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NDA's Deer Season 365
The Ultimate Archery Deer Season Prep With Professional Archer Dan McCarthy

NDA's Deer Season 365

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 57:41


In this episode of the Deer Season 365 Podcast, we are discussing how to prepare your equipment and yourself for the upcoming archery deer season with professional archer Dan McCarthy. We dive into equipment prep, bow string maintenance and replacement, practice routines, and why competitive archery will make you a better bowhunter. If you love to chase white-tailed deer with a bow, you won't want to miss this episode! Important Links: NDA's Weatherby Sweepstakes Follow Dan McCarthy on Instagram Follow Brian Grossman on Instagram Sign up for NDA's free weekly e-newsletter Subscribe to the Podcast on: Apple Podcasts Google Podcasts Spotify iHeartRadio Stitcher About the National Deer Association The National Deer Association (NDA) is a non-profit deer conservation group that works to ensure the future of wild deer, wildlife habitat and hunting. Thank you for subscribing to our podcast! Support NDA's mission by becoming a member today. NDA has the highest ranking from Charity Navigator, an independent group that monitors non-profits for financial efficiency and effectiveness. Learn more about deer and deer hunting in our weekly, free e-newsletter. Follow us on our other channels: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube

Screaming in the Cloud
Let Your Backups Help you Sleep with Simon Bennett

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 33:43


About SimonFounder and CEO of SnapShooter a backup company Links Referenced: SnapShooter.com: https://SnapShooter.com MrSimonBennett: https://twitter.com/MrSimonBennett TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: Finding skilled DevOps engineers is a pain in the neck! And if you need to deploy a secure and compliant application to AWS, forgettaboutit! But that's where DuploCloud can help. Their comprehensive no-code/low-code software platform guarantees a secure and compliant infrastructure in as little as two weeks, while automating the full DevSecOps lifestyle. Get started with DevOps-as-a-Service from DuploCloud so that your cloud configurations are done right the first time. Tell them I sent you and your first two months are free. To learn more visit: snark.cloud/duplo. Thats's snark.cloud/D-U-P-L-O-C-L-O-U-D.Corey: What if there were a single place to get an inventory of what you're running in the cloud that wasn't "the monthly bill?" Further, what if there were a way to compare that inventory to what you were already managing via Terraform, Pulumi, or CloudFormation, but then automatically add the missing unmanaged or drifted parts to it? And what if there were a policy engine to immediately flag and remediate a wide variety of misconfigurations? Well, stop dreaming and start doing; visit snark.cloud/firefly to learn more.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. One of the things that I learned early on in my career as a grumpy Unix systems administrator is that there are two kinds of people out there: those who care about backups an awful lot, and people who haven't lost data yet. I lost a bunch of data once upon a time and then I too fell on the side of backups are super important. Here to talk with me about them a bit today is Simon Bennett, founder and CEO of SnapShooter.com. Simon, thanks for joining me.Simon: Thanks for having me. Thank you very much.Corey: It's fun to be able to talk to people who are doing business in the cloud space—in this sense too—that is not venture-backed, that is not, “Well, we have 600 people here that are building this thing out.” And similar to the way that I handle things at The Duckbill Group, you are effectively one of those legacy things known as a profitable business that self-funds. What made you decide to pursue that model as opposed to, well, whatever the polite version of bilking venture capitalists out of enormous piles of money for [unintelligible 00:01:32]?Simon: I think I always liked the idea of being self-sufficient and running a business, so I always wanted to start a physical business when I was younger, but when I got into software, I realized that that's a really easy way, no capital needed, to get started. And I tried for years and years to build products, all of which failed until finally SnapShooter actually gained a customer. [laugh].Corey: “Oh, wait, someone finally is paying money for this, I guess I'm onto something.”Simon: Yeah.Corey: And it's sort of progressed from there. How long have you been in business?Simon: We started in 2017, as… it was an internal project for a company I was working at who had problems with DigitalOcean backups, or they had problems with their servers getting compromised. So, I looked at DigitalOcean API and realized I could build something. And it took less than a week to build a product [with billing 00:02:20]. And I put that online and people started using it. So, that was how it worked.Every other product I tried before, I'd spent months and months developing it and never getting a customer. And the one time I spent less than [laugh] less than a week's worth of evenings, someone started paying. I mean, admittedly, the first person was only paying a couple of dollars a month, but it was something.Corey: There's a huge turning point where you just validate the ability and willingness for someone to transfer one dollar from their bank account to yours. It speaks to validation in a way that social media nonsense generally doesn't. It's the oh, someone is actually willing to pay because I'm adding value to what they do. That's no small thing.Simon: Yeah. There's definitely a big difference between people saying they're going to and they'd love it, and actually doing it. So.Corey: I first heard about you when Patrick McKenzie—or @patio11, as he goes by on Twitter—wound up doing a mini-thread on you about, “I've now used SnapShooter.com for real, and it was such a joy, including making a server migration easier than it would otherwise have been. Now, I have automatically monitored backups to my own S3 account for a bunch of things, which already had a fairly remote risk of failure.” And he keeps talking about the awesome aspects of it. And okay, when Patrick says, “This is neat,” that usually means it's time for me to at least click the link and see what's going on.And the thing that jumped out at me was a few things about what it is that you offer. You talk about making sure that people can sleep well at night, that it's about why backups are important, about—you obviously check the boxes and talk about how you do things and why you do them the way that you do, but it resonates around the idea of helping people sleep well at night. Because no one wants to think about backups. Because no one cares about backups; they just care an awful lot about restores, usually right after they should have cared about the backups.Simon: Yeah. This is actually a big problem with getting customers because I don't think it's on a lot of people's minds, getting backups set up until, as you said in the intro, something's gone wrong. [laugh]. And then they're happy to be a customer for life.Corey: I started clicking around and looking at your testimonials, for example, on your website. And the first one I saw was from the CEO of Transistor.fm. For those who aren't familiar with what they do, they are the company that hosts this podcast. I pay them as a vendor for all the back issues and whatnot.Whenever you download the show. It's routing through their stuff. So yeah, I kind of want them to have backups of these things because I really don't want to have all these conversations [laugh] again with everyone. That's an important thing. But Transistor's business is not making sure that the data is safe and secure; it's making podcasts available, making it easy to publish to them.And in your case, you're handling the backup portion of it so they can pay their money and they set it up effectively once—set it and forget it—and then they can go back to doing the thing that they do, and not having to fuss with it constantly. I think a lot of companies get it wrong, where they seem to think that people are going to make sustained, engaged efforts in whatever platform or tool or service they build. People have bigger fish to fry; they just want the thing to work and not take up brain sweat.Simon: Yeah. Customers hardly ever log in. I think it's probably a good sign when they don't have to log in. So, they get their report emails, and that's that. And they obviously come back when they got new stuff to set up, but from a support point of view is pretty, pretty easy, really, people don't—[laugh] constantly on there.Corey: From where I sit, the large cloud providers—and some of the small ones, too—they all have backup functionality built into the offering that they've got. And some are great, some are terrible. I assume—perhaps naively—that all of them do what it says on the tin and actually back up the data. If that were sufficient, you wouldn't have any customers. You clearly have customers. What is it that makes those things not work super well?Simon: Some of them are inflexible. So, some of the providers have built-in server backups that only happen weekly, and six days of no backups can be a big problem when you've made a mistake. So, we offer a lot of flexibility around how often you backup your data. And then another key part is that we let you store your data where you want. A lot of the providers have either vendor lock-in, or they only store it in themselves. So… we let you take your data from one side of the globe to the other if you want.Corey: As anyone who has listened to the show is aware, I'm not a huge advocate for multi-cloud for a variety of excellent reasons. And I mean that on a per-workload basis, not, “Oh, we're going to go with one company called Amazon,” and you use everything that they do, including their WorkMail product. Yeah, even Amazon doesn't use WorkMail; they use Exchange like a real company would. And great, pick the thing that works best for you, but backups have always been one of those areas.I know that AWS has great region separation—most of the time. I know that it is unheard of for there to be a catastrophic data loss story that transcends multiple regions, so the story from their side is very often, oh, just back it up to a different region. Problem solved. Ignoring the data transfer aspect of that from a pricing perspective, okay. But there's also a risk element here where everyone talks about the single point of failure with the AWS account that it's there, people don't talk about as much: it's your payment instrument; if they suspend your account, you're not getting into any region.There's also the story of if someone gets access to your account, how do you back that up? If you're going to be doing backups, from my perspective, that is the perfect use case, to put it on a different provider. Because if I'm backing up from, I don't know, Amazon to Google Cloud or vice versa, I have a hard time envisioning a scenario in which both of those companies simultaneously have lost my data and I still care about computers. It is very hard for me to imagine that kind of failure mode, it's way out of scope for any disaster recovery or business continuity plan that I'm coming up with.Simon: Yeah, that's right. Yeah, I haven't—[laugh] I don't have that in my disaster recovery plan, to be honest about going to a different cloud, as in, we'll solve that problem when it happens. But the data is, as you say, in two different places, or more. But yeah, the security one is a key one because, you know, there's quite a lot of surface area on your AWS account for compromising, but if you're using either—even a separate AWS account or a different provider purely for storage, that can be very tightly controlled.Corey: I also appreciate the idea that when you're backing stuff up between different providers, the idea of owning both sides of it—I know you offer a solution where you wind up hosting the data as well, and that has its value, don't get me wrong, but there are also times, particularly for regulated industries, where yeah, I kind of don't want my backup data just hanging out with someone else's account with whatever they choose to do with it. There's also the verification question, which again, I'm not accusing you of in any way, shape, or form of being nefarious, but it's also one of those when I have to report to a board of directors of like, “Are you sure that they're doing what they say they're doing?” It's a, “Well, he seemed trustworthy,” is not the greatest answer. And the boards ask questions like that all the time. Netflix has talked about this where they backup a rehydrate-the-business level of data to Google Cloud from AWS, not because they think Amazon is going to disappear off the face of the earth, but because it's easier to do that and explain it than having to say, “Well, it's extremely unlikely and here's why,” and not get torn to pieces by auditors, shareholders, et cetera. It's the path of least resistance, and there is some validity to it.Simon: Yeah, when you see those big companies who've been with ransomware attacks and they've had to either pay the ransom or they've literally got to build the business from scratch, like, the cost associated with that is almost business-ending. So, just one backup for their data, off-site [laugh] they could have saved themselves millions and millions of pounds. So.Corey: It's one of those things where an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. And we're still seeing that stuff continue to evolve and continue to exist out in the ecosystem. There's a whole host of things that I think about like, “Ooh, if I lost, that would be annoying but not disastrous.” When I was going through some contractual stuff when we were first setting up The Duckbill Group and talking to clients about this, they would periodically ask questions about, “Well, what's your DR policy for these things?” It's, “Well, we have a number of employees; no more than two are located in the same city anywhere, and we all work from laptops because it is the 21st century, so if someone's internet goes out, they'll go to a coffee shop. If everyone's internet goes out, do you really care about the AWS bill that month?”It's a very different use case and [unintelligible 00:11:02] with these things. Now, let's be clear, we are a consultancy that fixes AWS bills; we're not a hospital. There's a big difference in the use case and what is acceptable in different ways. But what I like is that you have really build something out that lets people choose their own adventure in how managed they want it to be, what the source is, what the target should be. And it gives people enough control but without having to worry about the finicky parts of aligning a bunch of scripts that wind up firing off in cron jobs.Simon: Yeah. I'd say a fair few people run into issues running scripts or, you know, they silently fail and then you realize you haven't actually been running backups for the last six months until you're trying to pull them, even if you were trying to—Corey: Bold of you to think that I would notice it that quickly.Simon: [laugh]. Yeah, right. True. Yeah, that's presuming you have a disaster recovery plan that you actually test. Lots of small businesses have never even heard of that as a thing. So, having as us, kind of, manage backups sort of enables us to very easily tell people that backups of, like—we couldn't take the backup. Like, you need to address this.Also, to your previous point about the control, you can decide completely where data flows between. So, when people ask us about what's GDPR policies around data and stuff, we can say, “Well, we don't actually handle your data in that sense. It goes directly from your source through almost a proxy that you control to your storage.” So.Corey: The best answer: GDPR is out of scope. Please come again. And [laugh] yeah, just pass that off to someone else.Simon: In a way, you've already approved those two: you've approved the person that you're managing servers with and you've already approved the people that are doing storage with. You kind of… you do need to approve us, but we're not handling the data. So, we're handling your data, like your actual customer; we're not handling your customer's customer's data.Corey: Oh, yeah. Now, it's a valuable thing. One of my famous personal backup issues was okay, “I'm going to back this up onto the shared drive,” and I sort of might have screwed up the backup script—in the better way, given the two possible directions this can go—but it was backing up all of its data and all the existing backup data, so you know, exponential growth of your backups. Now, my storage vendor was about to buy a boat and name it after me when I caught that. “Oh, yeah, let's go ahead and fix that.”But this stuff is finicky, it's annoying, and in most cases, it fails in silent ways that only show up as a giant bill in one form or another. And not having to think about that is valuable. I'm willing to spend a few hours setting up a backup strategy and the rest; I'm not willing to tend it on an ongoing basis, just because I have other things I care about and things I need to get done.Simon: Yeah. It's such a kind of simple and trivial thing that can quickly become a nightmare [laugh] when you've made a mistake. So, not doing it yourself is a good [laugh] solution.Corey: So, it wouldn't have been a @patio11 recommendation to look at what you do without having some insight into the rest of the nuts and bolts of the business and the rest. Your plans are interesting. You have a free tier of course, which is a single daily backup job and half a gig of storage—or bring your own to that it's unlimited storage—Simon: Yep. Yeah.Corey: Unlimited: the only limits are your budget. Yeah. Zombo.com got it slightly wrong. It's not your mind, it's your budget. And then it goes from Light to Startup to Business to Agency at the high end.A question I have for you is at the high end, what I've found has been sort of the SaaS approach. The top end is always been a ‘Contact Us' form where it's the enterprise scope of folks where they tend to have procurement departments looking at this, and they're going to have a whole bunch of custom contract stuff, but they're also not used to signing checks with fewer than two commas in them. So, it's the signaling and the messaging of, “Reach out and talk to us.” Have you experimented with that at all, yet? Is it something you haven't gotten to yet or do you not have interest in serving that particular market segment?Simon: I'd say we've been gearing the business from starting off very small with one solution to, you know, last—and two years ago, we added the ability to store data from one provider to a different provider. So, we're sort of stair-stepping our way up to enterprise. For example, at the end of last year, we went and got certificates for ISO 27001 and… one other one, I can't remember the name of them, and we're probably going to get SOC 2 at some point this year. And then yes, we will be pushing more towards enterprises. We add, like, APIs as well so people can set up backups on the fly, or so they can put it as part of their provisioning.That's hopefully where I'm seeing the business go, as in we'll become under-the-hood backup provider for, like, a managed hosting solution or something where their customers won't even realize it's us, but we're taking the backups away from—responsibility away from businesses.Corey: For those listeners who are fortunate enough to not have to have spent as long as I have in the woods of corporate governance, the correct answer to, “Well, how do we know that vendor is doing what they say that they're doing,” because the, “Well, he seemed like a nice guy,” is not going to carry water, well, here are the certifications that they have attested to. Here's copies under NDA, if their audit reports that call out what controls they claim to have and it validates that they are in fact doing what they say that they're doing. That is corporate-speak that attests that you're doing the right things. Now, you're going to, in most cases, find yourself spending all your time doing work for no real money if you start making those things available to every customer spending 50 cents a year with you. So generally, the, “Oh, we're going to go through the compliance, get you the reports,” is one of the higher, more expensive tiers where you must spend at least this much for us to start engaging down this rabbit hole of various nonsense.And I don't blame you in the least for not going down that path. One of these years, I'm going to wind up going through at least one of those certification approaches myself, but historically, we don't handle anything except your billing data, and here's how we do it has so far been sufficient for our contractual needs. But the world's evolving; sophistication of enterprise buyers is at varying places and at some point, it'll just be easier to go down that path.Simon: Yeah, to be honest, we haven't had many, many of those customers. Sometimes we have people who come in well over the plan limits, and that's where we do a custom plan for them, but we've not had too many requests for certification. But obviously, we have the certification now, so if anyone ever [laugh] did want to see it under NDA, we could add some commas to any price. [laugh].Corey: This episode is sponsored in parts by our friend EnterpriseDB. EnterpriseDB has been powering enterprise applications with PostgreSQL for 15 years. And now EnterpriseDB has you covered wherever you deploy PostgreSQL on premises, private cloud, and they just announced a fully managed service on AWS and Azure called BigAnimal, all one word.Don't leave managing your database to your cloud vendor because they're too busy launching another half dozen manage databases to focus on any one of them that they didn't build themselves. Instead, work with the experts over at EnterpriseDB. They can save you time and money, they can even help you migrate legacy applications, including Oracle, to the cloud.To learn more, try BigAnimal for free. Go to biganimal.com/snark, and tell them Corey sent you.Corey: What I like as well is that you offer backups for a bunch of different things. You can do snapshots from, effectively, every provider. I'm sorry, I'm just going to call out because I love this: AWS and Amazon LightSail are called out as two distinct things. And Amazonians will say, “Oh, well, under the hood, they're really the same thing, et cetera.” Yeah, the user experience is wildly different, so yeah, calling those things out as separate things make sense.But it goes beyond that because it's not just, “Well, I took a disk image. There we go. Come again.” You also offer backup recipes for specific things where you could, for example, back things up to a local file and external storage where someone is. Great, you also backup WordPress and MongoDB and MySQL and a whole bunch of other things.A unified cloud controller, which is something I have in my house, and I keep thinking I should find a way to back that up. Yeah, this is great. It's not just about the big server thing; it's about having data living in managed services. It's about making sure that the application data is backed up in a reasonable, responsible way. I really liked that approach. Was that an evolution or is that something you wound up focusing on almost from the beginning?Simon: It was an evolution. So, we started with the snapshots, which got the business quite far to be honest and it was very simple. It was just DigitalOcean to start with, actually, for the first two years. Pretty easy to market in a way because it's just focused on one thing. Then the other solutions came in, like the other providers and, you know, once you add one, it was easy to add many.And then came database backups and file backups. And I just had those two solutions because that was what people were asking for. Like, they wanted to make sure their whole server snapshot, if you have a whole server snapshot, the point in time data for MySQL could be corrupt. Like, there could be stuff in RAM that a MySQL dump would have pulled out, for example. Like… there's a possibility that the database could be corrupt from a snapshot, so people were asking for a bit of, more, peace of mind with doing proper backups of MySQL.So, that's what we added. And it soon became apparent when more customers were asking for more solutions that we really needed to, like, step back and think about what we're actually offering. So, we rebuilt this whole, kind of like, database engine, then that allowed us to consume data from anywhere. So, we can easily add more backup types. So, the reason you can see all the ones you've listed there is because that's kind of what people have been asking for. And every time someone comes up with a new, [laugh], like, a new open-source project or database or whatever, we'll add support, even ones I've never heard of before. When people ask for some weird file—Corey: All it takes is just waiting for someone to reach out and say, hey, can you back this thing up, please?Simon: Yeah, exactly, some weird file-based database system that I've never ever heard of. Yeah, sure. Just give us [laugh] a test server to mess around with and we'll build, essentially, like, we use bash in the background for doing the backups; if you can stream the data from a command, we can then deal with the whole management process. So, that's the reason why. And then, I was seeing in, like, the Laravel space, for example, people were doing MySQL backups and they'd have a script, and then for whatever reason, someone rotated the passwords on the database and the backup script… was forgotten about.So, there it is, not working for months. So, we thought we could build a backup where you could just point it at where the Laravel project is. We can get all the config we need at the runtime because it's all there with the project anyway, and then thus, you never need to tell us the password for your database and that problem goes away. And it's the same with WordPress.Corey: I'm looking at this now just as you go through this, and I'm a big believer in disclaiming my biases, conflicts of interest, et cetera. And until this point, neither of us have traded a penny in either direction between us that I'm ever aware of—maybe you bought a t-shirt or something once upon a time—but great, I'm about to become a customer of this because I already have backup solutions for a lot of the things that you currently support, but again, when you're a grumpy admin who's lost data in the past, it's, “Huh, you know what I would really like? That's right, another backup.” And if that costs me a few hundred bucks a year for the peace of mind is money well spent because the failure mode is I get to rewrite a whole lot of blog posts and re-record all podcasts and pay for a whole bunch of custom development again. And it's just not something that I particularly want to have to deal with. There's something to be said for a holistic backup solution. I wish that more people thought about these things.Simon: Can you imagine having to pull all the blog posts off [unintelligible 00:22:19]? [laugh]—Corey: Oh, my got—Simon: —to try and rebuild it.Corey: That is called the crappiest summer internship someone has ever had.Simon: Yeah.Corey: And that is just painful. I can't quite fathom having to do that as a strategy. Every once in a while some big site will have a data loss incident or go out of business or something, and there's a frantic archiving endeavor that happens where people are trying to copy the content out of the Google Search Engine's cache before it expires at whatever timeline that is. And that looks like the worst possible situation for any sort of giant backup.Simon: At least that's one you can fix. I mean, if you were to lose all the payment information, then you've got to restitch all that together, or anything else. Like, that's a fixable solution, but a lot of these other ones, if you lose the data, yeah, there's no two ways around it, you're screwed. So.Corey: Yeah, it's a challenging thing. And it's also—the question also becomes one of, “Well, hang on. I know about backups on this because I have this data, but it's used to working in an AWS environment. What possible good would it do me sitting somewhere else?” It's, yeah, the point is, it's sitting somewhere else, at least in my experience. You can copy it back to that sort of environment.I'm not suggesting this is a way that you can run your AWS serverless environment on DigitalOcean, but it's a matter of if everything turns against you, you can rebuild from those backups. That's the approach that I've usually taken. Do you find that your customers understand that going in or is there an education process?Simon: I'd say people come for all sorts of reasons for why they want backup. So, having your data in two places for that is one of the reasons but, you know, I think there's a lot of reasons why people want peace of mind: for either developer mistakes or migration mistakes or hacking, all these things. So, I guess the big one we come up with a lot is people talking about databases and they don't need backups because they've got replication. And trying to explain that replication between two databases isn't the same as a backup. Like, you make a mistake you drop—[laugh] you run your delete query wrong on the first database, it's gone, replicated or not.Corey: Right, the odds of me fat-fingering an S3 bucket command are incredibly likelier than the odds of AWS losing an entire region's S3 data irretrievably. I make mistakes a lot more than they tend to architecturally, but let's also be clear, they're one of the best. My impression has always been the big three mostly do a decent job of this. The jury's still out, in my opinion, on other third-party clouds that are not, I guess, tier one. What's your take?Simon: I have to be careful. I've got quite good relationships with some of these. [laugh].Corey: Oh, of course. Of course. Of course.Simon: But yes, I would say most customers do end up using S3 as their storage option, and I think that is because it is, I think, the best. Like, is in terms of reliability and performance, some storage can be a little slow at times for pulling data in, which could or could not be a problem depending on what your use case is. But there are some trade-offs. Obviously, S3, if you're trying to get your data back out, is expensive. If you were to look at Backblaze, for example, as well, that's considerably cheaper than S3, especially, like, when you're talking in the petabyte-scale, there can be huge savings there. So… they all sort of bring their own thing to the table. Personally, I store the backups in S3 and in Backblaze, and in one other provider. [laugh].Corey: Oh, yeah. Like—Simon: I like to have them spread.Corey: Like, every once in a while in the industry, there's something that happens that's sort of a watershed moment where it reminds everyone, “Oh, right. That's why we do backups.” I think the most recent one—and again, love to them; this stuff is never fun—was when that OVH data center burned down. And OVH is a somewhat more traditional hosting provider, in some respects. Like, their pricing is great, but they wind up giving you what amounts to here as a server in a rack. You get to build all this stuff yourself.And that backup story is one of those. Oh, okay. Well, I just got two of them and I'll copy backups to each other. Yeah, but they're in the same building and that building just burned down. Now, what? And a lot of people learned a very painful lesson. And oh, right, that's why we have to do that.Simon: Yeah. The other big lesson from that was that even if the people with data in a different region—like, they'd had cross-regional backups—because of the demand at the time for accessing backups, if you wanted to get your data quickly, you're in a queue because so many other people were in the same boat as you're trying to restore stored backups. So, being off-site with a different provider would have made that a little easier. [laugh].Corey: It's a herd of elephants problem. You test your DR strategy on a scheduled basis; great, you're the only person doing it—give or take—at that time, as opposed to a large provider has lost a region and everyone is hitting their backup service simultaneously. It generally isn't built for that type of scale and provisioning. One other question I have for you is when I make mistakes, for better or worse, they're usually relatively small-scale. I want to restore a certain file or I will want to, “Ooh, that one item I just dropped out of that database really should not have been dropped.” Do you currently offer things that go beyond the entire restore everything or nothing? Or right now are you still approaching this from the perspective of this is for the catastrophic case where you're in some pain already?Simon: Mostly the catastrophic stage. So, we have MySQL [bin logs 00:27:57] as an option. So, if you wanted to do, like, a point-in-time of store, which… may be more applicable to what you're saying, but generally, its whole, whole website recovery. For example, like, we have a WordPress backup that'll go through all the WordPress websites on the server and we'll back them up individually so you can restore just one. There are ways that we have helped customers in the past just pull one table, for example, from a backup.But yeah, we geared towards, kind of, the set and the forget. And people don't often restore backups, to be honest. They don't. But when they do, it's obviously [laugh] very crucial that they work, so I prefer to back up the whole thing and then help people, like, if you need to extract ten megabytes out of an entire gig backup, that's a bit wasteful, but at least, you know, you've got the data there. So.Corey: Yeah. I'm a big believer in having backups in a variety of different levels. Because I don't really want to do a whole server restore when I remove a file. And let's be clear, I still have that grumpy old Unix admin of before I start making changes to a file, yeah, my editor can undo things and remembers that persistently and all. But I have a disturbing number of files and directories whose names end in ‘.bac' with then, like, a date or something on it, just because it's—you know, like, “Oh, I have to fix something in Git. How do I do this?”Step one, I'm going to copy the entire directory so when I make a pig's breakfast out of this and I lose things that I care about, rather than having to play Git surgeon for two more days, I can just copy it back over and try again. Disk space is cheap for those things. But that's also not a holistic backup strategy because I have to remember to do it every time and the whole point of what you're building and the value you're adding, from my perspective, is people don't have to think about it.Simon: Yes. Yeah yeah yeah. Once it's there, it's there. It's running. It's as you say, it's not the most efficient thing if you wanted to restore one file—not to say you couldn't—but at least you didn't have to think about doing the backup first.Corey: I really want to thank you for taking the time out of your day to talk to me about all this. If people want to learn more for themselves, where can they find you?Simon: So, SnapShooter.com is a great place, or on Twitter, if you want to follow me. I am @MrSimonBennett.Corey: And we will, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:30:11]. Thank you once again. I really appreciate it.Simon: Thank you. Thank you very much for having me.Corey: Simon Bennett, founder and CEO of SnapShooter.com. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this episode, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this episode, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry insulting comment that, just like your backup strategy, you haven't put enough thought into.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Drew and Mike Show
Drew And Mike – May 22, 2022

Drew and Mike Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 160:11


Dave Chappelle triggered John Mulaney fans, Elon Musk pulls a Deshaun Watson, Monkeypox, Stagflation, George Carlin's American Dream, Drew Crime: The Cyclist Murder, and the Detroit Lions' DJ cancels Kid Rock.John Mulaney is in trouble for not issuing a trigger warning for fans before bringing comedian Dave Chappelle on stage at his Columbus comedy show.Bill Maher went off on the trendiness of transgendered youth.Dustin Diamond is making a comeback and trying to eclipse Drew in Twitter followers.Other John Mulaney Notes: Chip 'n Dale: Rescue Rangers is really insensitive to the original Peter Pan. People are mad that John's baby-mama needs baby formula too. Early Voting won the Preakness stakes and Maz owes us all money for his 2nd consecutive incorrect horse race prediction.The Detroit Lions DJ scrubs Kid Rock from Ford Field.Harry Styles is ripping off Paul McCartney.Dolly Parton has covered a lot more rock songs than you think.My Next Guest Needs No Introduction with David Letterman landed a Will Smith interview... before the Oscars slap.The biggest stars in the world are showing up for the Queen's month-long Platinum Jubilee.The Detroit Tigers have many injuries.Congratulations to Travis and Kourtney on their THIRD wedding... this time in Italy.Stagflation is the newest thing we're told to fear.McDonald's in Royal Oak closes at 7pm despite the internet saying it's 24/7.A bunch of German baby formula has landed, but will take weeks to get on the shelves. Marc's worried there might be a peanut butter shortage soon.Monkeypox is the second newest thing we're told to fear.Elon Musk is #MeToo'd by a former flight attendant/masseuse that he has sign an NDA.Britney Spears is still CRAZY.Rebel Wilson was sexually assaulted years ago by a mystery celebrity (before she was sizzling). She wants you to know she handled it perfectly because she was a lawyer.Johnny Depp vs Amber Heard rolls into its 230th week. The Daily Wire spends thousands to somehow make this case political.A Bhad Bhabie look-a-like/sound-a-like battled with a Florida McDonald's and the McPuns were McPlentiful.George Carlin's American Dream doc on HBO is worth your time.Gaylord was hit hard by a tornado over the weekend leaving two dead.Studio Woes: The No BS News Hour can leave the DealsintheD.com studio in slight disarray every Friday. Check out ML's latest piece on Sam Riddle who will be in this basement on Tuesday.Mitch Albom has a lukewarm take on Nick Saban vs Jimbo Fisher.Juwan Howard told the LA Lakers to pound sand/salt.Drew Crime: Another nude pic suicide. Stop sending photos of your weiner. Player Dave 2.0 leads to another murder and a smoking hot fugitive. One of the Big 3 (Dateline, 48 Hours & 20/20) covered the murder surrounding ex-Chicago Bear Shaun Gayle.Jay Cutler allegedly nails his friend's wives.Matthew Stafford is in Top Gun commercials now. He's complicit with the atrocities of Scientology.Social media is dumb, but we're on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter (Drew and Mike Show, Marc Fellhauer, Trudi Daniels and BranDon).

The Kevin Jackson Show
Ep. 22-199 - Pausing DGB

The Kevin Jackson Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 38:40


In this episode, the optics of DHS pausing the Disinformation Governance Board. The Republican divide between Trumplicans vs RINOs in highest turnout in two decades.

Thought of the Day
Clip: Musk Says Twitter Aquisition Is Still A Go (Clean)

Thought of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 9:06


Welcome back, to another clip from Doc's Thought of the Day. Today Doc discusses the fact that Musk still says he intends to purchase Twitter.Website - https://www.thatsonpoint.infoFollow Us On;Bitchute-https://www.bitchute.com/channel/8SXcz1rqDyu7/YouTube-https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRNHroldv9kuaatarS7uclAMinds-https://www.minds.com/thatsonpoint/ToP Clips: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn_fZ4JhHN05YLijsdmkYSQ/Paler:https://parler.com/profile/DocComeauSupport Us On;Subscribe Star-https://www.subscribestar.com/that-s-on-pointPatreon-https://www.patreon.com/ThatsOnPoint?fan_landing=tru

Thought of the Day
Clip: Musk Says Twitter Aquisition Is Still A Go (Explicit)

Thought of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 9:06


Welcome back, to another clip from Doc's Thought of the Day. Today Doc discusses the fact that Musk still says he intends to purchase Twitter.Website - https://www.thatsonpoint.infoFollow Us On;Bitchute-https://www.bitchute.com/channel/8SXcz1rqDyu7/YouTube-https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRNHroldv9kuaatarS7uclAMinds-https://www.minds.com/thatsonpoint/ToP Clips: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn_fZ4JhHN05YLijsdmkYSQ/Paler:https://parler.com/profile/DocComeauSupport Us On;Subscribe Star-https://www.subscribestar.com/that-s-on-pointPatreon-https://www.patreon.com/ThatsOnPoint?fan_landing=tru

Thought of the Day
Clip: Twitter Says Musk Violated Their NDA (Explicit)

Thought of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 8:47


Welcome back, to another clip from Doc's Thought of the Day. Today Doc discusses Twitter accussing Elon of violated their NDA over Bot analysis Tweet.Website - https://www.thatsonpoint.infoFollow Us On;Bitchute-https://www.bitchute.com/channel/8SXcz1rqDyu7/YouTube-https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRNHroldv9kuaatarS7uclAMinds-https://www.minds.com/thatsonpoint/ToP Clips: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn_fZ4JhHN05YLijsdmkYSQ/Paler:https://parler.com/profile/DocComeauSupport Us On;Subscribe Star-https://www.subscribestar.com/that-s-on-pointPatreon-https://www.patreon.com/ThatsOnPoint?fan_landing=tru

Thought of the Day
Clip: Twitter Says Musk Violated Their NDA (Clean)

Thought of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 8:47


Welcome back, to another clip from Doc's Thought of the Day. Today Doc discusses Twitter accussing Elon of violated their NDA over Bot analysis Tweet.Website - https://www.thatsonpoint.infoFollow Us On;Bitchute-https://www.bitchute.com/channel/8SXcz1rqDyu7/YouTube-https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRNHroldv9kuaatarS7uclAMinds-https://www.minds.com/thatsonpoint/ToP Clips: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn_fZ4JhHN05YLijsdmkYSQ/Paler:https://parler.com/profile/DocComeauSupport Us On;Subscribe Star-https://www.subscribestar.com/that-s-on-pointPatreon-https://www.patreon.com/ThatsOnPoint?fan_landing=tru

Thought of the Day
Clip: Musk Questions Twitter's Bot Numbers (Clean)

Thought of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 9:09


Welcome back, to another clip from Doc's Thought of the Day. Today Doc discusses Elon Musk discusses everyone conducting their own bot number analysis.Website - https://www.thatsonpoint.infoFollow Us On;Bitchute-https://www.bitchute.com/channel/8SXcz1rqDyu7/YouTube-https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRNHroldv9kuaatarS7uclAMinds-https://www.minds.com/thatsonpoint/ToP Clips: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn_fZ4JhHN05YLijsdmkYSQ/Paler:https://parler.com/profile/DocComeauSupport Us On;Subscribe Star-https://www.subscribestar.com/that-s-on-pointPatreon-https://www.patreon.com/ThatsOnPoint?fan_landing=tru

Thought of the Day
Clip: Musk Questions Twitter's Bot Numbers (Explicit)

Thought of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 9:09


Welcome back, to another clip from Doc's Thought of the Day. Today Doc discusses Elon Musk discusses everyone conducting their own bot number analysis.Website - https://www.thatsonpoint.infoFollow Us On;Bitchute-https://www.bitchute.com/channel/8SXcz1rqDyu7/YouTube-https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRNHroldv9kuaatarS7uclAMinds-https://www.minds.com/thatsonpoint/ToP Clips: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn_fZ4JhHN05YLijsdmkYSQ/Paler:https://parler.com/profile/DocComeauSupport Us On;Subscribe Star-https://www.subscribestar.com/that-s-on-pointPatreon-https://www.patreon.com/ThatsOnPoint?fan_landing=tru

Thought of the Day
Clip: Musk Puts Twitter Deal On Hold (Clean)

Thought of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 8:50


Welcome back, to another clip from Doc's Thought of the Day. Today Doc discusses Elon Musk putting his Twitter deal on hold because of questionable bot numbers.Website - https://www.thatsonpoint.infoFollow Us On;Bitchute-https://www.bitchute.com/channel/8SXcz1rqDyu7/YouTube-https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRNHroldv9kuaatarS7uclAMinds-https://www.minds.com/thatsonpoint/ToP Clips: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn_fZ4JhHN05YLijsdmkYSQ/Paler:https://parler.com/profile/DocComeauSupport Us On;Subscribe Star-https://www.subscribestar.com/that-s-on-pointPatreon-https://www.patreon.com/ThatsOnPoint?fan_landing=tru

Thought of the Day
Clip: Musk Puts Twitter Deal On Hold (Explicit)

Thought of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 8:50


Welcome back, to another clip from Doc's Thought of the Day. Today Doc discusses Elon Musk putting his Twitter deal on hold because of questionable bot numbers.Website - https://www.thatsonpoint.infoFollow Us On;Bitchute-https://www.bitchute.com/channel/8SXcz1rqDyu7/YouTube-https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRNHroldv9kuaatarS7uclAMinds-https://www.minds.com/thatsonpoint/ToP Clips: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn_fZ4JhHN05YLijsdmkYSQ/Paler:https://parler.com/profile/DocComeauSupport Us On;Subscribe Star-https://www.subscribestar.com/that-s-on-pointPatreon-https://www.patreon.com/ThatsOnPoint?fan_landing=tru

Thought of the Day
215 The Musk Twitter Deal May Be In Trouble (Explicit)

Thought of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 30:58


Welcome back, to Doc's Thought of the Day. Today Doc discusses the fact that ELon Musk's Twitter deal seems to be in some trouble.Website - https://www.thatsonpoint.infoFollow Us On;Bitchute-https://www.bitchute.com/channel/8SXcz1rqDyu7/YouTube-https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRNHroldv9kuaatarS7uclAMinds-https://www.minds.com/thatsonpoint/ToP Clips: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn_fZ4JhHN05YLijsdmkYSQ/Paler:https://parler.com/profile/DocComeauSupport Us On;Subscribe Star-https://www.subscribestar.com/that-s-on-pointPatreon-https://www.patreon.com/ThatsOnPoint?fan_landing=tru

The Nerd Cantina Show
Azuki, data privacy, Madonna's NFT, and space news- TNCS Ep 209

The Nerd Cantina Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 65:28


This episode covers the latest in entertainment, tech, and space news.  Topics include video games and their impact on kids' IQ, data privacy, NFT news, and space news.   We ask that you support the show in any way possible.  You can like, share, rate or comment on any of the various social media and podcast players.  Join the conversation in our closed Facebook group at https://www.thenerdcantina.com/community, or become a patron on our Patreon page (https://www.patreon.com/thenerdcantina) where a pledge of as little as $1 will get you a free sticker.   ‘Doctor Strange In The Multiverse Of Madness' Rings Up $688M Global After Two Weekends; How High Can Cloak & Swagger Go? – International Box Officehttps://deadline.com/2022/05/doctor-strange-in-the-multiverse-of-madness-gobal-international-box-office-1235024115/ Playing Video Games Has an Unexpected Effect on Kids' IQ, Says New Studyhttps://www.sciencealert.com/video-games-could-be-able-to-boost-intelligence-in-kids?fbclid=IwAR3L3IbSwTX0w9fNiBAU4HnVRF3_xt2mMf23RL4F3cQljIC-wPFLaScjAcY  Some top 100,000 websites collect everything you type—before you hit submithttps://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2022/05/some-top-100000-websites-collect-everything-you-type-before-you-hit-submit/  Clearview AI agrees to restrict US sales of facial recognition mostly to law enforcementhttps://edition.cnn.com/2022/05/09/tech/clearview-ai-aclu-settlement/index.html  The Verge: Phishing attack pop-up targets MetaMask users visiting popular crypto sites.https://www.theverge.com/2022/5/13/23071786/etherscan-coingecko-crypto-phishing-ad-popup-coinzilla-metamask  Azuki Creator in Hot Water Amidst Rug Pull Allegations: Here Are the Factshttps://nftnow.com/news/azuki-creator-in-hot-water-amidst-rug-pull-allegations/  CNBC: China has been quietly building a blockchain platform. Here's what we know.https://www.cnbc.com/2022/05/16/china-blockchain-explainer-what-is-bsn-.html  NME: Madonna defends NFT collection that features 3D model of her vagina.https://www.nme.com/news/music/madonna-defends-nft-collection-that-features-3d-model-of-her-vagina-3225404?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=madonna-defends-nft-collection-that-features-3d-model-of-her-vagina  Elon Musk says $44 billion Twitter deal can't proceed until CEO proves the platform has fewer than 5% fake accountshttps://www.businessinsider.in/tech/news/elon-musk-says-44-billion-twitter-deal-cant-proceed-until-ceo-proves-the-platform-has-fewer-than-5-fake-accounts/articleshow/91615423.cms  Elon Musk says Twitter accused him of violating NDA over bot claimshttps://www.scmp.com/tech/big-tech/article/3177871/elon-musk-says-twitter-legal-team-told-him-he-violated-nda-revealing?utm_content=article&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Twitter#Echobox=1652670335-1  Futurism: Boeing Reportedly Melting Down Over Disastrous Spacecraft.https://futurism.com/the-byte/boeing-aerojet-blame-starliner  Black holehttps://astronomy.com/news/2022/05/say-hello-to-sagittarius-a-the-black-hole-at-the-center-of-the-milky-way 

Thought of the Day
215 The Musk Twitter Deal May Be In Trouble (Clean)

Thought of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 30:58


Welcome back, to Doc's Thought of the Day. Today Doc discusses the fact that ELon Musk's Twitter deal seems to be in some trouble.Website - https://www.thatsonpoint.infoFollow Us On;Bitchute-https://www.bitchute.com/channel/8SXcz1rqDyu7/YouTube-https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRNHroldv9kuaatarS7uclAMinds-https://www.minds.com/thatsonpoint/ToP Clips: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn_fZ4JhHN05YLijsdmkYSQ/Paler:https://parler.com/profile/DocComeauSupport Us On;Subscribe Star-https://www.subscribestar.com/that-s-on-pointPatreon-https://www.patreon.com/ThatsOnPoint?fan_landing=tru

Tim Pool Daily Show
Elon Musk Twitter Buyout Could COLLPASE Amid Potential FRAUD, Twitter Says Elon VIOLATED NDA

Tim Pool Daily Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 91:07


Elon Musk Twitter Buyout Could COLLPASE Amid Potential FRAUD, Twitter Says Elon VIOLATED NDA. Twitter CEO Parag Agrawal says an external audit is not possible due to a lack of data. Elon Musk revealed that Twitter only used 100 accounts to determine how many people were bots on the platform and in doing so was accused of violating his NDA. But if advertisers didn't know this how can they trust what they are actually buying. It seems the pro democrats and left wing bias of Twitter is being exposed along with bots and spam and whether Elon Musk Twitter Takeover happens we have learned a lot #ElonMusk #Censorship #Democrats Become A Member And Protect Our Work at http://www.timcast.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

FactSet Evening Market Recap
FactSet Evening Market Recap - Monday, 16-May

FactSet Evening Market Recap

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 4:05


US equities finished mostly lower in Monday trading following a notable Friday rally that nevertheless capped the S&P's sixth consecutive weekly drop. The market struggled for direction today as investors waited for more news later in the week. The narrative has defaulted to push-and-pull between bearish and bullish themes. In corporate news, Elon Musk tweeted Twitter's legal team accused him of violating NDA, Carlyle Group announced a plan to acquire Mantech International and Rivian sued Commercial Vehicle Group over the raising of an agreed-upon price for seats.

Highway Diary with Eric Hollerbach
Highway Diary w/ Eric Hollerbach Ep345 - Damien AJ Bostian

Highway Diary with Eric Hollerbach

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 146:46


VIDEO VERSION HERE   Damien AJ Bostian joins the Highway Diary podcast to talk about his appearance on ABC's Nightline.  Original Program can be found here:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p3KU8-NOsoA   We talk about the larger implications of US intervention in the conflict in the Ukraine. A debate ensues. Eric insists that there's plenty of creeps that should be handled in the USA before deploying marksmen abroad. For example, the most disgusting person in the world, Larry Silverstein.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RjpzJ6R-tJY   We talk about the World Economic Forum, Klaus Schwab Jr., and dance around NDA's.  www.EricHollerbach.com Instagram @ KlausSchwabJr ACBD Remedy - 20% off Promo Code Eric    

The David Pakman Show
5/16/22: Vile Mass Shooting, Vile Reactions Too

The David Pakman Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 62:02


--On the Show: --A horrifying domestic terror incident in Buffalo, New York, where an 18-year-old shooter deliberately targeted a black neighborhood and killed ten people --Without missing a beat, Fox News and its guest raise the topic of violence in video games as a possible cause of the Buffalo mass shooting --Within hours of the Buffalo mass shooting, Fox News fearmongers about immigrant terrorists coming through the southern border --Support for abortion being legal in the United States hits a record high in the aftermath of the leaked forthcoming Supreme Court decision on Roe v Wade --Donald Trump speaks in Austin, Texas and sets a new record for immorality --Our correspondent Luke Beasley was on the ground in Austin, Texas for the Trump rally and it was incredibly disturbing --Eric Trump seems determined to prove his ignorance, saying during a recent interview that the real pandemic isn't COVID but rather fentanyl overdoses --Failed former President Donald Trump's former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn claims that Trump is currently the President of the United States --Voicemail caller the Eggman asks whether right wingers are even aware of the Buffalo attack given the dearth of coverage of it on many right wing media outlets --On the Bonus Show: PA Dem Senate candidate John Fetterman suffers stroke, Mitch McConnell says Senate will pass largest Ukraine package yet this week, Elon Musk says Twitter legal team told him he violated NDA, much more...

Neural Implant podcast - the people behind Brain-Machine Interface revolutions
Evan Coopersmith on how software is just as important as hardware in neurotech machine learning

Neural Implant podcast - the people behind Brain-Machine Interface revolutions

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 31:06


Evan Coopersmith is the galactic head of admonishment and also executive vice president of data science at Agency Enterprise Studio. There they do contract work for machine learning in neuroscience and neurotech.  ***This podcast is sponsored by Iris Biomedical, check out their Neurotech Startup Services here*** Top 3 Takeaways: "One of the arguments I've often made is that it isn't only the hardware that holds us back. It is the software. When the software reaches a level of sophistication, suddenly the hardware is orders of magnitude more impactful." "Clearly we have learned how to understand patterns. We call these latent patterns in the data. The challenge we're involved in spoke to this idea of these latent patterns that exist in neurological data. And I think that's where the software has to take the next step of understanding those latent patterns in the same way." "One of the things that we're interested in is the unsexy efficiencies of how do you run data science analysis? In this field, how do you construct the infrastructure for it? How do you ensure that you're not driving your Ferrari on gravel roads?" 0:45 Do you want to introduce yourself? 2:30 What does AE Studios do? 8:00 How do you use machine learning for neuroscience? 11:00 How does your company work? When do they come to you? 12:30 Iris Biomedical ad sponsorship 13:00 Do you want to talk about your checkers and chess software analogy? 20:45 What is your company's headcount? 22:45 What are you guys working on which is not covered by NDA? 25:30 How do you guys run the software? 26:30 Is there anything that you wanted to talk about that we didn't mention?  

Drew and Mike Show
Drew And Mike – May 15, 2022

Drew and Mike Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 178:20


Thomas Markle tells us about the Queen's Jubilee, mass shooting in Buffalo, Britney Spears miscarriage, Jeff Bezos v. Joe Biden on Twitter, Joey B. Toonz hates influencers, new Norm Macdonald coming to Netflix, and menstrual shed inventor Randy Weaver dies.Britney Spears lost her "miracle" baby. Thoughts and prayers. Some people are saying that Marcstradamus called it.Paris Hilton went to Capitol Hill to fight child abuse even though it's very difficult for her.Pete Davidson got his dumbest tattoo yet.Detroit Tigers: Tom Mazawey once again assaulted the buffet. It may cost us $5,000 to make our Mazcot. The Tigers actually won a series. Tork knocked someone out. Teebs made the cover of a Freep story.The Cincinnati Reds pitched a no-hitter... and lost.A manifesto writing racist murdered 10 in a mass shooting in Buffalo. There were 3 mass shootings in Milwaukee this weekend.Incel load Johnny Young is on the loose after pepper spraying attacks.The baby formula thing is getting ridiculous.Bling Empire is Drew's new reality TV show fix.Garrison Keillor is making his comeback for no one to see.Cary Fukunaga's comments on Roe v. Wade opened up a storm of allegations against him.Drew did a deep dive on Joey B. Toonz and his great YouTube videos.Netflix: Netflix stock is going the wrong way, so much so, that they are telling their employees to love it or leave it. Norm Macdonald filmed a super secret Netflix special available at May 30th. Our Father is the latest wacky documentary. Nice doctor. Elon has violated Twitter's NDA. His purchase of the company is on hold. Some people are saying that he never had any intention of completing the purchase.Jeff Bezos calls out Joe Biden for equating two issues that are mutually exclusive.Bette Midler loves Joe Biden so much that she tweeted the dumbest take on the baby formula shortage.Bill Maher is mad at Jen Psaki.A Detroit car was split in half by a pole.Rand Paul single handedly holds up the $40,000,000,000 to Ukraine.RIP to actor Fred Ward.Menstrual Shed inventor, Randy Weaver, has died. Check out the fantastic TV miniseries here.Kwame Kilpatrick had his new "bundle of joy" and named him Kyng.Queen's Platinum Jubilee: Tom Cruise is in attendance for some reason. Not-a-Prince Harry and Meghan Markle act like they didn't even want to be on the balcony. LIARS! Thomas Markle is going to be the star of the show. We get him on the horn to get his thoughts.TV writer Michael Jamin explains the 'Melrose Hang Up'.Meg Ryan and Kelly McGillis were NOT asked to return to the Top Gun series.Singer Dan Hartman died of AIDS and no one ever told Drew.Drew forces us to watch old clips of St. Elmo's Fire.Hundreds of people showed up to Vicky White's funeral. We check in with the sex shop again and get in trouble.More Metallica / Johnny Depp mashups. SNL made some jokes about the turd in the bed.Phil Mickelson won't defend his PGA Championship because everyone's mad at the dumb things he said.Diddy is hosting and producing the Billboard Awards.We attempt to dial up The Sports Bra to get their programming schedule but they are closed on Sundays like every other bar.Some jerk bought Screech more followers to surpass Drew... but they messed up and didn't buy enough. IN YOUR FACE!Social media is dumb, but we're on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter (Drew and Mike Show, Marc Fellhauer, Trudi Daniels and BranDon).

Hacks & Wonks
Week In Review: May 13, 2022

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 34:41


On this Hacks & Wonks week-in-review, Crystal is joined by the former Director of Progressive Majority who has now transitioned into public service but remains involved in numerous political efforts across Washington, EJ Juarez. EJ and Crystal start off by discussing the Washington Supreme Court's decision that driving while high can get you a DUI and the role that bias plays in situations of suspicion. Then, they discuss King County Councilmember Reagan Dunn's lone vote against abortion rights that contradicts his previous position. News that Seattle parents are mobilizing against changes to school bell times sparks a conversation around whether the Seattle School Board is putting equity into practice and getting kids into school ready to learn. Crystal wraps up the show with a warning about “mutual termination agreements” that landlords are using to sign away renters' rights and the two share enthusiasm for the prospect of moving elections to even-numbered years as the King County Council considers the change. As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal Fincher on Twitter at @finchfrii and find today's co-host, EJ Juarez, at @EliseoJJuarez. More info is available at officialhacksandwonks.com. Resources “WA drivers can get DUIs for driving while high, state Supreme Court finds” by David Kroman from The Seattle Times: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/wa-drivers-can-get-duis-for-driving-while-high-state-supreme-court-finds/  “King County's Reagan Dunn votes against abortion rights in apparent about-face” by David Guttman from The Seattle Times: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/politics/after-years-of-supporting-abortion-rights-king-countys-reagan-dunn-votes-against-them/  “Seattle Families Mobilize Against Sweeping Change to School Bell Times” by Robert Cruickshank from The Urbanist: https://www.theurbanist.org/2022/05/04/seattle-families-mobilize-against-sweeping-change-to-school-bell-times-and-bus-schedules/  “Sign here to avoid eviction but beware: You might be signing away your rights” by  Anna Boiko-Weyrauch from KUOW:      https://www.kuow.org/stories/sign-here-to-avoid-eviction-but-beware-you-might-be-signing-away-your-rights    “King County Council to consider push to move elections to even-numbered years” by David Guttman from The Seattle Times: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/politics/king-county-looks-to-move-elections-to-even-numbered-years/   Transcript   [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington state through the lens of those who do the work, with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. Today, we're continuing our Friday almost-live shows where we review the news of the week with a cohost. Welcome to the program for the first time, today's co-host: the former Director of Progressive Majority who has now transitioned into public service - but remains involved in numerous political efforts across Washington - EJ Juarez. [00:00:59] EJ Juarez: Hi Crystal - thanks for having me. [00:01:01] Crystal Fincher: Hey, thanks for being here - pretty much if people have been involved in politics over the past decade, they have crossed paths with you, know of you - you have just had your hands in a lot of different efforts and I'm really excited to have you joining us today. [00:01:18] EJ Juarez: I'm excited to be here. [00:01:20] Crystal Fincher: Well it's been a funky week - we're still reeling from a lot of the news that we have received over the past couple of weeks and all of that falling out. But this week a few things did happen, including our State Supreme Court finding unanimously that Washington drivers can get DUIs for driving while high, which has been up for discussion since we legalized marijuana and people recognizing that the metrics for intoxication with alcohol are different than they are with cannabis. And that not being - there not being a really exact or precise way to determine how intoxicated someone is when they are using cannabis and how that interacts with how they're driving. How did you read this decision? [00:02:19] EJ Juarez: My first thing was - one, it's about time that this was taken up. But two, incredible anxiety around how the application of this law has been playing out since voters approved our initiative and ultimately how law enforcement officials are going to be applying this across the state. And for folks, I think this opens up - and has opened up - an incredible amount of bias and an incredible amount of subjectivity to this process where it is really up to an individual to say, I believe you are high, right? Like I know when I'm high, it looks a lot different than when my buddy's high. And that process is a scary one when you are operating a vehicle, which you should not be doing if you are high - let's be clear, under no circumstances. But especially when we are applying a scientific metric to something that - the science just isn't there yet. [00:03:12] Crystal Fincher: Science isn't there yet. There was just a post by David Kroman that I was reading yesterday and he's like, it's always interesting looking to see how police officers describe being high and things that just seem really weird - it's subjective. Their thing was - well, this person didn't have, wasn't able to correctly estimate time. And I'm sitting there like I am stone-cold sober and I doubt my ability to accurately estimate periods of time. That is something specific that doesn't seem like it would go right. And I just personally have this - a number of fears about being pulled over - justifiably fears about being pulled over - and being mistaken for being high. Or you drive through an area and you drive through an area where people have been smoking and you smell it in your car. And I'm so paranoid that at that moment, some police officer's going to be there and, you've been smoking. And I'm, no, no - I just drove through an area. It's always been that thing, but even here - this specific case generated from someone who was pulled over by a Washington state trooper. The trooper said that the person was shaking, sweating, and had dark circles under his eyes - and that made him think he was under the influence. He also noticed he was wearing a name tag from a cannabis shop, and I'm sure that didn't influence anything at all. But the person had said that they hadn't smoked since the prior day, and were not currently under the influence of anything. And his blood was drawn, his THC levels were above the legally permissible levels there, and he appealed his conviction up to the Supreme Court who unanimously found - hey, basically, they acknowledged that the levels are arbitrary and vague. The standards for THC in the blood are arbitrary and vague, but that the correlation between THC levels and impairment is challenging to pinpoint. They found that blood measurement nevertheless provides a useful and constitutionally acceptable measurement. And also acknowledging that, especially since this came from an initiative passed by the people, the standard for finding it unconstitutional is even higher. And I'm referring right now to an article about this by David Kroman in the Seattle Times. So it's just a really interesting situation. It does seem like the science isn't there for a lot of this, but really important for people to be cautious, to know where their legal liabilities lie, and that even if they aren't - they didn't just partake - we need to understand how long THC levels remain in the blood, what that looks like, because that can determine and be the difference in your legal liability in a DUI and not having one. [00:06:18] EJ Juarez: Absolutely. And I think the lesson here is just don't do it. Don't drive when you're high, don't drive after you've consumed. But I definitely think - in that same article that you're referencing from the Seattle Times, there's this assumption around the law being able to push the public and promote some level of public interest in highway safety. And I think that is the key - is that it doesn't matter what the science ultimately is. Whatever that line is that's chosen, once there is enough body of work to determine it - this is not an activity that should be taking place, but furthermore, the law does not and should not allow this to be something currently that's measured against drivers. [00:07:01] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. And I do again want to just reiterate, it is so critical not to drive while impaired. One of the interesting things in this and that has played out in a lot of different conversations is that they also mentioned in this decision - that driving is not a right, and we do have a responsibility to be careful. We should not be driving while intoxicated in any kind of way, whether it's just having a drink, or doing any kind of substance, or even being really tired. Being really tired is very similar in terms of the impacts to your judgment, reaction times, and driving to being intoxicated. So just be really safe out there. I'm thinking about the fatality collision with the bicyclist on Seattle's Fourth Avenue just the other day. We've seen several of these throughout our region and we just need to be alert and paying attention and being aware of pedestrians and folks on bikes - everywhere we're going and through everything we're doing if we're driving. It really is the driver's responsibility - people in cars have the capacity to do tremendous harm and we need to be careful, just overall. Just wanted to throw that in. I also wanted to talk about a vote that the King County Council took this week to reinforce their support of abortion rights in this week after the leaked Roe vs Wade decision - leaked decision - that overturns, seemingly would overturn, Roe vs Wade and the telegraphing that this is about to happen. Both the City of Seattle took a vote, affirming their support of abortion as a right. The King County Council did also - however, this time, Reagan Dunn, King County Councilmember, who is currently running for Congress against Kim Schrier, voted against it and voted against abortion rights. What did you think of this? [00:09:13] EJ Juarez: It seemed very on-brand for him to just take the contrarion, standing up for something that he thinks is right, but that is wildly off base and nonsensical. When I look at his career, he puts his finger into the air, sees which way the wind is blowing for who's going to be giving him money in his campaigns, and that's the way he votes. You can see here by his own history - it wasn't until he realized there was a base to activate, and I think that's really a shame. When you look at his colleagues, he's the lone vote there. I will say there is a definite sadness for me that this person represents King County and given who needs to see their local officials supporting a woman's right to choose, supporting body autonomy, and supporting basic human rights to control what happens to your own body - that is not something that an elected official in King County should ever have to question. [00:10:11] Crystal Fincher: It really isn't and you referenced - we're looking at his prior statements. He has nearly two decades in public service. In 2005, in his first race for the position for the seat he holds now for County Council, he said, government shouldn't be involved in that process at all. Opposing government funding for abortion, but saying government shouldn't interfere with women's decisions. In 2012, as he ran in his failed attempt to be State Attorney General, he said similar, with abortion I take a libertarian perspective that it ought to be a choice of the individual and less about the government. But this past Tuesday with this vote to affirm support of abortion rights, he was the lone No vote. It's just really - looking at being so cavalier and being such an opportunist politically that you flip your vote because you think it's going to help you in your upcoming race - then well, I guess this is the place where the Republican party is now, so let me just go ahead and switch what I believe to match with that. It's just really gross and vile and it does have to do with body autonomy. This isn't just about abortion, certainly starting there, and it's critical that we maintain abortion rights. It has everything to do with women being able to dictate the course of their lives, how they can participate in work and in the economy, absolutely being vital and critical to health, being - I have a couple of friends who are pregnant right now who have had really tough pregnancies and not everybody wants to be pregnant. And thinking pregnancy is just this easy thing that people go through - it can have lifelong consequences, it can debilitate you in ways for the rest of your life, there are complications that can kill you. And that people endure - not everybody wants to endure that, and people shouldn't have to. And to just ignore that fact because you don't personally happen to have to endure that is just really sad. Again, we talked last week about just where I stand on this issue. And it is just really infuriating and is definitely the start of a slippery slope to taking away so many rights, so many elements involved in women's healthcare that are just terrifying. And especially in a week where we're dealing, where we're talking about our formula shortage - we are doing so little to protect life in our country, to protect babies and families, and putting them in jeopardy in so many ways. And to force someone to participate in this and to see this coming from someone in the King County Council, it just is a reinforcement that - one, we have to be vigilant against people who are doing this. There are a lot of people, even though we think of ourselves as a blue county and a blue state and, Hey, we're totally fine - there are people working to dismantle this. And lots of people thought Roe vs Wade was settled law and totally fine until it wasn't. Same applies to us, so we can't take our foot off of the gas, no matter how comfortable we think we are. [00:13:50] EJ Juarez: Absolutely, and in the most disingenuous way is too - the justification that Councilmember Dunn gives here is basically - well, it's another government. It's another level of government that has to do this, which I think is so common for him. And so relevant to his governing style - whether it's transit, whether it's this, whether you pick the issue and Reagan Dunn is going to throw up his hands and say, it belongs in another jurisdiction. And it's disappointing because it's like, what kind of leadership is that actually giving? And ultimately, what are you voting for? If every stance you take is about pitching the issue to another level, nothing actually gets done because to truly change and defend or promote anything, it has to be layered, right? No level of government exists on its own. And when you look at, especially the statement that's used, I think by many folks at every level of government who are trying to justify really terrible takes - the statements are typically rooted in this fantasy land of - we need to be focused on what we have to focus on. Well, when you drill that down and you ask folks what they need to be focused on, they're going to say things like jobs and mobility and all this stuff. But ultimately, having a person who can have a child make the decision of when they're going to have that child, how they're going to have that child - is an economic decision. It impacts their ability to work. It impacts their ability to plan financially for their own family. These are things that are tied to the economy, these are things that are tied to basic human rights. And it was just a shocking insight into the councilmember's brain there of - it is simple logic that ultimately doesn't pay off at the end. [00:15:42] Crystal Fincher: It really doesn't and I completely agree with everything you just said - very well said. So we will leave that there for now. We'll continue to follow it. Also want to talk about a major issue that impacts so many families in the Seattle area and families mobilizing against a sweeping change to school bell times. The Urbanist and Robert Cruickshank wrote about this this week - Seattle Public Schools is proposing to return to a three-tiered system for bell times and bus service, with some schools starting as early as 7:30 AM. That's the school start time - meaning that bus times need to be much earlier for that to get kids to school. And it's just such a disruptive change that seems to be contrary to all of the health guidelines for kids in these age groups. And families are looking at this and saying - one, this is just a really disruptive change, it's hard to sustain, I'm looking at having more challenges coordinating more than one child in schools with different start times and dealing with that. It's just really disruptive. As you see this, what do you look at? And is this the right thing to be doing? [00:17:02] EJ Juarez: First of all, no. I don't think any kid should be starting school at 7:30 AM 'cause I know I wouldn't start work at 7:30 AM if I was given any kind of choice. But I will say, I'm mostly so - I guess - irritated. I'm irritated that for years now, we are still talking about buses, with Seattle Public Schools. We are still talking about the Seattle School Board not actually listening, not actually working in the best interest for the health of those children. And it is bang-your-head-against-the-wall insanity to continue to watch the Seattle School Board not do the nuts and bolts of governance of running this district. The leadership has willfully not addressed buses in a meaningful way. We should not, in 2022, be talking about bus issues and transportation, given what happened just a few years ago with the massive shortages in their hiring issues. And we should not be talking about and debating whether or not a kid should be in their seat in classrooms at 7:30 AM ready to learn. We know kids are not ready at 7:30 in the morning to talk about anything other than why they are awake. [00:18:20] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, it's a fact. And just health-wise, there've been plenty of studies showing that kids need more sleep than what is realistic to expect when school starts that early - when they have to wake up at 6:00 AM to get ready for school, to catch the bus by - to get to school at 7:30. It just doesn't make any sense. And why Seattle Public Schools, why the district is so determined to not listen to the science and to not listen to parents. The current bell schedule came about - switching from the prior three-tier system - in 2015, with a parent task force that came up with recommendations regarding bell times that led to this current system. Showing that the three-tier system wasn't meeting student needs, it flew in the face of best practices for student health, and that this system often made buses late, and left few buses available for the day for field trips. They specifically moved away from this kind of system because it was so broken and not working for everyone. And so following the lead of medical professionals, they recommended that the district move elementary start times to 8:00 and high school start times to 8:45. Teens need to sleep in later for their health. And so that was following that guideline saying that, Hey, teens need extra time just for their development. This is not controversial, this is well-known - has been for quite some time. But Seattle Public Schools staff continues to try and change the system, and go back to the three-tier system. And parents are just going, why - we moved away from this for a reason, you keep trying to do this. The school board took up a decision and they were going to basically allow the district to make its own decisions about start times. There has been a petition with over a thousand families signing up saying, no, we don't want this. So the school board has actually moved away from trying to fast track this through and it's going to take it up at a future meeting. So this is actually a very important time for parents to be communicating with their school board members and with the district to reinforce what they want to see from this bell schedule. And if you are not wanting to move back to a system that wasn't working for people basically, it's really important that people speak up because it - there isn't much time left to impact this decision. [00:21:05] EJ Juarez: It makes me really curious as to - if only this were a proclamation, if only it were a resolution, then the school board would be really good at passing it because that's what they're good at. If it is equity related, if it is anything that they can put into a feel good statement that they can vote on without doing work, it is heralded and championed. But when it comes to actually changing policy for equity and putting equity into practice, especially around how we are getting kids related to their health into school ready to learn, it is a struggle. And the district has not proven, for the past few years now, that they are able to do more than performative equity and more than performative changes to get student achievement up. This in particular is troubling, and I think you said it really well is that - this three-tier model is not actually something that is based on what is best for students. It is based on an external pressure of shortage of bus drivers and this staff. So what has the district done? It has chosen to change how it operates to meet this crisis versus trying to actually solve that crisis. It is terrible and it is another notch in the belt of Seattle Public Schools really not living up to its own standards. [00:22:23] Crystal Fincher: I completely agree. So just, again, lots of times we talk about what's happening, why it's happening - yes, they do have a bus driver shortage that they need to desperately address. Think this goes into conversations about, Hey, we're seeing lots of areas and sectors having challenges hiring people. I think in the private sector sometimes they are more agile and responsive to challenges like that - and hey, I guess we need to raise our prices, we need to take action now to do something to fix this. And sometimes the public sector is - sometimes because of barriers that they can't overcome, sometimes they aren't feeling the pressure to act - but saying, okay, we have a hiring problem that we need to solve here. What action do we need to take to solve it and let's get that implemented. To your point, it sounds like the district is just not engaging on how to adequately address that issue and moving in the direction that makes progress as opposed to saying, well, this is just a problem and we're just going to have to ask everyone else to accommodate it through these things that have been proven not to work. Just a big challenge there. We'll continue to follow along with that, to follow along with the proceedings, the meetings, and to engage and update you on what's happening there. Also this week, there was coverage on KUOW about Mutual Termination Agreements, which are very interesting - elements that in some cases are helpful and help people avoid eviction. But in other cases are tools that landlords are using to eliminate rights of people, sometimes in coercive ways, to get them out of their properties. Have you heard of this? What's going on here, EJ? [00:24:25] EJ Juarez: I think it is another example of landlords taking an opportunity and running with it. And especially while we are in a housing affordability crisis and ultimately a renter crisis here, we are watching these sneaky moves that are predatory by nature to take advantage of folks that otherwise are just trying to be made whole and live their lives with a good faith effort to remain where they are. And I think it's especially terrible when you look at - folks are looking at perhaps a 20-page rental agreement that's not written in layman's terms, that is definitely in legalese. And a landlord rolls up after perhaps an event in their own apartment or a renovation - they're like, look, we'll get this handled. We're going to get you moving on, just sign this away. And then that renter has simultaneously signed away 15 pages of protections in their original lease. So it is another example of landlords in this city - I think really being bad faith actors. [00:25:32] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, and compared to the formal eviction process, Mutual Termination Agreements are a quicker, easier way to get a renter out. Seattle law firms that represents property owners and eviction proceedings has a quick template that can be downloaded online and organizations who advocate for landlords are saying, this is good, and they're saying sometimes necessary. And because of the eviction moratoriums in place, things have become tougher for landlords and so they need it to perhaps get difficult people out of a unit, or a tenant who hasn't paid their rent, or who they want to get out for one reason or another. The reason why the eviction process exists is to protect the rights of everybody involved, just the fundamental rights that people have as renters, and to provide an appropriate remedy. These Mutual Termination Agreements are a shortcut and sometimes they're presented in situations where someone is behind on their rent and they're like, well, hey, I'll give you a few days extra to get out. We won't have to go through a formal eviction proceeding. Just sign this and it'll be fine. And people don't understand that that's not an agreement to extend for a couple of days - that's actually an agreement signing away all of the rights that they have. And even rights to be able to pay an owed balance in installments to catch up, to be able to have a right to their security deposit, which sometimes is signed away in agreements like this. Just lots of different reasons and what bubbled up, and I think caught the eye of the writer of this story - looks like Anna Boiko-Weyrauch, is that this has been abused in a number of ways. Following some of these proceedings in eviction courts, there was a situation of a gentleman with a - it looked like a traumatic brain injury who was not able to read because of that injury, but signed this document. People whose primary language is not English signing this document. Folks who end up - wound up with a fire - and those situations being presented - well, there's a lot of property damage, you're getting out of here, here sign this - and signing away all of their rights sometimes, including the right to even speak about your landlord. This is functioning as an NDA that - wow, you can't even leave a negative Yelp review - that would be in opposition to the terms of these contracts. And it just seems like they're a way to get around the protections that are - that tenants have and that we as a community and a society have agreed are appropriate to protect people from just being kicked out of the home that they have, after they have faithfully adhered to the terms of their agreements. It has been used in a predatory way, and I'm glad a light is being shined on this to help people understand that at least you have rights and you should understand them, and this may be a risk to them. [00:28:47] EJ Juarez: I think what this is making me think of a lot is that as a country, we have allowed a person's right to profit off of an investment - that housing itself trumps a person's ability to have shelter. And this is a really - it is a tsunami of little things that are put together to make it very difficult to justify that landlords should not be susceptible to losses, that landlords should not be subject to the same kind of common knowledge, common wisdom that - when you make an investment, you may take a loss on that. When you make an investment, you will not be guaranteed profit. And things like Mutual Termination Agreements are a brick in that wall that says that's actually not true - they are guaranteed profit, they are guaranteed to have stable income, even though they are providing a service that is a basic human right. That tension, especially here in Seattle and King County, is one that's not being rectified. And so you have situations where a person's ability to make money is pitted against a person's ability to remain in their home. And every time the person's ability to make money wins. And it's not through huge pieces of legislation, it's not through landmark things that we're all gonna hear about in the news, it's through stories like this - and credit to the reporter - and tactics around Mutual Termination Agreements that make that possible and make that enshrined as a cultural norm for our country. [00:30:21] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. So we of course will be linking this article in our show notes for you to read more about it, but certainly something to be aware of. The last thing I want to talk about today is what, to me, is an exciting event that we see at the King County Council. Not Reagan Dunn taking his horrible vote, but Councilmember Claudia Balducci introducing an effort to move elections to even-numbered years. We've talked about this on the show before - that turnout in elections in odd years, which here focuses on the most local positions usually, is really low. It's so much lower than it is for elections in even-numbered years. And it really is just disenfranchisement - we don't do a good job or anything associated with highlighting when these things happen broad and wide, how important local elections are, and we have the advantage in the even-numbered years of just very profile elections being covered and that turns out so many more people. So Councilmember Balducci has introduced a proposal to move elections on a countywide, for all county-wide positions, to even-numbered years starting in 2026. And all positions shifting to even-numbered years by 2028. What do you think about this proposal? [00:31:45] EJ Juarez: Oh, I love it. I love it. I think this is the thing that all of us who have been working in politics for - whether it's one day or whether it's 10 or 20 years, this is what we know will work to turn up, to drive turnout, to make sure that folks are keyed in to what they need to be keyed in, and actually help voters navigate the process easier. There is no reason where we should force the general public to learn all of the jurisdictions and the cadences of elections. Our job as folks who do this work and the jobs that people that serve in elected office should be about removing those barriers and consolidating it to make participation the path of least resistance. And I think things like this absolutely do it. Imagine the cost savings as well when you're not running consistent elections all throughout the year. I think the next - the natural progression of this is when you look at school bonds and special elections. Should we really be doing stuff in the middle of February? Should we really be doing another bond in April? Probably not. But if you know that we can get folks to expect about at a certain time - drive everybody towards that moment - folks are going to be ready to participate, and you're going to see more and more people participate. [00:33:01] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely well said. And really the difference - King County has an average of 47% turnout in odd years and 77% in even-numbered years. Having fewer than half the people participate vs over three quarters, seems like, Hey, this is such an obvious, logical thing to do. More people voting and participating is always better - let's make that happen. With that, we will conclude the show today. Thank you so much for listening to Hacks & Wonks on this Friday, May 13th, 2022. The producer of Hacks & Wonks is Lisl Stadler and assistant producer is Shannon Cheng, with assistance from Emma Mudd. Our insightful co-host today, as you heard - he's not that great at taking credit for things, he's usually not out in front of efforts, but you can hear why he has been so critical to so many of the great things that have happened in our state - former Director of Progressive Majority who has now transitioned into public service and still remains involved in numerous political efforts across Washington, EJ Juarez. You can find EJ on Twitter @EliseoJJuarez. You can find me on Twitter @finchfrii - we'll link those both in the show notes. And now you can follow Hacks & Wonks wherever you get your podcasts - just type "Hacks and Wonks" into the search bar. Be sure to subscribe to get full versions of our Friday almost-live shows and our midweek show delivered to your podcast feed. You can also get a full transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in the show at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the episode notes. Thanks for tuning in - talk to you next time.

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast
Gretchen Carlson: Speaking truth to power

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 11:40


Gretchen Carlson's name is synonymous with speaking truth to power after she called out sexual harassment at the hands of then Fox News CEO and Chairman Roger Ailes. She has now helped change the very law that tried to silence her.

NDA's Deer Season 365
You're Managing Deer Sanctuaries All Wrong With Zack Vucurevich of Whetstone Habitat

NDA's Deer Season 365

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 61:08


This week we are talking with wildlife biologist Zack Vucurevich of Whetstone habitat about deer sanctuary areas. We dive into best practices for choosing a location for, creating and maintaining sanctuary areas on your hunting property. Zack discusses some of the ways he often sees sanctuary areas mismanaged and how to avoid those common pitfalls. If you love talking deer habitat, you'll thoroughly enjoy this episode! Important Links: NDA Giving Day! Follow Zack on Instagram Whetstone Habitat website Follow Brian Grossman on Instagram Sign up for NDA's free weekly e-newsletter Subscribe to the Podcast on: Apple Podcasts Google Podcasts Spotify iHeartRadio Stitcher About the National Deer Association The National Deer Association (NDA) is a non-profit deer conservation group that works to ensure the future of wild deer, wildlife habitat and hunting. Thank you for subscribing to our podcast! Support NDA's mission by becoming a member today. NDA has the highest ranking from Charity Navigator, an independent group that monitors non-profits for financial efficiency and effectiveness. Learn more about deer and deer hunting in our weekly, free e-newsletter. Follow us on our other channels: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube

Truthers: Tiffany Dover Is Dead*
Tiffany Dover Is Alive

Truthers: Tiffany Dover Is Dead*

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 38:51


Brandy heads back to Chattanooga and Higdon, Alabama, a third time. Knocking on doors has yielded some results – the most promising being word from Tiffany's sister-in-law, Ashley, that Tiffany does want to talk and is only waiting for some sort of NDA to run out. So, in town again, Brandy leaves a note at a house she thinks belongs to Tiffany's in-laws, and, while refueling at the local pizza place, receives a totally unexpected text: “I got your letter. I will tell a great story about everything that happened, but only to the one who pays the most. So what are you paying?” The person who sent the text turns out to be a family member she hadn't interacted with before, a 19-year-old who tells Brandy it was her aunt Debbie, Tiffany's mother-in-law, who told her to send it. Tracking down Debbie herself gets the best result so far, and, armed with new evidence, Brandy confronts a hard-core Tiffany truther.

Millénium Condor Baladodiffusion
BAD IDEAS - X-Wing Podcast #0

Millénium Condor Baladodiffusion

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 81:16


Join Bruno, Zack, & Kris as they introduce Bad Ideas, an X-Wing Podcast.Episode 0 has them jumping right in to a few topics; will the Clone Z-95 be good? What Cards do you want to see make a return in 2.5? Will Bruno will get Zack to breach an NDA?Pew PEW !

Drury Outdoors 100% Wild Podcast
The NDA Speaks Out About Their Stance On Trail Cams EP – 263

Drury Outdoors 100% Wild Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 50:35


With statewide trail camera bans hitting the news, The National Deer Association is taking a stance and Communications Director Lindsay Thomas joins Matt and Tim this week to talk about it. Juston wants to know about summer scrapes, and the Wildlife Word is about an unusual superpower whitetail fawns have. You gotta watch this episode! Want to support the NDA on May, 11, 2022 on their Day of Giving? Just click here! Want to be on the show? Leave us a Question of the Day by clicking here and you could win a DeerCast hat! Join the 100% Wild Rack Pack!  It's a Facebook group just for you and other 100% Wild podcasters!

The Freedom Babe Podcast
EPISODE 187 | Amanda Marit - Being An Authority, Finding Your Unique Messages & Balancing Your Energy

The Freedom Babe Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 56:42


This week we have special guest, Amanda Marit! Amanda has coached individuals in all walks of life, including celebrities and public figures (all under NDA, of course.) She works with her clients to help reframe what leadership is and can be and identify what it takes to be seen as an authority figure in their industry, allowing them to step into their most opulent selves. This episode is a really great conversation, one of my favourites lately. I love how Amanda is so intuitive and brings that into this episode (you'll see what I mean as you listen). We chat about so much today, including: How to be seen as an authority by your audience  Going within to find the unique messages you're meant to share with the world  Balancing your masculine and feminine energy with launches A message for the babe tired of where she is and ready to quantum leap Get on the waitlist for Freedom Business Babe for first access and $500 off! 

Progressive Voices
Off Kilter TCF S2Ep10 04 - 29 - 22 REAIR Of 04 - 16 - 21

Progressive Voices

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 59:59


How would you feel if you found out your elected leaders had voted to hand out huge sums of public money to corporations, with some of them not even knowing who the recipient is, and the rest bound by contract not to divulge its identity or what its specific plans are? Now what if we told you this happens all over the country, all the time, in deals involving wealthy corporations such as Amazon, Facebook, Google, and on and on? Unfortunately, thanks to a legal tool called a non-disclosure agreement (NDA), this kind of corrupt secret dealmaking has become the norm rather than the exception in economic development deals. These agreements—signed by governors, mayors, state legislators, and other local leaders—prevent public officials from disclosing anything about a corporate subsidy deal they're working on, including even the recipient, until it's finished, cutting many key stakeholders, and most importantly the public, out of the process. But a new coalition is seeking to change that. To learn more about the effort to “Ban Secret Deals”—and why it's critical to economic justice in the United States—Rebecca sat down with Pat Garofalo, director of state and local policy at the American Economic Liberties Project, author of the book Billionaire Boondoggle and the Boondoggle newsletter, which looks at how corporations are ripping off our states, cities, and communities; and Illinois State Senator Robert Peters, an organizer and economic justice activist who now represents the Thirteenth Legislative District in the Illinois General Assembly, and who recently introduced the first state legislation to ban secret deals.

Demolition NOW
Episode 25 (April 29, 2022): Guidance for Demolition of Power Plants, 2022 Lifetime Achievement Award Winner David Sinclair and what to expect from the Hill

Demolition NOW

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 70:28


In this episode, we talk with NDA Industry Committee members, Chair, Blake Svendsen, ERM and Ahmed Khalil, Applied Sciences International about the Committees work on new NDA guidance document, Guidance for Demolition of Power Plants. Now available for download now, this document presents guidelines developed by the National Demolition Association to provide awareness and informational guidance to all stakeholders involved in demolition of power generation plants. Next, we talk with David P. Sinclair, SafeDEM USA, and 2022 NDA Lifetime Achievement Award winner on his thoughts regarding the industry and his recent award. Finally, we hear from NDA Director of Government Affairs, Kevin McKenney as provides an update on government affairs, infrastructure and the upcoming regulatory agenda.

NDA's Deer Season 365
Planning Your First Out-of-State Deer Hunt With Mark Kenyon

NDA's Deer Season 365

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 83:46


On this week's episode of the Deer Season 365 Podcast, we're talking with Mark Kenyon of Wired to Hunt and MeatEater about planning your first out-of-state deer hunt. We dive into choosing a state and specific hunting area, traveling on a budget, what gear to take and what to leave at home, as well as how to prepare for the hunt to improve your odds of success. Important Links: Firminator NDA Membership Drive Follow Brian Grossman on Instagram Sign up for NDA's free weekly e-newsletter Subscribe to the Podcast on: Apple Podcasts Google Podcasts Spotify iHeartRadio Stitcher About the National Deer Association The National Deer Association (NDA) is a non-profit deer conservation group that works to ensure the future of wild deer, wildlife habitat and hunting. Thank you for subscribing to our podcast! Support NDA's mission by becoming a member today. NDA has the highest ranking from Charity Navigator, an independent group that monitors non-profits for financial efficiency and effectiveness. Learn more about deer and deer hunting in our weekly, free e-newsletter. Follow us on our other channels: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube

Progressive Voices
Off Kilter TCF S2Ep8 04 - 15 - 22 Draft

Progressive Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 17, 2022 59:59


How would you feel if you found out your elected leaders had voted to hand out huge sums of public money to corporations, with some of them not even knowing who the recipient is, and the rest bound by contract not to divulge its identity or what its specific plans are? Now what if we told you this happens all over the country, all the time, in deals involving wealthy corporations such as Amazon, Facebook, Google, and on and on? Unfortunately, thanks to a legal tool called a non-disclosure agreement (NDA), this kind of corrupt secret dealmaking has become the norm rather than the exception in economic development deals. These agreements—signed by governors, mayors, state legislators, and other local leaders—prevent public officials from disclosing anything about a corporate subsidy deal they're working on, including even the recipient, until it's finished, cutting many key stakeholders, and most importantly the public, out of the process. But a new coalition is seeking to change that. To learn more about the effort to “Ban Secret Deals”—and why it's critical to economic justice in the United States—Rebecca sat down with Pat Garofalo, director of state and local policy at the American Economic Liberties Project, author of the book Billionaire Boondoggle and the Boondoggle newsletter, which looks at how corporations are ripping off our states, cities, and communities; and Illinois State Senator Robert Peters, an organizer and economic justice activist who now represents the Thirteenth Legislative District in the Illinois General Assembly, and who recently introduced the first state legislation to ban secret deals. For more: Here's some of the recent coverage of how non-disclosure agreements are enabling corrupt secret dealmaking with wealthy corporations like Amazon, Facebook, and more For more from Pat, subscribe to the Boondoggle newsletter and check out his book Billionaire Boondoggle For more from Senator Peters, check out this interview with ABC7 Chicago—and his legislation to ensure transparency in government contracts Learn more about the campaign to ban secret deals at bansecretdeals.org

Hitting the High Notes- Utah Jazz talk
134) Pazuzu tells the secrets!

Hitting the High Notes- Utah Jazz talk

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2022 93:39


We welcome back @cbowkstar_91. He doesn't have an NDA, he can tell secrets and we bring the Centipede into it... Please like and subscribe to this podcast. If you leave a 5-star review, you will be entered to win some tickets to the Great Room Escape located at 525 Ring Rd, Layton, UT 84041. Reserve your tickets now at GreatRoomEscapeUtah.com or call (801)546-6446 Thanks to our other sponsor the Off Broadway Theater. Catch Laughing Stock, Utah's longest running improv troupe! Call (801) 355-4628 or visit theobt.org for tickets. WRITE US A FIVE-STAR REVIEW! Win tickets to either The Great Room Escape or the Off Broadway Theater! (Message us on Twitter @JazzHighNotes and follow on Instagram @JazzHighNotes) Follow @JazzHighNotes on Twitter, IG and Facebook @GoTheDistance49 on Twitter @DragonSquatch on Twitter --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hittingthehighnotes/support

secrets utah ut reserve nda centipede pazuzu ring rd greatroomescapeutah catch laughing stock
OFF-KILTER with Rebecca Vallas
“Ban Secret Deals”: Meet the New Coalition Working to Ban NDAs in Corporate Subsidy Deals

OFF-KILTER with Rebecca Vallas

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 59:51


How would you feel if you found out your elected leaders had voted to hand out huge sums of public money to corporations, with some of them not even knowing who the recipient is, and the rest bound by contract not to divulge its identity or what its specific plans are? Now what if we told you this happens all over the country, all the time, in deals involving wealthy corporations such as Amazon, Facebook, Google, and on and on? Unfortunately, thanks to a legal tool called a non-disclosure agreement (NDA), this kind of corrupt secret dealmaking has become the norm rather than the exception in economic development deals. These agreements—signed by governors, mayors, state legislators, and other local leaders—prevent public officials from disclosing anything about a corporate subsidy deal they're working on, including even the recipient, until it's finished, cutting many key stakeholders, and most importantly the public, out of the process. But a new coalition is seeking to change that. To learn more about the effort to “Ban Secret Deals”—and why it's critical to economic justice in the United States—Rebecca sat down with Pat Garofalo, director of state and local policy at the American Economic Liberties Project, author of the book Billionaire Boondoggle and the Boondoggle newsletter, which looks at how corporations are ripping off our states, cities, and communities; and Illinois State Senator Robert Peters, an organizer and economic justice activist who now represents the Thirteenth Legislative District in the Illinois General Assembly, and who recently introduced the first state legislation to ban secret deals. For more: Here's some of the recent coverage of how non-disclosure agreements are enabling corrupt secret dealmaking with wealthy corporations like Amazon, Facebook, and more For more from Pat, subscribe to the Boondoggle newsletter and check out his book Billionaire Boondoggle  For more from Senator Peters, check out this interview with ABC7 Chicago—and his legislation to ensure transparency in government contracts Learn more about the campaign to ban secret deals at bansecretdeals.org

Shoot the Moon with Revenue Rocket
The Importance of M&A focused NDA's

Shoot the Moon with Revenue Rocket

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 23:33


Read our blog post on the importance of M&A Focused NDAs here.The need for NDA's are critical and the ways they are beneficial / required are endless. When working with your advisor or managing a deal on your own be sure to protect your confidential information BEFORE engaging in any discussions. For more information on preparing for a transaction check out our available resources at revenuerocket.com

NDA's Deer Season 365
No, Fawns Aren't Odorless: A Deep Dive Into Fawn Behavior and Biology With Dr. John Kilgo

NDA's Deer Season 365

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 74:10


In this week's Deer Season 365 Podcast episode, we are talking whitetail fawns with Dr. John Kilgo. We cover everything from how does choose a location to birth fawns, to a fawn's first few hours and weeks of life, to fawn predation and more. We also discuss how we, as hunters and land managers, can help improve fawn survival where we hunt. Important Links: Firminator NDA Membership Drive Follow Brian Grossman on Instagram Sign up for NDA's free weekly e-newsletter Subscribe to the Podcast on: Apple Podcasts Google Podcasts Spotify iHeartRadio Stitcher About the National Deer Association The National Deer Association (NDA) is a non-profit deer conservation group that works to ensure the future of wild deer, wildlife habitat and hunting. Thank you for subscribing to our podcast! Support NDA's mission by becoming a member today. NDA has the highest ranking from Charity Navigator, an independent group that monitors non-profits for financial efficiency and effectiveness. Learn more about deer and deer hunting in our weekly, free e-newsletter. Follow us on our other channels: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube

Three Rivers Land Trust Campfire Conversations
CWD Crash Course featuring Kip Adams, NDA

Three Rivers Land Trust Campfire Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 76:25


A sample collected from a white-tailed deer harvested in Yadkin County, North Carolina has tested positive for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). This is the first case of CWD detected in North Carolina's deer herd. Kip Adams, NDA's Chief Conservation Officer, joins the podcast to share valuable knowledge about the CWD, what other states have done to combat this disease, and practices that North Carolinian's should adopt to slow the spread.  Support the show (http://threeriverslandtrust.org)

Wake Up to Level Up
Hiring Employees? Working For An Employer? Let's Talk Contracts w/ Attorney Antonella Colella

Wake Up to Level Up

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 27:43


Join beauty business entrepreneur Kelly Callaghan as she is joined once again by Anotella Calella of Calella Legal Studio, to discuss how to best protect your business from a legal standpoint. By the end of this episode, you will learn about: The importance of appropriate hiring contracts and NDA's. Types of hiring contracts for employees and independent contractors. Protecting yourself from copyright infringement, intellectual property theft, client poaching, and more. The benefits of hiring a coach, lawyer, or consultant to make sure the contracts you work with are fair- as an employee and/or business owner! You can contact Antonella via Instagram, or antonella@calellalegalstudio.com. To follow Kelly's story, connect with her on the Beauty Business Babes Facebook group at www.facebook.com/groups/beautybusinessbabes, and on Instagram at www.instagram.com/iam_kellyann. Kelly also posts on her YouTube channel, Kelly Callaghan.  And of course, don't forget to join us next time for another episode of Beauty Business Babes!

Out d'Coup Podcast
Out d'Coup LIVE | Rick Smith - A ”Which Side Are You On” moment for PA's labor movement

Out d'Coup Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 37:49


On this special episode of Out d'Coup LIVE, I welcome Rick Smith to the show. Listeners to Raging Chicken's podcasts know that Rick is the Founder and Host of the Rick Smith Show. For those who don't know, The Rick Smith Show is by working people, for working people. It's a place that serves up a heaping portion of democracy with a side of fairness, the grit of a Teamster, and no apologies. Where facts are the center, where science is real, and where everyone gets a seat at the table.  I think you'll find today's show will only underscore Rick's commitment to building a strong, democratic, inclusive, and equitable union movement for and by working people.  On his show last week, Rick blew the whistle about a history of allegations of sexist and abusive behavior by the newly appointed President of the PA AFL-CIO, Frank Snyder. As a result, there is now an investigation into the history of those allegations. Rick is calling on out-going AFL-CIO president Rick Bloomingdale to "take responsibility for enabling the abusive behavior of the person who is replacing him as the most powerful labor voice in Pennsylvania." He is also calling Bloomingdale to release the women workers from their NDAs and "issue a statement allowing former employees to talk to the investigators and reporters about the abuses without fear of being sued for violating any NDA or confidentiality agreement."  Links: Rick Smith Show: https://www.thericksmithshow.org/ Follow Rick on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RickSmithShow Call on out-going president of the PA AFL-CIO, Rick Bloomindale, to release women workers from their NDAs of confidentiality agreements and "issue a statement allowing former employees to talk to the investigators and reporters about the abuses without fear of being sued for violating any NDA or confidentiality agreement." Tag Rick Bloomingdale on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RWBloomingdale Tell the PA AFL-CIO to make public the findings of their investigation into allegations of sexist and abusive behavior by Frank Snyder. Tag them on Twitter: https://twitter.com/PaAFL_CIO Join our Discord server: https://discord.gg/WMW98RQEYV    

DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast
159: Life as a Physician Leader in the Pharmaceutical Industry with Dr. Neil Sankar

DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 25:08


“You know, after the drug gets approved, it's a feather in your cap. You have been part of an NDA, that's great. Your value goes up. But after that, what do you do?” -Neil Sankar MD, MPH In this episode, DocWorking Founder and CEO, Dr. Jen Barna welcomes Dr. Neil Sankar. Dr. Sankar is President and Chief Medical Officer of SwanBio, LLC, a business development consultancy firm that facilitates the translation of scientific discoveries into cancer therapeutics. Dr. Sankar has over 16 years of experience in life sciences clinical development, pipeline strategy, clinical safety, and pharmacovigilance. Dr. Sankar shares his wealth of experience in the pharmaceutical industry with the DocWorking audience. He tells us about his journey, his tips for those wanting to get into pharmaceuticals and how he finds time to relax. If you are thinking about getting into the pharmaceutical industry, you will find this episode extremely helpful!   Neil Sankar received his MD degree from Bangalore University and internal medicine residency from University of West indies, Kingston, Jamaica and trained in the UK and the Caribbeans. He holds a postgraduate degree in public health from Queensland University in Australia.   Dr. Sankar got his training in clinical research and tumor biology from NCI Bethesda Maryland and since has held Clinical Development positions within leading Biotech/Pharma including Genentech, Medimmune, Pharmacyclics, FiveprimeTherapeutics, Portola, Loxo Oncology, Otsuka Pharmaceuticals, Elevar Therapeutics, Boston Biomedical, Effector Therapeutics and  Rhizen Pharmaceuticals to name a few.   Dr. Sankar is President and Chief Medical Officer of SwanBio, LLC, a business development consultancy firm that facilitates the translation of scientific discoveries into cancer therapeutics. Dr. Sankar has over 16 years of experience in life sciences clinical development, pipeline strategy, clinical safety, and pharmacovigilance. He has extensive experience in the application of US Food and Drug Administration regulations and the Good Clinical Practice guidelines set forth by the International Council on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use. He has acted as Medical lead in numerous phase I, II and III clinical trials in the therapeutic area of oncology ranging from solid tumors, connective tissue tumors to hematological malignancies including, CLL/SLL, B cell lymphomas, T cell Lymphomas, Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Hodgkins Lymphoma. He is an expert in providing global clinical development and regulatory strategies for therapeutic drugs and was instrumental in filing the New Drug Applications for the antibody-drug conjugate in Metastatic Breast cancer and the Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor in Mantle cell Lymphoma. Dr. Sankar has extensive experience in designing and deploying data capture tools that evaluate the efficacy and safety of clinical trials. He also has extensive experience as a member of drug safety committees and advisory boards of few companies including Leukemia Therapeutics and iNDX Technology. Dr Sankar has led or has been part of FDA/Regulatory Authority discussions for various companies pursuing IND and NDA applications including Pre-IND and Pre-NDA F2F meetings.   Dr. Sankar is an active member of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the American Society of Hematology (ASH), the European Hematology Association (EHA , Drug information Association (DIA) , European Society of Clinical Oncology (ESMO), American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), Enterprising Pharmaceutical Professionals from the Indian Sub-Continent (EPPIC GLOBAL), Connective Tissue Oncology Society (CTOS), IACA and TiE Silicon Valley. Find full transcripts of DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast episodes on the DocWorking Blog  DocWorking empowers physicians and entire health care teams to get on the path to achieving their dreams, both in and outside of work, with programs designed to help you maximize life with minimal time.   Are you a physician who would like to tell your story? Please email Amanda, our producer, at Amanda@docworking.com to be considered.   And if you like our podcast and would like to subscribe and leave us a 5 star review, we would be extremely grateful!   We're everywhere you like to get your podcasts! Apple iTunes, Spotify, iHeart Radio, Google, Pandora, Stitcher, PlayerFM, ListenNotes, Amazon, YouTube, Podbean   You can also find us on Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter.    Some links in our blogs and show notes are affiliate links, and purchases made via those links may result in payments to DocWorking. These help toward our production costs. Thank you for supporting DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast!   Occasionally, we discuss financial and legal topics. We are not financial or legal professionals. Please consult a licensed professional for financial or legal advice regarding your specific situation.   Podcast produced by: Amanda Taran

NDA's Deer Season 365
Summer Food Plots: What to Plant, How to Plant One, and Why You Should, With Ryan Basinger

NDA's Deer Season 365

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 63:11


On this week's episode of the Deer Season 365 Podcast, we are talking with Ryan Basinger of Westervelt Wildlife Services about summer food plots. Ryan covers why summer food plots are important, what you should plant, and how to successfully plant and maintain one. If you are a food plotter, this episode is for you! Important Links: Episode Sponsor: Moultrie Mobile Westervelt Wildlife Services Follow Brian Grossman on Instagram Sign up for NDA's free weekly e-newsletter Subscribe to the Podcast on: Apple Podcasts Google Podcasts Spotify iHeartRadio Stitcher About the National Deer Association The National Deer Association (NDA) is a non-profit deer conservation group that works to ensure the future of wild deer, wildlife habitat and hunting. Thank you for subscribing to our podcast! Support NDA's mission by becoming a member today. NDA has the highest ranking from Charity Navigator, an independent group that monitors non-profits for financial efficiency and effectiveness. Learn more about deer and deer hunting in our weekly, free e-newsletter. Follow us on our other channels: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube

Beyond The Horizon
A Look Back: The AML Laws Are One Step Closer To Reality

Beyond The Horizon

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 24:15


We have been discussing the new anti-money laundering bill that has been proposed by a bipartisan group of lawmakers and that bill has officially been inserted into the NDA. What will that mean going forward?Let's take a look.(commercial at 11:49)To contact me:Bobbycapucci@protonmail.comIf you enjoy my content and want to help support the podcast:Source:https://www.icij.org/inside-icij/2020/12/us-poised-to-overhaul-the-countrys-anti-money-laundering-legislation/

The Epstein Chronicles
A Look Back: The AML Laws Are One Step Closer To Reality

The Epstein Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 27, 2022 24:15


We have been discussing the new anti money laundering bill that has been proposed by a bipartisan group of lawmakers and that bill has officially been inserted into the NDA. What will that mean going forward?Let's take a look.(commercial at 11:49)To contact me:Bobbycapucci@protonmail.comIf you enjoy my content and want to help support the podcast:Source:https://www.icij.org/inside-icij/2020/12/us-poised-to-overhaul-the-countrys-anti-money-laundering-legislation/

The Consumer Quarterback Show

*Tapes Thursday 1PMTHIS SHOW AIRS: TUESDAY 3.22.22 --------------------------------------------------*NOW LIVE STREAMING TO MULTIPLE PLATFORMS*Facebook / Youtube / Periscope------------------------------------------------------------------LISTEN MONDAY thru THURSDAY AT 4PM ON AM860 / 93.7 FM SMART TV OWNERS CAN SEARCH BINGENETWORKS TO FIND US ON Roku / Firetv / Appletv /Amazon*Sunday show 102.5fm THE BONE SEGMENT 1 (:12 min) 24:30 to 12:30 OPEN: Who we are, What we do, todays show... SPONSOR – REPLENISH IV SOLUTIONS PROPERTIES (2) DIANE VANCE – FAIRWAY IND. MORTGAGE Dont get frustrated with the challenging real estate market, let Diane prepare you to offer, dont miss an opportunity when it appears! Check out dianevance.com and learn about rates and special loan programs for vets and 1st time buyers. **TEASE COMING UP................ & A FEELGOOD STORY ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- SEGMENT 2 (12:30 MIN) 12:30 – 00:00 SPONSOR – GOLF CART DEPOT PROPERTIES (2) MANNY FEBRE – FEBRE FRAMEWORKS Manny shares the story behind how Febre started and expanded to include the entire southeasternern US. New technology and education keeps Febre on the cutting edge, Manny explains how drones are allowing Febre to assist in mapping and construction.--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------SEGMENT 3 (12:00) 24:30 to 12:30 SPONSOR – VETERAN GUTTERS PROPERTIES SPECIAL COUNSEL LAUREN FRIEDER ADAMS & REESE, LLP adamsandreese.com Lauren is seeing a rise in "breach of contract" actions, find out what steps to take when confronted with a non compete or NDA contract. Make sure to hire an attorney to interpret new language in any employer/employee contract and determine whether it is legal. Are you able to quit your job and change employers in the same field? --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------SEGMENT 4 (12:00) 12:30 TO 00:30 SPONSOR -BROTHERS EZ MOVING PROPERTY (1) FEELGOOD STORY 00:30 – 00:00 CLOSE...RANDOM ACT OF KINDNESS... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Screaming in the Cloud
Diving Duckbill First into the Depths of Data with Alex Rasmussen

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 39:59


About AlexAlex holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science and Engineering from UC San Diego, and has spent over a decade building high-performance, robust data management and processing systems. As an early member of a couple fast-growing startups, he's had the opportunity to wear a lot of different hats, serving at various times as an individual contributor, tech lead, manager, and executive. Prior to joining the Duckbill Group, Alex spent a few years as a freelance data engineering consultant, helping his clients build, manage and maintain their data infrastructure. He lives in Los Angeles, CA.Links: Twitter: https://twitter.com/alexras/ Personal page: https://alexras.info Old Consulting website with blog: https://bitsondisk.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: The company 0x4447 builds products to increase standardization and security in AWS organizations. They do this with automated pipelines that use well-structured projects to create secure, easy-to-maintain and fail-tolerant solutions, one of which is their VPN product built on top of the popular OpenVPN project which has no license restrictions; you are only limited by the network card in the instance. To learn more visit: snark.cloud/deployandgoCorey: Today's episode is brought to you in part by our friends at MinIO the high-performance Kubernetes native object store that's built for the multi-cloud, creating a consistent data storage layer for your public cloud instances, your private cloud instances, and even your edge instances, depending upon what the heck you're defining those as, which depends probably on where you work. It's getting that unified is one of the greatest challenges facing developers and architects today. It requires S3 compatibility, enterprise-grade security and resiliency, the speed to run any workload, and the footprint to run anywhere, and that's exactly what MinIO offers. With superb read speeds in excess of 360 gigs and 100 megabyte binary that doesn't eat all the data you've gotten on the system, it's exactly what you've been looking for. Check it out today at min.io/download, and see for yourself. That's min.io/download, and be sure to tell them that I sent you. Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I'm the chief cloud economist at The Duckbill Group, which people are generally aware of. Today, I'm joined by our most recent principal cloud economist, Alex Rasmussen. Alex, thank you for joining me today, it is a pleasure to talk to you, as if we aren't talking to each other constantly, now that you work here.Alex: Thanks, Corey. It's great being here.Corey: So, I followed a more, I'd say traditional path for a cloud economist, but given that I basically had to invent the job myself, the more common path because imagine that you start building a role from scratch and the people you wind up looking for initially look a lot like you. And that is grumpy sysadmin, historically, turned into something, kind of begrudgingly, that looks like an SRE, which I still maintain are the same thing, but it is imperative people not email me about that. Yes, I know, you work at Google. But instead, what I found during my tenure as a sysadmin, is that I was working with certain things an awful lot, like web servers, and other things almost never, like databases and data warehouses. Because if you screw up a web server, we all have a good laugh, the site's down for a couple of minutes, life goes on, you have a shame trophy on your desk if that's your corporate culture, things continue.Mess up the data severely enough, and you don't have a company anymore. So, I was always told to keep my aura away from the expensive spendy things that power a company. You are sort of the first of a cloud economist subtype that doesn't resemble that. Before you worked here, you were effectively an independent consultant working on data engineering. Before that, you had a couple of jobs, but you had gotten a PhD in computer science, which means, first, you are probably one of the people in this world most qualified to pass some crappy job interview of solving a sorting algorithm on a whiteboard, but how did you get here from where you were?Alex: Great question. So, I like to joke that I kind of went to school until somebody told me that I had to stop. And I took that and went and started—or didn't start, but I was an early engineer at a startup and then was an executive at another early-stage one, and did a little bit of everything. And went freelance, did that for a couple of years, and worked with all kinds of different companies—vast majority of those being startups—helping them with data infrastructure problems. I've done a little bit of everything throughout my career.I've been, you know, IC, manager, manager, manager, IT guy, everything in between. I think on the data side of things, it just sort of happened, to be honest with you, it kind of started with the stuff that I did for my dissertation and parlayed that into a job back when the big data wave was starting to kind of truly crest. And I've been working on data infrastructure, basically my entire career. So, it wasn't necessarily something that was intentional. I've just been kind of taking the opportunity that makes the most sense for me it kind of every juncture. And my career path has been a little bit strange, both by academic and industrial standards. But I like where I'm at and I gained something really valuable from each of those experiences. So.Corey: It's been an interesting area of I won't say weakness here, but it's definitely been a bit of a challenge when we look at an AWS environment and even talking about a typical AWS customer without thinking of any of them in particular, I can already tell you a few things are likely to be true. For example, the number one most expensive line item in their bill is going to be EC2, and compute is the thing that powers it. Now, maybe that is they're running a bunch of instances the old-fashioned way. Maybe they're running Kubernetes but that's how it shows up. There's a lot of things that could be, and we look at what rounds that out.Now, the next item down should almost certainly not be data transfer and if so we should have a conversation, but data in one form or another is very often going to be number two. And that can mean a bunch of different things, historically. It could mean, “Oh, you have a whole bunch of stuff in S3. Let's talk about access patterns. Let's talk about lifecycle policies. Let's talk about making sure the really important stuff is backed up somewhere. Maybe you want to spend more on that particular aspect of it.”If it's on EBS volumes, that's interesting and definitely worth looking into and trying to understand the context of what's going on. Periodically we'll see a whole bunch of additional charges that speak to some of that EC2 charge in the form of EMR, AWS's Elastic MapReduce, which charges a per-hour instance charge, but also charges you for the instances that are running under the hood and under the EC2 line item. So, there's a lot of data lifecycle stuff, there's a lot of data ecosystem stories, that historically we've consulted out with experts in that particular space. And that's great, but we were starting to have to drag those people in on more and more engagements as we saw them. And we realized that was really something we had to build out as a core competency for ourselves.And we started out not intending to hire for someone with that specialty, but the more we talked to you, the more it became clear that this was a very real and very growing need that we and our customers have. How closely it is what you're doing now as far as AWS bill analysis and data pattern deep-dive align with what you were doing as a freelance consultant in the space?Alex: A lot more than you might expect. You know, I think that increasingly, what you're seeing now is that a company's core differentiator is its data, right, how much of it they have, what they do with it. And so, you know, to your point, I think when you look at any company's cloud spend, it's going to be pretty heavy on the data side in terms of, like, where have you put it? What are you doing to process it? Where is it going once it's been processed? And then how is that—Corey: And data transfer is a very important first word in that two-word sequence.Alex: Oh, sure is. And so I think that, like, in a lot of ways, the way that a customer's cloud architecture looks and the way that their bill looks kind of as a consequence of that is kind of a reification in a way of the way that the data flows from one place to another and what's done with it at each step along the way. I think what complicates this is that companies that have been around for a little while have lived through this kind of very amorphous, kind of, polyglot way that we're approaching data. You know, back when I was first getting started in the big data days, it was MapReduce, MapReduce, MapReduce, right? And we quickly [crosstalk 00:07:29]—Corey: Oh, yes. The MapReduce white paper out of Google, a beautiful April Fool's Day prank that the folks at Yahoo fell for hook, line, and sinker. They wrote Hadoop, and now we're all stuck with that pattern. Great gag, they really should have clarified they were kidding. Here we are.Alex: Exactly. So—Corey: I mostly kid.Alex: No, for sure. But I think especially when it comes to data, we tend to over-index on what the large companies do and then quickly realize that we've made a mistake and correct backwards, right? So, there was this big push toward MapReduce for everything until people realize that it was just a pain in the neck to operate and to build. And so then we moved into Spark, so kind of up-leveled a little bit. And then there was this kind of explosion of NoSQL and NewSQL databases that hit the market.And MongoDB inexplicably won that war and now we're kind of in this world where everything is cloud data warehouse, right? And now we're trying to wrestle with, like, is it actually a good idea to put everything in one warehouse and have SQL be the lingua franca on top of it? But it's all changing so rapidly. And when you come into a customer that's been around for 10 or 15 years, and has, you know, been in the cloud for a substantial—Corey: Yeah, one of those ancient customers. That is—Alex: I know, right?Corey: —basically old enough to almost get a driver's license? Oh, yeah.Alex: Right. It's one of those things where it's like, “Ah, yes, in startup years, you're, like, a hundred years old,” right? But still, you know, I think you see this, kind of—I wouldn't call it a graveyard of failed experiments, right, but it's a collection of, like, “Well, we tried this, and it kind of worked and we're keeping it around because the cost of moving this stuff around—the kind of data gravity, so to speak—is high enough that we're not going to bother transitioning it over.” But then you get into this situation where you have to bend over backwards to integrate anything with anything else. And we're still kind of in the early days of fixing that.Corey: And the AWS bill pattern that we see all the time across the board of those experiments were not successful and do not need to exist, but there's no context into that. The person that set them up left five years ago, the jobs are still running on time. What's happening with them? Well, we could stop them and see who screams, but very often, that's not the right answer either.Alex: And I think there's also something to note there, too, which is like, getting rid of data is very scary, right? I mean, if you resize a Kubernetes cluster from 15 nodes to 10, nobody's going to look at you sideways. But if you go, “Hey, we're just going to drop these tables.” The immediate reaction that you get, particularly from your data science team more often than not is, “Oh, God, what if we need that?” And so the conversation never really happens, and that causes this kind of snowball of data debt that persists in some cases for many, many years.Corey: Yeah, in some cases, what I found has been successful on those big unknown questions is don't delete the data, but restrict access to it for a few weeks and see what happens. Look into it a bit and make sure that it's not like, “Oh, cool. We just did for a month, and now we don't need that data. Let's get rid of it.” And then another month goes by it's like, “So, time to report quarterly earnings. Where's the data?”Oh, dear, that's not going to go well, for anyone. And understanding what's happening, the idea of cloning a petabyte of data so you can run an experiment on it. And okay, turns out the experiment wasn't needed. Do we still need to keep all of that?Alex: Yeah.Corey: The underlying platform advancements have been helpful toward this as well, a petabyte of data now in Glacier Deep Archive cost the princely sum of a thousand bucks a month, which is pretty close to the idea of why would I ever delete data ever again? I can get it back within a day if I need it, so let's just put it there instead.Alex: Right. You know, funny story. When I was in graduate school, we were dealing with, you know, 100 terabyte datasets on the regular that we had to generate every time because we only had 200 terabytes of raw storage. [laugh]. And this was before cloud was yet mature enough that we could get the kind of performance numbers that we wanted off of it.And we would end up having to delete the input data to make room for the output data. [laugh]. And thankfully, we don't need to do that anymore. But there are a lot of, kind of, anti-patterns that arise from that too, right? If data is easy to keep around forever, it stays around forever.And if it's easy to, let's say, run a SQL command against your Snowflake instance that scans 20 terabytes of data, you're just going to do it, and the exposure of that to you is so minimal that you can end up causing a whole bunch of problems for yourself by the fact that you don't have to deal with stuff at that low-level of abstraction anymore.Corey: It's always fun watching how this stuff manifests—because I'm dipping a toe into it from time to time—the easy, naive answer that we could give every customer but we don't is, “Huh. So, you have a whole bunch of EMR stuff? Well, you know, if you migrate that into something else, you'll save a whole bunch of money on that.” With no regard for the 500 jobs that run against that EMR cluster on a consistent basis that form is a key part of business process. “Yeah, if you could just do the entire flow of how data is operated with throughout your entire business that would be swell because you can save tens of thousands of dollars a month on that.” Yeah, how about we don't suggest things that are just absolute buffoonery.Alex: Well, and it's like, you know, you hit on a good point. Like, one of my least favorite words in the English language is the word ‘just.' And you know, I spent a few years as a freelance data consultant, and you know, a lot of what I would hear sometimes from customers is, “Well, why don't we ‘just' deprecate X?”Corey: “Why don't we just—” “I'm going to stop you there because there is no ‘just.'”Alex: Exactly.Corey: There's always context that we cannot have as outsiders.Alex: Precisely. Precisely. And digging into that really is—it's the fun part of the job, but it's also the hard part of the job.Corey: Before we created The Duckbill Group, which was really when I took Mike Julian on as business partner and CEO and formed the entity, I had something in common with you; I was freelancing for a couple of years beforehand. Now, I know why I wound up deciding, all right, we're going to turn this into a company, but what was it that I guess made you decide to, you know, freelancing is all well and good, but it's time to get something that looks a lot more like a quote-unquote, “Traditional job.”Alex: So, I think, on one level, I went freelance because I wasn't exactly sure what I wanted to do next. And I knew what I was good at. I knew what I had a lot of experience at, and I thought, “Well, I can just go out and kind of find a bunch of people that are willing to hire me to do what I'm good at doing, and then maybe eventually I'll find one of them that I like enough that I'll go and work for them. Or maybe I'll come up with some kind of a business model that I can repeat enough times that I don't have to worry that I wake up tomorrow and all of my clients are gone and then I have to go live in a van down by the river.”And I think when I heard about the opening at The Duckbill Group, I had been thinking for a little while about well, this has been going fine for a long time, but effectively what I've been doing is I've been you know, a staff-level data engineer for hire. And do I want to do something more than that, you know? Do I want to do something more comp—perhaps more sophisticated or more complex than that? And I rapidly came to the conclusion that in order to do that, I would have to have sales and marketing, and I would have to, you know, spend a lot of my time bringing in business. And that's just not something that I have really any experience in or I'm any good at.And, you know, I also recognize that, you know, I'm a relatively small fish in a relatively large pond, and if I wanted to get the kind of like, large scale people, the like the big, you know, Fortune 1000 company kind of customers, they may not pay attention to somebody like me. And so I think that ultimately, what I saw with The Duckbill Group was, number one, a group of people that were strongly aligned to the way that I wanted to keep doing this sort of work, right? Cultural alignment was really strong, good people, but also, you know, you folks have a thing that you figured out, and that puts you 10 to 15 steps ahead of where I was. And I was kind of staring down the barrel that, I'm like, am I going to have to take six months not doing client work so that I can figure out how to make this business sustain? And, you know, I think that ultimately, like, I just looked at it, and I said, this just makes sense to me, like, as a next step. And so here we all are.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of “Hello, World” demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking, databases, observability, management, and security. And—let me be clear here—it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself, all while gaining the networking, load balancing, and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build. With Always Free, you can do things like run small-scale applications or do proof-of-concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free? This is actually free, no asterisk. Start now. Visit snark.cloud/oci-free that's snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: It's always fun seeing how people perceive what we've done from the outside. Like, “Oh, yeah, you just stumbled right onto the thing that works, and you've just been going, like, gangbusters ever since.” Then you come aboard, it's like, “Here, look at this pile of things that didn't pan out over here.” And it's, you get to see how the sausage is made in a way that we talk about from time to time externally, but surprisingly, most of our marketing efforts aren't really focused on, “And here's this other time we screwed up as well.” And we're honest about it, but it's not sort of the thing that we promote as the core message of what we do and who we are.A question I like to ask people during job interviews, and I definitely asked you this, and I'll ask you now, which is going to probably throw some folks for a loop because who talks to their current employees like this? But what's next for you? When it comes time for you to leave the Duckbill Group, what do you want to do after this job?Alex: That's a great question. So, I mean, as we've mentioned before, you know, my career trajectory has been very weird and circuitous. And, you know, I would be lying to you if I said that I had absolute certainty about what the rest of that looks like. I've learned a few things about myself in the course of my career, such as it is. In my kind of warm, gooey center, I build stuff. Like, that is what gives me joy, it is what makes me excited to wake up in the morning.I love looking at big, complicated things, breaking them down into pieces, and figuring out how to make the pieces work in a way that makes sense. And, you know, I've spent a long time in the data ecosystem. I don't know, necessarily, if that's something that I'm going to do forever. I'm not necessarily pigeonholing myself into that part of the space just yet, but as long as I get to kind of wake up in the morning, and say, “I'm going to go and build things and it's not going to actively make the world any worse,” I'm happy with that. And so that's really—you know, might go back to freelancing, might go and join another group, another company, big small, who knows. I'm kind of leaving that up to the winds of destiny, so to speak.Corey: One thing that I have found incredi—sorry. Let me just address that first. Like that—Alex: Sure.Corey: —is the right way to think about it. My belief has always been that you don't necessarily have, like, the ten-year plan, or the five-year plan or whatever it is because that's where you're going to go so much as it gives you direction and forces you to keep moving so you don't wind up sitting in the same place for five years with one year of experience repeated five times. It helps you remember the bigger picture. Because I've always despised this fiction that we see in job interviews where average tenure in our industry is 18 to 36 months, give or take, but somehow during the interviews, we all talk like this is now your forever job, and after 25 years, you'll retire. And yeah, let's be a little more realistic than that.My question is always what is next and how can we align in a way that helps you get to what's coming? That's the purpose behind the question, and that's—the only way to make that not just a drippingly insincere question is to mean it and to continue to focus on it from time to time of, great. What are you learning what's next? Now, at the time of this recording, you've been here, I believe three weeks if I'm not mistaken?Alex: I've—this is week two for me at time of recording.Corey: Excellent. Yes, my grasp of time is sort of hazy at the best of times. I have a—I do a lot of things.Alex: For sure.Corey: But yeah, it has been an eye-opening experience for me, not because, “Oh, wow, we have an employee.” Yeah, we've done that a few times before. But rather because of your background, you are asking different questions than we typically get during onboarding. I had a blog post go out recently—or will be by the time this airs—about a question that you asked about, “Wow, onboarding into our internal account structure for AWS is way more polished than I've ever seen it before. Is that something you built in-house? What is that?”And great. Oh, terrific, I'd forgotten that this is kind of a novel thing. No. What we're using is AWS's SSO offering, which is such a well-built, polished product that I can only assume that it's under NDA because Amazonians don't talk about it ever. But it's great.It has a couple of annoyances, but beyond that, it's something that I'm a big fan of, but I'd forgotten how transformative that is, compared to the usual approach of all right, here's your username, here's a password you're going to have to change, here are your IAM credentials to store on disk forever. It's the ability to look at what we're doing through the eyes of someone who is clearly deep into the technical weeds, but not as exposed to all of the minutiae of the 300-some-odd AWS services is really a refreshing thing for all of us, just because it helps us realize what it's like to see some of this stuff for the first time, as well as gives me content ideas because if it's new to you, I promise you are not the only person who's seeing it that way. And if you don't really understand something well enough to explain it, I would argue you don't really understand the thing, so it forces me to get more awareness around exactly how different facets work. It's been an absolutely fantastic experience so far, from my perspective.Alex: Thank you. Right back at you. I mean, spending so many years working with startups, my kind of level of expected sophistication is, “I'm going to write your password on the back of a napkin. I have fifteen other things to do. Go figure it out.” And so you know, it's always nice to see—particularly players like AWS that are such 800-pound gorillas—going in and trying to uplevel that experience in a way that feels like—because I mean, like, look, AWS could keep us with the, “Here's a CSV with your username and password. Good luck, have fun.” And you know, they would still make—Corey: And they're going to have to because so much automation is built around that—Alex: Oh yeah—Corey: In so many places.Alex: —so much.Corey: It's always net-additive, they never turn anything off, which is increasingly an operational burden.Alex: Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. But yeah, it's nice to see them up-level this in a way that feels like they're paying attention to their customers' pain. And that's always nice to see.Corey: So, we met a few years ago—in the before times—at a mixer that we wound up throwing—slash meetup. It was in Southern California for some AWS event or another. You've been aware of who we are and what we do for a while now, so I'm very curious to know—and the joy of having these conversations is that I don't actually know what the answer is going to be, so this may never see the light of day if it goes to weird—Alex: [laugh].Corey: —in the wrong direction, but—no I'm kidding. What has been, I guess, the biggest points of dissonance or surprises based upon your perception of who we are and what we do externally, versus joining and seeing how the sausage is made?Alex: You know, I think the first thing is—um, well, how to put this. I think that a lot of what I was expecting, given how much work you all do and how big—well, ‘you all;' we do—and how big the list of clients is and how it gets bigger every day, I was expecting this to be, like, this very hyper put together, like, every little detail has been figured out kind of engagement where I would have to figure out how you all do this. And coming in and realizing that a lot of it is just having a lot of in-depth knowledge born from experience of a bunch of stuff inside of this ecosystem, and then the rest of it is kind of free jazz, is kind of encouraging. Because as someone that was you know, as a freelancer, right, who do you see, right? You see people who have big public presences or people who are giant firms, right?On the GCP side, SADA Systems is a great example. They're another local company for me here in Los Angeles, and—Corey: Oh, yes. [unintelligible 00:24:48] Miles has been a recurring guest on the show.Alex: Yeah. And he's great. And, like, they have this enormous company that's got, like, all these different specializations and they're basically kind of like the middleman for GCP on a lot of things. And, like, you see that, and then you kind of see the individual people that are like, “Yeah, you know, I'm not really going to tell you that I only have two clients and that if both of them go away, I'm screwed, but, like, I only have two clients, and if both of them go away, I'm screwed.” And so, you know, I think honestly seeing that, like, what you've built so far and what I hope to help you continue to build is, you know, you've got just enough structure around the thing so that it makes sense, and the rest of it, you're kind of admitting that no plan ever survives contact with the client, right, and that everybody's going to be different than that everybody's problems are going to be different.And that you can't just go in and say, “Here's a dashboard, here's a calculator, have fun, give me my money,” right? Because that feels like—in optimization spaces of any kind, be that cloud, or data or whatever, there's this, kind of, push toward, how do I automate myself out of a job, and the realization that you can't for something like this, and that ultimately, like, you're just going to have to go with what you know, is something that I kind of had a suspicion was the case, but this really made it clear to me that, like, oh, this is actually a reasonable way of going about this.Corey: We thought otherwise at one point. We thought that this was something could be easily addressed their software. We launched our DuckTools SaaS platform in beta and two months later, did the—our incredible journey has come to an end, and took it off of a public offering. Because it doesn't lend itself to solving these problems in software in any reasonable way. I am ever more convinced over time that the idea of being able to solve cloud cost optimization with software at VC-scale is a red herring.And yeah, it just isn't going to work because it's one size fits some. Our customers are, by definition, exceptional in many respects, and understanding the context behind why things are the way that they are mean that we can only go so far with process because then it becomes a let's have a conversation and let's be human. Otherwise, we try to overly codify the process, and congratulations, we just now look like really crappy software, but expensive because it's all people doing it. It doesn't work that way. We have tools internally that help smooth over a lot of those edges, but by and large, people who are capable of performing at especially at the principal level for a cloud economics role, inherently are going to find themselves stifled by too much process because they need to have the freedom to dig into the areas that are relevant to the customer.It's why we can't recraft all of our statements of work in ways that tend to shy away from explicitly defined deliverables. Because we deliver an outcome, but it's going to depend entirely, in most cases, up on what we discover along the way. Maybe a full-on report isn't the best way of presenting the data in the way that we see it. Maybe it's a small proof of concept script or something like that. Maybe it's, I don't know, an interpretive dance in front of the company's board.Alex: [laugh]. Right.Corey: I'm open to exploring opportunities. But it comes down to what is right for the customer. There's a reason we only ever charge a fixed fee for these things, and it's because at that point, great, we're giving you the advice that we'd implement ourselves. We have no partnerships with any vendor in the space just to avoid bias or the perception of same. It's important that we are the authoritative source around these things.Honestly, the thing that surprised me the most about all this is how true to that vision we've stayed as we've as we flushed out what works, what doesn't. And we can distantly fail to go out of business every month. I am ecstatic about that. I expected this to wind up cratering into a mountain four months after I went freelance. Not yet.Alex: Well, I mean, I think there's another aspect of this too, right? Because I've spent a lot of my career working inside of venture capital-backed companies. And there's a lot of positive things to be said about having ready access to that kind of cash, but it does something to your business the second you take it. And I've been in a couple of situations where, like, once you actually have that big bucket of money, the incentive is grow, right? Hire more people get more customers, go, go, go, go, go.And sometimes what you'll find is that you'll spend the time and the money on an initiative and it's clearly not working. And you just kind of have to keep doubling down because now you've got customers that are using this thing and now you have to maintain it, and before you know it, you've got this albatross hanging around your neck. And like one of the things that I really respect about the way that Duckbill Group is is handling this by not taking outside cash is, like, it frees you up to make these kinds of bets, and then two months later say, “Well, that didn't work,” and try something else. And you know, that's very difficult to do once you have to go and convince someone with, you know, money flowing out of their ears, that that's the right thing to do.Corey: We have to be intentional about what we're doing. One of the benefits of bringing you aboard is that one, it does improve our capacity for handling more engagements at the same time, but it also improves the quality of the engagements that we are delivering. Instead of basically doing a round-robin assignment policy we can—Alex: Right.Corey: —we consult with each other; we talk about specific areas in which we have specific expertise. You get dragged into a lot of data portions of existing engagements, and the rest of us get pulled into other areas in which you might not be as strong. For example, “What are all of these ridiculous services? I can't make heads or tails have the ridiculous naming side of it.” Surprise, that's not a you problem.It comes down to being able to work collaboratively and let each other shine in a way that doesn't mean we load people up with work. We're very strict about having a 40-hour or less work week, just because we're not rushing for an exit. We want to enjoy our time working, we want to enjoy what we're doing, and then we want to go home and don't think about work until it's time to come back and think about these things. Like, it's a lifestyle company, but that lifestyle doesn't need to be run, run, run, run, run all the time, and it doesn't need to be something that people barely tolerate.Alex: Yeah. And I think that, you know, especially coming from being an army of one in a lot of engagements, it is really refreshing to be able to—see because, you know, I'm fortunate enough, I have friends in the industry that I can go and say like, “I have no idea how to make heads or tails of X.” And you know, I can get help that way, but ultimately, like, the only other outlet that I have here is the customer and they're not bringing me in if they have those answers readily to hand. And so being able to bounce stuff off of other people inside of an organization like this has been really refreshing.Corey: One of the things I've appreciated about your tenure here so far is the questions that you ask are pitched at the perfect level, by which I mean, it is never something you could answer with a three-second visit to Google, but it's also not something that you've spent three days spinning your wheels on trying to understand. You do a bit of digging; it's a little unclear, especially since there are multiple paths to go down, and then you flag it for clarification. And there's really so much to be said for that. Really, when we're looking for markers of seniority in the interview process, it's admitting you don't know something, but then also talking about how you would go about getting the answer. And it's—because no one has all this stuff in their head. I spend a disturbing amount of time looking at search engines and trying to reformulate queries and to get answers that make sense.I don't have the entirety of AWS shoved into my head. Yet. I'm sure there's something at re:Invent that's going to be scary and horrifying that will claim to do it and basically have a poor user interface, but all right. When that comes, we'll reevaluate then because this industry is always changing.Alex: For sure. For sure. And I think it's, it's worth pointing out that, like, one of the things that having done this for a long time gives you is this kind of scaffolding in your head that you can hang things over. We're like, you don't need to have every single AWS service memorized, but if you've got that scaffold in your head going, “Oh, like, this thing sounds like it hangs over this part of the mental scaffold, and I've seen other things that do that, so I wonder if it does this and this and this,” right? And that's a lot of it, honestly.Because especially, like, when I was solely in the data space, there's a new data wareho—or a new, like, data catalog system coming out every other week. You know, there are a thousand different things that claim to do MLOps, right? And whenever, like, someone comes to me and says, “Do you have experience with such and such?” And the answer was usually, “Well if you hum a few bars, I can fake it.” And, you know, that tends to help a great deal.Corey: Yeah. “No, but I'll find out and get back to you,” the right answer. Making it up and being wrong is the best way to get rejected from an environment. That's not just consulting; that's employment, too. If 95% of the time, you give the right answer, but that one time and 20 you're going to just make it up, well, I have to validate the other 19 because I never know when someone's faking it or not. There's that level of earned trust that's important.Alex: Well, yeah. And you're being brought in to be the expert in the room. That doesn't necessarily mean that you are the all-seeing, all-knowing oracle of knowledge but, like, if you say a thing, people are just going to believe you. And so, you know, it's beholden on you—Corey: If not, we have a different problem.Alex: Well, yeah, exactly. Hopefully, right? But yeah, I mean, it's beholden on you to be honest with your customer at a certain point, I think.Corey: I really want to thank you for taking the time out of your day to got with me about this. And I would love to have you back on in a couple of months once you're fully up to speed and spinning at the proper RPMs and see what's happened then. I—Alex: Thank you. I'd—Corey: —really appreciate—Alex: —love to.Corey: —your time where's the best place for people to learn more about you if they haven't heard your name before?Alex: Well, let's see. I am @alexras on Twitter, A-L-E-X-R-A-S. My personal website is alexras.info.I've done some writing on data stuff, including a pretty big collection of blog posts on the data side of the AWS ecosystem that are still on my consulting page, bitsondisk.com. Other than that—I mean, yeah, Twitter is probably the best place to find me, so if you want to talk more about any weird, nerd data stuff, then please feel free to reach out there.Corey: And links to that will, of course, be in the [show notes 00:35:57]. Thanks again for your time. I really appreciate it.Alex: Thank you. It's been a pleasure.Corey: Alex Rasmussen, principal cloud economist here at The Duckbill Group. I am Corey Quinn, cloud economist to the stars, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry, insulting comment that you then submit to three other podcast platforms just to make sure you have a backup copy of that particular piece of data.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

NDA's Deer Season 365
Coyotes and Their Impact on Local Deer Populations With Dr. Michael Chamberlain

NDA's Deer Season 365

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 53:34


In this episode of the Deer Season 365 Podcast, we are talking with Dr. Michael Chamberlain of the University of Georgia about coyote research he's been involved with. We start with the basics of coyote biology and ecology before diving into the impacts they are having on deer populations and how hunters and land managers can mitigate that impact through hunting, trapping and habitat management.  Important Links: Episode Sponsor: Weatherby Dr. Chamberlain's Published Research Follow Dr. Chamberlain on Instagram Follow Brian Grossman on Instagram Sign up for NDA's free weekly e-newsletter Subscribe to the Podcast on: Apple Podcasts Google Podcasts Spotify iHeartRadio Stitcher About the National Deer Association The National Deer Association (NDA) is a non-profit deer conservation group that works to ensure the future of wild deer, wildlife habitat and hunting. Thank you for subscribing to our podcast! Support NDA's mission by becoming a member today. NDA has the highest ranking from Charity Navigator, an independent group that monitors non-profits for financial efficiency and effectiveness. Learn more about deer and deer hunting in our weekly, free e-newsletter. Follow us on our other channels: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube

The MeidasTouch Podcast
Stop Electing Evil with former Trump staffer and NDA killer Jessica Denson

The MeidasTouch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 98:20


On today's special episode of The MeidasTouch Podcast, you will listen to the most interesting story of courage in the face of Trump tyranny never before told. Our guest, Jessica Denson, is a defected former Trump Campaign staffer & NDA killer who goes into detail about her victory in court over the corrupt Trump regime and their ludicrous and unenforceable NDAs. The remainder of the episode, the brothers give you the latest breaking news from over the weekend that you need to know. We cover it all: the latest updates on Russia, a heinous Missouri proposed bill attacking childbearing persons & the absolutely dystopian Trump rally from over the weekend. If you enjoyed today's episode please be sure to rate, review and subscribe! As always, thank YOU for listening! DEALS FROM OUR SPONSORS: Athletic Greens: https://athleticgreens.com/meidas Buck Mason: https://buckmason.com/meidas Grove Collaborative: https://grove.com/meidastouch Thesis: https://takethesis.com/meidas Listen to Wondery Business Wars Airbnb vs NYC: https://wondery.com/shows/business-wars/ Remember to subscribe to ALL the Meidas Media Podcasts: MeidasTouch: https://pod.link/1510240831 Legal AF: https://pod.link/1580828595 The PoliticsGirl Podcast: https://pod.link/1595408601 The Influence Continuum: https://pod.link/1603773245 Kremlin File: https://pod.link/1575837599 Mea Culpa with Michael Cohen: https://pod.link/1530639447 Zoomed In: https://pod.link/1580828633 The Weekend Show: https://pod.link/1612691018 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Freedom One-On-One with Jeff Dornik
Jasmin St Claire: The Racist Democrat Party is a Bad Cult on Some Kind of Acid

Freedom One-On-One with Jeff Dornik

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2022 60:47


This weekend I was at Clay Clark's ReAwaken America Tour in San Diego, and people kept coming up to me asking why so many Americans, including their friends and family, are so blinded to what's really going on. To answer this question, we must first understand and label the Democrat party for what they are: A Racist Cult.Jasmin St Claire, host of the controversial podcast Krazy Train, joined me on this episode of The Jeff Dornik Show to decipher how so many people can be so deceived in such a short period of time. Think about it: The mainstream narrative is that the Democrats are the party of the Black Community. Yet, at the exact same time, they are the party that tells African-Americans that their skin color makes then “less than” and they cannot make it to the top without help from the “superior” white people.They tell the feminist movement to be ok with men competing in their sports and taking their roles in exclusively female positions… and if they don't, they aren't a feminist. So you are telling me that to be a pro-woman feminist you must be ok with allowing men to win in female sports? The contradictions are astounding, yet that's exactly what the Left is gobbling up.St Claire had some choice words for the utter hypocrisy of the Democrat Party:“The whole Democrat Party is like a really bad cult on some kind of acid…. I feel like the Democrats are very popular for taking Black voters votes. They always say they are for them, yet they don't listen to what they're really saying. And it is racist to get a job just based upon your skin color. How about let's just get jobs based upon our skillsets whether you are a man or a woman? And women that do this whole MeToo Movement? That just sets back doing business with a woman by hundreds of years. If you sign an NDA, no matter what it is, you don't break that NDA. You have women sleeping with these Hollywood moguls to get to the top, then getting buyers remorse after. It's a joke. It is a joke, and it's very embarrassing to be a woman on some of those days. It really is.”We've got to wake the American people up the sham that is the Democrat Party. They've gaslit and deceived their followers… in exact same way that a cult leader like Jim Jones did with his followers.That parallel is actually quite uncanny… in the same way that he convinced his followers to drink the Kool-Aid which ultimately led to their deaths, the Democrat Party is convincing their followers to get injected with the Poison Death Shot, which is also leading to their deaths.Tell me again what the difference between Jim Jones and the Democrat Party is again? Hint: There is none.Many of you have been asking how you can support The Jeff Dornik Show. One way you can do that is to simply donate whatever amount you so choose. Every dollar helps us to build, grow and expand this show. Any donations of at least $35 will receive a copy of the book Church & State: How the Left Used the Church to Conquer America. Please visit http://jeffdornik.com/donate and get your copy of the book sent right out to you.

Always Saucy in Chicago
ASIC #64 - Tickle My Pickle for Some Nickel?

Always Saucy in Chicago

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2022 64:00


Episode LXIV: Nickel soars past the $100,000 mark during some weird trading events. What was your experience seeing Playboy for the first time? Zach and Bobby share their vivid "core" memories, the Weekend Recap, 312 day and another one down the drain trying to snag a bike, New Reddit News, and our genius app ideas that you've verbally signed a NDA. Stay Saucy... --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/alwayssaucy/support

City Cast Pittsburgh
Warhol AI, Thinking Like A Criminal, And Sewickley Academy In Shambles

City Cast Pittsburgh

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2022 25:01


For our Friday news roundup, the team hears about student demands at Sewickley Academy; a former lawyer's five-year federal prison sentence for marijuana distribution; the Warhol docu-series (and the artificial intelligence that replicates his voice); and, finally, some bridge news that doesn't end in collapse… we hope. Today's conversation is powered by local journalism, including: Paula Reed Ward has some great background from the Tribune-Review on the antics of former attorney and rapper Daniel Muessig, aka Dos Noun, including the infamous video: https://triblive.com/local/former-pittsburgh-defense-attorney-gets-5-years-in-prison-for-marijuana-distribution/ Like Morgan, 90.5 WESA's Julia Zenkevich attended the student press conference about the happenings at Sewickley Academy: https://www.wesa.fm/education/2022-03-10/sewickley-academy-students-seek-public-apology-petition-administration-for-concessions Ed Blazina's got a great scoop at the Post-Gazette on Norfolk Southern's NDA: https://www.post-gazette.com/news/transportation/2022/03/07/norfolk-southern-pittsburgh-bridges-construction-modification-double-stacked-trains-north-side-allegheny-commons/stories/202203070012 And City Paper's Amanda Waltz lets us know what to look for in Netflix's new six-part series, “The Andy Warhol Diaries”: https://www.pghcitypaper.com/pittsburgh/the-andy-warhol-diaries-looks-at-intensely-private-life-of-pittsburgh-born-pop-artist/Content?oid=21245880 Our newsletter is fresh daily at 6 a.m. Sign up here. We're also on Twitter @citycastpgh & Instagram @CityCastPgh!