Podcasts about Gardener

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

Person who tends gardens

  • 1,296PODCASTS
  • 4,455EPISODES
  • 34mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 29, 2021LATEST
Gardener

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about Gardener

Show all podcasts related to gardener

Latest podcast episodes about Gardener

RNZ: Nine To Noon
In the Company of Gardeners

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 16:24


Photographer Juliet Nicholas and writer Sue Allison have produced a collection of New Zealand's most magnificent gardens, and met the inspired gardeners behind them. In the Company of Gardener has enough botanical detail to appeal to the most experienced of gardeners, while its stunning photography will also inspire newcomers to don gardening gloves. Kathryn speaks with Juliet Nicholas, an acclaimed garden photographer, and Sue Allison an award-winning journalist and author.

Mic The Gardener - Gardening Podcast
Mic the Gardener - Gardening Podcast - Penstemon Special with GreenJJam Nurseries

Mic The Gardener - Gardening Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 59:41


Hello! And welcome back to the Mic the Gardener - Gardening Podcast page. This week I have a rather exciting Plant Special episode for you featuring penstemon. I speak to RHS gold medal winning nursery owner, Julia Mitchell of GreenJJam nurseries, specialists in growing penstemon. As with all of my Plant special episodes, we chat about everything you need to know about growing penstemon including: What soil to grow them in and where How to grow them in containers General maintenance Pests and diseases Feeding and watering, and Propagation It's a truly in-depth chat which will enable us all to go away and grow the best penstemon in our borders next year. If you're looking to add more penstemon to your collection, or, indeed to start growing penstemon, then you can head to the nursery website www.greenjjam.co.uk. For still more information, why not follow GreenJJam Nurseries on their Instagram page. And, if you don't already follow me, then you can head over to my Instagram page, @mike_thegardener. As always, my thanks to Julia for sharing her knowledge and expertise with us. I'll be back next week, as usual with another Mic the Gardener - Gardening Podcast episode. In the meantime, if you wish to send me a message, you can email me at the pod email address micthegardener01@gmail.com. I'd like to say ‘hello' to you if you're new to listening to my podcast… welcome along! Don't forget to follow/subscribe to make sure you don't miss out on any new episodes. And finally(!), if you listen via Apple podcasts, please do leave a review. See you next week. Bye-bye!

Talking Heads - a Gardening Podcast
Ep. 116 - Hedges are important! When it comes to choosing, planting and pruning Lucy and Saul know that planning and preparation is key. In this episode, they discuss their respective hedging masterplans.

Talking Heads - a Gardening Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 34:49


The mellow fruitfulness of Autumn has been heralded by the subtle change in temperature and darker mornings and evenings in the garden. For Lucy Chamberlain and Saul Walker this starts one of their favourite times of year as Lucy's vegetable patch is at maximum yield producing food for East Donyland Hall and Saul revels in the changing colours in the canopies of his precious treescape at Stonelands. So join us throughout the season as we bring tales of crispy leaves, hibernating plants and plenty of pumpkins!Whether you love formal or informal, evergreen or deciduous, large or small - hedges play an intrinsic role in our gardens. There is a hedging plant to suit all gardens, tastes and budgets but it's crucial to put some thought into exactly what and how you want to plant, to ensure the hedge meets your specific needs. Saul and Lucy muse on what would be their hedging masterclass.Twitter links:Saul @GardeningSaulLucy @HeadGardenerLCIntro and Outro music from https://filmmusic.io"Fireflies and Stardust" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com)License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) 

Cybernautica
The Gardener - 1.0 - Elliot

Cybernautica

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 14:27


The Gardener - Episode 1.0 - Taking place during the same time period as season one (Breakwall), this mini series follows Elliot, a trusted Biodome Custodian as he finally acts on the questions that have plagued his conscience for years. The main story continues on Dec. 17th! Follow us on Twitter for news and updates. Join us on discord to hang out with cast and crew! Want to support the show? Please check out our Patreon as Cybernautica is 100% Fan Supported! Make sure to stay up to date with our free, no spam newsletter Cybernautica is intended for mature audiences on account of mature language, theme and violence. Please be advised.   EPISODE CREDITS: Aubrey Poppleton as Elliot Marcus Salley as The Voice Will Handford as Gate Guard --- Dan Boud as the Narrator Written by Damian Szydlo & Alexander Baxter Direction by Amanda Hufford Sound Design by Chris Henry Script Editing by Jupiter Sanders Show theme by Doug Maxwell   Music from Audioblocks & Fesliyan Studios

372 Pages We'll Never Get Back
Episode 112 – Irene Iddsleigh Ep 3 – HAWKES! (The Gardener)

372 Pages We'll Never Get Back

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 148:46


Our Patreon listeners are our favorite listeners! Join them at patreon.com/372pages and be the first to learn what book we're doing next Wow, there's no way around it, we unabashedly loved the places this book went! (If you don't agree with us please contact our solicitors, Messrs. Hutchinson and Harper.  If you find no relief … Continue reading "Episode 112 – Irene Iddsleigh Ep 3 – HAWKES! (The Gardener)"

Grow, cook, eat, arrange with Sarah Raven & Arthur Parkinson
Growing Spectacular Salvias with Sarah Raven & Arthur Parkinson - Episode 43

Grow, cook, eat, arrange with Sarah Raven & Arthur Parkinson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 21:56


Few flowers are quite as essential as the Salvia, a plant of the moment which is as low maintenance as it is high performing. It takes just a little care to keep these ocean deep blues, rich purples and eye-catching reds flourishing well into the autumn months.Not only are colourful varieties like Jezebel and Amistad also edible, but they're an indomitable blackspot deterrent and great for cutting. Sarah & Arthur take a look at this must-have family of long-blooming flowers in this week's ‘grow, cook, eat, arrange', and serve up a spectacular recipe for butternut squash.In this episode, discover:The new, exciting, and vigorous varieties of Salvia that are ideal for potsParticularly useful Salvias for companion planting with Roses to battle blackspot How to take Salvia cuttings to grow youthful, vigorous plants, ready for when your current flowers start to waneMaking the most of sage at its best this time of year in an incredible recipe for butternut squashView all products mentioned and find further advice from Sarah: https://bit.ly/3f2DFiHFollow Sarah: https://bit.ly/3jDTvBpFollow Arthur: https://bit.ly/3jxSKK5Order Sarah's book: https://bit.ly/2TWHJczOrder Arthur's book: https://bit.ly/3xOov7HShop on the Sarah Raven Website: http://bit.ly/3jvbaeuGet in touch: info@sarahraven.com

Field & Garden
Meet Blossom Lane Farm & Fox Hollow Peonies

Field & Garden

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 71:39


I loved catching up with Wanda of Fox Hollow Peonies and Jonalyn of Blossom Lane Farm. I came to know both of these ladies because they are students of our courses. They became standouts and kept showing up on my radar because of how they were pursuing their businesses. Learn more about our courses mentioned: The Gardener's Workshop Connect with these two gals: Fox Hollow Peonies Instagram Facebook Blossom Lane Farm Instagram Facebook I hope you are inspired by their stories! – Lisa Ziegler The Gardener's Workshop and Flower Farming School Online and the publisher of Farmer-Florist School Online and Florist School Online. Award-winning Author of Vegetables Love Flowers and Cool Flowers. Watch Lisa's Story and view her blog Field & Garden. Connect with Lisa on Facebook and Instagram!

Organic Gardener Podcast
391. Ann Truesdell | Montana Backyard gardener | Helena, MT

Organic Gardener Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 79:16


Connect with Ann on https://www.instagram.com/annntruesdell/ (Instagram) Let's take a minute to thank our sponsors and affiliate linksWanna donate to the show! You can https://www.buymeacoffee.com/vlnjczo ("buy me a cup of coffee") where your https://www.buymeacoffee.com/vlnjczo (donation) goes directly to support the https://www.buymeacoffee.com/vlnjczo (GREEN Organic Garden Podcast) to help pay for things like hosting the mp3 files or maintaining the website. [gallery ids="137595,137597,137596" type="rectangular"] https://growers.co/ (Growers & Co)https://mailchi.mp/7d7096fe8752/grow-live-with-patti-and-jackie-ask-question-here () Ask Your https://mailchi.mp/7d7096fe8752/grow-live-with-patti-and-jackie-ask-question-here (questions here)https://youtu.be/2S9tbLIIhy4 https://goodseedco.net/ (The Good Seed Company)Now Let's Get to the Root of Things! http://organicgardenerpodcast.us11.list-manage1.com/track/click?u=e3e16d6ddb7c0acd9e17348ed&id=b6a8f6bd31&e=e16e7400c4 () We'd love if you'd join  http://organicgardenerpodcast.us11.list-manage1.com/track/click?u=e3e16d6ddb7c0acd9e17348ed&id=b6a8f6bd31&e=e16e7400c4 (Organic Gardener Podcast Facebook Community!)https://amzn.to/2PEYW6c () https://amzn.to/2PEYW6c (Get Your Copy of the The Organic Oasis Guidebook!)Twelve Lessons designed to help you create an earth friendly landscape, some deep garden beds full of nutrient rich healthy food or perhaps even develop a natural market farm. https://amzn.to/2PEYW6c (Get a copy on today printed in the USA from Amazon) https://amzn.to/2PEYW6c () The Organic Gardener Podcast is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com If you like what you heard on the Organic Gardener Podcast we'd love it if you'd give us review and hopefully a 5 star rating on iTunes so other gardeners can find us and listen to. Just click on the https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/organic-gardener-podcast/id962887645 (link here). and don't forget if you need help getting started check out our new  https://mailchi.mp/5611bc3d7dfd/free-garden-course (Free Garden Course.com)https://mailchi.mp/5611bc3d7dfd/free-garden-course () https://mailchi.mp/5611bc3d7dfd/free-garden-course ( Free Organic Garden Course )http://organicgardenerpodcast.us11.list-manage1.com/track/click?u=e3e16d6ddb7c0acd9e17348ed&id=b6a8f6bd31&e=e16e7400c4 () We'd love if you'd join  http://organicgardenerpodcast.us11.list-manage1.com/track/click?u=e3e16d6ddb7c0acd9e17348ed&id=b6a8f6bd31&e=e16e7400c4 (Organic Gardener Podcast Facebook Community!)If you like what you heard on the Organic Gardener Podcast we'd love it if you'd give us review and hopefully a 5 star rating on iTunes so other gardeners can find us and listen to. Just click on the https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/organic-gardener-podcast/id962887645 (link here).   This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy Support this podcast

Becoming HeadStrong
358. Gardener Mentality - Coach Katie

Becoming HeadStrong

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 5:21


In this episode, Coach Katie talks about how the same mentality you have when trying to grow a plant applies to growing as an athlete. Listen close to hear how she compares the two!

Mic The Gardener - Gardening Podcast
Mic the Gardener - Gardening Podcast - Natural Grower

Mic The Gardener - Gardening Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 29:44


In this weeks episode of the Mic the Gardener gardening podcast, I chat to the owner of Natural Grower, Charlotte Beatty. I am thrilled to have Natural Grower sponsor my podcast. I've used their products in my own gardening for a while now, and certainly well before Charlotte agreed to sponsor the podcast. As such, having natural growth as a podcast sponsor is fantastic as I genuinely love their products, but not quite as much as my garden and plants do! In this episode, Charlotte tells me about how the business came about, how the products are made and manufactured and how they coped through the difficulties of a lockdown in 2020, and lots more. Here's some important information about Natural Grower's products: The Natural Grower's natural liquid fertiliser is concentrated and, once diluted, can be poured around the base of all plants in the garden and in your home, to be quickly absorbed as a potent source of organic food. Houseplants can be fed by pouring around the base of the plant, or they love to have a bottom feed by standing the plant pot in a bowl or sink with the diluted liquid feed and leave it to soak all the goodness up. Natural Grower's natural plant feed and soil conditioner is a mulch that can be mixed into the soil/compost before planting, or used on the surface of your beds and pots as a top dressing. Rich in nitrogen, phosphorous, potassium and other trace elements, it will be broken down gradually by organisms in the soil/compost as a long-term, slow release fertiliser. If you have clay soil, or soil which is full of stones, the plant feed and conditioner will improve the quality and structure of your soil. The mulch is also excellent at helping to retain moisture, which in turn reduces the amount of watering you will need to do – perfect! As always, my thanks to you all for listening to my podcast each week. Please do spread the good word and don't forget to follow/subscribe as there are still a few more episodes left in series 2. And, if you listen through Apple podcast, please do leave a review. If you wish to contact me, please drop me an email at micthegardener01@gmail.com or contact me via my Instagram page @mike_thegardener. See you here next week. Mike

Talking Heads - a Gardening Podcast
Bonus Episode #14 - Lucy and Saul are joined in conversation by Brendan Arundel - the new Head Gardener at Helmingham Hall in Suffolk - and he reveals his thoughts on taking up his first head gardening role.

Talking Heads - a Gardening Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 43:25


From time to time Lucy and Saul decided they wanted to record conversations with other Head Gardeners, Curators, Garden Owners and fellow horticulturists across the UK, these will be published as Bonus Episodes alongside their usual format of chatting about their gardening lives. We hope you enjoy.For the Bonus Episode #14 we are joined by the brand new Head Gardener at Helmingham Hall, Brendan Arundel. Having made the jump from Cambridge Botanic Garden and Wisley Apprentice, via RHS Hyde Hall to Helmingham in no short time, Brendan gives us his thoughts on becoming a first time Head Gardener, the confidence it takes to make that step up into managing an historic space and his advice to those who have started in our industry about how to reach this worthwhile career milestone.Apologies for some of the audio quality on this interview.Twitter links:Brendan @BrendanArundelSaul @GardeningSaulLucy @HeadGardenerLCIntro and Outro music from https://filmmusic.io"Fireflies and Stardust" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com)License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)

People and Projects Podcast: Project Management Podcast
PPP 343 | How to Cultivate Change at Work by Thinking Like a Gardener, Not a Mechanic

People and Projects Podcast: Project Management Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 50:30


Leading in an Ecosystem We're continuing a series of episodes on the topic of change. Back in episode 339 we talked with Katy Milkman about her book How to Change, which provided some helpful insights into the behavioral science of change. But what if you are planning to lead a change initiative. Beyond what Katy brought us from behavioral science, I wanted to bring you a process—something that is practical, memorable, and tested across industries. And I'm glad to say I found it! In this episode I'm excited to introduce you to Gary Lloyd, author of Gardeners Not Mechanics: How to Cultivate Change at Work. I'm not a gardener but I find Gary's approach to be practical for changes you want to lead at work and in your personal life. I can't wait to share the discussion with you. Learn more about Gary at GardenersNotMechanics.com/. Join our Global LEAD52 Community Ready to take your leadership skills to the next level? LEAD52 is your 5-minute weekly pass to leadership intelligence. You get 52 weeks of learning, delivered right to your inbox, taking less than 5 minutes a week. And it's all for free. Join us at https://GetLEAD52.com. Thank you for joining me for this episode of The People and Projects Podcast! Talent Triangle: Leadership   Funky Corporation by chilledmusic Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/8072-funky-corporation License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license It's Funky by Frank Schröter Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/8061-it-s-funky License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Googly Eyes Gardener by Saturday Night Live is available on YouTube at YouTube.com/watch?v=zc7qJE9Nzo8

The Gestalt Gardener
The Gestalt Gardener | Smug Lessons

The Gestalt Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 50:54


Thanksgiving is around the corner and Felder is taking some well-deserved time off. But before Felder frolics in the autumn sun, he brings the best garden party to your radio (or podcast) and helps with another round of southern gardening questions. Also, he learns a few lessons along the way. Let's get dirty! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Grow, cook, eat, arrange with Sarah Raven & Arthur Parkinson
Highlights from our Christmas Range with Sarah Raven & Arthur Parkinson - Episode 42

Grow, cook, eat, arrange with Sarah Raven & Arthur Parkinson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 19:40


The allure of a warm, glowing, gorgeously adorned home to spend Christmas is particularly appealing in lieu of a challenging few years, and there's no better way to bring your home to life than with our Christmas range!In this week's episode of ‘grow, cook, eat, arrange', learn how you can transform your home with some of Sarah & Arthur's highlights from this year's winter offering from our range - from stylish ornaments to glistening, Allium-inspired lighting, plus some delightful gift ideas for your loved ones.In this episode, discover:Our luminescent offerings of Micro-LED Globes, subtle Wire Lights, and Solar Allium LightsThe nature-inspired collection of decorative ornaments, from lovely llamas to opulent glass beetles ideal for hanging from the treeA great selection of foliage with which to decorate a showstopping wreathThe extended range of carefully chosen gifts, perfect for that special someoneView all products mentioned and find further advice from Sarah: https://bit.ly/3f2DFiHFollow Sarah: https://bit.ly/3jDTvBpFollow Arthur: https://bit.ly/3jxSKK5Order Sarah's book: https://bit.ly/2TWHJczOrder Arthur's book: https://bit.ly/3xOov7HShop on the Sarah Raven Website: http://bit.ly/3jvbaeuGet in touch: info@sarahraven.com

Gardening with the RHS
Meet the Premier League gardener

Gardening with the RHS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 27:44


Just a few short years took Kuda Chimbudzi from asylum seeker to superstar gardener, growing healthy fruit and veg for the Premier League footballers at Tottenham Hotspur FC. Our resident gardening guru Guy Barter heads to north London to check out his award-winning kitchen garden at the club's grounds. Plus we meet Sophie Vincent of Food Behind Bars – a charity that's trying to improve the lives and diets of prisoners through growing food; and Greig Robertson from Edible Estates in Edinburgh, an organisation creating neighbourhood plots to bring fresh food to disadvantaged communities. **Useful links: ** - Read more about the kitchen garden at Tottenham Hotspur FC https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/health-and-wellbeing/real-life-stories/kuda-chimbudzi - The Garden magazine - https://www.rhs.org.uk/about-the-rhs/publications/the-garden - Food Behind Bars https://foodbehindbars.co.uk - Edible Estates http://www.edibleestates.co.uk - [RHS Flourish Fund](https://www.rhs.org.uk/education-learning/bursaries-grants/rhs-bursaries/flourish-fund)

FROM THE NOSEBLEEDS
Episode 59 - How Did Jim Gardener Impact Your Life?

FROM THE NOSEBLEEDS

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 73:01


The boys talk about the legacy of Jim Gardener, briefly the Phillies, Tyrese Maxey's surge, the Eagles big win over the Broncos and what that means for the team and Vince rants about the College Football Playoff selection committee.

Field & Garden
The Blow That Almost Derailed the Book Cool Flowers

Field & Garden

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 39:33


This episode is about the struggle I was up against while I was writing Cool Flowers. When I first saw the surveyors next door it paralyzed me. I wasn't sure how I would focus to write a book, but I did it and came through with a fresh perspective. I hope that sharing this may help others that are facing this type of loss. Read the blog This Side of the Fence. Doug Tallemy's book Bringing Nature Home – Lisa Ziegler Founder of The Gardener's Workshop and Flower Farming School Online and the publisher of Farmer-Florist School Online and Florist School Online. Award-winning Author of Vegetables Love Flowers and Cool Flowers. Watch Lisa's Story and view her blog Field & Garden. Connect with Lisa on Facebook and Instagram!

The Daily Gardener
November 16, 2021 Virtual Herbariums, Laurel Hill, Root Crop Preservation in 1835, Odoardo Beccari, Louise Driscoll, Marsha Mehran, Plant by Phaidon Editors, and Elizabeth Coblentz

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 25:37


Today in botanical history, we celebrate Laurel Hill and Root Crop Preservation in 1835. We'll also remember the botanist who discovered the Titan arum and a little poem about the November garden by Louise Driscoll. We'll hear an excerpt from Pomegranate Soup. We Grow That Garden Library™ with a beautiful garden book from 2016. And then we'll wrap things up with a look back at a charming garden column from 1999.   Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart To listen to the show while you're at home, just ask Alexa or Google to “Play the latest episode of The Daily Gardener Podcast.” And she will. It's just that easy.   The Daily Gardener Friday Newsletter Sign up for the FREE Friday Newsletter featuring: A personal update from me Garden-related items for your calendar The Grow That Garden Library™ featured books for the week Gardener gift ideas Garden-inspired recipes Exclusive updates regarding the show Plus, each week, one lucky subscriber wins a book from the Grow That Garden Library™ bookshelf.   Gardener Greetings Send your garden pics, stories, birthday wishes, and so forth to Jennifer@theDailyGardener.org   Facebook Group If you'd like to check out my curated news articles and original blog posts for yourself, you're in luck. I share all of it with the Listener Community in the Free Facebook Group - The Daily Gardener Community. So, there's no need to take notes or search for links. The next time you're on Facebook, search for Daily Gardener Community, where you'd search for a friend... and request to join. I'd love to meet you in the group.   Curated News Circulating Specimens: History | herbariumworld.wordpress.com | Maura Flannery   Important Events November 16, 1776 On this day, around 7 am Hessian troops allied with the Britsh opened fire on the American revolutionaries on Laurel Hill in Philadelphia. Laurel Hill is not named for the plant called Laurel. Laurel Hill was originally part of the Joseph Sims estate, and Joseph went by "Laurel," the property was named Laurel Hill in his honor. Mountain Laurel is botanically known as Kalmia latifolia in honor of the Finnish botanist Pehr Kalm. After his expedition to North America in the mid-1700s, Pehr correctly predicted that the American colonists would eventually rebel. Laurel Hill became America's first National Historic Landmark Cemetery.   November 16, 1835 On this day, the Hartford Courant wrote a piece called Gardener's Work For November. It is now quite time to [preserve] the roots and ...Mr. McMahon's method of preserving roots is as follows: Previous to the commencement of severe frost, you should take up, with as little injury as possible, the roots of your turnips, carrots, parsnips, beets, salsify, scorzonera, Hamburg, or large-rooted parsley, skirrots, Jerusalem artichokes, turnip-rooted celery, and ...horseradish… On the surface of a dry spot of ground, in a well-sheltered situation, lay a stratum of sand two-inches thick, [the place the root crops], covering them with another layer of sand, (the drier the better,) and…continue to layer about of sand and roots till all are laid in… then cover the heap or ridge [with] a good coat of straw, up and down as if thatching a house.   November 16, 1843 Birth of Odoardo Beccari, Italien botanist. After growing up an orphan, Beccarri managed to get an education in his native Italy, and he eventually traveled to England to study at Kew. Beccarri was friends with Hooker and Darwin, but he also befriended James Brooke, which meant he could spend three years exploring Borneo. During his lifetime, Becarri traveled all over India, Malaysia, and New Zealand. But it was on a little voyage he took to central Sumatra (in Indonesia) in 1878 that Beccarri discovered the plant with which he will forever be associated: the Amorphophallus titanum - or the Titan arum - the largest flower in the world. Seven years later, in 1885, the first Titan arum specimen bloomed at Kew, and when it happened, it created a sensation. Today, a Titan arum bloom still draws thousands of visitors. People love to take a selfie in front of the giant blooming plant. The flower is commonly referred to as the corpse flower as it smells like rotting flesh.   In a recent fascinating article, scent scientists identified the compounds that make up that terrible smell. The odor includes aspects of cheese sweat, rotting fish, decomposing meat, and garlic, among even worse unmentionable compounds. The putrid smell is meant to attract beetles and other insects to move pollen between blooming plants so that they can reproduce. It takes the corpse flower a decade before it can bloom. Incredibly, the plants only bloom for 24-36 hours before collapsing. Between that first bloom at Kew (back in 1885) and the year 2000, fewer than fifty Titan arum blooms had been recorded. But, in 2016, suddenly, dozens of corpse flowers around the world bloomed within weeks of each other. Horticulturists are still attempting to discern the reason for the clustered bloom event.   November 16, 1920 On this day, The Buffalo Times shared a poem by Louise Driscoll that had appeared in The New York Times called November Garden. Here's the first and last verse. In my November garden, I found a larkspur blossoming,  A lovely, radiant blue thing.  It swayed and shone,  And did not seem to know It was alone  In my November garden.  Where dry, dark leaves are falling  And all the birds have flown. The birds and Summer went  A way that no man knows. But here is honey that No bee will find.  No bird will linger at  This larkspur cup. This grace the butterfly  Has left behind. Summer went away And gave it up Yet it is bravely blue Swinging there alone  As if to challenge you!     Unearthed Words It is the pomegranate that gives Fesenjoon its healing capabilities. The original apple of sin, the fruit of a long-gone Eden, the pomegranate shields itself in a leathery crimson shell, which in Roman times was used as a form of protective hide. Once the pomegranate's bitter skin is peeled back, though, a juicy garnet flesh is revealed to the lucky eater, popping and bursting in the mouth like the final succumber of lovemaking. Long ago, when the earth remained still, content with the fecundity of perpetual spring, and Demeter was the mother of all that was natural and flowering, it was this tempting fruit that finally set the seasons spinning. Having eaten six pomegranate seeds in the underworld, Persephone, the Goddess of Spring's high-spirited daughter, had been forced to spend six months of the year in the eternal halls of death. Without her beautiful daughter by her side, a mournful Demeter retreated to the dark corners of the universe, allowing for the icy gates of winter to finally creak open. A round crimson herald of frost, the pomegranate comes to harvest in October and November, so Fesenjoon is best made with its concentrate during other times of the year. ― Marsha Mehran, Pomegranate Soup   Grow That Garden Library Plant by Phaidon Editors  This book came out in 2016, and the subtitle is Exploring the Botanical World. This book is gorgeous. You might remember it - it's got a black background and then a simple blossom design. Each of the leaves is made with a different type of fabric which makes for a magnificent cover. Now, of course, like all Phaidon books, this book is so visually appealing from the cover to the inside of the book. The whole point is to show the beauty and the diversity of plants through 300 works of botanical art that date back from ancient times all the way to modern times. You'll see plants and flowers and the entire botanical world portrayed using a variety of different mediums. Phaidon did a great job of curating all of these images. This is the first book to pull together botanical art across so many different media types and from such a broad timeline and every corner of the globe. Of course, in this book, you're going to see beautiful botanical art, but then you're also going to get lots of expert information about the pieces of art and the plants that are depicted. Phaidon is known for putting together high-level, very specialized books. And in this case, to tackle this broad topic of plants, they pulled together all kinds of experts, museum curators, horticulturists, historians, botanists, and more. Then they had each of them contribute their expertise in creating the text for this book. I love what Gardens Illustrated wrote about this book: "A dazzling collection of more than 300 images of plants that brings the evolution of botanical art right into the 21st century... Alongside old favorites, such as Redoute and Mary Delany, there is much here that is both unfamiliar and arresting... An extraordinary collection."  This book is 352 pages of botanical art that gives us a new appreciation and understanding of plants and their role in our history and culture. You can get a copy of Plant: Exploring the Botanical World by Phaidon Editors and support the show using the Amazon Link in today's Show Notes for around $17.   Today's Botanic Spark Reviving the little botanic spark in your heart November 16, 1999 On this day, The Columbus Telegram shared a column by Elizabeth Coblentz  - an Old Order Amish woman who handwrote her column by lantern light in her Indiana home. November is now on the calendar, and we are still having beautiful days in the 70s. The laundry is drying well out there on the clothesline, and work is continuing in our garden.  I have been taking the celery, carrots, red beets, cabbage, and pumpkins out from the garden today. Hopefully, the weather will stay nice, and some vegetables will grow even larger.  To the reader who sent me radish and turnip seeds to plant: I did plant them in August, and we are now feasting on them. They are very good and tender, which was surprising considering our hot, dry summer.  I put some leftover small potatoes in the ground, and the yield was good. I should have put more sweet potato plants in the ground, but at least we have enough for a good taste this winter. We'll be glad for all this hard work in the garden during the long, cold, dark days of January when we can open those canning jars and taste the bounty of summer.  Sunday evening, we planned a favorite around here for supper: tacos.  We had a large gathering, but having family over is the best of times. Those sweet, precious grandchildren are always welcome here, so the house was full of children. We all enjoy a taco supper. The tomatoes, mangoes (peppers) and onions used on the tacos were all from our garden. Canned hamburger was browned for the tacos, and there was lots more to feast on because everyone else brought a covered dish. As the family gets bigger and older we have to use larger containers now.  Here is a good dessert to use those beets from the garden:   Red Beet Chocolate Cake  1 1/2 cups sugar  3 eggs  1 cup oil  1 1/2 cups cooked, pureed, fresh beets  2 (1 ounce) squares of unsweetened chocolate, melted and cooled  1 teaspoon vanilla  1 3/4 cups flour  1/2 teaspoon salt  1/2 teaspoon baking soda  sifted confectioner's sugar Mix flour, soda, and salt. Set aside. Combine sugar, eggs, and oil in a mixing bowl. Stir vigorously. (People who use electric mixers can use them here at medium speed for 2 minutes.) Beat in beets, chocolate, and vanilla. Gradually add dry ingredients, beating well after each addition. Pour into buttered 9-inch by 13-inch cake pan. Bake at 350 for 25 minutes or till cake tests done when a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean. Cool in pan. Cover and let stand overnight to improve flavor. Sprinkle with powdered sugar. PS. You can put cream cheese icing on instead of powdered sugar.   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener. And remember: "For a happy, healthy life, garden every day."

The Daily Gardener
November 15, 2021 NYC Tree Canopy, Nutmeg, Flower Selections for a Box Garden, 1985 New York Spring Flower Show, Ray Bradbury, A House by the Sea by Bunny Williams, and Les Liliacees

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 26:09


Today in botanical history, we celebrate nutmeg, some flower recommendations for a green garden, and the rebirth of the NYC flower show after a ten-year hiatus. We'll hear an excerpt from some writing by Ray Bradbury. We Grow That Garden Library™ with a beautiful book by Bunny Williams. And then we'll wrap things up with the fate of Empress Josephine's copy of Pierre-Joseph Redoute's botanical watercolors known as ''Les Liliacees'' (''The Lilies'').     Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart To listen to the show while you're at home, just ask Alexa or Google to “Play the latest episode of The Daily Gardener Podcast.” And she will. It's just that easy.   The Daily Gardener Friday Newsletter Sign up for the FREE Friday Newsletter featuring: A personal update from me Garden-related items for your calendar The Grow That Garden Library™ featured books for the week Gardener gift ideas Garden-inspired recipes Exclusive updates regarding the show Plus, each week, one lucky subscriber wins a book from the Grow That Garden Library™ bookshelf.   Gardener Greetings Send your garden pics, stories, birthday wishes, and so forth to Jennifer@theDailyGardener.org   Facebook Group If you'd like to check out my curated news articles and original blog posts for yourself, you're in luck. I share all of it with the Listener Community in the Free Facebook Group - The Daily Gardener Community. So, there's no need to take notes or search for links. The next time you're on Facebook, search for Daily Gardener Community where you'd search for a friend... and request to join. I'd love to meet you in the group.   Curated News First NYC Tree Canopy Study Shows Growth as Storms and Budget Cuts Threaten Gains | thecity.nyc | Rachel Holliday Smith   Important Events November 15, 1843 On this day, the New England Farmer ran a little blurb about the Nutmeg Tree. The nutmeg tree flourishes in Singapore, near the equator. It is raised from the nut in nurseries, where it remains till the fifth year when it puts forth its first blossoms and shows its sex. It is then set out permanently. The trees are planted thirty feet apart, in diamond order a male tree in the center. They begin to bear in the eighth year, increasing for many years, and they pay a large profit. There is no nutmeg season. Every day of the year shows buds, blossoms, and fruit, in every stage of growth to maturity. The nutmeg is a large and beautiful tree, with thick foliage and of a rich green color. The ripe fruit is singularly brilliant. The shell is glossy black, and the mace it exposes when it bursts, is of a bright scarlet, making the tree one of the most beautiful objects of the vegetable world.  Well, this article from 1843 was correct. Nutmeg trees can actually grow to be about 65 feet tall. They bear fruit for six decades or longer - so they're very productive. The fruit of the nutmeg tree resembles and apricots.   And by the way, in case you're wondering the nutmeg is not a nut, it is a fruit - and that's why people with nut allergies can enjoy nutmeg because it's not a nut. Now the botanical name for nutmeg is Myristica fragrans. The etymology of the word Myristica is Greek and means “fragrance for anointing”, which gives us a clue to one of the ways that nutmeg was used in ancient times. You may have heard that nutmeg is illegal in Saudi Arabia. According to the journal of medical toxicology, nutmeg can be toxic and in Saudi Arabia, they consider nutmeg to be a narcotic.  Nutmeg is not allowed anywhere in the country unless it's already incorporated into some type of pre-blended spice mix.   November 15, 1981 On this day, Henry Mitchell wrote an article for the Washington Post called Blooms in the Boxwood in which he shared some of his favorite plants to grow in a primarily-green garden. Regarding the Japanese anemone, Henry wrote, It abides a good bit of shade and never looks better than against a background of box and ivy. The delicate-looking (but tough as leather) flowers are like white half-dollars set on a branching stem about four feet high, with a yellow boss of stamens in the middle. Its leaves all spring from the ground, like large green polished hands, so it looks good from spring to fall, and in winter you tidy it up and the earth is bare (sprigs of the native red cedar or holly can be stuck in… Regarding bugbane, Henry wrote, ...named for its supposed baneful effect on bugs... Its foliage is as good as or better than that of the anemone, and in October it opens its foxtail flowers (a quite thin fox, admittedly) on firm thin stems waist to chest high. The flowers are made of hundreds of tiny white florets, somewhat like an eremurus or a buddleis, only more gracefully curving than either. Against a green wall it is very handsome; gardeners who sometimes wonder what is wrong with marigolds and zinnias, reproached for their weedy coarseness, need only consult the bugbane to see the difference in elegance.  For Chrysanthemums, Henry advises: As fall comes, you might indulge in a white cushion chrysanthemum. Chrysanthemums in my opinion cannot be made to look very grand or elegant, so I would not overdo them. Of course, they are fine for specialists who like to grow hundreds of different sorts, but I am speaking of just a green garden with a touch of white. Then you come again to the white Japanese anemones and bugbanes.   November 15, 1984 On this day, The New York Times announced the return of a Spring Flower Show for the city. The International Flower Show ended, after over 10 years of exhibiting in the Coliseum, because of increasing costs and the demise of estates that recruited their garden staffs to create and grow exhibits, The new show's exhibition space will be 60,000 square feet, as against the 200,000 square feet provided by the Coliseum. An advantage of the new flower show's layout is that it will be on one floor. Larry Pardue, executive director of the Horticultural Society of New York, sponsor of the show, said:  ''It will be unlike any show in the country. Rather than view a series of small gardens, visitors will be totally immersed in two huge gardens, 76 feet by over 100 feet long. It will be designed to be an emotional experience.'' By all accounts, the 1985 flower show was a huge success and was visited by more than 83,000 people. Larry Pardue became the Sarasota, Florida executive director of the Marie Selby Botanic Gardens, which specialized in orchids, bromeliads, and other epiphytes.   Unearthed Words One day many years ago, a man walked along and stood in the sound of the ocean on a cold sunless shore and said, "We need a voice to call across the water, to warn ships; I'll make one. I'll make a voice that is like an empty bed beside you all night long, and like an empty house when you open the door, and like the trees in autumn with no leaves. A sound like the birds flying south, crying, and a sound like November wind and the sea on the hard, cold shore. I'll make a sound that's so alone that no one can miss it, that whoever hears it will weep in their souls, and to all who hear it in the distant towns. I'll make me a sound and an apparatus and they'll call it a Fog Horn, and whoever hears it will know the sadness of eternity and the briefness of life." The Fog Horn blew. ― Ray Bradbury, The Fog Horn   Grow That Garden Library A House by the Sea by Bunny Williams This fantastic book came out in 2016 and it is all about Bunny's marvelous, Caribbean home called La Colina. This book is a beautiful coffee table book and what's really neat about this book is that each chapter is written by her friends. So Bunny has one friend write about the architecture and then another friend discusses the collections and another friend talks about the cooking and the food. Then Paige Dickey, the garden writer, toured the gardens and writes this wonderful essay about Bunny's beautiful gardens at La Colina. Of course,  if I wasn't a huge bunny Williams fan if I didn't have her book called An Affair With A House or her book On Garden Style,  I maybe would be tempted not to get this book. But I am a huge bunny Williams fan and I know that everything she does is done with so much beauty, grace, and style that I could not resist getting a copy of this book. Then once I learned that Paige Dickey was the person that got to review the gardens? Well, then I had to get my copy of this book. This beautiful book would make a great Christmas present. The photographs are absolutely incredible. I'll tell you a few of my favorite things from the garden section of this book. There is an entrance to the cactus garden that features all of this blue pottery and in each one of these blue pots is a cactus which makes for a stunning entrance to her cactus garden. There's also a gorgeous stone shell fountain at the end of the swimming pool and it's covered in vine. In fact, Bunny is known for her use of vines in the garden - something to keep your eyes peeled for if you get this book because you'll see her use of vines throughout the garden. Bunny not only has vines climbing up structures, but they also just ramble around and kind of make their way - softening a lot of the hard edges in the garden. The hardscapes are absolutely to die for and there's an avenue of Palm trees in this over-the-top, incredible garden. The entire property is just truly breathtaking. This book is 256 pages of Bunny Williams in the Caribbean and it's a must-have if you enjoy Bunny Williams and her work. You can get a copy of A House by the Sea by Bunny Williams and support the show using the Amazon Link in today's Show Notes for around $20.   Today's Botanic Spark Reviving the little botanic spark in your heart November 15, 1985 On this day, The New York Times announced the auction of Empress Josephine's copy of Pierre-Joseph Redoute's botanical watercolors for ''Les Liliacees'' (''The Lilies''). Now the speculation in this article was that the auction could go from being five minutes long to five hours or longer. They had no idea who was going to ultimately win this particular auction and they estimated that Redoute The Lilies would go for anywhere from $5 to $7 million. Now this work was extra special because it was commissioned by Marie Antoinette. In fact, there's a famous story that Marie wanted to make sure that Redoute was as good as what she had heard and so she summoned him to come to her chambers in the middle of the night, one night and when he got there, she ordered him to paint her a cactus on the spot. He did and so obviously he proved his worth to her and he began painting many of the flowers that were in the Royal Gardens. Now Josephine Bonaparte was a huge lover of the gardens. She loved the flowers. She loved all of the new, exotic flowers from the tropics so she was always looking for new, beautiful blossoms to put in the Royal garden and of course, she was a huge Redoute fan. This impressive Redoute collection became hers and was passed on through her family line until 1935 when the collection was auctioned off in Zurich. Since that time it was held in a vault, in a bank as part of a family trust. Now, when it came to this particular auction, the reporter for this article spoke with a London dealer named Peter Mitchell who specialized in flower paintings and stressed the important significance of this work. He felt it was so unusual to have all of these originals still intact and still so beautiful and he expressed his concern that the collection might be bought by a syndicate, which basically means that a group of people would get together to buy the collection and then split it up. Thus, everybody in the syndicate would get their share of the collection. To cut the suspense, that's exactly what ended up happening. I checked the New York times for the result of this sale and here's what they wrote. “The sale lasted only three minutes. It was one of the fastest ever for such an expensive property. And the price achieved was the 10th highest for work purchased at an art auction house.  ''I have $5 million against all of you on the phone and most of you standing,'' John L. Marion, Sotheby's president, said from the rostrum. ''Is there any advance on $5 million? I give you fair warning - sold for $5 million.'' The 10 percent buyer's commission brought the total selling price to $5.5 million. Now the gentleman that represented the syndicate said that he thought the collection was worth $20 million and so he was thrilled with his purchase. He also gave a little insight into the syndicate, which was made up of executives from different companies, there was also a shopping mall developer, partners in law firms, commodities traders, as well as every major investment bank in New York. He said that. 75% of them wanted the watercolors for themselves (they wanted to own a piece of Redoute's botanical art) while the other 25% were using it purely for investment. And so that was the fate of Pierre Joseph Redoute's The Lilies collection of botanical watercolors that had been owned by Empress Josephine Bonaparte. Today for you and I, we can purchase copies of Redoute's work on Etsy for around $20.   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener. And remember: "For a happy, healthy life, garden every day."

Mic The Gardener - Gardening Podcast
Mic the Gardener - Gardening Podcast - Hosta Special with Sienna Hosta

Mic The Gardener - Gardening Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 56:54


In this episode, another Plant Special, I chat to nurserymen Chris Potts and Ollie Walker of Sienna Hosta. Chris and Ollie are hosta fanatics and what they don't know about hostas isn't worth knowing. And, I can assure you, there isn't much if anything they don't know! Following a walk around the hosta-packed nursery I sat down with them both to chat about everything you could possibly need to know about growing hostas successfully. We chat about: What to grow hostas in and where Growing hostas in containers General maintenance Slugs and snails! Other pests and diseases Feeding and watering Propagation And, following their debut at the Chelsea Flower Show in September 2021, they tell me about how their spectacular stand came together, and how they found out they had been awarded the prestigious RHS Chelsea Flower Show gold medal for their stand. You can find out more about Sienna Hosta and order hostas from their website www.siennahosta.co.uk or follow them at their Instagram account @_siennahosta_. And talking of Instagram, click here to see some pics of me with Chris and Ollie on the day the podcast was recorded My thanks to Chris and Ollie for their time and I look forward to chatting again and seeing you both in 2022 at some of the shows. As always, please do follow/subscribe and if you listen through Apple podcast, please do leave a review. You can also follow me at my Instagram account @mike_thegardener or email me at micthegardener01@gmail.com. See you next week. Mike

Talking Heads - a Gardening Podcast
Ep. 115 - Summer and Autumn in the Vegetable Garden may have passed, but how much should we focus on Winter as well - Lucy lets Saul know there's lots more going on than we think!

Talking Heads - a Gardening Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 31:06


The mellow fruitfulness of Autumn has been heralded by the subtle change in temperature and darker mornings and evenings in the garden. For Lucy Chamberlain and Saul Walker this starts one of their favourite times of year as Lucy's vegetable patch is at maximum yield producing food for East Donyland Hall and Saul revels in the changing colours in the canopies of his precious treescape at Stonelands. So join us throughout the season as we bring tales of crispy leaves, hibernating plants and plenty of pumpkins!Throughout  Spring, Summer and Autumn we think of the Vegetable plots as a hive of growing energy and then a larder of beautiful fruit and veg for our kitchens - but are we guilty of switching of during the winter believing that there not much going on. Well lucy lets Saul know that actually the winter time can be just as busy when it comes to growing, harvesting and planning in the vegetable garden!Twitter links:Saul @GardeningSaulLucy @HeadGardenerLCIntro and Outro music from https://filmmusic.io"Fireflies and Stardust" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com)License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) 

Jungle Brothers Strength and Movement
#135 Paul West Returns To The Jungle

Jungle Brothers Strength and Movement

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021


#135 Paul West Returns To The Jungle Paul West is back in the church of gains for the first time in an interesting 12 months...Paul West is a Chef, Gardener, Author and star of River Cottage Australia. He's also a BJJ and movement enthusiast and an honorary Jungle Brother. We catch up on a lot, […] The post #135 Paul West Returns To The Jungle appeared first on Jungle Brothers Strength and Movement.

Renaissance Church Weekend Messages
The Gardener and The King | Future

Renaissance Church Weekend Messages

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021


Into the Garden with Leslie
39: Fall Fiesta Sugar Maple, Erin the Impatient Gardener, planting a tree and more

Into the Garden with Leslie

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 40:43


I highly recommend you get your fall fiesta from the native Acer saccharum instead of that other colorful thing that is taking over our native forests: Burning Bush or Eonymus alatus. Erin Schanen the Impatient Gardener and I talk about most anything and everything, including her new naturalistic garden. And I take you through some basics of perennials division, planting a tree, and what to do with compost (not much, right now!)

The Gestalt Gardener
The Gestalt Gardener | Perennial Veggies

The Gestalt Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 49:49


Who does not love a good and healthy vegetable garden? How about one that sprouts and produces year after year? In this edition of the Gestalt Gardener, Felder is asked to suggest perianal vegetables that would make for a great year-round garden and gets an assist from an unlikely source. Also, he fields questions about lawn grass, weed & feed, and other timely southern garden questions. Let's get dirty! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Landscaper's Guide to Modern Sales & Marketing
Recruiting & Retention Strategies with Monique Allen Part 2 of 2

The Landscaper's Guide to Modern Sales & Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 25:05


If there's one thing in common with most ineffective landscaping job ads right now, it's demanding that everyone has at least three years of experience doing landscaping. But what if you accepted applicants who had no landscaping experience for a paid internship, could it work? In today's podcast episode, I sat down with Monique Allen, who runs the Garden Continuum, a landscaping company out in Massachusetts, who also wrote the book, Stop Landscaping, Start Life-Scaping. Like many landscapers, Monique found herself facing staffing and supply chain issues and decided to try some new and bold ideas. In today's podcast episode we talk about this further, including:If paid internships with inexperienced professionals is working What happened when she introduced flex-time and added part-time positionsWhat it means to have the mindset of being a Gardener of PeopleFor the full show notes, visit ramblinjackson.com/recruiting-and-retention-strategies-with-monique-allenMore episodes, videos, show transcripts at http://www.ramblinjackson.com/podcast/

The Landscaper's Guide to Modern Sales & Marketing
Recruiting & Retention Strategies with Monique Allen Part 1 of 2

The Landscaper's Guide to Modern Sales & Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 30:30


If there's one thing in common with most ineffective landscaping job ads right now, it's demanding that everyone has at least three years of experience doing landscaping. But what if you accepted applicants who had no landscaping experience for a paid internship, could it work? In today's podcast episode, I sat down with Monique Allen, who runs the Garden Continuum, a landscaping company out in Massachusetts, who also wrote the book, Stop Landscaping, Start Life-Scaping. Like many landscapers, Monique found herself facing staffing and supply chain issues and decided to try some new and bold ideas. In today's podcast episode we talk about this further, including:If paid internships with inexperienced professionals is working What happened when she introduced flex-time and added part-time positionsWhat it means to have the mindset of being a Gardener of PeopleFor the full show notes, visit ramblinjackson.com/recruiting-and-retention-strategies-with-monique-allenMore episodes, videos, show transcripts at http://www.ramblinjackson.com/podcast/

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
Common Ground Radio 11/11/21: Keynote Address from the 2021 MOFGA Farmer to Farmer Conference – Dr. Gladis Zinati – Rodale Institute

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 57:45


Producer/Host: C.J. Walke Keynote Address from the 2021 MOFGA Farmer to Farmer Conference – Dr. Gladis Zinati – Rodale Institute -Gladis Zinati – “Linking Soil Health to Plant Health: Connecting the Dots” -Linking soil health to crop health and human health -Nutrient cycling and carbon sequestration Speaker: Dr. Gladis Zinati, Director of Vegetable Systems Trial, Rodale Institute, Kutztown, PA About the hosts: C.J. Walke has been involved in Maine agriculture for over 20 years and has worked in numerous capacities for the Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association (MOFGA) starting in 2006. Since 2012, C.J. has worked as farm manager for College of the Atlantic’s Peggy Rockefeller Farms in Bar Harbor, Maine, where he works with students to grow organic fruits, vegetables and livestock products. He holds degrees in park management/environment education and library science. Common Ground Radio debuted in June of 2010 and C.J. has been the show’s host since 2014. Holli Cederholm has been involved in organic agriculture since 2005 when she first apprenticed on a small farm. She has worked on organic farms in Maine, Vermont, Connecticut, Scotland and Italy and, in 2010, founded a small farm focused on celebrating open-pollinated and heirloom vegetables. As the former manager of a national nonprofit dedicated to organic seed growers, she authored a peer-reviewed handbook on GMO avoidance strategies for seed growers. Holli has also been a steward at Forest Farm, the iconic homestead of “The Good Life” authors Helen and Scott Nearing; a host of “The Farm Report” on Heritage Radio Network; and a long-time contributor for The Maine Organic Farmer & Gardener, which she now edits in her role as content creator and editor at MOFGA. The post Common Ground Radio 11/11/21: Keynote Address from the 2021 MOFGA Farmer to Farmer Conference – Dr. Gladis Zinati – Rodale Institute first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

Grow, cook, eat, arrange with Sarah Raven & Arthur Parkinson
Tender Perennial Climbers with Sarah Raven & Arthur Parkinson - Episode 41

Grow, cook, eat, arrange with Sarah Raven & Arthur Parkinson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 21:34


The pleasure of designing a garden stretches far beyond colour - with the prolific growth of tender perennial climbers, your flowers become architectural art, giving arches and teepees spectacular structure.Join Sarah & Arthur this week as they take a journey through their pick of the climbers, from the pleasant purple and apricot combination of Rhodochiton & ‘African Sunset' to the captivating and cathartically named ‘Love in a Puff'. In this episode, discover:Sarah & Arthur's passion for the exotic and rampant Cobaea ScandensThe bombastic balloon-like seed pods that lend Cardiospermum its common name: Love in a PuffHow a smattering of ‘African Sunset' paired with Rhodochiton creates a striking pairing for teepees and archesWhen and how to sow each of these climbers to transform your garden with their incredible depthSarah's simple recipe for a delicious roasted cauliflower with a dressing rich in flavourView all products mentioned and find further advice from Sarah: https://bit.ly/3f2DFiHFollow Sarah: https://bit.ly/3jDTvBpFollow Arthur: https://bit.ly/3jxSKK5Order Sarah's book: https://bit.ly/2TWHJczOrder Arthur's book: https://bit.ly/3xOov7HShop on the Sarah Raven Website: http://bit.ly/3jvbaeuGet in touch: info@sarahraven.com

It's All About Food
It‘s All About Food - DJ Cavem, Eco-Hip Hop

It's All About Food

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 57:46


Dr. Ietef “DJ Cavem” Vita, Eco-Hip Hop Dr. Ietef “DJ Cavem” Vita the O.G. (organic Gardener) is an eco-hip hop artist, educator and vegan chef from Denver. His songs are about climate change, food justice and eating healthy. He's performed at the White House, and has been featured in Oprah Magazine and on the Rachael Ray Show. His latest album BIOMIMICZ was released as a seed pack to spur listeners into action. He's shared the stage with Moe Def, Nick Jonas, Rick Ross, The Wu-Tang Clan, Public Enemy, Snoop Dogg, Wyclef Jean, among others. On the web: facebook.com/veganchefietef instagram.com/ietef twitter.com/ietef Music links: https://smarturl.it/DjCavem-Biomimicz #ECOHIPHOP #VEGAN. New BIOMIMICZ EP available in seed packs @ chefietef.com    Starting November 11th for one week only join dozens of Hip Hop, sports and entertainment stars for They're Trying To Kill Us which blows the lid off the institutional racism that has led to abhorrent rates of diabetes, cancer and other chronic diseases among Americans of Color. You can download the film for 7 days only on the website at https://www.theyretryingtokillus.com/ starting 11/11 at 11:00 am ET.  

Money Talkers
Don't Take Your Medical Advice from Your Gardener - High Impact Interview with Brent Kesler

Money Talkers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 10:17


Brent Kesler is sharing his advice to people looking to build wealth and how to help kids retain some of the financial tips you give them. His big advice to people: be careful who you get your financial education from. Brent Kesler was a Chiropractor and Chiropractic coach for over 14 years in what seems like a previous life at this point. After implementing The Money Multiplier (TMM) Method, he was able to pay off $984,711 in 3rd party debt in 39 months. He became so passionate about how powerful this concept was, he began to share it with others. Don't forget to get Brent's book "Mapping Out The Millionaire Mystery" on Amazon!

Mic The Gardener - Gardening Podcast
Mic the Gardener - Gardening Podcast - Freddie Strickland

Mic The Gardener - Gardening Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 59:09


In this week's episode I chat to RHS Young Designer of the Year, Freddie Strickland. This episode was recorded at the beautiful Iford Manor Gardens near Bradford on Avon, Wiltshire, a garden which both Freddie and I have wanted to visit. Luckily, garden owners William and Marianne allowed us to sneak in through the back door as the garden is currently closed for winter. Freddie tells me how he got into garden design, about his course and his lecturer and landscaper, Matt James. He also talks about the process he went through to apply for the RHS Young Designer of the Year and his Tatton Park show garden, ‘On Tropic'. He recounts the build of the garden, the judging process and the moment when he was announced as the winner of the RHS Young Designer of the Year competition, live on national television. In an in-depth conversation Freddie talks about making the transition from college to starting out on your own in the world of garden design world and the importance of building a great relationship with clients to ensure the best possible garden is designed, built and planted for them. Freddie is clearly an ambitious, enthusiastic and dedicated garden designer. I look forward to seeing what he does next and will follow his career with much interest. Head over to Freddie's website for more information, www.freddiestickland.com. My thanks to Freddie for taking the time to chat to me and for taking me to Iford Manor Gardens. Pictures of our visit to Iford Manor gardens can be found by visiting my Instagram page, @mike_thegardener. And you can find out more about Freddie by visiting his Instagram page @freddiestricklandgardens. As always, please do follow/subscribe as there are still more episodes to come in series 2. And, if you listen via Apple podcast, please do leave a review. And I will see you next week with a Hosta plant special episode! Mike

In Defense of Plants Podcast
Ep. 342 - The Way of the Gardener

In Defense of Plants Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 68:17


Gardener, author, and environmentalist Lyndon Penner returns to the podcast to talk about his new book, "The Way of the Gardener: Lost in the Weeds Along the Camino de Santiago." This book details his 825 km (512 mi) journey across Spain and all of the wonderful plants he met along the way. This episode was produced in part by Levi, Sylvia, Lanny, Ben, Lily, Craig, Sarah, Lor, Monika, Brandon, Jeremy, Suzanne, Kristina, Christine, Silas, Michael, Aristia, Felicidad, Lauren, Danielle, Allie, Jeffrey, Amanda, Tommy, Marcel, C Leigh, Karma, Shelby, Christopher, Alvin, Arek, Chellie, Dani, Paul, Dani, Tara, Elly, Colleen, Natalie, Nathan, Ario, Laura, Cari, Margaret, Mary, Connor, Nathan, Jan, Jerome, Brian, Azomonas, Ellie, University Greens, Joseph, Melody, Patricia, Matthew, Garrett, John, Ashley, Cathrine, Melvin, OrangeJulian, Porter, Jules, Griff, Joan, Megan, Marabeth, Les, Ali, Southside Plants, Keiko, Robert, Bryce, Wilma, Amanda, Helen, Mikey, Michelle, German, Joerg, Cathy, Tate, Steve, Kae, Carole, Mr. Keith Santner, Lynn, Aaron, Sara, Kenned, Brett, Jocelyn, Ethan, Sheryl, Runaway Goldfish, Ryan, Chris, Alana, Rachel, Joanna, Lori, Paul, Griff, Matthew, Bobby, Vaibhav, Steven, Joseph, Brandon, Liam, Hall, Jared, Brandon, Christina, Carly, Kazys, Stephen, Katherine, Mohsin Kazmi Takes Pictures, Manny, doeg, Daniel, Tim, Philip, Tim, Lisa, Brodie, Bendix, Irene, holly, Sara, and Margie.

Renaissance Church Weekend Messages
The Gardener and the King | Resurrection

Renaissance Church Weekend Messages

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021


Talking Heads - a Gardening Podcast
Ep. 114 - Autumn leaves are showing their colours, but what exactly is happening for the tones of yellow, orange, red and purple to be at their glorious best? In this episode, Saul and Lucy delve in to the science of autumn colour.

Talking Heads - a Gardening Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 35:24


The mellow fruitfulness of Autumn has been heralded by the subtle change in temperature and darker mornings and evenings in the garden. For Lucy Chamberlain and Saul Walker this starts one of their favourite times of year as Lucy's vegetable patch is at maximum yield producing food for East Donyland Hall and Saul revels in the changing colours in the canopies of his precious treescape at Stonelands. So join us throughout the season as we bring tales of crispy leaves, hibernating plants and plenty of pumpkins!Autumn leaf colours are one of the marvels of our temperate climate, but what exactly is happening within the leaf, and why do some trees and shrubs exhibit more glorious tones than others? Lucy and Saul muse on this topic, delving into the world of chlorophyll, anthocyanins and carotenoids. Leafmould, too, is at our fingertips at this time of year - is there science behind this? You bet! Twitter links:Saul @GardeningSaulLucy @HeadGardenerLCIntro and Outro music from https://filmmusic.io"Fireflies and Stardust" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com)License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) 

The Gestalt Gardener
The Gestalt Gardener | Fall Flavors

The Gestalt Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 49:54


While autumn is the proper name for the season between summer and winter, the name that you are most likely to hear is fall. This four-letter word perfectly describes this time of year with the falling temperatures, falling tree leaves, and falling away from the bright colors of summer. Today Felder brings in a great fall bouquet with color and flavor to represent the season and shares a message of what is on the other side of a gardener's life. And as always helps out with your southern gardening questions. Let's get dirty! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

WPKN Community Radio
Bob Halstead Community Gardener and activist. Digging In The Dirt

WPKN Community Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 21:15


Bob Halstead is president of two community garden groups, one statewide, and one for Bridgeport: Connecticut Community Gardening Association (CCGA) and Bridgeport Community Land Trust (The Trust), respectively. Bob founded the community garden program in 1980 in Bridgeport and has been active in various leadership capacities in forming approximately 50 gardens about 25 that still exist in low income areas. Most gardens manage themselves and many are between are 20 to 40 years old. Bob actively now manages 6 thriving gardens one of which is a school garden at Harding High School.

Grow, cook, eat, arrange with Sarah Raven & Arthur Parkinson
Prue Leith in conversation with Sarah Raven - Episode 40

Grow, cook, eat, arrange with Sarah Raven & Arthur Parkinson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 29:22


After Sarah's recent appearance on Prue Leith's More4 show, Prue's Great Gardening Plot, it's an absolute delight to host Prue on this week's fascinating episode of ‘grow, cook, eat, arrange'.We're given an insight into Prue's gardening and the work that's happened behind the scenes to create the dazzling spaces we see on her TV programme, how she's made the most of challenging Cotswold clay with glamourous tulips & gorgeous roses, and Prue's marvellous, ongoing support for better catering in hospitals.The latter part of this episode does contain a deep and sensitive discussion about recent developments around dignity in dying, so listener discretion is advised.In this episode, discover:How Prue transformed a farmyard into a sprawling orchardPicking prolific plants that thrive in difficult soil & challenging conditionsFascinating tales from the recent series' of The Great British Bake OffPrue's remarkable advocacy for a revolution in hospital cateringPhoto by Geoff Pugh.View all products mentioned and find further advice from Sarah: https://bit.ly/3f2DFiH Follow Sarah: https://bit.ly/3jDTvBpFollow Arthur: https://bit.ly/3jxSKK5Follow Prue Leith: https://www.instagram.com/prueleith/Watch Prue's Great Garden Plot on demand: https://www.channel4.com/programmes/prues-great-garden-plotOrder Sarah's new book: https://bit.ly/2TWHJczOrder Arthur's new book: https://bit.ly/3xOov7HShop on the Sarah Raven Website: http://bit.ly/3jvbaeuGet in touch: info@sarahraven.com

SB Nation AM with Tony Desiere & Ronn Culver
1631: Steve Gardener, USA Today joins Wake Up Call

SB Nation AM with Tony Desiere & Ronn Culver

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 13:03


USA Today's baseball writer and friend of the show, Steve Gardner breaks down this #Braves team and their road to winning the #WorldSeries

The Daily Gardener
November 3, 2021 Mercy Park Sculptures, William Young, William Cullen Bryant, Sarah Addison Allen, Genealogy for Gardeners by Simon Maughan and Ross Bayton, and Kansas Gardens

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 39:36


Today in botanical history, we celebrate a German-American botanist who reached out to Queen Charlotte, an American poet who found inspiration in nature and the father of ecology. We'll hear an excerpt from The Sugar Queen - a great fiction book. We Grow That Garden Library™ with a book that's part of a wonderfully informative series from the RHS. And then we'll wrap things up with a little story about the glory of Kansas gardens in November.   Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart To listen to the show while you're at home, just ask Alexa or Google to “Play the latest episode of The Daily Gardener Podcast.” And she will. It's just that easy.   The Daily Gardener Friday Newsletter Sign up for the FREE Friday Newsletter featuring: A personal update from me Garden-related items for your calendar The Grow That Garden Library™ featured books for the week Gardener gift ideas Garden-inspired recipes Exclusive updates regarding the show Plus, each week, one lucky subscriber wins a book from the Grow That Garden Library™ bookshelf.   Gardener Greetings Send your garden pics, stories, birthday wishes, and so forth to Jennifer@theDailyGardener.org   Facebook Group If you'd like to check out my curated news articles and original blog posts for yourself, you're in luck. I share all of it with the Listener Community in the Free Facebook Group - The Daily Gardener Community. So, there's no need to take notes or search for links. The next time you're on Facebook, search for Daily Gardener Community, where you'd search for a friend... and request to join. I'd love to meet you in the group.   Curated News The Almanac A Seasonal Guide to 2021by Lia Leendertz  Mercy Park garden adds 3 new sculptures | The Joplin Globe | Emily Younker   Important Events November 3, 1766 On this day, a young botanist named  William Young returned to America after receiving the title of the Queen's botanist. William Young was born in Germany, and he immigrated to the United States when he was just a little boy at the age of two. His family settled in Philadelphia and eventually became neighbors to one of America's first botanists, John Bartram. Growing up, William spent a great deal of his childhood exploring Bartram's gardens. Bertram even encouraged him to pursue botany, and he took him along on some collecting trips. By all accounts, William was a smart and self-directed young man. When he was in his early twenties, he decided that he wanted to get the attention of the brand new Queen of England, Queen Charlotte. Charlotte was the bride of George III, and William put together a little parcel for her - a little gift of seeds - along with a letter (no doubt congratulating her on her wedding and introducing himself as an American botanist.) Charmed by William's thoughtful gift, Charlotte decided to summon William to England. She wanted him to come to England to study botany for a year and then return to America to collect plants on behalf of the royal family. And so that's exactly what William Young ended up doing. When he left America, he had no formal training in botany. He was, however, full of potential and eager to learn. This opportunity in England was an extraordinary chance for William to learn the science of botany from the worldwide center for botanical research: England. At the same time, this series of events caused a bit of jealousy and a shock in the American botanical community. John Bartram himself was an old man by the time this happened for William, and he made comments along the lines of, "Hey, I've been in America, collecting and cultivating for decades, and I've never received an offer like this." And so many of the American botanists really couldn't believe William's good fortune. His trip was essentially like winning a botanist lottery with the promise not only of training but steady work and support from a generous, well-funded patron. Despite Charlotte's hopes for William, his peers were dubious of William's ability to measure up to the task. While William was passionate about botany, he hadn't demonstrated any particular acumen or success that should have garnered the kind of opportunity that had come his way. The bottom line was, they didn't think William had it in him. Yet, William's critics were not entirely fair. After all, William had been bold enough to send that package of seeds to the new Queen. And he was smart enough to leverage his German heritage when he wrote to her. Charlotte had German heritage as well, and when she first came to England, she surrounded herself with other Germans who spoke her language and shared her history, customs, and culture. Summoning William to England was just another example of Queen Charlotte making herself feel more at home away from home. When William arrived in England, he was in his early twenties. He had a huge learning curve to conquer when it came to his new station in life. He had no idea what it was like to be in front of royalty or how to behave in Royal circles. Of course, William didn't have a ton of life experience as a young person in his twenties. So, he performed exactly as one might imagine he would: dazzled by the luxury and lifestyle, he quickly began racking up bills. With each passing month, he found himself deeper in debt until he ended up arrested and in jail for the large debts that he owed. Incredibly, it was the Queen who bailed him out - but not before sending him home to Philadelphia with the hopes that he could still perform as a plant collector in America. And so it was on this day. November 3 in 1766, that William returned to America with his new title as botanist to the King and Queen. Instead of being humbled by his financial misdeeds, William returned proud and haughty. He strutted about under the auspices of his Royal appointment, but his behavior didn't endear him to his American peers. They heard the rumors about how William had acted when he was in England and they were turned off by his peacocking and attire. In a letter to the botanist Peter Collinson, John Bartram wrote, “I am surprised that Young is come back so soon. He cuts the greatest figure in town and struts along the streets whistling, with his sword and gold lace.” And then Bartram confided that William had visited his garden three times, feigning respect and bragging about his yearly pay from the Royal family, which amounted to 300 pounds sterling. Now William was no fool, and it's clear that he craved acceptance from his peers. At the same time, he was probably aware of how some of his peers truly felt about him. But he did not dwell on this conundrum and focused on his work. He still had collecting to do for the King and Queen, and he needed to mend fences on that front if he ever hoped to make it as a botanist. And so, he set off for the Carolinas, where he spent an entire year collecting plants. Then, he carefully and quite expertly packaged up all of the plants that he had found and traveled back to London - personally bringing all of these plants to the King and Queen and hoping to get back in their good graces. Although William arrived in England only to be refused to be seen by the King and Queen, he still managed to make his trip a resounding success. By shepherding rare, live plants in wonderful condition from the Carolinas to England, he impressed English collectors. And there was one plant in particular that really helped to repair and save William's reputation, and that was the Venus Fly Trap. William brought many live specimens of the Venus flytrap to England, and as one might imagine, the plant caused a sensation. Without the flytrap, there was probably little that William could say to restore his reputation. So in this sense, his plants, especially the Venus flytrap, did the mending and the PR work for him. What William did was essentially no different than an apologetic spouse who brings their partner flowers after a fight. That's exactly what William did on this trip when he returned and presented the Venus flytrap to England. One other fact about this trip is that William proved himself to be an expert plant packer. Clearly, one of the biggest challenges for early botanists was keeping specimens alive - that was really hard to do. Dead specimens didn't garner anywhere near the attention or pay of living plants. William's skill in this area underscores just how intelligent and thoughtful William could be. A 1771 letter to Humphrey Marshall detailed William's packing technic: William Young sends his plants very safely by wrapping them in moss and packing them pretty close [together] in a box. He ties the moss in a ball around the roots with a piece of packthread...It's very surprising how well they keep in this manner.  William's method differs little from the way plants are packaged and sent by mail today. William ends up devoting his life to botany. He returned to American and collected plants in the Carolinas, returning to England when he had a full shipment. William mastered his collecting strategy over his lifetime - returning again and again to the Carolinas, scouring the wilderness for rare plants like the Venus flytrap that had brought him so much success. Along the way, William continued to struggle financially as he paid his debts. But by the end of his life, William was able to get his affairs in order, and he actually died a fairly wealthy man. Tragically, he died young at the age of 43. In December of 1784, William decided to set out once again for the Carolinas. Unbeknownst to him, he was going on what would become his final collecting trip. He never did reach the Carolinas. He only made it as far as Maryland, where he collected along a waterway known as Gunpowder Falls, where he fell into the river and died after being swept away by the current. His body was found about seven weeks later.   November 3, 1794 Birth of William Cullen Bryant, American poet.   William drew inspiration from the natural world. He once wrote a lovely verse about roses: Loveliest of lovely things are they, On earth, that soonest pass away. The rose that lives its little hour Is prized beyond the sculptured flower. William also wrote about the month of November in a little poem called A Winter Piece.  ...When shriek'd The bleak November winds, and smote the woods, And the brown fields were herbless, and the shades, That met above the merry rivulet, Were spoil'd, I sought, I loved them still,—they seem'd Like old companions in adversity.   November 3, 1841 Birth of Eugenius Warming, Danish botanist. Eugenius was one of the founders of modern plant ecology. He's credited with writing the first ecology textbook with his book, Oecology of Plants: An Introduction to the Study of Plant Communities (1895).   Unearthed Words She went to the window. A fine sheen of sugary frost covered everything in sight, and white smoke rose from chimneys in the valley below the resort town. The window opened to a rush of sharp early November air that would have the town in a flurry of activity, anticipating the tourists the colder weather always brought to the high mountains of North Carolina. She stuck her head out and took a deep breath. If she could eat the cold air, she would. She thought cold snaps were like cookies, like gingersnaps. In her mind, they were made with white chocolate chunks and had a cool, brittle vanilla frosting. They melted like snow in her mouth, turning creamy and warm. ― Sarah Addison Allen, The Sugar Queen   Grow That Garden Library Genealogy for Gardeners by Simon Maughan  and Dr Ross Bayton This book came out in 2017, and the subtitle is Plant Families Explored & Explained. Anything that has genealogy and gardening in the title is a book that I'm interested in. Before I get into this particular review, I should mention that this book is part of one of my favorite garden series by the RHS. So in this series is the book Latin for gardeners as well as botany for gardeners. And now this book Genealogy for Gardeners is designed to help you explore and understand plant families - and plant family trees, which to me is even more exciting. Now you may be wondering why. Well, I think the authors do a great job of explaining that in the preface to their book. They write, While most of us think of plants, that's belonging to one big happy family. The fact is they don't. There are hundreds of different plant families, which botanists have cleverly grouped together using what they know of family histories and genealogy and now, of course, DNA to bring some sense and order to more than a quarter of a million different plant species.  But why should this matter to you as a gardener, aside from just wanting to become more knowledgeable about plant families? Well, here's the explanation from the authors: Plant families are all around us. Whatever the time of year, go for a walk and look for wild or garden plants. You'll be surprised at how many plant families are represented within a small radius of your home. Even in your own garden, there will be a fantastic genealogy of plants.  Thanks largely to the efforts of plant collectors and horticulturists who brought the plants into cultivation from the four corners of the world.  When it comes to being a good gardener making connections is what it's all about. And if you are faced with a strongly acidic soil, and know that rhododendrons will grow, then you can broaden your planting ideas to include other plants in the same family, such as Heather. Mountain Laurel, leather leaf, blueberries, and others. If you are designing with plants, you may know that all plants and a particular family, and share certain features, which enables you to mix displays effectively and extend your range.  Now that is a very compelling reason to get to know your plant families. One of the things that I love about this particular series of books is that the illustrations are incredible. The editors have pulled images of botanical art that truly are the best example of some of these plants. The beauty of these books, including the cover, just is not rivaled. In fact, the minute I spot these books, they just have a look and a feel to them - I know immediately that it's part of this series from the RHS. These books are in my office on a special little bookshelf of books that I reference all the time, and this little series from the RHS is such a gem. This particular book about plant family, garden, genealogy - Basically the genealogy of plants-  is one that I go back to again and again, and again. So this is a fantastic book. As I mentioned, the illustrations are great. It is very clearly laid out. They've really done the heavy lifting when it comes to simplifying this material, making it very understandable and accessible. And yet, they do not dumb it down. That's not what this book is about. If you want a book on this topic that is exceptionally clear And is a delight to read, then this is the book that you've been waiting for. So, whether you're a landscape designer, a horticulture student, or just an amateur gardener, Genealogy for Gardeners will help you better understand and utilize plant families in your garden. This book is 224 pages of plant families and plant family trees - and it's part of one of the top garden book series on the market today. You can get a copy of Genealogy for Gardeners by Simon Maughan and Ross Bayton and support the show using the Amazon Link in today's Show Notes for around $20.   Today's Botanic Spark Reviving the little botanic spark in your heart November 3, 1903 On this day, The Cherokee Sentinel (Cherokee, Kansas) published this heartwarming blurb about the gardens in the Heartland of America. Here's what they wrote: It's November, and gardens and flowers are as green and beautiful as in summer. Verily, Kansas is an American Italy and the garden spot of the world.  Well, I don't know how true that was, and I question whether that was written for the benefit of enticing immigrants to come to Kansas. Nevertheless, I found it very sweet, and I thought it was a great way to end the show today.   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener. And remember: "For a happy, healthy life, garden every day."

The Daily Gardener
November 2, 2021 Happier with Horticulture, Carnegie Cactus, Daniil Andreyev, Potpourri, Tom Perrotta, The Art of the Islamic Garden by Emma Clark, and 1975 Book Recommendations

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 36:51


Today in botanical history, we celebrate the botanical name of the Saguaro Cactus, a Russian writer and mystic, and November potpourri. We'll hear an excerpt from Tom Perrotta's best-selling 2011 book. We Grow That Garden Library™ with a book that celebrates the Islamic Garden. And then we'll wrap things up with some hip Book Recommendations from 1975.   Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart To listen to the show while you're at home, just ask Alexa or Google to “Play the latest episode of The Daily Gardener Podcast.” And she will. It's just that easy.   The Daily Gardener Friday Newsletter Sign up for the FREE Friday Newsletter featuring: A personal update from me Garden-related items for your calendar The Grow That Garden Library™ featured books for the week Gardener gift ideas Garden-inspired recipes Exclusive updates regarding the show Plus, each week, one lucky subscriber wins a book from the Grow That Garden Library™ bookshelf.   Gardener Greetings Send your garden pics, stories, birthday wishes, and so forth to Jennifer@theDailyGardener.org   Facebook Group If you'd like to check out my curated news articles and original blog posts for yourself, you're in luck. I share all of it with the Listener Community in the Free Facebook Group - The Daily Gardener Community. So, there's no need to take notes or search for links. The next time you're on Facebook, search for Daily Gardener Community, where you'd search for a friend... and request to join. I'd love to meet you in the group.   Curated News Getting Happier with Horticulture: The Healthy Benefits of Gardening | gradynewsource.uga.edu | Gianna Perani   Important Events November 2, 1902 On this day, Nathaniel Britton, one of the founders of the New York Botanical Garden, wrote to the industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie asking for permission to name a genus of Giant Cactus native to Arizona and northern Mexico in his honor. Three days later, Mr. Carnegie's secretary responded:   “Mr. Carnegie has yours of November 2nd and asks me to say he is greatly honored by the proposal and will do his best to live up to it.”  And so, the majestic Saguaro ("suh-GWAR-oh") Cactus, the largest cactus in the United States and a plant synonymous with the American West, was christened the Carnegiea gigantea.   Saguaros can live for over two centuries. The Saguaro root system has one large tap root accompanied by a very intricate and shallow root system that lies within the top three inches of the soil. Any precious drops of rain are guided down to the ground beneath its mighty arms.  After thirty-five years of life, Saguaro's produce a white night-blooming flower that is bat-pollinated. Saguaros begin to develop their arms after reaching the age of fifty. The average Saguaro weighs three tons. The largest Saguaro ever recorded was called "Granddaddy." Granddaddy stood forty feet tall, had over 52 limbs, and was estimated to be three hundred years old.   November 2, 1906 Birth of Daniil Andreyev ("Da-NEEL An-drave"), Russian writer, poet, and mystic. He wrote a book called The Rose of the World over eight-and-a-half years as a prisoner in a Stalin prison camp. Daniil once wrote, "Perhaps the worst will never come to pass, and tyranny on such a scale will never recur. Perhaps humanity will forevermore retain the memory of  Russia's terrible historical experience. Every heart nurses that hope, and without it life would be unbearable." Daniil had uncanny powers of recall and memory. He was also a voracious reader and grew his personal library to over 2,000 books by the time he was arrested in 1947. Daniil suffered from a spinal defect and wore an iron corset while in prison to cope with the pain. Daniil began having mystic experiences as an adolescent. His first poem was called The Garden. In 1949, at the Vladimir high-security prison, Daniil started to have regular spiritual encounters and visions. And so he used those experiences to write Rose of the World at night. He had his final transcendent revelation in November of 1953 and then finished the book after his release from prison in 1957. And then, Daniil kept the book to himself - hiding it from the government in order to keep it from being destroyed. Daniil's Rose of the World remained hidden before finally getting published in 1991 under Gorbachev. The Rose of the World was an instant bestseller. Daniel H. Shubin wrote the latest English translation in 2018. Shubin writes that, “[Daniil] Envisioned the reign of rows of the world on Earth in the twenty-third century, the future Epoch being a golden age of humanity, whose essence will develop… into a close connection between God and people. It includes a society that consists of a worldwide ecclesiastical fraternity.” Daniil himself explained Rose of the World this way: Rose of the World can be compared to an inverted flower whose root is in heaven, while the petal bowl is here, among Humanity, on Earth. Its stem is the revelation through which the spiritual sap flows, sustaining and strengthening its petals... But other than the petals, it also has a pith; this is its individual teaching.   November 2, 1954 On this day, The Journal Herald (Dayton, Ohio) ran a little snippet on the wonder of Potpourri from the November garden. The November garden has her odors. In most instances, they are not so beguiling as those of spring and summer, yet they are far from displeasing.  There is the sharp, vinegary tang that rises from leaves, sodden and cold.  There is the odor of soil on which frost has laid whiteness; an odor, which seems different from that of earth newly turned in spring.  There is the pungence that rises from rotting apples and pears; and the heavy fragrance which issues from the chrysanthemum leaf and blossom.  Occasionally a flower remains whose breath is that of July. Even though the hand of chill has pressed heavily on the garden, the sweet alyssum has summer perfume. And a rose, spared, has a scent which speaks nostalgically of June.  But in the main, the odor of the November garden is distinctive, sharp, penetrating, and has something of that element of age, which cannot be associated with redolence but rather with a potpourri.   Unearthed Words She felt strong and blissfully empty, gliding through the crisp November air, enjoying the intermittent warmth of the sun as it filtered down through the overhanging trees, which were mostly stripped of their foliage. It was that trashy, post-Halloween part of the fall, yellow and orange leaves littering the ground. ― Tom Perrotta, The Leftovers   Grow That Garden Library The Art of the Islamic Garden by Emma Clark This book came out in 2011 - so an oldie, but goodie. (It's already ten years old.) And here's what Emma wrote at the beginning of this book: Even a glimmer of understanding of traditional Islamic art and architecture clearly reveals that its beauty is not simply surface decoration, but is a reflection of a deep knowledge and understanding of the natural order and of the divine unity that penetrates all of our lives. Studying Islamic art and architecture and completing a master's thesis on Islamic gardens and garden carpet at the Royal college of art opened my eyes to the meaning of art.  Understanding something of the religion of Islam in general and Islamic art in particular, it became clear that all art to a greater or lesser degree should be a vehicle of hope.  It should remind us what it means to be human of our place in the universe and our role as is said in Islam as God's vice-regent on earth. And then she writes, and bear in mind; this is 2011: In the increasingly difficult times in which we live, it is good to be reminded that gardens and nature, transcend nationality, race, religion, color, and ideology. The Islamic garden is not only for Muslims, it's beauty is apparent to  everyone.  In her book, Emma offers an introduction to the design, the symbolism, and the planting of the traditional Islamic garden. Emma also gives some practical tips if you're interested in creating an Islamic garden for yourself. Emma points out that we all have different starting points for our gardens. We have different garden sizes and situations (urban garden or a country garden), obviously different climates and soils, etc.  And so, she spends a couple of chapters offering up ideas for plants and trees and shrubs that you might want to consider incorporating into an Islamic-inspired garden. Now there is a pattern to Islamic gardens. They're often constructed around a central pool or fountain with four streams flowing symbolically to the earth's four corners. My favorite part of this book is exploring the symbolism behind Islamic art and gardens. And by the way, there is a magnificent chapter in this book that is all about the prince of Wales carpet garden. It's just spectacular. Now this book is out of print, and I predict that copies of this book will only get harder to get as time goes on. So if you have any interest, you should make sure that this one gets on your list. You can get a copy of The Art of the Islamic Garden by Emma Clark and support the show using the Amazon Link in today's Show Notes for around $26.   Today's Botanic Spark Reviving the little botanic spark in your heart November 2, 1975 On this day, The New York Times Around the Garden segment recommended some new garden books. Some bright newcomers have been added to the trowel‐watering can library. Here they are.  Masakuni Kawasumi spent three years in this country adapting his Japanese methods of bonsai growing to American species of trees. His “Bonsai With American Trees” ($10, Kodansha International) is the result, an excellent basic primer... Tapeworm plant, living stones bead vine, spiderweb, and polka dot are a few of the off‐beat plants described in “Fun With Growing Odd and Curious House Plants” Virginie and George Elbert ($8.95, Crown). The odd‐sized book, 6½ x 11 inches, gives brief biographies and how‐to‐grow tips for many unusual house plants, delightful changes from the tried‐and‐true. And while on the subject of fun, there is Jack Kramer's “How to Identify & Care for House Plants” ($8.95, Doubleday). The fun comes in matching line‐drawings and silhouettes to the author's organizational key. Though probably not meant to be a puzzle book, it is. ...a plant number 8‐1‐3 turns out to be none other than a cattleya orchid. Thalassa Cruso, television “lady of the trowel” has done it again. This time she is telling about “Making Vegetables Grow” ($8.95, Knopf), one of her best with chatty helpful tips on bringing the crop in abundantly.  Light gardens are booming, especially among those who have dark apartments and want some greenery indoors. “The Complete Book of Houseplants Under Lights” by Charles Marden Fitch ($9.95, Hawthorn) updates the hobby and is full of ideas.  Joining the series of “state” books on wildflowers by John E. Klimas Jr., is “A Pocket Guide to the Common Wild Flowers of New York” ($5.95, Walker). Compact tuck in a backpack, Descriptions are in everyday language, not botanist's twang. Environmental awareness has come full circle with “Organic Flower Gardening” by Catherine Osgood Foster ($12.95, Rodale Press). An organic gardener's book on raising flowers? Mrs. Foster explains why,  “One is for the sake of the bees, wasps and other beneficial insects and butterflies … another good reason is to protect the birds … the most important is that you avoid starting chain reactions in the environment from poisonous chemical sprays and dusts you might introduce.”  And for winter reading by the fireplace, here are a few:  “A Gardener Touched With Genius, The Life of Luther Burbank” by Peter Dreyer ($10, Coward, McCann & Geoghegan):  “The Best of American Gardening” by Ken and Pat Kraft ($10, Walker), a clip hook of garden tips gleaned from 100‐year‐old seed catalogues;  “The Plant Hunters” by B. J. Healey ($8.95, Scribners), a brief biography of discoverers of exotic species from the 17th century to the present. And for reference; “Ornamental Grasses” by Mary Hockenberry Meyer ($9.95, Scribners), an excellent well-illustrated guide to this unusual group of plants.  “The Personal Garden, Its Architecture and Design” by Bernard Wolgensinger and Jose Daidone ($30, Van Nostrand Reinhold), beautifully illustrated with design concepts from European, Western and Japanese gardens.  “Plant A Tree” by Michael A. Weiner ($15.95, Macmillan) subtitled, “A working guide to regreening America.”  Good reference book for city planners, libraries, and schools on tree planting and care, nationwide. Florida, Texas, and California where the avocado is grown commercially, the trees do not start flowering until six years old, or sooner if grafted. One rare exception was reported by Barbara Stimson, a gardener in Maine, who wrote in a recent Letters to the Editor, Flower and Garden, that her indoor avocado did flower, but no fruit, when it was about two years old and four feet high.   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener. And remember: "For a happy, healthy life, garden every day."

Mic The Gardener - Gardening Podcast
Mic the Gardener - Gardening Podcast - Andrew Fisher Tomlin

Mic The Gardener - Gardening Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 53:10


In this week's episode I chat to world renowned garden designer and plantsman Andrew Fisher Tomlin. I've been a huge fan of Andrew's work for many years, so it was a privilege to chat with him. We were originally due to meet in Andrew's south London garden, but unfortunately, the UK petrol price put paid to that. Nonetheless, Andrew starts this episode by giving us a detailed tour of his garden and talks about some of the more unusual plants in it. We also talk about how Andrew started his journey into horticulture and garden design with Andrew recounting his very first Chelsea Flower Show show garden and his first 'Alan Titchmarsh moment'. Andrew founded his garden design company Fisher Tomlin Bowyer in 1991 and his approach focuses on creative solutions and sound horticultural advice. Andrew chats at length about garden design and the skills needed by garden designers today in a profession where ecology, sustainability and biodiversity are increasingly important. Andrew is also one of the directors at the London College of Garden Design (LCGD) and he talks about the extremely popular planting design course that he wrote, his love of plants and planting design and much, much more. My thanks to Andrew for taking the time to chat with me in this thoroughly enjoyable episode. And, as always, my thanks to you for listening. Please do ensure that you follow/subscribe as there's still more to come. And, if you listen via Apple podcast, please leave a review. Thank you. Mike

Renaissance Church Weekend Messages
The Gardener and the King | Exchange

Renaissance Church Weekend Messages

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021


Talking Heads - a Gardening Podcast
Ep. 113 - At this time in Autumn there is an abundance of produce coming out of our Kitchen Gardens - but does anything beat the taste of a home-grown Apple or a swig of freshly pressed Apple juice - Saul and Lucy don't think so!

Talking Heads - a Gardening Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 36:05


The mellow fruitfulness of Autumn has been heralded by the subtle change in temperature and darker mornings and evenings in the garden. For Lucy Chamberlain and Saul Walker this starts one of their favourite times of year as Lucy's vegetable patch is at maximum yield producing food for East Donyland Hall and Saul revels in the changing colours in the canopies of his precious treescape at Stonelands. So join us throughout the season as we bring tales of crispy leaves, hibernating plants and plenty of pumpkins!One of Saul and Lucy's great joys at this time of year is to have a wander into the orchards they look after, pluck an apple straight from the tree and sink their teeth into one of nature's greatest fruits! And both implore you to take a look at the 100's and 100's of varieties that can be grown in this country to find your favourite and give it a go in your garden - from Cox's Orange Pippin to Pitmaston's Pineapple, the wonderfully complex world of Apples is a feast of flavour, colour and texture.Twitter links:Saul @GardeningSaulLucy @HeadGardenerLCIntro and Outro music from https://filmmusic.io"Fireflies and Stardust" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com)License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) 

The Gestalt Gardener
The Gestalt Gardener | Fire Fingers

The Gestalt Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 50:44


This is Halloween weekend and there is something scary happening in lots of gardens around Mississippi: Nothing! Felder does his best to answer another round of your southern gardening questions and celebrates the spooky season with a very timely tune. He also tips the Scoville scale with his weekly show and tell plants. Now let's get dirty! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Grow, cook, eat, arrange with Sarah Raven & Arthur Parkinson
Forcing Bulbs for Indoor Arrangements with Sarah Raven & Arthur Parkinson - Episode 39

Grow, cook, eat, arrange with Sarah Raven & Arthur Parkinson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 30:00


With 2021 waning and the winter months taking hold, the opportunity to force bulbs presents the delightful prospect of creating indoor arrangements for a much-needed splash of colour and pleasant aroma within the home.This week's episode of ‘grow, cook, eat, arrange' offers an eclectic selection of Narcissi, Amaryllis and Hyacinths to consider when assembling your chromatic chorus of bulbs, and essential advice on when, where and how to force your bulbs for maximum impact.In this episode, discover:What ‘forcing' means, and how that helps you bring a delightful range of bulbs throughout the monochromatic winter monthsThe fabulous varieties of impactful, easy to grow AmaryllisGrowing for glamour and scent with vibrant HyacinthsSarah's favourite Narcissi for reliable forcing year after yearPicking perfect pots, caring for your bulbs, and decorating your pots with a delicate sprinkling of MossView all products mentioned and find further advice from Sarah: https://bit.ly/3f2DFiHFollow Sarah: https://bit.ly/3jDTvBpFollow Arthur: https://bit.ly/3jxSKK5Order Sarah's new book: https://bit.ly/2TWHJczOrder Arthur's new book: https://bit.ly/3xOov7HShop on the Sarah Raven Website: http://bit.ly/3jvbaeuGet in touch: info@sarahraven.com

Dark House
Is it Possible to Live (Happily) in a Haunted House? The S.K. Pierce Mansion (ft. Joni Mayhan)

Dark House

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 78:08


In the finale of Dark House, Alyssa brings listeners to the last—and most haunted—stop on the tour: the S.K. Pierce Mansion in Gardner, Massachusetts. Built in 1875 for a wealthy furniture manufacturer and his family, the grand Victorian was inhabited for just two weeks before the first of five confirmed deaths in the house took place. According to countless visitors, the spirits of those who lived and died there never actually left. In fact, the ghosts are so active, the couple who owned the home from 2008 to 2015 only lived there for two years before they felt like they had no choice but to move out. After sharing the most frightening encounters reported to have happened in the house, and the current owners' plans to turn the mansion into a bed and breakfast, Hadley and Alyssa wonder how a house this haunted can ever be inhabitable, for residents and tourists alike. Looking for answers, they reach out to Joni Mayhan, author of Bones In The Basement: Surviving the S.K. Pierce Haunted Victorian Mansion (40:24). A psychic medium, self-proclaimed ghost magnet, and former resident of Gardner, MA, Mayhan joins the hosts to share an exclusive update on the hauntings at the mansion (44:25), her personal experiences with the ghosts there (including which one followed her home) (46:32), and most importantly, her best advice for anyone who thinks they're living in a haunted house (1:02:09).CONTRIBUTORSHost/Producer: Alyssa FiorentinoHost/Producer: Hadley MendelsohnProducer: May TsehaySound Engineer: Josh Caldwell

The Flower Podcast
Growing Bulbs with Val Schirmer

The Flower Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 64:46


My guest this week brings the experience of specialty cut flower growing & fine floral design together with a motto to grow the kind of flowers that could literally stop people in their tracks. After a few Kentucky bourbon toasts on a porch one summer evening between friends was the beginning of this idea to grow the best. That was the beginning of Three Toads Farm which produced some of biggest and boldest Oriental lilies along with other heirloom flowers. This farm has been called one of the top 10 farmer florists in the country by Martha Stewart Weddings. I'm excited to be chatting with Val Schirmer owner of Three Toads Farm, upcoming President of Association of Specialty Cut Flower Growers, and creator of her first online course for The Gardener's Workshop all about bulb forcing. Today we're talking about growing lily's, forcing season bulbs, benefits in joining the ASCFG, and so much more. Learn more about Val and all of our past guests on TheFlowerPodcast.com Subscribe to our YouTube Channel for access to all of our Zoom chats, tutorials, IG Lives, and video extras. Also Subscribe on your favorite podcast platform. We are available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Amazon Music, Gaana, and many more! The Flower Podcast Blog Sponsors of The Flower Podcast Garden Roses Direct Accent Decor The Gardeners Workshop ASCFG

The NoSleep Podcast
NoSleep Podcast - Sleepless Decompositions Vol. 5

The NoSleep Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 74:40


Our Halloween Month of Horror continues with the first of two Sleepless Decompositions episodes this month. "Sunfall" written by S.H. Cooper (Story starts around 00:02:00) TRIGGER WARNING! Produced by: Phil Michalski Evelyn – Sarah Thomas, Kendra – Erin Lillis, Oula – Nikolle Doolin, Dad – Jesse Cornett, The Gardener voices performed by – Erika Sanderson, Jeff Clement, Danielle McRae, Graham Rowat Click here to learn more about The NoSleep Podcast team Click here to for Season Pass 17 Click here to learn more about S.H. Cooper Click here to learn more about S.H. Cooper's novel, "Inheriting Her Ghosts"   Executive Producer & Host: David Cummings Musical score composed by: Brandon Boone "Sleepless Decompositions" illustration courtesy of Kelly Turnbull Audio program ©2021 - Creative Reason Media Inc. - All Rights Reserved - No reproduction or use of this content is permitted without the express written consent of Creative Reason Media Inc. The copyrights for each story are held by the respective authors. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices