Podcasts about Stroke

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Death of a region of brain cells due to poor blood flow

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Best podcasts about Stroke

Show all podcasts related to stroke

Latest podcast episodes about Stroke

Armstrong & Getty Podcast
December 2, 2021 - Stroke It Into Readiness

Armstrong & Getty Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 45:03


Thursday's A&G features a hefty discussion on the Supreme Court abortion hearings. A hearty mailbag, and a fortunate mishap with a Michigan high school See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Armstrong and Getty
Stroke It Into Readiness

Armstrong and Getty

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 45:48


Thursday's A&G features a hefty discussion on the Supreme Court abortion hearings. A hearty mailbag, and a fortunate mishap with a Michigan high school Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Plant Based Briefing
159: Health Concerns With Eggs by PCRM.org

Plant Based Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 8:25


Learn about the health concerns with egg consumption including heart disease and stroke, diabetes, cancer and kidney disease. From PCRM.org. Please take a moment to rate & review the podcast here. Thank you!

Neurology® Podcast
Common Issues in Stroke Management (December 2021 Neurology Recall)

Neurology® Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 52:57


The December 2021 replay of past episodes showcases a selection of interviews regarding the diagnosis and management of stroke. This episode features Dr. Andy Southerland and Will Rondeau in conversation with Drs. Seemant Chaturvedi, Lee Schwamm, Jyri Virta, and Sidsel Hastrup, offering listeners a review across the field of vascular neurology.

Free Associations
Episode 112 - COVID-19, heart attacks, and stroke

Free Associations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 53:24


Matt, Chris, and Jess discuss a complex study of the effect of COVID-19 on heart attacks and strokes, they discuss the mild influenza season (or at least Matt and Jess do), and Chris tells us how many fish we need to catch to decide the color of the fish in the lake. Journal club article: […]

Autobiology Bits with JLF
My SHOCKING DNA 360 Report Read LIVE by Kashif Khan of The DNA Company, Episode 30

Autobiology Bits with JLF

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 62:23


Episode 30.  My guest is Kashif Khan, the CEO of The DNA Company. After running clinical analysis with over 5,000 diverse participants, the DNA Company has developed incredible insights about genomic expression that no other company can offer.I suggest watching this episode on my YouTube channel if possible: https://youtu.be/wQK6en7sVJQWhat if you learned your tendency to be:a bingerbe depressedhappy-go-luckya fast learnereasily irritateda poor sleeperokay with clutter vs OCD....was part of your genetic programming? Yes, your personality is essentially hard-wired into your brain! What if you learned your brain's ability to deal with trauma is AMAZING and you would make a great front-line warrior? What if the opposite was true?  What if you could set yourself up for success knowing how your brain is hard-wired to react?What if you could learn what you are likely to die from IF you eat the Standard American Diet (a crappy diet) your whole life? What if you could find out if your body can't handle excess estrogen BEFORE you spend a lifetime on the birth control pill?What if you learned early that you make mostly the toxic type of testosterone that causes prostate and hair loss issues?What if you found out that your body's ability to handle high-intensity cardiac activity is nonexistent BEFORE you started training for a marathon?Life-changing, right?Those are exactly the kinds of things I learned from my 360 report from The DNA Company. And this information is literally saving me from early death and/or dementia.After listening to this, I think you'll want to understand where you net out, too, so here is a link for $50 off your own test:   https://thednacompany.com/jenniferThis might be the most important podcast you ever listen to. Sign up for my newsletter at https://autobiology.net/newsletter and I'll send my newest podcast topics and cool anti-aging/health products and strategies straight to your inbox. My tips, experiences, and advice about both helpful-but-low-tech and cutting-edge biology are all yours, every week! Plus, you'll get additional information that is only safe to discuss through newsletters since many health topics are now censored.Connect with Me!IG: @autobiologywithjenniferRumble: @autobiologywithjenniferYouTube: autobiologyFB: @autobiologyTikTok: @jenniferlittlefleckWebsite: https://autobiology.net/Autobiology Bits Podcast on AppleBiOptimizers: Digestion & Optimization! BiOptimizers has been optimizing digestion since 2004 & now offer a complete line of health products$50 off your Test from The DNA Company Revolutionizing DNA interpretation by matching genetic systems to human biochemistry. Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.

Neurology® Podcast
Small Fiber Neuropathy; Representation of Women in Stroke Clinical Trials

Neurology® Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 26:25


In the first part of the podcast, Dr. Stacey Clardy talks with Dr. Christopher Klein about small fiber neuropathy incidence, prevalence, longitudinal impairments, and disabilities (00:45). In the second segment, Dr. Amy Guzik discusses the representation of women in stroke clinical trials relative to the burden of disease in the population with Dr. Cheryl Carcel (16:12).

RNZ: Morning Report
Hospital projects delayed over fire designs

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 4:15


Vital hospital building projects in Auckland are being delayed for months by questions over fire designs - and especially the safe evacuation of smoke-filled rooms. Stroke, rehabilitation and baby care units are all affected as well as a catheter lab and renal dialysis project. Phil Pennington reports.

Neurology Minute
Representation of Women in Stroke Clinical Trials: A Review of 281 Trials Involving More Than 500,000 Participants

Neurology Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 3:28


Dr. Cheryl Carcel discusses her study, "Representation of Women in Stroke Clinical Trials: A Review of 281 Trials Involving More Than 500,000 Participants". Show references: https://n.neurology.org/content/97/18/e1768

Your Journey to Greatness Through Routine
Pt. 7 Dangers & Causes of Hatred - Stroke, Aneurisms & Weakened Immune Function

Your Journey to Greatness Through Routine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 8:08


Support the show (https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/reframerewire)

Naruhodo
Naruhodo #312 - Ficar sentado muito tempo aumenta a chance de morrer mais cedo?

Naruhodo

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 52:30


A gente tende a acreditar que passar muito tempo sentado é um mal contemporâneo.Mas será verdade? Ou é mais antigo que imaginamos?Nosso corpo foi feito pra ficar sentado, de pé, deitado?Confira no papo entre o leigo curioso, Ken Fujioka, e o cientista PhD, Altay de Souza.> OUÇA (52min 30s)*Naruhodo! é o podcast pra quem tem fome de aprender. Ciência, senso comum, curiosidades, desafios e muito mais. Com o leigo curioso, Ken Fujioka, e o cientista PhD, Altay de Souza.Edição: Reginaldo Cursino.http://naruhodo.b9.com.br*PARCERIA: ALURAA Alura tem mais de 1.000 cursos de diversas áreas e é a maior plataforma de cursos online do Brasil -- e você tem acesso a todos com uma única assinatura.E no link especial de Black Friday você tem o maior desconto da história da Alura: 25% de desconto para quem se matricular do dia 22 até o dia 26 de novembro.bit.ly/blackfriday-alura-naruhodoAproveite: é a sua chance de estudar na Alura com um preço incrível!*REFERÊNCIASSitting time and mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease, and cancerhttps://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19346988/Give Your Ideas Some Legs: The Positive Effect of Walking on Creative Thinkinghttps://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/releases/xlm-a0036577.pdfAssessment of Physical Activity in Adults Using Wrist Accelerometershttps://academic.oup.com/epirev/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/epirev/mxab004/6313190Passive and mentally-active sedentary behaviors and incident major depressive disorder: A 13-year cohort studyhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165032718310905?casa_token=hFLbw0ZoU1UAAAAA:VsZcaX2ZKIFQehcgdXLwSND47MBwyTcYiGGNot8KGdz2Nz3yxRAVe9WIamywV5iL-BmV_VJ8RicLack of exercise is a major cause of chronic diseaseshttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4241367/Impact of sedentarism due to the COVID-19 home confinement on neuromuscular, cardiovascular and metabolic health: Physiological and pathophysiological implications and recommendations for physical and nutritional countermeasureshttps://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17461391.2020.1761076?casa_token=Lf4C5xlNB7UAAAAA%3Ahzbrv2TR22WW5bAa30p4WcWn7McfI0pcEWKHr4q4pUpYwtxF_H7IX_3CyOOgtJr2TbMZbZ7sHclSagSignificant reduction of physical activity in patients with neuromuscular disease during COVID-19 pandemic: the long-term consequences of quarantinehttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00415-020-10064-6A systematic review and meta-analysis of the effect of treadmill desks on energy expenditure, sitting time and cardiometabolic health in adultshttps://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-021-12094-9Influence of Baseline Physical Activity as a Modifying Factor on COVID-19 Mortality: A Single-Center, Retrospective Studyhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40121-021-00418-6Efficacy, characteristics, behavioural models and behaviour change strategies, of non-workplace interventions specifically targeting sedentary behaviour; a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised control trials in healthy ambulatory adultshttps://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0256828Effects of Interrupting Prolonged Sitting with Physical Activity Breakson Blood Glucose, Insulin and Triacylglycerol Measures: A SystematicReview and Meta‑analysishttps://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s40279-019-01183-w.pdfTrends in Adherence to the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans for Aerobic Activity and Time Spent on Sedentary Behavior Among US Adults, 2007 to 2016https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/article-abstract/2739044Objectively measured physical activity, sedentary behaviour and all-cause mortality in older men: does volume of activity matter more than pattern of accumulation?https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/bjsports/53/16/1013.full.pdfIs the time right for quantitative public health guidelines on sitting? A narrative review of sedentary behaviour research paradigms and findingshttps://bjsm.bmj.com/content/bjsports/53/6/377.full.pdfWalk more and sit less: even light exercise is linked to a lower risk of deathhttps://www.bmj.com/content/366/bmj.l5051Dose-response associations between accelerometry measured physical activity and sedentary time and all cause mortality: systematic review and harmonised meta-analysishttps://www.bmj.com/content/366/bmj.l4570.fullGet Up, Stand Up: The Effects of a Non-Sedentary Workspace on Information Elaboration and Group Performancehttps://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1948550614538463?casa_token=0rJskI98etMAAAAA%3Au18V12isIlvbF7cnYdhQSIdA9sOyllBIqsdIFczaWCEetr0GkAfmahIJ9WAMgJlVb0TkkCL4D0PMWAWorldwide surveillance of self-reported sitting time: a scoping reviewhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7469304/De Morbis Artificum Diatriba [Diseases of Workers]https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1446785/A Philosophy of Walkinghttps://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1781688370/ref=as_li_qf_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=farnamstreet-20&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=1781688370&linkId=f9888e26f18e71c758bbd1d402cb26d4Sedentary Behaviors and Health Outcomes Among Adultshttps://www.ajpmonline.org/article/S0749-3797(10)00608-2/fulltextDose–response association of screen time-based sedentary behaviour in children and adolescents and depression: a meta-analysis of observational studieshttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4977203/Sedentary Behavior and Cancer: A Systematic Review of the Literature and Proposed Biological Mechanismshttps://cebp.aacrjournals.org/content/19/11/2691Workplace interventions for reducing sitting at workhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6517221/Suppression of skeletal muscle lipoprotein lipase activity during physical inactivity: a molecular reason to maintain daily low-intensity activityhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2343229/Biopsychosocial Functions of Human Walking and Adherence to Behaviourally Demanding Belief Systems: A Narrative Reviewhttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2021.654122/fullMemória de Kant em Kaliningrad / Königsberghttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v1gCVjh2RmE&t=164s&ab_channel=Ant%C3%B3nioLu%C3%ADsRoviscoThe physical activity paradox: six reasons why occupational physical activity (OPA) does not confer the cardiovascular health benefits that leisure time physical activity does https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/52/3/149.abstractAssociation Between Excess Leisure Sedentary Time and Risk of Stroke in Young Individualshttps://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/STROKEAHA.121.034985Naruhodo #284 - Qual o impacto do desemprego em nossa vida?https://www.b9.com.br/shows/naruhodo/naruhodo-284-qual-o-impacto-do-desemprego-em-nossa-vida/Podcasts das #Minas: DAZMINA#MulheresPodcastershttps://open.spotify.com/show/6qeCBTW2uQu4JKWeutm1f6*APOIE O NARUHODO!Você sabia que pode ajudar a manter o Naruhodo no ar?Ao contribuir, você pode ter acesso ao grupo fechado no Telegram, receber conteúdos exclusivos e ter vantagens especiais.Assine o apoio mensal pelo PicPay: https://picpay.me/naruhodopodcast

Health Science Starts Here
A Client From SLI's Traumatic Brain Injury Group Shares His Story

Health Science Starts Here

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 11:04


Joined with the head of the SLP department, Bob Serianni, an SLI client shares his story of how speech therapy and Salus students helped him after his stroke.To learn more about our podcast series, visit salus.edu/podcasts

Neurology Minute
Management of Stroke in the Neurocritical Care Unit - Part 2

Neurology Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 3:29


In part 2 of a 2 part series, Carolina B. Maciel, MD, MSCR, discusses her article, “Neurologic Outcome Prediction in the Intensive Care Unit" from the October Neurocritical Care Continuum issue. This article and the accompanying Continuum Audio interview are available to subscribers at continpub.com/PredICU.

RNZ: Morning Report
Covid-19: Stroke Foundation urging NZers to get vaccinated

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 3:20


The Stroke Foundation is urging New Zealanders to get vaccinated to against Covid-19 to help reduce the risk of a debilitating stroke. Stroke is the largest cause of serious adult disability in this country, and the second largest cause of death here after cancer. The foundation says new research shows that a Covid-19 infection increases the risk of a person having a stroke. Foundation chief executive Jo Lambert spoke to Corin Dann.

Neurology Minute
Management of Stroke in the Neurocritical Care Unit - Part 1

Neurology Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 1:41


In part 1 of a 2 part series, Carolina B. Maciel, MD, MSCR, discusses her article, “Neurologic Outcome Prediction in the Intensive Care Unit" from the October Neurocritical Care Continuum issue. This article and the accompanying Continuum Audio interview are available to subscribers at continpub.com/PredICU.

The NeuroNerds
Being Thankful With The NeuroNerds

The NeuroNerds

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 38:45


All episodes are available at https://TheNeuroNerds.com.  Follow @TheNeuroNerds on Twitter/Instagram and Like us at Facebook.com/TheNeuroNerds. SummaryIt's the week of Thanksgiving in the States so Joe and Lauren are talking all about gratitude. Having a brain injury adds another layer to the meaning of finding gratitude in everyday life. Joe and Lauren share how they practice gratitude and find thanks for life and all of its ups and downs. Plus, Joe shares more details about his new coaching program for brain injury survivors. What are you grateful for? Please share on our socials! Links Mentioned•Joe's new YouSoRock Coaching Program for Brain Injury Survivors - www.YouSoRock.coachCredits•Support The NeuroNerds podcast on Patreon and join our NeuroJedi High Council at www.Patreon.com/TheNeuroNerds•Co-hosted by Joe Borges and Lauren Manzano•Find Joe at http://joesorocks.com and @joesorocks on Twitter/Instagram and submit your stroke/brain injury recovery story at https://www.joesorocks.com/submit-your-story•Find Lauren at @laurenlmanzano on Instagram, @tankbbg on Twitter•Produced by Joe Borges and Felice LaZae, http://felicelazae.com, @felicelazae on Twitter/Instagram•Edited by  Marcellus Wesley•Sponsored by Motus Nova, Avid Technology, and our Patreon Supporters

The Language Neuroscience Podcast
Language development and perinatal stroke, with Elissa Newport

The Language Neuroscience Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 70:30


In this episode, I talk with Elissa Newport, Professor of Neurology and Rehabilitation Medicine at Georgetown University Medical Center, about her work on the neural and cognitive underpinnings of language development, including statistical learning, language after perinatal stroke, lateralization, plasticity, the critical period, and more.Saffran JR, Aslin RN, Newport EL. Statistical learning by 8-month-old infants. Science 1996; 274: 1926-8. [doi]Newport EL, Landau B, Seydell-Greenwald A, Turkeltaub PE, Chambers CE, Dromerick AW, Carpenter J, Berl MM, Gaillard WD. Revisiting Lenneberg's hypotheses about early developmental plasticity: Language organization after left-hemisphere perinatal stroke. Biolinguistics 2017; 11: 407-22. [doi]Olulade OA, Seydell-Greenwald A, Chambers CE, Turkeltaub PE, Dromerick AW, Berl MM, Gaillard WD, Newport EL. The neural basis of language development: Changes in lateralization over age. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2020; 117: 23477-83. [doi]Elissa Newport's website

Rapid Response RN
Air Don't Go There!: Air Embolism to the Brain With Guest Marissa RN

Rapid Response RN

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 24:56


Air embolism to the brain is one of those rare complications of having vascular access. But just like your professor warned you, if you don't pull out the central line properly, you could cause an air embolus!!! Joining me for this episode is Rapid Response Nurse Marissa sharing her experience responding to a patient with altered mental status who had a large cerebral embolus.

WebTalkRadio.net
The Philosophy of a Brush Stroke With Xiongbo Shi

WebTalkRadio.net

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021


My apologies but this is our first episode with any technical sound problems.  So, please use captioning and, as with so much in life, remember that “patience is a virtue”. Hence, please tolerate the less than ideal sound quality at the beginning because what Xiongboo shares throughout is truly enlightening and inspiring! This Conversation with […] The post The Philosophy of a Brush Stroke With Xiongbo Shi appeared first on WebTalkRadio.net.

The Jaipur Dialogues
Farm Laws Repeal - Brain Stroke or Masterstroke? | Sandeep Deo, Tufail C, Vijay Sardana

The Jaipur Dialogues

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 50:33


Whereas Farm Laws had overwhelming majority of small farmers and middle classes with them, only a vocal and aggressive fringe was opposed. By succumbing to this fringe, has Modi played another 'master stroke'?

Look Out For Joy
Anna's Hope - After the stroke of her 15 year old son

Look Out For Joy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 66:20


Anna continues to stay strong by leaning into HOPE (Have Only Positive Expectations)In April 2021 her son went to visit family in Florida. Everyone was planning to  have a relaxing week ahead. Her 15 year-old son, Brody, was finishing up a shower and noticed his face and arm go numb. A few minutes later he had a stroke and was carried to the hospital. Mom and dad were hundreds of miles away in Virginia but were able to hope on a plane within a matter of hours to be by there son's bedside.Anna shares so many God moments in this episode.You heart will be moved by the love and support Anna's family received during this difficult couple of months. Brody is continuing to make improvements and is blessing others with his spirit that never gives up.

Plant Based Briefing
150: What About Coconuts, Coconut Milk, and Coconut Oil MCTs by Dr. Michael Greger at NutritionFacts.org

Plant Based Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 7:47


Dr. Michael Greger of NutritionFacts.org explains the difference, nutrition-wise, between whole coconuts and coconut milk or coconut oil. Please take a moment to rate & review the podcast here. Thank you!

Stroke Alert
Stroke Alert November 2021

Stroke Alert

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 28:22


On Episode 10 of the Stroke Alert Podcast, host Dr. Negar Asdaghi highlights two articles from the November 2021 issue of Stroke: “Biomarkers of Coagulation and Inflammation in COVID-19–Associated Ischemic Stroke” and “Treatment-Associated Stroke in Patients Undergoing Endovascular Therapy in the ARUBA Trial.” She also interviews Dr. S. Claiborne Johnston about “Ischemic Benefit and Hemorrhage Risk of Ticagrelor-Aspirin Versus Aspirin in Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack.” Dr. Negar Asdaghi: 1) What is the net ischemic benefit derived from combination of ticagrelor and aspirin treatment in patients with mild ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack? 2) Is the ischemic stroke in patients hospitalized with COVID-19 associated with the rise in biomarkers of inflammation and coagulopathy? 3) What are the characteristics associated with periprocedural stroke in patients treated endovascularly for an unruptured AVM? We'll discuss these topics and much more at today's podcast. Stay with us. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Welcome back to the Stroke Alert Podcast. My name is Negar Asdaghi. I'm an Associate Professor of Neurology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and your host for the monthly Stroke Alert Podcast. For the November 2021 issue of Stroke, we have a large selection of topics, from peanut consumption reducing the risk of ischemic stroke, and the decline in the rate of progression of coronary atherosclerosis in patients on a Mediterranean diet, to how the efficacy of endovascular thrombectomy diminishes in patients with more pervious thrombus composition, which I encourage you to review in addition to our podcast today. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Later in the podcast, I have the distinct honor of interviewing Dr. Claiborne Johnston from Dell Medical School at UT Austin on his latest work with data from the THALES trial to clarify the net ischemic benefits derived from a combination of ticagrelor and aspirin therapy in comparison with the risks of hemorrhage associated with this treatment in patients with mild and moderate stroke and TIA. But first with these two articles. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        COVID-19–associated ischemic stroke, or CAIS, is a new term that, unfortunately, stroke physicians need to be familiar with. While acute ischemic stroke can occur in parallel from, say, traditional causes of stroke in patients infected with coronavirus, ischemic stroke and other thrombotic events, such as myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, deep vein thrombosis, and acute limb thrombosis, can occur in the setting of overt hyperinflammation and subsequent coagulopathy that is observed in patients hospitalized with severe COVID-19 illness. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Elevated D-dimer, although quite non-specific, has emerged as a marker of COVID-19–associated coagulopathy, but whether an elevated D-dimer in isolation or in combination with various other inflammatory and coagulation markers is associated with development of acute in-hospital ischemic stroke in those hospitalized with COVID is not known. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        So, in the current issue of the journal, in the article titled "Biomarkers of Coagulation and Inflammation in COVID-19–Associated Ischemic Stroke,” Dr. Charles Esenwa from the Department of Neurology at Montefiore Medical Center and colleagues did an interesting analysis of over 5,000 patients with COVID-19 who were admitted to one of the Montefiore Health System hospitals between March 1, 2020 and May 8, 2020. This was a retrospective analysis, so they had to work with the available biomarkers for each patient and use a machine learning cluster analysis of these biomarkers to divide the patients basically based on five biomarkers to four clusters. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        The following five biomarkers were chosen by this machine learning cluster analysis. These included CRP, D-dimer, LDH, white BC, and PTT. So, they had to come up with some arbitrary rules to exclude biomarkers that were either missing in over 30% of their population, and they also excluded those patients that were hospitalized for a long period of time, and they chose a 30-day hospitalization and over. And they also only used the first reading for each biomarker. Again, these were arbitrary rules that were set forth by the authors, and they found some alarming findings. When they clustered patients based on similarities in these biomarkers, they came up with predicted models for combined thrombotic events and acute ischemic stroke. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        For example, in the cluster where the patients had the highest mean values for CRP, D-dimer, LDH, and white BC, and a relatively low PTT, these patients had the highest prevalence of acute ischemic stroke. They had the highest prevalence of in-hospital strokes and severe strokes and highest percentage of total thrombotic events. In contrast, the cluster with the lowest mean of all of these five biomarkers had no cases of in-hospital acute ischemic strokes; they had the lowest prevalence of composite, all thrombotic events, and patients had the least severe complications. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        So, they also tested the effects of biomarkers individually for prediction of acute ischemic stroke. And it turns out that when they used a lone marker, only D-dimer again was associated with acute ischemic stroke. Very interestingly, D-dimer was specifically elevated in those COVID-19 patients in whom the stroke was ultimately classified as cryptogenic. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        So, what does that mean? That means that it's more likely that a stroke had occurred in the setting of severe COVID-19 hyperinflammatory response, and less likely associated with other classical causes of stroke. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        So, what did we learn overall from this study? Well, hospitalized COVID-19 patients with a combination of high CRP, D-dimer, LDH, and white BC, and slight reduction in their PTT, had a 4.5-fold increase in the risk of in-hospital mortality and a fivefold increase in the risk of in-hospital stroke as compared to the COVID-19 patients with the lowest mean values for all the five biomarkers mentioned above. So, important information to keep in mind as we treat hospitalized COVID-19 patients, and we await more prospective data on this topic. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Arteriovenous malformations, or AVMs, are congenital vascular lesions that are associated with long-term excess mortality and morbidity, essentially almost all related to their risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. Roughly half the patients with brain AVMs present with intracerebral hemorrhage, resulting in a first-ever hemorrhage rate of about 0.5 per 100,000 person years. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Annual risk of hemorrhage is estimated at 1 to 4% for all comers with AVMs, but varies significantly, and can be as low as 0.9% in patients with unruptured, superficially located brain AVMs with superficial drainage, but may be as high as over 34% in patients with ruptured, deeply seated brain AVMs with deep venous drainage. So, treatment would entirely be dependent on the type of presentations and characteristics of each patient with an AVM. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Whether unruptured AVMs should be managed clinically or treated either endovascularly or surgically is the subject of the ARUBA trial that is a randomized trial of unruptured brain AVMs. The enrollment of ARUBA was halted by the study's DSMB board, but medical management was found to be superior to treatment arm for the primary outcome of symptomatic stroke and death. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Since then, there's been a lot of focus in the literature and comparison of outcomes between treated and untreated patients with unruptured AVMs, but less has been published on characteristics of patients who suffered from periprocedural stroke, an important part of the primary outcome of ARUBA. So, in the current issue of the journal, we have the study titled “Treatment-Associated Stroke in Patients Undergoing Endovascular Therapy in the ARUBA Trial.” Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Dr. Joshua Burks and colleagues from the Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Miami and colleagues evaluated 64 patients with unruptured AVMs enrolled in the ARUBA trial who underwent endovascular treatment as part of the trial and looked at the characteristics of those who suffered a perioperative stroke, defined as a stroke recorded at or within 48 hours of intervention, as this would represent a direct procedure-related complication rather than sequelae of, say, treated or partially treated AVM itself. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        All patients who initiated endovascular intervention, including attempted interventions in cases where therapy was aborted secondary to technical or anatomical limitations, were included regardless of randomization or subsequent withdrawal from the study beyond 48 hours following the intervention. So, what they found was that 16% of interventions resulted in stroke, 11% hemorrhagic, and 5% ischemic strokes. And they had no perioperative mortality, which is good news. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        In univariate analysis, they found many factors that were more commonly seen in patients that suffered from perioperative stroke as compared to those who did not have a stroke perioperatively. Those factors included, for instance, female sex. Over half of these patients were female. Close to half were enrolled in France. And over 40% of those who suffered a stroke in the perioperative timeframe had Spetzler-Martin grade two AVMs. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        When they accounted for all confounding variables, they found that endovascularly treated unruptured AVMs that are supplied by the posterior cerebral artery cortical feeders and those with Spetzler-Martin grade two and three had a higher perioperative stroke risk as compared to their counterparts without these characteristics. Interestingly, there are also significant geographical disparities in the risk of stroke in that patients treated in the United States or Germany had a significantly lower stroke risk than patients treated in other countries. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        So, what did we learn from this study? There are patients and lesion characteristics that increase the risk of stroke associated with endovascular treatment of unruptured AVMs. The current study suggests that AVMs with cortical arterial feeders from posterior cerebral artery and those with grade two and three Spetzler-Martin were associated with a higher risk of procedural and periprocedural stroke. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        And very importantly, as with every surgical intervention, the risk of a procedure is operator-dependent, as well as center-dependent. And these are important factors to keep in mind as technology evolves and more treatments become available to decide whether to keep or to refer patients with unruptured AVMs to a more experienced center. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Patients with mild ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack are at high risk of having recurrent ischemic events, especially in the immediate aftermath of their symptom onset. Early diagnosis and initiation of secondary preventive measures, such as antiplatelet or anticoagulation therapies, in the appropriate setting considerably reduce this recurrent risk. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Multiple randomized trials have shown that as compared to treatment with a single antiplatelet agent, dual antiplatelet treatment is more effective in reducing the risk of stroke and other major vascular events in the TIA mild stroke population, a benefit that comes with an expected increase in the risk of hemorrhage. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        THALES trial is one of the latest trials to determine the efficacy of dual, which is combination of ticagrelor and aspirin, versus mono-antiplatelet therapy, that is aspirin alone, in eligible patients with non-cardioembolic acute ischemic stroke and TIA. Now, it's important to keep in mind that the primary outcome of THALES is a composite of stroke or death, which included both ischemic and hemorrhagic events. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Now, it's important to understand that while in the setting of a clinical trial, combining the risks associated with dual antiplatelet therapy, which is hemorrhage, and the potential treatment benefit, that is reduction of recurrent ischemic events, is appropriate as part of the outcome selection. In routine practice, this type of primary outcome can obscure the actual trade-offs between the benefits of dual antiplatelet treatment and its inherent hemorrhagic risk. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        So, in this issue of the journal, in the study titled "Ischemic Benefit and Hemorrhage Risk of Ticagrelor-Aspirin Versus Aspirin in Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack," the THALES investigators led by Dr. Claiborne Johnston sought to separate the ischemic benefits of combination of ticagrelor and aspirin therapy from its hemorrhagic risks in patients enrolled in the trial. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        I'm joined today by Professor Johnston to discuss the findings of this paper. Dr. Johnston absolutely needs no introduction to the stroke community and our readership. He's a Professor of Neurology at Dell Medical School at the University of Texas at Austin. He's a leader in the field of cerebrovascular disorders, has served as the primary investigator of multiple randomized trials and large prospective studies to evaluate the preventive treatment outcomes in TIA and mild stroke, and has pioneered the development and validation of predictive models for recurrent stroke in this population. He's authored over 700 peer-reviewed manuscripts, has won several awards for research and teaching, and is recognized for his leadership in the field of medicine and healthcare. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Good morning, Clay. We're delighted that you could join us on the podcast. Dr. S. Claiborne Johnston:           Well, thank you. It's wonderful to be here. Thank you for having me. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Thank you. So, THALES is an exciting new addition to the most recent trials of dual antiplatelet therapy that studied mostly the role of clopidogrel and aspirin combination therapy. Can you please start us off by telling us why did we need a new trial in a very similar patient population? Dr. S. Claiborne Johnston:           Well, the primary reason was, yes, clopidogrel works in combination with aspirin in the setting, but clopidogrel is actually a prodrug. It requires conversion in the liver to its active form. And polymorphisms in CYP2C19 and Cyt P450 pathways are really common and associated with an inability or limited ability to convert that prodrug into its active form. So, there are a number of people who may not benefit much, if at all, from clopidogrel. So, it's kind of surprising that it works as well as it does. Dr. S. Claiborne Johnston:           Ticagrelor doesn't have that problem. It's not a prodrug. It acts directly on the P2Y12 inhibitor. And so, the hope was that we would have a more consistent and pronounced effect on risk reduction in patients after TIA and mild to moderate strokes. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Primary efficacy outcome in THALES was different from the primary efficacy outcome chosen for the POINT trial, that was major ischemic events and death from ischemic vascular events, and that of the CHANCE trial, that was a combination of ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes in 90 days. Can you please tell us about the thought process behind choosing this particular primary efficacy outcome in THALES? Dr. S. Claiborne Johnston:           Yeah, so this was encouraged by the regulatory authorities. And so the primary efficacy outcome in THALES is all stroke, hemorrhagic and ischemic, and all death, hemorrhagic and ischemic. And we teased apart just the ischemic etiologies in POINT. Dr. S. Claiborne Johnston:           The rationale was that we were including all the major outcomes that the drug could impact. The problem is that people forget that it includes hemorrhagic events, and then they weigh that efficacy outcome against the safety outcome. And so there's confusion. There's sort of double-counting of safety elements in doing that comparison. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Okay, great. And now, before we hear about how you disentangled the two safety and efficacy outcomes, can you please remind our listeners about the primary results of THALES, which was published obviously a few months ago? Dr. S. Claiborne Johnston:           Yeah, sure. So, it showed that the combination of ticagrelor and aspirin works. It reduced the stroke and death by about 17% over the 30-day period of treatment. So robust effect. There were some increased hemorrhages, and looking at severe hemorrhage as defined by the GUSTO definition, there was almost a fourfold increase, but it was tiny in absolute terms of 0.4% increase. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Okay. So, now it's very important, as you mentioned, this disentangling of recurrent ischemic, again, safety from efficacy outcomes. Your current study that is published in the November issue of Stroke clarified these results. And we're excited to hear about those results. Dr. S. Claiborne Johnston:           That's right. So, there were two problems with the way people have interpreted the results of the THALES trial. One is this entanglement of safety events and both efficacy outcome and the safety outcome. The other was the use of relative risks as opposed to absolute risks, because a high relative risk for a rare event is less important than a small relative risk for a more difference between more common events. And so we wanted to deal with both of those issues. Dr. S. Claiborne Johnston:           So, we defined new outcomes that were not entangled. So, we defined major ischemic events, similar to what we had done in POINT, and then we defined major hemorrhage as being basically irreversible hemorrhage, and compared outcomes in the two groups. And what we found was that when we did it that way, for every 1,000 patients treated, we avoided 12 major ischemic events and produced three major hemorrhages. So, about a four-to-one ratio of ischemic benefit to hemorrhage risk. And that was true at various cutpoints for disability. Dr. S. Claiborne Johnston:           So, if we said, "Okay, yes, you had an event, and are you disabled at last follow-up at 30 days?" Then if we said that, there was also a four-to-one difference in disabling events, ischemic versus hemorrhagic. And if we said a two or greater, so moderate disability or worse, it was the same ratio, four-to-one. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Okay, so four-to-one ratio of benefit. That's an important number to keep in mind. Also reassuring to see that this net clinical benefit or net clinical impact of the combination of therapy was practically the same across all the pre-specified subgroups in the trial. Were you at all surprised by the subgroup analysis? Dr. S. Claiborne Johnston:           Well you know if you do enough subgroup analyses, you're going to find differences, right? And thankfully, we have the looking at interaction terms to keep us honest, but even so, you look at 20 and you're going to have some significant interaction terms, as well. But yeah, it was reassuring that the effects were so consistent across groups. Dr. S. Claiborne Johnston:           I think there's been a tendency to over-interpret results from subgroup analyses. We don't have any evidence to suggest that we should be doing that here. I'm sure we can pick out groups that do better, and we've done that actually. The group with atherosclerosis does particularly well, but is that a chance event or is that real? I think we just have to be super-cautious about subgroup analyses. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        So, absolutely. One of the subgroups that I'm personally very interested in is just the time subgroup. So, all of the patients in THALES were enrolled within the first 24 hours, and the subgroup analysis did not show that there were any differences in terms of the net benefit between those that were enrolled earlier, within the first 12 hours, and those that were enrolled later, between 12 and 24 hours. But in routine clinical practice, we often see patients with TIA and mild stroke actually presented to us later than that timeframe entirely. Should we be giving them dual antiplatelet treatment? Dr. S. Claiborne Johnston:           That's a great question. So, we did an analysis in POINT where we modeled out, would we still have an important significant net benefit if we had started the trial later? And we didn't start the trial later, right? So, this was just pretending like anybody who had an event early on was not in the study in starting at a later timepoint and modeling that out. And basically what we found was that for out to three days, there was still a benefit. And, in fact, if you look at that data and look at those tables, you could even say, even out to five days. Dr. S. Claiborne Johnston:           I would say it's not unreasonable to do that given that the risks are so small and they're going to be even later with later treatment. But I would say, too, that even though we're not seeing greater impact within that first 24 hours versus 12 to 24, it just makes sense with event rates being as great as they are early on that if you don't treat with a preventive medication before an event occurs, it doesn't work. So, it just makes sense that as much as possible we ought to treat people as early as possible after their events. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Very important findings and things to keep in mind. I want to ask you about the top two takeaway messages from the study. Dr. S. Claiborne Johnston:           One is that there's a favorable benefit-to-risk ratio for ticagrelor/aspirin in mild to moderate actually ischemic stroke and high-risk TIA from THALES. So that would be number one. Dr. S. Claiborne Johnston:           And then number two is watch your endpoints carefully. Think carefully, too, about whether balancing safety to efficacy events really makes sense and also whether focusing on relative risks really makes sense. I would encourage us, even though our journals tend to push us towards relative risks and we're more familiar with those, I'd encourage us to get more comfortable with using absolute risks in the way we look at data, but also in the way we talk to patients about their impact. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Fair enough. I remember a few years ago, you visited us here at the University of Miami to deliver the annual Cerebrovascular Scheinberg Lecture. And you had mentioned that the idea of dual antiplatelet therapy treatment of patients with TIA mild stroke had come to you many years back when you were still in training, but it took many years for that idea to turn into reality, into randomized trials, and now translated into clinical practice. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        At the time, if you recall, this was right before you went to Europe to present the primary results of POINT at the European conference. And the trial results were not publicly available, so you were sworn to secrecy. You couldn't tell us about the results. It's been a few years since then. You've already completed yet another trial on this topic. Can I ask what's next for you and your team as it pertains to acute treatment of patients with TIA and mild stroke? Dr. S. Claiborne Johnston:           Well, there are a few things. So, CHANCE-2 is a really interesting trial. My role in that was peripheral, just really advisory, but it's an exciting trial. So, basically it's looking at people with those CYP2C19 polymorphisms that I mentioned before, people who don't rapidly and readily convert clopidogrel to its active form, and randomizing them to clopidogrel versus ticagrelor. Dr. S. Claiborne Johnston:           So, it's going to give us some head-to-head data on the two drugs and the people who may benefit the most from ticagrelor. And that is complete, and that will be published in the next few months. So, I that's going to be an important trial in people's thinking about how best to approach these patients. Dr. S. Claiborne Johnston:           The second is, you know, we're not done. We still have a 5% risk of events, even in those three dual antiplatelet therapy. And so we need more agents. And we need to think about secondary prevention extending to other groups as well, just as you said, longer periods of time, more severe strokes, people after thrombolysis/thrombectomy. Those are big groups of patients at extreme risk for secondary events, and we have no agents and no data right now. Dr. S. Claiborne Johnston:           I would be concerned about dual antiplatelet therapy in those patients, just given what we've seen about the risks of hemorrhage in the existing groups, which are again manageable and shouldn't change people's decision about treatment. But for the groups I just mentioned, risks of hemorrhage start to get greater. And so one worries about whether dual antiplatelet therapy's the right thing or whether other agents make more sense. So, yeah, we're interested in looking at other agents, some novel, for those other indications as well. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Professor Johnston, thank you for your time, and we look forward to covering more of your research in the future. Dr. S. Claiborne Johnston:           Well, thank you. It's been a pleasure. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Thank you. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        And this concludes our podcast for the November 2021 issue of Stroke. Please be sure to check out the November table of contents for a full list of publications, including two important topical review articles, one on thrombus composition after thrombectomy, and one on pearls and pitfalls of perfusion imaging in acute ischemic stroke, as advanced neuroimaging continues to play a critical role in decision-making for acute stroke therapies. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        Now, speaking of advanced neuroimaging and the immense role that neuroimaging plays in our day-to-day practice, let's take a moment as we end our November podcast to remember how the concept of medical imaging first began over 120 years ago with the discovery of X-ray by German professor of physics Wilhelm Röntgen. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        On Friday, November 8, 1895, while experimenting with electricity, Röntgen accidentally discovered a new kind of rays that he referred to as X-rays. He soon realized that X-rays were capable of passing through most substances, including the soft tissues of the body, but left bones and metals visible. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        One of his earliest photographic plates of his experiments was a film of his wife Bertha's hand with her wedding ring clearly visible. This was the first time that the inside of human body was seen without performing surgery. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        From Röntgen's first X-ray image to the advanced neuroimaging that we review today on our portable devices, I can't help but wonder, what will your accidental discovery on a Friday fall afternoon in November do to advance the field of science and stroke 100 years from now, as we continue to stay alert with Stroke Alert. Dr. Negar Asdaghi:                        This program is copyright of the American Heart Association, 2021. The opinions expressed by speakers in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association. For more, visit AHAjournals.org.

Yaad & Abroad
I HAD A STROKE ||STORY TIME||

Yaad & Abroad

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 16:41


Elda tell his story about the day he had a stroke and all the flashes he went through when it happened. ||BLACK LIVES MATTER||

JNIS podcast
COMPASS: intravenous ateplase and the efficacy of aspiration vs. stent retriever thrombectomy

JNIS podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 16:44


In this podcast, we discuss the COMPASS: a trial of aspiration thrombectomy versus stent retriever thrombectomy as first-line approach for large vessel occlusion, comparing patients with and without prior intravenous (IV) alteplase administration. JNIS Editor-in-Chief, Felipe C. Albuquerque, interviews Maxim Mokin, from the Department of Neurosurgery and Brain Repair, University of South Florida, Tampa, USA, about the post hoc analysis. which concludes that prior administration of IV alteplase may adversely affect the efficacy of aspiration, whilst it does not seem to influence the stent retriever first approach to MT in patients with anterior circulation ELVO. Read the related paper on the JNIS website: https://jnis.bmj.com/content/early/2021/10/13/neurintsurg-2021-017943

IronWill
75: Learning To Be Indifferent To What Makes No Difference With Keith McCoy

IronWill

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 60:38


Keith McCoy and his wife Keri have been together 25 years. After having their eighth child, Keri suffered a stroke. Keith tells their story and how they learned that they could not control everything and how to shift their focus onto only what they can control. You can listen to this podcast on our website www.ironwill.us or on your favorite podcast platform.

Plant Based Briefing
148: Fight Erectile Dysfunction and 4 More Reasons to Go Plant Based This Movember by Josh Cullimore, MD at PCRM.org.

Plant Based Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 7:57


Dr. Josh Cullimore at PCRM.org explains how a plant based diet can help fight erectile dysfunction, reduce the risk of prostate cancer, have a healthy testosterone level, improve fertility and mood. Please take a moment to rate & review the podcast here. Thank you!

The NeuroNerds
Becoming The Light with Tymiak Hawkins

The NeuroNerds

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 87:04


All episodes are available at https://TheNeuroNerds.com.  Follow @TheNeuroNerds on Twitter/Instagram and Like us at Facebook.com/TheNeuroNerds. SummaryWe love celebrating fellow survivors and their stories through recovery and beyond. In this episode, we're featuring stroke survivor Tymiak Hawkins who is sharing his story in a big way with the debut of his first book “Becoming The Light.” Our host Joe is chatting with him about their similar recovery experiences being that they both have mostly invisible, mental deficits from their strokes and how they manage that in their daily lives. They're also both former basketball players so they talk a lot about how being athletes played into their recovery. Like Joe, Tymiak is all about positive thinking and so this episode dives into how the focus on the gift of life post-stroke. How do you stay positive through the adversities of life? Please share on our socials!  Links Mentioned•Order Tymiak's book “Becoming The Light” here - https://www.tymiakhawkins.com/•Follow Tymiak on Instagram - https://instagram.com/twothet2.0?utm_medium=copy_link Credits•Support The NeuroNerds podcast on Patreon and join our NeuroJedi High Council at www.Patreon.com/TheNeuroNerds•Co-hosted by Joe Borges and Lauren Manzano•Find Joe at http://joesorocks.com and @joesorocks on Twitter/Instagram and submit your stroke/brain injury recovery story at https://www.joesorocks.com/submit-your-story•Find Lauren at @laurenlmanzano on Instagram, @tankbbg on Twitter•Produced by Joe Borges and Felice LaZae, http://felicelazae.com, @felicelazae on Twitter/Instagram•Edited by  Marcellus Wesley•Sponsored by Motus Nova, Avid Technology, and our Patreon Supporters

Suck it up and Succeed
Mind, Body, and Business with Stephanie Shaw

Suck it up and Succeed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 33:27


Stephanie Shaw is a nutrition strategist who helps high-performing women get the body they desire and the confidence they deserve. Stephanie helps these women peel back the layers of the intricate health puzzle, down to the DNA, and shows them precisely what to do. As a result, her clients lose and keep off the weight, and build a sustainable lifestyle of confidence, energy, and love for their bodies. My Story:March 23, 2017, walking in New Orleans, I stepped on Bourbon Street and almost passed out. My body became numb, my breathing short, and my left jaw began to tingle. That day started a 2-year process that left me with a host of unanswered medical questions. In addition to having every typical stroke symptom, I also began to suffer from migraines and anxiety. I visited neurologists, physical therapists, acupuncturists, chiropractors (note the plural on each specialist)... I was poked and prodded by over 18 physicians (Western and Eastern medicine), and no one had a solution. I fought back by educating myself on natural ways to heal my body, got two nutrition certifications, and turned that knowledge into a successful business where I help other high-performing women who have a body that is fighting them.www.StephanieLynnShaw.com www.Instagram.com/MindBodyBusinessMethodSupport the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/JMCLifestyle)

Frankly Speaking About Family Medicine
Time to Recommend the Use of Salt Substitutes for CVD Prevention? - Frankly Speaking Ep 250

Frankly Speaking About Family Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 9:39


Credits: 0.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™   CME/CE Information and Claim Credit: https://www.pri-med.com/online-education/podcast/frankly-speaking-cme-250   Overview: While the data conflict on how much sodium intake is optimal for preventing cardiovascular disease, it is clear that daily salt intake for most Americans exceeds what is recommended. However, restricting salt intake on an individual or on a public health level has been controversial. An interesting alternative is the use of salt substitutes, which can help to decrease sodium intake while increasing potassium intake, and both have been associated with lowering blood pressure. Join us to hear a discussion on the results of the recently published studies on salt and cardiovascular disease, along with an overview of the Salt Substitute and Stroke Study (SSaSS).   Episode resource links: Neal B, Wu Y, Feng X, et al. Effect of salt substitution on cardiovascular events and death. N Engl J Med. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa2105675 O'Donnell M, Mente A, Alderman MH, et al. Salt and cardiovascular disease: insufficient evidence to recommend low sodium intake, European Heart Journal, Volume 41, Issue 35, 14 September 2020, Pages 3363–3373, https://doi.org/10.1093/eurheartj/ehaa586 Circulation. 2021;143:1542–1567. DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.120.050371 Guest: Robert A. Baldor MD, FAAFP   Music Credit: Richard Onorato

Health Mysteries Solved
The Biggest Hidden Food Trigger for Hashimoto's and Autoimmune Diseases You Need to Know

Health Mysteries Solved

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 62:26


The Case:  Jessica has Hashimoto's Disease and can't seem to balance her thyroid Her doctors say her levels are fine but she's experiencing bloating, fatigue, hair loss, GI issues, and brain fog. She met with several doctors but none were able to address her concerns.    The Investigation When I met Jessica, I knew that we had to go beyond supporting the thyroid, we had to slow or stop the attack on her immune system. There are many triggers and Jessica had already cut out gluten. This was great but that told me we had to dig deeper.  I noticed that Jessica came from a family of farmers and had quite a bit of exposure. Figuring out her specific triggers was how we were going to solve her autoimmune mystery.  Autoimmune Triggers and Glyphosate I talk a lot about the four most common triggers for autoimmune disease and they are: stress, toxins, infections and foods. There is one thing that intersects with all four of these triggers - glyphosate. To explain it fully, I invited Jeffrey Smith on the show. He is the Founder and Executive Director of the Institute for Responsible Technology and Protect Nature Now. He's also a bestselling author, award-winning filmmaker, and an in-demand speaker. I could think of nobody better to explain what's going on for those with autoimmune disease and even for those who do not have an autoimmune disease.  What is Glyphosate? Glyphosate is the main ingredient found in Roundup (a herbicide) created by Monsanto which is now owned by Bayer. This chemical has been found (in a US lawsuit) to have contributed to Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma and cancer. It has also been linked to more than 30 diseases. It was originally patented as a descaler for industrial builders because it chelates minerals. When it gets into the human body, it also grabs minerals from our system and prevents these minerals from doing their work in keeping us healthy.  How are we Exposed to Roundup and Glyphosate? Since the late 1990's, Roundup has been used on human food including genetically modified crops such as soy, corn, cotton, canola, sugar beets, and alfalfa. These GMO crops are engineered to be Roundup-ready which means they can withstand it. Other crops that are often sprayed are oats, wheat, mung beans, lentils, chickpeas, and even orchard fruits and grapes used for wine. It is found throughout the food chain.  Effects of Glyphosate Exposure There are many ways that glyphosate exposure can affect the body, including:  Mineral deficiencies (which can cause metabolic pathways to shut down) Acts as an antibiotic that kills off the beneficial bacteria in our microbiome.  Can break down the cellular walls of our gut, brain, kidneys, or other organs in the body Can damage and mutate the DNA which can lead to cancer.  Can damage the mitochondria which has been linked to chronic fatigue, cancer, aging, and several other diseases. Interferes with intercellular communication causing gap junctions (also linked to cancer). Blocks the production of good gut bacteria. Can throw off hormonal balance between estrogen and testosterone.  Acts as an endocrine disruptor.  Can cause epigenetic changes in gene expression in future generations. Suppresses cellular detoxification pathways and downgrades Nrf2. How Can Glyphosate Trigger Autoimmune Disease? Several of the effects listed above can then contribute to the development of an autoimmune disease. Jeffrey points to GMOs and BT toxin. BT toxin works by creating tiny holes in the insects and that is how it acts as an insecticide. While this can help grow those plans, it can also have the same effect on human cells. This is why he believes that leaky gut can be directly related to BT toxins and that leaky gut can lead to a variety of autoimmune diseases because the gut is now allowing bigger proteins that don't below in the bloodstream, directly into the bloodstream and the immune system starts to see these as an invader and attacks them. The thing is that when the  immune system attacks them, it can also by accident attack our other tissues.  For example, in the case of Hashimoto's, the immune system is attacking the thyroid because it's mistaking it as an intruder. Because the gap junctions are permanently open due to leaky gut, more and more proteins get into the bloodstream and this creates a lot of inflammation.  Scientific studies have found that lab animals fed GMOs will develop inflammation and issues with the immune system, leaky gut, and the destruction of the good bacteria in the gut. Diseases That May Be Linked to Glyphosate and GMO Foods Jeffrey shares that correlational charts show a rise of specific diseases in parallel with the increased use of glyphosate on soy and corn in the US as well as the increased prevalence of genetically modified soy and corn. The specific diseases that appear in the correlation include: Inflammatory Bowel Disease  Deaths from intestinal infection Liver disease Various cancers (liver, bile duct, kidney, breast) Autism ADHD  Deaths from Alzheimer's Deaths from Senile Dementia Deaths from Parkinson's  Anxiety Suicide by overdosing  Schizophrenia Celiac disease Insomnia and other Sleep Disorders Skin problems Birth defects Eye problems Diabetes Obesity  Stroke and Hypertension Anemia While of course correlation does not prove causation, Jeffery says that he's seen the correlations first hand. He recently surveyed 3256 people who switched to an organic diet and they reported that they felt better. In fact, 85.2% said their digestive issues were resolved. They also reported improvements in fatigue, weight problems, brain fog, anxiety, depression, food sensitivities and allergies. In addition, 21.4% of respondents reported improvements with their autoimmune diseases.  Additional Threats from Engineered Microbes We often focus on the microbes in our gut but the atmosphere is full of microbes. And, all of these different microbes belong to microbiomes. For example, there is a microbiome in the dirt, in trees, in other organisms, and in the atmosphere. The threat to these microbiomes (and our own) comes from genetically engineered microbes. Microbes can mutate, swap genetic material, and travel around the world. This is how an engineered microbe created for one purpose could end up inside the DNA of hundreds or thousands of other types of microbes and enter the ecosystems with unknown effect.  Jeffrey is trying to stop the release of engineered microbes and has created a film about the threat. You can watch “Don't Let the Gene Out of the Bottle” on his website protectnaturenow.com How to Avoid Glyphosate, BT and GMO Foods Jeffrey gets asked all the time about how to avoid these harmful chemicals. Is going organic enough given the exposure so many of us have already experienced? Jeffrey says it is possible to heal from GMO and Glyphosate exposure but it's more than just switching to organic. You will likely need to remineralize, restore your leaky gut, heal the mitochondria and rebalance hormones (especially if there are sleep issues causing anxiety or depression). The good news is that reducing the GMO and Glyphosate burden has helped people regain their health. He suggests tracking how you feel before you switch to organic and then each day on a clean diet.  If going organic feels like a financial challenge, he outlines a few areas to focus and a few ways to reconsider your budget for health and food. There are also certain foods to avoid because they have the highest concentration of Glyphosate or BT toxin. Are GMO and Glyphosate Related to Peanut Allergies? There could be a connection between GMO soy and the increase in peanut allergies as these have a cross reactivity. Plus, genetically modified soy has trypsin inhibitors. Trypsin makes it possible for the body to break down certain proteins including peanut proteins. Genetically modified soy has seven times more trypsin inhibitors compared to natural soy. When these proteins are not broken down properly, they remain in the stomach long enough to create an allergic reaction. Glyphosate and BT (which may damage the mitochondria, destroy the microbiome, and cause leaky gut) can also contribute to an allergic reaction.  Testing for Glyphosate and BT Exposure It is possible to find out if you have toxins like Glyphosate and BT in your system. There are urine tests available. If you plan to detox, it can be helpful to do a test before you start and then again afterward to get a sense of the change in toxin levels in the body.    Next Steps in Solving Jessica's Health Mystery After spending 2 hours with Jessica reviewing her health history and diet, I saw that she came from a long family of farmers and has not only been exposed to many herbicides on the farm, she also has never really eaten organic foods. She was also gluten-free but was eating quite a bit of conventional corn and soy.  Our first step was to clean up her diet by switching to organic, non-GMO corn and lowering how much of it she was eating. She also switched her other foods to organic.  We also had to support her gut and liver. We did this with a cleanse, as well as microbial nutrients like GI MicrobX and FC Cidal  and supported her digestion with digestive enzymes and Hydrochloric acid. We also supported the healing of her gut with Glutamine and EnteroVite, as well as probiotics. After the gut cleanse, I wanted to make sure that we restored the microbiome because glyphosate can be so damaging. I recommended R's Koso. This is a Japanese fermented drink made from more than 100 different vegetables, fruits, and plants that I find delivers great results. It's like a natural prebiotic and probiotic and a great way to rebalance and continue to support the microbiome. By the way, I have a code for anyone that may want to try it and save 10%, it's INNA10. Use it at checkout on their website. We also had to help out her liver so we did a Push Catch Detox followed by 3 months of phase 2 support using NAC. Happy Ending In just 3 months of the new protocol, Jessica was feeling much better and her brain fog was gone. Eliminating Health Mysteries For Jessica, we were able to find that missing piece of the health puzzle and help her regain her health. Could Glyphosate and GMO exposure be the missing clue for you or someone in your life?    Links: Thanks to my guest Jeffrey Smith. He mentioned several resources in this episode. If you are looking for his 90Day healthy eating program, it can be found on https://livehealthybewell.com/. This is also where you will find The Secret Ingredient program. You can research toxin levels in your food at https://www.responsibletechnology.org/ If you want to learn more about engineered microbes, you can view his film “Don't Let the Gene out of the Bottle” on his website protectnaturenow.com   Suggested Products R Koso Japanese Fermented Drink (don't forget to save 10% by using INNA10 at checkout) PushCatch Liver Detox Digestive Enzymes Betaine HCl L-Glutamine GI MicrobX  FC CidalEnteroVite (please create an account to access this supplement) Probiotics Related Podcast Episodes: Could Glyphosate be Causing Gluten Intolerance? The Case of fatigue, brain fog and muscle weakness w/ Dr. Tim Jackson The Case of the False Negative Celiac Test w/ Dr. Peter Osborne The Dangers of Ignoring your Mouth's Microbiome w/ Dr. Kourosh Maddahi, DDS   Thanks for Listening If you like what you heard, please rate and review this podcast. Every piece of feedback not only helps me create better shows, it helps more people find this important information.   Never miss an episode -  Subscribe NOW to Health Mysteries Solved with host, Inna Topiler on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or Google Podcasts and remember to rate and review the show! Find out more at http://healthmysteriessolved.com     PLEASE NOTE All information, content, and material on this podcast is for informational purposes only and is not intended to serve as a substitute for the consultation, diagnosis, and/or medical treatment of a qualified physician or healthcare provider. Some of the links provided are affiliate links. This means we may make a very small amount of money should you choose to buy after clicking on them. This will in no way affect the price of the product but it helps us a tiny bit in covering our expenses.

Straight Garbage
Claiming your father-in-law had a stroke to call in sick to work!

Straight Garbage

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 79:26


Still drinking at 4:30 am when you have to be to work in a couple of hours? In a fit of rage, Robert punches the window in a garbage truck and breaks the window and quits, welcome back! Cowboy hats with boobie tassels? Robert's question for the Australian guest...do you have slaves over there? That's how you get aids... Coughing during sex? Take advantage of that, follow us for more sex tips!

The NeuroNerds
Brain Injury Survivor Tips For The Holidays

The NeuroNerds

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 27:19


All episodes are available at https://TheNeuroNerds.com.  Follow @TheNeuroNerds on Twitter/Instagram and Like us at Facebook.com/TheNeuroNerds. SummaryWinter is coming which means the holidays are on the way so our host Joe is talking with his partner and our producer Felice about how they prepare for this time of year. It can be especially overwhelming for a brain injury survivor to deal with the overstimulation and the extra social interactions associated with the holidays so Joe and Felice go into how he prepares mentally as a stroke survivor. If you are a brain injury survivor, how do you cope with the overwhelm the holidays can bring? Please share on our socials! Credits•Support The NeuroNerds podcast on Patreon and join our NeuroJedi High Council at www.Patreon.com/TheNeuroNerds•Co-hosted by Joe Borges and Lauren Manzano•Find Joe at http://joesorocks.com and @joesorocks on Twitter/Instagram and submit your stroke/brain injury recovery story at https://www.joesorocks.com/submit-your-story•Find Lauren at @laurenlmanzano on Instagram, @tankbbg on Twitter•Produced by Joe Borges and Felice LaZae, http://felicelazae.com, @felicelazae on Twitter/Instagram•Edited by  Marcellus Wesley•Sponsored by Motus Nova, Avid Technology and our Patreon Supporters

Women, Men & Relationships
Ep. 295: My Stroke of Insight with Jill Bolte Taylor

Women, Men & Relationships

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 57:53


Registration is open for Inner Circle Mastermind 2022 with 7 spots left! http://jjsinnercirclemastermind.com   5 Reasons Money Holds You Back From Living Your Purpose- FREE webinar November 17th 5pm PT/8pm ET  http://jjflizanes.com/purpose     Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor is a Harvard-trained and published neuroscientist. In 1996 she experienced a severe hemorrhage (AVM) in the left hemisphere of her brain causing her to lose the ability to walk, talk, read, write, or recall any of her life. Her memoir, My Stroke of Insight, documenting her experience with stroke and eight-year recovery, spent 63 weeks on the New York Times nonfiction bestseller list and is still routinely the #1 book in the category Stroke in the Amazon marketplace. Dr. Jill is a dynamic teacher and public speaker who loves educating all age groups, academic levels, as well as corporations and not-for-profit organizations about the beauty of our human brain. She focuses on how we can activate the power of our neuroplasticity to not only recover from neurological trauma, but how we can purposely choose to live a more flexible, resilient, and satisfying life. In 2008 Dr. Jill gave the first TED talk that ever went viral on the Internet, which now has well over 27.5 million views. Also in 2008, Dr. Jill was chosen as one of Time magazine's “100 Most Influential People in the World” and was the premiere guest on Oprah Winfrey's “Soul Series” webcast. Her new book, Whole Brain Living – the Anatomy of Choice and the Four Characters That Drive Our Life is a #1 release on Amazon in categories ranging from Neuroscience to Nervous System Diseases and Stroke. https://www.drjilltaylor.com/   JJ Flizanes is an Empowerment Strategist and the host of several podcasts including People's Choice Awards nominee Spirit, Purpose & Energy. She is the Director of Invisible Fitness, a best-selling author of Fit 2 Love: How to Get Physically, Emotionally, and Spiritually Fit to Attract the Love of Your Life and The Invisible Fitness Formula: 5 Secrets to Release Weight and End Body Shame. Named Best Personal Trainer in Los Angeles for 2007 by Elite Traveler Magazine, JJ has been featured in many national magazines, including Shape, Fitness, and Women's Health as well as appeared on NBC, CBS, Fox, the CW and KTLA. Grab a free copy of the Invisible Fitness Formula at http://jjflizanes.com/book    

Fit 2 Love Podcast with JJ Flizanes
Ep. 598: My Stroke of Insight with Jill Bolte Taylor

Fit 2 Love Podcast with JJ Flizanes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 57:42


Registration is open for Inner Circle Mastermind 2022 with 7 spots left! http://jjsinnercirclemastermind.com   5 Reasons Money Holds You Back From Living Your Purpose- FREE webinar November 17th 5pm PT/8pm ET  http://jjflizanes.com/purpose     Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor is a Harvard-trained and published neuroscientist. In 1996 she experienced a severe hemorrhage (AVM) in the left hemisphere of her brain causing her to lose the ability to walk, talk, read, write, or recall any of her life. Her memoir, My Stroke of Insight, documenting her experience with stroke and eight-year recovery, spent 63 weeks on the New York Times nonfiction bestseller list and is still routinely the #1 book in the category Stroke in the Amazon marketplace. Dr. Jill is a dynamic teacher and public speaker who loves educating all age groups, academic levels, as well as corporations and not-for-profit organizations about the beauty of our human brain. She focuses on how we can activate the power of our neuroplasticity to not only recover from neurological trauma, but how we can purposely choose to live a more flexible, resilient, and satisfying life. In 2008 Dr. Jill gave the first TED talk that ever went viral on the Internet, which now has well over 27.5 million views. Also in 2008, Dr. Jill was chosen as one of Time magazine's “100 Most Influential People in the World” and was the premiere guest on Oprah Winfrey's “Soul Series” webcast. Her new book, Whole Brain Living – the Anatomy of Choice and the Four Characters That Drive Our Life is a #1 release on Amazon in categories ranging from Neuroscience to Nervous System Diseases and Stroke. https://www.drjilltaylor.com/   JJ Flizanes is an Empowerment Strategist and the host of several podcasts including People's Choice Awards nominee Spirit, Purpose & Energy. She is the Director of Invisible Fitness, a best-selling author of Fit 2 Love: How to Get Physically, Emotionally, and Spiritually Fit to Attract the Love of Your Life and The Invisible Fitness Formula: 5 Secrets to Release Weight and End Body Shame. Named Best Personal Trainer in Los Angeles for 2007 by Elite Traveler Magazine, JJ has been featured in many national magazines, including Shape, Fitness, and Women's Health as well as appeared on NBC, CBS, Fox, the CW and KTLA. Grab a free copy of the Invisible Fitness Formula at http://jjflizanes.com/book    

Health & Wealth
Ep. 103: My Stroke of Insight with Jill Bolte Taylor

Health & Wealth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 57:47


Registration is open for Inner Circle Mastermind 2022 with 7 spots left! http://jjsinnercirclemastermind.com   5 Reasons Money Holds You Back From Living Your Purpose- FREE webinar November 17th 5pm PT/8pm ET  http://jjflizanes.com/purpose     Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor is a Harvard-trained and published neuroscientist. In 1996 she experienced a severe hemorrhage (AVM) in the left hemisphere of her brain causing her to lose the ability to walk, talk, read, write, or recall any of her life. Her memoir, My Stroke of Insight, documenting her experience with stroke and eight-year recovery, spent 63 weeks on the New York Times nonfiction bestseller list and is still routinely the #1 book in the category Stroke in the Amazon marketplace. Dr. Jill is a dynamic teacher and public speaker who loves educating all age groups, academic levels, as well as corporations and not-for-profit organizations about the beauty of our human brain. She focuses on how we can activate the power of our neuroplasticity to not only recover from neurological trauma, but how we can purposely choose to live a more flexible, resilient, and satisfying life. In 2008 Dr. Jill gave the first TED talk that ever went viral on the Internet, which now has well over 27.5 million views. Also in 2008, Dr. Jill was chosen as one of Time magazine's “100 Most Influential People in the World” and was the premiere guest on Oprah Winfrey's “Soul Series” webcast. Her new book, Whole Brain Living – the Anatomy of Choice and the Four Characters That Drive Our Life is a #1 release on Amazon in categories ranging from Neuroscience to Nervous System Diseases and Stroke. https://www.drjilltaylor.com/   JJ Flizanes is an Empowerment Strategist and the host of several podcasts including People's Choice Awards nominee Spirit, Purpose & Energy. She is the Director of Invisible Fitness, a best-selling author of Fit 2 Love: How to Get Physically, Emotionally, and Spiritually Fit to Attract the Love of Your Life and The Invisible Fitness Formula: 5 Secrets to Release Weight and End Body Shame. Named Best Personal Trainer in Los Angeles for 2007 by Elite Traveler Magazine, JJ has been featured in many national magazines, including Shape, Fitness, and Women's Health as well as appeared on NBC, CBS, Fox, the CW and KTLA. Grab a free copy of the Invisible Fitness Formula at http://jjflizanes.com/book    

Nutrition & Alternative Medicine
Ep. 219: My Stroke of Insight with Jill Bolte Taylor

Nutrition & Alternative Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 57:57


Registration is open for Inner Circle Mastermind 2022 with 7 spots left! http://jjsinnercirclemastermind.com   5 Reasons Money Holds You Back From Living Your Purpose- FREE webinar November 17th 5pm PT/8pm ET  http://jjflizanes.com/purpose     Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor is a Harvard-trained and published neuroscientist. In 1996 she experienced a severe hemorrhage (AVM) in the left hemisphere of her brain causing her to lose the ability to walk, talk, read, write, or recall any of her life. Her memoir, My Stroke of Insight, documenting her experience with stroke and eight-year recovery, spent 63 weeks on the New York Times nonfiction bestseller list and is still routinely the #1 book in the category Stroke in the Amazon marketplace. Dr. Jill is a dynamic teacher and public speaker who loves educating all age groups, academic levels, as well as corporations and not-for-profit organizations about the beauty of our human brain. She focuses on how we can activate the power of our neuroplasticity to not only recover from neurological trauma, but how we can purposely choose to live a more flexible, resilient, and satisfying life. In 2008 Dr. Jill gave the first TED talk that ever went viral on the Internet, which now has well over 27.5 million views. Also in 2008, Dr. Jill was chosen as one of Time magazine's “100 Most Influential People in the World” and was the premiere guest on Oprah Winfrey's “Soul Series” webcast. Her new book, Whole Brain Living – the Anatomy of Choice and the Four Characters That Drive Our Life is a #1 release on Amazon in categories ranging from Neuroscience to Nervous System Diseases and Stroke. https://www.drjilltaylor.com/   JJ Flizanes is an Empowerment Strategist and the host of several podcasts including People's Choice Awards nominee Spirit, Purpose & Energy. She is the Director of Invisible Fitness, a best-selling author of Fit 2 Love: How to Get Physically, Emotionally, and Spiritually Fit to Attract the Love of Your Life and The Invisible Fitness Formula: 5 Secrets to Release Weight and End Body Shame. Named Best Personal Trainer in Los Angeles for 2007 by Elite Traveler Magazine, JJ has been featured in many national magazines, including Shape, Fitness, and Women's Health as well as appeared on NBC, CBS, Fox, the CW and KTLA. Grab a free copy of the Invisible Fitness Formula at http://jjflizanes.com/book    

Spirit, Purpose & Energy
Ep. 320: My Stroke of Insight with Jill Bolte Taylor

Spirit, Purpose & Energy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 57:47


Registration is open for Inner Circle Mastermind 2022 with 7 spots left! http://jjsinnercirclemastermind.com   5 Reasons Money Holds You Back From Living Your Purpose- FREE webinar November 17th 5pm PT/8pm ET  http://jjflizanes.com/purpose     Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor is a Harvard-trained and published neuroscientist. In 1996 she experienced a severe hemorrhage (AVM) in the left hemisphere of her brain causing her to lose the ability to walk, talk, read, write, or recall any of her life. Her memoir, My Stroke of Insight, documenting her experience with stroke and eight-year recovery, spent 63 weeks on the New York Times nonfiction bestseller list and is still routinely the #1 book in the category Stroke in the Amazon marketplace. Dr. Jill is a dynamic teacher and public speaker who loves educating all age groups, academic levels, as well as corporations and not-for-profit organizations about the beauty of our human brain. She focuses on how we can activate the power of our neuroplasticity to not only recover from neurological trauma, but how we can purposely choose to live a more flexible, resilient, and satisfying life. In 2008 Dr. Jill gave the first TED talk that ever went viral on the Internet, which now has well over 27.5 million views. Also in 2008, Dr. Jill was chosen as one of Time magazine's “100 Most Influential People in the World” and was the premiere guest on Oprah Winfrey's “Soul Series” webcast. Her new book, Whole Brain Living – the Anatomy of Choice and the Four Characters That Drive Our Life is a #1 release on Amazon in categories ranging from Neuroscience to Nervous System Diseases and Stroke. https://www.drjilltaylor.com/   JJ Flizanes is an Empowerment Strategist and the host of several podcasts including People's Choice Awards nominee Spirit, Purpose & Energy. She is the Director of Invisible Fitness, a best-selling author of Fit 2 Love: How to Get Physically, Emotionally, and Spiritually Fit to Attract the Love of Your Life and The Invisible Fitness Formula: 5 Secrets to Release Weight and End Body Shame. Named Best Personal Trainer in Los Angeles for 2007 by Elite Traveler Magazine, JJ has been featured in many national magazines, including Shape, Fitness, and Women's Health as well as appeared on NBC, CBS, Fox, the CW and KTLA. Grab a free copy of the Invisible Fitness Formula at http://jjflizanes.com/book    

Holmberg's Morning Sickness
11-04-21 - BR - THU - Deliverance Boosted Georgia Tourism - Pet Owner Hygiene Survey And Naughtiest Dog Breeds List - Wife Got Hubby 3 Promotions By Boning Boss - Reliving Brady's Police Of Chief Stroke - Daughter's Ride A Dick Note To Mom

Holmberg's Morning Sickness

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 32:17


Holmberg's Morning Sickness - Brady Report - Thursday November 4, 2021

Recovery After Stroke
Parenting After Stroke – Dr. Bettina Tornatora

Recovery After Stroke

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 82:32


Parenting is hard enough but parenting after stroke brings with it so many more challenges. Today I am joined by Dr. Bettina Tornatora for a discussion of some of the problems parents face after a stroke The post Parenting After Stroke – Dr. Bettina Tornatora appeared first on Recovery After Stroke.

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Self-rehab for stroke patients significantly improves outcomes

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 17:10


A new study has found that self-rehabilitation after a stroke could make a significant difference to recovery outcomes for patients. Dr Harry McNaughton has been leading the research for the Medical Research Institute of New Zealand, which involves a talking therapy programme called Take Charge. It encourages people recovering from a stroke to focus on what, and who, is most important to them in order to best plan their own rehabilitation. If the programme was implemented across New Zealand, it's estimated that an additional 600 people would be independent 12 months after their stroke for basic activities like walking, showering, and dressing. As a low cost solution it's also expected to save the health system upwards of $9 million each year. The findings of the study have recently been published in the international journal, Clinical Rehabilitation. Kathryn speaks to the MRINZ Stroke Rehabilitation Research director, Dr Harry McNaughton.

The NeuroNerds
Adulting Post-Stroke with Tania Saiz

The NeuroNerds

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 76:13


All episodes are available at https://TheNeuroNerds.com.  Follow @TheNeuroNerds on Twitter/Instagram and Like us at Facebook.com/TheNeuroNerds. SummaryIn this episode, Joe is interviewing 2x stroke survivor, mother, and Dictionary nerd, Tania Saiz.  Tania shares her perspective of recovering from a stroke while parenting.  Joe and Tania talk about how she deals with physical and cognitive deficits plus the challenge of finding her new normal while raising a family.  Links mentioned- Follow Tania on IG - https://www.instagram.com/thecubanita- Read Tania's Blog - https://a-stroke-of-luck.weebly.com Credits- Support The NeuroNerds podcast on Patreon and join our NeuroJedi High Council at www.Patreon.com/TheNeuroNerds- Co-hosted by Joe Borges and Lauren Manzano- Find Joe at http://joesorocks.com and @joesorocks on Twitter/Instagram and submit your stroke/brain injury recovery story at https://www.joesorocks.com/submit-your-story- Find Lauren at @laurenlmanzano on Instagram, @tankbbg on Twitter 

The Naked Scientists Podcast
Spooky spiders: silk, sex and squirting venom

The Naked Scientists Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 56:08


We're wandering into the weird world of spiders! We'll be looking at spiders that can fly using little silk parachutes and the grisly and gruesome mating habits of black widow spiders. Plus in the news, as UK cases surge, should Covid precautions move to Plan B; how does raw sewage affect our waterways; and is your mobile phone damaging your finger? Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Naked Scientists

Neurology® Podcast
Aducanumab: What About the Patient?; Risk of Aneurysm Rupture After Stroke Thrombolysis

Neurology® Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 25:48


In the first part of the podcast, Dr. Gregg Day discusses the importance of patient participation in the decision-making process when considering the use of aducanumab for the treatment of Alzheimer disease with Dr. Ron Petersen, Director of the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Center. In the second segment, Dr. Andy Southerland talks with Dr. Jyri Virta about the risk of aneurysm rupture after thrombolysis in patients with acute ischemic stroke and unruptured intracranial aneurysms.

Recovery After Stroke
166. Parenting After Stroke – Dr Bettina Tornatora

Recovery After Stroke

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 82:32


Parenting is hard enough but parenting after stroke brings with it so many more challenges. Today I am joined Dr. Bettina Tornatora for a discussion of some of the problems parents face after a stroke The post 166. Parenting After Stroke – Dr Bettina Tornatora appeared first on Recovery After Stroke.

UNcivilized UNplugged
Joy Dushey — How a stroke at age 29 changed everything.

UNcivilized UNplugged

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 51:29


Never forget life can change in a blink of an eye. One day everything is okay, and the other, you can wake up inside an MRI machine scared and asking yourself what happened. One day, you are married, and the other, you are signing a divorce paper. One day, you can wake up and decide to change your life, start a transformational path and walk in with no turning back. One day, you can be on your way to happiness and peace and find success and define it your way. Today we will hear the transformative and impressive journey of our guest Joy Dushey. A woman who, despite having lived experiences that would break anyone's heart, turned them into strength, knowledge and wisdom. After suffering a stroke at the age of 29, the loss of her brother, and ending her marriage, she knew how to get up and find her voice, passion, and motivation to live a plentiful life. Now, from her personal experience and her professionalism as a coach, she will talk to us in today's episode about the importance of slowing down. Also, we will dive into relationships, breathwork, support, and transformations. ABOUT JOY DUSHEY Joy Dushey is a New York based transformative coach , holistic guide , mentor and Breathwork facilitator. She specializes in inspiring people of all ages to start living optimal vital lives by nurturing the balance of mind body and spirit and empowers them to living more authentically and coming back to their true essence. Her greatest passion is in building conscious community and cocreating with like minded innovators. With all that Joy is up to, she maintains a curious mind with an open heart. She's curious about the universe's endless possibilities At the age of 29 Joy faced the biggest adversity of her life when she suffered an ischemic stroke that ultimately led to a most profound transformation embarking on a Holistic Path. Through Spiritual teachings, Holistic education and her life experiences she formulated The Joyful Approach lifestyle system and a platform for inspiring positive impact. As a transformative coach & Spiritual guide, Joy maintains a curious mind with an open heart. She's curious about the universe's endless possibilities. CONNECT WITH JOY Website: https://thejoyfulapproach.com Instagram @thejoyfulapproach :https://www.instagram.com/thejoyfulapproach/ Facebook :@Thejoyfulapproach WHAT YOU WILL HEAR: [2:40] A transformative coach. [4:48] Don't rush. Slow down. [10:39] Joy's story. 16:38] How it feels to have a stroke and its recovery. [22:43] Redesigning the relationship with reality. [29:55] An easy divorce. [34:20] The purpose of a conscious relationship. [39:02] Conscious uncoupling. [47:16] The best way to support a woman who is experiencing a transformation. If you look at the civilized world and think, "no thank you," then you should subscribe to our podcast, so you don't miss a single episode! Also, join the UNcivilized community, and connect with me on my website Man UNcivilized.com or Instagram so you can join in on our live recordings, ask questions to guests, and more. Join us on the New Year's Costa Rica Unfolding Retreat Dec. 27th 2021- Jan 3, 2022.

HealthcareNOW Radio - Insights and Discussion on Healthcare, Healthcare Information Technology and More

Our guest for this episode has a truly remarkable story. At 26, Paul Coyne suffered a stroke while working as a derivatives analyst at Goldman Sachs. Rather than slowing him down, the stroke and the nurses who cared for him inspired Paul to pursue a career in healthcare, and over the next four years, he earned five degrees, including a Doctorate from Columbia University School of Nursing, an MBA in Healthcare Management and an MS in Finance from Northeastern University. Paul went on to pursue a career in nursing informatics at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York, where he is now a Vice President. He also founded Inspiren, a nurse-led technology company that has been recognized by awards from the ANA, Time Magazine, Fast Company, Becker's Hospital Review, SXSW and the Webby Awards. In our conversation today, Paul and Dan talk about his journey and how it led him to where he is today, as well as the outside-the-box advice he gives to nurses who come to him for career advice. Find all of our network podcasts on your favorite podcast platforms and be sure to subscribe and like us. Learn more at www.healthcarenowradio.com/listen/

This Week in Cardiology
Oct 29, 2021 This Week in Cardiology

This Week in Cardiology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 21:04


ESUS, CAC 0, Takotsubo syndrome, and chest pain are the topics John Mandrola, MD, covers in today's podcast. To read a partial transcript or to comment, visit: https://www.medscape.com/twic I – ESUS Anticoagulation May Benefit Stroke Patients With LV Dysfunction https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/961815 - Left Ventricular Dysfunction Among Patients With Embolic Stroke of Undetermined Source and the Effect of Rivaroxaban vs AspirinA Subgroup Analysis of the NAVIGATE ESUS Randomized Clinical Trial https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaneurology/article-abstract/2785030 - Rivaroxaban for Stroke Prevention after Embolic Stroke of Undetermined Source https://www.nejm.org/doi/10.1056/NEJMoa1802686 - Dabigatran for Prevention of Stroke after Embolic Stroke of Undetermined Source https://www.nejm.org/doi/10.1056/NEJMoa1813959 II – CAC CAC Score 0 Unreliable to Rule Out Stenosis in Younger Patients https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/961801 - Association of Age With the Diagnostic Value of Coronary Artery Calcium Score for Ruling Out Coronary Stenosis in Symptomatic Patients https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamacardiology/fullarticle/2785586 - The Case Against Coronary Artery Calcium Scoring for Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment https://www.aafp.org/afp/2019/1215/p734.html III – Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy Broken Heart Syndrome: On the Rise, Especially in Women 50-74 https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/961307 - Sex‐ and Age‐Based Temporal Trends in Takotsubo Syndrome Incidence in the United States https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/JAHA.120.019583 IV- Chest Pain Guidelines AHA/ACC Issues First Comprehensive Guidance on Chest Pain https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/961806 - 2021 AHA/ACC/ASE/CHEST/SAEM/SCCT/SCMR Guideline for the Evaluation and Diagnosis of Chest Pain: Executive Summary: A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Joint Committee on Clinical Practice Guidelines https://www.jacc.org/doi/10.1016/j.jacc.2021.07.052 You may also like: Medscape editor-in-chief Eric Topol, MD, and master storyteller and clinician Abraham Verghese, MD, on Medicine and the Machine https://www.medscape.com/features/public/machine The Bob Harrington Show with Stanford University Chair of Medicine, Robert A. Harrington, MD. https://www.medscape.com/author/bob-harrington Questions or feedback, please contact news@medscape.net

Holmberg's Morning Sickness
10-29-21 - BR - FRI - It's Natl Stroke Day For Brady - Halloween Candy Fun Facts - Would We Be Willing To Buy Or Live In A Murder House - Toledo's Kid Called Him Bruh The Other Day

Holmberg's Morning Sickness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 30:00


Holmberg's Morning Sickness - Brady Report - Friday October 29, 2021

The Handoff
Overcoming a stroke and finding a career in nursing

The Handoff

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 28:43


Our guest for this episode has a truly remarkable story. At 26, Paul Coyne suffered a stroke while working as a derivatives analyst at Goldman Sachs. Rather than slowing him down, the stroke and the nurses who cared for him inspired Paul to pursue a career in healthcare, and over the next four years, he earned five degrees, including a Doctorate from Columbia University School of Nursing, an MBA in Healthcare Management and an MS in Finance from Northeastern University. Paul went on to pursue a career in nursing informatics at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York, where he is now a Vice President. He also founded Inspiren, a nurse-led technology company that has been recognized by awards from the ANA, Time Magazine, Fast Company, Becker's Hospital Review, SXSW and the Webby Awards.  In our conversation today, Paul and Dan talk about his journey and how it led him to where he is today, as well as the outside-the-box advice he gives to nurses who come to him for career advice. Links to recommended reading:  Improving Clinical Communications: A Smartphone for Every Nurse Paul Coyne,  A Nursing Graduate Inspired by His Nurses   The full transcript for this episode can be found here: http://www.trustedhealth.com/the-handoff-podcast/paul-coyne