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Best podcasts about mounting

Latest podcast episodes about mounting

The Coconuts Podcast
Fresh Tunes Friday: Behind the Back To The Middle EP, with Bryan Estepa | The Coconuts Podcast | Oct 15, 2021

The Coconuts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 59:23


It's the start of Fresh Tunes Friday, where we showcase a musical guest every third Friday of the month. We kicked things off with Sydney's own Bryan Estepa, a Filipino-Australian singer-songwriter, who just released his Back To The Middle EP. What's it like recording music in lockdown? Listen in to find out!Other stories include:Indonesia finally confirms 19 eligible countries as Bali reopens to foreign tourism today | Come Saturday, Bangkok can stay out till 11pm | Man who murdered taxi driver was psych patient, once threatened mass shooting | Mounting calls in Indonesia to ban new Superman comic featuring bisexual character | Legoland Malaysia reopens theme park tomorrow | LOOK: Over 100 rescued by Philippine Coast Guard from floods due to ‘Maring' | Singapore Telegram channel attracts claims of vaccine magnetism | Let's go to the movies? Junta wants to reopen Myanmar's cinemasThe Coconuts Podcast delivers impactful, weird, and wonderful reporting by our journalists on the ground in eight cities: Singapore, Bangkok, Hong Kong, Manila, Jakarta, Kuala Lumpur, Yangon, and Bali. Listen to headline news and insightful interviews on matters large and small, designed for people located in – or curious about – Southeast Asia and Hong Kong.

Progressive Voices
Green News Report 10-12-2021

Progressive Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 6:00


IN TODAY'S RADIO REPORT: 'No climate, no deal!' --- Democratic Senators demand climate policies stay in Biden's Build Back Better Act; A quarter of all critical U.S. infrastructure is at risk of failure due to flooding; Mounting costs of extreme weather disasters in 2021 already surpass all of 2020; PLUS: President Biden restores Bears Ears and two other national monuments... All that and more in today's Green News Report!

The N.P.O. Podcast
The Jamie Durie Show 10.8.21 Can Minting a Trillion Dollar Coin Erase Debt? Mounting Evidence Of The Superiority Of Natural Immunity Against COVID 19 vs Vaccines.

The N.P.O. Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 48:49


The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 10.08.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 59:38


Raspberries, ellagic acid reveal benefits in two studies Oregon State University, October 1, 2021.    Articles that appeared recently in the Journal of Berry Research report that raspberries and compounds present in the fruit could help support healthy body mass and motor function, including balance, coordination and strength.   In one study, Neil Shay and colleagues at Oregon State University fed mice a high fat, high sugar diet plus one of the following: raspberry juice concentrate, raspberry puree concentrate, raspberry fruit powder, raspberry seed extract, ellagic acid (a polyphenol that occurs in a relatively high amount in raspberries), raspberry ketone, or a combination of raspberry ketone and ellagic acid. Additional groups of animals received a high fat, high sugar diet alone or a low fat diet.   While mice that received the high fat and sugar diet alone experienced a significant increase in body mass, the addition of raspberry juice concentrate, raspberry puree concentrate or ellagic acid plus raspberry ketone helped prevent this effect. Of note, mice that received raspberry juice concentrate experienced gains similar to those of animals given a low fat diet. "We hope that the findings from this study can help guide the design of future clinical trials," Dr Shay stated.   In another study, Barbara Shukitt-Hale, PhD, and her associates at Tufts University's Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging gave 19 month old rats a control diet or a diet enhanced with raspberry extract for 11 weeks. Psychomotor behavior was assessed during week 7 and cognitive testing was conducted during weeks 9-10.   Animals that received raspberry performed better on psychomotor coordination and balance, and had better muscle tone, strength and stamina than those that received a control diet. "These results may have important implications for healthy aging," stated Dr Shukitt-Hale. "While further research in humans is necessary, animal model studies are helpful in identifying deficits associated with normal aging."       Massage doesn't just make muscles feel better, it makes them heal faster and stronger Harvard University, October 6, 2021 Massage has been used to treat sore, injured muscles for more than 3,000 years, and today many athletes swear by massage guns to rehabilitate their bodies. But other than making people feel good, do these "mechanotherapies" actually improve healing after severe injury? According to a new study from researchers at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), the answer is "yes." Using a custom-designed robotic system to deliver consistent and tunable compressive forces to mice's leg muscles, the team found that this mechanical loading (ML) rapidly clears immune cells called neutrophils out of severely injured muscle tissue. This process also removed inflammatory cytokinesreleased by neutrophils from the muscles, enhancing the process of muscle fiber regeneration. The research is published in Science Translational Medicine. "Lots of people have been trying to study the beneficial effects of massage and other mechanotherapies on the body, but up to this point it hadn't been done in a systematic, reproducible way. Our work shows a very clear connection between mechanical stimulation and immune function. This has promise for regenerating a wide variety of tissues including bone, tendon, hair, and skin, and can also be used in patients with diseases that prevent the use of drug-based interventions," said first author Bo Ri Seo, Ph.D., who is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the lab of Core Faculty member Dave Mooney, Ph.D. at the Wyss Institute and SEAS. Seo and her coauthors started exploring the effects of mechanotherapy on injured tissues in mice several years ago, and found that it doubled the rate of muscle regeneration and reduced tissue scarring over the course of two weeks. Excited by the idea that mechanical stimulation alone can foster regeneration and enhance muscle function, the team decided to probe more deeply into exactly how that process worked in the body, and to figure out what parameters would maximize healing. They teamed up with soft robotics experts in the Harvard Biodesign Lab, led by Wyss Associate Faculty member Conor Walsh, Ph.D., to create a small device that used sensors and actuators to monitor and control the force applied to the limb of a mouse. " The device we created allows us to precisely control parameters like the amount and frequency of force applied, enabling a much more systematic approach to understanding tissue healing than would be possible with a manual approach," said co-second author Christopher Payne, Ph.D., a former Postdoctoral Fellow at the Wyss Institute and the Harvard Biodesign Lab who is now a Robotics Engineer at Viam, Inc.  Once the device was ready, the team experimented with applying force to mice's leg muscles via a soft silicone tip and used ultrasound to get a look at what happened to the tissue in response. They observed that the muscles experienced a strain of between 10-40%, confirming that the tissues were experiencing mechanical force. They also used those ultrasound imaging data to develop and validate a computational model that could predict the amount of tissue strain under different loading forces. They then applied consistent, repeated force to injured muscles for 14 days. While both treated and untreated muscles displayed a reduction in the amount of damaged muscle fibers, the reduction was more pronounced and the cross-sectional area of the fibers was larger in the treated muscle, indicating that treatment had led to greater repair and strength recovery. The greater the force applied during treatment, the stronger the injured muscles became, confirming that mechanotherapy improves muscle recovery after injury. But how? Evicting neutrophils to enhance regeneration To answer that question, the scientists performed a detailed biological assessment, analyzing a wide range of inflammation-related factors called cytokines and chemokines in untreated vs. treated muscles. A subset of cytokines was dramatically lower in treated muscles after three days of mechanotherapy, and these cytokines are associated with the movement of immune cells called neutrophils, which play many roles in the inflammation process. Treated muscles also had fewer neutrophils in their tissue than untreated muscles, suggesting that the reduction in cytokines that attract them had caused the decrease in neutrophil infiltration. The team had a hunch that the force applied to the muscle by the mechanotherapy effectively squeezed the neutrophils and cytokines out of the injured tissue. They confirmed this theory by injecting fluorescent molecules into the muscles and observing that the movement of the molecules was more significant with force application, supporting the idea that it helped to flush out the muscle tissue. To pick apart what effect the neutrophils and their associated cytokines have on regenerating muscle fibers, the scientists performed in vitro studies in which they grew muscle progenitor cells (MPCs) in a medium in which neutrophils had previously been grown. They found that the number of MPCs increased, but the rate at which they differentiated (developed into other cell types) decreased, suggesting that neutrophil-secreted factors stimulate the growth of muscle cells, but the prolonged presence of those factors impairs the production of new muscle fibers. "Neutrophils are known to kill and clear out pathogens and damaged tissue, but in this study we identified their direct impacts on muscle progenitor cell behaviors," said co-second author Stephanie McNamara, a former Post-Graduate Fellow at the Wyss Institute who is now an M.D.-Ph.D. student at Harvard Medical School (HMS). "While the inflammatory response is important for regeneration in the initial stages of healing, it is equally important that inflammation is quickly resolved to enable the regenerative processes to run its full course." Seo and her colleagues then turned back to their in vivo model and analyzed the types of muscle fibers in the treated vs. untreated mice 14 days after injury. They found that type IIX fibers were prevalent in healthy muscle and treated muscle, but untreated injured muscle contained smaller numbers of type IIX fibers and increased numbers of type IIA fibers. This difference explained the enlarged fiber size and greater force production of treated muscles, as IIX fibers produce more force than IIA fibers. Finally, the team homed in on the optimal amount of time for neutrophil presence in injured muscle by depleting neutrophils in the mice on the third day after injury. The treated mice's muscles showed larger fiber size and greater strength recovery than those in untreated mice, confirming that while neutrophils are necessary in the earliest stages of injury recovery, getting them out of the injury site early leads to improved muscle regeneration. "These findings are remarkable because they indicate that we can influence the function of the body's immune system in a drug-free, non-invasive way," said Walsh, who is also the Paul A. Maeder Professor of Engineering and Applied Science at SEAS and whose group is experienced in developing wearable technology for diagnosing and treating disease. "This provides great motivation for the development of external, mechanical interventions to help accelerate and improve muscle and tissue healing that have the potential to be rapidly translated to the clinic." The team is continuing to investigate this line of research with multiple projects in the lab. They plan to validate this mechanotherpeutic approach in larger animals, with the goal of being able to test its efficacy on humans. They also hope to test it on different types of injuries, age-related muscle loss, and muscle performance enhancement. "The fields of mechanotherapy and immunotherapy rarely interact with each other, but this work is a testament to how crucial it is to consider both physical and biological elements when studying and working to improve human health," said Mooney, who is the corresponding author of the paper and the Robert P. Pinkas Family Professor of Bioengineering at SEAS. "The idea that mechanics influence cell and tissue function was ridiculed until the last few decades, and while scientists have made great strides in establishing acceptance of this fact, we still know very little about how that process actually works at the organ level. This research has revealed a previously unknown type of interplay between mechanobiology and immunology that is critical for muscle tissue healing, in addition to describing a new form of mechanotherapy that potentially could be as potent as chemical or gene therapies, but much simpler and less invasive," said Wyss Founding Director Don Ingber, M.D., Ph.D., who is also the Judah Folkman Professor of Vascular Biology at (HMS) and the Vascular Biology Program at Boston Children's Hospital, as well as Professor of Bioengineering at SEAS.   Vitamin E could help protect older men from pneumonia University of Helsinki (Finland), October 7 2021.    An article that appeared in Clinical Interventions in Aging reported a protective role for vitamin E against pneumonia in older men.   For the current investigation, Dr Harri Hemilä of the University of Helsinki, Finland analyzed data from the Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-Carotene (ATBC) Cancer Prevention Study conducted in Finland. The trial included 29,133 men between the ages of 50 to 69 years who smoked at least five cigarettes daily upon enrollment. Participants received alpha tocopherol (vitamin E), beta carotene, both supplements, or a placebo for five to eight years.   The current study was limited to 7,469 ATBC participants who started smoking at age 21 or older. Among this group, supplementation with vitamin E was associated with a 35% lower risk of developing pneumonia in comparison with those who did not receive the vitamin.  Light smokers who engaged in leisure time exercise had a 69% lower risk compared with unsupplemented members of this subgroup. The risk in this subgroup of developing pneumonia by age 74 was 12.9%.   Among the one-third of the current study's population who quit smoking for a median period of two years, there was a 72% lower risk of pneumonia in association with vitamin E supplementation. In this group, exercisers who received vitamin E experienced an 81% lower pneumonia risk.   Dr Hemilä observed that the benefit for vitamin E in this study was strongest for older subjects—a group at higher risk of pneumonia.   "The current analysis of individual-level data suggests that trials on vitamin E and pneumonia on nonsmoking elderly males are warranted," he concluded.       Toxic fatty acids to blame for brain cell death after injury New York University, October 7, 2021 Cells that normally nourish healthy brain cells called neurons release toxic fatty acids after neurons are damaged, a new study in rodents shows. This phenomenon is likely the driving factor behind most, if not all, diseases that affect brain function, as well as the natural breakdown of brain cells seen in aging, researchers say. Previous research has pointed to astrocytes—a star-shaped glial cell of the central nervous system—as the culprits behind cell death seen in Parkinson's disease and dementia, among other neurodegenerative diseases. While many experts believed that these cells released a neuron-killing molecule to "clear away" damaged brain cells, the identity of this toxin has until now remained a mystery. Led by researchers at NYU Grossman School of Medicine, the new investigation provides what they say is the first evidence that tissue damage prompts astrocytes to produce two kinds of fats, long-chain saturated free fatty acids and phosphatidylcholines. These fats then trigger cell death in damaged neurons, the electrically active cells that send messages throughout nerve tissue. Publishing Oct. 6 in the journal Nature, the study also showed that when researchers blocked fatty acid formation in mice, 75 percent of neurons survived compared with 10 percent when the fatty acids were allowed to form. The researchers' earlier work showed that brain cells continued to function when shielded from astrocyte attacks.  "Our findings show that the toxic fatty acids produced by astrocytes play a critical role in brain cell death and provide a promising new target for treating, and perhaps even preventing, many neurodegenerative diseases," says study co-senior author Shane Liddelow, Ph.D. Liddelow, an assistant professor in the Department of Neuroscience and Physiology at NYU Langone Health, adds that targeting these fats instead of the cells that produce them may be a safer approach to treating neurodegenerative diseasesbecause astrocytes feed nerve cells and clear away their waste. Stopping them from working altogether could interfere with healthy brain function. Although it remains unclear why astrocytes produce these toxins, it is possible they evolved to destroy damaged cells before they can harm their neighbors, says Liddelow. He notes that while healthy cells are not harmed by the toxins, neurons become susceptible to the damaging effects when they are injured, mutated, or infected by prions, the contagious, misfolded proteins that play a major role in mad cow disease and similar illnesses. Perhaps in chronic diseases like dementia, this otherwise helpful process goes off track and becomes a problem, the study authors say. For the investigation, researchers analyzed the molecules released by astrocytes collected from rodents. They also genetically engineered some groups of mice to prevent the normal production of the toxic fats and looked to see whether neuron death occurred after an acute injury. "Our results provide what is likely the most detailed molecular map to date of how tissue damage leads to brain cell death, enabling researchers to better understand why neurons die in all kinds of diseases," says Liddelow, also an assistant professor in the Department of Ophthalmology at NYU Langone. Liddelow cautions that while the findings are promising, the genetic techniques used to block the enzyme that produces toxic fatty acids in mice are not ready for use in humans. As a result, the researchers next plan is to explore safe and effective ways to interfere with the release of the toxins in human patients. Liddelow and his colleagues had previously shown these neurotoxic astrocytes in the brains of patients with Parkinson's, Huntington's disease, and multiple sclerosis, among other diseases.   Clinical trial for nicotinamide riboside: Vitamin safely boosts levels of important cell metabolite linked to multiple health benefits University of Iowa Health Care, October 3, 2021   In the first controlled clinical trial of nicotinamide riboside (NR), a newly discovered form of Vitamin B3, researchers have shown that the compound is safe for humans and increases levels of a cell metabolite that is critical for cellular energy production and protection against stress and DNA damage.   Studies in mice have shown that boosting the levels of this cell metabolite -- known as NAD+ -- can produce multiple health benefits, including resistance to weight gain, improved control of blood sugar and cholesterol, reduced nerve damage, and longer lifespan. Levels of NAD+ diminish with age, and it has been suggested that loss of this metabolite may play a role in age-related health decline.   These findings in animal studies have spurred people to take commercially available NR supplements designed to boost NAD+. However, these over-the-counter supplements have not undergone clinical trials to see if they work in people.   The new research, reported in the journal Nature Communications, was led by Charles Brenner, PhD, professor and Roy J. Carver Chair of Biochemistry at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine in collaboration with colleagues at Queens University Belfast and ChromaDex Corp. (NASDAQ: CDXC), which supplied the NR used in the trial. Brenner is a consultant for ChromaDex. He also is co-founder and Chief Scientific Adviser of ProHealthspan, which sells NR supplements under the trade name Tru NIAGEN®.   The human trial involved six men and six women, all healthy. Each participant received single oral doses of 100 mg, 300 mg, or 1,000 mg of NR in a different sequence with a seven-day gap between doses. After each dose, blood and urine samples were collected and analyzed by Brenner's lab to measure various NAD+ metabolites in a process called metabolomics. The trial showed that the NR vitamin increased NAD+ metabolism by amounts directly related to the dose, and there were no serious side effects with any of the doses.   "This trial shows that oral NR safely boosts human NAD+ metabolism," Brenner says. "We are excited because everything we are learning from animal systems indicates that the effectiveness of NR depends on preserving and/or boosting NAD+ and related compounds in the face of metabolic stresses. Because the levels of supplementation in mice that produce beneficial effects are achievable in people, it appears than health benefits of NR will be translatable to humans safely."   The next step will be to study the effect of longer duration NR supplementation on NAD+ metabolism in healthy adults, but Brenner also has plans to test the effects of NR in people with diseases and health conditions, including elevated cholesterol, obesity and diabetes, and people at risk for chemotherapeutic peripheral neuropathy.   Prior to the formal clinical trial, Brenner conducted a pilot human study -- on himself. In 2004, he had discovered that NR is a natural product found in milk and that there is pathway to convert NR to NAD+ in people. More than a decade of research on NR metabolic pathways and health effects in mice and rats had convinced him that NR supplementation had real promise to improve human health and wellness. After consulting with UI's institutional review board, he conducted an experiment in which he took 1 gram of NR once a day for seven days, and his team analyzed blood and urine samples using mass spectrometry. The experiment showed that Brenner's blood NAD+ increased by about 2.7 times. In addition, though he reported immediate sensitivity to flushing with the related compound niacin, he did not experience any side effects taking NR.   The biggest surprise from his metabolomic analysis was an increase in a metabolite called NAAD, which was multiplied by 45 times, from trace levels to amounts in the micromolar range that were easily detectable.   "While this was unexpected, I thought it might be useful," Brenner says. "NAD+ is an abundant metabolite and it is sometimes hard to see the needle move on levels of abundant metabolites. But when you can look at a low-abundance metabolite that goes from undetectable to easily detectable, there is a great signal to noise ratio, meaning that NAAD levels could be a useful biomarker for tracking increases in NAD+ in human trials."   Brenner notes this was a case of bidirectional translational science; having learned something from the initial human experiment, his team was able to return to laboratory mice to explore the unexpected NAAD finding in more detail.   Brenner's mouse study showed that NAAD is formed from NR and confirmed that NAAD levels are a strong biomarker for increased NAD+ metabolism. The experiments also revealed more detail about NAD+ metabolic pathways.   In particular, the researchers compared the ability of all three NAD+ precursor vitamins -- NR, niacin, and nicotinamide -- to boost NAD+ metabolism and stimulate the activity of certain enzymes, which have been linked to longevity and healthbenefits. The study showed for the first time that oral NR is superior to nicotinamide, which is better than niacin in terms of the total amount of NAD+ produced at an equivalent dose. NR was also the best of the three in stimulating the activity of sirtuin enzymes. However, in this case, NR was the best at stimulating sirtuin-like activities, followed by niacin, followed by nicotinamide.   The information from the mouse study subsequently helped Brenner's team design the formal clinical trial. In addition to showing that NR boosts NAD+ in humans without adverse effects, the trial confirmed that NAAD is a highly sensitive biomarker of NAD+ supplementation in people.   "Now that we have demonstrated safety in this small clinical trial, we are in a position to find out if the health benefits that we have seen in animals can be reproduced in people," says Brenner, who also is co-director of the Obesity Research and Education Initiative, professor of internal medicine, and a member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center at the UI.   Protecting the ozone layer is delivering vast health benefits Montreal Protocol will spare Americans from 443 million skin cancer cases National Center for Atmospheric Research, October 7, 2021 An international agreement to protect the ozone layer is expected to prevent 443 million cases of skin cancer and 63 million cataract cases for people born in the United States through the end of this century, according to new research. The research team, by scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), ICF Consulting, and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), focused on the far-reaching impacts of a landmark 1987 treaty known as the Montreal Protocol and later amendments that substantially strengthened it. The agreement phased out the use of chemicals such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) that destroy ozone in the stratosphere. Stratospheric ozone shields the planet from harmful levels of the Sun's ultraviolet (UV) radiation, protecting life on Earth. To measure the long-term effects of the Montreal Protocol, the scientists developed a computer modeling approach that enabled them to look to both the past and the future by simulating the treaty's impact on Americans born between 1890 and 2100. The modeling revealed the treaty's effect on stratospheric ozone, the associated reductions in ultraviolet radiation, and the resulting health benefits.  In addition to the number of skin cancer and cataract cases that were avoided, the study also showed that the treaty, as most recently amended, will prevent approximately 2.3 million skin cancer deaths in the U.S. “It's very encouraging,” said NCAR scientist Julia Lee-Taylor, a co-author of the study. “It shows that, given the will, the nations of the world can come together to solve global environmental problems.” The study, funded by the EPA, was published in ACS Earth and Space Chemistry. NCAR is sponsored by the National Science Foundation. Mounting concerns over the ozone layer Scientists in the 1970s began highlighting the threat to the ozone layer when they found that CFCs, used as refrigerants and in other applications, release chlorine atoms in the stratosphere that set off chemical reactions that destroy ozone. Concerns mounted the following decade with the discovery of an Antarctic ozone hole. The loss of stratospheric ozone would be catastrophic, as high levels of UV radiation have been linked to certain types of skin cancer, cataracts, and immunological disorders. The ozone layer also protects terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, as well as agriculture. Policy makers responded to the threat with the 1987 Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, in which nations agreed to curtail the use of certain ozone-destroying substances. Subsequent amendments strengthened the treaty by expanding the list of ozone-destroying substances (such as halons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons, or HCFCs) and accelerating the timeline for phasing out their use. The amendments were based on Input from the scientific community, including a number of NCAR scientists, that were summarized in quadrennial Ozone Assessment reports. To quantify the impacts of the treaty, the research team built a model known as the Atmospheric and Health Effects Framework. This model, which draws on various data sources about ozone, public health, and population demographics, consists of five computational steps. These simulate past and future emissions of ozone-destroying substances, the impacts of those substances on stratospheric ozone, the resulting changes in ground-level UV radiation, the U.S. population's exposure to UV radiation, and the incidence and mortality of health effects resulting from the exposure. The results showed UV radiation levels returning to 1980 levels by the mid-2040s under the amended treaty. In contrast, UV levels would have continued to increase throughout this century if the treaty had not been amended, and they would have soared far higher without any treaty at all.  Even with the amendments, the simulations show excess cases of cataracts and various types of skin cancer beginning to occur with the onset of ozone depletion and peaking decades later as the population exposed to the highest UV levels ages. Those born between 1900 and 2040 experience heightened cases of skin cancer and cataracts, with the worst health outcomes affecting those born between about 1950 and 2000. However, the health impacts would have been far more severe without the treaty, with cases of skin cancer and cataracts rising at an increasingly rapid rate through the century.  “We peeled away from disaster,” Lee-Taylor said. “What is eye popping is what would have happened by the end of this century if not for the Montreal Protocol. By 2080, the amount of UV has tripled. After that, our calculations for the health impacts start to break down because we're getting so far into conditions that have never been seen before.” The research team also found that more than half the treaty's health benefits could be traced to the later amendments rather than the original 1987 Montreal Protocol. Overall, the treaty prevented more than 99% of potential health impacts that would have otherwise occurred from ozone destruction. This showed the importance of the treaty's flexibility in adjusting to evolving scientific knowledge, the authors said. The researchers focused on the U.S. because of ready access to health data and population projections. Lee-Taylor said that the specific health outcomes in other countries may vary, but the overall trends would be similar. “The treaty had broad global benefits,” she said.     What is Boron? The trace mineral boron provides profound anti-cancer effects, in addition to maintaining stronger bones. Life Extension, September 2021 Boron is a trace mineral found in the earth's crust and in water. Its importance in human health has been underestimated. Boron has been shown to have actions against specific types of malignancies, such as: Cervical cancer: The country Turkey has an extremely low incidence of cervical cancer, and scientists partially attribute this to its boron-rich soil.1 When comparing women who live in boron-rich regions versus boron-poor regions of Turkey, not a single woman living in the boron-rich regions had any indication of cervical cancer.2(The mean dietary intake of boron for women in this group was 8.41 mg/day.)  Boron interferes with the life cycle of the human papillomavirus (HPV), which is a contributing factor in approximately 95% of all cervical cancers.1  Considering that HPV viruses are increasingly implicated in head and neck cancers,3,4 supplementation with this ultra-low-cost mineral could have significant benefits in protecting against this malignancy that is increasing in prevalence. Lung cancer: A study conducted at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center between 1995 and 2005 found that increased boron intake was associated with a lower risk of lung cancer in postmenopausal women who were taking hormone replacement therapy. Prostate cancer: Studies point to boron's ability to inhibit the growth and spread of prostate cancer cells.  In one study, when mice were exposed to boric acid, their tumors shrank by as much as 38%.6 One analysis found that increased dietary boron intake was associated with a decreased risk of prostate cancer.7 Several human and animal studies have confirmed the important connection between boron and bone health. Boron prevents calcium loss,8 while also alleviating the bone problems associated with magnesium and vitamin D deficiency.9 All of these nutrients help maintain bone density. A study in female rats revealed the harmful effects a deficiency in boron has on bones, including:10 Decreased bone volume fraction, a measure of bone strength, Decreased thickness of the bone's spongy inner layer, and Decreased maximum force needed to break the femur. And in a study of post-menopausal women, supplementation with3 mg of boron per day prevented calcium loss and bone demineralization by reducing urinary excretion of both calcium and magnesium.8 In addition to its bone and anti-cancer benefits, there are nine additional reasons boron is an important trace mineral vital for health and longevity. It has been shown to:1 Greatly improve wound healing, Beneficially impact the body's use of estrogen, testosterone, and vitamin D, Boost magnesium absorption, Reduce levels of inflammatory biomarkers, such as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), Raise levels of antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, Protect against pesticide-induced oxidative stress and heavy-metal toxicity, Improve the brain's electrical activity, which may explain its benefits for cognitive performance, and short-term memory in the elderly, Influence the formation and activity of key biomolecules, such as S-adenosyl methionine (SAM-e) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), and Potentially help ameliorate the adverse effects of traditional chemotherapeutic agents. Because the amount of boron varies in the soil, based on geographical location, obtaining enough boron through diet alone can be difficult. Supplementing with low-cost boron is an effective way to maintain adequate levels of this overlooked micronutrient.

Around the Horn
Pressure Mounting

Around the Horn

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 26:24


Tony Reali and the national panel discuss the Red Sox big win over the Yankees in the AL Wild Card before previewing the NL Wild Card game tonight.

Dukes & Bell
Georgia's QB Concerns mounting! (Hour 3 10-6-21)

Dukes & Bell

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 31:06


Dukes & Bell talk DAWGS with Connor Riley and have some GUY TALK! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Bucs Pewter Nation Podcast
Pewter Report Podcast: Bucs Injuries Mounting, Leftwich Struggles vs. Patriots

Bucs Pewter Nation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 64:01


Jon is joined by Kasey Smith and later on Matt for episode 419. They get into the pile of injuries to the Bucs secondary and how it will impact them over their next couple of games, starting with next week. Then they break down the usage of Antonio Brown on Sunday night along with the performance of Tom Brady and the decisions made by offensive coordinator Byron Leftwich in the second half. Hear it all on the Pewter Report Podcast, energized by CELSIUS.

The Practical Filmmaker
Gear n' Gadget - SmallRig mounting plates for Canon C70, do you really need a full cage?

The Practical Filmmaker

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 3:32


Is the SmallRig a better solution than a full cage for the Canon C70?This week David George talks with Nick Evenson, Creative Director, who shares why he opted for the SmallRig over a full cage for his Canon C70. Listen to see if the SmallRig will work for your C70. Pros: ⭐️ Magnetic tool easily unscrew your base plate⭐️ Easily mount top handle⭐ 2 cold shoes⭐ Easy access to camera controlsCons:

The FOX News Rundown
Evening Edition: The United States Facing Mounting Supply Chain Issues

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 12:41


Dozens of freight containers at ports in Los Angeles and Long Beach, California, two of the largest ports in the United States, cannot be unloaded because of a shortage of workers is an example of one of the key issues causing supply chain delays. Other issues, including rising gas prices, the Delta variant surge and Biden Administration policy changes can all be argued to be a part of the overall problem. FOX's John Saucier speaks to FOX's Edward Lawrence, White House Correspondent for FOX Business, about the multiple issues causing delays in the supply chain which look to be getting worse.  

Bridging the Gap
Don't Move the Mounting Block

Bridging the Gap

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 39:58


Don't move the mounting block; while it has value in the literal sense, it also has great value as a mindset. After a little time away another thought provoking conversation about becoming a better horse person.

Colonial Era to Present Day History Buff
Mounting Tensions At Fort McKay

Colonial Era to Present Day History Buff

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 52:22


Learn whether failed American Advances up Mississippi & Missouri Rivers led to better unity amongst Indian Nations whose allegiances beforehand were uncertain. Discover what became the biggest issue British Military Officials faced within confines of Fort McKay by Mid September 1814. Learn what else became significant besides British Victory at Mackinac Island to re securing Western Great Lakes. Find out what truly was the biggest desire Indian Tribes had sought. Learn about the struggles La Baye's Residents faced as they had no military presence to defend them. Learn about Captain Andrew Bulger and how he goes about addressing the concerns of La Baye's Residents including Indian Tribal Nations. Find out exactly how many Indian People's were under British Protection throughout Upper Mississippi. Learn what happened to Washington D.C., Nation's Capital, and how the people of Baltimore came together and saved America. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/kirk-monroe/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/kirk-monroe/support

Burns & Gambo Podcasts
Burns and Gambo: The Cardinals' injuries are mounting up

Burns & Gambo Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 38:46


Burns and Gambo look at how deep the injury report has gotten for this weekend. Will the Cardinals be able to manage if there are a lot of guys out? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

First Take
Hour 2: Pressure Mounting?

First Take

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 44:40


Stephen A. Smith, Sam Acho and Ryan Clark debate more about the Bucs at Rams, if Big Ben or Fields is under more pressure, if Eli Manning is a hall of famer and more.

First Take
Hour 2: Pressure Mounting?

First Take

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 44:40


Stephen A. Smith, Sam Acho and Ryan Clark debate more about the Bucs at Rams, if Big Ben or Fields is under more pressure, if Eli Manning is a hall of famer and more.

OutKick 360
NFL QB Injuries Mounting, Jameis STRUGGLES

OutKick 360

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 44:18


This is the OutKick 360 for Tuesday September 21, 2021.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Crain's Daily Gist
09/22/21: Pressure mounting at AbilityLab

Crain's Daily Gist

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 16:32


Crain's health care reporter Stephanie Goldberg talks with host Amy Guth about the future of AbilityLab after the death of the company's longtime CEO as consolidations sweep the health care industry. Plus: Mayor Lightfoot talks about enhancing and expanding Soldier Field to keep the Bears, "hedge fund in a box" maker Enfusion plans an IPO, Geico hikes Illinois auto rates by most in 6 years and a local booze-ordering startup raises $100 million.

Halford & Brough in the Morning
Sept. 21: Hour 3 – Frustrations mounting?

Halford & Brough in the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 45:11


Mike and Jason are joined by Thomas Drance as they dive in on the Pettersson-Hughes contract talks. Also What We Learned. The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the hosts and guests and do not necessarily reflect the position of Rogers Sports & Media or any affiliates.

Guy Benson Show
Where's The President? WH Embroiled In Mounting Crisis As Biden Vacations At Beach House

Guy Benson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 110:04


Guy Benson Show - 9-20-2021 [00:00:00] 3:06 pm - San Francisco Mayor London Breed defiant after dancing maskless [00:16:22] 3:27 pm - Emmy viewers call out celebs for not wearing masks [00:18:21] 3:35 pm - John Roberts, Fox News Co-Anchor of America Reports [00:30:21] 3:51 pm - CIA warned of kids near target of Kabul drone strike [00:36:40] 4:06 pm - Bret Baier, Chief Political Anchor for Fox News & Anchor of Special Report with Bret Baier [00:52:38] 4:27 pm - In Overwhelmed Del Rio, Texas, Migrants Cross the Border Freely [00:55:04] 4:35 pm - As Biden Attacks, DeSantis Vindicated Again, This Time on COVID Antibody Treatments [01:10:09] 4:54 pm - Woke Tales: Fords Theater Tweet [01:13:23] 5:06 pm - Genn Youngkin, Virginia's GOP Gubernatorial nominee [01:28:45] 5:26 pm - AOC's ‘Tax the Rich' dress designer Aurora James owes debt in multiple states [01:31:45] 5:35 pm - REPLAY: Bret Baier [01:37:27] 5:45 pm - Homestretch: The Guy Benson Show's NEW DC Studio

Topic Lords
100. Cold Brew Ham

Topic Lords

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 59:23


Support Topic Lords on Patreon and get episodes a week early! (https://www.patreon.com/topiclords) Lords: * Jenni * https://twitter.com/horsewizrd/ * Chris Topics: * Lord Chumley * Topic Lords editor Esper Quinn weighs in on Transformer lore: "The second ever podcast I really worked on was called Sound.wav, a read-along Transformers comics podcast. I knew nothing about Transformers, and my friend Nell knew everything about them. We stuck to the IDW canon, but my understanding is, Transformers show up as naturally occurring "sparks" (a sort of semi-magical soul-piece) on the surface of the planet Cybertron, which if left to incubate will form a liquidmetal shell, which eventually becomes a full-on Transformer. (There's also something called Cold Construction which takes raw sparks and puts them in purpose built bodies, but whatever.) All of this means Transformers, in my mind, DO NOT qualify as actual robots. To me, a robot has to be built by somebody, but Transformers are just a metallic alien entity. On the podcast, we eventually had James Roberts, writer of the IDW comics series, and I confronted him with this: he agreed that Transformers are not technically robots. Felt pretty smart that day." * "Also, again I can only speak for the IDW canon, but Transformers on Cybertron don't have much of a concept of gender at all. Indeed, Transformers who were disconnected from society for millions of years and developed their own culture are the ones who sort of pioneered gender, purely as a cultural signifier. There's even explicitly trans transformers, who were known as one gender and switched to the other, and the storylines are handled pretty well in my opinion! (Other storylines, like the one explaining Arcee is a woman because she was experimented on by a mad Cybertronian scientist, are handled far less well.)" * "Transformers in IDW do have romance, and have officially recognized ceremonies for both 'amica endura' (equivalent to marriage), and 'conjunx endura' which is like eternal friendship." * "While you stepped out, there was brief discussion of Ultra Magnus and Minimus Ambus: Minimus Ambus is a tiny dude who wears the 'Ultra Magnus Armor,' Ultra Magnus being a sort of Dread Pirate Roberts semimythical figure of the universe. Good character, who has a good romance arc with Megatron!" * Is an edgelord phase a standard part of being a teen or what * Lordosis behavior * https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lordosisbehavior * Lordi - The Riff * https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zr9AattFkqo * Unedited (syncable) commentary: https://youtu.be/6qwGyZwDNI * Lord Dunsany the metalhead lord rewilding his estate * https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/aug/07/people-think-youre-an-idiot-death-metal-irish-baron-rewilds-his-estate * Time Lords Microtopics: * Taking a picture of a dog. * 140 strawberries. * Jim Not Knowing About Video Games Day. * Starting with how Smurfs fuck and then moving on to how Transformers fuck. * Transformers hanging out with humans because the humans can wipe them in places they can't reach. * Where Transformers come from in the various Transformers cosmologies. * How Grimlock built the Dinobots. * Sitting down with a screwdriver to make some buddies. * The hypothetical 1980s girl-child who might buy an Optimus Prime toy if it was wearing a pink bow on its head. * R.C., the hyper-pink Transformer with the wide, child-bearing hips. * Finally getting to the topic at hand. * Whether all Transformers are aromantic. * What kind of god would make a car in space where there's nothing to drive on. * The canonical term for when two Transformers are in a relationship. * Rarified Energon. * Prime's Rib, in which Future Feminists complain that there are no female Transformers so Optimus Prime constructs one from his own body parts. * The Wild 80s. * The British big game hunter who wanted to hunt the most dangerous game, Optimus Prime. * Mounting the nose of the plane you shot down as a trophy in your den. (The plane was actually grounded when you shot it.) * Whether teen edgelords are still a thing or whether teens are now performatively wholesome to freak out the olds. * The Alpha Teen. * The two genders of edgelord. * Toddlers hurting you so they can practice having empathy. * Accidentally promising a cat sexual favors. * The cat sticking its butt in your face so you'll lick it clean, because that's what the cat's mom did. * The innie arch vs the outie arch. * Bears playing 20 questions with themselves to determine whether you are also a bear. * The scientific term for scritches. * Sitting vs. standing up to wipe. * The various orders in which you could wipe, stand up, and flush. * Pushing vs. dragging. * Tai-chi vs. chai tea. * A picture of Lordi getting a vaccine. * A toilet in the shower. * The scene in Mad Max Furry Road where the guy with all the water hoses down the adulant throng below, except it's toilet paper instead of water. * Bringing the ugliest people you know on dates with you so you seem more attractive by comparison. * Whether it's still a cold cut if you heat it up. * Zombo Cop. * Making Video Content during the zombie apocalypse by putting GoPros on all the zombies. * Live streaming a zombie trying to walk into a brick wall. * Looking out on the zombie apocalypse and saying "time to finally eat the rich!" * The flashback explaining the origin story of the huge pile of bloody toilet paper. * Whether David Lynch explained something once. * The Lobster as a benchmark for bad date movies. * Pokemon that are weak to Basket. * Scientists studying the guillotine and determining that it's actually that basket your head lands in that kills you. * The worst part of the zombie apocalypse: when the self checkout tells you to wait for assistance, nobody ever comes. * The lordiest lord of them all. * A cool young lord. * A Jack Russell terrier named Beavis and Butt-Head. * Two dogs, one named Sneezy, Grumpy, Dopey, Happy, Sleepy, Bashful and Doc, and the other one named The Seven Dwarfs. * Hearing bird song you don't recognize, going to google and typing "Weee weee wha weee what's bird is this" * Shazam for bird call. * How to identify a bird that ages backwards. * An app that can take photos of an object and tell you whether it's a wizard in disguise. * Turning 25 and realizing that most movies are no longer about you at age 20. * Whether Doctor Who was based on Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. * Gene Roddenberry playing Willy Wonka. * The Gum Chewer. * Deleting a tweet in which you are cranky about Doctor Who. * Doctor Who showrunner Stephen Wolfram. * The vicar turning out the be a giant wasp and the author turning out to be a transphobe.

Whip Count
”We Have To Be Bold”: Policies to Tackle Delaware‘s Mounting Environmental Concerns

Whip Count

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 19:10


Weeks ago, Hurricane Ida brought record-breaking and catastrophic flooding to our region, causing millions of dollars in damages.  As so-called 100-year weather events like Ida become more and more commonplace in Delaware, the lowest-lying state in the nation, lawmakers are working to mitigate the effects of climate change and keep communities healthy by enacting common-sense environmental policies and investing in critical infrastructure. In this episode, Rep. Eric Morrison and Natural Resources Committee Chair Rep. Debra Heffernan reflect on a few key environmental bills passed by the 151st General Assembly and discuss strategies for addressing environmental concerns in Delaware. 

Blink of an Eye
Trauma Healing Learning: Mounting Pressure

Blink of an Eye

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 26:00


When our lives are incredibly busy or we experience a crisis, the pressure on our bodies and brains can show in a lot of ways: stomach aches, overwhelming emotions, and other physical and emotional symptoms. In Trauma Healing Learning: Mounting Pressure, Louise reveals a few key tips, tricks and methods to help provide some respite from the chaos inside and outside our bodies. Listen to this Trauma Healing Learning if you want a mini vacation from your busy life! Victoria Vox created the theme music. Music in this episode is: Deep Relaxation Preview by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5726-deep-relaxation-preview License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Relaxing Meditation by Liron Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/7891-relaxing-meditation License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Calm Meditation by MusicLFiles Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/7456-calm-meditation License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license To find out more about Archer, Louise, and this podcast, visit our website at blinkofaneyepodcast.com, and follow us on Instagram and Facebook @blinkofaneyepodcast. Our Twitter is @blinkofaneyepod. Make sure to subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You can become a member of our Patreon community and receive transcripts of the Trauma Healing Learnings, see extra Blink of an Eye content and bonus episodes at our Patreon page, www.patreon.com/blinkofaneyepod.  #hopeforeverything   #obtaineverything

Blink of an Eye
Season 2: Episode 12: Mounting Pressure

Blink of an Eye

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 70:23


When Louise and family convened with Archer's medical team, one of Archer's pulmonologists said something that threw everyone for a loop: he wouldn't make it through pacemaker surgery in the state he was in. The reply from Dr. Talucci, another of Archer's doctors? “We are stuck in between a rock and a hard place.” In Season 2: Episode 12: Mounting Pressure, Louise walks listeners through the meeting and the moments leading up to it. You'll also hear about how friends continued to be a sustaining force for Louise among the pressure-cooker environment of the hospital and more about how to advocate in complicated medical situations. And you'll hear two new look back interviews with members from Archer's medical team at the time. In this episode you will hear excerpts from Louise's conversations with: Dr. Edward Hamity, Head of Pulmonary at AtlantiCare and Chief of Critical Care during Archer's time in the ICU. He and Louise reflect on the cascading and serious complications Archer faced while in the ICU. Mary Jo Determan, friend of Louise and mom of Mike Determan, friend of Archer's. She and Louise reflect on the grief that comes with great loss — even when someone has not passed away but is instead catastrophically injured. Dr. Mohamed Hany Elnahal, Medical Director, AtlantiCare Physician Group and Head of Pulmonary during Archer's time in the ICU. He met with Louise one-on-one and performed Archer's pacemaker surgery. He and Louise reflect on the impact of their Family Meetings and how the medical system has changed to better serve patients in more patient advocacy oriented ways.  Victoria Vox created the theme music. Sound effects are from freesound.org.  Music in this episode is:  Placid Ambient by MusicLFiles Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/6189-placid-ambient License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Peppers Theme by Kevin MacLeod Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4998-peppers-theme License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Listen in afterwards to this week's companion Trauma Healing Learnings episode for new understandings on trauma and tools to navigate your own trauma healing: Trauma Healing Learning: Mounting Pressure. To find out more about Archer, Louise, and this podcast, visit our website at blinkofaneyepodcast.com, and follow us on Instagram and Facebook @blinkofaneyepodcast. Our Twitter is @blinkofaneyepod. Make sure to subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You can become a member of our Patreon community and see extra Blink of an Eye content and bonus episodes at our Patreon page.  To see some of Archer's artwork, check out www.slimeyard.com.  #hopeforeverything   #obtaineverything

Please Explain
Mounting the case for a four-day working week

Please Explain

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 11:41


Iceland recently conducted trials of a four-day working week and found not only were workers happier but firms reported increased productivity. As Australia looks towards a post-COVID life and begins to imagine how we might want to juggle returning to the office after spending so long indoors, is a four-day week the way of the future? Today on Please Explain, senior economics writer Jessica Irvine joins Nathanael Cooper to look at whether it is possible. Subscribe to The Age & SMH: https://subscribe.smh.com.au/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

MacVoices Video HD
MacVoices #21169 - PlexiCam's Dan Keldsen On Their Webcam Mounting Device and Looking Good On Camera

MacVoices Video HD

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 57:34


Dan Keldsen, a co-founder at PlexiCam, combines an introduction to their device that holds your web cam with a discussion of the benefits and importance of developing your video conferencing skills. The PlexiCam holds both normal sized, dedicated webcams as well as the big, heavy DSLRs at exactly the right height to help you look your audience in the eye. Dan explains how it came to be, the features of the various models, and how to get the best results so you look great in your next meeting on Zoom, Ecamm, Teams, or Skype. Today's MacVoices is supported by DraftKings. Safe and secure online betting. Get in on the action at DraftKings.com with the code MACVOICES. Show Notes: Guests: Dan Keldsen is a co-founder at PlexiCam, and co-author of The Gen Z Effect. Links: Logitech HD Pro Webcam C920 Logitech BRIO Ultra HD Webcam for Video Conferencing, Recording, and Streaming Lume Cube 2.0 Portable Lighting Kit Digital Body Language: How to Build Trust and Connection, No Matter the Distance by Erica Dhawan       Support: Become a MacVoices Patron on Patreon      http://patreon.com/macvoices      Enjoy this episode? Make a one-time donation with PayPal Connect: Web:      http://macvoices.com Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/chuckjoiner      http://www.twitter.com/macvoices Facebook:      http://www.facebook.com/chuck.joiner MacVoices Page on Facebook:      http://www.facebook.com/macvoices/ MacVoices Group on Facebook:      http://www.facebook.com/groups/macvoice LinkedIn:      https://www.linkedin.com/in/chuckjoiner/ Instagram:      https://www.instagram.com/chuckjoiner/ Subscribe:      Audio in iTunes      Video in iTunes      Subscribe manually via iTunes or any podcatcher: Audio: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesrss      Video: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesvideorss

MacVoices Video
MacVoices #21169 - PlexiCam's Dan Keldsen On Their Webcam Mounting Device and Looking Good On Camera

MacVoices Video

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 57:34


Dan Keldsen, a co-founder at PlexiCam, combines an introduction to their device that holds your web cam with a discussion of the benefits and importance of developing your video conferencing skills. The PlexiCam holds both normal sized, dedicated webcams as well as the big, heavy DSLRs at exactly the right height to help you look your audience in the eye. Dan explains how it came to be, the features of the various models, and how to get the best results so you look great in your next meeting on Zoom, Ecamm, Teams, or Skype. Today's MacVoices is supported by DraftKings. Safe and secure online betting. Get in on the action at DraftKings.com with the code MACVOICES. Show Notes: Guests: Dan Keldsen is a co-founder at PlexiCam, and co-author of The Gen Z Effect. Links: Logitech HD Pro Webcam C920 Logitech BRIO Ultra HD Webcam for Video Conferencing, Recording, and Streaming Lume Cube 2.0 Portable Lighting Kit Digital Body Language: How to Build Trust and Connection, No Matter the Distance by Erica Dhawan       Support: Become a MacVoices Patron on Patreon      http://patreon.com/macvoices      Enjoy this episode? Make a one-time donation with PayPal Connect: Web:      http://macvoices.com Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/chuckjoiner      http://www.twitter.com/macvoices Facebook:      http://www.facebook.com/chuck.joiner MacVoices Page on Facebook:      http://www.facebook.com/macvoices/ MacVoices Group on Facebook:      http://www.facebook.com/groups/macvoice LinkedIn:      https://www.linkedin.com/in/chuckjoiner/ Instagram:      https://www.instagram.com/chuckjoiner/ Subscribe:      Audio in iTunes      Video in iTunes      Subscribe manually via iTunes or any podcatcher: Audio: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesrss      Video: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesvideorss

FOX FOOTY Podcast
AFL 360 - Pressure mounting on the Demons & How Cameron prepares for a prelim final - (08/09/21)

FOX FOOTY Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 27:05


Catch up on all of the footy news from AFL 360, Wednesday the 8th of September, with Gerard Whateley and Nick Riewoldt. Gerard and Nick run through the two preliminary finals taking place this weekend and evaluate the level of pressure on the Melbourne Demons before sitting down with Geelong star Jeremy Cameron and the recently re-commited Sydney Swan Luke Parker. For more of the show tune in on Fox Footy & KAYO. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hot Take Titans
Week 1 Preview: Mounting Expectations

Hot Take Titans

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 49:33


Sims & Ryan discuss the imminent week 1 matchup with the Cards via preseason woes and excitement, roster movement and depth chart variance, and opponent analysis before diving into the rest of the NFL's week 1 matchups. More importantly, is this our year? Does it have to be? Either way, we're happy to be back!

Gun Talk
Is The Ruger LCP Pistol Reliable -- Pro Tip; Texas Gets Constitutional Carry!; Mounting An Optic To A Pistol's Rear Sight Dovetail: Gun Talk Radio | 09.05.21 After Show

Gun Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 34:31


In this hour: - The trick to getting the Ruger LCP (and any pocket pistol) to function reliably - Texas becomes the 21st state to get Constitutional Carry, and the media (again) predicts mayhem.   - Caller wants to know if he can mount a red dot sight onto the dovetail slot for the rear sight on his Glock. Tom Gresham's Gun Talk 09.05.21 After Show

H.E.R Space: Uplifting Conversations for the Black Woman
LIVE: Déjà vu? Managing Anxiety When COVID-19 Cases Are Mounting

H.E.R Space: Uplifting Conversations for the Black Woman

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 30:25


You're listening to a live mini-episode that aired on Spotify Greenroom. Join us live by downloading Greenroom (spotify.com/greenroom), follow us @TerriLomax & @TheDoctorDom, and meet us every Friday at 1:30 PM PT / 4:30 PM ET. Be sure to also catch our weekly standard podcast episodes every Friday morning.

14 Personnel
Injuries Mounting + Top 10 WR's - Fantasy Football

14 Personnel

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 67:13


The guys break down some of the injuries around the NFL as well as break down their consensus top 10 WR's for the 2021 season Support this podcast

The China in Africa Podcast
An Update on the Current State of China-Zimbabwe Economic Relations

The China in Africa Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 47:58


China's ties with Zimbabwe are either going off the rails or are among the strongest most dynamic in Africa depending on who you listen to. Mounting civil society anger towards Chinese companies and their apparent disregard for local labor and environmental standards is becoming a huge problem. But at the same time, Chinese banks and enterprises are making huge investments in Zim's energy, mining and telecommunications infrastructure that's bringing badly needed jobs to this embattled country.Prolific Mataruse, a political science lecturer at the University of Zimbabwe, closely follows Chinese economic trends in Zimbabwe. He recently contributed two chapters on the subject to a new China-Zim Economic Handbook published by the Zimbabwe Environmental Law Association and joins Eric & Cobus to discuss his findings.JOIN THE DISCUSSION:CAP on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ChinaAfricaProjectTwitter: @eolander | @stadenesque | @prolificmataruseSUBSCRIBE TO THE CHINA AFRICA PROJECTYour subscription supports independent journalism. Subscribers get the following:1. The world's only curated China-Africa News Feed with thousands of articles archive2. Exclusive analysis of the day's top stories about China in Africa and the Global South3. A copy of the popular China-Africa Daily Brief newsletter delivered to your inbox by 6am Washington time M-FTry it free for 30-days and see if you like it. Subscriptions start at just $7 a month for students and teachers and $15 a month for everyone else. Subscribe here: www.chinaafricaproject.com/subscribeSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Zero Doinks: A Chicago Bears Podcast
S3Ep9: Fields about to Debut. Injuries Mounting. White Sox Dominance.

Zero Doinks: A Chicago Bears Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 86:52


Adam Shaheen and the Dolphins are coming to town for preseason game number one but will the Bears have enough players to field a team? Soldier Field will house fans for the first time since 2019 as Justin Fields gears up to make his professional debut. What should we expect as fans? What's the latest word from camp? Is Justin Fields still the football form of Jesus? The boys will discuss that plus tons more, including smattering of other goings-on around the world of sports. Can the regular season just get here already? Thanks for listening! 0:00 - 01:36 - Intro + what's on tap tonight (intro audio courtesy of ESPN, music courtesy of Coach Cuse) 01:36 - 02:56 - Hello from the boys of Zero Doinks 02:56 - 12:38 - Justin Fields is Gold. What do we expect to see during JF1's preseason debut? How was last week of camp? Any news about Justin's dad Pablo? Did you see that sidearm throw in practice? 12:38 - 38:54 - Bears and NFL chatter. Dan gives some background on this week's preseason opponent, Miami, especially regarding their ownership group. Is Adam Shaheen going to be in the house? How about all those injuries, huh? Is Teven Jenkins dead? 38:54 - 39:31 - How you can follow Zero Doinks on the interwebs 39:31 - 56:59 - Hamm's N Bread. Sports wagering segment featuring the show's resident expert @rickfeelsmen. How many Bears future wagers do the boys have out there in the ether? Should we wet our beak with preseason action? 56:59 - 66:44 - Hamm's N Ted. Some hot baseball talk as the White Sox went into Wrigley Field and swept the Cubs. Is Dan coming around on Tony La Russa? Does Bill think the Sox have what it takes to win it all this October? 66:44 - 84:32 - Outro. How did Dan's deep-sea fishing adventures go? How about all of those moves made by the Bulls? 84:32 - END - Random audio, including a look back at the end of last week's new Zero Doinks exclusive single "Be With You." --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/zerodoinks/support

PBS NewsHour - Segments
How the Biden administration is addressing mounting housing insecurity

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 7:04


Millions of renters and landlords across the country are living in limbo amid a flurry of legal challenges to the Biden administration's new federal eviction ban. U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Secretary Marcia Fudge joins Yamiche Alcindor to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Financial Sense(R) Newshour
Jobs Numbers Were Good, But Correction Risks Are Mounting

Financial Sense(R) Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2021 26:24


Aug 6 – Chris Puplava and Frank Barbera discuss the technical backdrop of the market, including some troubling signs with credit spreads and other key indicators. Frank says that we've now seen a... Subscribe to our premium weekday podcasts: https://www.financialsense.com/subscribe

KMJ's Afternoon Drive
Hour 2 - Trustee Terry Slatic Stops By To Discuss The Replacement For The Late Carol Mills, & Brandon Davison, Pastor at Clovis Hills Community Church Calls In To Discuss Mounting Opiate Deaths Among Children

KMJ's Afternoon Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 37:37


After a 4-2 vote, the Fresno Unified School District Board of Trustees is moving forward with a tentative decision to appoint a replacement for the late Carol Mills, as opposed to holding an election. Trustee Terry Slatic joins the show to discuss. Brandon Davison, Campus Pastor at Clovis Hills Community Church and a leader in the recovery community, joins the show to discuss ongoing concerns about mounting opiate deaths among children and how to change the direction. Barbie is honoring the designer of the COVID vaccine with her own Barbie.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

PeerView Endocrinology & Diabetes CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast
James R. Gavin III, MD, PhD - The Contemporary Use of GLP-1 RAs to Individualize Therapy in T2DM: Candid Conversations on Glycemic and Nonglycemic Effects

PeerView Endocrinology & Diabetes CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 80:41


Go online to PeerView.com/QAM860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) have become a preeminent drug class for treating type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Mounting evidence from cardiovascular outcomes trials elevated these agents' position in clinical guidelines because of their ability to reduce cardiovascular and renal risks, while also improving glycemic control without the burdens of hypoglycemia or weight gain. In this activity, based on a recent live web broadcast, Dr. James R. Gavin III, welcomes special guests Dr. Jens Juul Holst and Davida F. Kruger for candid conversations about the science behind GLP-1 RAs and its translation into patient-centered approaches for managing T2DM. Upon completion of this accredited CE activity, participants should be better able to: Explain the rationale for the prioritization of GLP-1 RAs in current clinical guidelines for patients with T2DM, including in patients with cardiovascular or renal disease, Compare and contrast GLP-1 RAs in terms of mechanism of action, safety, efficacy, mode of administration, and glycemic and nonglycemic effects, Engage in shared decision-making with patients with T2DM to individualize therapy with GLP-1 RAs, overcome administration barriers, and improve adherence, Incorporate GLP-1 RAs into evidence-based, individualized treatment regimens as appropriate for patients with T2DM.

PeerView Family Medicine & General Practice CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast
James R. Gavin III, MD, PhD - The Contemporary Use of GLP-1 RAs to Individualize Therapy in T2DM: Candid Conversations on Glycemic and Nonglycemic Effects

PeerView Family Medicine & General Practice CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 80:41


Go online to PeerView.com/QAM860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) have become a preeminent drug class for treating type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Mounting evidence from cardiovascular outcomes trials elevated these agents' position in clinical guidelines because of their ability to reduce cardiovascular and renal risks, while also improving glycemic control without the burdens of hypoglycemia or weight gain. In this activity, based on a recent live web broadcast, Dr. James R. Gavin III, welcomes special guests Dr. Jens Juul Holst and Davida F. Kruger for candid conversations about the science behind GLP-1 RAs and its translation into patient-centered approaches for managing T2DM. Upon completion of this accredited CE activity, participants should be better able to: Explain the rationale for the prioritization of GLP-1 RAs in current clinical guidelines for patients with T2DM, including in patients with cardiovascular or renal disease, Compare and contrast GLP-1 RAs in terms of mechanism of action, safety, efficacy, mode of administration, and glycemic and nonglycemic effects, Engage in shared decision-making with patients with T2DM to individualize therapy with GLP-1 RAs, overcome administration barriers, and improve adherence, Incorporate GLP-1 RAs into evidence-based, individualized treatment regimens as appropriate for patients with T2DM.

PeerView Clinical Pharmacology CME/CNE/CPE Audio Podcast
James R. Gavin III, MD, PhD - The Contemporary Use of GLP-1 RAs to Individualize Therapy in T2DM: Candid Conversations on Glycemic and Nonglycemic Effects

PeerView Clinical Pharmacology CME/CNE/CPE Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 80:35


Go online to PeerView.com/QAM860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) have become a preeminent drug class for treating type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Mounting evidence from cardiovascular outcomes trials elevated these agents' position in clinical guidelines because of their ability to reduce cardiovascular and renal risks, while also improving glycemic control without the burdens of hypoglycemia or weight gain. In this activity, based on a recent live web broadcast, Dr. James R. Gavin III, welcomes special guests Dr. Jens Juul Holst and Davida F. Kruger for candid conversations about the science behind GLP-1 RAs and its translation into patient-centered approaches for managing T2DM. Upon completion of this accredited CE activity, participants should be better able to: Explain the rationale for the prioritization of GLP-1 RAs in current clinical guidelines for patients with T2DM, including in patients with cardiovascular or renal disease, Compare and contrast GLP-1 RAs in terms of mechanism of action, safety, efficacy, mode of administration, and glycemic and nonglycemic effects, Engage in shared decision-making with patients with T2DM to individualize therapy with GLP-1 RAs, overcome administration barriers, and improve adherence, Incorporate GLP-1 RAs into evidence-based, individualized treatment regimens as appropriate for patients with T2DM.

PeerView Internal Medicine CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast
James R. Gavin III, MD, PhD - The Contemporary Use of GLP-1 RAs to Individualize Therapy in T2DM: Candid Conversations on Glycemic and Nonglycemic Effects

PeerView Internal Medicine CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 80:41


Go online to PeerView.com/QAM860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) have become a preeminent drug class for treating type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Mounting evidence from cardiovascular outcomes trials elevated these agents' position in clinical guidelines because of their ability to reduce cardiovascular and renal risks, while also improving glycemic control without the burdens of hypoglycemia or weight gain. In this activity, based on a recent live web broadcast, Dr. James R. Gavin III, welcomes special guests Dr. Jens Juul Holst and Davida F. Kruger for candid conversations about the science behind GLP-1 RAs and its translation into patient-centered approaches for managing T2DM. Upon completion of this accredited CE activity, participants should be better able to: Explain the rationale for the prioritization of GLP-1 RAs in current clinical guidelines for patients with T2DM, including in patients with cardiovascular or renal disease, Compare and contrast GLP-1 RAs in terms of mechanism of action, safety, efficacy, mode of administration, and glycemic and nonglycemic effects, Engage in shared decision-making with patients with T2DM to individualize therapy with GLP-1 RAs, overcome administration barriers, and improve adherence, Incorporate GLP-1 RAs into evidence-based, individualized treatment regimens as appropriate for patients with T2DM.

PeerView Internal Medicine CME/CNE/CPE Audio Podcast
James R. Gavin III, MD, PhD - The Contemporary Use of GLP-1 RAs to Individualize Therapy in T2DM: Candid Conversations on Glycemic and Nonglycemic Effects

PeerView Internal Medicine CME/CNE/CPE Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 80:35


Go online to PeerView.com/QAM860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) have become a preeminent drug class for treating type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Mounting evidence from cardiovascular outcomes trials elevated these agents' position in clinical guidelines because of their ability to reduce cardiovascular and renal risks, while also improving glycemic control without the burdens of hypoglycemia or weight gain. In this activity, based on a recent live web broadcast, Dr. James R. Gavin III, welcomes special guests Dr. Jens Juul Holst and Davida F. Kruger for candid conversations about the science behind GLP-1 RAs and its translation into patient-centered approaches for managing T2DM. Upon completion of this accredited CE activity, participants should be better able to: Explain the rationale for the prioritization of GLP-1 RAs in current clinical guidelines for patients with T2DM, including in patients with cardiovascular or renal disease, Compare and contrast GLP-1 RAs in terms of mechanism of action, safety, efficacy, mode of administration, and glycemic and nonglycemic effects, Engage in shared decision-making with patients with T2DM to individualize therapy with GLP-1 RAs, overcome administration barriers, and improve adherence, Incorporate GLP-1 RAs into evidence-based, individualized treatment regimens as appropriate for patients with T2DM.

Seek Outside Podcast
Into the Man Cave Caribou Mounting Tips and The Man Cave with Darryl from Darryl's Taxidermy

Seek Outside Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021


THIS EPISODE IS AVAILABLE ON YOUTUBE! In this special episode we talk with Grand Junction local and the Owner of Darryl's Taxidermy. We discuss what to do in the field to prepare for a shoulder mount, Teddy Roosevelt's big Colorado mountain lion and Darryl's harrowing story, and much more.   To learn more about Darryls Taxidermy check him out here: https://darrylstaxidermy.wordpress.com Check this episode out on YouTube here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p8qnKA0Wy5w  

Holmberg's Morning Sickness
07-19-21 - Businesses Affected During Suns Games - Restaurant Stories - Brooklyn Nets Paid For A House For Players To Have Affairs - Covid Cases Mounting Among Olympic Athletes In Tokyo

Holmberg's Morning Sickness

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 41:10


The Frequency: Daily Vermont News
Crime & Punishment In Chelsea

The Frequency: Daily Vermont News

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 12:09


Mounting fear in the town of Chelsea. Plus, the drought continues, UVM's vaccine requirement, and the child tax credit.

Janet Mefferd Today
7 - 15 - 21 - Janet - Mefferd - Today - Kennerly Davis (Restoring the Promise of America)

Janet Mefferd Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 47:21


Was the November presidential election stolen in numerous states? Mounting evidence from Georgia is raising serious questions about it. And the Evangelical Left is pushing a curriculum on evangelical pastors to combat faux "Christian Nationalism" in local churches. We'll talk about it all. Plus: How can freedom-loving patriots save the United States? Kennerly Davis joins me to talk about it and his book, "Revolution: A Call to Turn Back the Lawless Left And Restore the Promise of America." That's on Thursday's JANET MEFFERD TODAY.

The Evening Edge with Todd
Best French Fries in Dayton; Manhole Cover Death; Cows mounting a Moovolution; Best Coughing Fit Song; Man survives accident by drinking beer

The Evening Edge with Todd

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 70:55


Listen to 'The Evening Edge with Todd' on-demand here and live every weeknight 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. on WHIO Radio. It's live and local talk for the Miami Valley.

The Evening Edge with Todd
Update on Eaglett death; Video game meltdowns; Name the Headline feature; Creative ways of being dumped; Cows mounting revolution; Sex/Life naked moment; Florida man stories

The Evening Edge with Todd

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 116:45


Listen to 'The Evening Edge with Todd' on-demand here and live every weeknight 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. on WHIO Radio. It's live and local talk for the Miami Valley.

World News Tonight with David Muir
Full Episode: Sunday, June 27, 2021

World News Tonight with David Muir

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2021 23:49


Authorities confirm at least nine people are dead following the catastrophic high rise collapse in Surfside, Florida. More than 150 people are still unaccounted for, as hundreds of rescuers work around the clock to find any more survivors under the ruble. More than 30 million Americans across the Northwest now under heat alerts with some areas seeing temperatures 30 degrees above normal. Mounting concerns over the Delta variant seen in all but one state. A driver in a stolen work truck crashes into a building before fatally shooting a woman and a retired state trooper outside Boston. And a shark attack off the coast of California.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 06.21.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 53:31


VIDEOS   1. Sen. Johnson and Dr. Pierre Kory on the impact of censorship in fight against COVID-19   2. New Rule: Getting It in the Nuts | Real Time with Bill Maher (HBO)   3.  Black father destroys critical race theory at school board meeting   4.  Wuhan 15,00 bat samples and their virus databases all wiped from the internet   5. Fauci, Gain-of-Function Research, and Wuhan Lab Funding. Joe Rogan with Krystal Ball & Saagar Enjeti   Krystal Ball and Sagaar Enjeti are political commentators and hosts of the YouTube show and podcast "Breaking Points".   CoQ10 supplementation associated with lower pro-inflammatory factors in randomized trial Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences (Iran), June 8 2021    A double-blind trial reported in the International Journal of Vitamin and Nutrition Research found a reduction in markers ofinflammation in mildly hypertensive patients given coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) for twelve weeks. Participants who received CoQ10 also experienced an increase in adiponectin: a protein secreted by adipose tissue that has an anti-inflammatory effect and which has been found to be reduced in high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease.   "Considering that coenzyme Q10 has attracted noticeable attention in recent years for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and hypertension in regard to its effect on inflammatory factors such as cytokines, it is therefore hypothesized that supplementation with coenzyme Q10 reduces the proinflammatory factors," write Nasim Bagheri Nesami of Iran's Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences and colleagues. "This study was conducted in order to determine the effects of coenzyme Q10 on proinflammatory factors as well as on adiponectin in patients with mild hypertension." Sixty men and women were randomized to receive 100 milligrams CoQ10 or a placebo for a twelve week period. Plasma adiponectin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, a marker of inflammation) and the cytokines interleukin 2, interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were measured before and after treatment. At the end of the study, participants who received CoQ10 had significant declines in interleukin-6 and hs-CRP compared with levels measured upon enrollment. They also experienced an increase in adiponectin, while levels in the placebo group slightly declined. The authors suggest that CoQ10 could be prescribed as a supplement along with antihypertensive medication for patients with mildly elevated blood pressure, and recommend that further research be conducted to validate the current findings.     Exposure to nature during COVID-19 lockdown was beneficial for mental health A study by the ICTA-UAB and the University of Porto analyses the effects of exposure to green spaces during the first months of the COVID19 pandemic in Spain and Portugal Universitat Autònoma of Barcelona (Spain), June 18, 2021 A study carried out by the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) and the Instituto de Saúde Pública of the University of Porto (ISPUP), concludes that exposure to natural spaces during the first COVID-19 lockdown in 2020 was beneficial for the mental health of Spanish and Portuguese citizens. The research shows that, in Portugal, during the first confinement, people who maintained or increased contact with natural public spaces, such as parks and coastal areas, or who could contemplate these spaces from their homes, presented lower levels of stress, psychological distress and psychosomatic symptoms. In Spain, those who maintained or increased contact with private natural spaces, such as indoor plants or community green areas, presented lower levels of stress and psychosomatic symptoms. This could be due to the fact that Spain adopted more restrictive measures for foreign circulation during the period analysed. The research Exposure to nature and mental health outcomes during COVID-19 lockdown. A comparison between Portugal and Spain, published in the journal Environment International, was conducted between March and May 2020. Dr Ana Isabel Ribeiro, researcher at the ISPUP and first author of the work together with Margarita Triguero-Mas from the ICTA-UAB says that "we decided to study whether natural, public and private spaces had a beneficial effect on the mental health of Portuguese and Spanish citizens, helping them to better cope with the negative effects of lockdown". For her part, Margarita Triguero-Mas adds that "people around us and ourselves talked about how we missed the park we crossed when we went to the office or the walk on the beach with our dogs, so we wanted to check to what extent contact with natural spaces was an important factor during confinement". Several previous articles have also shown the positive impact of exposure to natural spaces on mental health, that is, in reducing stress, anxiety and improving psychological well-being as a whole. "Taking into account what is described in the literature, we wanted to evaluate whether people who enjoyed greater exposure to natural spaces during the first COVID-19 lockdown had better mental health indicators than those who had no contact with natural areas", explains Dr Ribeiro. At the same time, they wanted to investigate whether exposure to private natural spaces, such as gardens, orchards or plants, was more beneficial among Spanish citizens than among Portuguese, given that Spain applied stricter measures to restrict mobility than Portugal. To carry out the research, the authors applied an online questionnaire, between March 27 and May 6, 2020, aimed at all citizens aged 18 years old or older, residing in Spain or Portugal. The survey covered aspects related to the frequency and type of exposure people had to natural spaces (public and private), before and during the first confinement; mental health questions to assess levels of stress, mental disorders and somatization symptoms, and sociodemographic issues. Of the more than 3,000 citizens (n = 3,157) who answered the questionnaire, 1,638 were Portuguese and 1,519 Spanish. In both countries, during the confinement, there was a significant reduction in the use of public natural spaces, such as beaches, parks and gardens, and an increase in contact with private natural spaces, such as community gardens, urban gardens and plants, especially in Spain. People living in single-family houses (detached house) and flats located in cities were the ones who least maintained or increased their exposure to public natural spaces in both countries. In Spain, where the measures during the period analysed were much more restrictive and it was forbidden to leave the house and public outdoor spaces were closed, the benefits of exposure to public natural spaces were not as relevant as in Portugal, but it was clear the importance of private natural elements. Among the Spanish citizens who participated in the study, 66% decreased the frequency of exposure to public natural spaces (compared to 54% in Portugal). In Spain, people who had the opportunity to continue dedicating or increasing the time dedicated to caring for their plants had lower stress levels, while those who were able to continue enjoying or increasing the time of use of community green spaces had lower rates of somatization.  In Spain, it is remarkable that the people who least maintained or increased the care of indoor plants were people over 65 years of age, those who lived with several people at home or those who were in a second residence during confinement. In contrast, the people who maintained or increased the care of indoor plants the most were those with children, but without dependent adults. In Portugal, those who were confined the longest and those who commuted to work were those who least maintained or increased their contact with the natural public spaces. In turn, those who practiced physical exercise indicated greater exposure to these places. Portuguese citizens who managed to maintain or increase their exposure to natural public spaces showed lower levels of stress compared to those who did not. Likewise, those who contemplated natural spaces from their homes obtained improvements in all the mental health outcomes analysed: stress, mental disorders and somatization. "This study clearly demonstrates the benefit of natural spaces for the mental health of the population in a context of public health crisis," says Ana Isabel Ribeiro. "Public authorities and decision-makers could implement measures that facilitate access to natural public spaces, in a safe and controlled manner, in the context of a pandemic. This is particularly important for the most socially and economically vulnerable population groups, and for those who have little access to these spaces in their private context", she emphasizes. In addition, Dr Triguero-Mas adds that "our study is especially important for cities like Barcelona, where new buildings rarely have balconies or community spaces with vegetation. It is important to revalue how building remodelling or new homes can be healthier spaces that promote and prevent deterioration in the health of the people who inhabit them". Flame retardants and pesticides overtake heavy metals as biggest contributors to IQ loss New York University, June 2, 2021   Adverse outcomes from childhood exposures to lead and mercury are on the decline in the United States, likely due to decades of restrictions on the use of heavy metals, a new study finds. Despite decreasing levels, exposure to these and other toxic chemicals, especially flame retardants and pesticides, still resulted in more than a million cases of intellectual disability in the United States between 2001 and 2016. Furthermore, as the target of significantly fewer restrictions, experts say, flame retardants and pesticides now represent the bulk of that cognitive loss. NYU Grossman School of Medicine researchers found that IQ loss from the toxic chemicals analyzed in their study dropped from 27 million IQ points in 2001 and 2002 to 9 million IQ points in 2015 and 2016. While this overall decline is promising, the researchers say, their findings also identify a concerning shift in which chemicals represent the greatest risk. Among toxin-exposed children, the researchers found that the proportion of cognitive loss that results from exposure to chemicals used in flame retardants, called polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PDBEs), and organophosphate pesticides increased from 67 percent to 81 percent during the same study period. "Our findings suggest that our efforts to reduce exposure to heavy metals are paying off, but that toxic exposures in general continue to represent a formidable risk to Americans' physical, mental, and economic health," says lead study investigator Abigail Gaylord, MPH, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Population Health at NYU Langone. "Unfortunately, the minimal policies in place to eliminate pesticides and flame retardants are clearly not enough." The substances analyzed are found in household products from furniture upholstery to tuna fish, and can build up in the body to damage organs, researchers say. Heavy metals, lead and mercury in particular, are known to disrupt brain and kidney function. In addition, they, along with flame retardants and pesticides, can interfere with the thyroid, which secretes brain-developing hormones. Experts say exposure at a young age to any of these toxins can cause learning disabilities, autism, and behavioral issues. In their investigation, the researchers found that everyday contact with these substances during the 16-year study period resulted in roughly 1,190,230 children affected with some form of intellectual disability. Overall childhood exposures cost the nation $7.5 trillion in lost economic productivity and other societal costs. "Although people argue against costly regulations, unrestricted use of these chemicals is far more expensive in the long run, with American children bearing the largest burden," says senior study author Leonardo Trasande, MD, MPP, the Jim G. Hendrick, MD Professor at NYU Langone Health. Publishing online Jan. 14 in the journal Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology, the new study is the only long-term neurological and economic investigation of its kind, the authors say. The investigators analyzed PBDE, organophosphate, lead, and methylmercury exposures in blood samples from women of childbearing age and 5-year-olds. Data on women and children was obtained from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The researchers used results from several previous environmental health studies to estimate the annual number of IQ points lost per unit of exposure to each of the four main chemicals in the study. Then, they estimated the lost productivity and medical costs over the course of the children's lives linked to long-term intellectual disability using a second algorithm, which valued each lost IQ point at $22,268 and each case of intellectual disability at $1,272,470. While exposure to these chemicals persists despite tightened regulations, experts say Americans can help limit some of the effects by avoiding the use of household products or foods that contain them. "Frequently opening windows to let persistent chemicals found in furniture, electronics, and carpeting escape, and eating certified organic produce can reduce exposure to these toxins," says Trasande, who also serves as chief of environmental pediatrics in the Department of Pediatrics at NYU Langone. Trasande notes that the impact of these chemicals may be worse than their study can capture since there are far more hazards that affect brain development than the four highlighted in the investigation, and other potential consequences beyond IQ loss. "All the more reason we need closer federal monitoring of these substances," she says. The study authors say they plan to explore the cost of exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals in other countries. Red meat consumption may promote DNA damage-assoc. mutation in colorectal cancer patients Study provides mechanistic link between red meat consumption and colorectal cancer development Harvard Medical School, June 17, 2021 Bottom Line: Genetic mutations indicative of DNA damage were associated with high red meat consumption and increased cancer-related mortality in patients with colorectal cancer. Journal in Which the Study was Published: Cancer Discovery, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research Author: Marios Giannakis, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and a physician at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Background: "We have known for some time that consumption of processed meat and red meat is a risk factor for colorectal cancer," said Giannakis. The International Agency for Research on Cancer declared that processed meat was carcinogenic and that red meat was probably carcinogenic to humans in 2015.  Experiments in preclinical models have suggested that red meat consumption may promote the formation of carcinogenic compounds in the colon, but a direct molecular link to colorectal cancer development in patients has not been shown, Giannakis explained. "What is missing is a demonstration that colorectal cancers from patients have a specific pattern of mutations that can be attributed to red meat," he said. "Identifying these molecular changes in colon cells that can cause cancer would not only support the role of red meat in colorectal cancer development but would also provide novel avenues for cancer prevention and treatment." How the Study was Conducted: To identify genetic changes associated with red meat intake, Giannakis and colleagues sequenced DNA from matched normal and colorectal tumor tissues from 900 patients with colorectal cancer who had participated in one of three nationwide prospective cohort studies, namely the Nurses' Health Studies and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. All patients had previously provided information on their diets, lifestyles, and other factors over the course of several years prior to their colorectal cancer diagnoses.  Results: Analysis of DNA sequencing data revealed the presence of several mutational signatures in normal and cancerous colon tissue, including a signature indicative of alkylation, a form of DNA damage. The alkylating signature was significantly associated with pre-diagnosis intake of processed or unprocessed red meat, but not with pre-diagnosis intake of poultry or fish or with other lifestyle factors. Red meat consumption was not associated with any of the other mutational signatures identified in this study. In line with prior studies linking red meat consumption with cancer incidence in the distal colon, Giannakis and colleagues found that normal and cancerous tissue from the distal colon had significantly higher alkylating damage than tissue from the proximal colon.  Using a predictive model, the researchers identified the KRAS and PIK3CA genes as potential targets of alkylation-induced mutation. Consistent with this prediction, they found that colorectal tumors harboring KRAS G12D, KRAS G13D, or PIK3CA E545K driver mutations, which are commonly observed in colorectal cancer, had greater enrichment of the alkylating signature compared to tumors without these mutations. The alkylating signature was also associated with patient survival: Patients whose tumors had the highest levels of alkylating damage had a 47 percent greater risk of colorectal cancer-specific death compared to patients with lower levels of damage. Author's Comments: "Our study identified for the first time an alkylating mutational signature in colon cells and linked it to red meat consumption and cancer driver mutations," said Giannakis. "These findings suggest that red meat consumption may cause alkylating damage that leads to cancer-causing mutations in KRAS and PIK3CA, thereby promoting colorectal cancer development. Our data further support red meat intake as a risk factor for colorectal cancer and also provide opportunities to prevent, detect, and treat this disease."  Giannakis explained that if physicians could identify individuals who are genetically predisposed to accumulating alkylating damage, these individuals could be counseled to limit red meat intake as a form of precision prevention. In addition, the alkylating mutational signature could be used as a biomarker to identify patients at greater risk of developing colorectal cancer or to detect cancer at an early stage. Because of its association with patient survival, the alkylating signature may also have potential as a prognostic biomarker. However, future studies are needed to explore these possibilities, Giannakis noted. Study Limitations: A limitation of the study is the potential selection bias of study participants, as tissue specimens could not be retrieved from all incident colorectal cancer cases in the cohort studies. Current studies from Giannakis and his colleagues are exploring the potential role of red meat intake and alkylating damage in diverse groups of patients. Funding & Disclosures: The study was supported by the National Institutes of Health, the Stand Up To Cancer Colorectal Cancer Dream Team Translational Research Grant (co-administered by the AACR), the Project P Fund, the Cancer Research UK Grand Challenge Award, the Nodal Award from the Dana-Farber Harvard Cancer Center, the Friends of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the Bennett Family Fund, and the Entertainment Industry Foundation through the National Colorectal Cancer Research Alliance and Stand Up To Cancer.  Giannakis has received research funding from Bristol-Myers Squibb, Merck, Servier, and Janssen unrelated to this study. Association of higher average daily polyphenol intake with Mediterranean diet adherence and decreased waist to hip circumference University of the Aegean (Greece), June 14, 2021 According to news reporting originating from the University of the Aegean research stated, “Research data indicate the possible effect of both polyphenols consumption and Mediterranean diet adherence on metabolic diseases' prevalence. The present retrospective study investigated the possible association of polyphenols mean daily intake with Mediterranean diet adherence and anthropometric indices in a sample of the Greek population.” Our news reporters obtained a quote from the research from University of the Aegean: “A total of 250 healthy volunteers, aged between 18 and 65 years, were randomly recruited from central and northern Greece. Total daily polyphenols intake was estimated using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) based on the NHANES study, while Med Diet Score was used for the degree of Mediterranean diet adoption. Daily polyphenols intake was identified by the Phenol Explorer database, and anthropometric measurements (BMI, waist-to-hip circumference, and body composition) were performed. The mean daily polyphenols intake was determined to be 1905 mg, while most of the participants had moderate or high mean consumption last year (67.5% of the sample were consuming more than 1000 mg/d). Moderate adherence to the Mediterranean diet (higher Med Diet Score) was associated with increased mean daily polyphenols intake (* * p* * = 0.016). Increased polyphenols intake and higher Med Diet Score were associated with decreased waist-to-hip circumference (* * p* * = 0.027, 0.004, respectively).” According to the news editors, the research concluded: “Specific functional foods rich in polyphenols, such as sour cherry, tomatoes, black tea, and cocoa were associated with improved body composition indices. Larger epidemiological studies need to be performed for safer conclusions about whole population polyphenols intake and its association with metabolic disease biomarkers.” Whole, natural fiber works best to protect gut mucosal layer, researcher says University of Michigan, June 12, 2021 Dietary fiber plays an important role in protecting the gut's mucosal layer, according to research presented at the recent Probiota Americas event. It has long been known that the gut stays healthier and performs better with adequate fiber. But why? This is one of the questions that informed the research conducted by Dr Eric Martens, assistant professor of microbiology and immunology at the University of Michigan. Martens presented his research at the  IPA World Congress + Probiota Americas event, which was hosted by William Reed in Chicago last week. The event brought together 280 regulators, probiotics and prebiotics researchers and product developers.  Protecting the mucosal layer Martens said that his research showed that without adequate fiber in the gut, some organisms that might be nourished by that food source will look to alternative sources, one of which is the gut's mucosal layer. That layer is a critical component of the gut wall, and when it is eroded or absent harmful bacteria have an opportunity to latch onto the cells of the wall itself. “The core of our research is we are interested in the physiology of the many bacteria that live in the gut and defining at the functional and mechanistic level how they work with goal of understanding how the community works,” Martens said. The study he presented used 14 different bacteria with defined characteristics in a mouse model. The study had three groups, a group fed a fiber free diet, one with a whole grain diet rich in natural fibers, and a third that had fiber added back in in the form of purified, prebiotic fibers.  His research found that the whole grain, natural fibers fostered a microbial community in which the muscosa-eroding organisms were suppressed the best. He postulated that this could be because the large, whole food particles typical of the natural fiber diet were best able to reach the distal regions of the gut and affect the microbial community makeup there, whereas the purified fibers may have been mostly digested by that point. What Is the Liver Powerhouse Silymarin? GreenMedInfo  June 17th 2021   Here's what science has found most beneficial about silymarin, extracted from milk thistle and known to be a friend of your liver mainly through its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties When it comes to treating liver and gallbladder disorders, there is one name that stands out: silymarin. As a group of flavonolignans extracted from milk thistle, silymarin has been traditionally used for various protective benefits, from reinvigorating liver function to promoting breast milk production. The milk thistle plant, scientifically known as Silybum marianum, is a prickly plant with purple flowers and milky white veins present on the leaves, thus its name. Silymarin is the group of plant compounds that act as its active ingredient.[i] Silymarin is the main bioactive component of this medicinal plant. It is a mix of various flavonolignans, includings silybinin A and B, isosilybinin A and B, silychristin and silydianin.[ii] Milk thistle extract has a high silymarin content of approximately 65% to 80%. Silymarin is famed for its antioxidant, antiviral and anti-inflammatory components,[iii] as well as its traditional use or treating the liver and restoring its health. In addition, milk thistle itself is generally considered safe to take. Side effects are rare, and in an oral form standardized to contain 70% to 80% silymarin, it appears to be safe for up to 41 months of use.[iv] Silymarin's Liver-Protective Effects Fights liver inflammation and liver damage. Mounting evidence shows improvements in liver function among people with liver diseases who have taken a milk thistle supplement.[v] This suggests protection against flavanone silibinin liver inflammation and liver damage through use of the natural -- silymarin's primary active component -- which was combined with phosphatidylcholine in a specific study to enhance its solubility and bioavailability. Protects from toxins such as amatoxin, produced by Amanita mushroom, which can cause death if ingested. Two cases in the U.S. were treated with N-acetylcysteine, high-dose penicillin, cimetidine and silibinin.[vi] Uncontrolled trials and case reports cited successful treatment with intravenous silibinin, a flavonolignan isolated from milk thistle extracts, in nearly 1,500 cases.[vii] Overall mortality in those treated with the formula was less than 10%, compared to more than 20%when using penicillin, or a mix of silibinin and penicillin. Reduces liver fibrosis. In a randomized trial of 99 patients, the team administered silymarin in 700-milligram (mg) doses, or a placebo, given three times daily for 48 weeks.[viii] Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) activity score was reduced by 32.7% in the silymarin group compared to 26% in the placebo group. Among the secondary outcomes were reductions in inflammation and fibrosis score in the silymarin group, leading the researchers to conclude that silymarin may decrease liver fibrosis, to be confirmed in larger trials. Fibrosis is the formation of abnormally large amounts of scar tissue in the liver. Helps prevent liver cancer. Studies have concluded that the long-term use of silymarin significantly increases survival time among patients with alcohol-induced liver cirrhosis, a risk factor for liver cancer. Silymarin can also significantly reduce tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis or new blood vessel formation, as well as insulin resistance.[ix] The chemopreventive effects "have been established in several studies using in vitro and in vivo methods," according to the researchers, and combine well with anti-inflammatory and inhibitory effects on the metastasis or spread of cancer. Contributes to liver regeneration. An animal study suggested that silymarin played a crucial role in accelerating liver regeneration after liver resection, a kind of surgery designed to remove cancerous tumors from the liver.[x] Liver regeneration is thought to evolve to protect animals from loss of liver due to toxins or tissue injury. Silymarin for Breastfeeding, Neurological Support Not to be ignored is silymarin's formidable list of other health benefits, such as boosting milk production in lactating mothers. A randomized trial found that mothers taking 420 mg of silymarin for 63 days produced more breast milk than subjects who took a placebo.[xi] Silymarin combined with phosphatidylserine and galega also increased milk production in moms of preterm infants, without any significant side effects.[xii] Milk thistle is also a traditional remedy for neurological disorders such as Alzheimer'sand Parkinson's diseases. Its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action mean it may be neuroprotective and help prevent the brain decline experienced with aging.

SebyPodcast™️
Injuries mounting come the home Strech of the Playoffs

SebyPodcast™️

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2021 60:25


Seby and Mike discuss all things Playoffs in this weeks episode --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/sebypodcast/support

The Michael Berry Show
The Mounting Evidence That COVID Came From A Lab In Wuhan | AM Show Hr 3

The Michael Berry Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2021 34:45