cool. I've been following you on the internet in a non-weird way since 2016. I remember once in, I think it was 2018, I discovered your 2015 podcast series all about launching an ebook, and pricing plans, and all this stuff.It was so good. Now we're looking to do eBooks and things like that. Thank you for all the inspiration on that front.[00:01:46] Nathan:Yeah, for sure. Well, it's fun to have you on, it's been fun to watch you grow. I was actually on a hike with our mutual friend, Sean McCabe after he moved to Boise, my hometown. He was talking about you, and I hadn't come across your stuff yet. And I was like, oh, I gotta check it out.And now I'm watching a whole bunch of videos. And then of course we've been internet friends for, for awhile now.[00:02:08] Ali:I'm now a customer of ConvertKit as well, for the last few months.[00:02:11] Nathan:Yeah. Let's see. Okay. So I want to dive into your story and get some context because you have an interesting path of finishing school, like a substantial amount of schooling, and then diving into the world of being a doctor, and then transitioning out of it.What was the plan? Let's start.[00:02:36] Ali:Yeah. for a bit of context, I spent six years in medical school, and then two years working full-time as a doctor in the UK national health service before deciding to take a break. In that break I intended to travel the world, but then the pandemic happened and I ended up becoming a full-time creator on the internet by virtue of the fact that I didn't have a job when it was a pandemic.When I first decided to apply to med school, I'd been into the whole entrepreneurship thing since the age of 12. I learned to code. I started doing freelance web design and freelance web developer from age 13 onwards. So, in school, in high school, middle school, like we call it secondary school in the UK, I'd rush back home from school when I finished off my homework in record time, and then just be plugging away at like PHP or some HTML or some like jenky Java script. I used to make $5 here and there, and be like, yes, I'm, I'm making magical internet money. Every year when, when I was in, in high school, my friends and I would come up with a new business idea.So, we started this multi-level marketing thing and some other random pyramid schemes, and random paid surveys, and whatever we could do to make money circa 2006 to 2010. So, I always had this interest in entrepreneurship, but then when it came to figuring out what to do with my life, I was getting decent grades in school and because I'm Asian, and everyone in the UK who is Asian, their parents are doctors. So, it was like a default path for me to just like, oh, you know, why, why don't I become a doctor? And I kind of reasoned at the time that if I could be a doctor, and also be a coder on the side, that's like a more interesting combination than if I were just a coder or just a doctor.Not that there's anything wrong with either, but I felt the combination would be more interesting because of the synergy. And so I ended up going to med school, which is a weird, a weird reason for going to,[00:04:24] Nathan:Interesting to him, interesting to you, or interesting to[00:04:27] Ali:Yeah.[00:04:28] Nathan:Family friends.[00:04:30] Ali:Oh no, not family and friends, interesting to me, because it would make life more fun and interesting to me because it unlocks opportunities for creating a tech startup or whatever, further down the line. I think at the time I was drinking the zero to one Kool-Aid[00:04:45] Nathan:Well, Peter Thiel[00:04:46] Ali:Yeah, like that, where I first came across the idea that like, innovation happens at the intersection of multiple fields.And so, you know, the printing press was invented by the guy who really understood, I dunno, looms and how spinning yarn worked, but also understood like something else about something else, and combined these ideas to create something cool. So, I always found it in my head that, Hey, why don't I get really good at the medical stuff and be a really good doctor?And then on the side, if I know how to code, then I can like combine those to spin off some, fit some something interesting further down the line.[00:05:14] Nathan:I think that resonates with me of like,I think that people, especially like online creators who go and do one thing very specifically, maybe don't have as much of an interesting angle, to put into it. Like I think that some of what made me more interested.This is like, they're just hypothesizing, teaching like online business and, and marketing is having a design background, even though those are much more overlapping than say, like a big a doctor and, and, you know, a web developer, you know, as you were starting into it. But, but I think having those skills in another area makes you more interesting as a person and it gives you better stories to tell, and then it gives you a better perspective.And you're not like just pulling from the same industry over and over again.[00:05:58] Ali:Yeah, no, exactly. I, I often find that the, the YouTubers that I seem to kind of, and the, and the, and the bloggers as well, who I follow more of are the ones who seem to have multiple interests. And it kind of gets to that question of like, you know, the, the thing that holds everyone back around, like, what's my niche, like, oh, but I have to pick one thing and get really good at that.And yes, that does have some merit to it, but I often also think that, yeah, but you know, how, how can you carve out a niche for yourself? That's a combination of the other, other stuff that you're interested in, And so instead of trying to be the best, I don't know, productivity YouTuber, it's like, you're the only productivity YouTuber.Who's also a doctor who also runs a business that that's kind of how I think about it.[00:06:37] Nathan:Yeah, that makes sense. Okay. So, when you're in med school, when you started your YouTube channel or you're wrapping up med school, right.[00:06:45] Ali:That's right. Yeah. So, I started the YouTube channel in my penultimate year, so I, I, I, I done five years of med school at this point. I'd set up a few businesses. I had like two SAS products that I was using to side hustle, income, most my, my way through med school. And then in 2017, when I was in my final year, the YouTube channel actually started out as a content marketing strategy for my, my business, that business was helping other people get into med school.It was like that standard thing. Once you do something, you then teach other people how to do the thing. and it was like, you know, the creative economy before it was really called that where[00:07:20] Nathan:Yeah,[00:07:20] Ali:You kind of follow that model. And so the YouTube channel started.[00:07:23] Nathan:Because you were you teaching people like test prep[00:07:25] Ali:Exactly. Yeah. And it's so similar to pet Flynn story as well.You know, he, he started off teaching people how to do some architecture exam. I started up teaching people how to do the med school admissions exams, and that's kind of transitioned into a coaching business, which then transitioned into the YouTube channel.[00:07:40] Nathan:Okay. And so as the YouTube channel started to grow, like, what were some of those first milestones, you know, as you're getting to, how long did it take for you to a thousand subscribers and then maybe, you know, 5,000 or 10,000? Like what milestones stand out.[00:07:52] Ali:Yeah, so I started in the summer of 2017 and it took me six months and 52 videos to get to the first thousand subscribers, six months in 52 videos. I was putting out two videos every week while preparing for med school finals and kind of neglecting my exams for the sake of YouTube, because I could see the YouTube thing was like, oh, I really want to do this.I think the ROI on being a YouTube or is going to be higher than the ROI and getting an extra 2% in my med school finals. that was, that was the theory. Anyway, So, yeah, it took six months of the channel to get a thousand subscribers, another like four or five months for it to get up to 5,000 subscribers.And at the point where I was at around 4,005,000 subscribers, there were two like really good things that happened. Number one was a collab with a much bigger utuber. his name is Ibz Mo. So he and I got to know each other through university and he had 60 K at the time. And so he and I did a collab which took off and helped the channel get exposure.But also there was a video that I made my, my very first video that actually went viral, which was a video about how to study for exams. now this video is a bit weird because like I'd actually planned for it to happen like a whole year before I made it. So when I started YouTube, I, I sort of consumed the hell out of everything on the internet, around how to be a YouTuber and, Sara Dietschy and Casey Neistat had this thing whereby Casey Neistat, enormous YouTuber, Sarah DG would take YouTube who was smaller at the time.She went from 40 cases. Over to like one through over a hundred, a hundred thousand, basically overnight because Casey Neistat shouted her out. and the way that she described that, and I, that I found in some random interview, like on the YouTube grapevine, was that you, you benefit from a collaboration with a bigger utuber, but you only benefit from it.If there is already a backlog of really high quality content on your channel. And so I took that to heart and I knew that, okay, at some point I want to do a collab with a bigger utuber. And at some point I want to try and make specifically a video on how to study for exams, but I knew number one, I needed to have a backlog of hot, cold, high quality content because otherwise no one would care.And secondly, I knew that it would take me about a hundred videos to get good enough at making videos to actually be able to make a decent video about exams. And so that was like my 82nd or something video, which I, I, I I'd had in the back of my mind for so long since, because since getting started button, you know, I need to get my skills up.I need to put in the quantity so that I can actually make videos that are hopefully.[00:10:06] Nathan:Okay. That's interesting. Yeah, because coming, doing a collab and coming to a channel and it's like, okay, they have four videos. And the one that I saw in the collab is actually the best one they've ever done. Like it's sort of, it doesn't have the same ring to it as if you come in and be like, wow, this is incredible.Like, one of my favorite bloggers, you know, it's separate from the YouTube space, but I got him, Chris Guillebeau was an author and blogger and I followed him in the early days. And I had the experience of, he had written a guest post for Tim Ferris and I was reading Tim versus blogging. This was probably 2011, maybe.And I was like, oh, this is really good. I love it. I think it was on actually on travel, hacking, you know, credit card points and all of that. And so I clicked over to his site and I think. Over the next, like two days, I just read the entire website, you know, Nate, it was like years worth of blog posts and all that, but that was the experience.Right. The guest posts is a collab of some kind and then coming over and you're like, you're just deep dive and consume everything rather than the experience of coming over and be like, oh, okay. That's interesting. You know, and like moving along and the back catalog is what, what, drives that?[00:11:09] Ali:Yeah. Yeah. I had, I had that exact experience with Derek Sivers who I discovered through the Tim Ferriss show and Mr. Money mustache, but it's coming through a temporary. I was like, all right, I'm spending the next week of my life. Just binge reading all of your blog posts that you've ever written for the last 20 years.And now it's like, I've got this information downloaded into my brain.[00:11:24] Nathan:Yeah. I love it. Okay. So one thing that I wondered about is as you spend all this time, you know, on med school and, and then, you know, becoming a doctor, it's a big investment. then you also have this love for YouTube and the channels growing. Like the channel now has 2 million subscribers and, and, this is wild success.How do you think about. Like when you made that switch to YouTube, as your full-time thing and leaving behind, at least for now your career as a doctor, how did you make that decision? How did sunk cost play into it? You know, all that,[00:11:59] Ali:Yeah. So this is, it's still something I think about to this day. It's like, there's this balance between how much do I want to be a doctor? And how much do I want to be a YouTuber? when I made the decision at the time, it was, so it was about actually this time, last year, where I took a break from medicine intending to travel the world, but then pandemic happened and ended up being a full-time YouTuber.And then like back then, what I was thinking was I'm, I'm only going to do this for a little while. Cause this YouTube thing is going well right now, the problem with YouTube and like the creative stuff in general is that there's not a lot of like longevity to it necessarily. Like there are so few YouTubers who are big today that were also big 10 years ago.And so that's the thing that I constantly keeps me up at night. Like how will I continue to stay relevant? You know, X number of years from now. And to me, the medicine thing always seemed like a great, you know, my main hustle is being a doctor and my side hustle is being a YouTuber so that no matter what happens, you know, at least I'll have a, a full back career to kind of fall back on.[00:12:53] Nathan:Pretty sure doctors have irrelevant 10 years now.[00:12:55] Ali:Yeah, I'm pretty sure doctors will be relevant. So I wouldn't, I wouldn't have to worry in that context. in the UK, the way the medical system works, there's also like, after you're a doctor for two years, at that point, there's a very natural gap and a lot of people will take some time out to, to go traveling or whatever.And just so happened that COVID happened to that exact point just as I just, as I left to take a break. But I was, I was on the, the school of greatness podcast with Louis hose, last, last week. And he, he was calling me out on this. He was saying that basically I was bullshitting myself because I think the reason why I was holding onto the medicine thing was a profound sense of risk aversion.It was number one. The what if I, what if I lose everything at least then I'll still be able to be a doctor. And number two, it was a case of like, oh, but. I, you know, my brand was built up of the back of being a doctor. And if I lose that, then you know, who am I, why does anyone listen to what I have to say?Who will care what I have to think anymore? Because now I'm just a YouTuber rather than a doctor, which has like prestige and it has like clout. And he basically just called me out and dismantled, like all of my BS on all of those funds. And that really, really got me thinking. Cause like, you know, ultimately the thing that I care about is teaching and inspiring people.And if I think about, if I could only do one thing for the rest of my life, it would not be saving lives as a doctor. It would be teaching people. And that's the thing that YouTube lets you do and lets you do it at scale. And that's the thing, the internet that today. And so now right now I'm going through this phase of having to really think about like, am I only holding onto the doctor thing because of because of fear. And am I holding onto fear and sunk costs, which is obviously like a stupid thing. do I really want to go all in, on the YouTube stuff and then the business stuff, because my real passion is teaching. I don't know any, any thoughts on that balancing, like the fear and like the sensible decision would like following your passion.And it sounds so cliche, but yeah.[00:14:48] Nathan:Yeah. No, it all makes sense to me. The place that I would go is, you know, as you, cause there's, there's fear on both sides, right? I've given up the, being a doctor and then there's fear of what does this career as a, as a creator, as a YouTuber look like in five years, in 10 years. And I would lean in on that side and try to figure that out.Like who are the people, questions I would ask, who are the people who. You admire, who have had longevity in their careers. Right. Cause in the, in the blogging world that I've been a part of the last I want to spend, I guess, almost exactly 10 years now. There's a lot of people who are not around anymore, you know, like they're still alive.I'm sure they're living wonderful lives, but they don't live internet, you know, internet visible lives anymore. and then also seeing like what, what does your business look like in that? It's how you do dependent? Is it, what does that look like? So as you look five years ahead, this something I want to ask later, but, but I'm curious for now, like five years, 10 years ahead, like what are you doing?What's the, what does your, your audience look like? And what role does YouTube or other things play in[00:15:50] Ali:Yeah. Yeah. I think if, if, if I think about people who have longevity, I think you're one of the examples that comes to mind where you started off as a blogger, and then you did the ebook thing, and then you went into the SAS thing, which is now like, absolutely like, you know, exploded. so that's really cool.The other people who I look to are, you know, people like Tim Ferris, who. Has gotten bigger every year, since before I work, we came out and it wasn't a one hit wonder. We started off with the books and then he did a great job of transitioning into the podcast where now it's less about him and more about kind of spotlighting other people and building this almost the institution of his, his personal brand, which is built off of teaching people.Cool, cool things. yeah, I think about it, like in that context, like the thing that you and Tim have in common is that you've both gone, moved away from being very personal brand heavy and more towards being somewhat institutionalized in your case and convert kit in his case, through his podcast.And that's kind of how I see it for myself in a dream world, whereby let's say five years from now, I'm still like doing YouTube videos and teaching people and I'm learning things. And then teaching people, the things that I've been learning. Cause I, I enjoy that kind of stuff, but it's become, becomes less about me personally and more about kind of showcasing other experts.Building a team and building a brand that can be dissociated from my personal name, if need be.[00:17:09] Nathan:Is there a blueprint that comes to mind? So I think about this, a lot of where, where this goes with the highest leverage point to direct an audience to, I —-wrote an article called the billion Abdaalar creator, that is about like this exactly of, you know, if you have an audience of 10,000 or a hundred thousand or a million people, like, what is the thing that you would point that to long-term.And so I'm always looking for these blueprints that other people have created, right? Like I think, Dave Ramsey would be an example of someone who has taken this.Podcasting a radio show is basically a podcast. you know, and taking it to this extreme of, I don't know what they have, I'm making up numbers, but in the ballpark of like 500 to a thousand employees, they've got like this franchise thing, they've got courses that they're, you know, you can sign up for everywhere.Like it's this massive media empire that I can draw a pretty consistent line from, you know, blogger with 10,000 subscribers or 10,000 podcast downloads consistently to that of like continually working away at it. Not to guarantee you that, that you'll hit that, but you know, there'll be other people on Michael Hyatt or, anything else or there's the software direction that I went.So are there like specific blueprints that you look at and be like, okay, that, but[00:18:30] Ali:Yeah.[00:18:31] Nathan:Of it.[00:18:32] Ali:Yeah. I think for me, the playbook that I'm currently following is trying to be a cross between Tim Ferris and Cal Newport.In that Tim, Tim Ferriss in the context of starting a podcast, interviewing experts on stuff. And I need me to, I probably add someone to that. Tim Ferriss, Cal Newport, and the crash course, the YouTube channel, which is run by Hank and John Green, whereas also taking the Tim Ferriss model of podcast, interviewing other people.And then, then that becomes its own kind of content, which helps people, the Cal Newport model of actually I think he he's done a great job of straddling the two worlds of old world prestige of being a professor at Stanford or wherever he's a professor at a part-time and also being a part-time writer and blogger and internet personality type person.And then like taking elements of those and combining it with like the YouTube airy type thing, whereby I think, I think what's missing from the world of podcasts these days is that there are so many podcasts and there is so much incredible wisdom, which back in the day used to be locked up inside either textbooks or in scientific journals.Now, the people who write those scientific journal review papers are being interviewed on all the podcasts. but they're being interviewed in the context of a three hour long discussion. And yes, you could listen to the three hour long discussion. Yes. You could listen to the podcast clips that they've got, that they've been posting through Daily Content Machine on Twitter or whatever, but it's just not as actionable as someone actually creating a compelling YouTube video.So, you know, you could listen to Andrew Huberman interview, the world's expert on longevity about all the eight different things you should do to increase your life. And very few people would follow that advice because there's no in a digestible format. And so if I'm thinking like what I'm, what I'm thinking is that if we can do the podcast thing, we can do the kind of Cal Newport thing of combining old world prestige with new world, kind of content, and also do it in the format of like YouTube videos that are accessible to the mass market and, you know, a lay person audience that is kind of the combination that I see myself doing over the next like five years.And that feels quite exciting.[00:20:32] Nathan:Yeah. So that target of like the 10 to 15 minute YouTube video, that's really well crafted and architected to have the table of contents and even skip to the sections. And it's like, look, this is what you need. And it's not just what was covered in an hour long interview, but also like, and then we pulled in this and when they referenced this thing, like, this is what they're talking about.We can illustrate it with visuals and everything else.[00:20:55] Ali:Absolutely. Yeah. And that's the thing that I'm hooked. So in the process of building a team around, which is something I wanted to talk to you about because you've built a big team over time, I was speaking to Derek, you're a director of marketing as well about building a team and he had, so he had loads of advice to share.So that's, that's a challenge for me right now. It's like, you know, two years ago, it was just me last year, this time, last year, there were three, three of us full-time well, two full-time. It was me working as a doctor and a part-time assistant, and now there's 12 of us, but now we're hiring another 10 people.So by next month it's going to be maybe like 20, 20 of us a hundred. It's all those problems associated with scaling a team and leadership and management. And that's the kind of stuff that, I've been really as sort of very much on the steep learning curve of, and that I'm very excited about getting better at,[00:21:44] Nathan:Yeah. what's the reason that you're growing the team so quickly.[00:21:48] Ali:Well, let's see, because we just have a lot of money. once, once we launched our, yeah, it's a, it's a, it's a good problem to have. We're just like very cash rich and expertise poor as someone described as, We launched our cohort based course part time, YouTube academy this time, last year, it did phenomenally well, I'd been doing classes on Skillshare, which started off as making like a few hundred to a few thousand a month and is now compounded to the point where we make some way between 60 and $80,000 every month, just passive income of Skillshare classes.That means that every month we're just making more and more money. And I see the, I see the numbers going up and I see them go up and I, I see basically like, well, why, why are, why aren't we doing anything with that money other than just[00:22:30] Nathan:Right.[00:22:31] Ali:every year.[00:22:32] Nathan:Okay. So really quick, since you mentioned, are you okay sharing some of the numbers, like the numbers from part-time YouTube academy?[00:22:38] Ali:Yeah. so we launched the first cohort in November last year. I think this year we're on track to do maybe like $2 million revenue and like 1.1 0.5 million profit, 1.6 million profits, something like that. next year we're hoping to take that up to like 5 million revenue. Which again, all of these feel like, like dumb numbers, I'm just plucking out of thin air.Cause it's like, I I've, I'm, I'm really bad at like projecting, protecting financials. Like it's all, it's all just a guess. Anyway, like if we could do four cohorts and sell 600 places, that would be 5.5 0.1 million revenue. It's like, that's actually, that's actually doable, but it's just such a fricking ridiculous numbers.It's like, how on earth can that be doable? It's just like, how, how does it even work?[00:23:23] Nathan:Yeah. Welcome to the internet. And, when you have substantial leverage, like things that were possible, like seemed insane before you're like, oh yeah, I know that math checks out, you know?[00:23:34] Ali:Yeah, exactly. I suppose if somebody, to you for ConvertKit was I think last I checked, you were on 20 million annual recurring.[00:23:41] Nathan:Yeah. We're at 20, 28 and a half. Now[00:23:44] Ali:Well the hell that's going to quickly compounding.[00:23:48] Nathan:The magic of compounding, This is fascinating to me because a lot of, I feel like a lot of content creators are, you know, get to your stage and they're like, okay, what, you know, what Lamborghini should I buy right now?Have you thought about putting the line beginning in your YouTube videos? I'm kidding, please.Don't[00:24:05] Ali:I mean, I've got a Tesla model three, so that was my, a splurge.[00:24:08] Nathan:That was your splurge. Yeah, exactly. you know, so interesting to me that you're hiring at the rate that you are, which is to be totally clear is the rate that we hired at ConvertKit like slow at first of like two or three, four, and then it started to, like started to really take off. And I think in, let me think how long eight months we went from four people to 21 people.And, and that worked really well for us. And we were growing really, really quickly. And, and, like in that time, I think we 10 X revenue, like going. 30,000 a month in revenue to 300,000 a month and revenue. and so that that's absolutely a wild ride. And then we kind of paused there for a second and we like methodically about, okay, what are the roles that we need?How do we build the team culture within the group that we have? How can we invest in those relationships? We also had our first team, like in-person team retreat at that time. and so I think it's really important as you grow a team that quickly to make sure you're really, really, yeah. Intentional about, the team culture, which like, that's one of the things like, what does that even mean?How do you, how do you do that? And the way that I do it is being clear about the mission of what you're building and why. and then investing deeply in the relationships with each person.[00:25:32] Ali:Okay. And what does, what does that mean?[00:25:34] Nathan:Was, so you're hiring all these people, right? And let's say you're hiring from you're very much the face of the.And so if someone's applying to like, oh, I want to work with Ali, right? Like, let's do that. And so they have this relationship with you and what you don't want is this, you'd end up with this hub and spoke model where you're the hub and everyone has a relationship with you and they don't have it with each other.And that's just the, it's a natural way that things are joining, right. Or the way it comes about. I, the same thing when people wanted to start working at ConvertKit, they wanted to work at convergent, but they a lot wanted to work with me. And so you have to invest deeply in turning that hub and spoke into like a spiderwebs where if you're not at the core of it, they all are riffing on ideas.They, you know, understand each other's, families and like individual values and everything else. and that matters more. And so you have to know that the natural state of things is not ideal and you need to like aggressively work, to change that. So that you're less important than your own.[00:26:39] Ali:Oh, interesting. Yeah. That's exactly the challenge that we're having right now where. Still all of the things kind of flow through me, but it's, I think over the last few months, as I've gotten like business coaches and working with, with our mutual friend, Sean, as a coach, as well, and reading sort of dozens of books about like leadership and management and like org chart structure and all that jazz, we're starting to get to a point where I actually do feel like stuff is happening without me.And it's like the best feeling in the world when they're just doing stuff. And I'm like, whoa, wow. That's actually a great idea. It was so well done. And you've actually done this better, better than I would have done this. Whoa. Okay. This is really cool. so hopefully as the team expands, yeah, the, the, the culture thing is interesting.I think so far, I haven't given any thought to culture in the slightest as just sort of happened organically slash accidentally. but one of the exercises that Sean, Sean took me through was the thing of like, imagine, you know, a year from now or three years from now, what is the sort of business that you want to have?Like you go into work in the morning, like what, what do you want to say. It was only after that. I kind of thought about that, that I realized that for me, what that dream looks like, it's actually having an in-person team having like a studio, maybe, maybe in a place like London that we can invite people over to for podcasts and focus for collabs having an in-person team.Or maybe once a once a week, I have brainstorm meetings with, you know, our writers and researchers and stuff, and we figure out what we're doing. Maybe once a week, I filmed stuff for the YouTube channels. And maybe once a week, I sit down to record a podcast with someone cool. And the rest of the time I spend like chilling, or, you know, writing or reading or doing other, working on the businessy type stuff.And we have like a COO or general manager or whatever you want to call it, who runs the day-to-day operations without needing my input. and it was only really when I kind of said that out loud, I'm just going to ask, so, okay, well when you just make that happen and I was like, oh yeah, you're right.I could just make that happen. And then, because I think before I just, I, I drank the remote work Kool-Aid so, so much that I just sort of assumed that you had to hire remotely. Then I realized, hang on, given that this is the sort of business I want to be in where we're all actually in person, because it's more fun.I can just hire people who are only London. And so when we're not doing that, hiring people who are only in London, which feels weird, but it means we also have, you know, a few dozen applications rather than a few thousand to, to deal with, which is, which is kinda nice.[00:28:59] Nathan:Yeah. And that's something that when you get clear on that, and that's why so many people want, besides journaling or whatever, other journaling coaching, any, any form of getting that clarity, it's you realize that you're like following this meandering path and like, and then we can do this and then that, and then you realize like, oh, I can just draw a straight line from point a to point B and just do that now.And it's, it's so powerful and you'll save yourself a lot of trouble because then you won't be at a point, right. Where you say we've built a 25 person team. That's like, maybe there's six in London. And then, everyone else is spread throughout the world and people are loving aspects of that, but then they're feeling like the people in London are getting more time with you and right.And you go and create this major culture problems because you had an intention like, or an internal desire that you never expressed, explicitly. And then once you express that and then everyone's like, oh, okay. So I know that it's them working for you remotely right now. I know that I either long-term need to switch to being a contractor of like, just providing a service, you know, or I need to move to London or I need to fully transition out.Like, and there's like a beautiful clarity in that, that when you just keep it inside, you like no one will, no one will experience.[00:30:17] Ali:Hmm. Have you, have you got any like prompts that you find helpful in this sort of journaling thing and figuring out what you want from the business and from life?[00:30:25] Nathan:So, you and I both share a passion for coaching and I hire a coach as well as name's Dan, from an organization called reboot. so he asks all kinds of questions. one, I was navigating a scenario recently that was just really frustrating. And, he said, okay, I want you to picture when you're 40.So I'm 31 right now. So nine years from now, how would your 40 year old self looking back, you know, basically 10 years be proud of how the situation was handled. And that was a version. So basically the prompt would be like stepping forward, not just, what do you want 10 years from now, but like stepping forward and trying to really imagine that scenario.You know, what's pushing you to do, and then looking like looking back on it as a memory of how you handle this next period of difficult transition or any of that. So that'd be one version. Another is like really pushing on like the five why's and really digging in of why do you want that thing? What do you, what are you actually trying to accomplish?I'm sure there's more, butYeah. Are there others that you use.[00:31:38] Ali:Yeah, that question of why did I come across this? I can't remember where I was like to cite my sources, but, the thing of when, when making a decision, think about what decision your like 10 year older self would have wanted you to make, to be like the best version of yourself.And I've been thinking about that recently in the context of this thing of do I go all in on the YouTube thing or do I just kind of do Hoff medicine off YouTube? And I do think out of 10 years from now, I would have wanted myself to make the decision of actually just going all in on the passion project and just seeing what happens with that.If it doesn't work, it didn't work, but at least having a go rather than feeling kind of pulled in two directions, which are sort of incompatible because of the amount of time commitment that a physical career like medicine takes.[00:32:25] Nathan:Yeah. And it's hard when you're like, if you have a 10 person team and you're, you're the only one that's part-time right. Like that, that will result in, you wish you could spend more time with the team. You, you know, you being the bottleneck and things, you shouldn't be it made me think of like the, on the team side of things.There's a movie called the intern, Robert DeNiro and Hathaway.[00:32:44] Ali:No, yeah. I really enjoyed that. It[00:32:46] Nathan:It's a fun movie.And there's a scene in it. So Anne Hathaway runs this, like a fashion tech startup, but th but there's a scene early on when she's like rushing from thing to thing and everything is going to her for approval and all of this stuff.Right. And I remember watching the, how she's so important. It'd be nice to be that important. And then the second one, you stepped back and you're like, that is a terribly run business. Like, what is she doing? You know, like the whole thing, if she wasn't there, the whole thing would fall apart. Cause no one would have our approval for like the homepage designs or, or whatever else.And so, going back to the hub and spoke thing, that's the, you know, you'd like watch that little clip of the movie and then go, okay. That, but the opposite, like that's[00:33:30] Ali:Yeah,[00:33:30] Nathan:To go.[00:33:30] Ali:Yeah. There's one. So, often, you know, someone in my team will message me being like, Hey, you know, we, we need to discuss item X. can you, me and Angus hop on a call and discuss item X. And these days are reply with, can you and Angus discuss item X? Like, do I absolutely have to be on this call?And they're often like, oh no, I guess you don't. Yeah. You know, I mean, I'm just gonna take care of it. I'm like great, wonderful. and I'm always surprised when that works. it's like, oh yeah, this doesn't work. I actually don't need to be involved in everything. but I guess it's, it is that balance of, and I think sometimes the team does feel frustrated that I I'm involved in too many things.I've heard and they feel like maybe I don't necessarily trust all of their decisions. it's like, you know, my name that is going on all this stuff and I trust, but I want to, I want to be able to verify, like if I ask why was something done? Like why, why that pricing plan, rather than that pricing plan,[00:34:22] Nathan:Right.[00:34:22] Ali:Like a reason behind it beyond, oh, it's just, we just sort of plucked numbers out of thin air.[00:34:26] Nathan:Yeah. So two things that makes me think of is one, creating a culture where asking questions is encouraged and not just, Like asking questions of like, Hey, could you explain this to me? I truly don't understand it, but, but also like asking for, is there a reason behind this? You know, why did you do that?And then the other side, when people come to you and say like, Hey, what do you think we should do? Then you ask them, what do you think we should do?And then going like, oh, well I think X, Y, and Z. And you're like, okay, why do you think that because of this great, let's do that. You know, you have more and more conversations where like people come to you and then they make the decision and[00:35:05] Ali:Yeah,[00:35:05] Nathan:Place.[00:35:06] Ali:Yeah, yeah. I'd love to get to that point. I think I need to do a better job of, of doing that. the most, the most obvious example is like when we're brainstorming video content ideas and we're coming up with titles. so we had a meeting earlier today and, you know, the team came up with a few concepts and like 20 titles for each one.And then I made the final decision. I was like, oh, I kind of liked the sound of like title number five. but what I probably should do in that context is, okay, Gareth, if you were making this video, what title would you go for? And then kind of seeing what happens. And I guess there is an element of like, you know, I, I trust my gut on what makes a good title more than I trust anyone else's in the team Scott's or what makes a good title.But I'd like to be able to either train someone it's hard to train someone for this, like find someone who's got like trust more. And so who, who I can just fully outsource the responsibility of coming up with a decent title for, because it is such a huge part of what makes a successful YouTube video[00:36:00] Nathan:Yeah. Okay. On those lines. When you make a video, do you know how often do you know when it's going to be like a video that really hits?[00:36:09] Ali:Think about 20% of the time.I can, I have a gut feeling that, okay, this could be a banger. and th the way I think about it in my head is sort of in terms of Banga potential. So a video called I dunno, nine passive income idea is how I make $27,000 a week that has high bang of potential, a video call.The power of positive thinking the potential, like that's not going to be back. It's like, okay, can we increase the bang of potential by making the title more clickbait? and so for example, you know, I've been working with a life coach for the last few months. I want to make a video about it. I've been thinking, you know, how, like really the thing I worked with them on was how to figure out what I want from life.But a video called how I'm, how to figure out what you want from life. You know, maybe two out of five bang of potential, a video called I hired a life coach for $3,000. Here's what I learned. That's got bag of potential. And so often it's just like a tweaking of the title where it's like the more click baity and sensationalized the title that is annoyingly often.The thing that chorus that correlates most strongly with how much of a banger is this city you're going to be. And the formula that I try and use is sensational click baity title combined with like very deep nuanced. So that someone clicks on the video thinking, huh? And then they're very, very impressed by the production value by the structure, by the academic newness of it, by how awful it is.I think it's crossed the Pepsi, at least that's the intention.[00:37:32] Nathan:Okay. That's interesting to me. I have this like running fantasy as I teach. People how to build wealth and make money. Like, those are some of my favorite topics. I can talk about them all day. And so I was joking with someone that I was going to do, like these real estate seminars, you know, that you see advertised where it's really scammy or you're really just paying for that person's private jet.You know, or it's like, it's the, the MLM equivalent, multilevel marketing equivalent of whatever. Like I'm going to use the same tactics, but then like actually deliver real value. And like the ticket that I charged would just be like 50 bucks and it all go to, I don't know, clean water, charity water, or something like that, you know, basically saying like, I'm going to hook people in with the same thing, clickbait and then deliver, like substantial value that will actually be life-changing.Yeah. And so[00:38:23] Ali:Yeah.[00:38:23] Nathan:The same thing. I like it.[00:38:25] Ali:Yeah. I think it's a great idea because you kind of need to use the clickbait. Like there's literally no way someone's going to click on something. there's a channel, V very, to cm, which made an amazing video, like a few days ago, about the difference about the importance of clickbait and how, and how much it works.And his overall point was that like click, click bait is kind of the wrong word. There is sort of, I think, I think the two terms where there's this sort of like intrigue Bates, which is that, you know, oh, this is interesting. I want to, I want to click on this. And then there is, I can't remember what he said, but it's like, sort of trashed bait, which is that I'm going to stick a bikini model on a thumbnail and has nothing to do with that.But, and so there's those two, two different ones where like, in a way, the way that you title something or the title of your book or the cover of some. It's so, so important for getting the message across. And we shouldn't see that as being a bad thing. Whereas the word clickbait, it includes, you know, things like what is what what's a good headline designer.What's good marketing coffee, but it really shouldn't because clickbait has, it is a dirty word, but it, it shouldn't be because the cover of something is so important to how that thing is perceived and whether people are going to see it or not.[00:39:33] Nathan:Yeah. Yeah. That makes sense. How do you think about the thumbnails and then like the, say the first 30 seconds of the video, those are two separate questions, but as both of those in, in driving engagement,[00:39:44] Ali:Yeah. So thumbnail is really, really important. I think on our channel, we were bad at thumbnails. I'm not a fan of our thumbnail style. we're trying to evolve and iterate on it over time whereby the, you know, and so w w whenever someone's an early stage, utuber, it's like, you're, you're uploading the video.And then you think about the title. And then you think, okay, let me find a, still from the video that I can use with someone else, and then maybe you downloaded it, ramp up the contrast saturation, blah, blah, blah, sticker, clarity, filter on it, and maybe put some text on it in Canada. That's like the, the new YouTube, YouTube way of doing it.When you become a little bit more pro you start thinking of the title in advance anything, okay, what's the title of this video going to be, and then you make the video and you've got the title already. but the thumbnail is still a bit of an afterthought because it's, it's quite hard to think about something else.And that's the point where we're at. and the gold standard is where you have full about the title. And you have literally made the thumbnail before you even think about writing the script for the video. And that is a place where we would like to get to. so we're looking to hire like a graphic designer and, you know, a YouTube channel producer whose job it's going to be to work with a graphic designer at any time, because we, we we've got hundreds of ideas at the top of our pipeline, but at the moment, our bottleneck is in developing those ideas, crucially with a decent title of decent thumbnail and a rough talk, rough amount of talking points.And so, yeah, we're doing everything we can to make the thumbnail more of a first-class citizen, because it's just so stupidly important on YouTube. And in fact, often, you know, if, when I've heard YouTubers would like 10 million plus subscribers speak about thumbnails, they view the thumbnail as being even more important than the title, because the thumbnail is the first thing that really catches the viewer's eye.And the first thing that they see. so yeah, I think we do vaginal thumbnails. Well, relatively speaking, and we're trying to improve at it. I think equally the first 30 seconds is just ridiculously important where everyone's attention is so like all over the place, but if you don't hook the viewer within the first like five seconds, you see that huge drop off in engagement.And again, other other YouTubers that I look up to really, really obsess over the first 30 seconds to one minute of the video and when we teach our YouTube, of course, and we analyze like, what makes a good, like what do these sort of 5 million plus view videos happen? It's like often there's like a cut every single second in the first 30 seconds, like some new piece of gear or something happening on screen.It's just like so rapid and fast and really holds your attention. Whereas for the rest of the video, you can kind of switch to a car every five seconds or something happening every 10 seconds, the ten second rule. but certainly the first 30 seconds, like Panama, it's gotta be like really, really, really sharp and on points.Otherwise people just don't watch.[00:42:16] Nathan:Yeah, that's fascinating. I'm realizing that it's true for a lot of channels I've seen grow really quickly are employing the same things. that's something that's I wanted to ask you about on the monetization side is you're selling a high value course, to like a big audience, you know, 2 million subscribers on YouTube.You also have a what? Lower a hundred thousand subscribers on, on email.All right.[00:42:38] Ali:Yeah.130 or something.[00:42:41] Nathan:Nice. What's the, like, how does your approach differ when in promoting that, you know, a new course, like the part-time YouTube academy on YouTube versus on email.[00:42:50] Ali:I think I'm still scared of selling. It's really bad. I need to get over it. I was, so I was really, really scared of selling like a year ago. And when I had the idea for the part-time YouTube academy, it was on like the 16th of August, 2020, where I wrote the notion page about it for the first time I was thinking, okay, you know, this, this is either going to be a Skillshare class.I eat free, or it's going to be like maybe a 50 to $200 kind of self-paced course. And you know, I can really, really over-deliver on content. Cause I know what I'm talking about here. And so $200 is an absolute steal for this. No one's ever going to complain that this is not worth it. And then I spoke to, I think people that you probably know Tiago Forte and David Perell who run their own like cohort based courses.And they challenged me. You know, what if you had to do this live? What if you had to charge a thousand Abdaalars for it, how would it change your approach to the course? And starting to think in those terms made me really changed the way that we did a personal course and it became a high, second thing. It made me realize that actually what the world needed was not, or what needed to be grandiose, like what the internet needed.It was not, another YouTube or making a self-paced course on how to be a YouTuber. The thing that's actually holding people back is the accountability and the community. And these are things that you get in a live cohort. but getting back to your point about how, like the difference in, in setting it.So we actually only advertised it on Twitter and on the meeting list. initially I didn't even mention it on YouTube because I was so scared of mentioning the course on YouTube. And I think the reason I was so scared of mentioning the course on YouTube is a problem with YouTube that I've spoken to a bunch of other creators about, which is that the people who comment on the videos do not reflect the audience at all.[00:44:29] Nathan:Right.[00:44:30] Ali:Like, if you think about who comments on a YouTube video, it's generally kids, it's generally kids with with enough time on their hands to comment on to comment on videos. And so I was always scared. Like, my audience is not going to appreciate the fact that I'm selling a high ticket course. They're going to think I'm a snake oil salesman or something like that.And my audience mental model was the people who comment on my videos. And it took me a little bit of like an epiphany to realize, hang on, the people who I'm targeting are people with jobs. People would like, you know, six figure incomes, people who want to do the creative side hustle and take it seriously.They are not the 14 to 17 year old kids commenting on my videos. And that was such a major like revelation of like, I can actually completely ignore the comments and I can just go by the analytics that tells me like 40% of my audience is age like 24 to 36 in the U S fantastic. Those are the people I want.Whereas on email, you don't really see that as so, so clearly. And so I think, and especially because I've read your stuff. Read a lot around email marketing, but so little around YouTube marketing. I'm much more comfortable selling on email than I am selling on YouTube, but it's, it's something I'm trying to get better on.So,[00:45:31] Nathan:Are you able to track attribution for signups or that kind of thing of what's coming from YouTube versus email now, right? You're doing at least some promotion of it on YouTube.[00:45:40] Ali:Yeah. we actually, so in the first cohort where we did, we didn't promote on YouTube at all. So it was like 50% Twitter, 50% email, I think for the most recent cohort, even now we don't really promote on YouTube very much. It's less just like a very, very subtle casual plug at the start of a video.I think about 30% came in through YouTube and the rest came in through again, Twitter or email.And so, but you know, one of the things that we're hiring for is a marketing marketing manager to basically just lead marketing for the YouTube academy. And that was some of the stuff that, that your pal Derek was was, was helping us with.[00:46:13] Nathan:Yeah, they're good at all of that kind of stuff of taking, I mean, all the things that I did over the years of like, oh, there's, one-off push here, they're entering into like, okay, that was great. Look at the results we got from it. Also, we're going to do it as a system now, and it's going to work like this and it's going to drive consistent results over time, rather than like these spikes or that sort of thing, which I'm good. okay. Something else like in that journey, we kind of left off as you were, you know, I guess the last we're talking about YouTube numbers was, you know, like five, 10,000 subscribers. I want to hear a little bit more about going from that 10,000 to 100,000 and then like, I think it's a huge jump, but a hundred thousand to 2 million.[00:46:54] Ali:I think it is absolutely fancy. It's just the law of compounding and consistency and, you know, the results happen very, very slowly and then very, very fast. And before you know it, you know, Jim Collins, I thing has that model of the flywheel that it takes. It takes a hell of a lot of energy to get going, but once it starts to go, then it, it becomes unstoppable.I think it's, it's the case for any interesting kind of compounding could growth projectory, you know, YouTube channels, convert kits, any software platform that's growing. and so in year one, I think we hit maybe like 20,000 subscribers by the end of it. Then year two was probably the next few hundred thousand year three was the next like million in year four.It's just wrapped up wait, where we just hit the 2 million mark. And then at the end of year four, so it was just, you know, perfectly matches it maps onto one of those exponential growth curves. The scary thing about that is that like, if you extrapolate it further, that means we're going to be on like 4 million subscribers by next year.And that's just completely unfathomable to me because it's like, okay, that's just never gonna happen. And there is a point at which the, the compounding growth curve stops, That's the thing that I worry about. I don't really worry about it. That's the thing that I'm trying to build more and more like pillars of support around the business, a diversification, more into courses, more into books, more into stuff that is dissociated from my personal brand and also from my personal YouTube channel specifically.Yeah, it's, it's, it's weird. It's one of those things we look back on and you kind of forget like, oh yeah. When, when I started, like, I remember like when I started working as a doctor, I had, I hit 50,000 subscribers like that, that, month. And then a year later when I was having my first like appraisal, where they, your supervisor looks at how good a doctor you were.The first thing he said to me was there were 263,000 people following a YouTube channel. How the hell did that happen? And so I have that number in my head is like, oh yeah. Once I, at the, at the end of 2019, when I, when I finished my first year, I was Dr.. That was what. And then it was like my it's my second year of working as a doctor when the pandemic struck and the pandemic, me and my channel really take off because all of a sudden people were sitting home and watching YouTube videos.I think that was when we had and subscribers. and now a year on from that point, we've just had 2 million and it's just been just insane, insane growth. but obviously consistency compounding the thing I always tell my students is that, you know, YouTube can change your life. but you have to put out a video every single week for the next two years.And if you do that, I guarantee it'll change your life. I can't put any numbers. I can't tell you how many subscribers you'll have or how much revenue you have, like a hundred percent guarantee. You will change your life at the very least in terms of skills or connections or friends, or, you know, just opportunities that will come your way as a result of posting consistently on YouTube.And everyone here is that advice. And like, you know, so few people actually follow that,[00:49:43] Nathan:Yeah.[00:49:44] Ali:With me. You know, I've been trying, I've been trying to hit the gym for the last like eight years. Never done it consistently until I got a personal trainer and now I'm actually seeing gains, Yeah, compounding and consistency, which is some of the stuff that you talk about as well.[00:49:55] Nathan:Yeah, for sure. Is there a point in there where you saw things plateau at all? Like right. There was the, a flat part and an S-curve where you started to think, okay, I need to change something or push through this or anything like that, or has it always just been consistent?[00:50:10] Ali:Yeah. So I don't really look at the numbers very much. the way that's, you know, my, my theory of numbers has always been that like the, the numbers were, were always outside of my control. And the only thing that I could personally control were the number of videos I was putting out and how, how good I felt about the quality of those videos.That second one I got rid of very quickly, because I realized that what I feel about the quality of my own videos does not match at all what the audience feels about the quality of my videos. And therefore I'm not even gonna think about that. So the only metric I care about is just putting out two videos a week.The thing that I, I think of more. When it comes to, okay, these are, this is a bottleneck. We have to like push through. It is when the channel starts to feel like it's a bit stale. And there's been a few times, boy for four and a bit years now, or I felt like, okay, we've kind of been doing the same thing for awhile and it worked to get us here, but maybe what necessarily got us there.So most, you know, initially it was like medical school stuff or it's that Kevin doing medical school stuff for a whole year. I need to kind of branch out from this. And it was like student stuff in general. And it was like, okay, I, I'm not, I'm not graduated to the student. There's only so long. I can keep on just peddling the same stuff around how to be an effective student.It's all kind of, of it. I mean, it's, it's obvious, but it's, you know, there are a finite number of things. There's like a few techniques that work really well and you make videos about them over and over again. So it, it feel stale now more, more recently, the productivity hustle lead type stuff has started to feel a bit stuck.And so now we're now thinking, okay, what's the next level? And that was what prompted the idea to start any podcasts that we're what doing, trying to mimic basically the Tim Ferriss show or impact theory or school of greatness, or these other sorts of broadly in-person interview podcasts interviewing like entrepreneurs, CEOs, creators, and other inspiring people about how they find fulfillment in work and in life that's like the spiel for it.And I, I, I hope that will be like the next level, and be able to expand our content beyond just me talking about productivity or me talking about tech.[00:52:06] Nathan:Right.[00:52:07] Ali:Mostly based on that gut feeling of stillness that I feel okay. The writing on the wall is that this is going to decline unless we change something rather than about the numbers.[00:52:15] Nathan:Yeah. That makes sense of figuring out. I mean, it's in the quality of the product that you're delivering, you know, and making sure that you're continuing to innovate their innovative buzzword, but you know what I mean? so one other thing that I see you doing throughout all of this is making sure that it's fun.And so I'm curious for your[00:52:33] Ali:Yep.[00:52:33] Nathan:On like, what's your philosophy around making this fund? why is that important instead of just like, or in addition to the like rigorous discipline?[00:52:43] Ali:This is literally the thing that I'm writing a book about right now, which is that, you know, people have been asking me for it for years, how you said productive. Even when I was in like high school and university people would be like, oh my God, you do so much stuff. Like how, how are you so productive?How do you, how do you will have it? And it always felt a bit like, you know, people, people had this weird image of me that I was some kind of productivity guru. And now the comments on my videos, like, oh my God, he must be some sort of absolute machine. But you know, I, I, I, I line until like 11 o'clock in the morning this morning, the only thing that got me out of bed was a zoom meeting with the team.And I scroll Twitter for a solid, like 45 minutes today. And I wasted, you know, I, I finished up with a call about half an hour before we were meant to start recording. And I was like, ah, How much work are you ready to get done in half an hour at school, Twitter, often Ariba. So I'm just like genuinely really lazy.And all of the people who actually know me know that I'm really lazy and are completely baffled that the internet thinks I'm a productivity group. I think the, if there is one secret that secret is that I just make everything that I do really fun. and so I think that's got kind of two components.The first component is finding things that you already find fun and then doing them. and that's fine. it's, it's, it's quite hard to do that because often the things we find fun are the things that are not really suitable for a career. Like, you know, I enjoy playing the guitar and do I ha I enjoy playing board games.I enjoy watching Netflix. Like it's very hot. It's hard to make a kind of sustainable career out of that probabilistically. Yes, I could become the next ninja, but it's pretty unlikely I could become the next John Mayer was pretty fricking unlikely. and so the, the lever that I try and pull is figuring out ways to make the thing that I'm already doing, figuring out ways to make that more fun. And I think I've just sort of been subconsciously doing this for my whole life, because I don't like doing stuff that's boring. I only like doing stuff that's fun. And I figured out like a few different, different things I can do that. Basically it tricks my brain into having more fun, which makes me more productive, but it also makes my life more happy.And it also means I don't really need discipline because it's like fun. Like, you know, when

The Nine Club With Chris Roberts
#199 - Andrew Huberman

The Nine Club With Chris Roberts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 214:03


Andrew Huberman discusses growing up in South Bay CA area, skating at Embarcadero, working at Thrasher & Slap Magazine, how he got into science, going to college for Neuroscience, why we sometimes “black out” in the middle of a trick, muscle memory is not a thing, why sleep and breathing is extremely important, how to reduce fear and stress, raising your stress threshold (mental toughness), how dopamine in the brain works, what deja vu actually is, longevity and protecting your body and much more!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.
How To Improve Focus And Attention

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 16:15


How To Improve Focus And Attention | This episode is brought to you by Athletic GreensPreserving, supporting, and strengthening brain function is crucial to aging optimally. While we once thought that declining brain function was a given as you get older, we now know that our brain's have the ability to change structure and function all throughout our lives. Our diets and quality of sleep are crucial for a well functioning brain but so is our ability to harness focus and attention.In this mini-episode Dr. Hyman speaks to Dr. Andrew Huberman about enhancing neuroplasticity to support learning, memory, alertness, and attention. He also speaks with Jim Kwik about the science of learning how to learn.Dr. Andrew Huberman is a neuroscientist and tenured Professor in the Department of Neurobiology at the Stanford University School of Medicine. He has made numerous important contributions to the fields of brain development, brain function, and neural plasticity, which is the ability of our nervous system to rewire and learn new behaviors, skills, and cognitive functioning. Dr. Huberman is a McKnight Foundation and Pew Foundation Fellow and was awarded the Cogan Award in 2017, which is given to the scientist making the largest discoveries in the study of vision. His lab's most recent work focuses on the influence of vision and respiration on human performance and brain states such as fear and courage. Work from the Huberman Laboratory at Stanford University School of Medicine has been published in top journals including Nature, Science, and Cell and has been featured in TIME, BBC, Scientific American, Discover, and other top media outlets.Jim Kwik is the founder of Kwik Learning and a widely recognized world expert in speed-reading, memory improvement, brain performance, and accelerated learning. For over two decades he has served as the brain coach to many of the world's leading C-suite executives and celebrities. After a childhood brain injury left him learning-challenged, Jim created strategies to dramatically enhance his mental performance. He has since dedicated his life to helping others unleash their true brainpower to learn faster and perform smarter. His recent book, Limitless, provides the keys to accelerated learning and endless potential. This episode is brought to you by Athletic Greens. Athletic Greens is offering Doctor's Farmacy listeners a full year supply of their Vitamin D3/K2 Liquid Formula free with your first purchase, plus 5 free travel packs. Just go to athleticgreens.com/hyman to take advantage of this great offer. Find Dr. Hyman's full-length conversation with Dr. Andrew Huberman, “How to Rewire Your Brain For Sleep” here: https://DrMarkHyman.lnk.to/DrAndrewHubermanFind Dr. Hyman's full-length conversation with Jim Kwik, “How To Upgrade Your Brain And Learn Faster” here: https://DrMarkHyman.lnk.to/JimKwik See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Metanoia Lab | Liderança, inovação e transformação digital, por Andrea Iorio
Ep. 67a | como procrastinar menos e focar mais: a ciência da motivação. Andrew Huberman comentado por Andrea Iorio.

Metanoia Lab | Liderança, inovação e transformação digital, por Andrea Iorio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 20:50


Neste segundo episódio da semana dedicado ao Andrew Huberman, o Andrea entra a fundo na ciência da motivação e nos passa os mecanismos através quais procrastinar menos e focar mais, através do ciclo da dopamina.

Mark Bell's Power Project
EP. 592 - Andrew Huberman, How To Stay Calm, Focus Better & Be Happier

Mark Bell's Power Project

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 24:08


Fired off another quick podcast with Andrew Huberman discussing how to stay calm, how to focus better, how to live happier and the importance of expanding your view. Special perks for our listeners below! ➢Magic Spoon Cereal: https://www.magicspoon.com/powerproject to automatically save $5 off a variety pack! ➢8 Sleep: Visit https://www.eightsleep.com/powerproject to automatically save $150 off the Pod Pro! ➢Marek Health: https://marekhealth.com Use code POWERPROJECT15 for 15% off ALL LABS! Also check out the Power Project Panel: https://marekhealth.com/powerproject Use code POWERPROJECT for $101 off! ➢LMNT Electrolytes: http://drinklmnt.com/powerproject ➢Piedmontese Beef: https://www.piedmontese.com/ Use Code "POWERPROJECT" at checkout for 25% off your order plus FREE 2-Day Shipping on orders of $150 Subscribe to the Podcast on on Platforms! ➢ https://lnk.to/PowerProjectPodcast Subscribe to the Power Project Newsletter! ➢ https://bit.ly/2JvmXMb Follow Mark Bell's Power Project Podcast ➢ Insta: https://www.instagram.com/markbellspowerproject ➢ https://www.facebook.com/markbellspowerproject ➢ Twitter: https://twitter.com/mbpowerproject ➢ LinkedIn:https://www.linkedin.com/in/powerproject/ ➢ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/markbellspowerproject ➢TikTok: http://bit.ly/pptiktok FOLLOW Mark Bell ➢ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/marksmellybell ➢ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MarkBellSuperTraining ➢ Twitter: https://twitter.com/marksmellybell ➢ Snapchat: marksmellybell ➢Mark Bell's Daily Workouts, Nutrition and More: https://www.markbell.com/ Follow Nsima Inyang ➢ https://www.breakthebar.com/learn-more ➢YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/NsimaInyang ➢Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nsimainyang/?hl=en ➢TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@nsimayinyang?lang=en Follow Andrew Zaragoza on all platforms ➢ https://direct.me/iamandrewz

Mark Bell's Power Project
EP. 591 - Andrew Huberman, More Test More Sex? Let's Talk Hormones!

Mark Bell's Power Project

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 161:45


Dr. Andrew Huberman is an award-winning professor of neurobiology and ophthalmology at Stanford University, as well as the founder of the Huberman Lab. His lab focuses on researching brain function and brain regeneration. The lab's goals are to discover strategies for halting and reversing vision loss in blinding diseases, and understand how visual perceptions and autonomic arousal states are integrated to impact behavioral responses. Recommended Supplements: Fadogia Agrestis: https://amzn.to/3A933fj ongkat Ali Root: https://amzn.to/3lkyrB5 Grab the new Power Project "think LESS" shirt, supplies are limited: https://markbellslingshot.com/products/think-less-tee?variant=39468915261534 Special perks for our listeners below! ➢Magic Spoon Cereal: https://www.magicspoon.com/powerproject to automatically save $5 off a variety pack! ➢8 Sleep: Visit https://www.eightsleep.com/powerproject to automatically save $150 off the Pod Pro! ➢Marek Health: https://marekhealth.com Use code POWERPROJECT15 for 15% off ALL LABS! Also check out the Power Project Panel: https://marekhealth.com/powerproject Use code POWERPROJECT for $101 off! ➢LMNT Electrolytes: http://drinklmnt.com/powerproject ➢Piedmontese Beef: https://www.piedmontese.com/ Use Code "POWERPROJECT" at checkout for 25% off your order plus FREE 2-Day Shipping on orders of $150 Subscribe to the Podcast on on Platforms! ➢ https://lnk.to/PowerProjectPodcast Subscribe to the Power Project Newsletter! ➢ https://bit.ly/2JvmXMb Follow Mark Bell's Power Project Podcast ➢ Insta: https://www.instagram.com/markbellspowerproject ➢ https://www.facebook.com/markbellspowerproject ➢ Twitter: https://twitter.com/mbpowerproject ➢ LinkedIn:https://www.linkedin.com/in/powerproject/ ➢ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/markbellspowerproject ➢TikTok: http://bit.ly/pptiktok FOLLOW Mark Bell ➢ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/marksmellybell ➢ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MarkBellSuperTraining ➢ Twitter: https://twitter.com/marksmellybell ➢ Snapchat: marksmellybell ➢Mark Bell's Daily Workouts, Nutrition and More: https://www.markbell.com/ Follow Nsima Inyang ➢ https://www.breakthebar.com/learn-more ➢YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/NsimaInyang ➢Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nsimainyang/?hl=en ➢TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@nsimayinyang?lang=en Follow Andrew Zaragoza on all platforms ➢ https://direct.me/iamandrewz #PowerProject #Podcast #MarkBell

Metanoia Lab | Liderança, inovação e transformação digital, por Andrea Iorio
Ep. 67 | Andrew Huberman: neuroplasticidade em adultos, e importância da visão, comentados por Andrea Iorio.

Metanoia Lab | Liderança, inovação e transformação digital, por Andrea Iorio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 34:37


Neste episódio da segunda temporada, patrocinada pela Oi Soluções, o Andrea comenta a fundo 2 frases do Andrew Huberman, neurocientista de Stanford e um dos maiores especialistas do mundo, que falam sobre a ciência do aprendizado em vida adulta através da neuroplasticidade, e sobre a importância da visão para obtermos os estímulos certos.

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit
How to Hack Your Brain to Conquer Your Fears and Increase Motivation (Minisode #46)

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 38:56


How to Hack Your Brain to Conquer Your Fears and Increase Motivation | This episode is brought to you by BiOptimizers and Even.At one point or another, we've all felt stuck in a rut with feelings of laziness and fear. During these times it can be really hard to take a step back and wonder what's happening in the body, as opposed to just the mind, but it's the link between the two that can push us through it. Neurotransmitters have some incredible power over how we function. Dopamine is responsible for craving, motivation, and pursuit. Adrenaline relates to agitation and endurance. Serotonin helps us be grateful and feel good about what we have. And acetylcholine can help us focus. This is just a snapshot of the chemical symphony happening in our bodies all the time, and we can actually leverage these inner reactions to better understand the way we react to the world around us and make positive changes. In today's mini-episode, Dhru speaks with Dr. Andrew Huberman and Dr. Mark McLaughlin about the connection between fear, laziness, and motivation, and tools and strategies for overcoming them. Dr. Andrew Huberman is a neuroscientist and tenured Professor in the Department of Neurobiology at the Stanford University School of Medicine. He has made numerous important contributions to the fields of brain development, brain function, and neural plasticity. His lab's most recent work focuses on the influence of vision and respiration on human performance and brain states such as fear and courage. Work from the Huberman Laboratory at Stanford University School of Medicine has been published in top journals including Nature, Science, and Cell, and has been featured in TIME, BBC, Scientific American, Discover, and other top media outlets. Dr. Mark McLaughlin is a practicing board-certified neurosurgeon, a national media commentator, thought leader in performance enhancement, and author of the book, Cognitive Dominance: A Brain Surgeon's Quest to Outthink Fear. Find Dhru's full-length conversation with Dr. Andrew Huberman here: https://lnk.to/DrAndrewHuberman2/ Find Dhru's full-length conversation with Dr. Mark McLaughlin here: https://lnk.to/DrMarkMclaughlin/ For more on Dhru Purohit, be sure to follow him on Instagram @dhrupurohit, on Facebook @dhruxpurohit, on Twitter @dhrupurohit, and on YouTube @dhrupurohit. You can also text Dhru at (302) 200-5643 or click here https://my.community.com/dhrupurohit. Interested in joining The Dhru Purohit Podcast Facebook Community? Submit your request to join here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/2819627591487473/.This episode is brought to you by BiOptimizers and Even. If I had to pick one supplement that has made the biggest difference in my overall health, it would be magnesium. I personally started taking magnesium to help with my sleep, especially when I travel, and it's been super helpful. But I don't take just any old magnesium, I take BiOptimizers Magnesium Breakthrough. It contains 7 different forms of magnesium, which all have different functions in the body. I haven't found anything else like it on the market. Right now, BiOptimizers is offering my community a few special bundles and for a limited time BiOptimizers is also giving away free bottles of their bestselling products P3OM and Masszymes with select purchases, just head over to magbreakthrough.com/dhru with code DHRU10.Prescription drugs can have some benefits when they're used the right way, but it's important to recognize that they can also deplete key nutrients. This company called Even has created a whole system to help you replenish what's been lost while using certain medications, such as antidepressants, statins, or birth control. Their products are created by physicians, nutritionists, and pharmacists who have identified the exact recipe to rebalance nutrient levels and biochemistry while taking certain meds. Right now, Even is offering my community free consultations and 20% off your first order. Just go to feeleven.com/dhru to check out Even's line of supplements that specifically address medication-induced nutrient deficiencies. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Changing Minds with Owen Fitzpatrick
S03E12 Special Outtake on The Neuroscience of Love with Owen Fitzpatrick Part Two

Changing Minds with Owen Fitzpatrick

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 34:41


Contrary to what movies and storybooks tell us, our feelings and emotions do not come from the heart. They actually come from the brain.   In this second part of a special outtake of my Clubhouse session, I dig into the neuroscience of love, relationships, and heartbreak. I explain certain terms like synaptic pruning and neurotransmission. I then talk about how specific neurochemicals and hormones work when you meet someone, get into a relationship, or get out of one. I also weigh in on attraction, lust, and ghosting, offering advice so that you can better deal with strong feelings or emotionally-driven situations. Hope you enjoy!   Key Takeaways: Dopamine is the chemical that makes us want something or someone Serotonin stabilizes our mood, feelings of well-being, and happiness Oxytocin plays a role in social bonding, reproduction, and the period after childbirth Phenethylamine acts as a releasing agent for dopamine and other chemicals On pheromones, vasopressin, testosterone and estrogen On takotsubo cardiomyopathy or "broken heart” syndrome Set some rules or guidelines so that you don't just go with your feelings Loving someone and being in a relationship can lead to amazing experiences but it's not always easy so be kind to yourself   Quotes: “Feelings and emotions are largely the produce or the effect of these chemicals going across the brain.” “Oxytocin allows you to empathize more easily with people.” “Being attracted to someone and actually acting on that are two different things.” “As soon as you get heartbroken, you're also having your future broken.” “When you fall in love with someone, your brain is actually blind to the negatives.”   Resources: S03E10: Special Outtake on The Neuroscience of Love Part One Dr. Andrew Huberman's podcast Helen Fisher's books How Emotions Are Made by Lisa Feldman Barrett Love Sick by Frank Tallis   Subscribe to the Changing Minds Podcast!

MindBody Alchemy
S1E40 - It's Dopamine - Pleasure and Commitment Pt.2

MindBody Alchemy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 19:22


Episode Notes The battle in our heads between wishing that things weren't so pleasurable, and being terrified that our pleasure from food will be taken away is real. It's challenging to know where to point the finger. Are we weak-willed gluttons or is the food out to get us and life isn't fair? I would suggest that there is probably a little of both (haha), but the reality isn't so sinister. We just need to understand how pleasure is related to pain, and what we actually do have control over. When it comes to having a difficult relationship with food, we have to be on the lookout for our pleasure leaks. This episode simplifies these systems and shows us that we aren't out of control around food, we just haven't quite learned how to work with the systems we have. Find your pleasure leaks, change the way you reward yourself, and watch your relationship with food change along the way. *Shout out the Andrew Huberman of Huberman Labs for making these concepts around dopamine, pleasure, and pain so easy to digest. If you love to geek out on neuroscience as much as I do, be sure to give that page a follow. Apply for 1:1 Coaching Follow Soul Centered Fitness on Instagram  This podcast is brought to you by Soul Centered Fitness  Never miss an episode: Join my mailing list for weekly coaching, and more.  Email me your coaching inquiries, questions, and comments!   Follow Soul Centered Fitness on Instagram  Support MindBody Alchemy by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/mindbody-alchemy Find out more at https://mindbody-alchemy.pinecast.co

All Things Testosterone
Joe Rogan's thoughts about testosterone for athletes

All Things Testosterone

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 27:15


Today we're dissecting Joe Rogan, Russell Brand, and Andrew Huberman's thoughts on testosterone. Topics include: TRT and athletic benefits Female vs male sport salaries Russell Brand's thoughts on testosterone Andrew Huberman's thoughts on protocols and prolactin As always if you need doctor free labs, check HERE If you're looking for a doctor, check HERE If you want to enter the FREE Giveaway, check HERE

The Adversity Advantage
Mastering Your Response to Stress and Anxiety: A Convo With 3 Top Neuroscientists

The Adversity Advantage

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 97:47


Today's episode is another masterclass and one that is also timely like the last one. But the topic of this discussion centers around neuroscience, stress and anxiety something that we all can relate to. Today I have three of the top neuroscientists on the planet to help you better understand and manage your stress, anxiety and brain health. You will hear parts of 3 previously released episodes with Dr. Lisa Feldman Barrett, Dr. Jud Brewer, and Dr. Andrew Huberman.   The first part will feature a section from my previous chat with Dr. Lisa Feldman Barrett, Ph.D. She stands among the top 1% most cited scientists globally for her revolutionary research in psychology and neuroscience.  Her TED talk on emotions has been viewed over 6 million times. In this section, she explains the science and evolution of your emotions one reactions as to how to change them.  You will also learn the real function of the human brain and what stress actually is and why it scientifically leads to weight gain. Dr. Barrett will share how words affect our brain chemistry and how to change how we respond to anxiety and other struggles.   Then, you will hear from Dr. Andrew Huberman. Dr. Huberman is a neuroscientist and tenured Professor of Neurobiology ophthalmology at the Stanford University School of Medicine. He is also the host of the highly popular podcast, The Huberman Lab podcast. In this section, we take a deep dive into the neuroscience of the different reward systems of the brain, how they function, and how they relate to addiction. We also chat about cell phone addiction and the dangers of excessive screen time. You will also learn in depth about the stress response, how to use stress to your advantage, and science-backed tools to decrease stress immediately.    Finally, you will hear a section from a previous episode with Dr. Jud Brewer. Dr. Jud is a renowned addiction psychiatrist and neuroscientist whose Ted Talk ”A Simple Way to Break a Bad Habit” has over 16 million views on YouTube. Dr. Jud shares in depth about what anxiety actually is and how it can be directly related to your habits. You will also discover science-based, actionable steps that you can immediately take to understand, manage and mitigate anxiety. You will also learn some common anxiety myths and the important role that things like awareness, mindfulness and curiosity play into all of this and more...   Links to full episodes featured in this conversation: Dr. Lisa Feldman Barrett Dr. Andrew Huberman Dr. Jud Brewer   Connect with Dr. Lisa Feldman Barrett, Ph.D. Twitter: https://twitter.com/lfeldmanbarrett Website: https://www.lisafeldmanbarrett.com   Connect with Dr. Andrew Huberman: Website - http://www.hubermanlab.com/ Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/hubermanlab/   Connect with Dr. Jud Brewer: Website: https://drjud.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dr.jud/   Connect with Doug: Instagram: www.instagram.com Twitter: www.twitter.com/dougbopst Facebook: www.facebook.com/dougbopst   Join Marisa Peer's 21-day abundance challenge by clicking here:   www.marisapeer.com/DOUG   Use promo code “Doug” at checkout to receive 25% off. 

PJ Medcast
301 Quickie

PJ Medcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 9:06


The PJ Foundation is running a wellness program/ free education series   over the next month- on sleep, nutrition, finding happiness , stress management, etc for PJs/CROs/SERE and families. Sign up with Dr Jenn Byrne at 5x5performancetherapy@gmail.com New research discussing optimal cooling techniques in hot weather ops- from Dr Andrew Huberman's IG and podcast. More data supporting whole blood from NAR DOCTOR.   Please support the Pararescue Foundation. Ask family and friends an do Team events please. THAT OTHERS MAY LIVE

The Psychology Podcast
Andrew Huberman || Optimize Your Brain

The Psychology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 102:29


Today it's great to chat with Andrew Huberman on the podcast. Andrew is an associate professor of neurobiology and ophthalmology at Stanford. His lab is focused on brain function, development, and repair with emphasis on regeneration to prevent and cure blindness. He also studied the neural circuits that control visual fear and are developing tools to re-map them and to treat anxiety disorders. Additionally, Huberman is the host of the popular podcast called Huberman Lab. Topics · The Huberman Lab Podcast · Andrew's interest in neurobiology and his current work · Emotions and the autonomic nervous system · How visual focus and respiration alters internal states · Spiegel eye roll hypnosis test · The amygdala as the dynamic link between internal and external cues · How to increase motivation · Chronotype management and the optimal routine · Flow state and further research --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-psychology-podcast/support

The Tim Ferriss Show
#521: Dr. Andrew Huberman — A Neurobiologist on Optimizing Sleep, Performance, and Testosterone

The Tim Ferriss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021 161:50


Dr. Andrew Huberman — A Neurobiologist on Optimizing Sleep, Performance, and Testosterone | Brought to you by Athletic Greens all-in-one nutritional supplement, Theragun percussive muscle therapy devices, and Helix Sleep premium mattresses. More on all three below.Andrew Huberman, PhD (@hubermanlab), is a neuroscientist and tenured professor in the Department of Neurobiology at Stanford University's School of Medicine. He has made numerous important contributions to the fields of brain development, brain function, and neural plasticity. Andrew is a McKnight Foundation and Pew Foundation fellow and recipient of the 2017 Cogan Award for his discoveries in the study of vision. Work from the Huberman Laboratory at Stanford Medicine has been consistently published in top journals including Nature, Science, and Cell.Andrew is host of the Huberman Lab podcast, which he launched in January of this year. The show aims to help viewers and listeners improve their health with science and science-based tools. New episodes air every Monday on YouTube and all podcast platforms. Please enjoy!This episode is brought to you by Helix Sleep! Helix was selected as the #1 overall mattress of 2020 by GQ magazine, Wired, Apartment Therapy, and many others. With Helix, there's a specific mattress to meet each and every body's unique comfort needs. Just take their quiz—only two minutes to complete—that matches your body type and sleep preferences to the perfect mattress for you. They have a 10-year warranty, and you get to try it out for a hundred nights, risk free. They'll even pick it up from you if you don't love it. And now, to my dear listeners, Helix is offering up to 200 dollars off all mattress orders plus two free pillows at HelixSleep.com/Tim.*This episode is also brought to you by Theragun! Theragun is my go-to solution for recovery and restoration. It's a famous, handheld percussive therapy device that releases your deepest muscle tension. I own two Theraguns, and my girlfriend and I use them every day after workouts and before bed. The all-new Gen 4 Theragun is easy to use and has a proprietary brushless motor that's surprisingly quiet—about as quiet as an electric toothbrush.Go to Theragun.com/Tim right now and get your Gen 4 Theragun today, starting at only $199.*This episode is also brought to you by Athletic Greens. I get asked all the time, “If you could only use one supplement, what would it be?” My answer is usually Athletic Greens, my all-in-one nutritional insurance. I recommended it in The 4-Hour Body in 2010 and did not get paid to do so. I do my best with nutrient-dense meals, of course, but AG further covers my bases with vitamins, minerals, and whole-food-sourced micronutrients that support gut health and the immune system. Right now, Athletic Greens is offering you their Vitamin D Liquid Formula free with your first subscription purchase—a vital nutrient for a strong immune system and strong bones. Visit AthleticGreens.com/Tim to claim this special offer today and receive the free Vitamin D Liquid Formula (and five free travel packs) with your first subscription purchase! That's up to a one-year supply of Vitamin D as added value when you try their delicious and comprehensive all-in-one daily greens product.*If you enjoy the podcast, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts/iTunes? It takes less than 60 seconds, and it really makes a difference in helping to convince hard-to-get guests. I also love reading the reviews!For show notes and past guests, please visit tim.blog/podcast.Sign up for Tim's email newsletter (“5-Bullet Friday”) at tim.blog/friday.For transcripts of episodes, go to tim.blog/transcripts.Discover Tim's books: tim.blog/books.Follow Tim:Twitter: twitter.com/tferriss Instagram: instagram.com/timferrissFacebook: facebook.com/timferriss YouTube: youtube.com/timferrissSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.
How to Rewire Your Brain For Sleep with Dr. Andrew Huberman

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021 97:25


How to Rewire Your Brain For Sleep | This episode is brought to you by Athletic Greens, BiOptimizers, and Cozy EarthWhen I was in medical school, they taught us we can't regenerate brain cells. If you stayed up too late studying or did drugs, you'd lose precious connections and that was that. Now, luckily, we know that isn't true. There are multiple ways to encourage the plasticity of the brain at any age, to enhance everything from sleep to learning. Most people don't realize that sleep is a keystone of health. When we're sleep-deprived, it's really hard to eat well or to have the energy to exercise. It's hard to think straight. It's even hard to stay in a good mood or have a positive outlook on life. Understanding the way the brain and our neurotransmitters work means we can hack our sleep to not just feel amazing but to level up our focus, skills, and knowledge. Today on The Doctor's Farmacy, I talk to Dr. Andrew Huberman about the body-brain connection and how small actions can have huge payoffs for our brain health. Dr. Huberman is a neuroscientist and tenured Professor in the Department of Neurobiology at the Stanford University School of Medicine. He has made numerous important contributions to the fields of brain development, brain function, and neural plasticity, which is the ability of our nervous system to rewire and learn new behaviors, skills, and cognitive functioning. Dr. Huberman is a McKnight Foundation and Pew Foundation Fellow and was awarded the Cogan Award in 2017, which is given to the scientist making the largest discoveries in the study of vision. His lab's most recent work focuses on the influence of vision and respiration on human performance and brain states such as fear and courage. Work from the Huberman Laboratory at Stanford University School of Medicine has been published in top journals including Nature, Science, and Cell and has been featured in TIME, BBC, Scientific American, Discover, and other top media outlets. This episode is brought to you by Athletic Greens, BiOptimizers, and Cozy Earth.Athletic Greens is offering Doctor's Farmacy listeners a full year supply of their Vitamin D3/K2 Liquid Formula free with your first purchase, plus 5 free travel packs. Just go to athleticgreens.com/hyman to take advantage of this great offer. Right now, BiOptimizers is offering Doctor's Farmacy listeners 10% off your Magnesium Breakthrough order. Just go to magbreakthrough.com/hyman and use code HYMAN10 to receive this amazing offer.Cozy Earth makes it super easy to try out their products with a 30-day free trial and 10-year warranty. Plus, right now they are offering their best sale price ever with 40% off. Just go to cozyearth.com use the code HYMANPODCAST40 at checkout. Here are more of the details from our interview: What happens during the primary sleep and waking states (18:09)How states of alertness and calmness affect our ability to do certain tasks (21:51)Getting and avoiding bright light exposure at various points in the day is vitally important for sleep (28:24)Supporting sleep with apigenin (or chamomile extract), magnesium threonate, magnesium bisglycinate, and waking state hypnosis (39:17)Why you're waking up in the middle of the night and unable to fall back asleep (42:01)Eating for quality sleep (45:32)Neuroplasticity and restoring brain function at any age (1:00:17)The keys to learning new skills, enhancing memory, changing personality, and emotionality (1:06:11)Tools to overcome the effects of technology on the brain (1:21:49)Pharmaceuticals, supplements, and dietary habits to optimize focus, learning, and physical skill building (1:27:03)Learn more about Dr. Andrew Huberman at https://hubermanlab.com/ and follow him on Facebook @hubermanlab, on Instagram @hubermanlab, and on Twitter @hubermanlab. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit
#224: Reprogram Your Brain to Destroy Laziness and Improve Focus with Dr. Andrew Huberman

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2021 104:11


Reprogram Your Brain to Destroy Laziness and Improve Focus | This episode is brought to you by BLUblox.At one point or another, we've all felt stuck in a rut with feelings of laziness and fear. During these times it can be really hard to take a step back and wonder what's happening in the body, as opposed to just the mind, but it's the link between the two that can push us through it. Neurotransmitters have some incredible power over how we function. Dopamine is responsible for craving, motivation, and pursuit. Adrenaline relates to agitation and endurance. Serotonin helps us be grateful and feel good about what we have. And acetylcholine can help us focus. This is just a snapshot of the chemical symphony happening in our bodies all the time, and we can actually leverage these inner reactions to better understand the way we react to the world around us and make positive changes. Today on The Dhru Purohit Podcast, Dhru talks to Dr. Andrew Huberman about opening the window into our neurochemistry, training the nervous system, and confronting our inner real estate. Dr. Andrew Huberman is a neuroscientist and tenured Professor in the Department of Neurobiology at the Stanford University School of Medicine. He has made numerous important contributions to the fields of brain development, brain function, and neural plasticity, which is the ability of our nervous system to rewire and learn new behaviors, skills, and cognitive functioning. Dr. Huberman is a McKnight Foundation and Pew Foundation Fellow and was awarded the Cogan Award in 2017, which is given to the scientist making the largest discoveries in the study of vision. His lab's most recent work focuses on the influence of vision and respiration on human performance and brain states such as fear and courage. Work from the Huberman Laboratory at Stanford University School of Medicine has been published in top journals including Nature, Science, and Cell and has been featured in TIME, BBC, Scientific American, Discover, and other top media outlets.In this episode, we dive into: -The connection between fear, laziness, and motivation (4:56) -The difference between dopamine, adrenaline, and serotonin (17:50) -How to increase dopamine (19:12) -How to get your mind to stop racing (31:14) -An exercise to try if you are having a hard time falling asleep (35:47) -The benefits of hypnosis (38:57) -What to do if you are having trouble focusing (52:47) -Why structure is one of the best ways to create freedom (1:01:32) -How our phones are eroding our creativity, relationships, and more (1:05:52) -The importance of having times of no focus each day (1:16:39) For more on Dr. Andrew Huberman, you can follow him on Instagram @hubermanlab, and through his website http://www.hubermanlab.com/. Check out his podcast Huberman Lab at https://hubermanlab.com/category/podcast-episodes/.Also mentioned in this episode:-Episode #134: The Latest Science on Enhancing Focus and Developing a Growth Mindset with Dr. Andrew Huberman - https://drhyman.com/blog/2020/07/09/bb-ep13-Dr. David Spiegel and Hypnosis - https://stanfordhealthcare.org/doctors/s/david-spiegel.html-Reveri Hypnosis Ap - https://www.reveri.com/-Cal Newport - https://www.calnewport.com/-A World Without Email by Cal Newport - https://www.calnewport.com/books/a-world-without-email/-Oliver Sacks Documentary - https://www.oliversacksdoc.com/watch-now-Ido Portal - Movement Culture - https://www.instagram.com/portal.ido/-The Ready State - https://thereadystate.com/-Madefor Program - https://getmadefor.com-Guardians of Being by Ekhart Tolle and Patrick McDonnell - https://amzn.to/3vQTY7EFor more on Dhru Purohit, be sure to follow him on Instagram @dhrupurohit, on Facebook @dhruxpurohit, on Twitter @dhrupurohit, and on YouTube @dhrupurohit. You can also text Dhru at (302) 200-5643 or click here https://my.community.com/dhrupurohit.Sign up for Dhru's Try This Newsletter - https://dhrupurohit.com/newsletter.Interested in joining The Dhru Purohit Podcast Facebook Community? Submit your request to join here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/2819627591487473/.This episode is brought to you by BLUblox.As someone who is on the computer a lot, I realized all that screen time was negatively affecting how well I slept. I started learning about blue light and how it disrupts the body's natural melatonin production, so I decided to try blue-light blocking glasses throughout the day to see if they helped—and they totally did. I love the blue-light blocking glasses made by BLUblox. BLUblox glasses reduced my digital eye strain and dramatically improved my sleep, and I have more energy throughout the day. Right now BLUblox is offering my listeners 20% off, just go to blublox.com/dhru and use code DHRU at checkout. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.