Podcasts about goldsmiths

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Best podcasts about goldsmiths

Latest podcast episodes about goldsmiths

101 Part Time Jobs
Graham Sayle (High Vis)

101 Part Time Jobs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 23:11


Graham tells me about Liverpool growing up, doing art at Goldsmiths, being diagnosed with ADHD and making furniture. High Vis - Blending is out now. It's excellent. Get your 4 day tickets for 2000 Trees Festival, including Wednesday's Forest Stage Line Up with Bob Vylan, Holding Absence and more. Use '101POD' at checkout for £20 off, FREE MONEY: https://www.twothousandtreesfestival.co.uk/ Songs: High Vis 'Fever Dream', Cock Sparrer ‘Working' Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

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Pia Hunter Explains Warhol Supreme Court Oral Arguments

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Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 30:26


You can listen to the oral arguments yourself here: https://www.supremecourt.gov/oral_arguments/audio/2022/21-869 Pia M. Hunter is a Teaching Associate Professor at the University of Illinois College of Law and the Associate Director for Research and Instruction at the college's Albert E. Jenner Jr. Law Library. She holds a J.D. from the University of Illinois College of Law and a Master of Science from the School of Information Science at the University of Illinois. Prior to joining the law library faculty, she served as Visiting Assistant Professor and Copyright and Reserve Services Librarian at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) where she researched and developed best practices for copyright and fair use for instruction for the UIC campus. In 2013, she led the initiative to create Fair Use Week, an annual celebration that highlights the fair use doctrine and its significance to artists, students, faculty, librarians, journalists, and all users of copyrighted content. Sara:                    Welcome to a live recorded episode of Copyright Chat today. I am so excited to bring you the wonderful Pia Hunter. Welcome, Pia. Pia:                      Thank you, Sara. It's a pleasure to be here. Sara:                    So if you didn't know, Pia is a law librarian at the University of Illinois College of Law and a founder of Fair Use Week. Tell us about that Pia. Pia:                      Oh, gosh. Fair Use Week is, first of all, it's so wonderful that it's, we're coming up on a 10 year anniversary in February, 2023. I'm truly excited about that, but it is the result of a, a meeting of librarians back in 20 12, 20 13, and we were talking about the significance of fair use and not only how important it is to academics and scholars, but to everyone, to, to artists, to people every day who create content, everyone. And so we were discussing how wonderful it would be to set some time aside each year to acknowledge fair use, why it's significant in our everyday lives, and promote it to everyone so that we can take up the banner and protect this, right? Because I know that it's an affirmative defense in terms of the Copyright Act, but there are things we can do under fair use, and we, we use fair use every day. And so Fair Use Week is designed to promote and, uh, inform people about that. Sara:                    That is really exciting. I keep forgetting, we're coming up on the 10th anniversary, and this is a really interesting time p to be talking about fair use because as we know, the Supreme Court is addressing transformative fair use right now. Pia:                      I am, I'm not afraid to admit that I am a bit nervous about this case. I Sara:                    Think I, I think I said that in a nervous tone, , Pia:                      I think you said, I think your tone certainly reflects my, my feelings on the subject. And I'm looking forward to our discussion because a lot's been happening lately. Sara:                    Yes, a lot has been happening. So if you haven't been paying attention, let's get you up to speed. There is a very exciting case involving the Andy Warhol Foundation and a photographer and the late great singer Prince. So this is a really fun case that is up at the Supreme Court. Of course, it started below and in the lower court, um, the Warhol Foundation had one on its fair use claims where Andy Warhol borrowed, I say borrowed in a nice way. Um, the photograph of this famous photographer who took a photo of Prince, and he originally had, had permission through licensing to use the photo for an inspiration in a magazine article. But later on they, they, he had another reproduction and he did not have permission, and he claimed fair use. And in, in the Second Circuit Court of appeals, they reversed and said, Nope, it was not a fair use. And the issue at the Supreme Court was all about purpose and character of the use and whether it was transformative, which is, oh, scary to me because the last time Supreme Court addressed this was 1994. Pia, tell us some more about kind of what the arguments are on both sides. Pia:                      Okay. The arguments from the Goldsmith side, that's the original photographer, the artist, is that basically the Warhol Foundation has not produced this content in any way that is transformative. And when we went into oral arguments, there was a great deal of discussion about factor one, what is the purpose and character of the use? And the justices were really clued into fi trying to determine how the photograph was diff different in what ways from the Warhol piece, which is an artistic rendering and has been produced many, many times in several prints and sold over and over again. There's also, and on the Warhol side, they're claiming that it's a transformative use, that even though the commercial purpose of is the same and similar, that Warhol by taking the photograph and creating a painting from it. And from that painting came several other prints that were licensed and sold and so forth and so on, that this is a completely new work. Pia:                      And the justices seem early on to be pushing back against that because if you look at the photograph and you look at the paintings and the prints and the reproductions, you can s it's obvious that those come directly from the photograph. And this is what's troubling to me because I think for so many years there's been a lot of talk about transformative use in terms of a fair use argument. And quite frankly, I think transformative use has dominated to the fact that it has overshadowed some of the other factors that are just as important. So this case may bring some balance back to looking at all four factors, because if you consider all four factors, then this could very well be a fair use. But if you're basing it solely on whether the, the level of transformative, then we run into, into some difficulties. Sara:                    That's an interesting perspective. I think, um, I agree with you that on one side they're arguing that, um, it was just the same use, right? So I think that the, the thing that troubled the court here was that on the one hand, this photographer was in the business of licensing her works to, um, vanity Fair and other magazines. And that was the purpose that Andy Warhol also used his work for in this instance. Now, to me though, Andy Warhol in general has very different uses for his works, right? His works hang in many mag in many, um, museums, people come to see his works. They're not only used in magazines. Now, I'm certain that this photographer also could have her work in a fine art museum, but I do think that there are broader uses for a Warhol work. Um, and a lot was brought up about the other Andy Warhol case, the famous soup can case, right? Sara:                    Where the judges said, oh, well, this is not as hard a case in that instance because the soup cans were used for a different purpose, right? And normally the logo on Campbell's soup cans was used to market the brand. And of course, um, the use by Warhol was to show mass consumerism. Um, one point that the, the, uh, uh, photographers, lawyers made was that he had to have some necessity to use that particular photo. I wonder what you make of that argument, Pial, because the justices seem to be kind of buying into that a little bit. Pia:                      They did seem to buy into that a little bit. And the necessity argument is one that I find fascinating because it was ne it was necessary to use the Campbell soup can in its entirety, it's, it's it's logo, it's symbol. You look at that automatically and you recognize that it is Campbell's soup. So the necessity argument and Warhol's subsequent series of that discussion sparked a discussion of consumerism. When you, when I look at the Prince photo, I'm a little . It's funny, I am such a huge Prince fan that when I look at the Prince photo, I think that it's Prince. So it has to be necessary . And I know that's not a legal argument. It's more than mentality, I think for me than anything else. But looking at this, it's, it's, it seems that the justices are buying into that, that philosophy. I'm not sure how sustainable that really is in the long term. Pia:                      He could have picked any number of photos or images to do that exact same thing. It didn't not necessarily have to be prints, but because it was print, I think that lends itself to the argument about the fourth factor and commercial use and market for the work, because he's doing what is considered a reproduction. And I know that the, uh, Martinez, Mr. Martinez, who's the Warhol's attorney, used the term follow up work. And in my mind, that is the same as a derivative work, which falls to the bundle of rights that is reserved for the owners. So as this goes on, it'll be interesting to note how they, they, they parse out each factor and really examine what's happening in terms of the original content. Is it truly a derivative work? What's the difference between a follow up work and a derivative work? I mean, I think it's, it's a subtle nuance there, if there is a difference at all. And they're gonna have to examine each of these factors closely. So this, this may be something that, that justices appear to embrace now in the early stages, but I think that, that, that may change as time goes on. 1:                         Yeah, I think that's interesting. And I, I agree with you that one of the cruxes of the, the issue here was what is the line, or where is the line between a derivative work and a transformative work? Although to me, that's always been the question, right? That's always been the million dollar question in these types of cases. It just was made even more salient here because one of the things that they were pointing out is if you have a film, for instance, a movie that is an adaptation of a book, you would never say, oh, sure, that's a fair use. You would always think they need to get a license because the natural progression of a best seller is, oh, yes, let's make a movie. And of course, you want the person to be encouraged to make the book in the first instance. And so they need a piece of that economic pie, right, to incentivize creation. Sara:                    But, um, in this instance, was the photographer ever going to make a print, a painting print of her photo? I don't think so. So I really discouraging her in any way. Um, but of course she would be happy to take that license, right? I mean, she would be happy to take a license, especially for her work in a magazine, which I think is where they got caught up a lot during this case. And I wish they had not stuck to only that part, because I know Warhol's attorney pointed out this was a series, right? Yes. Warhol did not make just one print. He made a series of prints and the copyright was claimed in the entire series. And so only one of those photos, I think it was called Orange Prints, was used in the actual magazine article. And so maybe they could even find, okay, well, that one wasn't all right, but the other ones were is that, can you split the baby that way? Pia:                      I'm not sure that you can. And that's, that's an excellent point that you make. And that's a part that's been troubling me for so long. Also, the original license, Goldsmith did this painting, took the photograph, licensed the photograph to the magazine for an artist. It did not say Warhol for an artist to make a a, a rendering from the photograph. So he was licensed to do the work. However, in the process, he actually created additional pieces. The Silk Screen Painting series is what it's called. There were two screen prints on paper and two drawing, and all of these are referred to as the print series. Some of the originals were sold, some reproductions were printed and sold and licensed and sold to other people. So it we're looking at, it's, it's fascinating because I'm still always coming back to the, or the terms of the original license. Pia:                      How much leeway did he have in the original license that the magazine purchased from Goldsmith to make a derivative work? Because that's really what it is. They license access, a use of the photo for someone else to build something upon that. That's the first thing. And then the second thing, the Goldsmith attorneys are arguing that this case is significant because it's really fighting about the individual rights of the creator versus someone who has the power and the, the name recognition of Andy Warhol. So because, uh, someone who's famous decides to take and, and use a work and create something out of it in their own fashion, then that would give those people who are in a financial position or famous artists, uh, more power and authority to use people's works than say, someone like me who would come along and make a stick figure derivative or something like that. So that's another issue that I'm, I'm curious to, to see how that's gonna go. Sara:                    Yeah, I think that the argument goes, you know, Warhol makes it, and it's a piece of art. I make it, and it's what just not great, right? Pia:                      , it's just a photo. So the question becomes how does, how, how are artists able to protect their derivative uses while still leaving fair use on the table for other creators to come and use as well? Because otherwise, what we're doing is we're going to squash creativity and people's desire to create new content. Sara:                    Yeah. And that also leads me to think about appropriation art, right? Pia:                      Oh, yes. A favorite topic of mine Sara:                    Is a whole other variety of art. And is, would this, I mean, if they rule that it has to be some necessary purpose, like with, um, the, the attorneys who are protecting the photographer, does that just quash any kind of appropriation art? Pia:                      The potential for that is so great that that is really another part that, that I find troubling. I am not a fan, as you well know of the Richard Prince series, uh, he's an appropriation artist, started many years ago with the Marlborough ads. He's done some things with, uh, catcher and the Rye, taking a, a copy of Catcher and The Rye, leaving the print on the cover, the exact same except in place of the author. He's put his own name. There's the Instagram v prince that's going on right now, Cariou v Prince, back from the early two thousands. So this is an artist who specifically takes people's work and either displays his name on it or does something really, really different. Not different in terms of maybe size, but an exact replica. So a case like this would have a direct effect on the current case that's working its way through the courts now, gram v prints and, and other sorts of things. And it would, I'm thinking about memes and other derivatives that we take for granted and things that pop up across the internet that people find funny and creative. What happens with those? Sara:                    Yeah, what does happen with those? I mean, I think, I think with memes you can make a stronger argument that you're not usually trying to make any money off of them. Exactly. You might, you might win more on a factor four analysis. And that was one of the things that they pointed to quite a lot, uh, at least, um, the Warhol Foundation attorneys, when they were asked about, well, what about, you know, some really creative new film that is based on a book, but it's so different, right? Why isn't that a fair use? And the response was, well, you know, look at factor four. It's still highly commercial, so that even if it is different, it might still be a derivative. So I wonder if the part of the challenge here was that they were really trying to narrow in on the first factor, but, but we always try to weigh them together, right? Always in my mind, they go together. And so trying to parse them out makes it really hard. Pia:                      That's absolutely correct. And I, in this instance, parsing them out seems necessary because the first cat factor we know is, uh, what's under discussion now. But then you move on to the, the second factor. This is highly creative, uh, purpose in nature of the work, and, and you're moving through the factor. You get to factor three, you're looking at the amount, well, it was used in its entirety. So the, the, the second and third factors are almost sort of, uh, settled. And that brings us back to one in four. How is it being used? How is it the Campbell soup, uh, series that Andy Warhol created? It was an obvious commentary to many. I'm not sure the commentary in this respect is so obvious. Goldsmith claims that the photograph was showing Prince in a, in a sensitive way, a way that he's not frequently depicted in album covers and other sorts of, uh, photo shoots and different things. Pia:                      So she was capturing a certain vision of the artist in vulnerability. And the Warhol claim, I believe, if I remember correctly, is that they were not, they were exploiting that in different ways and, and making, uh, a different rendering of that original work. But I had a discussion with someone who is not into copyright law at all, and showed them the pictures because they'd been hearing so much about the case, and they made a very interesting point. Uh, when you look at the Wizard of Oz in black and white, and my mother in particular is a fan of, uh, old film Warren movies and so forth and so on. And she says, I don't like the color. I don't like it when they add color to it, it's, it's different to me. And that argument swings both ways because when I showed the, the port the photograph to someone and they looked at the color, uh, that that Warhol added, and the creativity that he placed upon the photograph, that person said, I don't see much of a difference. They just added color. It's the same thing. But someone else would look at that same rendering and say, it's completely different. It's, it's different. To me, there's an aesthetic. So when you're looking at art in this way, do we have to become art critics to make this type of assessment? And I think that's why this case is so troubling to me because there, it, some of this really is subjective. Sara:                    Well, I think that the Supreme Court justices also were troubled by that. And, and we're asking, you know, how do we decide this? Right? And, um, do we need expert testimony? Are we supposed to be asking what the artist intended? Right? Some of the early fair use cases kind of looked at the artist's intent. And then of course, in this case, Andy Warhol's deceased, so no one can look at his exact intent. Um, so it, it does get pretty troubling because do we want the Supreme Court justices to start guessing and becoming art critics? And the other thing that they were mentioning was, which level of generality are we looking at in terms of the comment? Are we looking at that this was used as magazine cover, and so was this one okay, done, right. That's the level of generality. But if that were the case, I think that that many of the cases, including the Supreme Court cases, would've come out differently, right? Sara:                    Because we had the two live crew song. If you look at the Campbell case, um, Campbell versus Acuff Rose from 1994, we had a two live crew song, and we had a pretty woman song. They're both songs. Okay, we're done. I mean, that level of generality doesn't work. But in that case, they said it was a parody of the song and that was why it was fair use. Um, and so what is, what is the, the conclusion here, right? Is it that it's, uh, different in the way that it is portraying prints? Because it is fine art. I mean, the, the second circuit below seemed to say they were transforming fine art into fine art, therefore we're done here. Pia:                      That, that, that seems to be, that's how I took it as well. And the other part about the Campbell case is that not only was it recognized as an obvious parody, the commercial use was the same, but the audience was significantly different. So your Roy Orbeson fans are not going to be listening to Luke Skywalker and two live cruise rendition of a song with the same title. So the, the impact on the, the effect upon the market is limited because we're looking at different audiences. Whereas here, it's the same sort of thing. It's going to a magazine and the types of, and the same type of magazine, if not the exact same magazine that was used for the Sara:                    Original, I think it was, I think it was, I think it was just the the parent company Pia:                      Conde Nast, Sara:                    Yes. Yeah, it was the same one because it was Vanity Fair and then Conde Nast. But here's the thing, uh, it sounds like then you're, you're almost getting into the fourth factor and the commercial, um, impact. However, if you read factor one carefully, it says purpose and character of the use, including whether it was a non-profit or commercial use. And so the commercial use can impact factor one as well. So technically the, the court could say, well, maybe it does comment somehow, but it's the same commercial impact or the same commercial use for the same exact audience. Um, I still wish they would address the other works in the series though, because I don't think they were aimed at, you know, magazines. I think they were just aimed at the fine art community. And I do think that's a different audience than people who are interested in that particular photographer's work. There are a lot more people who are interested in Warhol's work and his comments on commercialism and society, unfortunately than this artist. I mean, I think that's just the truth of, you know, what Warhol's work sell for. And one of the things they briefed was, yes, her work doesn't sell for as much as his work does, which to me it means they have different audiences, don't they? I mean, maybe not for this particular magazine, but in general they do Pia:                      In general that I agree in general, they have very different audiences. But here there's not going to be an opportunity for Goldsmith to recover for renderings of this paint of her photograph that Warhol created that are hanging in museums now, that are in people's private homes now because there is a series of silk screens and then there are the various reproductions, it's the orange prince reproduction in published in the magazine that people purchase at a newsstand or got, or however way they get their content. That's what sparked this controversy. And because she, I don't believe that she would've, she wasn't even aware that this had happened. And so you're right, the audiences are completely different. Uh, people who paid to have Andy Warhol's Warhol's version hanging in their living rooms or museums that are, are, are holding this work now, would not have paid for that photograph. And that's, that's, that's, that's a great case for the audiences being different, but it's this one single use in a magazine that could upend the way we are able to look at fair use in terms of these types of works. Sara:                    Will it? Because here's the other thing, couldn't they just, I mean, to me, bad facts make bad law. Okay? And these are bad facts. Pia:                      These are bad facts. These are terrible facts. They're Sara:                    Terrible facts. So couldn't the Supreme Court just say, okay, we agree that, that, you know, Warhol did comment in a different way, but you know, we still agree ultimately that it was a derivative because of this, this, and this based on these particular facts, right? And so could they, shouldn't they limit it to this case? Cause the facts are so bad, Pia:                      You are making my argument . I want them to limit it to this case. The facts here are terrible. Any, any move to make this case new precedent would be devastating for artists everywhere, uh, for creators, for for, for, for people who have existing works, think of how many things would unravel based on this, uh, a radical decision of that nature. And I can see, I'm optimistic because when you hear the oral arguments, you, you listen, I, I, I actually, I listened the first time with my eyes closed, and then I'd used your method, which was very good. Thank you very much. And I read the transcript while I listened a second time, and you can see them wrestling with all of these pieces and really trying to come to an accord and a deep understanding of, uh, the artist's rights, the rights of the Warhol Foundation. And I can see that they're casting an eye to a fu to the future to understand how this is going to ultimately affect creators and, and, and people who are trying to make content. Because this case has the potential to, uh, stifle so much creativity and so many new works that, uh, the public will be deprived of having. So I'm hoping that that, is that what you suggest? I'm, I'm gonna call that the most reasonable compromise. I'm hoping that that's the end result. Sara:                    Well, I am too. And I think, um, you know, given the last Supreme Court case, the Google versus Oracle case, you know, I do have hope. I understand that the Supreme Court has overturned lots of precedent, very long standing precedent, even very recently in the abortion case. So I mean, they are, they can do it. I don't think they're going to, in this case, I, I'm hopeful that they're gonna limit it. And if they do, um, decide that, you know, maybe this wasn't a fair use, that it won't be as sweeping and terrible, um, as it could be. That's my hope. But I, I, and I did see them wrestling with the creativity and the free kind of speech issues in the oral argument. And I saw some of the even conservative justices, you know, asking questions along those lines, which made me a little bit hopeful. Pia:                      That's exactly right. And they're, they're, they're looking at all of these different factors necessary or least useful. I, I know that the Goldsmith side is, is presenting almost a new sort of test. That's the part that I wanted to say mm-hmm. . And that test, if adopted would be devastating. So I'm really hoping that your, your, your recommended compromise is something that the justices can, can, can use to find some sort of middle ground. Sara:                    I don't think there's any basis, I'm sorry, all due respect to the Goldsmith's, um, lawyers here, but I don't think there's any basis for coming up with some new test based on these terrible facts. It's, it's just a bad, it's a bad way to go. And, and we have lots of precedent out there building on the Campbell case and the Campbell case in, in no respects, as anything has to be necessary, it does say you have to avoid the drudgery if you're only creating the new thing to avoid the drudgery of coming up with something new. It does say that, but that doesn't say it has to be necessary. Pia:                      It doesn't. And, but, but facts this bad required some creative and quite frankly, brilliant individual to come up with a new test. That's the first thing. Otherwise, there's no argument to make. And the second thing that I wanted to mention is that the government requested leave to argue, and they were granted leave to argue. So now you have the, uh, solicitor general sitting at the table with Goldsmiths. So the government has a vested interest in this. And I wonder how that looks to people who are examining this case from the outside, the fact that the government has taken up the argument on the Goldsmith side. What does that do for, uh, copyright law moving forward? Yeah, what does that say? Sara:                    That's curious, right? Yes. Because, um, it's, it's a little bit strange. And what is their interest necessarily? I mean, I, I'm assuming they're saying our interest is to correct is to protect authors, but you know, we also have the interest of the other side, which is, you know, the limitation on the rights of the authors, which is guaranteed by fair use. And as pointed out, even in the definition of derivative works, it still says as limited by fair use. So where's the government's involvement here? Why are they involved in the first place? Pia:                      That's the question I'd like answered. , back to the constitution. We go for the creativity and make sure ensuring that people are able to consume this content. That's where we need to start. Yeah, back to basics. Sara:                    We really do need to get back to basics. And I I will expect this, um, decision to come out soon. They haven't been taking a whole lot of time deciding cases. It's already been a little while since the oral argument. So, uh, we will definitely keep you posted and maybe we'll have a, a, a debrief after the opinion. We Pia:                      Can have another conversation. I think we have to, don't Sara:                    We? I think we do. So I, um, I hope this, you found this useful and interesting, and I will link to the oral arguments from this, um, podcast episode so you can follow along and listen yourself and come up with your own decisions about where you think this might be headed. I think the Supreme Court sounded pretty rigorous on both sides, so it wasn't obvious to me who they were favoring. Um, but I'm, I'm, I just hope they don't do anything drastic. , Pia:                      I concur. . Sara:                    Well, Pia thank you so much for joining and, um, we'll, we'll speak again soon. Pia:                      Yes, thank you for having me. And, uh, fingers crossed. Sara:                    Fingers crossed.

Art Sense
Ep. 73: Artist Glenn Brown

Art Sense

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 38:18


A discussion with artist Glenn Brown. Finding inspiration in works from art history as well as science fiction, Brown creates beautifully crafted paintings built from layers of fine brush strokes and thin glazes. The process can take years, but yields paintings that captivate the viewer with sublime colors and intertwining strokes that invite the viewer's closer inspection. The conversation dives into Brown's artistic mindset and methodology, as well as a discussion about his current exhibit “We'll Keep On Dancing Till We Pay the Rent” at Gagosian's 24th Street location in New York - his first show in the city since 2014. https://gagosian.com/exhibitions/2022/glenn-brown-well-keep-on-dancing-till-we-pay-the-rent/https://glenn-brown.co.uk/

Woman's Hour
Weekend Woman's Hour: LeAnn Rimes, Women in the Royal Navy, Althea McNish

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 55:40


The Grammy award-winning singer, songwriter and actress LeAnn Rimes joins us in the studio. Her unforgettable ballad "How Do I Live" holds the record as Billboard's Hot 100 all-time #1 hit by a female artist. She talks about the inspiration her latest album, God's Work. A woman who served in the Royal Navy for 20 years speaks for the first time about how she was raped and sexually assaulted during her career. The woman who we are calling Catherine says that when a senior colleague discovered she was pregnant, they suggested that an appointment be made for her to have an abortion. The Conservative MP Sarah Atherton serves on the Defence Select Committee, and led an inquiry last year into the experiences of women in the armed forces, which heard from 4200 women, including some 9% of women currently serving in the armed forces. The Atherton report found that 64% of female veterans and 58% of currently-serving women reported experiencing bullying, harassment or discrimination during their careers. She gives her response to Catherine's story. Lotte Wubben-Moy has become the latest women's football player to say she won't be watching the World Cup in Qatar, because of where it's being held and their stance on homosexuality and equal rights. Suzy Wrack from the Guardian tells us why women speaking out about this is so significant. Althea McNish was the first Caribbean designer to achieve international recognition and is one of the UK's most influential textile designers. There's currently a major retrospective of her, Althea McNish: Colour is Mine at the Whitworth in Manchester. Rose Sinclair, Lecturer in Design Education at Goldsmiths, University of London, co-curated the exhibition. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lucy Wai Editor: Louise Corley

Spotlight On
Duncan Chapman

Spotlight On

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 55:37


Duncan Chapman is a composer/musician based in Lincolnshire, UK. Much of his work involves collaborations with a wide range of people creating performances, installations & recordings. Recent projects include online live-streaming events, curating a concert for the Aural Diversity project, and performing morning music with Supriya Nagarajan at the Jaipur Literature Festival in India. Recent projects include work with BCMG, x-church Gainsborough, COMA Glasgow, online performances with Comb Filter (with Simon Limbrick and Adrian Lee), and Humbox (with Mike McInerney). His solo work is on Silent, Takuroku & Linear Obsessional labels & Dusk Notes (a collaboration with Supriya Nagarajan) was released in 2020. His current work includes an album of marimba and live electronic pieces with Simon Limbrick, a residency at EMS in Stockholm, performances (with Supriya) of Lullaby: Sonic Cradle at Radiophrenia in Glasgow, Casa Da Musica (Porto) and at the 2022 WOMAD festival. Duncan is also developing participatory events using the new multichannel sound system at x-church in Gainsborough, undertaking a sound mapping residency in North Lincolnshire, and leading participatory projects with Music in the Round (Sheffield), Manasamitra (Yorkshire), and Sound Scotland. He is a mentor for Sound And Music's Listen Imagine Compose project, and a trustee of Liquid Vibrations. He has contributed to courses at York, Aberdeen, Goldsmiths, Limerick, and De Montfort Universities.Lean more about Lyte.Find more great podcasts from Osiris Media, the leading storyteller in music. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Spot Lyte On...
Duncan Chapman

Spot Lyte On...

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 55:37


Duncan Chapman is a composer/musician based in Lincolnshire, UK. Much of his work involves collaborations with a wide range of people creating performances, installations & recordings. Recent projects include online live-streaming events, curating a concert for the Aural Diversity project, and performing morning music with Supriya Nagarajan at the Jaipur Literature Festival in India. Recent projects include work with BCMG, x-church Gainsborough, COMA Glasgow, online performances with Comb Filter (with Simon Limbrick and Adrian Lee), and Humbox (with Mike McInerney). His solo work is on Silent, Takuroku & Linear Obsessional labels & Dusk Notes (a collaboration with Supriya Nagarajan) was released in 2020. His current work includes an album of marimba and live electronic pieces with Simon Limbrick, a residency at EMS in Stockholm, performances (with Supriya) of Lullaby: Sonic Cradle at Radiophrenia in Glasgow, Casa Da Musica (Porto) and at the 2022 WOMAD festival. Duncan is also developing participatory events using the new multichannel sound system at x-church in Gainsborough, undertaking a sound mapping residency in North Lincolnshire, and leading participatory projects with Music in the Round (Sheffield), Manasamitra (Yorkshire), and Sound Scotland. He is a mentor for Sound And Music's Listen Imagine Compose project, and a trustee of Liquid Vibrations. He has contributed to courses at York, Aberdeen, Goldsmiths, Limerick, and De Montfort Universities.Lean more about Lyte.Find more great podcasts from Osiris Media, the leading storyteller in music. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

NPFX: The Nonprofit Fundraising Exchange
The Future of Museums: A Crisis of Relevance (with nico wheadon and Melissa Cowley Wolf)

NPFX: The Nonprofit Fundraising Exchange

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 40:26


As a sector, museums have been slow to engage underserved audiences and adapt to the evolving needs of the communities they serve, leading to a crisis of relevance for many organizations. In today's podcast episode, our panel discusses how cultural institutions can redefine themselves to stay relevant and better fulfill their duty to the public good. Free 30-minute consultation for NPFX listeners: http://www.ipmadvancement.com/free Want to suggest a topic, guest, or nonprofit organization for an upcoming episode? Send an email with the subject "NPFX suggestion" to contact@ipmadvancement.com. Additional Resources IPM's free Nonprofit Resource Library: https://www.ipmadvancement.com/resources Museum Metamorphosis: Cultivating Change Through Cultural Citizenship https://rowman.com/ISBN/9781538130421/Museum-Metamorphosis-Cultivating-Change-Through-Cultural-Citizenship [NPFX] Next Gen Donors and the Arts https://www.ipmadvancement.com/blog/next-gen-donors-and-the-arts nico wheadon is an independent arts consultant, curator, educator, and writer based in New Haven, CT. She is also founder and principal of bldg fund, LLC; a visiting critic at the Yale School of Art; and a board member at The National Academy of Design, and the Arts Council of Greater New Haven. As a consultant, nico delivers cultural strategy to artist-entrepreneurs, cultural institutions, government agencies, and philanthropic foundations—her approach is informed by her unique perspective as a practitioner working across sectors. She is the author of Museum Metamorphosis: Cultivating Change Through Cultural Citizenship. nico holds an MA in Creative & Cultural Entrepreneurship from Goldsmiths, University of London (2011), and a BA in Art-Semiotics from Brown University (2006). https://www.nicowheadon.com/ https://bldg.fund/ Melissa Cowley Wolf has 20 years of experience in philanthropy, strategic planning, and programming for art museums and higher education institutions across the United States. A philanthropy consultant for nonprofit organizations, an advisor to next generation philanthropists, and arts advocate working across industries, she was named to the Artnet 2020 Innovators List as one of 51 global innovators transforming the art industry. Melissa founded advising firm MCW Projects LLC in 2017 to expand the next generation of cultural philanthropists, advocates, and audiences. She is also the founding director of the Arts Funders Forum (AFF) an advocacy, media, convening, and research platform designed to develop new models of impact-driven financial support for the cultural sector. https://www.mcw-projects.com/ https://www.artsfundersforum.com/ Rich Frazier has worked in the nonprofit sector for over 30 years. In his role as senior consultant with IPM Advancement, Rich offers extensive understanding and knowledge in major gifts program management, fund development, strategic planning, and board of directors development. Russ Phaneuf, a co-founder of IPM Advancement, has a background in higher education development, with positions at the University of Hartford, Northern Arizona University, and Thunderbird School of Global Management. As IPM's managing director & chief strategist, Russ serves as lead fundraising strategist, award-winning content creator, and program analyst specializing in applied system dynamics. Nonprofits Mentioned in the Episode: The Studio Museum in Harlem https://studiomuseum.org/

Woman's Hour
Textile designer Althea McNish, Albanian female asylum seekers, endurance athlete Jenny Tough

Woman's Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 57:33


Following, Elon Musk's announcement that Twitter will permanently suspend any account on the social media platform that impersonates another, Nuala McGovern is joined by crime writer, Denise Mina who changed her twitter display name to ‘Elon Musk'. Jenny Tough is an endurance athlete who's best known for running and cycling in some of world's most challenging events. For a forthcoming film - SOLO - she set herself an audacious objective: to run – solo and unsupported, across mountain ranges on six continents, starting with one of the most remote locations on earth in Kyrgystan. She joins Nuala to describe how mountains give her a sense of home and why travelling solo is a “force for joy”. We speak to Anti Trafficking Social worker Lauren Starkey and Human rights Journalist about new research that suggests Albanian women are more likely to have their asylum applications approveddue to the threat they face from trafficking. They'll be sharing the experiences of some of the women with Nuala McGovern and give us an insight into the dangers that female asylum seekers face day to day. Textile designer Althea McNish was the first Caribbean designer to achieve international recognition and is one of the UK's most influential and innovative textile designers. There's currently a major retrospective of her, Althea McNish: Colour is Mine at the Whitworth in Manchester on tour from William Morris Gallery, Walthamstow. Rose Sinclair a Lecturer in Design Education at Goldsmiths, University of London co-curated the exhibition. Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Lucinda Montefiore

Rough Cut
Systématique Problématique Feat., Chris Oliver

Rough Cut

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 48:46


In this episode of Rough Cut, join us - JB Jones and Alain Simic - on a rip-roaring rollercoaster ride of an episode during which we are joined by the incredibly thoughtful Chris Oliver, Head of Professional Development at the https://www.goldsmiths-centre.org/ (Goldsmiths' Centre in London). We talk about lesbian cartoons, broken systems, the lack of professionalization, and of course the occasional solution to said problems. Follow Chris Oliver on the gram https://instagram.com/chrisollie99?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y= (here.) Check out the Goldsmiths' Centre https://www.goldsmiths-centre.org/ (here.) Learn more about everything WE do at https://nycjewelryweek.com/ (http://nycjewelryweek.com) Follow us on IG https://instagram.com/nycjewelryweek?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y=https://instagram.com/nycjewelryweek?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y= (@nycjewelryweek) + https://nycjewelryweek.com/ (www.nycjewelryweek.com) For Alain's work https://instagram.com/alainsimic?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y= (@alainsimic) + https://instagram.com/alainsimic?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y= (www.alainsimic.com) For JB Jones https://instagram.com/j_b_j_o_n_e_s?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y= (@j_b_j_o_n_e_s)

All About Art
Discussing Frieze Art Fair with Sophie Lambert from Lisson Gallery

All About Art

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 36:20


EPISODE 39 of ‘All About Art': Discussing Frieze Art Fair with Sophie Lambert from Lisson Gallery In this episode, I speak to Sophie Lambert, who works in Sales and Exhibitions at the fabulous Lisson Gallery in London. We talk about her professional experiences & Frieze Art Fair, as Sophie has given me an inside exclusive on Lisson Gallery's booth for the 2022 London fair. We talk about what the process is like preparing for such a big fair and what it means to have a solo presentation versus showing works by a multitude of artists, both of which you will see at the fair this year. In addition, Sophie gives some good advice to visitors on how to combat fair fatigue, so stay tuned for that. Below are some links for you to click on while tuning in, in case you want to see the art for yourself: Artist Garrett Bradley https://www.lissongallery.com/exhibitions/garrett-bradley Artist Laure Prouvost https://www.lissongallery.com/artists/laure-prouvost Artist Ceal Floyer https://www.lissongallery.com/artists/ceal-floyer Artist Shirazeh Houshiary https://www.lissongallery.com/artists/shirazeh-houshiary Thank you Sophie for coming on the podcast! You can follow her on Instagram here and check out more of her work on her website here. You can support All About Art on Patreon here: https://www.patreon.com/allaboutart ABOUT THE HOST: I am an Austrian-American art historian, curator, and writer. I obtained my BA in History of Art at University College London and my MA in Arts Administration and Cultural Policy at Goldsmiths, University of London. My specializations include contemporary art, specifically feminism and artificial intelligence in artistic practice, as well as museum policies and arts engagement. Here are links to my social media, feel free to reach out: Instagram @alexandrasteinacker Twitter @alex_steinacker and LinkedIn at Alexandra Steinacker-Clark COVER ART: Lisa Schrofner a.k.a Liser www.liser-art.com

Shakespeare and Company

The protagonist of My Name is Yip is, in his own written words, “a mute”, he also stands at 4 feet 8 inches tall and again in his words, “there is not a single hair on my person.” These physical limitations, coupled with the fact that Yip lives in the state of Georgia during the early nineteenth century gold rush, might make you imagine that a brutish and limited life awaited him. And yet, through Yip Tolroy's sheer force of character, as well as a few twists of fate, his is a story full of adventure, intensity, and human feeling. The voice of Yip is an act of extraordinary literary ventriloquism on the part of debut novelist Paddy Crewe, who so utterly inhabits not only Yip's mind, but also his epoch, and his geography, that every page of this book hums with an authenticity so rarely achieved in historical fiction. Buy My Name is Yip here: https://www.shakespeareandcompany.com/product/6006015/crewe-paddy-my-name-is-yip*SUBSCRIBE NOW FOR BONUS EPISODESLooking for Friends of Shakespeare and Company read Ulysses? https://podfollow.com/sandcoulyssesIf you want to spend even more time at Shakespeare and Company, you can now subscribe for regular bonus episodes and early access to Friends of Shakespeare and Company read Ulysses.Subscribe on Patreon here: https://www.patreon.com/sandcoSubscribe on Apple Podcasts here: https://podcasts.apple.com/fr/podcast/shakespeare-and-company-writers-books-and-paris/id1040121937?l=enAll money raised goes to supporting “Friends of Shakespeare and Company” the bookshop's non-profit, created to fund our noncommercial activities—from the upstairs reading library, to the writers-in-residence program, to our charitable collaborations, and our free events.*Paddy Crewe was born in Stockton-on-Tees. He studied at Goldsmiths, University of London. His first novel, My Name Is Yip, was published by Penguin in April 2022.Adam Biles is Literary Director at Shakespeare and Company. Buy a signed copy of his novel FEEDING TIME here: https://www.shakespeareandcompany.com/product/7209940/biles-adam-feeding-timeListen to Alex Freiman's Play It Gentle here: https://open.spotify.com/album/4gfkDcG32HYlXnBqI0xgQX?si=mf0Vw-kuRS-ai15aL9kLNA&dl_branch=1 Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Teenage Kicks Podcast
Talking to teenagers about bias

Teenage Kicks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 55:51


What do you know about bias? The chances are, if you're a white British parent who doesn't have to use a food bank, you know much less than your teenager. And I'd wager that if you have teens, they will understand much more about bias than you do. In fact, my own teenagers have been instrumental in my own learning curve as I've discovered unconscious bias not just in myself and my family, but all around me in the world. So what do you need to know about bias as the parent of a teenager? If this resonates, you will love this episode with Caryn Franklin, MBE, and Professor Keon West about their new audiobook SKEWED, where they shed light on the millions of messages in the media that we absorb every day, without even noticing. They hope that by listening to the book we'll all be able to notice these biases and know them for what they are. Which, quite aside from being a good thing to do, will help us understand and converse with our teenagers more easily. But how does understanding bias help make us better parents? In a series of interviews, the book tackles the issues parents are already beginning to challenge, like: Dads Don't Cry?  – exploring male vulnerability and bringing up sons who don't fear tears.Bringing up girls to understand and reject the hormonal payloadAre there harmful messages hidden in children's entertainment? Why don't white parents want to talk about race? This is not a book or a podcast that aims to chastise anyone for the way they think or operate. Instead, it attempts to open our eyes to aims to help open our eyes to how bombarded we are with biases, stereotypes and agendas that we unconsciously absorb every day, and to challenge cultural messaging around identity and objectification, including race, gender, gender non-conformity, sexual orientation, age, and attractiveness. You won't be left with a sense that you're not good enough; instead you'll be equipped to question more, notice more, and be able to rethink the things you've always taken for granted (for example fairy stories that normalise a world where it's okay to kiss an unconscious girl in the woods). Caryn Franklin MBE, fashion editor and later former presenter of BBC TV's iconic Clothes Show says "Keon and I wanted to challenge human propensity to absorb bias and the stereotypes our omnipresent and evermore powerful media presents. And just as importantly we wanted to explore our own biases, investigate the origins and unpick the comforting falsehoods we all sometimes tell ourselves”. Professor Keon West is a Social Psychologist at Goldsmiths, University of London and an expert on identity, prejudice, and representation. Keon opened my eyes to a completely different way of recognising bias in myself and others, and what it can teach me about my own relationships. Find out more about SKEWED: Decoding media bias on Caryn's website. You will also find the book on Audible via Amazon (affiliate links). More teenage parenting tips from Helen Wills: Helen wills is a teen mental health podcaster and blogger at Actually Mummy a resource for midlife parents of teens. Thank you for listening! Subscribe to the Teenage Kicks podcast to hear new episodes. If you have a suggestion for the podcast please email teenagekickspodcast@gmail.com. There are already stories from fabulous guests about difficult things that happened to them as teenagers - including losing a parent, becoming a young carer, and being hospitalised with mental health problems - and how they overcame things to move on with their lives. You can find more from Helen Wills on parenting teenagers on Instagram and Twitter @iamhelenwills. For information on your data privacy please visit Podcast.co. Please note that Helen Wills is not a medical expert, and nothing in the podcast should be taken as medical advice. If you're worried about a teenager, please seek support from a medical professional. Podcast produced by James Ede at Be Heard production.

Mentioned in Dispatches
Ep272 – The political and social history of Ireland in WW1 – Dr Niamh Gallagher & Prof Richard Grayson

Mentioned in Dispatches

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 61:37


Dr Niamh Gallagher,  University Associate Professor in Modern British and Irish History at the Faculty of History, St Catharine's College, University of Cambridge and Professor Richard Grayson, Professor of Twentieth Century History, Head of History at Goldsmiths, University of London discuss Niamh's recent book Ireland and the Great War. This is a a new social […]

All About Art
Death of an Artist: Ana Mendieta and Carl Andre Split the Art World

All About Art

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 11:03


BONUS EPISODE of 'All About Art': Preview of Death of an Artist: Ana Mendieta and Carl Andre Split the Art World Here's a preview from a new podcast, Death of the Artist, that explores a tragedy in the art world. For more than 35 years, accusations of murder shrouded one of the art world's most storied couples: Was the famous sculptor Carl Andre involved in the death of his up-and-coming artist wife Ana Mendieta? Host Helen Molesworth revisits Mendieta's death, taking a closer look at how she might have fallen out of the window of Carl's 34th floor New York apartment, and the following trial which has divided the art world since 1985. Hear more from Death of an Artist at https://podcasts.pushkin.fm/artist?sid=all You can support All About Art on Patreon here: https://www.patreon.com/allaboutart ABOUT THE HOST: I am an Austrian-American art historian, curator, and writer. I obtained my BA in History of Art at University College London and my MA in Arts Administration and Cultural Policy at Goldsmiths, University of London. My specializations include contemporary art, specifically feminism and artificial intelligence in artistic practice, as well as museum policies and arts engagement. Here are links to my social media, feel free to reach out: Instagram @alexandrasteinacker Twitter @alex_steinacker and LinkedIn at Alexandra Steinacker-Clark COVER ART: Lisa Schrofner a.k.a Liser www.liser-art.com

All About Art
Artist Interview with Flora Bradwell

All About Art

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 46:20


EPISODE 37 of ‘All About Art': Artist Interview with Flora Bradwell In this episode, I sat down with Flora Bradwell, a London-based artist. This episode was actually recorded a few months ago, which is quite atypical for All About Art, but there was a reason for it. At the time, Flora was pregnant with her baby boy, who has since then not only been born, but has already attended a few exhibition openings and art events! I'm launching this episode to coincide with Flora's exhibition ‘We're gonna need a bigger boat', with painters Lindsey Jean McLean, who has also been on All About Art (episode 29 linked here), and Sophie Knight. The show is opening on September 23rd 2022 and will be on view for that weekend on the Slash Arts Gallery Houseboat on Regent's Canal - so do come if you're in London! It'll be great. FREE tickets here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/private-view-were-gonna-need-a-bigger-boat-tickets-412929080997 In this episode, we don't just talk about Flora's pregnancy and the show on the boat. We talk about her experience at Slade, a well-known and well-respected art school. We also talk about her practice as a painter, sculptor, and filmmaker, how it has expanded into curatorial opportunities, artist residencies, and a project called Bad Art. Listen in to hear us talk candidly about all of this and more - motherhood and an arts career, what it feels like to be at the beginning of a new chapter in life, and how juggling tons of creative projects can have an impact on an artist's practice. Thank you Flora for coming on the podcast! You can follow her on Instagram here and check out more of her work on her website here. You can support All About Art on Patreon here: https://www.patreon.com/allaboutart ABOUT THE HOST: I am an Austrian-American art historian, curator, and writer. I obtained my BA in History of Art at University College London and my MA in Arts Administration and Cultural Policy at Goldsmiths, University of London. My specializations include contemporary art, specifically feminism and artificial intelligence in artistic practice, as well as museum policies and arts engagement. Here are links to my social media, feel free to reach out: Instagram @alexandrasteinacker Twitter @alex_steinacker and LinkedIn at Alexandra Steinacker-Clark COVER ART: Lisa Schrofner a.k.a Liser www.liser-art.com

Keen On Democracy
Caryn Franklin & Keon West: How to Recognize and Undermine Sexism, Racism, and Other Corrosive Media Biases

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 38:06


Hosted by Andrew Keen, Keen On features conversations with some of the world's leading thinkers and writers about the economic, political, and technological issues being discussed in the news, right now. In this episode, Andrew is joined by Caryn Franklin and Keon West, authors of Skewed: How Bias Distorts Our View of Other People and How to Make It Stop. Caryn Franklin and Professor Keon West are two friends, connecting across a number of divides to share their different perspectives and explore the topic of bias in an open and insightful way. Caryn Franklin MBE, MSc (Psyche) MBPsS is a former fashion editor and prime-time BBC TV Clothes Show presenter. Former co-editor of i-D Magazine, Caryn is a multi-platform broadcaster, fashion and identity commentator and activist. Across four decades of practice Caryn has explored the politics of image and self-esteem through commercial, educational and activist positions.  Caryn sat on steering groups for two successive Government Ministers of Equality: Lynne Featherstone and Jo Swinson. Consulting with the Advertising Standards Authority, Caryn has helped overturn the objectification of women in advertising. Professor Keon West is an Associate Professor of Social Psychology at Goldsmiths, University of London and an expert on identity, prejudice, and representation. He has published over 60 empirical papers which have been cited over 1700 times in the wider scientific literature.   Keon has received numerous international awards for his research, teaching, media engagement, and social activism. He has also appeared several times in print, on radio and on television (including BBC Radio 4, BBC World Service, Channel 4, and the Discovery Channel) discussing his research and area of expertise. Keon grew up in Jamaica and came to the UK as a Rhodes Scholar in 2006 to do a doctorate in Social Psychology at Oxford University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

If Jewels Could Talk with Carol Woolton
THE WORSHIPFUL COMPANY OF GOLDSMITHS

If Jewels Could Talk with Carol Woolton

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 52:36


Carol visits one of the Great Twelve Livery Companies of the City of London: the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths, where she speaks to Dr Dora Thornton, curator of the Goldsmiths' Company Collection, and jewellery designer Emefa Cole, who has recently been made Curator for Diaspora Jewellery at the Victoria and Albert Museum. This episode is brought to you by @fuligemstones For more information, please see: www.carolwoolton.com Follow Carol Woolton: @carolwoolton Produced by Natasha Cowan @tashonfash Music & editing by Tim Thornton @timwthornton Creative direction by Scott Bentley @bentleycreative Illustrations Jordi Labanda @jordilabanda Read Carol Woolton in Vogue magazine – vogue.co.uk/fashion/jewellery and carolwoolton.com Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Ahali Conversations with Can Altay
Episode 27: Paul O'Neill (Part 2)

Ahali Conversations with Can Altay

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 54:00


We are hosting Paul O'Neill. We closed our last episode at a crucial and rather existential moment. This second part of our conversation extends to our small group of audience members. You will hear Paul responding to questions on the educational turn, auto-theory, and variations on how to work with artists.Ahali Conversations are often recorded with an intimate group of audience members, so if you'd like to be in the loop, and join live sessions, please feel free to get in touch.EPISODE NOTES PART 2This episode includes questions by Alessandra Saviotti, Ula Soley, Enrico Arduini, and Furkan İnan. Paul O'Neill is a curator, artist, writer, and educator. He is currently the artistic director of Publics, in Helsinki, Finland.Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA) is an artistic and cultural center based in London. https://www.ica.art/Mick Wilson is an artist, educator and researcher based in Gothenburg and Dublin.Adrian Rifkin is a professor of art writing at Goldsmiths, University of London. http://gai-savoir.net/Dr. Andrea Phillips is BALTIC Professor and Director of BxNU Research Institute, Northumbria University & BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art.Richard Birkett was a curator at the ICA, London; and at the Artists Space in New York. He is currently a curator at the Yale Union art center in Portland, Oregon.Dave Beech is an artist and writer. https://www.davebeech.co.uk/Sarah Pierce is an artist based in Dublin.Nought to Sixty was a program of exhibitions and events, curated by Richard Birkett at the ICA, in 2008. Over the course of six months, the program was presenting solo projects by sixty emerging British- and Irish-based artists. https://archive.ica.art/nought-sixty-artists-index/The Copenhagen Free University is an artist-run institution, dedicated to the production of critical consciousness and poetic language. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copenhagen_Free_Universityunitednationsplaza is a project by Anton Vidokle in collaboration with Boris Groys, Jalal Toufic, Liam Gillick, Martha Rosler, Natascha Sadr Haghighian, Nikolaus Hirsch, Tirdad Zolghadr, and Walid Raad It operated as a temporary, experimental school in Berlin, following the cancellation of Manifesta 6 on Cyprus, in 2006. The project traveled to Mexico City (2008) and to New York City under the name Night School (2008-2009) at the New Museum. Its program was organized around a number of public seminars, most of which are available in the online archive. https://www.unitednationsplaza.org/The text Paul was referring to –Introduction to The Paraeducation Department– written by Annie Fletcher and Sarah Pierce is in the anthology Curating and the Educational Turn edited by Paul O'Neill and Mick Wilson: https://betonsalon.net/PDF/essai.pdfKate Zambreno is an American novelist, essayist, critic, and professor.Roland Barthes (1915 – 1980) was a French literary theorist, essayist, philosopher, critic, and semiotician. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roland_BarthesOctavia Butler (1947 – 2006) was an American science fiction author. Her writings have finally attracted well-deserved attention in the past years.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octavia_E._ButlerMaryam Jafri is a Copenhagen-based American artist. The artist's book Independence Days presents an expanded version of her photo installation and includes texts by Ariella Aïsha Azoulay, Paul O'Neill, Nina Tabassomi. https://www.maryamjafri.net/Lygia Pimentel Lins (1920 – 1988), better known as Lygia Clark, was a Brazilian artist and co-founder of Neo-Concrete movement. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lygia_ClarkP! is a multidisciplinary gallery and project space formerly in New York, currently based in Berlin. http://p-exclamation.com/Taken place in P!, in 2016, We are the (Epi)center was a group exhibition organized with the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, featuring: Can Altay, David Blamey, Katarina Burin, Jasmina Cibic, Céline Condorelli, Marjolijn Dijkman, Chris Kraus, Gareth Long, Ronan McCrea, Harold Offeh, William McKeown, Eduardo Padilha, Sarah Pierce, Richard Venlet, Grace Weir, and many others.PARSE is an international artistic research publishing and biennial conference platform based in the Faculty of Fine, Applied and Performing Arts at University of Gothenburg. This is the visual essay Paul was referring to: https://parsejournal.com/article/before-and-after/Autotheory refers to a critical approach in which the author uses personal experiences as the major creative force and the body as the source of knowledge.Sigmund Freud (1856 – 1939) is an Austrian neurologist and the founder of psychoanalysis. Jacques Marie Émile Lacan (1901-1981) is a French psychoanalyst and interpreter of Sigmund Freud's studies. Their contributions to the psychoanalytic theory have been influential on the literary theory in terms of deciphering a work based on the psychological condition its author is in, or conversely, portraying such condition through unconscious revelations of the author within the work.Maggie Nelson is an American writer. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maggie_NelsonSemiotext(e) is an independent press, publishing works of theory, fiction, madness, economics, satire, sexuality, science fiction, activism, and confession. http://www.semiotextes.com/McKenzie Wark is an Australian-born writer and professor of Media and Culture at Hudson University.Raymond Williams (1921 – 1988) was a Welsh socialist writer, academic, novelist, and critic. In his essay Dominant, Residual, and Emergent, he characterizes the grounded parts of cultural groups and their operating methods. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raymond_WilliamsStephen Wright is a writer and gardener. Listen to Episode 1 to get to know him better. https://www.ahali.space/episodes/episode-1-stephen-wrightTania Bruguera is an artist and activist. https://www.taniabruguera.com/Dr. Gregory Sholette is a New York-based artist, writer, teacher, and activist.NTS is a global radio station and media platform founded in 2011 by Femi Adeyemi. https://www.nts.live/Bjork is an Icelandic singer, songwriter, composer, record producer, and actress. https://bjork.com/Annie Fletcher is the Director of the Irish Museum of Modern Art.Leninism is a political ideology developed by Russian Marxist revolutionary Vladimir Lenin that proposes the establishment of communism through dictatorship of the proletariat.Stalinism is a totalitarian extension of Leninism and a period of governing by Joseph Stalin in the Soviet Union from 1927 to 1953.COALESCE is an ongoing exhibition project by Paul O'Neill which takes place at different locations with different artists and shapes around the idea of cohabitation.

Macro n Cheese
A New Labor with Liz Medina

Macro n Cheese

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 51:52


Some of the more, um, senior members of the Macro N Cheese team can remember a time when the Democratic Party supported labor and the union movement. Then we came to realize we had it backwards – it's really the Party expecting support from the unions, who made donations, helped with campaigning, and got out the vote. Followers of this podcast are regularly introduced to guests who bring word of a newly invigorated labor movement – one that is no longer tied to the Democrats' apron strings. Steve's guest is Liz Medina, the Executive Director of the Vermont State Labor Council, AFL-CIO. Her job title does a poor job of telling you what makes her so interesting. She is an artist (check out her http://www.atlizmedina.com/manifestoforcommonart-601108.html (Manifesto for Common Art)) as well as a podcaster working to build an oral working-class history and culture. She's a labor organizer with an expansive vision of the need for class struggle unionism and the understanding that unions don't exist in isolation; they must be connected to community and independent political groups. She speaks of the need to rebuild the relationship between the left and the labor movement, which has been decoupled since the days of the New Left in the 1970s. “I really do believe that the politics will follow what we do on the ground in our workplaces and in our communities … It is very hard work, but it's easier when we feel like we are part of a community in doing that. There's a real interest of our bosses and of capital more broadly in us staying isolated and alone and disconnected and out of community and not having a society at all, frankly. “There is no society,” as Margaret Thatcher would say. We really need that. We need those connections to continue to have strength to keep on going...” Liz talks about the labor movement in general, past and present, and the Vermont AFL-CIO. She describes the need to turn the movement around and adopt class struggle unionism. “We believe in the rank and file strategy,” she says. “We believe in prioritizing organizing and not being afraid of being militant.” Activists should follow suit. Liz Medina is the Executive Director of the Vermont State Labor Council, AFL-CIO. Previously, she served as the Goddard College Staff Union Co-Chair, UAW 2322. She received her MFA from Goddard College and an MA in Cultural Studies from Goldsmiths, University of London. She hosts an oral history podcast called En Masse to build working-class history and culture in her spare time. En Masse is part of the Labor Radio Network. Find her art and other content at atlizmedina.com @LizMedinArt on Twitter

Interviews by Brainard Carey

Portrait of Gaby Sahhar Page presents Gaby Sahhar, the New York debut of the London-based artist. Released explores alternative forms of knowledge-making through queer shapeshifting. Soaked in a kaleidoscopic palette of India and alcohol ink, Sahhar's new works draw on processes of articulation within LGBTQI+ communities that resist academic domination. Such tools of thought migrate across borders, slipping into the pores of the public sphere, shifting into a collective body. Gaby Sahhar (b. 1992, London, UK) lives and works in London, UK. Sahhar received a BA from Goldsmiths, London in 2015. Solo exhibitions include MAC VAL, Paris / The Kooples Art Prize (2023); PAGE (NYC), New York (2022); and Sweetwater, Berlin (2019). Group exhibitions include Fragment Gallery, New York (2022); Sadie Coles HQ, London (2022); and Museum of Moscow, Russia (2020). Installation view, Gaby Sahhar, Released, PAGE (NYC), 2022. Gaby Sahhar, Released, 2022, India and alcohol ink on synthetic paper, 80 x 156 inches. Gaby Sahhar, Shadow of the Other, 2022, Oil on canvas, 35.5 x 23.75 inches      

All About Art
Curating 'Surrealism and Magic' at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, with Gražina Subelytė

All About Art

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 30:50


EPISODE 36 of 'All About Art': Curating 'Surrealism and Magic: Enchanted Modernity' at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, with Gražina Subelytė In this episode, I speak to Gražina Subelytė, Associate Curator at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice, Italy. Gražina curated the exhibition showing during the 59th Venice Biennale which is titled 'Surrealism and Magic: Enchanted Modernity'. In this episode, we talk about her background and how she came to curate at such a renowned organization. We delve into the intricacies and processes of curating an extensive exhibition, and we also touch on the challenges of putting together a show like this one. Listen in to hear me ask Gražina about how it feels to contribute to the arts landscape during the Venice Biennale, and what advice she would give someone wanting to follow in her footsteps. 'Surrealism and Magic' gave such a rich overview of the Surrealist movement, and I loved that there was a particular focus on female artists, as well. I grew up loving Salvador Dalí, but now I think I love Leonor Fini a little bit more! Many thanks to the Peggy Guggenheim Collection for the collaboration, and, of course, to Gražina for coming on the podcast. You can find more information on the exhibition and the Peggy Guggenheim Collection here: www.guggenheim-venice.it/en/whats-on/exhibitions/surrealism-and-magic-enchanted-modernity/ And you can read about the Venice Biennale here: https://www.labiennale.org/en/art/2022 You can support All About Art on Patreon here: https://www.patreon.com/allaboutart ABOUT THE HOST: I am an Austrian-American art historian, curator, and writer. I obtained my BA in History of Art at University College London and my MA in Arts Administration and Cultural Policy at Goldsmiths, University of London. My specializations include contemporary art, specifically feminism and artificial intelligence in artistic practice, as well as museum policies and arts engagement. Here are links to my social media, feel free to reach out: Instagram @alexandrasteinacker Twitter @alex_steinacker and LinkedIn at Alexandra Steinacker-Clark COVER ART: Lisa Schrofner a.k.a Liser www.liser-art.com

Here, There, and Everywhere: A Beatles Podcast

John Illsley is the bass guitarist of the band Dire Straits. He has received multiple BRIT and Grammy Awards, and a Heritage Award. As one of the founding band members, with guitarist brothers Mark and David Knopfler, and drummer Pick Withers, Illsley played a role in the development of Dire Straits' sound. By the time the group disbanded in 1995 changes in personnel meant that Illsley and lead singer Mark Knopfler were the only two original band members remaining. Illsley was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of Dire Straits in 2018. In this episode, John speaks with Jack about his thoughts on The Beatles, their influence on him and Dire Straits, Paul McCartney's bass playing, whether or not there will be a biopic about Dire Straits, and his favorite Dire Straits record. Check out John's recent solo album, VIII: https://open.spotify.com/album/4VVX7O3Jc8yJ0wJih8jTXf?si=qlKyeTrARSaN2RoXTbB0Hw You can also buy John's book, "My Life in Dire Straits", here: https://www.amazon.com/My-Life-Dire-Straits-Biggest-ebook/dp/B08WBXZCQ1 If you like this episode, be sure to follow this podcast! Follow us also on Twitter and Instagram. Or click here for more information: Linktr.ee/BeatlesEarth ------------------------------- The Beatles were an English rock band, formed in Liverpool in 1960, that comprised John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr. They are regarded as the most influential band of all time and were integral to the development of 1960s counterculture and popular music's recognition as an art form. Rooted in skiffle, beat and 1950s rock 'n' roll, their sound incorporated elements of classical music and traditional pop in innovative ways; the band later explored music styles ranging from ballads and Indian music to psychedelia and hard rock. As pioneers in recording, songwriting and artistic presentation, the Beatles revolutionised many aspects of the music industry and were often publicised as leaders of the era's youth and sociocultural movements. Led by primary songwriters Lennon and McCartney, the Beatles evolved from Lennon's previous group, the Quarrymen, and built their reputation playing clubs in Liverpool and Hamburg over three years from 1960, initially with Stuart Sutcliffe playing bass. The core trio of Lennon, McCartney and Harrison, together since 1958, went through a succession of drummers, including Pete Best, before asking Starr to join them in 1962. Manager Brian Epstein moulded them into a professional act, and producer George Martin guided and developed their recordings, greatly expanding their domestic success after signing to EMI Records and achieving their first hit, "Love Me Do", in late 1962. As their popularity grew into the intense fan frenzy dubbed "Beatlemania", the band acquired the nickname "the Fab Four", with Epstein, Martin and other members of the band's entourage sometimes given the informal title of "fifth Beatle". By early 1964, the Beatles were international stars and had achieved unprecedented levels of critical and commercial success. They became a leading force in Britain's cultural resurgence, ushering in the British Invasion of the United States pop market, and soon made their film debut with A Hard Day's Night (1964). A growing desire to refine their studio efforts, coupled with the untenable nature of their concert tours, led to the band's retirement from live performances in 1966. At this time, they produced records of greater sophistication, including the albums Rubber Soul (1965), Revolver (1966) and Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (1967), and enjoyed further commercial success with The Beatles (also known as "the White Album", 1968) and Abbey Road (1969). Heralding the album era, their success elevated the album to the dominant form of record consumption over singles; they also inspired a greater public interest in psychedelic drugs and Eastern spirituality, and furthered advancements in electronic music, album art and music videos. In 1968, they founded Apple Corps, a multi-armed multimedia corporation that continues to oversee projects related to the band's legacy. After the group's break-up in 1970, all principal members enjoyed success as solo artists and some partial reunions have occurred. Lennon was murdered in 1980 and Harrison died of lung cancer in 2001. McCartney and Starr remain musically active. The Beatles are the best-selling music act of all time, with estimated sales of 600 million units worldwide.[4][5] They hold the record for most number-one albums on the UK Albums Chart (15), most number-one hits on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart (20), and most singles sold in the UK (21.9 million). The band received many accolades, including seven Grammy Awards, four Brit Awards, an Academy Award (for Best Original Song Score for the 1970 documentary film Let It Be) and fifteen Ivor Novello Awards. They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1988, and each principal member was inducted individually between 1994 and 2015. In 2004 and 2011, the group topped Rolling Stone's lists of the greatest artists in history. Time magazine named them among the 20th century's 100 most important people. Dire Straits were a British rock band formed in London in 1977 by Mark Knopfler (lead vocals and lead guitar), David Knopfler (rhythm guitar and backing vocals), John Illsley (bass guitar and backing vocals) and Pick Withers (drums and percussion). They were active from 1977 to 1988 and again from 1990 to 1995. Their first single, "Sultans of Swing", from their 1978 self-titled debut album, reached the top ten in the UK and US charts. It was followed by hit singles including "Romeo and Juliet" (1981), "Private Investigations" (1982), "Twisting by the Pool" (1983), "Money for Nothing" (1985), and "Walk of Life" (1985). Their most commercially successful album, Brothers in Arms (1985), has sold more than 30 million copies; it was the first album to sell a million copies on compact disc[4][5] and is the eighth-bestselling album in UK history. According to the Guinness Book of British Hit Albums, Dire Straits have spent over 1,100 weeks on the UK albums chart, the fifth most of all time. Dire Straits' sound draws from various influences, including country, folk, the blues rock of J. J. Cale, and jazz.[7] Their stripped-down sound contrasted with punk rock and demonstrated a roots rock influence that emerged from pub rock. There were several changes in personnel, with Mark Knopfler and Illsley being the only members who lasted from the beginning of the band's existence to the end. After their first breakup in 1988, Knopfler told Rolling Stone: "A lot of press reports were saying we were the biggest band in the world. There's not an accent then on the music, there's an accent on popularity. I needed a rest." They disbanded for good in 1995, after which Knopfler launched a solo career full-time. He has since declined numerous reunion offers. Dire Straits were called "the biggest British rock band of the 80s" by Classic Rock magazine; their 1985–1986 world tour, which included a performance at Live Aid in July 1985, set a record in Australasia. Their final world tour from 1991 to 1992 sold 7.1 million tickets. Dire Straits won four Grammy Awards, three Brit Awards (Best British Group twice), two MTV Video Music Awards, and various other awards. They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2018. Dire Straits have sold over 120 million units worldwide, including 51.4 million certified units, making them one of the best-selling music artists. Brothers Mark and David Knopfler, from Newcastle in northeast England, and friends John Illsley and Pick Withers, from Leicester in the east midlands, formed Dire Straits in London in 1977. Withers was already a 10-year music business veteran, having been a session drummer for Dave Edmunds, Gerry Rafferty, Magna Carta and others through the 1970s; he was part of the group Spring, which recorded an album for RCA in 1971. At the time of the band's formation, Mark was working as an English teacher, Illsley was studying at Goldsmiths' College, and David was a social worker. Mark and Withers had both been part of the pub rock group Brewers Droop at different points in and around 1973. The band was initially known as the Café Racers. The name Dire Straits was coined by a musician flatmate of Withers, allegedly thought up while they were rehearsing in the kitchen of a friend, Simon Cowe, of Lindisfarne. In 1977, the group recorded a five-song demo tape which included their future hit single, "Sultans of Swing", as well as "Water of Love" and "Down to the Waterline".[18][19] After a performance at the Rock Garden in 1977, they took a demo tape to MCA in Soho but were turned down. They then went to DJ Charlie Gillett, presenter of Honky Tonk on BBC Radio London.[20] The band simply wanted advice, but Gillett liked the music so much that he played "Sultans of Swing" on his show. Two months later, Dire Straits signed a recording contract with the Vertigo division of Phonogram Inc. In October 1977, the band recorded demo tapes of "Southbound Again", "In the Gallery" and "Six Blade Knife" for BBC Radio London; in November, demo tapes were made of "Setting Me Up", "Eastbound Train" and "Real Girl". The original Dire Straits line-up in Hamburg, Germany (1978); L to R: John Illsley, Mark Knopfler, Pick Withers and David Knopfler The group's first album, Dire Straits, was recorded at Basing Street studios in Notting Hill, London in February 1978, at a cost of £12,500. Produced by Muff Winwood, it was first released in the United Kingdom on Vertigo Records, then a division of Phonogram Inc. It came to the attention of A&R representative Karin Berg, working at Warner Bros. Records in New York City. She felt that it was the kind of music audiences were hungry for, but only one person in her department agreed at first. Many of the songs on the album reflected Mark Knopfler's experiences in Newcastle, Leeds and London. "Down to the Waterline" recalled images of life in Newcastle; "In the Gallery" is a tribute to Leeds sculptor/artist Harry Phillips (father of Steve Phillips); "Wild West End" and "Lions" were drawn from Knopfler's early days in the capital. That year, Dire Straits began a tour as opening band for Talking Heads, after the re-released "Sultans of Swing" finally started to climb the UK charts. This led to a United States recording contract with Warner Bros. Records; before the end of 1978, Dire Straits had released their self-titled debut worldwide. They received more attention in the US, but also arrived at the top of the charts in Canada, Australia and New Zealand. Dire Straits eventually went top 10 in every European country. The following year, Dire Straits embarked on their first North American tour. They played 51 sold-out concerts over a 38-day period. "Sultans of Swing" scaled the charts to No. 4 in the United States and No. 8 in the United Kingdom.[24][26] The song was one of Dire Straits' biggest hits and became a fixture in the band's live performances. Bob Dylan, who had seen the band play in Los Angeles, was so impressed that he invited Mark Knopfler and drummer Pick Withers to play on his next album, Slow Train Coming. Recording sessions for the group's second album, Communiqué, took place in December 1978 at Compass Point Studios in Nassau, Bahamas. Released in June 1979, Communiqué was produced by Jerry Wexler and Barry Beckett and went to No. 1 on the German album charts, with the debut album Dire Straits simultaneously at No. 3. In the United Kingdom, the album peaked at No. 5 in the album charts. Featuring the single "Lady Writer", the second album continued in a similar vein to the first and displayed the expanding scope of Knopfler's lyricism on the opening track, "Once Upon a Time in the West".[28] In the coming year, however, this approach began to change, along with the group's line-up.

Creative
Adam Duncan A Band of Brothers The Power of Ageing Life-Stage Project

Creative

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 62:40


Adam Duncan A Band of Brothers The Power of Ageing Life-Stage Project Adam trained in Drama and Education at Goldsmiths before writing scripts for the BBC and many other organisations. He ran a media company for twenty years and designed training programmes for large organisations such as Amnesty International. For the last ten years, Adam put a lot of energy into working with a charity called A Band of Brothers (ABOB), doing rites-of-passage weekends for young men involved in the Criminal Justice System in order to help them move on from adolescent behaviour to healthy masculinity. But at the age of 70 came a new question, what did growing old mean to him? As luck would have it, he was offered a place on a brilliant course in supporting people at the end of their lives. Through being alongside people who worked with the dying, Adam started to come to terms with mortality, being able to let go of some of the old attachments and this gave him a new lease of life and a surge of creative energy that he hadn't felt for decades.  In 2018, Adam wrote and rehearsed a show called The Seven Ages of the Dance of Life and Death with a community of actors, dancers and musicians. The show attracted an appreciative audience. In isolation, he was able to publish The Power of Ageing.  It sold around a hundred copies, but more importantly, it brought together a small group of like-minded people who felt passionately about the subject matter. Starting a monthly discussion forum from which the Life-Stage Project was formed. Find out more about the Life-Stage Project at  www.life-stage.org.  To support the podcast and get access to features about guitar playing and song writing visit https://www.patreon.com/vichyland and also news for all the creative music that we do at Bluescamp UK and France visit www.bluescampuk.co.uk For details of the Ikaro music charity visit www.ikaromusic.com Big thanks to Josh Ferrara for the music

All About Art
Art Censorship: Part 2

All About Art

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 14:57


EPISODE 35 of 'All About Art': Art Censorship PART 2! In this episode, I continue the conversation from episode 15 of the All About Art podcast on the topic of art censorship. I use a particular example that involves the US, the UK, Germany and Austria. The case study I speak about is the "100 Years and Still Too Daring?" ad campaign by the Vienna Tourist Board for the Viennese Modernism retrospective with works by Austrian artist Egon Schiele. To further the discussion, I cover the Vienna Tourist Board's move onto the platform OnlyFans in 2021, which has become popular amongst creators that made adult content, along with the mixture of art and sex through the adult film website Pornhub's 'Classic Nudes' tours. Here are my sources: https://www.theartnewspaper.com/2021/07/14/not-safe-for-art-work-pornhub-creates-classic-nudes-tours-of-museum-collections https://www.artnews.com/art-news/news/pornhub-classical-nudes-removed-1234601592/ https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2021/oct/16/vienna-museums-open-adult-only-onlyfans-account-to-display-nudes https://www.letseatcake.com/onlyfans-museums/ plus those in the shownotes of episode 15. ABOUT THE HOST: I am an Austrian-American art historian, curator, and writer. I obtained my BA in History of Art at University College London and my MA in Arts Administration and Cultural Policy at Goldsmiths, University of London. My specializations include contemporary art, specifically feminism and artificial intelligence in artistic practice, as well as museum policies and arts engagement. Here are links to my social media, feel free to reach out: Instagram @alexandrasteinacker Twitter @alex_steinacker and LinkedIn at Alexandra Steinacker-Clark COVER ART: Lisa Schrofner a.k.a Liser www.liser-art.com

New Books in Communications
M. I. Franklin, "Sampling Politics: Music and the Geocultural" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Communications

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 52:16


Music sampling has become a predominantly digitalized practice. It was popularized with the rise of Rap and Hip-Hop, as well as ambient music scenes, but it has a history stretching back to the earliest days of sound recording and experimental music making from around the world. Digital tools and networks allow artists to sample music across national borders and from diverse cultural traditions with relative ease, prompting questions around not only fair use, copyright, and freedom of expression, but also cultural appropriation and "copywrongs." For example, non-commercial forms of sharing that are now commonplace on the web bring musicians and their audiences into closer contact with emerging regimes of commercial web-tracking and state-sponsored online surveillance. Moreover, when musicians actively engage in political or social causes through their music, they are liable to both commercial and state forces of control. Shifts back to corporate ownership and control of the global music business—online and offline—highlight competing claims for commercial and cultural ownership and control of sampled music from local communities, music labels, and artists. Each case study is based on archival research, close listening, and musical analysis, alongside conversations and public reflections from artists such as David Byrne, Annirudha Das, Asian Dub Foundation, John Cage, Brian Eno, Sarah Jones, Gil Scott-Heron, Karlheinz Stockhausen, Dunya Yunis, and Sonia Mehta.  Sampling Politics: Music and the Geocultural (Oxford UP, 2021) provides ways to listen and hear (again) how sampling practices and music making work, on its own terms and in context. In so doing, M.I. Franklin corrects some errors in the public record, addressing some longstanding misperceptions over the creative, legal, and cultural legacy of music sampling in some cases of rich, and complex practices that have also been called musical "borrowing," "cultural appropriation," or "theft." This book considers the musicalities and musicianship at stake in each case, as well as the respective creative practices and performance cultures underscoring the ethics of attribution and collaboration when sampling artists make music. Marianne Franklin is Professor of Global Media and Politics at Goldsmiths, University of London Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/communications

New Books in Popular Culture
M. I. Franklin, "Sampling Politics: Music and the Geocultural" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Popular Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 52:16


Music sampling has become a predominantly digitalized practice. It was popularized with the rise of Rap and Hip-Hop, as well as ambient music scenes, but it has a history stretching back to the earliest days of sound recording and experimental music making from around the world. Digital tools and networks allow artists to sample music across national borders and from diverse cultural traditions with relative ease, prompting questions around not only fair use, copyright, and freedom of expression, but also cultural appropriation and "copywrongs." For example, non-commercial forms of sharing that are now commonplace on the web bring musicians and their audiences into closer contact with emerging regimes of commercial web-tracking and state-sponsored online surveillance. Moreover, when musicians actively engage in political or social causes through their music, they are liable to both commercial and state forces of control. Shifts back to corporate ownership and control of the global music business—online and offline—highlight competing claims for commercial and cultural ownership and control of sampled music from local communities, music labels, and artists. Each case study is based on archival research, close listening, and musical analysis, alongside conversations and public reflections from artists such as David Byrne, Annirudha Das, Asian Dub Foundation, John Cage, Brian Eno, Sarah Jones, Gil Scott-Heron, Karlheinz Stockhausen, Dunya Yunis, and Sonia Mehta.  Sampling Politics: Music and the Geocultural (Oxford UP, 2021) provides ways to listen and hear (again) how sampling practices and music making work, on its own terms and in context. In so doing, M.I. Franklin corrects some errors in the public record, addressing some longstanding misperceptions over the creative, legal, and cultural legacy of music sampling in some cases of rich, and complex practices that have also been called musical "borrowing," "cultural appropriation," or "theft." This book considers the musicalities and musicianship at stake in each case, as well as the respective creative practices and performance cultures underscoring the ethics of attribution and collaboration when sampling artists make music. Marianne Franklin is Professor of Global Media and Politics at Goldsmiths, University of London Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/popular-culture

New Books Network
M. I. Franklin, "Sampling Politics: Music and the Geocultural" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 52:16


Music sampling has become a predominantly digitalized practice. It was popularized with the rise of Rap and Hip-Hop, as well as ambient music scenes, but it has a history stretching back to the earliest days of sound recording and experimental music making from around the world. Digital tools and networks allow artists to sample music across national borders and from diverse cultural traditions with relative ease, prompting questions around not only fair use, copyright, and freedom of expression, but also cultural appropriation and "copywrongs." For example, non-commercial forms of sharing that are now commonplace on the web bring musicians and their audiences into closer contact with emerging regimes of commercial web-tracking and state-sponsored online surveillance. Moreover, when musicians actively engage in political or social causes through their music, they are liable to both commercial and state forces of control. Shifts back to corporate ownership and control of the global music business—online and offline—highlight competing claims for commercial and cultural ownership and control of sampled music from local communities, music labels, and artists. Each case study is based on archival research, close listening, and musical analysis, alongside conversations and public reflections from artists such as David Byrne, Annirudha Das, Asian Dub Foundation, John Cage, Brian Eno, Sarah Jones, Gil Scott-Heron, Karlheinz Stockhausen, Dunya Yunis, and Sonia Mehta.  Sampling Politics: Music and the Geocultural (Oxford UP, 2021) provides ways to listen and hear (again) how sampling practices and music making work, on its own terms and in context. In so doing, M.I. Franklin corrects some errors in the public record, addressing some longstanding misperceptions over the creative, legal, and cultural legacy of music sampling in some cases of rich, and complex practices that have also been called musical "borrowing," "cultural appropriation," or "theft." This book considers the musicalities and musicianship at stake in each case, as well as the respective creative practices and performance cultures underscoring the ethics of attribution and collaboration when sampling artists make music. Marianne Franklin is Professor of Global Media and Politics at Goldsmiths, University of London Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Music
M. I. Franklin, "Sampling Politics: Music and the Geocultural" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Music

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 52:16


Music sampling has become a predominantly digitalized practice. It was popularized with the rise of Rap and Hip-Hop, as well as ambient music scenes, but it has a history stretching back to the earliest days of sound recording and experimental music making from around the world. Digital tools and networks allow artists to sample music across national borders and from diverse cultural traditions with relative ease, prompting questions around not only fair use, copyright, and freedom of expression, but also cultural appropriation and "copywrongs." For example, non-commercial forms of sharing that are now commonplace on the web bring musicians and their audiences into closer contact with emerging regimes of commercial web-tracking and state-sponsored online surveillance. Moreover, when musicians actively engage in political or social causes through their music, they are liable to both commercial and state forces of control. Shifts back to corporate ownership and control of the global music business—online and offline—highlight competing claims for commercial and cultural ownership and control of sampled music from local communities, music labels, and artists. Each case study is based on archival research, close listening, and musical analysis, alongside conversations and public reflections from artists such as David Byrne, Annirudha Das, Asian Dub Foundation, John Cage, Brian Eno, Sarah Jones, Gil Scott-Heron, Karlheinz Stockhausen, Dunya Yunis, and Sonia Mehta.  Sampling Politics: Music and the Geocultural (Oxford UP, 2021) provides ways to listen and hear (again) how sampling practices and music making work, on its own terms and in context. In so doing, M.I. Franklin corrects some errors in the public record, addressing some longstanding misperceptions over the creative, legal, and cultural legacy of music sampling in some cases of rich, and complex practices that have also been called musical "borrowing," "cultural appropriation," or "theft." This book considers the musicalities and musicianship at stake in each case, as well as the respective creative practices and performance cultures underscoring the ethics of attribution and collaboration when sampling artists make music. Marianne Franklin is Professor of Global Media and Politics at Goldsmiths, University of London Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/music

New Books in Dance
M. I. Franklin, "Sampling Politics: Music and the Geocultural" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Dance

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 52:16


Music sampling has become a predominantly digitalized practice. It was popularized with the rise of Rap and Hip-Hop, as well as ambient music scenes, but it has a history stretching back to the earliest days of sound recording and experimental music making from around the world. Digital tools and networks allow artists to sample music across national borders and from diverse cultural traditions with relative ease, prompting questions around not only fair use, copyright, and freedom of expression, but also cultural appropriation and "copywrongs." For example, non-commercial forms of sharing that are now commonplace on the web bring musicians and their audiences into closer contact with emerging regimes of commercial web-tracking and state-sponsored online surveillance. Moreover, when musicians actively engage in political or social causes through their music, they are liable to both commercial and state forces of control. Shifts back to corporate ownership and control of the global music business—online and offline—highlight competing claims for commercial and cultural ownership and control of sampled music from local communities, music labels, and artists. Each case study is based on archival research, close listening, and musical analysis, alongside conversations and public reflections from artists such as David Byrne, Annirudha Das, Asian Dub Foundation, John Cage, Brian Eno, Sarah Jones, Gil Scott-Heron, Karlheinz Stockhausen, Dunya Yunis, and Sonia Mehta.  Sampling Politics: Music and the Geocultural (Oxford UP, 2021) provides ways to listen and hear (again) how sampling practices and music making work, on its own terms and in context. In so doing, M.I. Franklin corrects some errors in the public record, addressing some longstanding misperceptions over the creative, legal, and cultural legacy of music sampling in some cases of rich, and complex practices that have also been called musical "borrowing," "cultural appropriation," or "theft." This book considers the musicalities and musicianship at stake in each case, as well as the respective creative practices and performance cultures underscoring the ethics of attribution and collaboration when sampling artists make music. Marianne Franklin is Professor of Global Media and Politics at Goldsmiths, University of London Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/performing-arts

New Books in Economic and Business History
M. I. Franklin, "Sampling Politics: Music and the Geocultural" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Economic and Business History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 52:16


Music sampling has become a predominantly digitalized practice. It was popularized with the rise of Rap and Hip-Hop, as well as ambient music scenes, but it has a history stretching back to the earliest days of sound recording and experimental music making from around the world. Digital tools and networks allow artists to sample music across national borders and from diverse cultural traditions with relative ease, prompting questions around not only fair use, copyright, and freedom of expression, but also cultural appropriation and "copywrongs." For example, non-commercial forms of sharing that are now commonplace on the web bring musicians and their audiences into closer contact with emerging regimes of commercial web-tracking and state-sponsored online surveillance. Moreover, when musicians actively engage in political or social causes through their music, they are liable to both commercial and state forces of control. Shifts back to corporate ownership and control of the global music business—online and offline—highlight competing claims for commercial and cultural ownership and control of sampled music from local communities, music labels, and artists. Each case study is based on archival research, close listening, and musical analysis, alongside conversations and public reflections from artists such as David Byrne, Annirudha Das, Asian Dub Foundation, John Cage, Brian Eno, Sarah Jones, Gil Scott-Heron, Karlheinz Stockhausen, Dunya Yunis, and Sonia Mehta.  Sampling Politics: Music and the Geocultural (Oxford UP, 2021) provides ways to listen and hear (again) how sampling practices and music making work, on its own terms and in context. In so doing, M.I. Franklin corrects some errors in the public record, addressing some longstanding misperceptions over the creative, legal, and cultural legacy of music sampling in some cases of rich, and complex practices that have also been called musical "borrowing," "cultural appropriation," or "theft." This book considers the musicalities and musicianship at stake in each case, as well as the respective creative practices and performance cultures underscoring the ethics of attribution and collaboration when sampling artists make music. Marianne Franklin is Professor of Global Media and Politics at Goldsmiths, University of London Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society
M. I. Franklin, "Sampling Politics: Music and the Geocultural" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 52:16


Music sampling has become a predominantly digitalized practice. It was popularized with the rise of Rap and Hip-Hop, as well as ambient music scenes, but it has a history stretching back to the earliest days of sound recording and experimental music making from around the world. Digital tools and networks allow artists to sample music across national borders and from diverse cultural traditions with relative ease, prompting questions around not only fair use, copyright, and freedom of expression, but also cultural appropriation and "copywrongs." For example, non-commercial forms of sharing that are now commonplace on the web bring musicians and their audiences into closer contact with emerging regimes of commercial web-tracking and state-sponsored online surveillance. Moreover, when musicians actively engage in political or social causes through their music, they are liable to both commercial and state forces of control. Shifts back to corporate ownership and control of the global music business—online and offline—highlight competing claims for commercial and cultural ownership and control of sampled music from local communities, music labels, and artists. Each case study is based on archival research, close listening, and musical analysis, alongside conversations and public reflections from artists such as David Byrne, Annirudha Das, Asian Dub Foundation, John Cage, Brian Eno, Sarah Jones, Gil Scott-Heron, Karlheinz Stockhausen, Dunya Yunis, and Sonia Mehta.  Sampling Politics: Music and the Geocultural (Oxford UP, 2021) provides ways to listen and hear (again) how sampling practices and music making work, on its own terms and in context. In so doing, M.I. Franklin corrects some errors in the public record, addressing some longstanding misperceptions over the creative, legal, and cultural legacy of music sampling in some cases of rich, and complex practices that have also been called musical "borrowing," "cultural appropriation," or "theft." This book considers the musicalities and musicianship at stake in each case, as well as the respective creative practices and performance cultures underscoring the ethics of attribution and collaboration when sampling artists make music. Marianne Franklin is Professor of Global Media and Politics at Goldsmiths, University of London Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/science-technology-and-society

All About Art
The London Art Critic: Interview with Tabish Khan

All About Art

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 38:16


EPISODE 34 of 'All About Art': Interview with Tabish Khan a.k.a. London Art Critic In this episode, I chat to art critic Tabish Khan. Tabish specializes in London's art scene and he believes passionately in making art accessible to everyone. He visits and writes about hundreds of exhibitions a year covering everything from the major blockbusters to the emerging art scene. He's been a visual arts editor for Londonist since 2013, and he is also a regular contributor for FAD with a weekly “top exhibitions in London” column, as well as a column called 'What's wrong with art'. Tabish is also trustee of ArtCan, a non-profit arts organization that supports artists through profile raising activities and exhibitions. We talk about how he entered into the arts, having not studied an arts-related subject. We also talk about issues within the art world, including social media and the “who-you-know” culture. Listen in to hear me ask him about how he approaches being a critic, if he has ever had to write about an exhibition he really didn't enjoy, and more! You can find Tabish on socials here: Instagram: @LondonArtCritic Twitter: @LondonArtCritic Website: www.tabish-khan.com You can support All About Art on Patreon here: https://www.patreon.com/allaboutart ABOUT THE HOST: I am an Austrian-American art historian, curator, and writer. I obtained my BA in History of Art at University College London and my MA in Arts Administration and Cultural Policy at Goldsmiths, University of London. My specializations include contemporary art, specifically feminism and artificial intelligence in artistic practice, as well as museum policies and arts engagement. Here are links to my social media, feel free to reach out: Instagram @alexandrasteinacker Twitter @alex_steinacker and LinkedIn at Alexandra Steinacker-Clark

通勤學英語
回顧星期天LBS - 雜誌相關時事趣聞 All about magazines

通勤學英語

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 9:23


Topic: The Magazine Business, From the Coolest Place to the Coldest One I miss magazines. It's a strange ache, because they are still sort of with us: staring out from the racks at supermarket checkout lines; fanned wanly around the table in hotel lobbies; showing up in your mailbox long after the subscription was canceled, like an ex who refuses to accept the breakup. 我懷念雜誌,這是一種奇怪的痛,因為它們在某種程度上仍與我們同在。超市排隊結帳時,它們從架上盯著我們;在飯店大廳桌子周圍憔悴晃動;取消訂閱很久後還會出現在信箱,像是拒絕接受分手的舊愛。 But they're also disappearing. This accelerating erosion has not been big news during a time of pandemic, war and actual erosion, and yet the absence of magazines authoritatively documenting such events, or distracting from them, as they used to do with measured regularity, is keenly felt. 但它們也在消失。在疫情、戰爭與雜誌真的衰微的時期,這種加速衰微並不是什麼大新聞,但人們敏銳地感覺到,缺乏權威性雜誌來記錄這些事件,或像過去那樣定期的讓注意力從這些事情轉移。 Time marches on, or limps, but Life is gone. There's no more Money. The print editions of their former sister publications Entertainment Weekly and InStyle, which once frothed with profit, stopped publishing in February. It's been au revoir to Saveur and Marie Claire; shrouds for Playboy, Paper and O. (As I type this, people are tweeting about The Believer being bought by a sex-toy site.) 「時代」雜誌還在前進,或說蹣跚前行,但「生活」雜誌已經逝去。「金錢」雜誌沒了。它們以前的姊妹刊物「娛樂周刊」和「InStyle」印刷版曾獲利豐厚,但已在2月停止出版。大家向「Saveur」和「美麗佳人」告別,也讓「花花公子」、「紙」與O雜誌穿上壽衣。(就在我撰寫此文時,人們在推特上說「The Believer」被一個情趣用品網站收購了。) Two recent books — “Dilettante,” by Dana Brown, a longtime editor at Vanity Fair, and a new biography of Anna Wintour, by Amy Odell, formerly of cosmopolitan.com — are graveyards of dead or zombie titles that were once glowing hives of human whim. 最近出版的兩本書,「浮華世界」資深編輯達納.布朗的「Dilettante」及柯夢波丹前成員艾咪.歐德爾的安娜溫圖新傳記,有如亡者的墓地,或曾是人類奇想的光輝巢穴冠上了殭屍名號。 “There were so many magazines in 1994,” Brown writes. “So many new magazines, and so many great magazines. All the young talent of the moment was eschewing other industries and flocking to the business. It was the coolest place to be.” 布朗寫道:「1994年有很多雜誌。很多新雜誌,很多很棒的雜誌。當時所有年輕人才避開了其他行業,湧向這個行業。那是最酷的。」 Then suddenly the coldest. On the big fancy cruise ship that Brown had just boarded — Vanity Fair, where he'd been beckoned by Graydon Carter while a barback at the restaurant 44 — he and so many others then could only see the tip of an enormous iceberg they were about to hit: the internet. Smartphones, little self-edited monster magazines that will not rest until their owners die, were on the horizon. These may have looked like life rafts, but they were torpedo boats. 然後突然變成最冰冷的地方。布朗在44號餐廳吧檯用餐時,被總編輯卡特招攬,剛登上有如大型豪華郵輪的「浮華世界」,但他跟其他許多人只能看到他們即將撞上的巨大冰山一角:網路。智慧手機這種自我編輯、直到擁有者死去才會停止的小怪物雜誌也即將來臨。這些東西可能看起來像是救生艇,但它們其實是魚雷艦。 Every year, the American Society of Magazine Editors issues a handsome award, a brutalist-looking elephant called the Ellie, modeled after an Alexander Calder elephant sculpture. Any writer would be proud to have it on the mantelpiece. 每年,美國雜誌編輯協會都會頒發一項大獎,這是一頭野獸派風格、名叫「艾利」的大象獎座,模仿考爾德大象雕塑設計而成。作家都以把它放在壁爐上為榮。 The history of modern American literature is braided together with its magazines. The future can feel like a lot of loose threads, waving in the wind. 現代美國文學史與它的雜誌彼此交織在一起。未來就像是許多鬆散的線,在風中飄揚。Source article: https://udn.com/news/story/6904/6379678   Next Article   Topic: The Not-So-Glossy Future of Magazines One evening in mid-September, a gaggle of writers and bon vivant editors gathered by the outdoor fireplace and ivy-covered trellis of a West Village tavern. Steak was served, and the toasts lasted late into the night, the revelry trickling out to the nearby sidewalk. 九月中旬的一個夜晚,在西村的一家小酒館,一群作家和喜歡享受生活的編輯們聚集在一個室外壁爐和常春藤覆蓋的格狀架子旁。牛排上桌後,眾人杯觥交錯直到深夜,歡鬧聲流瀉到鄰近的人行道上。 It could have been a scene from the Jazz Age heyday of the Manhattan magazine set — or even the 1990s, when glossy monthlies still soaked up millions of dollars in advertising revenue, and editors in chauffeured town cars told the nation what to wear, what to watch and who to read. 這幕場景可能來自爵士時代曼哈坦雜誌業全盛時期,甚至是90年代,以亮光紙印刷的月刊還是廣告收入淹腳目,編輯們坐在司機駕駛的豪華轎車內,告訴全國該穿些什麼、欣賞什麼、閱讀什麼人的年頭。 This night, however, had an elegiac tinge. The staff of Vanity Fair was saluting the magazine's longtime editor, Graydon Carter, who had announced that he was departing after a 25-year run. In the back garden of Carter's restaurant, the Waverly Inn, star writers like James Wolcott and Marie Brenner spoke of their gratitude and grief. 不過,這一晚透著一種悲傷的況味。《浮華世界》的員工正向雜誌的長期總編輯葛雷登.卡特致敬。卡特在任職25年後,宣布即將離職。在卡特自家餐廳「韋佛利餐廳」的後花園中,一些明星作家如詹姆士.沃科特、瑪麗.布倫納都表達了他們的謝意和感傷。 Carter has always had a knack for trends. Within two weeks, three other prominent editors — from Time, Elle and Glamour — announced that they, too, would be stepping down. Another titan of the industry, Jann S. Wenner, said he planned to sell his controlling stake in Rolling Stone after a half-century. 卡特一向走在趨勢前端。不出兩星期,又有3位知名雜誌總編,分別是《時代》、《ELLE她》、《魅力》的總編也宣布準備下台。另一個業界巨頭,《滾石》創刊人詹恩.溫納則表示,打算出售他在《滾石》已保有半個世紀的控制性持股。 Suddenly, it seemed, long-standing predictions about the collapse of magazines had come to pass. 突然之間,長久來有關雜誌業終將崩潰的預言,似乎成真了。 Magazines have sputtered for years, their monopoly on readers and advertising erased by Facebook, Google and more nimble online competitors. But editors and executives said the abrupt churn in the senior leadership ranks signaled that the romance of the business was now yielding to financial realities. 雜誌業步履蹣跚已有多年,雜誌對讀者和廣告的壟斷遭到臉書、谷歌和更靈活的網路競爭對手侵奪。編輯和高管表示,高階領導階層的突然異動,說明這一行業的羅曼史正向財務現實低頭。 As publishers grasp for new revenue streams, a “try-anything” approach has taken hold. Time Inc. has a new streaming TV show, “Paws & Claws,” that features viral videos of animals. Hearst started a magazine with the online rental service Airbnb. Increasingly, the longtime core of the business — the print product — is an afterthought, overshadowed by investments in live events, podcasts, video, and partnerships with outside brands. 隨著發行人尋找新的收入來源,「無所不試」的作法開始出現。時代公司因此有了新的串流電視節目《寵物》,主要播出網路瘋傳的動物影片。赫斯特集團與網路出租服務公司Airbnb合辦了一份雜誌。但是雜誌業長久以來的核心─紙本產品卻越來越像後來才添加的產品,對於現場直播、播客、影片的投資,以及和外面品牌的合作關係,都讓紙本產品黯然失色。 The changes represent one of the most fundamental shifts in decades for a business that long relied on a simple formula: glossy volumes thick with high-priced ads. 這些變化代表這一行出現了數十年來最根本的轉變,而這個行業一向仰賴一個簡單公式存活,光鮮亮麗的書冊和滿滿的高價廣告。 “Sentimentality is probably the biggest enemy for the magazine business,” David Carey, president of Hearst Magazines, said in an interview. “You have to embrace the future." 赫斯特雜誌集團總裁大衛.凱里受訪時說:「多愁善感恐怕是雜誌業最大的敵人。你必須迎向未來。」 Source article: https://paper.udn.com/udnpaper/POH0067/319070/web/   Next Article   Topic: Edward Enninful Is Named Editor-in-Chief at British Vogue   Edward Enninful, the creative and fashion director of the U.S. magazine W, is set to replace Alexandra Shulman as editor-in-chief of British Vogue, its parent company, Conde Nast, confirmed Monday. The first man and the first black editor to take the helm of Britain's most powerful fashion publication in its 100-year history, Enninful will begin his new role Aug. 1. A top stylist and acclaimed fashion director who migrated to Britain from Ghana as a child, the 45-year-old Enninful is known for his cheerful demeanor, his legendary fashion covers and for having an army of loyal fans in and out of the fashion business. He received an Order of the British Empire in June for his services to diversity in the fashion industry. 英國版Vogue雜誌的母公司康泰納仕4月10日證實,美國W雜誌的創意與時尚總監艾德華.恩寧佛將接替亞歷珊卓.舒爾曼,擔任該雜誌總編輯。恩寧佛將在8月1日走馬上任,他將是這個英國最有影響力的時尚刊物創立一百年來,執掌大權的第一位男性,也是第一位黑人總編輯。 45歲的恩寧佛是頂尖造型師和備受讚譽的時尚總監,他孩童時期從迦納移民英國,以快活的舉止表情、傳奇的時尚雜誌封面,以及在時尚圈內和圈外擁有大批鐵粉聞名。去年6月獲頒大英帝國勳章,表彰他對時尚產業多元化的貢獻。 Conde Nast's international chairman and chief executive, Jonathan Newhouse, called Enninful “an influential figure in the communities of fashion, Hollywood and music which shape the cultural zeitgeist,” and added that “by virtue of his talent and experience, Edward is supremely prepared to assume the responsibility of British Vogue.” The appointment comes three months after Newhouse named another man, Emanuele Farneti, to the helm of Italian Vogue, following the death of Franca Sozzani. 康泰納仕國際集團董事長兼執行長強納森.紐豪斯說,恩寧佛是「形塑時代思潮的時尚界、好萊塢和音樂界一位具有影響力的人物」,「憑他的才華和經驗,艾德華已為承擔英國版Vogue的責任做好了萬全的準備。」 在決定這項任命的三個月前,紐豪斯任命了另一位男士艾曼紐爾.法內提出掌義大利版的Vogue,接替去世的法蘭加.索薩妮。 Enninful was an unexpected choice. Born in Ghana, Enninful was raised by his seamstress mother in the Ladbroke Grove area of London, alongside five siblings. At 16, he became a model for the British magazine i-D after being scouted while traveling on the Tube, London's subway system. He has called modeling his “baptism into fashion.” By 17, he was assisting on photography shoots for the publication with the stylists Simon Foxton and Beth Summers. In 1991, at 18, he took over from Summers as i-D fashion editor, making him one of the youngest-ever leaders of a major fashion publication. He also obtained a degree from Goldsmiths, University of London. 恩寧佛是出人意料的人選。他在迦納出生,當裁縫的母親在倫敦蘭僕林區把他和5個兄弟姊妹撫養長大。16歲時,他在搭乘倫敦地鐵時被星探相中,成為英國i-D雜誌的模特兒。他把自己的模特兒經驗稱為「進入時尚界的受洗禮」。 到了17歲,他協助造型師西蒙.佛克斯頓和貝絲.桑默斯為這本刊物拍攝照片。1991年18歲時,他取代桑默斯,成為i-D雜誌時尚編輯,使他成為主要時尚刊物有史以來最年輕的主管之一。他並取得倫敦大學金匠學院的文憑。 Although there are a handful of notable exceptions, the fashion industry has a dearth of black power players, and that had been a source of immense frustration for Enninful, who has made a considerable effort to improve things. He has made headlines with accusations of racism, including after he was assigned to sit in the second row at a couture show in Paris in 2013 when white “counterparts” were in the first. 雖然有少數著名的例外,時尚產業極欠缺有權力的黑人,這一直令恩寧佛極感挫折,而他已相當努力以謀求改進。他曾因指控種族歧視而上了大新聞,包括2013年在巴黎一場高級訂製服的秀上,他被指定坐在第二排,而與他「地位相當」的白人坐在第一排。 Source article: https://paper.udn.com/udnpaper/POH0067/312421/web/

All About Art
Writing about Art with Holly J. Black, Managing Editor of Elephant Magazine

All About Art

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 30:37


EPISODE 33 of 'All About Art': Interview with Holly J. Black, Managing Editor of Elephant Magazine and Author of 'Artists on Art' In this episode, I sit down with Holly J. Black, who published her first book 'Artists on Art' with Laurence King Publishing earlier this year. Holly has over eight years of experience editing and producing content across print and digital media, with excellent knowledge of the arts sector – from national institutions to contemporary galleries. She started off as Editorial Assistant of Art Quarterly, the magazine of the Art Fund, and has since then written for The Art Newspaper, Wallpaper* Magazine, Sotheby's, and the Museums Journal to name but a few. She is now Managing Editor of Elephant, a leading arts and culture magazine that covers the international art world with a focus on emerging artists, designers, and photographers. In this episode, I ask her about her career as an arts writer, and we delve into the process of writing an arts book. Listen in to hear me ask Holly about how she defined her audience, what her writing approach was, and how she overcame self doubt. We also talk about what her role as managing editor entails, and what you have to keep in mind when writing about art! Thank you Holly for coming on the podcast. You can follow Holly on social media here: www.instagram.com/hollyejblack and you can find her book 'Artists on Art' at Waterstones or on Amazon. You can support the All About Art Podcast on Patreon here: https://www.patreon.com/allaboutart ABOUT THE HOST: I am an Austrian-American art historian, curator, and writer. I obtained my BA in History of Art at University College London and my MA in Arts Administration and Cultural Policy at Goldsmiths, University of London. My specializations include contemporary art, specifically feminism and artificial intelligence in artistic practice, as well as museum policies and arts engagement. Here are links to my social media, feel free to reach out: Instagram @alexandrasteinacker Twitter @alex_steinacker and LinkedIn at Alexandra Steinacker-Clark COVER ART: Lisa Schrofner a.k.a Liser www.liser-art.com

Art Sense
Ep. 56: Artist Sarah Morris: Story Time

Art Sense

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 68:13


Another hour in conversation with artist Sarah Morris. Sarah was first on the program for Episode 51. In that conversation, we spent the hour trying to get inside the head of the noted painter and filmmaker. In contrast, this episode's conversation is more story time. Sarah shares a number of stories from the span of her career, including her entry into the New York art scene in the late 80s, her time in London during the reign of the YBAs, trying to shoot a sleep-deprived Kate Moss for Vogue and combating a museum's power play.

School of War
Ep 37: Alexander Watson on WWI's Siege of Przemysl and the Making of Europe's Bloodlands

School of War

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 60:45


Alexander Watson, Professor of History at Goldsmiths, University of London, joins the show to talk about the Eastern Front in World War One, and how the events of 1914/15 foreshadowed tragedies to come and the crisis in Ukraine today.  ▪️ Times  • 01:43 Introduction • 02:40 WWI In The East • 05:29 Battlefield - Austria-Hungary  • 10:10 The Austro-Hungarian Army • 13:28 Coveted Galicia • 17:44 1914 - A Primordial Soup • 19:02 The Siege Begins • 26:27 Przemysl's Defensive Plan • 29:50 The Russians Take A Direct Approach • 36:08 Inside A City Under Siege     • 40:19 Total Exhaustion  • 44:45 Military And Human Consequences • 50:00 Birthplace Of The Bloodlands • 55:09 Strange Ends Maps Courtesy of United States Military Academy West Point Eastern Europe, 1914 and Planned Army Concentration Areas in Central Europe, 1914  Operations on The Eastern Front to 20 September 1914

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 162 Part 2: Why Fair Trade Is the Gold Standard for Ethical Jewelry

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 28:06


What you'll learn in this episode: Why an empty mind is the key to creative exploration The difference between an artist-jeweler and a jeweler or artist alone What fair-trade gold is, and how Ute became a pioneer in the ethical jewelry movement Why greenwashing is the newest trend threatening the ethical jewelry market How jewelry creates connections, even when someone wouldn't wear a piece themselves About Ute Decker Ute Decker, born 1969, Germany, lives and works in London, UK. The jewels of Ute Decker are described as “a powerful statement” that “sets a shining ethical example” (Financial Times). The Economist 1843 compares her “avant-garde sculptural pieces” to “swirling sculptures” while Christie's simply calls them “wearable works of art”. Ute's pieces are exhibited internationally and have won prestigious awards including Gold Awards from The Goldsmiths' Craft and Design Council, UK. Public collections include the Victoria & Albert Museum, UK; the Crafts Council, UK; the Goldsmiths' Company, UK; the Spencer Museum, USA; Musée Barbier-Mueller, Switzerland; and the Swiss National Museum. As a political economist-turned-journalist-turned-artist jeweler, Ute Decker is a pioneer of the international ethical jewelery movement. She works predominately in recycled silver and was one of the first worldwide to work in Fairtrade Gold. Additional Resources: Website  Instagram Ute's Facebook Ute's Jewelry Facebook Photos Available on TheJewelryJourney.com  Transcript: When it comes to ethical jewelry, artist-jeweler Ute Decker is the real deal. She was one of the first people to use fair-trade gold when it became available in the U.K., and she has spent her career advocating for the use of truly ethically sourced materials in the jewelry industry. Above all, she's proven that ethical can be beautiful: her sculptural works have won several awards and are in the collection of museums worldwide. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about what fair trade means; how she approaches the creative process; and what makes an artist-jeweler. Read the episode transcript here.     Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. This is the second part of a two-part episode. If you haven't heard part one, please go to TheJewelryJourney.com. Today my guest is Ute Decker, talking with us from London. Ute is an artist-jeweler who's known for her innovative method of sculpting, bending and twisting metal into three-dimensional, wearable sculptures. She works in fair-trade gold and recycled silver and is considered a pioneer in the international ethical jewelry movement. Welcome back.   So how did all of this lead you into recycled material? Was that something you decided you wanted to do, and that was it? How did it happen?   Ute: As we talked about at the beginning, as a teenager, I wanted to change the world. I was always quite environmentally mindful. Then studying political economics, working as a journalist, you think that is very far removed from being a creative, and at the time it certainly felt like a big break, but in hindsight I think it was an important apprenticeship I needed to take to become the jeweler I am today. As in political economics, you don't just look at the piece and take it as art for art's sake or design for design's sake. You want to know the meaning, the context, the economic, the social, the political, the gender.    All those different histories and intersectionalities, that's my training to look at those. As a journalist, your training is to ask questions, so when I started out making jewelry, I did ask questions. Like many people, I've seen the film “Blood Diamonds,” and I thought, “Oh well, thank god I don't work with diamonds. I work with metals.” Then I started to look into gold, and the story is very similar to “Blood Diamonds” with gold. Of course, my reaction was, “I can't possibly work with this kind of material. I can't be part of the status quo. I'd have blood on my hands. It's discretionary. It's something I'm making. There's absolutely no need for those horrible stories.” So, I researched quite a bit and asked many questions about ethics.    In 2009, when I started, there was no information out there whatsoever. In fact, I was met with a lot of hostility. Once you start asking about the ethics of jewelry, you're tainting the story because jewelry is sold as that beautiful, luxurious love, but it's such a tainted story. So, in the jewelry industry, those questions were certainly not welcome. I was met with either belittlement, “Don't you worry. Everything is fine,” or outright hostility. I think as a journalist that meant, O.K., if people avoid your questions, that means you're asking the right questions.    I searched high and low and found a like-minded person who's been very active in that field. I was one of the very first to work with fair-trade gold when it was launched in the U.K. It was together with Fair Trade and Fair Mined Gold. Those two organizations have now separated. I know in America more jewelers work with Fair Mined; in Europe, more work with Fair Trade, but it's very similar standards. The main thing is it's fully traceable. We know exactly where it comes from. I know from which mine in the highlands of Peru my gold is coming from. I know it's not smuggled out from the Congo, supporting atrocities there. I know it's not smuggled out of Russia or somewhere else. It's fully traceable, every single gram. I'm registered with the Fair Trade Foundation in the U.K. The mine is registered as well as the importer, and the refiner is registered. We all have a number and we all declare how much we buy, and it's fully traceable. As a smaller maker, I'm audited every two to three years. I have to be able to show every single invoice; every single gram, I have to account for. It's being checked. It is quite bureaucratic, but that is the guarantee. The whole fair-trade ethos is trade not aid. It is about paying a fair price rather than the small-scale miner selling to middlemen, middlemen exploitation. It's very much about dignity: avoiding child labor, more gender equality, environmental standards of not burning down the Amazon. Fair-trade gold and fair-mined gold is a little more expensive, but in the great scheme of things, it is worth it.   It's also quite interesting that we started with just 20 jewelers. In 2009, we launched jewelry. All the other jewelers were also very small, individual jewelers. The entire industry said, “Traceability is not possible. Our gold is clean.” Well, where does it come from? “It's clean.” But where? Traceability is impossible, we were told by the industry. Gold comes from all over the world, it's then refined mostly in hubs like Switzerland or Dubai. The gold from all over the world comes through those hubs and then is distributed again all over the world. Gold has no identity, and they said it is absolutely impossible to have traceability. So, as 20 tiny, little jewelers, and unimportant jewelers in the great scheme of things, we gave the proof of concept that it was something that is possible. The entire industry no longer could deny that this was a possibility. Sometimes you get so disheartened thinking, “Whatever I do as an individual, what difference could it possibly make? It couldn't be more than a drop in the ocean.” But the ocean is nothing but an accumulation of drops. We can change the waves. We can change. So, we have more power than we think we do.   Sharon: First, let me ask you: What is Fair Trade and Fair Mined? What is fair-trade gold?    Ute: I'll answer both of them together because they started out together. It was called Fair Trade and Fair Mined gold. Later those two organizations separated, but they wrote the standards together, so they're still very similar. When I say Fair Trade, you could almost consider it Fair Mined as well. They're almost interchangeable. I think I did once read the standard. It's pages and pages and pages of small print standards of environmental guidelines, of engaging with gender equality. It is about the minimum payments.    Quite often with small-scale miners, it's not a job you do for fun. Artisanal sounds romantic, but it's not. It's a dollar-a-day, often horrible job, sometimes bonded labor, sometimes involving an awful lot of child labor. All of that is why the Fair Trade Foundation or Fair Mined works with the mine for a long time to come up to standard with certain environmental standards. They have to form a cooperative. We pay a premium that is then invested into community development. Women have a voice. Child labor is not allowed. Those mines are audited, and for their efforts they receive more money. It's really enabling those miners to have more dignity, to live in a cleaner environment, to help protect the environment for all of us, and hopefully earn enough money for those children not to go down the shaft, but to go to school.    The question is, “Well, let's just not use any gold at all,” which I also heartily agree with. But as we said, these miners almost subsist on a dollar a day, quite a few of those small-scale miners around the world. 100 million depend on that income, and it's a poverty-stricken income. For us in the West to say, “Well, it would better if you didn't do that,” is not going to work. It is helping those communities to work more environmentally friendly but also to earn more money to eventually get out of mining. It is a slower process. It's not that we have all the answers. It's a process of empowerment.   Sharon: How about the recycled silver you use? Do you only use recycled silver? How did Fair Mined lead you into only working with recycled silver?   Ute: Fair Trade and Fair Mines initially were only gold mines. When you mine gold, in the ore there is some silver, but it's a much smaller percentage. So, there was availability of fair-trade gold, but very, very little of fair-trade silver. Of course, it's much cheaper to work with silver, so there would be a much higher demand. I would occasionally get a few grams of silver. I think now the availability of fair-mined silver is a little bit better. In fact, I've been told that it's quite good now, so I need to look into that again. It is a continuous journey, but at the time and until recently, there was not just enough availability of fair-trade silver. Otherwise, I would prefer to work in fair-trade silver.    Recycled silver—now we call it recycled because we're all so green; we used to call it scrapping. So, we've always done that.  We've never thrown away precious metals. For me, it is not necessarily an ethical proposition to work in recycled. It is a little bit better than nothing, but I wouldn't say I'm working ethical because I'm using recycled materials. I think that's almost the bare minimum we should be using.    But then we come back to your earlier questions about art jewelry, artist jewelry, ethical jewelry. I don't like the term ethical at all, ethical jewelry. It seems to be a standard term now. Sustainable jewelry, it definitely isn't sustainable. We're using finite resources. Responsible is probably a better term. I quite like mindful, but then mindful is so occupied with other things, so you can't use that term. So, I use ethical jewelry as a term because I think we all know what we mean by that, but I don't particularly like the term.   Sharon: Do your clients care? When you're having a showing or people call about your jewelry and you mention it, does it make a difference to them how you're working, whatever you want to call it? Do they care?   Ute: Not as much as I would have thought. Not as much as I do. It is not what people call a unique selling point; it's not. If you do make small wedding bands, I think young couples, especially younger people, are much more engaged in that sustainable question. For them it's much more important. People find their way first and foremost because there is something that speaks to you about the forms I make. It's only afterwards, when they look closer and they see the materials I use. I think it is a certain appreciation of individually made, sculpted pieces that are unique even when I make a series, because they're all hand sculpted. I will never be able to make the same piece again, so even with a series, pieces are unique.    If that somebody goes to the trouble and cares to choose the best material possible, I think that is appreciated, but nobody comes to me to buy a ring because it's made in fair trade. I would love to stop talking about this subject because I would love it to be normal, nothing special anymore, but after being met with so much hostility all those years ago in 2011, if you look at any website of jewelers now—especially high street—they all proclaim to have responsible sourcing, conflict-free diamonds. As a consumer, if you look, you think, “Oh, thank god all of it has been sorted.” I think our biggest problem now—because there are more and more responsible and ethical options available—is greenwash.   Sharon: Greenwash, did you say?   Ute: Yeah, greenwash. Greenwash means painting the status quo green, changing nothing, just making it sound green. Unless you have fully traceable, unless you know 100% where your materials come from, you can't make those claims. For me, using recycled is not necessarily ethical because there are huge issues with recycled. I'm always asked about that. I put a whole section on my website with several articles: “Is recycled or fair mined better?” because a lot of jewelers want to do the best. Rather than answering that question each time, I put quite a few articles on my website.    Sharon: May I ask you this about your jewelry, about something you said before? It's always seemed to me that if you're doing a show, you're putting your work out there for people to judge. “Yes, I want a ring like that,” or “No, it doesn't appeal to me,” and they move onto the next thing. It must take thick skin.   Ute: Interesting question. You would think so. Before I outed myself, I made jewelry for myself for nearly 20 years. I made what I wanted to wear, what I enjoyed. For me, it was totally unimportant if anybody else liked it.    Sharon: Are the pieces you make for the shows pieces you like or pieces you want to make?   Ute: When I started out only making jewelry for myself, I didn't show it to anybody. I made it for myself. It was out of interest and the creative joy of it. I wore the pieces, and it didn't matter whether somebody liked it. Then I accidentally showed my work for the first time, and I thought, “Who else is going to like this? I love it and some of my friends do, but maybe they're just being nice.” I did win a prize and things happened. It's quite amazing, to my greatest surprise, that several of my pieces are now in several museums including the V&A. I would have never, ever thought so. I think as any creative, to be authentic, you can't try to please everybody. You don't want to please everybody. It's wonderful that there are several people out there in the world who think that what I do speaks to them, but I'm quite happy for many people to just walk past.   Sharon: It doesn't matter.   Ute: Yes, it doesn't matter. There are some lovely older ladies who come. They giggle and say, “Oh, you couldn't do the gardening with that one.” I love that comment. It's still engaging, and they're interested in the shapes. It's so obvious it's not for them, but they still engage in a way. Jewelry, for me, is a way of making connections. You can't connect with absolutely everybody, but when it makes those connections, it's beautiful.  So no, I don't have thick skin, because I guess enough sparkling eyes gives me joy as well. I see artwork that others are enthused about, and it doesn't speak to me. Maybe a few years later it does. So no, I'm not trying to please anybody. It's a joy that there are many people I can share the work with.    Sharon: Your work is unusual, but if your work is not for gardening, as these women say, who is it for? Is it for younger people? Is it for people who appreciate the art and when they go garden, they'll put it aside? Who is it for?   Ute: Every piece I make is a piece I want to wear. Maybe in a way it's firstly for me, so I can keep making them. I sell my work to support my habit. Mostly the people who are drawn to my work are mature, mostly women, but also men. Mature people who are confident that come in all shapes, sizes, ages, everything, but who feel quite confident wearing a piece like the ring I'm wearing or the beautiful ring you're wearing.    Jewelry can also be very empowering. You put on a piece, and here I am talking nonstop, but I can be quite shy. Being in a gathering of people, especially for me to go up to somebody, yeah, I dread being in groups of people. When you wear a piece, it allows other people to approach you. It gives that invitation to speak to you. It doesn't say, “Hey, look what a cool piece I'm wearing.” It says, “Yes, I'm open to have a conversation.” It's amazing how many doors wearing my jewelry has opened. Then you start a conversation, and it naturally flows. Coming back to the question, it is for confident people, but it's also for non-confident people like myself. It's both.   Sharon: I can see how it would be for confident people. I invite everybody to take a look at our website. We'll have picture. It's very unusual jewelry. I really appreciate you being here today. Thank you so much.   Ute: Thank you. That time passed very quickly, Sharon. Thank you.   Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 162 Part 1: Why Fair Trade Is the Gold Standard for Ethical Jewelry

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 21:00


What you'll learn in this episode: Why an empty mind is the key to creative exploration The difference between an artist-jeweler and a jeweler or artist alone What fair-trade gold is, and how Ute became a pioneer in the ethical jewelry movement Why greenwashing is the newest trend threatening the ethical jewelry market How jewelry creates connections, even when someone wouldn't wear a piece themselves About Ute Decker Ute Decker, born 1969, Germany, lives and works in London, UK. The jewels of Ute Decker are described as “a powerful statement” that “sets a shining ethical example” (Financial Times). The Economist 1843 compares her “avant-garde sculptural pieces” to “swirling sculptures” while Christie's simply calls them “wearable works of art”. Ute's pieces are exhibited internationally and have won prestigious awards including Gold Awards from The Goldsmiths' Craft and Design Council, UK. Public collections include the Victoria & Albert Museum, UK; the Crafts Council, UK; the Goldsmiths' Company, UK; the Spencer Museum, USA; Musée Barbier-Mueller, Switzerland; and the Swiss National Museum. As a political economist-turned-journalist-turned-artist jeweler, Ute Decker is a pioneer of the international ethical jewelery movement. She works predominately in recycled silver and was one of the first worldwide to work in Fairtrade Gold. Additional Resources: Website  Instagram Ute's Facebook Ute's Jewelry Facebook Photos Available on TheJewelryJourney.com  Transcript: When it comes to ethical jewelry, artist-jeweler Ute Decker is the real deal. She was one of the first people to use fair-trade gold when it became available in the U.K., and she has spent her career advocating for the use of truly ethically sourced materials in the jewelry industry. Above all, she's proven that ethical can be beautiful: her sculptural works have won several awards and are in the collection of museums worldwide. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about what fair trade means; how she approaches the creative process; and what makes an artist-jeweler. Read the episode transcript here.   Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. This is a two-part Jewelry Journey Podcast. Please make sure you subscribe so you can hear part two as soon as it comes out later this week.    Today my guest is Ute Decker, talking with us from London. Ute is an artist-jeweler who's known for an innovative method of sculpting, bending and twisting metal into three-dimensional, wearable sculptures. She works in fair-trade gold and recycled silver and is considered a pioneer in the international ethical jewelry movement. We'll hear more about her jewelry journey today. Ute, welcome to the program.   Ute: Sharon, thank you very much for having me. It's a pleasure to be here.   Sharon: So glad to have you. Tell us about your jewelry journey. How did you end up doing what you're doing?   Ute: Yes, it was rather unplanned. I'm the daughter of winemakers, several generations of winemakers. As a child, I thought that's what I wanted to be, making wine. So, I grew up in beautiful nature. As I grew up, I was more and more interested in politics, history, philosophy, and I ended up in political economics, because already as a teenager, I wanted to change the world. I thought it was best to have some understanding of how things work. During university, I did a six-month internship at the United Nations. It was also a real eye opener on how slow progress is made and lobbying, so I was quite disheartened after that internship. Then I worked as a journalist for a while, doing news, current affairs. I probably failed in that because I'm not a good storyteller. Words are not my medium.    I was a little bit lost for a while as to what I really wanted to do. When I grew up, in primary and secondary school, art classes were all about figurative drawing and making. I admired it in other people when they can do it, but that's not my interest, and certainly I can't draw a stickperson to save my life. So, I left school thinking I'm actually not very creative or artistic because I failed in what was required. It was probably not until my mid-30s or maybe late 20s when friends said when I made something, “Oh, that's interesting.” For years I was a closet creator. I went to evening classes and all kinds of workshops, whether it's large-scale sculptures, textiles—I love ceramics—several photography workshops. It really was doing workshops that I kept going back.    Nearly for 20 years before offering myself as a jeweler, friends said, “You should do something with your jewelry,” and I said, “Absolutely not.” I loved it so much. There's no way I would like to make it something professional, to have that kind of pressure. I enjoyed it far too much, but then I was invited to take part in a group show. I thought, “It's fine; I'll add a few pieces and just see.” That was quite amazing. That was in 2009. I won a prize and tons of press, and a couple of major collectors bought my pieces. I thought, “Wow, that's nice! I'll maybe do that one more time.” Soon afterwards, I got a proper, full-time studio. The rest is history, really.   Sharon: I don't know if it's still in progress or you just finished up a solo exhibition at the Elisabetta Cipriani Gallery. Tell us about that. Did you feel it was fulfilling, the adulation?   Ute: Elisabetta Cipriani Gallery is absolutely wonderful. We met, I think, in 2013 at Design Basel where they gave me a spotlight showcase, and we've been working together ever since. As you know—you've done an interview with Elisabetta—Elisabetta primarily represents jewelry by artists. Probably the best known is Rebecca Horn. She does collaborations with fine artists, and I was the first one that was more of an art jeweler than a fine artist making jewelry. Now she works with a few more art jewelers. Elisabetta is Italian and it's always “bella.” What a joy to work with somebody who has a really keen eye, interesting observations, does some wonderful projects, is incredibly supportive and is just a joy to be with.    For that exhibition, it's been in discussion for years. I maybe procrastinated a bit because it feels like—it's the same with how I never wanted to show my jewelry. It feels like you're offering it for others to judge. For me, it's a private thing in a way; it's my way of expressing. A solo show is similar. Here is me at this time. I didn't quite like the idea, but of course it's crazy to postpone an offer of a solo show. Then I finally said to Elisabetta, “Look, I will never be ready. Let's just set a date.” So, we did, and then Covid happened, so it was delayed even more. But I created a new body of work for that show called “Creating Waves.” If you have a chance to see it on Elisabetta's or my website—   Sharon: Which we'll list afterwards with show images.   Ute: Yeah. I've also worked with some system of loops because, for me, jewelry is about making connections. It's making personal connections, but it's making broader connections. Coming from that political/economic background in journalism, it's connections of materiality; it's connections where the material comes from. For me, the interlinking loops—and quite a few of those loops are open, so you can change which connections you would like to make and configure the piece. That's another strand that I developed for the solo show, yeah.   Sharon: I can see. We'll hopefully have a picture of it posted with the podcast. You're wearing one of your rings. Were the loops something you saw in front of you when the metal is flat? Was that something that came to you when you were playing around with it? How did that happen?   Ute: For me, making is very much an exploration. I might have certain ideas when I go into the studio and sit, but I'm very fascinated by Japanese Zen philosophy. That philosophy talks a lot about emptiness as well as empty mind. We in the West see emptiness as a void of something we absolutely, quickly need to fill, as something missing, while in that philosophy, emptiness is the vast openness for potential. For me, I don't want to come to the studio with a fixed idea of what I'd like to do, because then I've already determined it as if I know. I don't need to explore anymore if I feel I know. So, I always kind of know what I'd like to do, but then I usually do something completely different. It's that almost empty mind of exploring metal, shapes.    Quite often it's the sculptural form that I explore. As I said, I can't draw, so I make maquettes in garden wire or in brass and explore the shape for its sculptural form. It's quite often only later that I decide for which part of the body that sculpture form would work best. Then it's weeks of tweaking the brass maquettes. I'm quite often seen wearing the maquettes, because when you create such large sculptural forms, they really need to balance and sit well on the body. It's important that I work that out while wearing them, how they engage with the body. It's only then, when I'm happy, I make the final pieces. It's only then, once the pieces are in front of me, that there's another thought process and those pieces remind me of something, remind me of the loops, how they're interconnected, how we can change our connections, other waves.    I think if you gave me a commission to make a piece about waves, I would fail. It is rather I make a piece, and then it reminds me of waves when I see them. It's kind of arresting time of that kind of movement. I'm very happy with some of the pieces that have become quite special to me. Maybe if we can add a particular armpiece for your listeners to see, it is very much a large wave, but when you put the several maquettes next to each other and you don't have any idea of scale, some people who saw the maquettes said, “Oh, that looks like a Richard Serra that you could walk into.” I think that's also why I give my pieces relatively open titles, because I don't want to pre-determine people's associations, just like I don't want to predetermine what reaction I might have to it. We all come with our own backgrounds, with our own thoughts to a piece, and it's the same. Any great artwork will elicit different reactions depending on what state of life we're in and recent experiences. I like to give pieces very open titles for the viewer and wearer to make it their own.   Sharon: So, you say you're an artist-jeweler. What is the difference between that and an artist alone or a jeweler alone? What is an artist-jeweler to you?   Ute: That is the eternal question, isn't it? That is the eternal question, and I still don't know how to answer that. When I'm asked what I do, if we're face-to-face it's very easy, because I usually wear one of my pieces. I hold it up and say, “This is what I do,” and then you decide what that means to you. The other times when you say you're a jeweler, very few people know about the art jewelry world, really surprisingly. So, most people think you're designing little hearts for the high street shops. I think that's why an artist-jeweler will then elicit another question where you can go deeper into it, but it's all just words. This is what I'm doing.    Sharon: No, it is. It's a very difficult question to answer. I usually ask people what they consider a collector, which also is a very difficult question. When you find the answer, give me a call.    You tried textiles. You tried photography. You tried sculpture. What is it about the kind of jewelry you do; why did it attract you? Why did it stand out?   Ute: I guess jewelry is not called the most intimate of art forms for nothing. I love that you can disappear in your studio and quietly work. I create everything myself with my two hands. I sculpt everything myself. With large-scale sculpture, there's much more immediacy with jewelry because I can bend the shapes with my own hands. In fact, my jewelry studio has very few tools, has no nasty chemicals. It's really my hands, a few pliers, a few mallets, mandrels. I like being able to have a spark and immediately translate that into a shape. That's also why I love ceramics. I think in my next life I'll try ceramics as well, explore that.   After setting up as a jeweler, I was commissioned to make some large-scale sculptures, and I thought, “That's amazing. That's what you wanted to do, of course.” But they're so large I had to work with a fabricator. It was a fantastic fabricator who had done it for very well-known artists, the YBAs, the Young British Artists, and did a fantastic job. But for me, it felt unfinished. I handed over the maquette. The fabricator did a wonderful job making a large piece, but usually when I finish a piece of jewelry, I then go and tweak it. It sits there for weeks, and I continue working on it. Here, I was handed over something finished. I don't want something finished. You can't bend it any more with your hands. So, it was surprisingly unsatisfying to make very large sculptures, but I'll do table-size sculptures where I can still be fully hands on. That is something I enjoy doing.   Sharon: Do you do that now, make table-size sculptures similar to jewelry that you bend?   Ute: Yeah, quite a few pieces. In fact, that is one of my favorite reactions when I show my work. People say, “Oh, this is a sculpture. I'm sure you can't wear it,” and then I put it on my hand and the person's hand, and I say, “But surely you can't wear that piece,” and it's wearable. Quite a few pieces look like they only could possibly be sculptures and there's no way to wear them. That's what I really enjoy. Many pieces have been purchased purely for the sole purpose of displaying them rather than wearing them. It's the liminal space between sculpture and wearable sculpture, and again, it's your choice.