Podcasts about copd

Lung disease involving long-term poor airflow

  • 956PODCASTS
  • 1,810EPISODES
  • 29mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Sep 27, 2022LATEST
copd

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about copd

Show all podcasts related to copd

Latest podcast episodes about copd

Emergency Medical Minute
Podcast 816: Ventilator Management in Asthmatics

Emergency Medical Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 4:15


Contributor: Aaron Lessen, MD Educational Pearls: The management of severe asthma or COPD exacerbation is complex, especially when the patient requires intubation/ventilation Asthma is an obstructive airway disease that can cause air trapping and hyperinflation of the lungs To avoid worsening hyperinflation patients typically require slower respiratory rates, lower tidal volumes, and increased expiratory time when on a ventilator Patients on a ventilator require very close monitoring to prevent worsening hyperinflation and associated complications including barotrauma and hypotension/cardiac arrest secondary to decreased venous return  If patient condition starts to worsen, decrease respiratory rate and tidal volume  In these cases, a decreased oxygen saturation is acceptable until their condition improves If patient status continues to worsen, consider disconnecting the ventilator and pushing on the chest for approximately 30 seconds to help force out trapped air If patient continues to decompensate, consider the possibility of a pneumothorax and determine if a chest tube is necessary Remember to continue asthma/COPD management including albuterol/duonebs, steroids, magnesium, and alternatives including as heliox References Demoule A, Brochard L, Dres M, et al. How to ventilate obstructive and asthmatic patients. Intensive Care Med. 2020;46(12):2436-2449 Garner O, Ramey JS, Hanania NA. Management of Life-Threatening Asthma: Severe Asthma Series. Chest. 2022 Laher AE, Buchanan SK. Mechanically Ventilating the Severe Asthmatic. J Intensive Care Med. 2018;33(9):491-501   Summarized by Mark O'Brien, MS4 | Edited by John Spartz MD & Erik Verzemnieks, MD   In an effort to promote diversity, equity, and inclusion in Emergency Medicine, The Emergency Medical Minute is proud to present our 2nd annual Diversity and Inclusion Award. We support increasing the representation of underrepresented groups in medicine and extend this award to individuals applying to emergency medicine residencies during the 2022-2023 cycle. For information on award eligibility and the application process, visit https://emergencymedicalminute.com/edi-award/

The Curbsiders Internal Medicine Podcast
#356 Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Update with Dr. Antonio Anzueto

The Curbsiders Internal Medicine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 78:55 Very Popular


Brush up on your COPD skills and learn some new tips for diagnosis and management of this common respiratory condition from our expert Dr. Antonio Anzueto (University of Texas San Antonio).  Claim free CME for this episode at curbsiders.vcuhealth.org! Episodes | Subscribe | Spotify | Swag! | Top Picks | Mailing List | thecurbsiders@gmail.com | Free CME! Show Segments Intro, disclaimer, guest bio Guest one-liner Case from Kashlak Epidemiology Diagnosis Workup Characterization of disease Treatment Outro Credits Writer and Producer: Cyrus Askin, MD Show Notes: Deborah Gorth MD, PhD Infographic: Kate Grant MD Cover Art: Kate Grant MD Hosts: Matthew Watto MD, FACP; Paul Williams MD, FACP    Associate Editor: Leah Witt, MD Showrunner: Matthew Watto MD, FACP Technical Production: PodPaste Guest: Antonio Anzueto, MD Sponsor: Wild Grain Start your subscription at Wildgrain.com/curb and get $30 off your first box plus free croissants in every box. Sponsor: Grammarly Go to grammarly.com/curb to sign up for a free account and get 20% off when you upgrade to Grammarly Premium.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null - 09.26.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 61:44


Videos : Those who speak out are shouted down until they are proved right, says Neil Oliver – 10:06 Gad Saad: Why Rational People Fall for ‘Parasitic' Ideas | American Thought Leaders CLIP – 9:11 Scientist Carl Sagan testifying to the U.S. Senate in 1985 on the greenhouse effect: – 2:44 Parent Eviscerates School Board Over Censorship– 4:59 Vitamin C supplementation associated with improved lung function in COPD Medical College of Lanzhou University (China), September 23 2022. The International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease published a systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials that found improvement in lung function among chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients who received vitamin C. The disease is characterized by airflow limitation and persistent respiratory symptoms. Ting Lei of Medical College of Lanzhou University in Lanzhou, China and associates identified 10 randomized, controlled trials that included a total of 487 adults with COPD for the meta-analysis. The trials compared lung function and/or antioxidant enzyme or nutrient levels of COPD patients who received vitamin C to a placebo or control group. The meta-analysis found improvement in forced expiratory volume in one second as a percentage (FEV1%, a measure of lung function) in association with vitamin C supplementation. When dosage was analyzed, it was determined that consuming more than 400 milligrams vitamin C per day was needed experience a significant benefit. The ratio of FEV1 to forced vital capacity (another lung function assessment), and levels of vitamin C and glutathione, both of which are antioxidants, also improved among participants who received vitamin C supplements. The authors remarked that oxidative stress, which is a disturbance of the oxidant to antioxidant balance, has been suggested as playing a role in the development of COPD. The current investigation is the first systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the effect of vitamin C supplementation in people with COPD. “We found that supplementing vitamin C to patients with COPD demonstrated vital clinical significance,” Lei and associates concluded. “Vitamin C supplementation could increase the levels of antioxidation in serum (vitamin C and glutathione) and improve lung function (FEV1% and FEV1/FVC), especially in patients treated with vitamin C supplementation greater than 400 mg/day.” Single Flavanoid (Found in 6 Foods) Reduces Cognitive Impairment Drastically Fourth Military Medical University (China), September 19, 2022 A singular flavanoid can protect the brain against cognitive deficit and other cellular damage, according to studies from the Fourth Military Medical University. The news comes from Xi'an, People's Republic of China, and shows great promise for those suffering from mental impairment due to Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, and other debilitating cognitive conditions. The study abstract concludes: “Our results provide new insights into the pharmacological actions of rutin and suggest that rutin has multi-targeted therapeutical potential on cognitive deficits associated with conditions with chronic cerebral hypoperfusion such as vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease.” Rutin is a biologically active flavonoid found in the following foods:  Buckwheat – Possibly the best source of rutin, and much better than boiled oats, uncooked buckwheat leaf flower offers about 675 mg in a 1.1 cup serving. Uncooked buckwheat groats contain 230 mg of rutin per 1 kg, dark buckwheat flour has 218 mg per 1 kg and buckwheat noodles provide 78 mg. Elderflower Tea – When dried, the white flowers of the elderflower make a delicious and rutin-filled tea. According to the Czech Journal of Food Science, elderflower tea contains approximately 10.9g/kg of rutin per brewed cup. Amaranth Leaves – In Western cultures, most people are familiar with the edible seeds of amaranth, though in Chinese and Southeast Asian cooking the leaves are also gaining traction, partly due to their high rutin content. You can expect around 24.5g/kg from the dried leaves. Seeds only contain trace amounts of the important nutrient. Unpeeled Apples – Keep the peel on your apples to enjoy lots of rutin. Just be sure that they are organic, since apple peels are especially prone to pesticide build-up. Apple skins are 6x as powerful as the flesh at preventing high blood pressure due to this flavanoid, too. • Unfermented Rooibos Tea – While rooibos tea contains fewer antioxidants than black or green teas, it is a good source of rutin, providing around 1.69 mg/g. • Figs – These little gems contain about the same amount of rutin as apples, so be sure to add them to your diet. The scientists found that rutin works primarily through anti-inflammatory mechanisms, and reducing hypofusion in the brain. Resistance-breathing training found to lower blood pressure University of Colorado and University of Arizona, September 23, 2022 A team of researchers with members from the University of Colorado, the University of Arizona and Alma College, has found that resistance-breathing training can lower blood pressure as much as some medicines and/or exercises. The study is published in the Journal of Applied Physiology. Hypertension, also known as chronic high blood pressure, can lead to a wide variety of health problems, from loss of vision to strokes and heart attacks. For that reason, doctors take it seriously. Typically, patients are directed to modify their diet and to exercise more. If that does not fix the problem, medications are prescribed. In this new effort, the researchers looked into a new type of therapy to reduce blood pressure levels—resistance-breathing training. Resistance-breathing training involves breathing in and out of a small device, called, quite naturally, a POWERbreathe, every day for several minutes. The device forces the patient to use their breathing muscles to push and pull air through it, making them stronger. And that, the researchers found, also reduces blood pressure. The device has been in use for several years as a means to assist athletes, singers and people with weak lung muscles. Several groups of healthy volunteers practiced the training for a few minutes every day for six weeks. Each was breathed in and out with the device 30 times each session. Each of the volunteers had their blood pressure measured before and after the training. The researchers found a sustained average drop of 9 mmHg in systolic blood pressure (the top number in blood pressure readings)—normal pressure is defined as 120/80. They describe the change as significant, as much as some patients see with medication. They also note that it is similar to changes in many patients who begin an aerobic exercise regimen, such as walking, cycling or running. They suggest such training could be used by patients of all ages who are unable to exercise to lower their blood pressure. How To Maintain Peak Brain Health: Scientists Say It Comes Down To These 3 Factors Norwegian University of Science and Technology, September 23, 2022 What's the best way to maintain peak brain health as we age? There are countless studies detailing ways to prevent cognitive decline, so scientists in Norway sought to simplify the science of managing strong brain health to three recommendations. This report is something of a summation covering modern science's current understanding of how best to cultivate robust brain health. The team at NTNU cite 101 references to prior articles in this latest theoretical perspective paper. “Three factors stand out if you want to keep your brain at its best,” Prof. Sigmundsson adds. The three identified keys to strong brain health are: Physical exercise Social activity Strong, passionate interests and hobbies It's common knowledge that spending all day on the couch isn't healthy for the body, but physical activity is also key to brain health. “An active lifestyle helps to develop the central nervous system and to counteract the aging of the brain,” according to study authors. Researchers add that consistency is essential. Do your best to get in at least a little movement each and every day. Even if you work a sedentary job that requires lots of sitting, get moving every hour or so for just a few minutes at the very least. Some people are naturally more social than others, but researchers stress that no one is an island. Even if you prefer a quiet night in to attending a party, make an effort to stay in touch with the people who matter to you. Our brains thrive on social interactions and connections. “Relationships with other people, and interacting with them, contribute to a number of complex biological factors that can prevent the brain from slowing down,” Prof. Sigmundsson explains. Just like bicep curls help us build muscle, keeping the brain active promotes strong lifelong cognition. Consider taking up a new hobby, or learning a new skill. Perhaps most importantly, though, don't force it; find something you're actually passionate about. It's never too late in life to learn something new! “Passion, or having a strong interest in something, can be the decisive, driving factor that leads us to learn new things. Over time, this impacts the development and maintenance of our neural networks,” Prof. Sigmundsson says. “Brain development is closely linked to lifestyle. Physical exercise, relationships and passion help to develop and maintain the basic structures of our brain as we get older,” Prof. Sigmundsson concludes. Calcium supplements may support a healthy colon: Harvard study Harvard School of Public Health, September 18, 2022 Supplements of calcium or non-dairy products fortified with the mineral may reduce the risk of colorectal cancer, according to meta-analysis of prospective observational studies by researchers at Harvard School of Public Health. For every 300 mg increase in calcium from supplements was associated with a 9% reduction in risk, wrote NaNa Keum and her co-authors in the International Journal of Cancer . Every 300 mg increase in total calcium was associated with a similar reduction in risk (8%), they added. “Our findings have several important clinical and public health implications,” they explained. “First, according to the 2003 to 2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a nationally representative cross-sectional survey in the U.S., median total calcium intake of adults aged over 50 years was approximately 650 mg/day for no calcium-supplement users and 1,000 mg/day for calcium-supplement users. “As the benefit of calcium intake on CRC is expected to continue beyond 1,000 mg/day, not only non-supplement users but also supplement users may further reduce their CRC risk through additional calcium intake.” “Second, while dairy products, especially milk, are the major sources of calcium in many countries, they are a substantial source of calories and contain potentially harmful factors such as saturated fat, hormones, and casein proteins. Since our analyses provide evidence for an equivalent benefit of dietary and supplementary calcium, the benefit of calcium on CRC risk may be obtained through supplements and non-dairy products fortified with calcium.” The Boston-based scientists conducted dose-response meta-analyses of 15 studies involving 12,305 cases of colorectal cancer and calcium intakes ranging from 250-1,900 mg/day. The studies varied in duration from 3.3 to 16 years. The data indicated that both total and supplemental calcium were associated with reductions in the risk of colorectal cancer. “In conclusion, both dietary and supplementary calcium intake may continue to decrease colorectal cancer risk beyond 1,000 mg/day,” wrote Keum and her co-authors. Yoga's Age-Defying Effects Confirmed by Science Defence Institute of Physiology and Allied Sciences (India), September 21st 2022 While yoga's longevity promoting effects have been the subject of legend for millennia, increasingly modern science is confirming this ancient technology for spiritual and physical well-being actually can slow aging and stimulate our regenerative potential. One particularly powerful study published lin the journal Age titled, “Age-related changes in cardiovascular system, autonomic functions, and levels of BDNF of healthy active males: role of yogic practice”, found that a brief yoga intervention (3 months) resulted in widespread improvements in cardiovascular and neurological function. Indian researchers studied healthy active males of three age groups (20-29, 30-39, and 40-49 years) by randomly assigning them to practice one hour of yoga daily for 3 months. The observed significant differences between the younger and older participants in the study, specifically: “Significantly higher values of heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), load in heart (DoP), myocardial oxygen consumption (RPP), and total cholesterol (TC) were noted in senior age group.” The yogic practice resulted in significant reductions in all of these parameters (HR, BP, DoP, RPP and TC). Also observed in the older participants were decreases in high frequency (HF), total power (TP), all time domain variables of heart rate variability (HRV), and skin conductance (SC) — all of which increased following yogic practice. Higher levels of catecholamines (“stress hormones”) and low frequency (LF) power of HRV were noted in advancement of age, both of which decreased following yogic practice. Additionally, the senior age group had highest levels of cortisol and adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), both of which decreased following yogic practice. Finally, brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF), serotonin, and dopamine were low in higher age group, but these increased following yogic practice; an indication of improved brain function and cognition. The researchers concluded: ‘This study revealed that yogic practices might help in the prevention of age-related degeneration by changing cardiometabolic risk factors, autonomic function, and BDNF in healthy male.” There are a number of promising studies revealing the age-defying potential of this ancient practice. Here are some additional benefits confirmed in 2014 alone: Age-Related Respiratory Problems: A 2014 study from the journal of Human Kinetics found that a 3 month yoga intervention in 36 elderly women (average age 63.1) significantly improved pulmonary (respiratory) function. Age-Related Brain Cognitive Decline: A review in the Journals of Gerontology, involving a two month Hatha yoga intervention in the elderly (average age 62.0) resulted in significant improvements in “executive function measures of working memory capacity and efficiency of mental set shifting and flexibility compared with their stretching-strengthening counterparts.” Age-Related Hormone Insufficiency: A study published in Evidence Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine found that a 3 month yogic intervention in men (average age 42.8) and women (average age 44.75) resulted in improvements in the level of growth hormone and DHEAS, two essential hormones that drop off precipitously as we age. Age-Related Sleep Problems: Astudy published in Alternatives Therapies in Health and Medicine found a 12 week yogic intervention (yoga 2x a week) resulted in significant improvements in the quality of sleep in older individuals (average age 60). Age-Related Depression: From the Chinese Journal of Nursing found that not only did yoga improve sleep as found in the study above but also significantly reduced the depressive symptoms of elderly participants…after 6 months. “ This is just a small sampling of the literature. There is older research revealing that yoga has even more benefits for aging populations.

Pri-Med Podcasts
Suspecting COPD: What If the Spirometry Result Is Normal? - Frankly Speaking EP 295

Pri-Med Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 9:24


Credits: 0.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™   CME/CE Information and Claim Credit: https://www.pri-med.com/online-education/podcast/frankly-speaking-cme-295   Overview: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is typically diagnosed based on spirometry findings, but what if that finding isn't what you expect? Spirometry measurements are compared to standard values for age, sex, and race. The use of race-based equations has been questioned in several clinical situations, and researchers are now raising similar concerns about the use of race-based equations in spirometry, which may lead to health inequities. Join us for an important discussion on how to overcome these potential disparities in diagnosing COPD.   Episode resource links: Liu GY, Khan SS, Colangelo LA, et al. Comparing Racial Differences in Emphysema Prevalence Among Adults With Normal Spirometry: A Secondary Data Analysis of the CARDIA Lung Study [published online ahead of print, 2022 Jul 19]. Ann Intern Med. 2022;10.7326/M22-0205.   Guest: Alan Ehrlich MD, FAAFP   Music Credit: Richard Onorato

Frankly Speaking About Family Medicine
Suspecting COPD: What If the Spirometry Result Is Normal? - Frankly Speaking EP 295

Frankly Speaking About Family Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 9:24


Credits: 0.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™   CME/CE Information and Claim Credit: https://www.pri-med.com/online-education/podcast/frankly-speaking-cme-295   Overview: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is typically diagnosed based on spirometry findings, but what if that finding isn't what you expect? Spirometry measurements are compared to standard values for age, sex, and race. The use of race-based equations has been questioned in several clinical situations, and researchers are now raising similar concerns about the use of race-based equations in spirometry, which may lead to health inequities. Join us for an important discussion on how to overcome these potential disparities in diagnosing COPD.   Episode resource links: Liu GY, Khan SS, Colangelo LA, et al. Comparing Racial Differences in Emphysema Prevalence Among Adults With Normal Spirometry: A Secondary Data Analysis of the CARDIA Lung Study [published online ahead of print, 2022 Jul 19]. Ann Intern Med. 2022;10.7326/M22-0205.   Guest: Alan Ehrlich MD, FAAFP   Music Credit: Richard Onorato

The Flipping 50 Show
Short Workouts for Women Over 50 | What Works?

The Flipping 50 Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 28:09 Very Popular


Short workouts for women over 50 sound like a dream? Let's talk time. Warning: This may trigger you. It may trigger comments from trainers who disagree or have said short(er) programs. I know you love short workouts. I'm frequently asked for 30-minute workouts. Here's the thing, it's almost impossible. EXCEPT, for those who aren't doing anything. STARTING low to moderate frequency or duration exercise… has the more powerful influence on health (not fitness), than does moderate to vigorous. Even infrequent activity has an influence on your health. So, if you're not moving, listen no further, and go for a walk! Yes, you can go for a walk, you can do yoga, you can do interval training all start to end in 30 minutes and it is WORTH IT to do so. Yet, when we look at research, and we look at the need for a warmup and cool down, even at minimum for each of those… we have used 10 minutes. Some of you skipping the warmup ignore the fact that a 5-10 minute warm up: Increases comfort during exercise Enhances oxygen delivery to working muscles which… Increases energy expenditure during exercise Lubricates joints before exercise Reduces risk of injury Improves the benefit of the exercise you're about to do Short Workouts for Women Over 50 Don't Skip the Warmup! And that a proper 5–10-minute cool down: Makes your next workout better Enhances flexibility Prevents stiffness, soreness, or Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) At the very least that's 10 minutes between the two. At most it's 15-20 minutes. If you have arthritis or stiff joints, a longer and more gradual warm up is recommended. Similarly, for those of you with respiratory challenges like asthma, COPD, or even long-haul post virus issues. Say you're hoping for a 30-minute workout. Let's look at how beneficial and realistic that is. If you do a warmup and cool down, depending on the length, that leaves 10 to 20 minutes for the main set. Now, if you're doing strength training with the hope of boosting muscle mass for metabolism's sake, you need multiple sets of exercise for major muscle groups. That is, 3 sets or 4 would be best. This is particularly true if you're doing a short workout. Choose the biggest muscles you can and create your volume by doing at least 3 sets, and 4 if you can… to muscular fatigue. Split vs Total Body There's one other caveat. Many women – and trainers – swear by split routines. Doing one body part a day does make it easier in theory to fit exercise in. However, there's a loss of metabolism boost from exercise compared to total body. Until they don't is my experience. Prior to the point when estrogen drops noticeably and muscle breakdown occurs more easily than muscle protein synthesis, split routine may be something you can get away with. However, it doesn't hold a candle to total body workout's metabolism boosting influence. Total body creates 8x the metabolism-boost as split routine. Imagine it like a threshold. If you don't hit a certain level on a given day, it's not the same – and definitely not better – to try a smaller boost in metabolism more days of the week. What interferes here is overall fatigue, and ability to fully recover. What's more, with those split routines, if you miss a day, you've got less latitude for moving those workouts easily into another day. Your entire week can more easily be thrown. Every study I've seen, shared, included in books, blogs, and podcasts since 2013 emphasizes volume AND intensity for women over 40. WHAT IS VOLUME Volume should come from repeated quality of major muscle group exercises and not from a variety of exercises. Do a few things really well to boost metabolism most. Likewise with bone density. Volume comes from a combination of weight, repetitions, and sets. Though at first glance you may think that more repetitions is best, it's not true. If you can go heavy x fewer reps x more sets your volume will benefit most. Since 1995, I've been teaching workshops and conducting trainings for women, and the trainers who coach them, about what really matters and it is heavy, on specifically so the hip, spine, and wrist benefit. I have shared often and everywhere one of my simple, go-to workouts when the time-crunch grabs me. I choose one each of compound push, a pull, and a lower body exercise. https://youtu.be/l_HWGuO6isM Compound Exercises in Short Workouts For Women Over 50 Compound means it utilizes more than one joint, therefore incorporates more major muscles. For instance, if you were at the gym doing a leg extension, you're using the quadriceps muscle on the top of the thigh. It is a major muscle group. However, if you're short on time (AND, I might add, are quad-dominant like so many of us are), a better way to spend your exercise time is doing a squat (or leg press) where you will use the quadriceps, but also glutes, and hamstrings. If you only did these three exercises and moved efficiently between them, you could complete in about 10 minutes. That allows for one minute for each exercise set (a must if you're going slowly enough to ensure you're not using momentum). It doesn't allow for a lot of transition time. Exactly How This Works As I write this, I'm traveling. I got up yesterday before the second leg of a road trip driving 6 more hours. I wanted to be on the road early, so did a short weight training workout of exactly this nature. Chest press, bent over row, and squats with as heavy weight as I could, knowing I was only doing 3 sets, so my volume would come from the weight vs the repetitions and sets. There's one more thing we have to consider when wishing, hoping for shorter workouts. Stick-to-itiveness of the exercise. Exercise obstacles and adherence have been science of this behavior change researcher for 38 years. Adherence to exercise among older women Twice weekly strength training for greater than 4 months resulted in 79% adherence. Adherence was positively associated with age, and with perceptions of overall good health. Interestingly enough, adherence was also strongly associated with the exercise leader's prior participation in sports and in prior experience leading programs.  “Despite compelling scientific research and widespread public health recommendations, among women 45–64 years and 65–74 years old, only 18% and 11%, respectively, perform physical activities that enhance and maintain muscle strength and endurance two or more times per week.” What helps? Get a Community Although personal involvement and commitment to any exercise program are essential, studies indicate that initiating individual behavior change is more likely with social or environmental change and support.  A large number of women who drop out report time, and preference of exercising at home (in part due to time savings of at-home exercise) as obstacles to exercise. As age increased, participants were more likely to adhere to strength training. We clearly gain a sense of urgency. For example, for every added decade of life, participants were approximately 10 times as likely to adhere to strength training. 1, 2, or 3 sessions per week? One small study in 2013 found no difference. Researchers divided women over 60 into those that did 1 aerobic and 1 resistance exercise session a week 2 each aerobic and resistance, and 3 each aerobic and resistance. Muscle strength, cardiovascular fitness, and function were all assessed after with no significant difference among the groups. The 3 mph walk test the women did from pre and post evaluations showed an average of 112 heart rate pre to an average of 92 after. There was visible increase in strength of lower body comparing twice weekly to one time weekly. And a very slight increase of cardiovascular fitness 3x per week group compared to 2x per week group. (and one time) For Energy Expenditure and Weight Control There WAS a difference. Only the two-time a week group in a similar study of women 60-74 increased in Total Energy Expenditure (TEE) and Activity-related Energy Expenditure. How could that be? When 3 times weekly compared to 2 times weekly exercise was performed, the effort level and caloric burn was less than the activity performed during two-time weekly workouts. WHY? Exercising fresh and recovered results in expending more energy  (without feeling as if it is more effort). So much that increasing exercise sessions by 33% still did not equate to more activity-related energy expenditure. Often, in order to perform 3 sessions within 7 days, these sessions are performed before full recovery is achieved. Entering a workout sore, tired, or with muscle still in need of repair, will be ineffective for advancing fitness. As for TEE, we know that the “couch compensation” effect occurs with those who are overzealous in exercise sessions resulting in more sedentary hours the remainder of the day. TEE for individuals in jobs like mail delivery (on foot) or UPS or Amazon delivery drivers in and out of their vehicles regularly through the day has been notoriously higher than jobs requiring desk work for the same time span. When women gain enough strength and cardiorespiratory benefit to boost energy, but not so much it drains them or creates “couch compensation” effect, it also boosts activity outside of their sessions. It's similar to the thermogenic effect of eating certain foods. Thermogenesis What we're after is a thermogenic effect, both from food and exercise if we desire to boost metabolism or maintain it as we age. We'll stay focused on exercise here, except to say, regularly consuming high protein meals evenly distributed throughout the day does -and supports the muscle protein synthesis a woman over 50 needs. If you compare thermogenic effects of cleaning house, going up and downstairs, to sitting and resting, which wins? Comparing thermogenic effect of walking a dog 1-2 miles vs around the block, which wins? Compare playing 18 holes of golf or spending the day gardening to reading a book. Sweet Spot You get the idea. When you exercise in the sweet spot – which appears to be twice weekly strength training, and twice weekly cardiovascular exercise you will make gains in bone density, lean muscle mass, and cardiovascular fitness. You'll do so while maintaining, or gaining, the desire and motivation to be active throughout the rest of your day. Short workouts for women over 50 or short life? Maybe that's dramatic and maybe not. Still, a comprehensive, yet hormone-honoring workout week is 90 minutes split in two sessions of strength training and 2 sessions of 30 minutes of cardiovascular training (HIIT or HIRT). The rest of the week then leaves plenty of time and energy for walking daily, golfing, yoga, pilates, and generally loving life. Want a DFY program that provides this combination of enough but not too much? STRONGER: Tone & Define is open a few times a year. Learn more here and hear from students. Resources: Seguin RA, Economos CD, Palombo R, Hyatt R, Kuder J, Nelson ME. Strength training and older women: a cross-sectional study examining factors related to exercise adherence. J Aging Phys Act. 2010 Apr;18(2):201-18. doi: 10.1123/japa.18.2.201. PMID: 20440031; PMCID: PMC4308058. Lippke S, Ratz T, Keller FM, Juljugin D, Peters M, Pischke C, Voelcker-Rehage C. Mitigating Feelings of Loneliness and Depression by Means of Web-Based or Print-Based Physical Activity Interventions: Pooled Analysis of 2 Community-Based Intervention Trials. JMIR Aging. 2022 Aug 9;5(3):e36515. doi: 10.2196/36515. PMID: 35943790; PMCID: PMC9399846. Fisher G, McCarthy JP, Zuckerman PA, Bryan DR, Bickel CS, Hunter GR. Frequency of combined resistance and aerobic training in older women. J Strength Cond Res. 2013 Jul;27(7):1868-76. doi: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e31827367e0. PMID: 22996024; PMCID: PMC4066209. Hunter GR, Bickel CS, Fisher G, Neumeier WH, McCarthy JP. Combined aerobic and strength training and energy expenditure in older women. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2013 Jul;45(7):1386-93. doi: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e3182860099. PMID: 23774582; PMCID: PMC3713080.

Information Morning Saint John from CBC Radio New Brunswick (Highlights)

The CBC's Megan MacAlpine has the story of a Saint John pilot program that is proving to be a gamechanger for people with the progressive lung disease.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 09.19.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 63:24 Very Popular


Videos : New Rule: Let the Population Collapse | Real Time with Bill Maher (HBO) – 8:29 The De-Population Bomb – hoover institution (0:43 – 8:15) THE GREAT AWAKENING: PLANDEMIC 3 PRELAUNCH PARTY – (21:00 – 30:20) Gary Null Speaking Out at the NYS Assembly Hearing  (25:00)   Meta-analysis finds less fatigue with CoQ10 supplementation National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University (Taiwan), September 16 2022. The results of a systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials, published in Frontiers in Pharmacology, support an anti-fatigue effect among individuals who supplemented with coenzyme Q10. “Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a popular nutritional supplement and a lipid-soluble antioxidant that is endogenously produced by the human body,” authors I-Chen Tsai of National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University and associates observed. “CoQ10 supplementation has been successfully applied for reducing fatigue in patients with various conditions, including chronic fatigue and fibromyalgia, as well as in healthy subjects.” For their analysis, Tsai colleagues identified 13 randomized, controlled trials that compared fatigue scores of participants who received CoQ10 or a placebo. The trials included a total of 1,126 participants. Analysis of the 13 trials showed a consistent significant effect for CoQ10 in reducing fatigue. When trials that included healthy participants were analyzed separately from trials that included patients with fatigue-associated diseases, both supplemented populations showed decreases in fatigue, however the effects were significant among the unhealthy participants, who may have more severe CoQ10 depletion. Higher CoQ10 doses and longer duration of supplementation were correlated with increased fatigue reduction. The anti-fatigue effect of CoQ10 is unsurprising, given its role in energy production. Chronic fatigue syndrome patients have lower plasma levels of CoQ10 in comparison with healthy subjects. While the body makes some CoQ10, the authors remarked that studies have provided evidence that supplementing with CoQ10 does not affect the body's synthesis of the coenzyme. Researchers identify a potential new approach with a dietary supplement to treat HER2 positive breast cancer Mayo Clinic, September 9, 2022 Researchers at Mayo Clinic have identified an important new pathway by which HER2 positive breast cancers grow and have discovered that a dietary supplement called cyclocreatine may block the growth of HER2 positive breast cancer. Their findings were published in Cell Metabolism. “The HER2 receptor tyrosine kinase, which functions as an ‘on' or ‘off' switch in cellular functions, is a key driver of breast cancer, and is overexpressed in about a quarter of all breast cancers,” says Taro Hitosugi, Ph.D., a pharmacologist at Mayo Clinic and corresponding author of the paper. Dr. Hitosugi and his colleagues decided to explore ways to resolve an unmet clinical need. Their strategy was to develop a treatment to target tumor mitochondrial energy metabolism, which is the process cancer cells use to manipulate energy during cell metabolism in order to grow. Dr. Hitosugi and his colleagues discovered that cyclocreatine, a dietary supplement used in sports drinks, effectively targets mitochondrial creatine kinase 1 enzyme and reduces cancer growth without toxicity. This finding was confirmed in mice models where a patient-derived, trastuzumab-resistant HER2 positive tumors were administered to the mice. “Mitochondrial creatine kinase 1 may be a new drug target for the treatment of HER2 positive breast cancer,” says Matthew Goetz, M.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Breast Cancer research program. “Future clinical trials will be necessary to determine the effectiveness of this drug for HER2 positive breast cancer resistant to standard therapies.” Excessive smartphone screen time linked to earlier puberty onset Gazi University (Turkey), September 16, 2022 Exposure to blue light, via regular use of tablets and smartphones, may alter hormone levels and increase the risk of earlier puberty, according to data from a rat study presented at the Annual European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology Meeting. Longer duration of blue light exposure was associated with earlier puberty onset in the female rats, which also showed reduced levels of melatonin, increased levels of some reproductive hormones and physical changes in their ovaries. Use of blue light-emitting mobile devices has previously been linked to disrupted sleeping patterns in children but these findings suggest there could be additional risks for childhood development and future fertility. The escalating use of blue light-emitting devices, such as tablets and smartphones, has previously been implicated in reducing sleep quality in both children and adults. This is thought to be through disruption of our body clock as blue light inhibits the evening rise in levels of the hormone, melatonin, which prepares our bodies for rest and sleep. Melatonin levels are overall higher during pre-puberty than in puberty, which is believed to play a role in delaying the start of puberty. Puberty is a complex process that involves co-ordination of several body systems and hormones. In recent years, several studies have reported increases in early puberty onset for girls, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic. The link between blue light exposure and reduced melatonin levels suggests that increased screen time, such as during the pandemic restrictions, may be playing a role in this reported increase. However, it is very difficult to assess this in children. In this study, Dr. Aylin Kilinç Uğurlu and colleagues in Ankara, Turkey, used a rat model to investigate the effects of blue light exposure on reproductive hormone levels and the time of puberty onset. Female rats were divided into three groups of six and exposed to either a normal light cycle, 6 hours or 12 hours of blue light. The first signs of puberty occurred significantly earlier in both groups exposed to blue light, and the longer the duration of exposure, the earlier the onset of puberty. Rats exposed to blue light also had reduced melatonin levels and elevated levels of specific reproductive hormones (estradiol and luteinizing hormone), as well as physical changes in their ovarian tissue, all consistent with puberty onset. At the 12-hour exposure, rats also showed some signs of cell damage and inflammation in their ovaries. Dr. Aylin Kilinç Uğurlu comments, “We have found that blue light exposure, sufficient to alter melatonin levels, is also able to alter reproductive hormone levels and cause earlier puberty onset in our rat model. In addition, the longer the exposure, the earlier the onset.” Fitness trackers reveal links among exercise, memory, and mental health Dartmouth College, September 15, 2022 Exercise can improve your cognitive and mental health—but not all forms and intensities of exercise affect the brain equally. The effects of exercise are much more nuanced, as specific intensities of exercise over a long period of time are associated with different aspects of memory and mental health, according to a new Dartmouth study. The findings are published in Scientific Reports and provide insight into how exercise could be optimized. “Mental health and memory are central to nearly everything we do in our everyday lives,” says lead author Jeremy Manning, an assistant professor of psychological and brain sciences at Dartmouth. “Our study is trying to build a foundation for understanding how different intensities of physical exercise affect different aspects of mental and cognitive health.” The researchers asked 113 Fitbit users to perform a series of memory tests, answer some questions about their mental health, and share their fitness data from the previous year. They expected that more active individuals would have better memory performance and mental health, but the results were more nuanced. People who tended to exercise at low intensities performed better at some memory tasks while those who exercised at a high intensities did better on other memory tasks. Participants who were more intensely active also reported higher stress levels, whereas people who regularly exercised at lower intensities showed lower rates of anxiety and depression. Participants who had been more active over the prior year tended to show better memory performance overall, but the specific areas of improvement depended on which types of activity people did. The researchers found that participants who often exercised at moderate intensities tended to perform better on the episodic memory tasks while participants who often exercised at high intensities did better on the spatial memory tasks. Sedentary participants who seldom exercised tended to perform worse on the spatial memory tasks. The researchers also identified connections between participants' mental health and their memory performance. Participants with self-reported anxiety or depression tended to perform better on the spatial and associative memory tasks, while those with self-reported bipolar disorder tended to perform better on the episodic memorytasks. Participants who reported higher levels of stress tended to perform worse on the associative memory tasks. Positive psychological well-being can improve overall heart health Northwestern University, September 10, 2022 Maintaining positive thoughts and feelings through intervention programs can help patients achieve better overall outcomes when it comes to their cardiovascular health, according to a review paper published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. “We addressed how social environment, psychological well-being and the effectiveness of intervention strategies can help strengthen a patient's outlook,” said Darwin R. Labarthe, MD, MPH, Ph.D., professor of Preventive Medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and the review's lead author. “We focused on whether psychological well-being can be consistently related with a reduced risk of heart disease.” In this review, the authors looked at a growing body of research to examine whether psychological well-being might lead to reduced risk of heart disease. Prospective studies have shown a positive relationship between optimism (one facet of psychological well-being) and heart disease, including a study showing older women in the highest quartile of optimism had a 38 percent reduced risk of heart disease mortality. Additional studies since 2012 have associated a perceived higher purpose in life with lower odds of having a stroke. Optimistic patients sustained healthier diets by consuming more fruits and vegetables, and less processed meats and sweets, leading patients to maintain a healthy BMI. The review authors found that psychological well-being influenced heart health through biological processes, health behaviors and psychosocial resources. Having a strong network of social support also gives patients confidence about their future health and helps them act readily on medical advice, engage in problem solving and take active preventive measures. A likely link is that favorable social environment, known to influence heart disease risk, has also been shown to predict psychological well-being. Milk thistle protects against COPD caused by secondhand smoke Sichuan University, (China), September 11, 2022 According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 15.7 million people suffer from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) – a serious respiratory condition which can cause scarring of the lungs, narrowing of the airway and extreme difficulty breathing. Taking enough milk thistle – on a regular basis – can help protect you from harm. Exposure to tobacco smoke – whether through actively smoking or simply inhaling the smoke from another's cigarette – is the primary cause of COPD. Although Western medicine currently offers no cure for COPD, recent studies generate a ray of hope. Groundbreaking new research suggests that milk thistle extracts may not only prevent COPD but, help to treat it. In a study published in the journal Inflammation, researchers exposed mice to the equivalent of 1.5 packs of cigarettes a day for four weeks, creating drastic increases in peribronchial inflammation, thickening of airway walls and airway obstruction. The team found that pretreating the mice with silymarin – the active component of milk thistle – an hour before exposure dramatically decreased inflammatory changes, and cut production of pro-inflammatory chemicals such as TNF-alpha and interleukin. Encouragingly, silymarin also helped safeguard levels of superoxide dismutase, an important disease-fighting antioxidant produced in the body. A year later, the same team of researchers took another, closer look at the workings of milk thistle. And what they found was encouraging. In a study of human bronchial cells published in Scientific Report, the team explored the molecular and cellular mechanisms of silymarin – and found once again that the flavonoid attenuated cigarette smoke-induced upregulation of pro-inflammatory chemicals. And, researchers discovered for the first time that silymarin modulated a certain pathway – known as MAPK – that governs inflammation. The takeaway? The team concluded that silymarin might be “an ideal agent for treating inflammatory pulmonary diseases.” In a third study, recently published in Food and Chemical Toxicology, researchers treated mice with silibinin (a constituent of silymarin) one hour before exposure to cigarette smoke. The team found that the silibinin caused the mice to not only experience the sharp reductions in inflammatory changes seen in earlier studies – but discovered that it also suppressed the scarring and fibrosis that are typical of COPD in humans. This means that silibinin may not only help prevent COPD – but, reverse it! Intriguingly, the silibinin directly affected the expression of a certain pro-inflammatory protein – transforming growth factor beta-1 – that is activated and spurred on by exposure to smoke, making it appear that this compound is custom-designed to protect against secondhand smoke. Milk thistle extracts are available in the form of pills, powders, extracts, liposomes and teas. Look for a high-quality preparation that is standardized to contain 70 to 80 percent silymarin.

Fifty Plus
Geriatric Headaches and COPD

Fifty Plus

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 33:26


Today, Doug Pike talks about a California-based anti-everything group that's trying to destroy Maine's lobster fishery. He'll also talk to a top Houston neurologist about geriatric headaches and how they can be warning signs of serious issues, and to a pulmonologist about COPD and what can be done about it. And a bunch of other stuff he hopes you find educational and/or entertaining. ( Show from 9/15/2022 )

CNS
[podcast] Changemakers: Danica Marie F Supnet of Philippines | Asia Youth Festival on Innovation for SRHR

CNS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022


This podcast features changemaker Danica Marie F Supnet of Philippines, who is among the changemakers featured at the 2022 Asia Youth Festival on Innovation for Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia - hosted by Asian-Pacific Resource & Research Centre for Women (ARROW, https://arrow.org.my). She is in conversation with noted journalist and development communication expert Sumita Thapar of CNS.Listen to this podcast on Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn, aCast, Podtail, BluBrry, Himalaya, ListenNotes, American Podcasts, CastBox FM, Ivy FM, Player FM, and other podcast streaming platforms.ThanksCNS team

CNS
[podcast] Changemakers: Lian Cambel in Philippines | Asia Youth Festival on Innovation for SRHR

CNS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022


This podcast features changemaker Lian Cambel of Philippines, who is among the changemakers featured at the 2022 Asia Youth Festival on Innovation for Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia - hosted by Asian-Pacific Resource & Research Centre for Women (ARROW, https://arrow.org.my). She is in conversation with noted journalist and development communication expert Sumita Thapar of CNS.Listen to this podcast on Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn, aCast, Podtail, BluBrry, Himalaya, ListenNotes, American Podcasts, CastBox FM, Ivy FM, Player FM, and other podcast streaming platforms.ThanksCNS team

CNS
[podcast] Changemakers: Yuvraj Lama of Nepal | Asia Youth Festival on Innovation for SRHR

CNS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022


This podcast features changemaker Yuvraj Lama of Nepal, who is among the changemakers featured at the 2022 Asia Youth Festival on Innovation for Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia - hosted by Asian-Pacific Resource & Research Centre for Women (ARROW, https://arrow.org.my). He is in conversation with noted journalist and development communication expert Sumita Thapar of CNS.Listen to this podcast on Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn, aCast, Podtail, BluBrry, Himalaya, ListenNotes, American Podcasts, CastBox FM, Ivy FM, Player FM, and other podcast streaming platforms.ThanksCNS team

The Medbullets Step 2 & 3 Podcast
Pulmonary | COPD Exacerbation

The Medbullets Step 2 & 3 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 9:27


In this episode, we review the high-yield topic of COPD Exacerbation from the Pediatrics section. Follow Medbullets on social media: Facebook: www.facebook.com/medbullets Instagram: www.instagram.com/medbulletsofficial Twitter: www.twitter.com/medbullets

New Life Live with Steve Arterburn
New Life Live: September 13, 2022

New Life Live with Steve Arterburn

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 49:05


Topics: Intimacy, Mother Issues, Guilt, Grandparenting, Adult Children Hosts: Chris, Becky Brown, Dr. Jill Hubbard, Chris Williams Caller Questions: My wife has been checked out for awhile; what is my part? She was diagnosed with COPD and stopped smoking, but she started vaping.  How can I help my mom who is in another state and having a hard time since my dad The post New Life Live: September 13, 2022 appeared first on New Life.

New Life Live! on Oneplace.com
New Life Live: September 13, 2022

New Life Live! on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 49:19


Hosts: Chris, Becky Brown, Dr. Jill Hubbard, Chris Williams Caller Questions: - My wife has been checked out for awhile; what is my part? She was diagnosed with COPD and stopped smoking, but she started vaping. - How can I help my mom who is in another state and having a hard time since my dad died? She gives me guilt trips. - Part 1 of Max Lucado's interview about his newest book Help Is Here. - If you see that harm might come to your grandkids, is it wrong to say something? My daughter thinks it is none of my business. To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/451/29

New Life Live!
New Life Live: September 13, 2022

New Life Live!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 49:05


Topics: Intimacy, Mother Issues, Guilt, Grandparenting, Adult Children Hosts: Chris, Becky Brown, Dr. Jill Hubbard, Chris Williams Caller Questions: My wife has been checked out for awhile; what is my part? She was diagnosed with COPD and stopped smoking, but she started vaping.  How can I help my mom who is in another state and having a hard time since my dad The post New Life Live: September 13, 2022 appeared first on New Life.

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - DR. HILDEGARDE STANINGER - An Organic Kitchen Sink Of Radiation Detox Information

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 41:29


Hildegarde Staninger, Ph.D., RIET-1 is a world renowned industrial toxicologist, who is the author of the international bestseller, Comprehensive Handbook of Hazardous Materials: Regulations, Monitoring, Handling and Safety, Lewis Publishing/CRC Press. Among the leading international scientist in her field, she has done decades of research and was awarded the prestigious 8th Army and Greater Stuttgart Community Award for her work in preventing increased chronic obstructive e pulmonary disease (COPD) during Operation Desert Shield form the Kuwaiti burning oil fields during Desert Storm. In 2006-2007 she was principal investigator of a privately funded project to identify the composition of Morgellon's fibers. This original research revealed the environmental impacts upon man, environment and other life forms from exposure to nanotechnology, a work she continues to pursue. - www.staningerreport.com******************************************************************To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewpaper.com

CNS
[podcast] Changemakers: Joshua Dilawar of Artivism Academy | Asia Youth Festival on Innovation for SRHR

CNS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022


This podcast features changemaker Joshua Dilawar of Artivism Academy, who is among the changemakers featured at the 2022 Asia Youth Festival on Innovation for Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia - hosted by Asian-Pacific Resource & Research Centre for Women (ARROW, https://arrow.org.my). He is in conversation with Sumita Thapar of CNS.Listen to this podcast on Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn, aCast, Podtail, BluBrry, Himalaya, ListenNotes, American Podcasts, CastBox FM, Ivy FM, Player FM, and other podcast streaming platforms.ThanksCNS team

CNS
[podcast] Changemakers: Arefin Noman Bin Awal of Bangladesh | Asia Youth Festival on Innovation for SRHR

CNS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022


This podcast features changemaker Arefin Noman Bin Awal of Bangladesh, who is among the changemakers featured at the 2022 Asia Youth Festival on Innovation for Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia - hosted by Asian-Pacific Resource & Research Centre for Women (ARROW, https://arrow.org.my). He is in conversation with noted journalist and development communication expert Sumita Thapar of CNS.Listen to this podcast on Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn, aCast, Podtail, BluBrry, Himalaya, ListenNotes, American Podcasts, CastBox FM, Ivy FM, Player FM, and other podcast streaming platforms.ThanksCNS team

CNS
[podcast] Changemakers: Sabir Ali | Asia Youth Festival on Innovation for SRHR

CNS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022


This podcast features changemaker Sabir Ali of Rural Development Foundation in Pakistan, who is among the changemakers featured at the 2022 Asia Youth Festival on Innovation for Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia - hosted by Asian-Pacific Resource & Research Centre for Women (ARROW, https://arrow.org.my). He is in conversation with Sumita Thapar of CNS.Listen to this podcast on Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn, aCast, Podtail, BluBrry, Himalaya, ListenNotes, American Podcasts, CastBox FM, Ivy FM, Player FM, and other podcast streaming platforms.ThanksCNS team

The Final Straw Radio
Compañeras: Zapatista Women's Stories (rebroadcast)

The Final Straw Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 66:51


This week on the show, we re-air Amar's 2015 interview with Hilary Klein, author/editor of the book Compañeras: Zapatista Women's Stories, out from Seven Stories Press. Over the hour, Hilary talks about her 7 years of living in Chiapas and recording the stories and experiences of women there, collecting stories on their behalf. The book covers the Zapatistas experiences before the EZLN uprising of 1994, during that period and after. Discussion address what gender, indigeneity and class looked like and how that's changed in the Zapatista communities, the state of Chiapas and in Mexico. William and Hilary also explore the effects that the EZLN & La Otra Compaña have had on radicals and anarchists abroad, the origins of the EZLN, some parallels and distinctions between anarchism and Zapatismo and much more. You'll find a transcript of this audio available soon at our website. The book is also available for free reading on archive.org. Next week, stay tuned for another rebroadcast, with some new content coming up real soon. Annoucement Post-Release Funds for Maumin Khabir from GoFundMe.com: SUPPORT FUND FOR NEW AFRIKAN POLITICAL PRISONER ON HOSPICE, MAUMIN KHABIR! (SN MELVIN MAYES). CURRENT GOAL IS $3K FOR ESSENTIAL MEDICINE! Maumin Khabir served a 27 year sentence behind prison walls in North Carolina for a crime he didn't commit. Declared a terrorist by the U.S. government, Khabir was targeted by RICO laws (a draconian set of laws that target individuals opposed to U.S. ideology) and captured in 1995. Maumin turned down a plea deal that would require him to confess to crimes he did not commit. As a political prisoner, he has remained an organizer, educator, and devote Muslim while on the inside. Maumin is a citizen of the sovereign Republic of New Afrika and his secession from the United States of America is the motivating factor behind the government's prosecution and has no criminal basis. Maumin asks the court to recognize him as a political prisoner in accordance with the Geneva Conventions of 1949 and Protocol 1. In February, Maumin was granted compassionate release by the courts due to his severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). He is now in the care of people who love him but it is still a very difficult situation. Maumin is on 24hr oxygen and can hardly move and it's overall difficult to care for him. We are raising funds for to support Maumin's care, to ensure it is the best it can be right now, and so his family who cares for him can give him a proper burial after he transitions. We ask you to share this link and donate what you can! We need money for medication, medical bills, and hopefully new transportation so Maumin can see loved ones and make appointments. Thank you for your support! Free The Land! . ... . .. Featured Tracks: Politiks Kills (Prince Fatty Instrumental) by Manu Chao from Politiks Kills single Himno Zapatista (track #20) from Antología Musical Zapatista Por El Suelo by Manu Chao from Clandestino

CNS
[podcast] Effectiveness of new drug-resistant TB treatment is maintained with reduction in dosage and duration of Linezolid

CNS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022


This podcast features Dr Conor Tweed, Honorary Clinical Lecturer, Medical Research Council (MRC) Clinical Trials Unit at University College London (UCL), who is in conversation with CNS founding Managing Editor and Executive Director Shobha Shukla. Jessica Wiggs, Senior Communication Specialist of TB Alliance (Global Alliance of TB Drug Development, www.TBalliance.org) joins the conversation. Listen to this podcast on Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn, aCast, Podtail, BluBrry, Himalaya, ListenNotes, American Podcasts, CastBox FM, Ivy FM, Player FM, and other podcast streaming platforms.ThanksCNS team

CNS
[podcast] Changemakers: Tanya Khera of Samanta | Asia Youth Festival on Innovation for SRHR

CNS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022


This podcast features changemaker Tanya Khera of Samanta in Uttarakhand, India, who is among the changemakers featured at the 2022 Asia Youth Festival on Innovation for Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia - hosted by Asian-Pacific Resource & Research Centre for Women (ARROW, https://arrow.org.my). She is in conversation with Sumita Thapar of CNS.Listen to this podcast on Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn, aCast, Podtail, BluBrry, Himalaya, ListenNotes, American Podcasts, CastBox FM, Ivy FM, and other podcast streaming platforms.ThanksCNS team

BrainStuff
How Did Vikings' Gut Worms Create Today's Lung Disease?

BrainStuff

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 4:17 Very Popular


Intestinal parasites that plagued our ancestors seem to have led to a genetic adaptation that's causing emphysema and COPD today. Learn more in this episode of BrainStuff, based on this article: https://health.howstuffworks.com/diseases-conditions/respiratory/viking-toilet-investigation-emphysema.htmSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Alter Your Health
#335 | MM - Food Choices Can Heal Lung Issues

Alter Your Health

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 28:24


When suffering with chronic lung conditions, it's not so common to consider food choices and nutritional status as important factors in prevention and healing.Air quality/pollution, smoking, and environmental toxin exposure are the much more traditional risk factors for lung conditions like lung cancers, COPD, and asthma.BUT, nutritional status is SO huge for so many reasons.Today we overview some of the empowering nutritional science that demonstrates the role whole food plant based eating has in both preventing and reversing the most common chronic lung conditions.When we understand the mechanisms of the diseases like COPD, asthma, and of course cancer, it's plain to see how optimizing nutritional status can play a huge part in reducing oxidative stress, eliminating chronic inflammation, and balancing immune status to defend against both acute respiratory illness (like pneumonia, which is actually responsible for a large number of deaths annually, especially amongst elderly) as well as the chronic and debilitating conditions.As always, you can join us live each Monday at 12 PT / 3 ET on the Alter Health YouTube Channel! https://www.youtube.com/alterhealthSome highlights from today's episode on Heart Health...How hidden toxins in air can irritate lungs and cause oxidative damage to set the stage for more chronic conditionsHow COPD (chronic bronchitis and emphysema) causes airway destruction overtime and clear ways to stop the progression of diseaseThe common immune imbalance that is associated with asthma - airflow obstruction and the inability to properly ventilate lungsSpecific constituents in foods that either promote healing or exacerbate dis-ease in lungsAn inspiring testimonial of asthma reversal in an adult from whole food plant based eating and lifestyle healingLinks to some more good stuff- Get the Alter Health weekly WFPB Meal Guides: https://www.alter.health/meal-guides- Cleanse with Us during the next Alter Health Cleanse: https://www.alter.health/cleanse- Work with us in the Thrive on Plants program: https://www.alter.health/thrive-on-plants- ATTN Health Practitioners! Learn more and apply to the Plant Based Mind Body Practitioner Program: https://www.alter.health/pbmb-practitionerPeace and Love.

Clinical Conversations » Podcast Feed
Podcast 298: COPD exacerbations — 7 days of antibiotics versus 2

Clinical Conversations » Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 14:08


A VIDEO RECORDING OF THIS INTERVIEW WILL BE AVAILABLE WITHIN A FEW DAYS. [display podcast] In treating most exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) the usual regimen consists of prednisone plus 5- to 7-days of antibiotics. But what if a shorter course of antibiotic therapy would do? That would be both convenient for patients and less […] The post Podcast 298: COPD exacerbations — 7 days of antibiotics versus 2 first appeared on Clinical Conversations.

Ninja Nerd
COPD

Ninja Nerd

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 24:10


This week, Rob and Zach will be talking about Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).We will be discussing the following topics within this episode on COPD!Introduction to COPDCauses / PathophysiologyClinical FeaturesPhysical Exam FindingsDiagnosisTreatmentTo follow along with Notes & Illustrations for our podcasts please become a member on our website! https://www.ninjanerd.org/podcast/copdFollow us on:YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/ninjanerdscienceInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/ninjanerdlecturesFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/NinjaNerdLecturesTwitter: https://twitter.com/ninjanerdsciDiscord: https://discord.com/invite/3srTG4dngWTikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@ninjanerdlecturesHolistic Life NavigationThis podcast explores how to heal stress & trauma holistically. I am your host, Luis...Listen on: Apple Podcasts SpotifySupport the show

The Body Show
The Body Show: COPD

The Body Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 29:08


COPD, or Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, can make it feel like you can't get your breath, and not able to enjoy the same activities as you used to. Val Chang of the Hawaii COPD Coalition is on the show, along with Czamira Alba, NP from Straub Lung Center, to share the latest on the diagnosis and treatment of this life limiting illness.

Pre-Hospital Care
The COPD Pathway with Jonathon Will and Tom Fardon

Pre-Hospital Care

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 45:21


In this session we will examine a new pathway which is emerging within Scotland and north of England. The Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) pathway has been designed to both specialise treatment and expedite specialist care to this cohort of patients. NHS data shows that in 2020/21, approximately 1.17 million people in England have been diagnosed with COPD, which is around 1.9% of the population. To host the conversation I have Jonathon Will with me. Jonathon is a registered Paramedic working with the Scottish Ambulance Service (SAS), he has also worked as an Emergency Care Paramedic within various Emergency Department Resuscitation units. His last two years has been spent working as the Clinical Effectiveness Lead within SAS and a National improvement Advisor for urgent and unscheduled care within NHS Scotland. Tom Fardon is a Respiratory Consultant within NHS Tayside, with a specialist interest in airways disease (COPD, Asthma and Bronchiectasis). Tom is also the clinical lead for the managed clinical network within Tayside and the chair of the national advisory group for respiratory medicine, also the lead for respiratory care action plan within NHS Scotland. He also leads the Scottish Respiratory advisory committee to initiate the recommendations within the respiratory care action plan. In the conversation we talk about: * The pathology of COPD; what's going on with these patients and how these patients normally present to the ambulance service. * Physiological tolerance and adaptation over time. * Why this pathway has been designed? (what is the current problem) * How the key clinicians and specialisms have been brought together * End points that the pathway serves * Improvements to the current services * What tiers of patients this pathway serves * What happens to the life-threatening COPD patients * What a patient could expect when they go through the pathway. * What the future holds * Take homes messages Please find more about the pathway here: https://www.consultantconnect.org.uk/copd-pathway-tayside/ Consultant Connect are partly responsible for supporting this pathway and can be found here: https://www.consultantconnect.org.uk/ This podcast is brought to you in association with BHA Medical. BHA medical source, supply and implement innovative medical technology and solutions across the globe. BHA provide market leading services in covid 19 testing kits, medical products, smart technology and consultancy. One of their most innovative recent products is the D heart: D-Heart is the first portable ECG device that is simple to use, clinically reliable, affordable and makes use of a smartphone. It allows anyone to perform a hospital-level ECG in total autonomy with the option to send the results to the 24/7 tele-cardiology service or to your trusted doctor. D-Heart allows you to track your heart health, explain possible unclear symptoms or to monitor the efficacy of medication. D-Heart will allow you to become an engaged partner in the management of your health. You can record an ECG whenever you have symptoms and share it with your trusted physician and to establish a shared decision-making process. The image-processing and artificial intelligence will guide you to the correct electrode placement by showing you an image of your own chest with virtual marks placed where you should apply the electrodes. More information on the D heart can be found here: https://www.bha-medical.com/d-heart-ecg-mobile-device More information on BHA medical can be found here: https://www.bha-medical.com/

The Physio Matters Podcast
COPD and Balance issues - Samantha Harrison - Chewing It Over

The Physio Matters Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 35:00


Today Samantha Harrison is here so we're chewing over her latest research into the relationship between COPD and balance. Learn what to look out for and what you can do about it! Your lunchtime show 12:30-13:00 on Mondays and Thursdays with Jack Chew chatting about whatever is topical. Usually healthcare and education, occasionally current affairs, always honest

Beyond the Pearls: Cases for Med School, Residency and Beyond (An InsideTheBoards Podcast)

Today's Episode Dr. Esther G. Chong reviews the case of a 57 year old male who presents with a 1 week history of shortness of breath and a productive cough. He has a history of COPD and has shortness of breath at baseline. Today's Host Dr. Esther G. Chong is a 2nd year hematology/oncology fellow at the University of Loma Linda Medical Center. About Dr. Raj Dr Raj is a quadruple board certified physician and associate professor at the University of Southern California. He was a co-host on the TNT series Chasing the Cure with Ann Curry, a regular on the TV Show The Doctors for the past 7 seasons and has a weekly medical segment on ABC news Los Angeles. More from Dr. Raj www.BeyondThePearls.net The Dr. Raj Podcast Dr. Raj on Twitter Dr. Raj on Instagram Want more board review content? Crush Step 1 Step 2 Secrets Physiology by Physeo Step 1 Success Stories The InsideTheBoards Study Smarter Podcast The InsideTheBoards Podcast Study on the go for free! Download the Audio QBank by InsideTheBoards for free on iOS or Android. If you want to upgrade, you can save money on a premium subscription by customizing your plan until your test date on our website! Produced by Ars Longa Media To learn more about us and this podcast, visit arslonga.media. You can leave feedback or suggestions at arslonga.media/contact or by emailing info@arslonga.media. Produced by: Christopher Breitigan Executive Producer: Patrick C. Beeman, MD Legal Stuff InsideTheBoards is not affiliated with the NBME, USMLE, COMLEX, or any professional licensing body. InsideTheBoards and its partners fully adhere to the policies on irregular conduct outlined by the aforementioned credentialing bodies. The information presented in this podcast is intended for educational purposes only and should not be construed as professional or medical advice. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

CHEST Journal Podcasts
Optimizing COPD Acute Care Patient Outcomes Using a Standardized Transition Bundle and Care Coordinator

CHEST Journal Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 49:08


Moderator Neha S. Dangayach, MD, MSCR, and journal CHEST® authors Michael K. Stickland, PhD, and Chantal E. Atwood, PhD, discuss the article, "Optimizing COPD Acute Care Patient Outcomes Using a Standardized Transition Bundle and Care Coordinator," which was published in the August issue. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chest.2022.03.047

Dead Doctors Don't Lie Radio
Dead Doctors Dont Lie 10 Aug 2022

Dead Doctors Don't Lie Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 54:00


Monologue Dr. Joel Wallach begins the show discussing reactive hypoglycemia. Stating this can be responsible for some head on collisions. Contending people eat sugary foods the body then dumps insulin into the bloodstream. Causing people go to sleep and they cross the center line of the road. Asserting that people should do a hair analysis to find out if they are low on minerals. Pearls of Wisdom Dr. Wallach continues his monologue. Callers Jacinto has several health challenges including high blood pressure, is on dialysis, has arthritis and has difficulty urinating. Betty has MS (multiple sclerosis) and is having trouble walking. Due to bone on bone arthritis in her hips. Patty is having gastrointestinal problems and has bloating and gas. Gladys has peripheral neuropathies, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) and carpul tunnel disease. Call Dr. Wallach's live radio program weekdays from noon until 1pm pacific time at 831-685-1080 or toll free at 888-379-2552.

CorConsult Rx: Evidence-Based Medicine and Pharmacy
2022 COPD Guidelines *ACPE-Accredited*

CorConsult Rx: Evidence-Based Medicine and Pharmacy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 59:44 Very Popular


On this episode, we discuss the 2022 GOLD guidelines for COPD. Cole and I are happy to share that our listeners can claim ACPE-accredited continuing education for listening to this podcast episode! We have continued to partner with freeCE.com to provide listeners with the opportunity to claim 1-hour of continuing education credit for select episodes. To earn credit for this episode, visit the following link: COPD post-activity test on freeCE.com For existing Unlimited freeCE members, this CE option is included in your membership benefits at no additional cost! Members can simply follow the link above to take the post-test and evaluation for this activity. Use the password CENTRAL (all caps) to unlock the post-test for this episode. But if you're not currently a freeCE member, we definitely suggest you explore all the benefits of their Unlimited Membership on their website and earn CE for listening to this podcast. CorConsult Rx listeners can save 15% off the purchase of an unlimited membership by entering the discount code “PODCAST2022” at checkout, or by clicking the following link in the description https://hubs.ly/Q012N0H60 Thanks for listening! We want to give a big thanks to our main sponsor Pyrls. Try out their drug information app today. Visit the website below for a free trial: www.pyrls.com/corconsultrx If you want to support the podcast, check out our Patreon account. Subscribers will have access to all previous and new pharmacotherapy lectures as well as downloadable PowerPoint slides for each lecture. You can find our account at the website below:  www.patreon.com/corconsultrx If you have any questions for Cole or me, reach out to us on any of the following: Text - 415-943-6116

Reefer MEDness
E89 - It's About Smokin' Lyme

Reefer MEDness

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022


Brent Alarie is informed he has COPD, then it was multiple sclerosis. No wait, he receives another diagnosis of blood cancer. These were just a few of the catastrophic verdicts given to describe how his body was betraying him. He needed to create change and prepare for his enviable death. With a new bucket list he started living his best life under the circumstances. A six-year painful journey, of the most insane symptoms and being bounced from one diagnosis to another, finally comes to an end. Brent is told he has chronic Lyme Disease. A new journey begins with learning to live with the on-going symptoms of Lyme and regular pharmaceuticals do not help with the chronic nerve-pain. He was never a drug-guy, but after a friend gave him Cannabis, he finds therapeutic relief. Brent shares how he now balances his life with nutrition and Cannabis. Kirk and Trevor bring their second story on how Cannabis brings relief to people suffering from this Monster sickness in which we call Lyme Disease.Human Cannabinoid Pharmacokinetics: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2689518/pdf/nihms-118643.pdfThe Monster Inside Me - Lyme Disease Documentary - https://www.themonsterinsideme.com/Music by:Wreckin So - https://www.wreckinso.com/Still Smokinhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5VRz0jbjy8s (Yes we got a SOCANmembership to use thissong all legal andproper like) Additional Music:Desiree Doriondesireedorion.comMarc Clementmarcclementmusic.com Transcripts, papers and so much more at: reefermed.ca

Plant Proof - Plant Based Nutrition & Inspirational Stories
A doctor's guide to lung health with Dr MeiLan Han

Plant Proof - Plant Based Nutrition & Inspirational Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 96:38 Very Popular


In Episode #220, Dr MeiLan Han joins me to discuss the lungs and respiratory system. Despite being an incredibly important factor of our overall health, the respiratory system is often overlooked. Most people's knowledge is surface level, and we aren't educated on the importance of the lungs or how to best support respiratory health. Dr MeiLan Han joins me in this episode to explain what the respiratory system is, how it works, and what we can do to optimise it. In this episode, Dr Han establishes what the respiratory system is and how it works. We discuss the prevalence of lung conditions, Covid-19 and its impact on the respiratory system, and air quality. We also discuss healthy habits for pregnancy, the effects of smoking and vaping on lung health, diet, and how to reduce exposure to toxic compounds. Specifically, we cover: Intro [0:00] Breathing Lessons: The Book [2:09] Meilan's Story [5:59] Importance of Lung Awareness [11:07] Lung Tests [24:25] Impact of Covid [29:57] How the Lungs Work [33:32] Childhood Lung Health [44:52] Air Quality [53:55] Cleansing the Lungs [1:15:20] COPD [1:19:47] Final Thoughts [1:27:32] Outro [1:29:35] If you are interested in learning more about lung health, Dr Han's book is the perfect resource. You can find her book, Breathing Lessons: A Doctor's Guide to Lung Health, here. You can also connect with Dr Han on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, and LinkedIn. Her website, www.drmeilanhan.com/, contains more information and trusted resources. The best way to support the show is to use the products and services offered by our sponsors. To check them out, and enjoy great savings, visit theproof.com/friends. Make sure to head to theproof.com/podcast for the full show notes. Enjoy, friends. Simon Want to support the show? The best way to support the show is to use the products and services offered by our sponsors. To check them out, and enjoy great savings, visit theproof.com/friends. Simon Hill, Msc, Bsc (Hons) Creator of Theproof.com and host of The Proof with Simon Hill Author of The Proof is in the Plants Watch the episodes on YouTube, or Listen on Apple/Spotify Connect with me on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook Download my complimentary two week meal plan and plant performance Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

PodMed TT
TT HealthWatch - Friday, August 5, 2022

PodMed TT

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 12:39


This week's topics include the best medications for insomnia, calorie labeling of supermarket foods, the global burden of COPD, and restricting driving in people who faint.

Slice of Healthcare
#277 - Navya Davuluri, Founder & CEO at Curie AI

Slice of Healthcare

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 12:28


Our Guest: Navya Davuluri, Founder & CEO at Curie AIWhat you'll get out of this episode: The background of herself and Curie AI Leveraging AI to get ahead of COPD or other respiratory issues Why respiratory issue treatments aren't managed as well as conditions like diabetes How COVID has worsened respiratory conditions, and how big health systems think about COPD & asthma Why healthcare is slow to adopt AI What's next for Curie AI Our sponsors for this episode are BlocHealth, Curation Health, ChenMed & MediTelecare.BlocHealth is building the ecosystem of services and solutions to power the future of healthcare. For more information, please go to www.blochealth.com & follow BlocHealth on social media - @blochealth"Curation Health's advanced clinical decision support platform seamlessly integrates into the electronic health record and leverages more than 750 proven clinical and quality rules. With this intelligent point-of-care platform, you can power a scalable risk adjustment process and amplify quality program performance." For more information, please go to www.curationhealthcare.com & follow Curation Health on social media - @curationhealth"ChenMed brings concierge-style medicine and better health outcomes to the neediest populations – moderate-to-low income seniors with complex chronic diseases. For more information, please go to www.chenmed.com & follow ChenMed on social media - @chenmed"MediTelecare provides behavioral telemedicine services to residents of skilled nursing and assisted living facilities, using state-of-the-art telehealth technology." For more information, please go to www.meditelecare.com & follow MediTelecare on social media – @meditelecareTo learn more about Curie AI please use the links below:- Website - LinkedInAlso, be sure to follow Slice of Healthcare on our social channels:- Website - Facebook - LinkedIn - Twitter - YouTube - Newsletter

MedMaster Show (Nursing Podcast: Pharmacology and Medications for Nurses and Nursing Students by NRSNG)

Download the cheat: https://bit.ly/50-meds  View the lesson: https://bit.ly/EpinephrineEpiPenNursingConsiderations    Generic Name Epinephrine Trade Name Adrenalin, EpiPen Indication Asthma and COPD exacerbations, allergic reactions, cardiac arrest, anesthesia adjunct Action Affects both beta1 and beta2 also has alpha agonist properties resulting in bron- chodilation and increases in HR and BP. Inhibits hypersensitivity reactions. Therapeutic Class Antiasthmatic, bronchodilator, vasopressor Pharmacologic Class Adrenergic agonist Nursing Considerations • Side effects include: angina, tachycardia, hypertension, restlessness, nervousness, hyperglycemia • Use with MAOI may lead to hypertensive crisis • Patients should not use stimulants (caffeine, guarana, etc) • Excessive use may cause bronchospasm • Assess lung sounds, pulse, BP, and other hemodynamic parameters • Monitor for chest pain • Instruct patient to use as directed • Patient should insure adequate fluid intake to liquefy secretions • Mouth should be rinsed after inhalation • Beta blockers may negate effects • May increase blood glucose levels

Healthed Australia
Triple Therapy in Asthma- Your Questions Answered

Healthed Australia

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 37:42


In this Healthed lecture, respiratory physician, Prof Christine Jenkins provides practical advice for GPs wanting to translate the latest COPD management guidelines into effective and realistic clinical practice. New options for treating COPD are good news for patients but can sometimes prove a challenge for treating clinicians. Which patient needs which treatment and when - is a frequent question posed by GPs. In addition, clarity is often sought as to when triple therapy should be started,  how treatment can be intensified and importantly, what are the risks and benefits of the different combinations? In this presentation, COPD expert, Professor Christine Jenkins will provide practical answers to some of the more common questions Australian GPs have about the role of triple therapy in treating this very common condition.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.