Podcasts about nursing education

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Best podcasts about nursing education

Latest podcast episodes about nursing education

Rapid Response RN
28: Another Metabolic Acidosis With Christian Guzman APRN

Rapid Response RN

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 34:24


Do you want to grasp ABGs more?  Arterial Blood Gases are tricky! It's one thing to memorize the normal ranges for each value, but an astute clinician is able to see the combination of abnormal values and determine what led to this derangement and what to do about it.In this episode, guest Christian Guzman, Critical Care APRN shares an interesting case of...SPOILER ALERT: Necrotizing FasciitisThe patient's presentation was concerning but not very clear what was going on initially.  But the Nurse's intuition which led to an ABG helped guide the team towards a diagnosis, prompted Christian to upgrade the patient to the ICU, and ultimately led to the patient making a full recovery.If you love nerding out with a deep dive into pathophysiology, then you will love this episode.

Raise the Line
What Changes Are Needed in Nursing Education - Dr. Katie Kay, University Dean for West Coast University College of Nursing

Raise the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 28:20


As Dr. Katie Kay reflects on what adjustments need to be made to nursing curricula in light of the pandemic, she is not focused mainly on academic content. “We have to address some gaps in curriculums across the board that really prepare individuals for what they're going to encounter in the healthcare setting.” Assessing grit, making sure students seek out resources when they are struggling and adding resilience and wellness training to the mix are top-of-mind examples. As University Dean for West Coast University College of Nursing, Kay is able to impact learning for thousands of students in the largest states in the country where the pandemic has left demand for nurses at an all-time high. In this wide-ranging conversation with host Shiv Gaglani, Kay touches on ways the nursing field can reduce burnout, and gives her opinion on how to successfully implement new technology in the healthcare system.  She also speaks about ways the pandemic caused a shift in student expectations around education,the need for faculty to center themselves to best serve students and why hospitals should view nursing as an operational expense versus a billable service.  Don't miss this chance to learn about current and future challenges and opportunities in nursing education.  Mentioned in this episode: https://westcoastuniversity.edu

NLN Nursing EDge Unscripted
Surface - Celebrating the Year of the Nurse Educator: The Evolution of Nursing Education and Its Impact on Curricula

NLN Nursing EDge Unscripted

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 25:31


This episode of the NLN Nursing EDge Unscripted Surface track features guest Sue Forneris.

Raise the Line
Exploring Trends & Opportunities in Oral Healthcare - Ann Battrell, CEO of the American Dental Hygienists Association and Laura Skarnulis, CEO of the Dental Assisting National Board and the DALE Foundation

Raise the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 44:13


The increasing integration of oral healthcare with medical care could lead to a reconsideration of roles and responsibilities on care teams in both fields. That's just one of the emerging trends in oral healthcare we explore on this episode of Raise the Line with guests Laura Skarnulis, CEO of the Dental Assisting National Board and the DALE Foundation, and Ann Battrell, CEO of the American Dental Hygienists Association. Both agree this trend, among others, is making oral healthcare an increasingly dynamic field of employment. “There are so many opportunities, pathways, jobs, and environments in which to work,” says Skarnulis. “People can make all different kinds of choices today that never had been there before,” Battrell adds. There is also an ongoing need for both dental assistants and dental hygienists, with the supply in both roles declining during the pandemic due to retirements and other factors. In their informative conversation with host Shiv Gaglani, these industry experts also dive into issues surrounding scope of practice, the benefits of having diversified experiences throughout one's career and why it's important to “get comfortable with being uncomfortable” to maximize professional and personal growth.

MelissaBPhD's podcast
EP115: Top Car Consideration for Older Drivers: Age-Friendly Technologies/Age-Friendly Cars

MelissaBPhD's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 8:39


In today's world, there are advances in many age-friendly products and services — meaning that when things are age-friendly, they are friendly for everyone.  Another term I've learned for designing age-friendly products is “universal design”. Universal design means products that are accessible for all people — regardless of age, disability or other factors.  Over the years, I've noticed many advances in the automotive industry that I consider to be age-friendly, so I wanted to do a podcast focused on age-friendly cars. Many of the technology features in newer vehicles help drivers of ALL ages.  However, when I googled “best cars for older drivers”, most of what came up had to do with seating comfort, how easy it was to get in and out of the vehicle, safety ratings, reliability and/or warranties. It was more difficult to find articles focusing on technologies that could make us all safer drivers, particularly as we get older.  Contrary to popular belief, as we age, some of us may prefer to drive cars with all of the technology — but some older adults don't like all the new bells and whistles — the technology they are used to is what they like. My parents are two great examples — my Dad loves technology, and my Mom wants to keep it simple. You may have gleaned from that statement that I'm more like my  Dad, but some of the technology I'll share also keeps it simple. With a new driver in my own family I've had to learn to use these technologies as a passenger, and have promised my kids that I would try not to “freak out if the car wasn't,” with all of its sensors and warning capabilities. Tune in to this episode of This Is Getting Old: Top Car Consideration for Older Drivers: Age-Friendly Technologies/Age-Friendly Cars, to learn about a few of the age-friendly technologies in cars and how they help drivers of all ages.  Key points covered in this episode:  ✔️ Blind Spot Information Systems with Cross-Traffic Alert Blind spot information systems with cross-traffic alerts are great for older drivers and those with reduced mobility–or if you're the passenger in the vehicle with a newly-licensed driver (like my 16-year-old!). This feature uses sensors to alert drivers, and displays a warning light in the side mirror (and/or make a sounds, depending on your vehicle) when a car is in your blind spot.  ✔️ Front 180-Degree Camera with Split View The front 180-degree camera helps see small children, pets, or other obstacles that may be too close to your car when trying to pull out, with limited visibility for oncoming traffic. A split-view camera can also show you what's on the front of your car's left and right sides.  I decided this was a good feature when I inadvertently pulled out of a grass parking lot that I thought was level on all four sides, only to drive right into the only ditch. Said ditch was the length of the front of my car, and my older children had a field day laughing at my error while we waited for the tow truck to pull me out. My next vehicle had the front camera, which has proven handy for several intersections in my town and when I drive in Washington, DC. ✔️ Park Assist System for Parallel Parking Park assist systems are another helpful feature for drivers of all ages. This feature helps you with traditional parallel parking (and some vehicles also assist with perpendicular parking). Parallel parking assist systems are very useful in urban areas where there may not be much room between cars.  And while I love this feature, my 16-year-old son enjoys using this feature and has been quite proud of himself for successfully parallel parking. What he may not realize is that he needs to pay attention to the angles the car uses to parallel park so he can park without this feature — because the chances that his first car will self-park are pretty slim. ✔️ Adaptive Cruise Control with Stop-and-Go Adaptive cruise control with stop-and-go allows you to set your cruise control to a certain speed, and if you have a car driving slower in front of you, the car auto-adjusts to the slower speed. You can set this feature to follow one, two, or three car-lengths behind, depending on your comfort level. ✔️ Perimeter and Rear Parking Sensors Perimeter and rear sensors emit a high-frequency sound that bounces off nearby objects. If you're backing up to park in a garage, these sensors can emit a sound that lets you know if you're getting too close to a wall or another car. These sensors can be helpful for all drivers; the trick is to make sure you use them.  In the video version of the podcast, you can see that I didn't listen to my perimeter sensors when I was in a parking deck recently, and my car, Foxy, ended up in the “hospital” for repairs. ✔️ Infotainment Touch Screen Systems: Apple Play The Infotainment Touch Screen System is a great feature that simplifies things when transitioning from car to car. I've found this “universal” technology to be particularly helpful when I travel and have to use a rental car. Through your smartphone, you can use apps you are already familiar with from car to car, such as Waze or Google Maps for navigation, which might be easier than the vehicle's built-in GPS that you may not be familiar with.   Apple Play can also let you connect your phone to your car's speakers to listen to music or podcasts through the car's audio system. This feature also allows you to use voice activation hands-free, using the same technology on your phone. ✔️ Lane Keeping System I've found this feature to calm my nerves when riding with a less-experienced driver. There have been times that I felt like we weren't in the middle of our lane when my son was driving, and to verify where we were, I could look over and see the lane-keeping system. I could do this without stressing my son out and relax, and/or the car would let him know by correcting him into the lane without any verbal prompting from me. All parents riding with new drivers benefit from this technology! ✔️ CarFit Program The most important thing is that the car we drive at any age fits us — for maximum safety and comfort. The AAA, AARP, and the American Occupational Therapy Association, partnered in 2006 to offer a new program called CarFit — a community-based program designed to keep older drivers safe while driving by focusing attention on comfort, fit, and security in their vehicles. The program is designed to help older drivers find out how well they fit into their current vehicle, identify actions they can take to improve their fit, and talk about driver safety — for themselves and others on the road. They have an in-person event and offer virtual workshops. You can volunteer to help keep the roads safer for everyone. You can find more information at Car-Fit.org — the link is below in the description if you're watching on YouTube, but can also be found on my website, MelissaBPhD.com, in the blog for this episode.  If you have questions, comments, or need help, please feel free to drop a one-minute audio or video clip and email it to me at melissabphd@gmail.com, and I will get back to you by recording an answer to your question.  ————————————————————————————— About Melissa Batchelor, PhD, RN, FNP, FGSA, FAAN: I earned my Bachelor of Science in Nursing ('96) and Master of Science in Nursing ('00) as a Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) from the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW) School of Nursing (SON). I genuinely enjoy working with the complex medical needs of older adults. I worked full-time for five years as FNP in geriatric primary care across many long-term care settings (skilled nursing homes, assisted living, home, and office visits), then transitioned into academic nursing in 2005, joining the faculty at UNCW SON as a lecturer. I obtained my PhD in Nursing and a post-master's Certificate in Nursing Education from the Medical University of South Carolina College of Nursing ('11). I then joined the faculty at Duke University School of Nursing as an Assistant Professor. My family moved to northern Virginia in 2015 which led to me joining the George Washington University (GW) School of Nursing faculty in 2018 as a (tenured) Associate Professor. I am also the Director of the GW Center for Aging, Health, and Humanities. Please find out more about her work at https://melissabphd.com/.

Raise the Line
Making Rare Disease Treatments A Priority - John Crowley, Executive Chairman at Amicus Therapeutics

Raise the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 28:16


It was on a Friday the 13th in late winter 1997 when John Crowley's life changed forever.  John and his wife Aileen had been noticing concerning symptoms in their infant daughter Megan for several months, and after a few rounds of testing she was diagnosed with a rare form of muscular dystrophy known as Pompe disease.  Doctors told the Crowleys their daughter likely only had a few years to live, an outlook that ultimately sparked John's remarkable efforts to find treatments for Megan as well as her younger brother Patrick, who was also struck with Pompe. His family's amazing journey was the inspiration for the movie Extraordinary Measures starring Brendan Fraser and Harrison Ford.  Join host Shiv Gaglani in this captivating and inspiring conversation with Crowley, now the Executive Chairman at Amicus Therapeutics, to learn about how he and his team are shedding light on some of the rarest diseases in the world, the promise of new technology in genetics, and the need for an Operation Warp Speed to develop rare disease treatments.  As Crowley puts it, “We can beat nature, we think, in the years and decades ahead. We just oftentimes have to beat time.”Mentioned in this episode: https://amicusrx.com/

ROSC
029. Why We Spread the Blame

ROSC

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 26:11


Welcome to the ROSC PodcastWe have talked about the idea of blaming yourself for everything you can, and I know that sounds very inflammatory.In this episode, we discuss the idea of spreading the blame among others, and why w feel the need to do it.Responsibility is not a percentage.  It is not a finite amount that will run out if put in the wrong place.  And even though others might think that way, when you realize that is the case, you begin to get comfortable taking on responsibility because you find it gives you one key super-power: Control.www.rosc.life

Raise the Line
Empowering Consumers to Make Better Health Decisions - Dr. Taylor Sittler, Head of Research & Development at Levels

Raise the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 23:26


Direct-to-consumer healthcare and how technology can empower people to be active participants in achieving and maintaining their own good health is a favorite topic on Raise the Line.  Today we're going to take a closer look at how one consumer health device that's growing sharply in popularity, continuous glucose monitors, can be used to drive healthier decisions.  Millions of Americans wear the devices to see the impact of what they eat on their bodies, but it can be difficult for people to use that information.  That's where Levels enters the picture, a health tech company helping people discover how diet and lifestyle choices impact their metabolic functioning.  “We're enabling people to better understand what health decisions they should be making,” says Dr. Taylor Sittler, the company's Head of Research and Development. Levels does that through an app that presents data from the monitors in a way that people can understand.  For example, you can see a chart showing your glucose levels over the course of the day.  Next up for Levels is supporting people as they act on the information, and providing data on exercise and sleep. Join host Michael Carrese as he explores this growing area of medical technology with Dr. Sittler, and how measuring and monitoring resilience can also play an important role in improving health.Mentioned in this episode: https://www.levelshealth.com

Rapid Response RN
27: Time is Brain: The Why Behind the Hustle With Stroke

Rapid Response RN

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 46:40


This episode is jam packed with everything you need to know for your next stroke alert!I was interviewed by Annie Fulton from the Up My Nursing Game Podcast and we got to talk about all things stroke from differentiating between ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke to the life saving interventions of tPA, thrombectomy, ventriculostomies, and the pharmacological interventions for stroke.  We discuss the role of the Rapid Response Nurse and the bedside Nurse during a stroke alert. What to assess for first, what information the stroke team is going to need, what are the priorities, and why all the hustle to get to CT?! If you want to be prepared, not only to recognize the signs and symptoms of stroke, but also anticipate what is next in this patient's course of care from diagnostics to interventions and recovery, this episode is for you! You can listen to more of Annie's podcasts at https://www.upmynursinggame.com/ and on Apple Podcasts at https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/up-my-nursing-game/id1527032817You can also find Annie on Instagram @UpMyNursingGame If you would like to check out my course, you can find it at:www.RapidResponseandRescue.com

Raise the Line
A New Tool to Improve Clinic Visits for Both Patients and Providers – Dr. David Canes, Founder of WellPrept

Raise the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 27:06


Unlike many young children who are fearful of visits to the doctor, Dr. David Canes was fascinated by his.  This early interest set the foundation for a career in medicine, leading him to become a skilled urologist and robotic surgeon. But he started to feel unsatisfied with the repetition of information he needed to deliver during patient appointments. “I think there's a lot of other doctors like me who really love making a connection with another human being who needs your help, but if you are repetitively explaining things, you enter an autopilot type of mindset and it really bothered me a lot.” Ultimately, the patient-centered solution he developed grew into the company Wellprept, which empowers doctors to curate educational content that can easily be shared with patients before appointments via a single link.  Happily, it's working well for both the physicians who are using the system and their patients. “The "ah-ha" moment seems to be that the patient comes back in and says, ‘thank you so much for sending me that,' and then the provider notices that the visit is better.” Check out this wide-ranging conversation with host Shiv Gaglani, in which Dr. Canes shares his insights on other ways to reduce physician burnout, thoughts on improving the doctor-patient relationship, and tips on planning for a long-term career in medicine. Mentioned in this episode: https://wellprept.com

Raise the Line
A Mission to Maximize the Use of Donated Organs - Leslie McMahon, Organ Recovery Manager with Donor Alliance

Raise the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 31:15


There's good news in the world of organ donation and transplant.  For the first time last year, more than 40,000 transplants were performed in the U.S. and donations from deceased donors increased for the eleventh year in a row. And as we'll learn from today's guest Leslie McMahon, newer technologies are making it possible to evaluate organs for viability that previously might have been rejected due to concerns about trauma-inflicted damage or other factors. “They can put the heart in a box and watch its function outside of the body before implanting it. They have the same devices for liver, kidneys and lungs as well.” McMahonis Organ Recovery Manager at Donor Alliance, an organ, eye and tissue  procurement organization serving Colorado and parts of Wyoming, one of 57 OPOs in the United States dedicated to helping the 106,000 Americans in need of transplants. “Our vision is to maximize all donation opportunities. We are really focused on performance improvement to be able to meet that vision.” Don't miss this informative conversation with host Shiv Gaglani in which McMahon shares her insights on the challenges of procuring organs for donation, the special connection developed with donor families, and why having a positive attitude is essential in growing a career in the healthcare field.Mentioned in this episode:https://www.donoralliance.org/https://www.donatelife.net/

MelissaBPhD's podcast
EP114: Social Media in Healthcare with Dr. Mona Shattell and Rebecca Darmoc

MelissaBPhD's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 12:44


Social media has developed into a valuable resource for knowledge in the healthcare arena. A poll found that 76% of participants used social media "at least a bit" to research COVID-19, but the majority of those respondents (63.6%) indicated they were reluctant to check with a health expert about the accuracy of that information. Healthcare professionals can use social media to educate the public and contribute to halting the spread of false information while using social media. Do you want to be on social media but don't know how to get started? Tune in to this episode of This Is Getting Old: Moving Towards an Age-Friendly World - Social Media in Healthcare. If you are a health-care professional or a leader in a healthcare organization, this information could help you get started in using social media. In this episode, we are joined by Dr. Mona Shattell, PhD, RN, FAAN and Rebecca Darmoc, MS. ✔️ Why Should Healthcare Professionals Use Social Media? There are so many things healthcare professionals can do on and through social media. For example: Networking  Sharing information with their colleagues. Expanding their practice.  Disseminating research.  Get information out to the public.  Healthcare professionals are experts in their specialty, and misinformation is spread on social media. The public and even reporters trust healthcare professionals to give the most accurate information. A social media presence is an opportunity for healthcare professionals to go outside of their practice and the walls of their institutions and reach people on an exponential level. ✔️ Tips For Branding Professionally On Social Media Social media in the healthcare industry may be challenging to navigate.  The first thing to remember is: YOU ARE YOUR BRAND. Use your name when you're signing up for social media as your username if possible. Using your first and last name helps potential followers to find you. You don't want to use slang terms or phrases—be as professional as possible.  Number two is to highlight your expertise. Brag a little by sharing some of the accolades and things you've done professionally in your profile. People will know you're an expert when they can see what you've done, and when they can see a few aspects of your professional experience. Furthermore, it's how people will learn from you and trust what you have to say on social media. ✔️ Three Levels For Joining The Conversation Using Social Media: Consume, Contribute, And Create It can be overwhelming to start up a new social media platform. Healthcare professionals should think about gaining social media experience as a developmental process.  First, CONSUME. This step involves just reading and scrolling through a variety of social media platforms. Get comfortable with how to use each one, follow your colleagues, look up people's names in your specialty area, see what others are doing, and see how (and what) they are posting. Getting used to the platform at this level is the most critical step to beginning your journey.  Then once you're comfortable with being a consumer, you can move on to the second level and CONTRIBUTE to the online conversation. When you see something that someone says, you can like it and retweet it (e.g., on Twitter).  When you retweet and add a comment, you are contributing to the conversation.  The highest level in using social media is to CREATE. This is when you create content from scratch, and begin to move into being a thought leader. Creating means putting your specialized knowledge and expertise out there for your specific audience based on your goals.  ✔️ Where to Find Help With Kickstarting Your Social Media Presence? Dr. Mona Shattell, PhD, RN, FAAN, Rebecca Darmoc, MS, and Melissa Batchelor, PhD, RN, FNP, FGSA, FAAN, released a book a couple of weeks ago called '#SocialMedia and #HealthCare: A Guide to Creating Your Professional Digital Presence.' The book is a guide to helping professionals use social media to educate the public and specific patient communities, make connections with industry leaders and peers, and enhance their professional reputation online. Grab a copy of the book through AMAZON; or through the publisher Slack Incorporated, and receive 20% OFF and FREE SHIPPING of the print book with promo code AU20. If you have questions, comments, or need help, please feel free to drop a one-minute audio or video clip and email it to me at melissabphd@gmail.com, and I will get back to you by recording an answer to your question.  ————————————————————————————— Mona Shattell, PhD, RN, FAAN, is a professor, and Hugh F. and Jeannette G. McKean Endowed Chair and Department Chair at the University of Central Florida College of Nursing in Orlando. She is also the editor of the Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services. Mona got into social media about 10 or 12 years ago when she did a fellowship with the Op-Ed project.  ————————————————————————————— Rebecca Darmoc, MS, is a marketing strategist for a technology consulting company. For about 10 years before that, she was director of marketing and communications for an academic health system in Chicago. She got into social media for her job as a marketing professional.  ————————————————————————————— About Melissa Batchelor, PhD, RN, FNP, FGSA, FAAN: I earned my Bachelor of Science in Nursing ('96) and Master of Science in Nursing ('00) as a Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) from the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW) School of Nursing (SON). I genuinely enjoy working with the complex medical needs of older adults. I worked full-time for five years as FNP in geriatric primary care across many long-term care settings (skilled nursing homes, assisted living, home, and office visits), then transitioned into academic nursing in 2005, joining the faculty at UNCW SON as a lecturer. I obtained my PhD in Nursing and a post-master's Certificate in Nursing Education from the Medical University of South Carolina College of Nursing ('11). I then joined the faculty at Duke University School of Nursing as an Assistant Professor. My family moved to northern Virginia in 2015 which led to me joining the George Washington University (GW) School of Nursing faculty in 2018 as a (tenured) Associate Professor. I am also the Director of the GW Center for Aging, Health, and Humanities. Please find out more about her work at https://melissabphd.com/.

Integrative Nurse Coaches in ACTION!
Powerful Holistic Nurse Coaching- Danene Coroneos-Shannon, PhD, MSEd, BSN, BS, MCHES, NPD-BC, NC-BC, IC

Integrative Nurse Coaches in ACTION!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 45:57 Transcription Available


Powerful Holistic Nurse Coaching- Danene Coroneos-Shannon, PhD, MSEd, BSN, BS, MCHES, NPD-BC, NC-BC, IC"And I get to do it in a holistic manner, which makes it even better. And I think that that creates a very unique bond. I think it creates a very unique relationship. And I'm one of those folks that I like to have that kind of relationship with people. I like to be around people, I like to feel their energy, I love to hear their stories. "  ~Danene Coroneos-Shannon, PhD, MSEd, BSN, BS, MCHES, NPD-BC, NC-BC, ICAh-ha MomentsHolistic Nursing may open possibilities for a Nurse to develop greater awareness of the interconnectedness of self, others, nature, spirit and relationship with the global communitySpending time reconnecting with your purpose helps reinvigorate your passion for NursingReiki is a holistic energy practiceSelf-care is vital to every humanVulnerability might just open us up to learning something newSometimes you must trust the processCoaching is walking beside, and sometimes walking a little behind someone to support themProvision 5 of the Nursing Code of Ethics states:  The nurse owes the same duties to self as to others, including the responsibility to promote health and safety, preserve wholeness of character and integrity, maintain competence, and continue personal and professional growthLinks and ResourcesIntegrative Nurse Coach Certificate Program InformationCode of Ethics for Nurses from American Nurses AssociationEp32: Valuing Stories Of Suffering- Holly Kapusinksi, MSN, RN NC-BC CPNP-PC

MedChat
Teens and Headaches

MedChat

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 24:47


Podcast: Teens and Headaches    Evaluation and Credit:  https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/MedChat43   Target Audience             This activity is targeted toward all physician specialties.   Statement of Need  When pediatric patients present with headaches, a comprehensive evaluation should be conducted to determine if it is a primary or secondary headache. Providers should consistently utilize the latest diagnostic and management guidelines to effectively diagnose and manage their pediatric patients with headaches.   Objectives  At the conclusion of this offering, the participant will be able to:  Discuss the prevalence of headaches in the pediatric population. Discuss the symptoms and clinical characteristics of headaches including the distinction of symptoms between adults and teens.  Describe the diagnostic process for headaches in teens including red flags.  Identify effective management strategies for primary headaches including migraines in the teen patient.   Moderator Joe Flynn, D.O. Chief Administrative Officer Norton Medical Group Physician-in-Chief  Norton Cancer Institute   Speaker Brian Plato, D.O., FAHS Medical Director Headache Medicine, Neurology Norton Neuroscience Institute Norton Healthcare   Moderator, Speaker and Planner Disclosures   The planners and moderator of this activity do not have any relevant relationships to disclose.  The speaker, Brian Plato, D.O., FAHS has relevant relationships with: Allergan and Amgen - Advisory Board and Speaker Bureau; Biohaven – Speaker Bureau; and Teva - Advisory Board. These relationships have been successfully mitigated.   Commercial Support   There was no commercial support for this activity.    Physician Credits   Accreditation  Norton Healthcare is accredited by the Kentucky Medical Association to provide continuing medical education for physicians.   Designation  Norton Healthcare designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.   Nursing Credits Norton Healthcare Institute for Education and Development is approved with distinction as a provider of nursing continuing professional development by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation (ANCC). This continuing professional development activity has been approved for .5 contact hours. In order for nursing participants to obtain credits, they must claim attendance by attesting to the number of hours in attendance. For more information related to nursing credits, contact Sally Sturgeon, DNP, RN, SANE-A, AFN-BC at (502) 446-5889 or sally.sturgeon@nortonhealthcare.org.   Resources for Additional Study:   Headache Diagnosis in Children and Adolescents https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29476266/   Practice guideline update summary: Acute treatment of migraine in children and adolescents: Report of the Guideline Development, Dissemination, and Implementation Subcommittee of the American https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31413171/   American Headache Society https://americanheadachesociety.org/     Norton Healthcare, a not for profit health care system, is a leader in serving adult and pediatric patients throughout Greater Louisville, Southern Indiana, the commonwealth of Kentucky and beyond. Five Louisville hospitals provide inpatient and outpatient general care as well as specialty care including heart, neuroscience, cancer, orthopedic, women's and pediatric services. A strong research program provides access to clinical trials in a multitude of areas. More information about Norton Healthcare is available at NortonHealthcare.com.     Date of Original Release |September 2022; Information is current as of the time of recording.  Course Termination Date | September 2024 Contact Information | Center for Continuing Medical, Provider and Nursing Education; (502) 446-5955 or cme@nortonhealthcare.org  

Raise the Line
Fixing Centuries of Inequities for Women in Healthcare - Halle Tecco, Executive Vice President of Everly Health

Raise the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 29:52


Inspired by her own challenges with fertility a few years ago, serial entrepreneur Halle Tecco saw a tremendous opportunity to rebuild the fertility and pregnancy experience for families from the ground up. She wanted to bring a human-centered approach to physical products that were largely designed and sold by male-owned incumbents in the space. She came home one day after interviewing a few potential CEOs and told her husband, "I'm so sorry. I know I said I wouldn't start a company, but I think that I have to do this, I'm just so passionate about it." With those words, Halle founded Natalist to offer fertility and pregnancy essentials for women and men who wanted a better solution, just like her. The company was acquired in October of 2021 by Everly Health where Halle now serves as vice president, focusing on developing and supporting women's health strategy across the organization. Check out this episode of Raise the Line as host Shiv Gaglani sits down with Halle to hear all about her journey as an entrepreneur in the healthcare space, and discuss the many obstacles and challenges women still face navigating the healthcare system today.

Raise the Line
A Ukrainian Wellness Company Meets the Needs of Its Consumers and Employees Despite the War - Victoria Repa, CEO & Founder of BetterMe

Raise the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 21:52


Victoria Repa has known from her earliest days growing up in Ukraine how difficult it can be to lose weight. “In my family, everyone is overweight. It's our family problem and we can't overcome it.” Breaking that cycle provided Repa with the motivation to start her own journey toward better health, but she wanted to help others find their own motivation as well, and sustain it. Armed with business degrees from Kyiv University and Stanford, she launched the tech company BetterMe five years ago whose apps have already been downloaded 110 million times. Keeping that level of success going would be a challenge in any circumstances, but especially during the War in Ukraine which has required some staff to flee the country while others stayed to fight. Join host Michael Carrese for this inspirational conversation with a tenacious leader who is fighting for her country, her employees and the health of her customers all at once.Mentioned in this episode: https://u24.gov.ua/ to support the people of Ukraine.

ROSC
028. How to be fixed on your goal but flexible on the details

ROSC

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 18:29


Welcome to the ROSC PodcastThe idea of being rigid on the goal but flexible on the details is crucial leadership principle.  If your goal is flexible or even non-existent, it could potentially lead you to be so aimless that you become fixed in your ways without an end point.  That leads to feeling lost.In this episode, we touch on the topic of having some sort of end point, no matter what it is, and using that to guide how you deal with the unexpected, with failure, and with pivoting.Feel free to subscribe, share, and like!www.rosc.life

Raise the Line
A Patient Perspective on Degenerative Brain Disease - Leonard Marshall, Former NFL Great and Dementia Advocate

Raise the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 23:04


It was a decade after NY Giants great and Super Bowl champion Leonard Marshall retired when he first started to notice cognitive issues and a concerning change in attitude. Five years, many doctor visits and countless hours of research later, the two-time Pro Bowl defensive lineman received a diagnosis of CTE, or chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease that's common in former NFL players. He estimates taking over 30,000 blows to the head in his entire college and pro football career, which included 12 years in the NFL. “I knew what I signed up for when I started to play pro football. I knew there was a very strong chance I could end up getting a knee injury, back injury, neck injury, maybe a concussion or two.  But nowhere in that fine print did it say you could end up with chronic traumatic encephalopathy, and no one ever talked about it.” Today, Marshall is using his high profile to support CaringKind, New York City's leading expert on Alzheimer's and dementia caregiving with a forty-year history of working with community partners to help affected patients and families.  Join host Shiv Gaglani for this touching opportunity to hear a patient's perspective on a disease that is constantly in the headlines, and learn what Leonard Marshall is doing to support people facing the same reality.  Mentioned in this episode: www.caringkindnyc.org

Raise the Line
Chasing Lifesaving Cures for Himself and Others: Dr. David Fajgenbaum, President of the Castleman Disease Collaborative Network

Raise the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 26:50


“I knew I wasn't going to survive unless I found a drug that could save my life,” says Dr. David Fajgenbaum, who has almost died five times from the rare disorder idiopathic multicentric Castleman disease, which he developed while in medical school. Now a physician and assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania, Fajgenbaum has led research efforts into a cure for Castleman, discovering a drug that has kept him disease-free for eight years and is helping other patients. As he continues pursuing new therapies for Castleman, Fajgenbaum is also spearheading an effort to create a system for identifying alternate uses for existing drugs, something which could benefit millions in the rare disease community and beyond. “One of my favorite examples is tocilizumab, which was made for Castleman in the 1990's and is now the first drug you'll receive if you're admitted to the ICU with COVID,” he tells host Shiv Gaglani.The non-profit effort is being announced this month at a Clinton Global Initiative meeting. Don't miss this deeply inspiring conversation with many lessons on the importance of collaboration, laughter and hope, and the perspective gained from feeling like you are living on borrowed time.  Mentioned in this episode: www.chasingmycure.com

Raise the Line
On the Medical Frontlines of the War in Ukraine – Dr. Oleg Turkot, Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine at Johns Hopkins Hospital

Raise the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 25:30


On this special episode of Raise the Line, we get an eyewitness account of how medical needs are being met in the midst of the war in Ukraine from Ukrainian-American anesthesiologist Dr. Oleg Turkot, who has been coordinating resources and treating patients since the war started. As he tells host Shiv Gaglani, one important focus for him has been working with the Butterfly Network to distribute hand-held ultrasound devices. “If you have an ultrasound that weighs sixty pounds, lugging that as you're fleeing from a rocket attack ends up not really being your best priority versus something that you have on your belt.” Dr. Turkot is not new to improving medical care in under-resourced countries. For years, he's been working with Kybele, an organization that creates healthcare partnerships across borders to improve childbirth safety.  Tune in to this fascinating and important conversation to hear more about that work, how Twitter can be a powerful resource in crowdsourcing medical devices, and about some of the unique differences between the healthcare systems in the United States and Ukraine. “I think the most important thing is to continue to support organizations that are doing the work on the ground because this is going to have to continue for years.”Mentioned in this episode: https://kybeleworldwide.org/https://www.butterflynetwork.com/ 

MelissaBPhD's podcast
EP113: Five Symptoms of Alzheimer's Disease

MelissaBPhD's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 7:09


Alzheimer's disease is a syndrome that impacts a person's ability to think, problem-solve, and function every day. It can influence a person's memory, language, behavior, decision-making, visual and spatial skills, and ability to pay attention.   It happens slowly, over time, so often it may take family and friends – and even the person experiencing the disease – years to recognize these problems. In fact, dementia isn't usually diagnosed until these problems are to the point that they interfere with the person's ability to work, take care of their affairs, and manage their household.  Tune in to this episode of This Is Getting Old: Moving Towards an Age-Friendly World to learn about five symptoms of Alzheimer's. This information could help you or a loved one identify the early warning symptoms and get earlier treatment.  Key points covered in this episode:   ✔️ #1: Difficulty Understanding Spatial Relationships   If your loved one has difficulty understanding how to get from place to place, it could be a symptom of dementia. This can manifest in several ways, such as getting lost in familiar places, being unable to follow directions, or misjudging distances.  If you notice your loved one having difficulty figuring how things fit together, understanding maps, wandering, or getting lost, or changes in depth perception – trips, slips, falls, or a car accident, it could be an early symptom of a memory problem.   ✔️ #2: Aphasia—Difficulties with Language Use   Aphasia—not to be confused with dysphagia (trouble swallowing)—is difficulty with understanding or using words. It can make it hard to read, write, or say what you want to. Aphasia may also make it hard to follow or carry on a conversation.   If you notice your loved one having trouble following conversations, finding the right word, substituting made-up words; writing that is hard to understand; or slurred speech, it could be an early symptom of dementia.  ✔️ #3: Trouble Paying Attention   Staying focused becomes more difficult; repeating questions; losing or misplacing things; errors in managing finances. The person may lose their train of thought when talking to you or have trouble following a conversation.   ✔️ # 4: Difficulty Managing Time and Effort   Trouble with time management is another common symptom of dementia. This can manifest as forgetting what day it is, losing track of time, or inability to follow a schedule. In more severe cases, people with dementia may have difficulty planning and carrying out tasks that require multiple steps.  This can manifest as forgetting to take medications, having trouble cooking meals, having difficulty driving, taking longer to complete normal daily activities, and having trouble organizing themselves to get out of the house.  ✔️ # 5: Amnesia and Agnosia—Memory Loss and Trouble Recognizing Familiar Objects or People   One of the classic symptoms of dementia is memory loss. This can manifest as forgetting recent events, conversations, or appointments. In more severe cases, people with dementia may forget who their loved ones are.  Memory loss is often accompanied by agnosia, difficulty recognizing familiar objects or people. This can manifest as the inability to identify everyday household items, not knowing how to use ordinary things, or not recognizing close friends or family members.  Watch the NOSH: Nurses Optimizing Supportive Handfeeding video to learn more about how to manage mealtimes for persons with Alzheimer's disease. You can use the three different hand hand-feeding techniques with other activities of daily living.   Knowing that Alzheimer's Disease is Not A Normal Part of Aging Could Help You Live Longer.  Aging doesn't have to equate to decay and decline.   Alzheimer's disease is not a normal part of aging. You should know that as a young person because what you think about aging impacts how well you age and how long you live.    Learn all you can about what is NORMAL with aging, not what you may think is expected or believing the negative stereotypes accompanying aging in American culture. The negative stereotype of aging is called ageism, and it can decrease your life expectancy by almost 8 years. In fact, most older adults in the US are still vibrant and engaged in life. Strive to be that type of older adult – I know I am.  If you have questions, comments, or need help, please feel free to drop a one-minute audio or video clip and email it to me at melissabphd@gmail.com, and I will get back to you by recording an answer to your question.    About Melissa Batchelor, PhD, RN, FNP, FGSA, FAAN:  I earned my Bachelor of Science in Nursing ('96) and Master of Science in Nursing ('00) as a Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) from the University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW) School of Nursing (SON). I genuinely enjoy working with the complex medical needs of older adults. I worked full-time for five years as FNP in geriatric primary care across many long-term care settings (skilled nursing homes, assisted living, home, and office visits), then transitioned into academic nursing in 2005, joining the faculty at UNCW SON as a lecturer. I obtained my PhD in Nursing and a post-master's Certificate in Nursing Education from the Medical University of South Carolina College of Nursing ('11). I then joined the faculty at Duke University School of Nursing as an Assistant Professor. My family moved to northern Virginia in 2015 which led to me joining the George Washington University (GW) School of Nursing faculty in 2018 as a (tenured) Associate Professor. I am also the Director of the GW Center for Aging, Health, and Humanities. Please find out more about her work at https://melissabphd.com/.     

ROSC
027. The Long Tail - Navigating Social Media in Healthcare

ROSC

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 19:36


Welcome to the ROSC PodcastBack when mass attention was a finite commodity, it took being picked to make it, as Seth Godin refers to it.  With social media and the internet in general, the shelf space is now infinite, but our attention still sticks to what is newest and most flashy.So how do we nagivate the pressure to perform to what is trending?  And how does it relate to us in healthcare?Feel free to subscribe, share, and like!www.rosc.life

The Oncology Nursing Podcast
Episode 222: Ethical and Moral Dilemmas of Futility in Cancer Care and Treatment

The Oncology Nursing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 41:51


“Let's take time, invest time, in learning more about futility. Let's invest some time in learning more about how to understand our patient's goals, their family's goals, what their values are,” Kathleen Turner, BSN, RN, CHPN, CCRN-CMC, clinical nurse in the medical-surgical intensive care unit at the University of California, San Francisco, Medical Center, told Stephanie Jardine, BSN, RN, oncology clinical specialist at ONS, during a discussion on a nurse's approach to futility in cancer care and treatment. You can earn free NCPD contact hours after listening to this episode by completing the evaluation linked below. Music Credit: "Fireflies and Stardust" by Kevin MacLeod Licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 3.0 Earn 0.75 contact hours of nursing continuing professional development (NCPD) by listening to the full recording and completing an evaluation at myoutcomes.ons.org by August 26, 2024. The planners and faculty for this episode have no relevant financial relationships with ineligible companies to disclose. ONS is accredited as a provider of NCPD by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. Episode Notes Complete this evaluation for free NCPD. Oncology Nursing Podcast: Episode 78: Ethical Distress Impacts Nursing Practice Episode 135: ELNEC Has Trained More Than One Million Nurses in End-of-Life Care ONS Voice articles: It Takes a Team to Confront Moral Distress Palliative Care Resources Comfort Nurses Through COVID-19 Stress, Dilemmas, and Grief Articles about ethics and communications Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing articles: When Does Treatment in Cancer Care Become Futile? How Does an Oncology Nurse Increase Moral Resilience During a Pandemic? Moral Distress: A Qualitative Study of Experiences Among Oncology Team Members Moral Distress: Identification Among Inpatient Oncology Nurses in an Academic Health System Oncology Nursing Forum article: Coping With Moral Distress in Oncology Practice: Nurse and Physician Strategies Journal of Nursing Education and Practice article: R.A.C.E. for Nurses: Cultivating Compassion in Nurse/Patient Interactions AACN Advanced Critical Care article: Ethical Discernment and Action: The Art of Pause JAMA article: Conflicts Regarding Decisions to Limit Treatment: A Differential Diagnosis Podcast: Decompress by Anthony Back Resources on Being Mortal: Book by Atul Gawande FRONTLINE documentary VitalTalk resources and IMPACT-ICU toolkit American Association of Colleges of Nursing: End-of-Life Nursing Education Consortium project To discuss the information in this episode with other oncology nurses, visit the ONS Communities. To provide feedback or otherwise reach ONS about the podcast, email pubONSVoice@ons.org. Highlights From Today's Episode “Medical futility has traditionally been framed as care that can't achieve its stated purpose. For instance, treating myocardial infarction with an antibiotic. There's no way that that medicine is going to fix somebody's heart attack. Often, though, I think it is something that we tend to invoke in our own practice when we feel like the care that we're providing may not be able to achieve our goal for the patient—and I mean our personal goal as opposed to a clinical goal. And from there, moral distress arises.” Timestamp (TS) 02:40 “I think that there's a tremendous opportunity for nurses to also actively participate in that conversation, especially oncology nurses, because we are with patients throughout their continuum of care and work with people for a long time and have more ‘in-the-room-time' with our patients. I think of the nurses who had been giving my own mom her chemotherapy, where they spend so much time in the room with her and talking about her impressions of her care, what she wants, what's important, what's a meaningful result, and we can share that with our physician colleagues.” TS 04:38 “I think it's the question of, ‘Because there is another thing that we can do, should we do it?' That feeling of futility that clenches at our heart, at our guts, that's a signal to us to stop and think, ‘What is the goal of treatment? Whose goal is that? And is what's happening right now aligned with that goal, or have we somehow gone astray?'” TS 08:51 “When futility rears its head in our nursing practice, our first duty to ourselves and our patients is to take a pause. . . . Stop and reflect with a learner mindset on, ‘What it is I'm not seeing in this situation, whose voice is not being heard, what are my assumptions and biases?' And then think about, ‘What's another narrative that I can write about this situation?,' trying to be very mindful of other patients that we've cared for in similar situations where we might be bringing or protecting these other patients onto this current patient.” TS 09:40 “Several years ago, when I was really going through some struggles in the ICU with this issue of futile or potentially inappropriate care, I went to a workshop and learned this mnemonic called GRACE to help clinicians remain compassionate and see what is the ethically appropriate thing to do in really fraught situations.” TS 16:18 “Let's take time, invest time, in learning more about what is futility. Let's invest some time in learning more about how to understand our patient's goals, their family's goals, what their values are. Taking some time to invest in communication training, ethics—if clinical ethics is something that's a particular interest to you—that's a great way to start, but also just really investing in learning how to communicate.” TS 36:18

Raise the Line
Overcoming a One-in-A-Million Disease: Akiva Zablocki, President of the Hyper IgM Foundation

Raise the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 31:58


When Akiva Zablocki found out his infant son Idan had a one-in-a-million immune disorder, he and his wife Amanda were terribly worried, as all parents would be. But unlike most parents of children with rare diseases, Akiva could draw on the expertise in navigating the healthcare system he gathered when successfully overcoming his own rare and scary ordeal with a brain stem tumor. Thanks to that know-how, his wife's background in healthcare law, some amazing clinicians, the couple's tenacity, and Idan's spirit, he is now a healthy ten-year-old enjoying summer camp. On this episode of Raise the Line, Akiva shares the remarkable details of his family's journey with host Shiv Gaglani, and tells the story of how the Hyper IgM Foundation, which the Zablockis launched, is helping patients all over the world. Be sure to stay tuned for some heartfelt advice for current and future providers as they encounter patients and families with rare diseases. Mentioned in this episode: https://hyperigm.org/

Raise the Line
How Healthcare Can Harness the Potential of AI - Dr. Karim Lakhani, Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School

Raise the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 34:58


In this super insightful conversation with host Shiv Gaglani, Dr. Karim Lakhani breaks down the difference between “strong” and “weak” artificial intelligence, and how the healthcare world can not only adapt to it, but harness its full potential. But, he stresses, the system has some important groundwork to do before that can happen. “Process change is the biggest work that has to happen in healthcare, from discovery to the clinic and beyond. Otherwise, we're basically pouring digital and artificial intelligence asphalt over old cow-paths." As professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School, founding director of the Laboratory for Innovation Science at Harvard, and the Principal Investigator of the NASA Tournament Lab at the Harvard Institute for Quantitative Social Science, Lakhani is a powerful intellectual force in understanding AI, open-source software and crowdsourcing. He's also the author of the book Competing in the Age of AI. If you're curious about how artificial intelligence might transform the healthcare system, this is a can't miss opportunity to hear from a leading expert in the field.

ROSC
026. To the Left and Right of You

ROSC

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 17:11


Welcome to the ROSC PodcastLeadership is not about rank or authority, but rather it is about taking care of the person to the left and right of you.Simon Sinek made this statement famous, and t ome, it is the foundation of the moves we seek to make as a community.  This is one of the most valuable tools to put the power and control back into your own hands whether it's at work or in life.Feel free to subscribe, share, and like!www.rosc.life

Women, Wealth, and Entrepreneurship
WOMEN, WEALTH AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP WITH MELISSA ELLIS OF LIFE BEYOND GLOBAL OUTREACH!

Women, Wealth, and Entrepreneurship

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 24:34


Welcome to Women, Wealth & Entrepreneurship with Ariel Shaw, MBA! We want to increase your bottom line and create generational wealth that lasts way beyond you. It's 2022 and it's the year of ACTION! About Our Guest, Melissa Ellis Melissa Ellis is the CEO of Life Beyond Water Global Outreach. Their mission is to provide relief, aid, support, and education to areas that lack clean water while developing the next generation of water leaders to foster sustainability. Melissa has a Bachelors of Science in Nursing from Michigan State University. She practiced in Nursing 20 years working in pediatrics, labor and delivery and Nursing Education. Upon relocating from Michigan to Georgia she became a serial entrepreneur and is currently working as a Realtor and Real Estate Investor. Melissa has a heart for the youth. She spent years as a long-term substitute teacher, Youth Leader and Youth Pastor. She is no stranger to children or the classroom. We could not do this without our amazing sponsors! We are sponsored by Alzheimer's Services Center at ascga.org, Xtreme Fun on Wheels at extremefunonwheels.com, Sherry DeVouse-Dennard of State Farm at sddinsurance.com, Tyronica Carter of Radiant Styles at radiantstylesjewelry2.com, Kim Mays of State Farm at coveredbykim.com, Page Testing Solutions at pagetestsolutions.com. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Raise the Line
A Planetary Perspective on Healthcare - Dr. Maria Guevara, International Medical Secretary at Médecins Sans Frontières

Raise the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 31:37


As a young girl, Dr. Maria Guevara was inspired by her parent's volunteer medical missions in the Philippines where they helped repair cleft lips and palates. The deep impression that work created led her on a path to medicine and eventually to her role today as International Medical Secretary at Médecins Sans Frontières (aka Doctors Without Borders). In her eighteen years with the agency, Dr. Guevara has traveled the world tending to the needs of people who have been victimized by armed conflicts, natural disasters, and disease outbreaks such as Ebola. Founded in 1971 in the wake of the Biafra war in Nigeria, Médecins Sans Frontières now operates as an independent medical organization in over seventy countries with more than forty-six thousand members. Join host Shiv Gaglani for this riveting conversation with Dr. Guevara in which she shares her experiences in the field, provides her thoughts on global health as a discipline, and shares lessons from the COVID-19 pandemic with an eye on the looming challenge of climate change. “We're getting dress rehearsals on a regular basis to see how we can fix ourselves. It's like Mother Earth is saying, ‘We're going to teach you. Learn!'”