Podcasts about Chief technology officer

Executive-level position focusing on scientific and technological issues

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HealthcareNOW Radio - Insights and Discussion on Healthcare, Healthcare Information Technology and More
The Dish: The Value of Integrating and Automating In-hospital Room Technology

HealthcareNOW Radio - Insights and Discussion on Healthcare, Healthcare Information Technology and More

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 41:19


Hosts, Ken Kleinberg, POCP Innovation lead and Pooja Babbrah, POCP Pharmacy and PBM Lead talk to Scott King, Chief Technology Officer at Vibe Health, by eVideon about the the value of use cases and hospital in-room technology integrated with the EHR and other systems that can keep the patient and their families informed as well as support provider staff. So often we talk about patient engagement and data access through the lens of patient-facing apps or ambulatory doctor visits but what about during hospital stays? This episode will cover the role of APIs, FHIR or not in Vibe Health's solutions and Scott's thoughts on the current interoperability landscape from policy to standards. Find all of our network podcasts on your favorite podcast platforms and be sure to subscribe and like us. Learn more at www.healthcarenowradio.com/listen/

The Bad Crypto Podcast
Will Tether Crash Next?

The Bad Crypto Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 51:01 Transcription Available


There are a lot of questions surrounding Tether, the third largest crypto by market cap. With the collapse of UST, people want to be sure that there is liquid backing dollar for dollar behind USDT. Is the world's biggest stablecoin too big to fail?   Today we welcome the Chief Technology Officer of Tether, Paolo Ardoino, to the show to ask these tough questions. We also discuss FTX, audits and the future of the cryptos. We're a fairly stable podcast with unstable podcast hosts. Hopefully our guest can bring some stability to the show on episode #655 of the Bad Crypto Podcast.  Full Show Notes at: http://badco.in/ TIME STAMPS 00:00 - Intro 03:27 - Tell us about some of your background, Paolo.  06:00 - Explain how you're the CEO of Bitfinex and CTO of Tether 08:35 - Let's get to the basic, birds-eye definition of Tether and how it works as a stablecoin.12:45 - How do you ensure Tether never goes down and is a supported asset?  16:00 - Tether is the number 3 in crypto marketcap. The audit of Tether is still pending release. News coverage of the release is missing. Why is the audit taking so long to be released?  20:35 - So you understand why it looks questionable to people because this is not the first time that has been something questionable has happened. 32:00 - What happens to Tether if the US Dollar loses its dominance as a global currency reserve?  35:00 - Tether Gold is an alternative to fiat stablecoins.  36:12 - We are looking for audits on USDT; where is the gold?  38:45 - Why is there such a discrepancy between the Tether Gold and the market price of gold right  now?  42:00 - Closing remarks SUBSCRIBE, RATE, & REVIEW: Apple Podcast: http://badco.in/itunesGoogle Podcasts: http://badco.in/googleSpotify: http://badco.in/spotify FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Twitter: @badcryptopod - @joelcomm - @teedubyaFacebook: /BadCrypto - /JoelComm - /teedubyawFacebook Mastermind Group: /BadCryptoLinkedIn: /in/joelcomm - /in/teedubyaInstagram: @BadCryptoPodcastEmail: badcryptopodcast[at]gmail[dot]comPhone: SEVEN-OH-8-88FIVE- 90THIRTY BE A FEATURED GUEST: http://badco.in/apply DISCLAIMER:Do your own due diligence and research. Joel Comm and Travis Wright are NOT FINANCIAL ADVISORS. We are sharing our journey with you as we learn more about this crazy little thing called cryptocurrency. We make NO RECOMMENDATIONS. Don't take anything we say as gospel. Do not come to our homes with pitchforks because you lost money by listening to us. We only share with you what we are learning and what we are investing it. We will never "pump or dump" any cryptocurrencies. Take what we say with a grain of salt. You must research this stuff on your own! Just know that we will always strive for RADICAL TRANSPARENCY with any show associations.Support the show: https://badcryptopodcast.comSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Alliance Aces
George Drapeau: Partnering in an Open Source World

Alliance Aces

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 32:17 Transcription Available


Everybody is selling something, so what's the best way to stand out? Have you tried giving it away for free?  That's the business model that's been so successful for George Drapeau, Senior Director, Global Partner Solutions & Technology, and his team at Red Hat. George's team builds lasting success and relationships with clients by doing the unthinkable: listening to the community first. They start by asking clients what they're missing, and the end by providing them a world-class service built upon quality partnerships.  Join us as we discuss: Providing value and capabilities through relationships Roadmap sharing in new partnerships Managing all the players sitting at the table.     Here are some additional episodes featuring other ecosystem leaders that might interest you:  #121 Aligning Ecosystem Strategy with Your Customer as the North Star with Lara Caimi, Chief Partner Officer, ServiceNow  #122 There's No Easy Button For Partnering with Nicole Napiltonia, VP Of Alliances and OEM Sales, at Barracuda  #106 The Secrets to Managing Alliances Like Microsoft with David Totten, Chief Technology Officer, US Partner Ecosystem at Microsoft  #97 Why Quality Always Beats Quantity in Software Ecosystems with Tom Roberts, Senior Vice President at the Global Partner Organization over at SAP.   Links & Resources  Learn more about how WorkSpan helps customers accelerate their ecosystem flywheel through Co-selling, Co-innovating, Co-investing, and Co-marketing. Subscribe to the Ecosystem Aces Podcast on Apple Podcast, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Podcast.  Join the WorkSpan Community to engage with other partner ecosystem leaders on best practices, news, events, jobs, and other tips to advance your career in partnering. Find insightful articles on how to lead and get the most out of your partner ecosystem on the WorkSpan blog.  Download the Best Practices Guide for Ecosystem Business Management  Download the Ultimate Guide for Partner Incentives and Market Development Funds To contact the host, Chip Rodgers, with topic ideas, suggest a guest, or join the conversation about modern partnering, he can be reached on Twitter, LinkedIn, or send Chip an email at: chip@workspan.com   This episode of Ecosystem Aces is sponsored by WorkSpan.   WorkSpan is the #1 ecosystem business management platform. We give CROs a digital platform to turbocharge indirect revenue with their partner teams at higher win rates and lower costs. We connect your partners on a live network with cross-company business applications to build, market, and sell together. We power the top 10 business ecosystems in the technology and communications industry today, managing over $50 billion in the joint pipeline. 

The Next Great Thing
Dorothy Li, CTO, Convoy - Building Elastic Capacity in Freight (And Saving the Planet, Too)

The Next Great Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 19:30


Look around you. Chances are, most of what you see has, at some point, been shipped on a truck and driven around by a truck driver. Trucking is a massive, $800 billion industry in the U.S. — 80% of every dollar spent moving freight is spent on trucking. Despite its size and scale, America's traditional freight network of brokers, shippers, and carriers is fragmented, inefficient, and antiquated. It's also harming the planet. Nearly 35% of all trucks on the road are empty, and all those empty miles create 87M metric tons of carbon emissions a year. But trucking's digital transformation, and zero waste mission, has begun. Dorothy Li is the Chief Technology Officer at Convoy, the nation's leading digital freight network that uses AI, machine learning, and data analytics to optimize and automate a marketplace for matching a trucker to a shipper. Before Convoy, she spent 23 years at Amazon innovating everything from the initial launch of Amazon Prime, to Kindle, to AWS Cloud. Dorothy joins the podcast to explain how her team is creating more efficiency across — and visibility into — the freight network and expanding elastic capacity for shippers, just like cloud did for compute capacity. 

The Agile World with Greg Kihlstrom
#300: Fostering innovation inside and outside your company, with Kurt Schaubach, Federated Wireless

The Agile World with Greg Kihlstrom

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 16:27


Today we're going to talk about fostering innovation and growth in rapidly changing times. I have with me a representative from one of the winners of the Inaugural Arlington REV Awards, which honors fast-growing innovative companies in Arlington County Virginia. Federated Wireless is a market leader in shared spectrum, making, deploying, and managing new 5G private wireless networks for a range of customers. I'd like to welcome Kurt Schaubach, Chief Technology Officer at Federated Wireless to the show. RESOURCES The Agile Brand podcast website: https://www.gregkihlstrom.com/theagilebrandpodcast Sign up for The Agile Brand newsletter here: https://www.gregkihlstrom.com  Get the latest news and updates on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-agile-brand/  For consulting on marketing technology, customer experience, and more visit GK5A: https://www.gk5a.com  The Agile Brand podcast is brought to you by TEKsystems. Learn more here: https://www.teksystems.com/versionnextnow

The Innovation Engine Podcast
190. Moving from Project to Product with Sejal Amin | PRODUCT MINDSET

The Innovation Engine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 35:13


Sejal Amin is the newly-named Chief Technology Officer at Shutterstock where she has a broad mandate to drive Shutterstock's digital transformation into a full-service creative platform for hundreds of thousands of creative professionals around the world. She talks with 3Pillar's Scott Varho and Elisabeth Beller about moving from software project to product on this episode of The Innovation Engine. Tune in to the full conversation to hear how Shutterstock is making the leap from project to product, what a value stream is and how to manage it within a company, and why using a body of metrics is vital to drive decision-making during digital transformation.   Resources: Connect with Sejal on LinkedIn Read: Accelerate: Building and Scaling High Performing Technology Organizations by Nicole Forsgren, PhD, Jez Humble, and Gene Kim Read: Project to Product: How to Survive and Thrive in the Age of Digital Disruption with the Flow Framework by Mik Kersten Read: Sooner Safer Happier: Antipatterns and Patterns for Business Agility by Jonathan Smart If you have any feedback about the podcast or guests you'd like to hear interviewed, send your suggestions to info@3pillarglobal.com.   Learn more and get the full show notes at: 3PillarGlobal.com

Millennium Live | A Digital Diary Podcast
Episode 184 | SAP on Hyperscale Cloud

Millennium Live | A Digital Diary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022


To kick off the week with a solution that is engineering the best SAP on cloud experience to clients across a variety of industries including, Healthcare, Consumer Products, Hospitality, and more. Eamonn O'Neill​, Co-Founder & Chief Technology Officer, joins #millenniumlive to explain the enormous benefits of the Lemongrass Cloud Platform (LCP), purpose-built to modernize and automate SAP systems on Cloud. Eamonn also discusses top challenges, biggest time-saving automations, and IT flexibility that comes with operating SAP in the Cloud. Lemongrass's mission is to help large Enterprises achieve the best operating experience of SAP on hyperscale Cloud through a transformation to a digitally enabled, highly automated service delivery model that empowers the greatest level of agility and innovation.

Unpacking the Digital Shelf
Enabling the Right Technology for Results, with Matt Powell, Chief Technology Officer at FTD

Unpacking the Digital Shelf

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 52:14


Strategy, Outcomes, people and process first, then technology. That's a pretty good rule of thumb, but for that to succeed the business and IT leaders need to be in lockstep to put the right stack in place for the right outcomes, now and in the future. This is a podcast audio version of a webinar featuring of course Lauren Livak, Director of the Digital Shelf Institute and driving force behind the Digital Shelf Playbook series from the DSI, and our special guest, Matt Powell, Chief Technology Officer at FTD, a 112-year old floral gifting marketplace powered by a network of 10,000 small business florists, grocery stores, and retail gift shop. Matt and Lauren dug in deep on how to achieve that business and tech partnership for success.

The Crumbl Mumbl Podcast
S2: E7 | Chief Technology Officer: Bryce Redd

The Crumbl Mumbl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 19:14


Today we talk to Bryce Redd, Crumbl's Chief Tech Officer and the mastermind behind how Crumbl uses tech to make the best cookies in the world! Tune in!

Horizen
ZenCon0 2022 Panel: Zendoo - What's Next, with Panelist from Horizen Labs and IOHK

Horizen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 27:40


ZenCon0 is the first Horizen Ecosystem Summit to celebrate what we have achieved, share ideas for growth, and envision the future of the broader Horizen ecosystem. We welcomed partners, advisors, and community members on stage to discuss visions and expertise in the area.  Moderator: Luca Cermelli, Senior Product Manager at Horizen Labs Panelist:  Alberto Garofollo, Chief Technology Officer at Horizen Labs Dmytro Kaidalov, Research Fellow at IOHK  Paolo Tagliaferri, Lead Software Engineer at Horizen Labs Event website: https://zencon.events/ ***** Twitter: https://twitter.com/horizenglobal Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/horizenglobal Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/horizenglobal/ Reddit page: https://www.reddit.com/r/Horizen/ Discord channel: https://horizen.global/invite/discord Telegram channel: https://t.me/horizencommunity Website: https://horizen.io Horizen on CoinMarketCap – https://bit.ly/ZENCoinMarketCap Horizen on CoinGecko – https://bit.ly/ZENCoinGecko

EntreArchitect Podcast with Mark R. LePage
EA484: Farshid Tafazzoli - Material Bank

EntreArchitect Podcast with Mark R. LePage

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 49:41


Material BankAs Co-Founder and Chief Business Officer of Material Bank, Farshid Tafazzoli is focused on corporate growth initiatives, from strategy to execution, and key strategic partnerships across all business units. Farshid has worked alongside Adam Sandow since the earliest days as Chief Technology Officer to build out Sandow's vision to create the world's largest material marketplace for architectural, design and construction materials.Farshid's background is in fintech as Co-Founder of Trade Station Group, one of the early electronic brokerage firms on Wall Street. Farshid held a variety of key roles as he expanded the company from a concept to the 6th largest online broker-dealer. From managing a single office operation to expanding worldwide in Equity, Options, and Futures markets, Farshid helped grow the firm to over 400 employees by organic and strategic acquisitions. Farshid was a key contributor to the company's IPO and ultimate sale to a Japanese Bank.After TradeStation Group, Farshid continued to create other technology-based Wall Street fintech firms that focused on delivering proprietary data utilized for primary and secondary research purposes.Shortly after divesting from these ventures, SANDOW brought in Farshid to bring to life category firsts such as Beauty DNA, the world's first algorithm-based Beauty Engine, followed by the inception of Material Bank. Now valued at almost $1.9 billion dollars, Farshid leads many of Material Bank's acquisitions, building out a vast network servicing the interior design industry worldwide.This week on EntreArchitect Podcast, Material Bank with Farshid Tafazzoli.Connect with Farshid online at Material Bank, or find him on LinkedIn.Please visit Our Platform SponsorsDetailed is an original podcast by ARCAT that features architects, engineers, builders, and manufacturers who share their insight and expertise as they highlight some of the most complex, interesting, and oddest building conditions that they have encountered… and the ingenuity it took to solve them. Listen now at ARCAT.com/podcast.Freshbooks is the all-in-one bookkeeping software that can save your small architecture firm both time and money by simplifying the hard parts of running your own business. Try Freshbooks for 30 days for FREE at EntreArchitect.com/Freshbooks.Visit our Platform Sponsors today and thank them for supporting YOU… The EntreArchitect Community of small firm architects.Graphisoft + EntreArchitect Archicad BIM software enables design, collaboration, visualization, and project delivery, no matter the project size or complexity. With flexible licensing options and a dedicated support team to guide us along the way, Archicad is an ideal choice for firms and projects of any size. Visit our dedicated landing page at EntreArchitect + Graphisoft for an exclusive special offer waiting for our community of architects.

IT Visionaries
Mission Thanksgiving Roundtable: Is Black Friday Dead?

IT Visionaries

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2022 43:51


With the holiday shopping season in full swing, how are businesses handling the busiest commerce period of the year? On this special crossover episode, the hosts from Mission.org podcasts, Up Next in Commerce, Marketing Trends and IT Visionaries join forces for the first time ever to discuss all things retail. Tune in to hear Stephanie, Jeremy, and Albert share their thoughts and expertise about the latest shopping technology, holiday cyber threats, and whether shifting consumer attitudes will make Black Friday a thing of the past.Tune in to learn:Has in-store Black Friday shopping become a thing of the past? (04:21)Cybersecurity's role in Black Friday and Cyber Monday (13:51)Is there consumer optimism in today's uncertain market? (19:02)End capping its evolution into ad-buying (29:15)The Mission hosts share about their podcasts (42:52)Mentions:“Bringing Build-A-Bear Alive in New Ways With Jenn Kretchmar, Chief Digital and Merchandising Officer of Build-A-Bear Workshop” (Marketing Trends podcast; Episode 359)“How The Simple P&L Statement Can Be Key To Long-Term Success” (Up Next In Commerce podcast; Episode 33)“Not Dumbing It Down: DECIEM and the Art of Straightforward Marketing with Jordanne Dyck” (Up Next In Commerce podcast; Episode 197)“Flipping Ecommerce on its Head” (Up Next In Commerce podcast; Episode 90)Common Thread Collective“Where ‘Credit' Is Due with Randy Kern, CTO, Marqeta” (IT Visionaries podcast; Episode 417)Stephan Pretorius - Chief Technology Officer - WPP“Smart TV and Smarter TV Marketing With Jordan Rost, Head of Ad Marketing, Roku, Inc.” (Marketing Trends podcast; Episode 341)American Giant: American Made Clothing & ActivewearDanny Fields - EVP Engineering and Chief Technology Officer -  Avalara“Why Liquid Death Didn't Water Down Its Marketing Strategy” (Up Next In Commerce podcast; Episode 262)Mission.org is a media studio producing content for world-class clients. Learn more at http://www.mission.org.

Tech Hive: The Tech Leaders Podcast
#59 Adrian Condon, Chief Technology Officer at B-Secur

Tech Hive: The Tech Leaders Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 49:13


On this week's episode of The Tech Leader's podcast, Gareth is joined by Adrian Condon, the CTO of B-Secur, a company that creates cutting-edge, heart health technology that is used in some of our favourite tech wearables. In this episode, the topic of discussion centres around how technology can be used to understand the human body, exemplified by the life-saving heart rate variability monitors that Condon himself has helped create.  In understanding our connection to machinery, we also find out how our stress levels mirror that of a car in first gear, and how to avoid a subsequent tech-induced burnout. However, at a time where there is frequent talk about ‘cyborgs' replacing the organic human body, Adrian Condon discusses how technology should be used as a way of ‘aiding humans, not replacing them'. 02:16 – What does good leadership mean to Adrian?04:00 – What did Adrian want to be when he grew up?05:14 – Where B-Secur started08:20 – Information we can receive from ECG signals 10:20 – Where this technology is going in terms of clinical usage 11:30 – What does HRV (heart rate variability) mean?15:00 - Stress in relation to cardiovascular disease16:33 - Next wave of heart problems and “Athletes Heart”21:30 – Lifestyle impact of these wearable technologies23:40 – Is implantable technology the future?26:10 – Sports performance and how this technology assists athletes.29:40 – Alcohol, drinking and seeing the changes in HRV32:00 – What is Adrian most excited about in the world in terms of technology innovation?36:00 – How does Adrian stay healthy working in this field? 40:00 – Adrian's productivity advice41:00 – If Adrian could have a coffee with anyone in the world, who would it be?41:54 – What advice would you give to your 21-year-old self?43:10 - Encouraging start-ups and teaching schools about tech and money

Lead(er) Generation on Tenlo Radio
Employer Branding & Its Role In Recruitment

Lead(er) Generation on Tenlo Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 25:17


Employer branding is essential in today's competitive job market. It not only creates a positive impression of your organization but also helps attract top talent. On this episode of Leader Generation, experienced brand marketing professional Whitney Cornuke answers questions such as: How important is employer branding in recruiting?  What are the benefits of employer branding?  How does it differ from other forms of marketing? Employers who invest time and resources into their employer brand will likely see higher levels of employee retention and productivity. Listen now to hear ideas and get inspired. This episode of the Leader Generation Podcast is hosted by Tessa Burg, Chief Technology Officer at Mod Op. About Whitney Cornuke: Whitney Cornuke is the Senior Vice President of Marketing at TalentLaunch. She has fifteen years of experience in driving businesses through strong P&L management, financial analysis, product innovation and go-to-market strategy, brand strategy and multi-media communications, team leadership and people development, and retail strategy and partnership. Whiney is also passionate about coaching and developing talent to build high-performing teams. About Tessa Burg: Tessa Burg is Host of the Leader Generation podcast and Chief Technology Officer at Mod Op after its acquisition of Tenlo in 2022. In her previous role as Vice President of Technology, she helped clients execute engaging, multi-platform experiences and products to bring their brands to life. In her role as CTO, Tessa oversees Mod Op's technology stack to ensure the agency is leveraging the right platforms to deliver valuable and measurable marketing communications, entertainment and experiences.

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast
S41E14 - How Blockchain is Improving Data Availability, Security, and Flexibility, with Raghu Bala

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 34:28


In this HCI Podcast episode, Dr. Jonathan H. Westover talks with Raghu Bala about how blockchain is improving data availability, security, and flexibility. Raghu Bala (https://www.linkedin.com/in/raghubala/) is the Chief Technology Officer of Kresus Labs and was previously an executive with Yahoo, Infospace, PwC, and with 3 successful startup exits. He also teaches MIT Sloan School of Business/Computer Science and AI Laboratory's course on the Implications of Artificial Intelligence on Business, as well is a Tutor for MIT's Blockchain course. Mr. Bala was winner of 2016 Best Abstract in Best Wearable Medical Device category at the AI in Medicine conference, and in 1993 winner of the Best Thesis Award on Temporal Databases at the Hartford Graduate Center Conference. He holds an MBA in Finance from Wharton MBA, an MS in Computer Science from RPI, has been a Columbia University Adjunct Lecturer, published author (Microsoft Press, Macmillan) and speaker at several major conferences including IoT Congress, Google IO, and more. Please consider supporting the podcast on Patreon and leaving a review wherever you listen to your podcasts! This episode is sponsored by/brought to you by BetterHelp. Give online therapy a try at www.BetterHelp.com/HCI and get on your way to being your best self. Check out Ka'Chava at www.Kachava.com/HCI. Check out BELAY here. Check out the HCI Academy: Courses, Micro-Credentials, and Certificates to Upskill and Reskill for the Future of Work! Check out the LinkedIn Alchemizing Human Capital Newsletter. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Future Leader. Check out Dr. Westover's book, 'Bluer than Indigo' Leadership. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Alchemy of Truly Remarkable Leadership. Check out the latest issue of the Human Capital Leadership magazine. Each HCI Podcast episode (Program, ID No. 592296) has been approved for 0.50 HR (General) recertification credit hours toward aPHR™, aPHRi™, PHR®, PHRca®, SPHR®, GPHR®, PHRi™ and SPHRi™ recertification through HR Certification Institute® (HRCI®). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Women Who Code Radio
WWCode Career Nav #21: Technical Growth as a Startup CTO: From 0 to 100k+ Users

Women Who Code Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 26:57


Kathy Zhou, Chief Technology Officer, and Co-Founder at Queenly, shares her talk, “Technical Growth as a Startup CTO: From 0 to 100k+ Users.” She talks about the benefits of using out-of-the-box tools, applying for startup credits for cloud space, and taking accountability for tech debt.

Transform It Forward
Evolving the healthcare insurance space through tech | Neetu Rajpal

Transform It Forward

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 24:01


We all know the healthcare space has undergone dramatic changes in recent years, and this episode is all about exploring the industry's rapid evolution and technological advancements. In this episode, Paul sits down with Neetu Rajpal, the Chief Technology Officer at Oscar. As the first health insurance company built around a full-stack technology platform, Oscar maintains a relentless focus on serving its members. In her role, Neetu oversees Oscar's fully cloud native distributed software stack and the IT infrastructure. During the episode, she shares why she's passionate about improving the healthcare experience for members, providers and partners. Neetu also explains why she's always on the lookout for ways to move the needle in the health insurance industry, and how she uses the resources she has available to create positive change in the world. Interested in learning more about the show? Check out our website: https://www.transformitforward.com/

The Dish on Health IT
Value of Integrating and Automating In-Hospital Room Technology

The Dish on Health IT

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 41:19


Ken Kleinberg, POCP Innovation lead and host for this episode kicked off the episode by welcoming guest, Scott King, Chief Technology Officer at Vibe Health, by eVideon and co-host,Pooja Babbrah, POCP's Pharmacy & PBM Lead.Ken set up the episode topic explaining this episode will explore use cases and technology like hospital in-room technology integrated with the EHR and other systems that can keep the patient and their families informed as well as support provider staff. Ken explained that so often we talk about patient engagement and data access through the lens of patient-facing apps or ambulatory doctor visits but what about during hospital stays? The discussion will cover the use cases Vibe Health works to solve, the role of APIs, FHIR or not, and the interoperability landscape from policy to standards. Ken then asked Pooja to briefly introduce herself and for her to explain what she's looking forward to exploring and learning today. Pooja explained that because a lot of her work in interoperability deals with client-facing data, she is really excited to learn more about the technology that is being used in-hospital rooms because that isn't an environment normally discussed when thinking about patient-facing data.Scott King then introduced himself as the CTO of Vibe Health by eVideon. He went on to describe the Vibe Health platform as an interactive patient experience platform that is generally in and around the hospital room. He explained that over the last several years it's also become a staff experience platform. Scott described that platform as running on multiple devices in the room like the smart television, digital whiteboards, companion bedside tablets, and digital signage outside the room. The idea is to put the right information and controls in the right place at the right time.Scott delved into the staff experience component of the platform by giving an example of the whiteboard in most patient rooms. Many times, the nurses are expected to keep the information on the whiteboard up to date, but when it's digitized and the information can be taken directly from the patient record and displayed, the nurse's time is freed up to focus on more important duties. Ken thanked Scott for providing the introduction and background information. Ken went on to set the stage a little more for the rest of the discussion by saying that, we so often think of patient access to their data, patient engagement, and education as happening between doctor visits or during a doctor visit but a patient's experience during a hospital stay is also really critical. Ken went on to ask Scott to describe the unique challenges a patient might face in their hospital room and how smart-room technology including access to their data and customized education might help. Scott responded by saying that in the past the television and other tools in the hospital rooms were simply one-way mediums. The television was there to provide entertainment, and the whiteboard was there for the nurse to capture important information for the patient and other staff on duty but as technology has advanced, there are more opportunities to digitize these tools and make them interactive tools that can be more useful. Scott went on to compare hospital rooms equipped with interactive, smart TVs to hotel rooms where the patient can be greeted by name with personalized information on the screen. With smart TVs, the patient can use it to access relaxation content, set white noise to drown out beeps and buzzes common in the hospital setting. Additionally, it can be used as a tool to get the patient ready for discharge by using the smart TV for educational videos and content that will help inform the patient about their condition, dietary recommendations, or post-visit instructions without requiring the nurse to have to set it up. Once a patient views this assigned education, it can be noted in the medical record automatically which is another thing the nurse won't have to do. Ken agreed that most of us have either had a hospital stay or visited family at the hospital and that we can all imagine the challenges he described and how more real-time access to data would be helpful to patients, their families as well as the staff taking care of them. Ken then asked about what happens when the patient leaves the hospital and whether they will still have access to the data and education videos and content they could see in their room via the Vibe Health Platform. Scott responded by explaining that patients are in high-stress situations in the hospital and may very well get home and want to re-watch an education video when they get home and are less in pain or groggy. Through Vibe Health technology partners, many times hospital systems will make links to these videos and other content available to the patient post-discharge. Ken then asked Pooja to share her thoughts, because her work has her thinking consistently about patient-facing data exchange.Pooja shared a personal story about her daughter suffering a head injury earlier this year and there were still some COVID restrictions in place that impacted the number of visitors resulting in her husband and her having to take turns visiting. Additionally, overnight visitors were not permitted. Having an interactive way to have the most up-to-date information about her daughter without having to wait for a nurse or a doctor to come by would have been really helpful and made the situation less stressful. Pooja went on to say that she does work with the CARIN Alliance which is the patient-facing HL7 Accelerator. She described the patient stories she's heard that support the need for more data and more interactivity. Pooja posed a question about how this type of technology might positively impact medication adherence, which is another area Pooja is passionate about. Patient education and instruction about how to take medication are really critical and the patient getting the instructions while they're in the hospital and having the ability to access it afterward could have a significant impact on adherence. Ken thanked Pooja for her insights and went on to ask Scott to cover a topic covered during the prep conversation about the move by many hospitals to have cameras in all hospital rooms to enable virtual rounds, and monitoring and to give patients access to video calls with family members. Ken asked Scott to explain how Ken also asked Scott to talk about whether patients who might want to opt out of that for privacy reasons can do so. Before Scott answered Ken's question about cameras in the rooms, he went back to Pooja's comments about medication adherence. He explained that there is more that can be done to improve adherence. He pointed out that many times part of the problem is that patients never pick up their medications. The Vibe Health platform can help automate getting those prescriptions filled by the hospital's outpatient pharmacy, if they have one, so the patient has their medications in hand when they are discharged. Scott then came back to Ken's questions about in-room cameras. One of the main use cases for in-room cameras is offering ways for family and friends to visit the patient if they can't come in person. This was a big deal during the pandemic but continues to be important when the patient may have family across the country. Vibe Health offers the Hello platform to help support these visits and reduces the nurse or other staff having to serve as a help desk video calls. Scott described another emerging use case for cameras in hospital rooms for virtual monitoring. This has started to become standard in ICU rooms but now hospitals are seeing value in putting cameras in every room. This allows for specialists that may work out of a hospital across town to seamlessly visit the patient without having to drive through traffic to get to the patient in person. Some patients also require a sitter for patients that are a high fall risk, cameras in the room allow for this monitoring to occur virtually. Virtual rounding is another use case where cameras in-room can improve efficiencies. The Vibe Health platform can also integrate with telehealth platforms to automatically start virtual visits through the smart TV and then after the visit is over the TV can automatically go back to what the patient was doing or watching before. Patients are always made aware if there is a camera and if it's on. Over the last few years, the resistance to having a camera in-room by patients has come down a lot. Ken asked Scott to talk about the locationing capabilities of the platform and to describe some of the use cases around that. Scott explained that real-time location systems or RTLS can be used in a lot of different ways. One of the more common use cases is for locating equipment like IV poles, that have been labeled with a radio tag. It can also be used for patient tracking to make sure the patient is where they are supposed to be. Where Vibe Health has seen great value in using RTLS for staff tracking. For staff wearing a badge, the system can update the screen with the provider's name and picture on the screen to give that additional info but it also gets documented on the digital whiteboard so the patient and the family can see everyone who has been in the patient's room recently. Ken then switched gears a little and asked Scott to describe the health IT approach Vibe Health uses to make these integrations. Ken asked if Vibe Health is using FHIR and what the health systems Vibe is working with are usingScott explained that their first system went live about 15 years ago. At that time, they were told to support HL7. Admission, Discharge, and Transfer (ADT) data is the foundation data. So far, Vibe Health hasn't transitioned everything to FHIR because they need real-time information that is pushed from the EHR to the digital whiteboard or other tools vs having to query the system. There are some use cases where Vibe Health uses FHIR, but they are waiting for the FHIR subscription standard to get published. Ken found the explanation interesting and wondered if there is an opportunity for data exchange and access in the patient hospital room setting for some new use cases for the standards community to take on. So, somewhat tangential to the standards discussion what are your thoughts on where the industry is with interoperability in general and the role policy requirements play? Do you think ONC naming specific FHIR Implementation Guides in upcoming policies will help progress the industry by having a common playbook or is it too limiting? Scott responded by saying that the transition to more modern standards is a good thing. One of the things Scott has noticed is that there seems to be a shortage of developers that know HL7 standards including FHIR, so they are seeing the use of JSON and RESTful APIs. Ken asked Pooja if there is anything she'd want to add or ask here. Pooja added that as the chair of the board for NCPDP and currently working on the strategic plan, one of the comments recently was that they shouldn't be building standards for standard's sake. She went on to explain that standards have to be usable, workable, and make sense and that how patients access their data is still an area ripe with opportunities for standardization. Ken thanked Pooja for her input and then recapped the discussion briefly saying that Vibe Health platform serving up patient data and educational content has been covered. Ken then wanted to know about writing data into the EHR. Can a patient, for example, update their health family history? Scott confirmed there are some use cases where the Vibe Health Platform can write information back into the EHR like when a patient has finished watching an education video and then capture the post-educational comprehension survey and that completion can be written back into the EHR. Other information like pulse surveys on patient satisfaction with food or if another request was satisfied, while important data for the hospital, wouldn't be written back into the EHR. Pooja asked where there was a health equity piece to this capability as far as confirming understanding and comprehension and even maybe capturing consent after confirming the patient understands what they are consenting to. She went on to say that she sees this as an opportunity. Scott agreed to say that right now the system knows the age, ethnicity, preferred language, preferred pronouns, and all of that and it's possible to correlate that information with how the education or other content being provided is being served up and understood. Ken closed out the discussion by asking Scott if he had any final message or calls to action for the audience. Scott responded by saying that he'd want folks to realize that there are so many different technologies in the hospital setting and it's Vibe Health's goal to try to automate and allow all these different technologies to talk to each other and work contextually. He gave the example of having the TV automatically mute or turn off during a code blue. The second thing Scott wanted to highlight is that the sooner the FHIR subscription standard can be published, the better. Ken thanked guest, Scott King, and co-host Pooja Babbrah before reminding listeners that they can find and subscribe to The Dish on Health IT podcast on Apple Podcast, Spotify, or whatever platform listeners use to pick up podcasts and that videos of episodes can be found on the POCP YouTube Channel.

IT TECH TALK
Amit Modi CTO / CIO at Movius

IT TECH TALK

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 30:03


Amit Modi is the Chief Technology Officer and Chief Information Security Officer at Movius – the world's leading provider of AI-powered secure mobile communications. Businesses worldwide use the company's patented mobility solution to serve their consumers better, staying away from crackdowns and keeping employees productive. T-Mobile, BlackBerry, BT, and Tier 1 banks are just a few giants with which Movius has established and growing partnerships. Since 2013 Amit's responsibilities included managing the Product Strategy and Evangelization, Product Management, Engineering, Technology Partnerships, and Marketing functions. During his tenure, he has led Movius into the global marketplace by driving product vision, developing an expanding portfolio of enterprise-grade Omni-channel communication services, and delivering global service delivery infrastructure. Amit's extensive telecommunications experience has been integral at Movius since its inception. He was instrumental in building the products from scratch and deploying them to customers globally. He has also held various sales leadership positions including heading International Sales (EMEA and APAC) and Global Channel Partners Business. In these roles, Amit exceeded goals and expanded Movius's business in international and emerging markets. Prior to Movius, he worked for Wipro Technologies in India. Amit holds a Bachelor of Technology degree in Electrical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur in India, and has an International Executive MBA from IE Business School in Spain. He also holds Cyber Security Specialization from NYU Tandon and Business Strategy specialization from Wharton. Senior compliance executives, techno-business leaders as well as IT and data security decision-makers will find Amit's insights more than inspiring. He can't wait to go on your show and share top-class knowledge on SaaS innovation, solutions for highly regulated industries such as finance and healthcare, omnichannel intelligent engagement, and next-gen mobile communications!

Keen On Democracy
Peter Rawlinson: The Truth About Battery-Powered and Self-Driving Cars From the Engineer Who Invented the Tesla Model S and the Lucid Air

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 24:49


Hosted by Andrew Keen, Keen On features conversations with some of the world's leading thinkers and writers about the economic, political, and technological issues being discussed in the news, right now. In this episode, Andrew is joined by Peter Rawlinson, CEO of Lucid Motors. Peter Rawlinson serves as the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Technology Officer of Lucid. As CEO, Peter is responsible for all strategic and business aspects of the company. As CTO, he is responsible for the creation and delivery of all Lucid products. He brings over 30 years of automotive industry experience to bear in these roles. Prior to Lucid, Peter was Vice President of Vehicle Engineering at Tesla and Chief Engineer of the Model S, where he led the engineering of the Model S from a clean sheet to production readiness while building the engineering team. A graduate of Imperial College, University of London, Peter was formerly Head of Vehicle Engineering at Corus Automotive, Chief Engineer at Lotus Cars, and Principal Engineer at Jaguar Cars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Enterprise Software Innovators
Next-Generation Innovations in Healthcare with HSS CTO Bashir Agboola

Enterprise Software Innovators

Play Episode Play 54 sec Highlight Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 26:03


On the 13th episode of Enterprise Software Innovators, hosts Evan Reiser (Abnormal Security) and Saam Motamedi (Greylock Partners) talk with Bashir Agboola, Chief Technology Officer at Hospital for Special Surgery. HSS is one of the preeminent medical institutions in the world, specializing in orthopedics and providing care to patients from over 100 different countries. Today, Bashir shares his perspective on digital transformation, the exciting technologies HSS is deploying to improve patient outcomes, and insights into upcoming step changes in the healthcare industry. Quick hits from Bashir:On HSS utilizing 3D printing: “We have the first in-hospital 3D printing of joints. This was a project we did in collaboration with a European company to set up an FDA regulated facility at the hospital to print the joints for acute procedures. So for things like that of course you might think, ‘3D printing, is that digital?' Of course…it's all along the line of digital transformation. The modern total knee replacement was developed at HSS close to 50 years ago. So being able to do 3D printing of implants for those acute situations is just in line with that tradition of groundbreaking innovation.”On HSS accelerating its digital transformation during COVID-19: “We went from an organization that as of 2019 probably had less than 1% of our workforce working remotely to within March of 2020, a third of the organization was working from home, so we had to enable that technology. For me and other infrastructure and operations leaders in healthcare it was ‘finally, yes. This is what we've been saying all along, we need to focus on digital workplace transformation…'[For perspective], in all of 2019 we had less than 1500 telehealth sessions. 12 months later, we had over 123,000 telehealth sessions.”On the future of healthcare delivery: “The future of healthcare has us consuming care virtually more and in ambulatory settings whether it's in-home or in a clinical setting. To put things in perspective, for the first 150 years of HSS, we did surgery at the hospital. In the last five years, we've opened a number of ambulatory surgical care centers where you go in, you get that meniscus tear repaired and you go back home. You don't have to stay in a hospital setting.”On blockchain's use cases for healthcare: “People have also talked about tackling the problems of counterfeit therapeutics, which is a big problem, particularly in the developing world. There are counterfeit drugs in pharmacies all over Africa and other parts of the world. Leveraging the blockchain to track the provenance of that drug or any other thing for which you want to track the provenance, the decentralized nature of the blockchain can allow us to do that.”Recent Book Recommendation: The First 90 Days by Michael D. Watkins--Like what you hear? Leave us a review and subscribe to the show on Apple, Google, Spotify, Stitcher, or wherever you listen to podcasts.Find more great lessons from tech leaders and enterprise software experts at enterprisesoftware.blog.Enterprise Software Innovators is produced by Josh Meer, Luke Reiser

Million Dollar Mastermind with Larry Weidel
Episode #552 - Infinity Levels And Raising Expectations with Dennis Yu

Million Dollar Mastermind with Larry Weidel

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 18:17


In this episode of Million Dollar Mastermind podcast, Host Larry Weidel speaks with Dennis Yu, Chief Technology Officer at BlitzMetrics. They discuss how new experiences change one's perspective, and how it impacts one's expectations given that there are always greater heights to reach.

IT Visionaries
Innovating at the Cutting Edge of Ad Technology

IT Visionaries

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 42:31


How can brands best utilize today's technology to make the biggest possible impact on consumers? Our guest today is Stephan Pretorius, Chief Technology Officer at WPP, the world's largest marketing services organization. Poised at the forefront of advertising innovation, Stephan discusses how marketers can effectively target consumers without impinging on their privacy, and shares how some of WPP's most groundbreaking ad campaigns came to fruition.Tune in to learn:What is WPP and what is Stephan's role there? (01:10)How does WPP navigate the changing marketing landscape? (16:40)Deepfakes and the future of likeness licensing in advertising (28:10)Stephan's tech journey and his advice for aspiring tech leaders (35:55)Mentions:Cadbury Celebrations | Not Just A Cadbury AdToxic Influence: A Dove Film | Dove Self-Esteem ProjectIT Visionaries is brought to you by Salesforce Platform. If you love the thought leadership on this podcast, Salesforce has even more meaty IT thoughts to chew on. Take your company to the next level with in-depth research and trends right in your inbox. Subscribe to a newsletter tailored to your role at Salesforce.com/newsletter.Mission.org is a media studio producing content for world-class clients. Learn more at mission.org.

Alliance Aces
David La Rose: Strengthening Partner Commitment in the Ecosystem Era

Alliance Aces

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 29:29 Transcription Available


Last year, IBM's CEO, Arvind Krishna made a bold commitment to invest over $1 billion in the IBM partner ecosystem. Since that time, the IBM ecosystem team has been rolling out a number of initiatives to make good on that promise. David La Rose, General Manager - IBM Partner Ecosystem, Sales at IBM, shares the inside view as he and his team are transforming partnering at IBM. With nearly 55,000 partners, the company is fully committed to its ecosystem by partnering with more global resellers, system integrators, ISVs, MSPs, and others. IBM has been doubling the number of partner-facing resources this year, with an increase in the technical community service for partners by 35%. And recently, the company has reported 15% growth, with partnerships playing a significant role in that growth. Join us as we discuss: How David's background prepared him for this global partner role Significant commitments IBM is making to the partner ecosystem Opening up IBM internal training and enablement to all ecosystem partners  Here are some additional episodes featuring other ecosystem leaders that might interest you: #121 Aligning Ecosystem Strategy with Your Customer as the North Star with Lara Caimi, Chief Partner Officer, ServiceNow #122 There's No Easy Button For Partnering with Nicole Napiltonia, VP Of Alliances and OEM Sales, at Barracuda #106 The Secrets to Managing Alliances Like Microsoft with David Totten, Chief Technology Officer, US Partner Ecosystem at Microsoft  #97 Why Quality Always Beats Quantity in Software Ecosystems with Tom Roberts, Senior Vice President at the Global Partner Organization over at SAP Learn more about how WorkSpan helps customers accelerate their ecosystem flywheel through Co-selling, Co-innovating, Co-investing, and Co-marketing. Subscribe to the Ecosystem Aces Podcast on Apple Podcast, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Podcast. Join the WorkSpan Community to engage with other partner ecosystem leaders on best practices, news, events, jobs, and other tips to advance your career in partnering. Find insightful articles on how to lead and get the most out of your partner ecosystem on the WorkSpan blog. Download the Best Practices Guide for Ecosystem Business Management Download the Ultimate Guide for Partner Incentives and Market Development Funds To contact the host, Chip Rodgers, with topic ideas, suggest a guest, or join the conversation about modern partnering, he can be reached on Twitter, LinkedIn, or send Chip an email at: chip@workspan.com  This episode of Ecosystem Aces is sponsored by WorkSpan. WorkSpan is the #1 ecosystem business management platform. We give CROs a digital platform to turbocharge indirect revenue with their partner teams at higher win rates and lower costs. We connect your partners on a live network with cross-company business applications to build, market, and sell together. We power the top 10 business ecosystems in the technology and communications industry today, managing over $50 billion in the joint pipeline.

Million Dollar Mastermind with Larry Weidel
Episode #551 - Achieving Growth At Scale with Dennis Yu

Million Dollar Mastermind with Larry Weidel

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 21:39


In this episode of Million Dollar Mastermind podcast, Host Larry Weidel is joined by Dennis Yu, Chief Technology Officer at BlitzMetrics. They talk about achieving growth that impacts people at scale, its approaches and challenges, and how the right relationships, data, and insights contribute to ensuring sustainable results.

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast
James Forrester, Chief Technology Officer and Associate Vice President Information Technology at University of Rochester Medical Center

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 22:44


This episode features James Forrester, Chief Technology Officer and Associate Vice President Information Technology at University of Rochester Medical Center. Here, he discusses the most challenging positions to recruit for, how strategy surrounding retaining & recruiting has evolved, and much more. 

Million Dollar Mastermind with Larry Weidel
Episode #550 - Moving In The Right Direction with Dennis Yu

Million Dollar Mastermind with Larry Weidel

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 17:08


In this episode of Million Dollar Mastermind podcast, Host Larry Weidel is joined by Dennis Yu, Chief Technology Officer and Data Geek at BlitzMetrics.

The Propcast
How To Integrate ESG Into Your Portfolio Effectively. with Eric Duchon & John Fitzpatrick

The Propcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 31:08


Summary: In the ninth episode of Season 10 of the Propcast, host Louisa Dickins is joined by Eric Duchon, Global Head of ESG for Blackstone Real Estate and John Fitzpatrick, Chief Technology Officer of Alternative Asset Management Technology at Blackstone, the world's largest alternative asset manager. John featured previously in Season 2 of The Propcast. Eric and John share where Blackstone is on ESG and why they are seen as one of the leaders in this space. They talk about what Blackstone is focusing on as a business when it comes down to strategy, investment and innovation across their diverse and global portfolio. In this episode you will hear how Blackstone ensures attractive returns for their investors whilst making a positive impact on the communities in which they invest. Resources: LMRE Global Recruitment and Search Consultancy LMRE YouTube Interviews Companies Mentioned: Sphera Schneider Electric EQ Office Willis Tower Aquicore Shout Outs: Don Anderson StuyTown Kenneth Caplan Kathleen McCarthy Baldwin  Jonathan Gray  Key Insights From This Episode:     We believe that ESG is a real source of value and a way to mitigate risk in our portfolio - Eric   What drove me into this space is the use of passion to drive change, whilst driving value - Eric We do need the technologies that help us automate and optimise our buildings but this also requires the people that know what they're doing - Eric Technology is important, but having a clear strategy is the starting place that people should have if they want to achieve their ESG targets - John About Our Guests: Eric Duchon: Eric Duchon is Global Head of ESG for Blackstone Real Estate. As part of the Real Estate Asset Management team, he partners with the firm's central ESG team and Portfolio Operations to initiate, manage, implement and report ESG initiatives across the global Real Estate portfolio. Prior to joining Blackstone in November 2020, Mr. Duchon was at LaSalle Investment Management where he was a Managing Director and Global Head of Sustainability. Prior to LaSalle, Mr. Duchon spent over 9 years at Cushman & Wakefield as the Director of Sustainability Strategies. Mr. Duchon received a BBA from Emory University – Goizueta Business School and a Masters in Real Estate Development Degree from New York University Schack Institute of Real Estate. John Fitzpatrick: John Fitzpatrick is Chief Technology Officer of Alternative Asset Management Technology at Blackstone. He handles all aspects of technology across Blackstone's Real Estate and Private Equity businesses and assists our portfolio companies with managing their technology programs and strategy. He is also involved in the firm's balance sheet investments in targeted, early stage, technology-related opportunities. Prior to his current role, Mr. Fitzpatrick oversaw various initiatives across the entire Technology and Innovations group. Before joining Blackstone in 2011, Mr. Fitzpatrick worked at Capital IQ, a division of Standard & Poor's, for seven years where he was most recently the Head of Product. He received a BS in Finance from St. John's University and currently serves on the Blackstone Charitable Foundation's Leadership Council. About Blackstone: Blackstone is the world's largest alternative asset manager. We seek to create positive economic impact and long-term value for our investors, the companies we invest in, and the communities in which we work. We do this by using extraordinary people and flexible capital to help companies solve problems. Our $941 billion in assets under management include investment vehicles focused on private equity, real estate, public debt and equity, infrastructure, life sciences, growth equity, opportunistic, non-investment grade credit, real assets and secondary funds, all on a global basis. Further information is available at www.blackstone.com. Follow @blackstone on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Instagram. About Our Host Louisa Dickins Louisa is the co-founder of LMRE, which has rapidly become the market leading global PropTech recruitment platform and search consultancy with operations across North America, United Kingdom, Europe and Asia-Pacific. To promote the industry she is so passionate about, Louisa set up the Global podcast ‘The Propcast' where she hosts and invites guests from the built environment space to join her in conversation about innovation. About LMRE LMRE is globally recognised for leading the way in Real Estate Tech & Innovation talent management. From the outset our vision was to become a global provider of the very best strategic talent to the most innovative organisations in PropTech, ConTech, Smart Buildings, ESG, Sustainability and Strategic Consulting. At LMRE we are fully committed at all times to exceed the expectations of our candidates and clients by providing the very best advice and by unlocking exclusive opportunities across our global network in the UK, Europe, North America and Asia-Pacific. Timestamps: [2:06] Eric: What is your role at Blackstone? I lead ESG for Blackstone Real Estate globally, this means myself and my team work with all the departments at Blackstone to ensure we are implementing our ESG priorities as they are aligned with our fiduciary duty to add value to our portfolio and deliver great returns to our investors. We are finding ways to continue delivering value and ensuring that we are improving the environmental, social and governance performance of our companies and our assets. [4:44] John: What are your responsibilities in your role at Blackstone and how have they changed? My responsibility is alternative asset management technology, this involves everything under our private equity and real estate umbrellas, it's more than half of the AUM at Blackstone and really fits within ESG. [5:35] Eric: What does ESG mean to Blackstone and how has it changed since you joined in 2020? There were great initiatives happening across Blackstone when I joined with regards to ESG however, the firm needed a more programmatic approach which is what we have done over the last 2 years. We're focused on 3 main areas; diversity, decarbonisation and good governance. This guides everything that our ESG teams do and how we continue to integrate this more programmatic approach into our portfolio. [7:40] John: How does your team assist with the ESG part of Blackstone? If you want to hit targets and goals then you need to be able to get the data and track it to see your progress over an extended period of time.  It's our job to collect that data in the most streamlined fashion so we can process that content in real time to ensure we are driving towards those targets [9:05] John: Are there any more climate focused ESG investments across your portfolio that you could share with us? The data and insights that we have got from Sphera have helped us improve and learn in this space and helped our ESG technical ecosystem. [9:42] Eric: How do these investments assist with your portfolios? We worked to develop a framework which sets out Blackstone Real Estates ESG priorities across 6 pillars, these set the tone for how we engage with the portfolio companies in order for them to develop their 3 year strategic ESG roadmaps. [13:31] John: How do you tackle the technology gaps in businesses across your portfolio? We use our data initiatives to help them implore technology and try to make the transition as seamless as possible. We can then analyse and track their data and help them achieve their targets. We tend to make investments in solutions that have a competitive advantage or a unique data set like Sphera.  [17:11]  Eric: What are the main barriers when it comes down to reducing carbon across your portfolios? A couple of years ago the social aspect of ESG was focused around  health, wellness and community engagement. Today, it is more focused on diversity, equity and inclusion. When we look at PropTech solutions for ESG one of the main barriers is being able to identify what the strengths and weaknesses are. There are some really good processes in place but humans are still necessary to ensure the quality data flows through. We need to ensure that we have the right people that understand the technologies and can drive action from it. [20:45] John: Is there anything you would like to mention that you have seen in terms of barriers? Technology is important but having a clear strategy is the starting place that people should have if they want to achieve their ESG targets. [23:00] Eric: What is the balance between automation and optimisation, and reducing carbon footprint?  We need the technologies that help us automate and optimise our buildings but this also requires the people that know what they're doing. When our US office portfolio company EQ office implemented Aquicore, it really improved our insight into the daily operations of all the operating equipment. This allowed us to recognise better start-stop sequences in the building. L – Touch on the main lessons you have learnt throughout your career within this space? Eric: You need to stay nimble in everything that you do, different things come at you everyday and you need to be able to take them in your stride. M - Please give a mention to anyone / product / service. John: Jonathan Gray, President at Blackstone, he is committed to ESG and doing it the right way.  R – What has been the most  rewarding  aspect of working in ESG? Eric: Whether you're reducing carbon emissions, whether you're ensuring that folks from under-resourced communities are getting better opportunities working with our portfolio companies. That to me is what drove me into the space connecting the passion to drive change. E - What are you excited about in the future of the ESG space? John: The innovation that is coming down the pipe, some of the best and brightest minds are in this space that are really passionate about this topic so the landscape in a few years time is going to look vastly different. Sponsors Launch Your Own Podcast A Podcast Company is the leading podcast production and strategic content company for brands, organisations, institutions, individuals, and entrepreneurs. Our team sets you up with the right strategy, equipment, training, guidance and content to ensure you sound amazing while speaking to your niche audience and networking with your perfect clients. Get in touch jason@apodcastcompany.com

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast
Understanding the Growing Challenges of Medical Device Cybersecurity

Becker’s Healthcare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 14:04


In this episode, we are joined by Doug Folsom, President, Clinical Engineering, Cyber Security & Chief Technology Officer at TRIMEDX to discuss how to better understand the growing challenges of medical device cybersecurity. Tune in to learn what makes medical device cybersecurity risk unique among healthcare technology and the gaps in how healthcare organizations identify, assess, and take steps to manage their medical device cybersecurity risk. Hear insights on what health systems can do to standardize how they understand risk and how they take action.This episode is sponsored by TRIMEDX.

Tech for Non-Techies
124. What type of developer you need to make friends with

Tech for Non-Techies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 15:46


To lead in the Digital Age, you need a network of developer friends. They can help you understand the latest tech trends and decipher jargon. But to build the right network, you need to act intentionally. Don't just hunt down anybody who has ever taken a python course. There are two types of developers: managers and specialists. All developers start off as coders, but as they progress in their careers, they come to a fork in the road. Some decide to specialise deeper in a particular aspect of technology, whereas others go the management route. Engineering managers lead teams of engineers, and rarely write code themselves. In fact, a Chief Technology Officer is unlikely to have written any code for quite some time. Their task is to manage the team, and to work with non-technical teams to align technology strategy to business needs. Engineers on the management route must take business courses to progress in their careers. Just as the non-techies need to speak tech, the techies need to speak business. Because engineers who want to get to the C Suite also need to learn from the business side, your relationships are an equal value exchange. Build these relationships with mutual respect, and the confidence that you are both bringing something to the table. Join our next FREE Masterclass on 30 November 2022, 12 pm EST / 5 pm GMT How to Become a Digital Leader You will learn: The top mistake non-technical leaders make when it comes to tech Leadership case studies from Netflix & Microsoft How to go from traditional business manager to Digital Leader SIGN UP HERE   Listen here on Apple Podcasts Listen here on Spotify ----- If you like learning about how tech products and profits get made, you'll like our newsletter. It's funny too. Sign up here. -----  Tech for Non-Techies clients  Reach senior leadership positions in Big Tech firms Lead digital transformation in established businesses Create tech businesses as non-technical founders Pivot into careers in venture capital If you want to have a great career in the Digital Age, then APPLY FOR A CONSULTATION CALL.   What happens when you apply for a consultation call: Sophia and her team will look through your application. If they genuinely think Sophia could help you, you will get a link to her calendar.. You will have a 20 – 30 minute call to discuss your goals and see if you are a good fit for each other.  If we establish that Tech for Non-Techies courses + coaching could help you and believe we would enjoy working together, we will discuss a relevant approach to suit you. The aim of the call is not to sell you on anything that is not right for you. We both win if you get results, but we both lose if you don't. We love hearing from our readers and listeners. So if you have questions about the content or working with us, just get in touch on info@techfornontechies.co   Say hi to Sophia on Twitter and follow her on LinkedIn. Following us on Facebook, Instagram and TikTok will make you smarter.

That Digital Show
The Transformation Debrief: How Botify is Transforming SEO with AI

That Digital Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 43:00


To deliver for its customers, Botify continues to reinvent how companies perform SEO. From those early days of the manual indexing of websites to the eras of keyword stuffing and anchor links, Botify is changing the landscape of optimization. In this extended conversation of The Transformation Debrief, Chris Hood, Digital Strategist at Google Cloud, hosts Pierre Couzy, Chief Technology Officer at Botify, and Robert Rothschild, Chief Marketing Officer at Botify, to discuss how they are helping drive more traffic and revenue with machine learning and artificial intelligence to reinvent how companies perform SEO.

CIO Leadership Live
Episode 96: Ivneet Kaur, Chief Technology Officer at Silicon Valley Bank

CIO Leadership Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 57:07


Ivneet Kaur, Chief Technology Officer at Silicon Valley Bank, joins host Maryfran Johnson for this CIO Leadership Live interview, jointly produced by CIO.com and the CIO Executive Council. They discuss the evolving digital customer experience, secure cloud migrations, agile-first, API-first strategies, competing for tech talent and more.

Million Dollar Mastermind with Larry Weidel
Episode #549 - Leveraging the Dollar-a-Day Ads Strategy with Dennis Yu

Million Dollar Mastermind with Larry Weidel

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 18:12


In this episode of Million Dollar Mastermind podcast, Host Larry Weidel is joined by Dennis Yu, Chief Technology Officer and Data Geek at BlitzMetrics. They discuss the Dollar-a-Day ads strategy for putting content so you can reach your customers, how to design a successful "content factory," and how to build a meaningful relationship with your audience through social media. Dennis also talks about his approach to helping digital agencies grow and the importance of data analytics in the process.

Sixteen:Nine
Alan Larson, 65cubed

Sixteen:Nine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 37:43


The 16:9 PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY SCREENFEED – DIGITAL SIGNAGE CONTENT 65cubed makes and markets a technology solution that has the triple benefit of making commercial displays, like big roadside LED boards, look better, last longer, and still use substantially less energy . The company has a small box that plugs in between the media player and display controller box of a display set-up, using a ton of graphics capabilities, smarts and supporting technology to make, it says, even lower-end, lower cost product from China look great. I had an interesting chat with 65cubed partner Alan Larson about the technology - which I suppose is a form of video wall processing. It gets a little technical in parts of the discussion, but Larson does a good job of not taking listeners too deep into the technical weeds. Color reproduction and image quality are important to brands, but the really intriguing aspect to this is the ability to get another year or two out of the capital investment in a big screen, while also reducing the month to month energy usage bills. Power usage is a much bigger issue in Europe at the moment, but it's something that every media owner with big, bright displays should be looking at, as energy bills rise and, in Europe these days, energy availability is constrained. Subscribe to this podcast: iTunes * Google Play * RSS TRANSCRIPT Alan, thank you for joining me. Can you tell me what your company 65cubed is all about? I just came across it literally a couple of days ago and don't know a lot about it.  Alan Larson: 65cubed is a color management server product designed for LED walls and other video sources. Its roots are better than a dozen years old in the high-end color management space that you might see in a very eclectic home setting, or more commonly post-production studios where color has to be absolutely spot on. What we discovered a couple of years back as LEDs came on, was that as we modulated the color signature, there were significant changes in the power signature. So we started experimenting with that and discovered that we could apply our technology combined with some aggressive time of day, environmental conditions style algorithms to create an aggressive product for an environmental impact on LED walls and that's what sort of got us started. We can make the color on a digital wall look very amazing, we've gotten literally cinematic events on walls before. We usually range between 18-20 to the low 30s on average for a digital wall, especially outdoor settings that are on 24/27 and it varies based on how the customer wants their image and what the foot traffic or automobile traffic might be.  So when you say 18 to 30, what do you mean by that?  Alan Larson: If you are using say 100 Amps peak on a digital midsize wall, the second we turn our system on at the same brightness and color correct it, it'll usually drop that peak amperage, down to 75-80% max, more typically it's sitting in the 60s, I would suppose because most people don't wanna blow their eyes out with the brightness, and a byproduct of that is we've noticed that a lot of people that sell wall time, the arbitrage people go through for the bids, is they request about a 10% grayscale on whites to lessen the risk of their walls being overloaded.  By definition, when we take the power signature down, the advertisers are free to do what they want. We don't care what they do because we're not on that side of the game. But that's a byproduct. You simply don't get the power swings that you would in a wall that does not have our product. So the advantages are both energy savings and better-looking visuals? Alan Larson: Yes, and the byproduct of energy is that because you're not stressing those LEDs as much, they run cooler. We contend that lower stress on the system and its ability to react to external conditions of interest that that'll extend the display life and what that means is that the display owner is in it for keeps, in other words, we've noticed that some people just flip the displays. They bring 'em up and they're looking for somebody else, like any property, those that use it as a long-term investment are very interested in seeing the net present value of that asset go up and know it's gonna stay up. And our guess is somewhere around 12-15% increased display life. In a display the size of a roadside, that's a very substantial saving over time.  Yeah. So if you can lower the energy costs while extending the operating life, that's a double benefit there, right? Alan Larson: The studies we've done so far on outdoor signage, to put in layman's terms, we estimate that the savings on an average wall, call it about 25% conservatively, because we can be very aggressive in low viewership time periods like overnight, is about the same as saving two average American homes electricity every year.  And the media company won't really care about that, but they will care about what it means to their bottom line. Alan Larson: And to your point, Dave, when I get asked who is your market? My market is typically the guy that owns the OpEx and the EBITDA for the company. As we've found again, our roots are on the studio side, but as we've talked to asset owners the price point and fulfillment of their displays are market-driven. Their costs underlying, they're the only ones that really care about it, because they're gonna get what they can get based on the location and so forth. So if we can take 25% out of their most consistent ongoing costs, by definition, that asset owner's gonna earn more money.  So would your typical customer then be somebody in Oklahoma, who has a small media company and they've got five digital billboards along a highway and they are looking for ways to save money on that? Is that most typical or are these big media companies? Alan Larson: We don't care. If they have one sign, to us that savings are linear. Each sign has the same impact, of a given size. Our market is those asset owners.  For example, I'm working on a project with a company that owns, I think around 40 roadside billboards, and they can blanket it across. Now they're in the rural Midwest, and what's especially of interest to them is that in the overnight hours, we can turn the savings model into the 40+ percent range because of the way we can manipulate the pixels on the screen and drive down the power consumption even further. How do you do that?  Alan Larson: It's probably best I don't give away all our secrets because some of what I'm describing is in the patent-pending process. The underlying technology, I think, has around 14 or 17 patents in the color management space, and just by reference, the roots of this company come out of ex-Kodak people in their digital color division.  The actual author of most of the patents is the retired Chief Technology Officer for that division with a Ph.D. in Color Physics out of MIT, so it's pretty heavy stuff. When I talk about some of the concepts of the color gamut, most people's eyes go shut in about half a second. So we have to be careful to tone it down a little bit.  Count me among those!  Alan Larson: The overnight hours, basically what we do is we sit between the video player and the wall's controller. So in a production setting, you unplug the HDMI into the video controller and insert our box between the player and that video controller, and then put another little segment of HDMI cable and we're in line between the two, and what happens is, because we know a particular color red, let's call it the OU Crimson color. That's a branded color. We can reproduce that color to that PMS standard if you're thinking of it as a paper representation. We've never seen it. If someone says, I want to bid with pure IBM Blue, I think we'd probably win the deal. Now, what that means is that we put a scope against a screen, and we measure upwards of 8,000-9,000 patches. We call them patches, but they're effectively samples. So if I feed that OU Red to the screen, I'm gonna make this up because the numbers are huge. Each digital pixel gets a digital command that tells it what colors, how to turn the pixels on, how bright it should be, and so forth. But let's just say in simple terms, the color for that OU Red is the number 1234. We have a very nice reference scope that looks at it and says, we got 1234, but the best that screen could spit back, because all the pixels in the world are made in one big bucket over in China, it spits back 1662. “Why?” It's cuz it does. It has nothing to do with the controller. It has nothing to do with anything else. Then we know. Oh cool. So that means we have to send at the number 1553, whenever we see 1234 for any given pixel and it'll spit back the actual image of 1234, and poof, we do that for all the colors in the gamut and that's what brings out the true color.  Now, a lot of people talk about, moving the white point. That's a fallacy in our world because a white point is actually what's called D65 or 6,500 Kelvin is pure white. When you properly set red, green, and blue (RGB), when they're running to true calibrated and color-managed perfection, that white is the Venn diagram intersection of those color spaces. It never moves no matter how bright it is. So when we reduce the illumination of a screen, we're actually bringing down the mathematical values that told the LED to be bright, not the mathematical values that keep the color in perfect harmony, which makes a very nice cinematic look. In the evening, you can drive down the freeway or in Nova Scotia, a remote road with trees around it, and the colors are beautiful. And at night we take a much more aggressive use of the color black in a way that people can't see cuz black on an LED wall is electrically the value of 0 Amps. So if we query 20-30% of that screen in a mathematical way, no matter where we had it set, that amount of additional power is gonna disappear cuz those LEDs are physically not doing anything, but it really looks nice and we don't tell people how we do it because we can't do that. And you're able to do more at night simply because you don't have to drive these things as hard, right?  Alan Larson: We've never actually put up a light meter, I know we could, but we use the absolute location of the display itself, and the nice thing is the geolocation of every place on the earth has an exact sunrise and sunset time that changes every day of the year. So that means in Nova Scotia, the Sun's gonna set at 4: 28 this afternoon, which means somewhere around 4 o'clock or maybe a little before, we'll start taking the brightness part of that mathematical equation, slowly move it over, perhaps 45 minutes or so into a full post-dusk mode where it'll be in an evening setting and then when the asset owner says, there's nobody on this road, let's flip in the low viewership mode because from, say 11 o'clock till 6 in the morning, only three cars go by, but we're required by contract to keep that wall alive. So it's a combination of how the marketing people wanna see it and what's appropriate for the marketing setting. When we do things like Las Vegas, we can't be as aggressive, because they just love brightness out there. But I will tell you that some of those absolutely huge walls that you see, I'm assuming you've been to the strip, it's nothing to take 50 grand a year and cost off of those walls. So when I am buying your product, am I purely buying the box and the technology that's in there, or am I buying a service and a platform?  Alan Larson: Yes. The answer is the latter. The box is a computer. It's a very fast computer that has boatloads of GPUs and processors because it's creating absolute color, and saturation is different at each pixel level, which means we can maintain grayscale visibility in an almost black setting.  Most of the time they dither out and they're just a blob. You can actually see the changes in the subtleties of the shadows, and I'm gonna go back to your question, but a point I wanted to make earlier is because of that purity, that absolute control at a pixel level, your image will be more in focus, and it's simply because the processor captures the subtleties between each pixel to the point where the processor doesn't give up and approximate them as a cheap TV would, and all of a sudden you see what the director intended, not what a lower cost video display processor was able to produce.  Now, back to your question about pricing. We sell our product in a tier of four ways. For lack of marketing intelligence, we call it the base product. It's the kind of product you would use, say in a conference room or a church where you turn it on and you just want it to look nice and you're gonna turn it off. The energy savings piece is incidental because they don't care, and they plug it into a 110 circuit and call it a day. We sell that as basically the asset with the color management system and everything they want to use on it is basically a manual setting.  Then the next one, which we affectionately call our Energy module and pops in all of the automated features for geolocation time of day, anything you wanna do that is environmentally based or schedule based, it'll take over. In fact, when we take the color way down to the point where you go, gosh, it's dim, the color management system can actually pull, this is the patented stuff, out warm colors or blue colors or whatever would add a little zip back into the picture. Now is it absolutely pure to the King's English studio? No. Does it look better? Oh yeah, it does.  So that means you can create a very pleasant brand running it about 25 to 35% of the power signature, and I'd have to show it to you cuz once you see it, you go, huh? What do you know, those facial tones came out. So that part of the product is typically sold on an energy split, software as a service model, either as an asset purchase or as a software as a service, continued service. And it's based on an energy savings model. So technically if you were in Nevada versus New York, the price point for the same asset would probably be different in our eyes. But in all cases, the customer always wins. If they purchase the product, they will always be cash positive in less than 24 months and thereafter. Yeah, that was gonna be a question was, yes, you could save money on this, but is the cost of the technology at a point where you're not really saving, you're just saving on your energy bill or whatever?  Alan Larson: No, our play is, I gotta be able to look a CFO in the eye and go, you'll be better off with us. End of conversation. I don't care if you give a damn about color, you'll be better off, and quite frankly, the entertainment companies that have a customer that comes in for three days and gambles, they honestly don't care, right? ? Cause their market is to get people behind a slot machine. And other people, if you go into a boardroom setting or someone that cares about their brand, oh heck, they don't care about the energy. They want it to look perfect. They're there to impress their customers. So it depends on the market. And by the way, the device is always hooked via a very secure tunnel to our server farm in Rochester, New York, which means nobody can actually get into the server. It's impenetrable, and the only way you access it is through a web app that can run on any device and you can watch the behavior. You can see how much the machine is ready. You can see how much if you elect to put onboard storage and so forth, and you can do all the manipulation of the screen via the web, no matter where you are. Since I brought that up, I'll shift to the fourth piece of our product, which is smart automation. Because we're keeping a heartbeat pulse on that machine, if the video path goes away, either to or from, the technician on duty will get an immediate alert on his cell phone. If we're hooked to a UPS and the UPS is alive, so we're alive, but the network's connection goes down, then more than likely there's a power failure somewhere else. Once again, we'll notify them immediately, and the reason we can do that is that the server farm is that which actually notifies the technician, not the device itself. So it's saying, “I lost my baby out there in the middle of nowhere. I'm gonna tell somebody about it.” As a byproduct of that, the third tenant that we sell to, and this is for people that just have a desire for it, we've been asked and have done camera installations. There are a lot of controllers that do camera installations, which is fine. It's nothing unique, but again if someone is having a hard time with a consumer paying their bill because they want absolute validation of their display ads, we'll just have the server snap a picture every three seconds and log it both locally and up on the server, and if somebody asks a question, here, knock yourself out. Here's a log of everything that happened, and if we throw an error at the system, then if the camera's up, we would immediately turn a live feed on and make that feed available to the technician via that text. So in rural settings like where you live and a lot of the mountain states, these guys in bucket trucks drive two hours just to find out they didn't even need to go there.  For example, we were at a sports bar where the network went down for six minutes and the technician got an error. By the time he read the error, the system was back up. So he calls and says, What the heck happened? We go, go talk to your network people. That's exactly what happened. It's that kind of stuff. The idea behind this smart service is that we do not want the distributors that buy and resell our product to get a call at 11 o'clock at night because the consumer found something wrong. We want them to be able to call their customer and say, by the way, “if it's of interest to you, I remediated a couple of issues last week. No problem. That's just what we do for you because we care”, and that's why we built it. That was all based on the distributor. Because they have a business to run and every time they have to service a wall for no reason, it just takes away their bottom line above and beyond what the customer bought. This is a distributor feature.  So I've been to many trade shows, but trade shows that included booths for companies who were specifically in the business of video wall processing for LED video walls. I'm thinking of companies like Brompton and I understand at a base level, I guess at most, that you're running your signal through these boxes, which optimizes and improves the visuals that get pushed to the screen and therefore make it look better. Is that essentially what you're doing here or is this like another component?  Alan Larson: No, it definitely conditions the video signal. In the high-end video market, a couple competitors I can think of, on a studio set, you'll see Black Box, where they actually condition the camera. I've seen Lumigen in high-end settings.  We're similar in those products. There's a thing called a LUT box. We are the highest-resolution LUT box on the market. We got our name 65cubed because we're a 65x65x65, that's the cube, RGB-based technology. The nearest competitor that does something like this, I think is 37 cube and most of them are like 17, and most of the calibration style activities we've seen from all companies are one-dimensional, not three-dimensional, and again, we're basically hitting the color management system for a digital wall with a sledgehammer because we happen to own the asset. Our sister company is owned by the same investor as we are so we have untethered access to all the software assets.  So is this the sort of thing that you purely sell as a product or would you license it as well to a big-time, top-five LED manufacturer so it would just be incorporated in the overall product? Alan Larson: We would welcome it because it's a lot easier to sell and implement, for example, there are two ways that our system gets installed. Because we can't control the quality of any given panel that goes on a wall, regardless of the manufacturer, we always scope the system to start with.  So if someone owns some walls along Interstate 10 and they said, we want these fixed, we'll actually go in a bucket truck for a couple of hours and scope the screen, and once done, it's done and every display that's of the same bin of LED, they're done. But if it's an oddball, you go do it.  For a distributor when they receive their great big crates of panels from China, they take one out, they're usually like 6 inches x 12 inches or foot by foot or wherever there are. They just lay it on the floor, hook a controller to it, put the scope against it, and go home for dinner. And then that entire set of crates that came in the same shipment are all done, and so the customer never gets involved in it. But no, the underlying technology of our sister company is in thousands of high-end monitors that are used in commercial settings, high-end gaming, that kinda stuff. Who's the sister company?  Alan Larson: The technical name is Entertainment Experience. Their trademark company is called EE Color, and it's embedded in our technology. We're both owned by the same group.  Is the product something that would be used across any manufacturer? I mentioned the top five companies that perhaps sell a lot of this stuff at least to the major media companies, for the sides of buildings and roadside billboards, and so on. Or is this more the thing that's gonna really improve lower-tier, lower-cost products? Alan Larson: I can't speak for the quality management of any manufacturer. The lower quality products, distributors that don't sell the top three or four name brands. They love it because they can go and compete for head to head. We have clever tools we give them. We give them an image that's basically duplicated side by side and play it in duplication on the screen, and then we tell our processor to physically not process the left side of the screen pixels and the right side we do, and it's visually impressive because the telltale evidence of digital walls that are pushing too much electricity and don't portray are people. We went to the Infocom Show last June, I believe we went with a partner, a distributor that resells our product. We were the only ones that had people, not swirling colors and mountain scenes, right? Because we can produce the facial tones of anybody, whether you're Caucasian, of color, just as if you're looking at them in your face. When you get the people's faces right, I guarantee you the rest of the colors are in.  Typically what happens is people look like they sat under a sunlamp all day. Another telltale evidence of a screen often aging is that white looks turquoise. That just means the whole color skew is pushed way out, and when we bring that back in, and by the way, when it's pushing purple, it's pushing a lot more electricity too. When you bring it into white, the white is is the byproduct of the red, blue, and green in concert. We don't create white, white happens, is what I'm trying to say.  For the lower-cost products coming over primarily from China, one of the criticisms is that they use LED light admitters from a really wide “bin”, a wide assortment of bins with different Color properties, and everything else. Is the proposition here that that's not the same worry if you're using this kind of technology?  Alan Larson: No. We usually tell the distributors who buy those. You have to pay attention to the bin numbers as they come in because yes, they vary widely and you find that the distributors are pretty clever. If they pull some panels out that look odd compared to the rest of them, they literally sort them. It sounds like a big pain in the neck, but they don't want their customer to have a checkerboard on the wall.  But no, typically the rule is if you receive another shipment that the manufacturer declares is of the same bin, you hope that the manufacturer has integrity then you go with that. What you typically find is, let's assume the bins are off by 5% or 6% in the color signature, and it's on the side of a wall, along a freeway somewhere. The energy curve is gonna be taken care of. These colors won't be textbook, but again, you have a viewing discussion with the consumer for about two seconds when they look at the screen. otherwise, they're gonna hit that semi in front of them. So you don't have to be as particular on roadside displays as you do in company settings or boardrooms.  You mentioned coming out of the studio world and so on. Is this primarily a product for outdoor displays that you're gonna see from a long distance or is this the sort of thing that you could use indoors for 1.8-millimeter fine pixel pitch walls? Alan Larson: Actually, today I'm going over to a manufacturer's US distribution center, and I'm gonna be working with their team to set up a 0.5-millimeter, 5x9 foot wall in their boardroom. Now, the finer the pixel pitch, the more amazing the product actually.  So last question: I was curious about energy savings. I work quite a bit with a company over in Germany. We collaborate on things and they asked me about energy concerns in North America I say, people are aware of it, but it's not a point of discussion. Obviously, it's a huge point of discussion now in Europe. Are you getting questions at all about that and are the customers interested in that side of it? Alan Larson: We're more interested than people we've found. In fact, one of the reasons I went to the DPAA shows a couple of weeks ago. One of my missions was specifically to look for potential distributors in continental Europe for that very reason. I've traveled extensively in my career overseas and have put a lot of time into Europe and the Middle East, and it's a whole different world over there, and the weird thing about Americans, and probably Canadians too, is they've never been more than 250 miles from the day place they were born and like in Dallas where I live, you don't see any news about New York because it might as well be Germany. They don't get it, there's just not something that would register. So the European thing here is nothing more than news on the nationals every so often. And you don't have US media companies or maybe Canadian media companies as well expressing concerns about the cost of energy and interest in your product primarily because of that. They're more interested because of the color properties?  Alan Larson: If they pay the bill for that asset, they care. When I was at DPAA, I got killed with acronym soup because I come out of the high-tech industry, databases, applications, and computers, and I could have given you the same three letters and some acronyms, and I would've thought it was something different. So I sat there and just listened and looked for the context and by and large the word “energy”, and the word “perfect color” wasn't mentioned once in the five days I was there, and hence I met with an architectural engineering firm that's all about energy and they went, you have uniqueness here that we believe as we do these great big installations will give us a competitive advantage, and that was the most productive meeting I had all week, actually. So back to your question about the majors. I have approached the likely candidates that are the big display owners, the people that make them and some have amazing products, don't get me wrong, We've looked at a couple of them, call it the top three or four, and we go, you know what the difference is between some of the cool things they're doing and what we can provide, that just validates our market. We don't care if we so-called compete against them because that's goodness. Because they're doing the right thing for the environment. That we're trying to do. We're sensitive to that. So the European piece is very important to us. We're just attempting to get a foothold to get our product supported locally.  All right, Alan. If people wanna know more about the company, where can they find it online?  Alan Larson: If they go to our website, they can fill out a simple form that says, “I wan to know more” and that's about all it does, and I'll call them right back, or I'll have somebody in our group call them back. That's 65cubed.com, right? Alan Larson: Right! All right. Thanks again for spending some time with me.  Alan Larson: Thanks very much.

Mortgage Marketing Expert
148 One Million Jobs & Six Million Miles with Dennis Yu

Mortgage Marketing Expert

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 46:44


In this episode I chat with a incredible guy a met a few years ago, who also happens to be one of the foremost digital marketers in the world, Dennis Yu! He and I talk about the content hack for using video on ALL social media platforms, how to leverage the social algorithms to create attention, and the way to add assistants to your business without spending thousands! Episode breakdown: 00:00 – Intro 02:13 – Who is Dennis Yu 03:10 – Authenticity is the key 06:43 – The power of stories 07:47 – The Jake Paul Effect 12:10 – What to post 18:05 – How to build trust 21:05 – Tom Ferry digital masterclass 23:05 - Living a life of gratitude 28:20 – Dennis' Guarantee 30:01 – The power of repurposing 36:12 – Automate content sharing 39:12 – Leveraging VA's for growth 44:55 – Dennis's VA academy Dennis Yu is the Chief Technology Officer for BlitzMetrics, as well as a former Search Engine Engineer and one foremost authorities on social media in the world today! He's the co-author of the #1 best-selling book on Amazon for social media, “The Definitive Guide to TikTok Ads”.  He has spent a billion dollars on Facebook ads across his agencies and agencies he advises. He's often used as a resource and quoted on CNN, NPR, and in the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, NPR, and LA Times. He's spoken at over 750 conferences in 20 countries, having flown over 6 million miles in the last 30 years to train up young adults and business owners. Dennis is on a mission to create one million jobs via hands-on social media training, and partnering with universities and professional organizations. You can find him hiking tall mountains, eating chicken wings, and taking  oxygen baths. Virtual Assistant FB Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/377777747205784   Hire a VA: https://blitzmetrics.com/vah/ Tom Ferry Dennis Yu Masterclass - A Master Class in Digital Marketing with Dennis Yu and Jason Pantana Dennis' VA academy - https://www.teamblitznation.com/team-blitznation If you are enjoying the MME podcast, please take a second and LEAVE US A REVIEW, and JOIN our text group: 214-225-5696 

Behind The Mission
BTM93 - Frank Larkin - National Warrior Call Day

Behind The Mission

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 32:30


About Today's GuestFrank Larkin is a national advocate for veteran suicide prevention and military traumatic brain injury research. He currently serves as the Chief Operating Officer for the Feherty's Troops First Foundation and the National Warrior Call Day campaign. Frank is also aligned with several other non-profit organizations working to positively impact the health and survivability of our veterans and first responders. He recently served as the vice president for corporate development at SAP National Security Services. Frank was the 40th United States Senate Sergeant at Arms. As chief law enforcement and executive officer of the Senate, the Sergeant at Arms enforces rules of the Senate; provides a range of technical and administrative services to Senators in their Washington D.C., and state offices; and maintains security in the Capitol and Senate office buildings. He had direct oversight of the US Capitol Police Department, a 2200-member agency, and led numerous national security events.Frank was a member of the federal Senior Executive Service for almost 15 years, serving as both the Acting Director and the Vice Director of Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Organization (JIEDDO) and Director of the Counter IED Operations-Intelligence Integration Center (COIC) within the Department of Defense. He led the integration of technical capabilities, information analysis and human resources against the global IED threat and terror networks. Frank served for more than two decades as a special agent and senior leader in the United States Secret Service (USSS). He conducted complex criminal investigations and protected four US presidents, until his retirement as the Deputy Assistant Director for Protective Research and the agency's Chief Technology Officer. In the private sector, Frank continued to support the defense and intelligence communities. He recently was the Vice President for Corporate Development at SAP National Security Services. In the past, he was the Director for Program Management & Leadership for the Raytheon Company and Senior Program Manager at Lockheed Martin's Defense & Intelligence Solutions. A veteran of the U.S. Navy, Frank served as a special warfare operator in the Navy SEALs. After his military service, he was a uniformed patrol officer with the Norristown (PA) Police Department, a homicide detective with the Montgomery County (PA) District Attorney's Office, and a Maryland State Trooper-Flight Paramedic. He has been a nationally licensed paramedic for 40 years and still serves Maryland as a volunteer firefighter-paramedic for the City of Annapolis. Frank holds a BA degree in criminal justice and a MS degree in public administration from Villanova University. He is the recipient of numerous awards, to include the USSS Valor award, the Department of the Army's Exceptional Civilian Service award and the Superior Civilian Service award.Links Mentioned In This EpisodeNational Warrior Call Day CampaignNational Warrior Call Day ResolutionVeteran Crisis LinePsychArmor Resource of the WeekThe PsychArmor Resource of the Week is the PsychArmor Suicide Prevention, Intervention and Postvention Course Catalogue. In this course listing, you will find 19 different courses for those interested in learning more about how to make an impact with regards to suicide. Courses include information on grief and trauma, developing a crisis response plan, and the gatekeeper training S.A.V.E. You can find a link to the resource here: https://learn.psycharmor.org/collections/suicide-prevention-intervention-and-postventionThis Episode Sponsored By: This episode is sponsored by PsychArmor, the premier education and learning ecosystem specializing in military culture content. PsychArmor offers an online e-learning laboratory with custom training options for organizations.Contact Us and Join Us on Social Media Email PsychArmorPsychArmor on TwitterPsychArmor on FacebookPsychArmor on YouTubePsychArmor on LinkedInPsychArmor on InstagramTheme MusicOur theme music Don't Kill the Messenger was written and performed by Navy Veteran Jerry Maniscalco, in cooperation with Operation Encore, a non profit committed to supporting singer/songwriter and musicians across the military and Veteran communities.Producer and Host Duane France is a retired Army Noncommissioned Officer, combat veteran, and clinical mental health counselor for service members, veterans, and their families.  You can find more about the work that he is doing at www.veteranmentalhealth.com  

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Lead(er) Generation on Tenlo Radio
Part 2: Shift To The Future With Machine Learning

Lead(er) Generation on Tenlo Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 22:32


Matz Lukmani, Product Lead at Google, joins us once again on the Leader Generation podcast. In Part 2, Matz focuses on Performance Max a new goal-based campaign type that allows marketers to access all of their Google Ads inventory from a single campaign. Powered by machine learning, Performance Max helps marketers drive performance based on specified conversion goals. In Part 1, he answered common questions from marketers about Google Analytics 4. Tune in to hear how these tools can help marketers improve overall measurement, strategy, and performance. This episode of the Leader Generation Podcast is hosted by Tessa Burg, Chief Technology Officer at Mod Op. About Murtaza (Matz) Lukmani: Matz Lukmani (EMEA Product Lead, Performance Max & Attribution) based in London (UK) has been with google for +7 years working on products like Google Analytics 360, Google Ads, Search Ads 360, and Firebase Analytics. He currently leads Performance Max Campaigns and Attribution offerings within Google Ads, Search Ads 360, and Google Analytics in EMEA. About Tessa Burg: Tessa Burg is the Host of the Leader Generation podcast and Chief Technology Officer at Mod Op, a full-service marketing communications agency focused on using the right methods to help clients capitalize on their opportunities. Originally part of Tenlo, Tessa became part of the Mod Op team in 2022 after Mod Op's acquisition of the company. In her previous role as vice president of technology, she helped clients execute engaging, multi-platform experiences and products to bring their brands to life. In her role as CTO, she oversees Mod Op's technology stack to ensure the agency is leveraging the right platforms to deliver valuable and measurable marketing communications, entertainment, and experiences.