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The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 01.18.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 60:39


HEALTH NEWS Walking for 150 minutes per week associated with improved wellbeing in over-50  Trinity College Dublin, January 17, 2022  New research using data from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) at Trinity College Dublin shows that being physically active, for example by walking for at least 150 minutes per week, is associated with more social participation and better mental health and wellbeing.  The findings show that: Two-thirds of the Irish population aged 50 years and older report low or moderate levels of physical activity while only one-third report high levels of activity, based on the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Middle-aged and older Irish adults with high levels of physical activity report greater participation in social activities, less anxiety, better quality of life, and less loneliness compared to those with low physical activity levels. Middle-aged and older adults with low levels of physical activity are over twice as likely to have clinically relevant depressive symptoms as those with high levels of physical activity (14% versus 6%). Interventions should specifically target women, older adults, those in employment, those who are not engaged in non-church related social activities and those living in built-up areas such as apartments.     Study finds hydroxychloroquine delays disability for least treatable form of multiple sclerosis University of Calgary (Canada), January 17, 2022 A University of Calgary study has found promising results for the generic drug hydroxychloroquine when used to treat the evolution of disability of primary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS), the least treatable form of the autoimmune disease.  Cumming School of Medicine research teams found hydroxychloroquine helped to slow the worsening of disability during the 18-month study involving participants at the MS clinic in Calgary. The research was published in Annals of Neurology. The experimental study, known as a single-arm phase II futility trial, followed 35 people between November 2016 and June 2021. Researchers expected to see at least 40 percent, or 14 participants, experience a significant worsening of their walking function, but at the end of the trial only eight participants had worsened. Hydroxychloroquine was generally well-tolerated.     Tree nut consumption is associated with better diet Louisiana State University,  January 16, 2022 A new study, published this week in the open access journal Nutrients, compares the nutrient adequacy and diet quality of those who consume tree nuts (almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamias, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios and walnuts), and non-tree nut consumers in a nationally representative population. Tree nut consumption was associated with better nutrient adequacy for most nutrients that are lacking in the diets of many Americans, and with better diet quality. Researchers looked at 14,386 adults in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES). The data showed that, compared to non-consumers, tree nut consumers had a lower percentage of the population consuming usual intakes of nutrients below the recommended levels of vitamins A, E and C; folate; calcium; iron; magnesium; and zinc. Tree nut consumers had a higher percentage of the population over the recommendation for adequate intake for dietary fiber and potassium    Protein isolated from baker's yeast shows potential against leukemia cells University of Sao Paulo (Brazil), January 16, 2022  An enzyme identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, commonly known as brewer's or baker's yeast, has passed in vitro trials, demonstrating its capacity to kill acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. "In this study, we characterize the enzyme L-asparaginase from S. cerevisiae. The results show this protein can efficiently annihilate leukemia cells with low cytotoxicity to healthy cells," said Gisele Monteiro, a professor at FCF-USP and the principal investigator for the published study. Production of the enzyme asparagine synthetase is deficient in ALL and several other types of cancer cells, which are therefore unable to synthesize the amino acid asparagine. "This type of cell depends on extracellular sources of asparagine, an essential amino acid for the synthesis of proteins and hence of DNA and RNA. So it's required for cell division," Monteiro said. "The enzyme asparaginase depletes this amino acid in the extracellular medium, converting it into aspartate and ammonia. In patients with ALL, this leads to a sharp fall in serum levels of asparagine, hindering protein synthesis in malignant cells and inducing apoptosis, or programmed cell death." The bacterial enzyme killed about 90 percent of the MOLT4 human leukemia cells and displayed low toxicity to the healthy HUVEC cells, killing only 10 percent. "The yeast enzyme killed between 70 percent and 80 percent of the MOLT4 cells and displayed less than 10 percent toxicity for HUVEC cells. Neither was significantly effective against REH cells."   Pakistan says trial of Chinese traditional medicine for Covid-19 successful International Center for Chemical and Biological Science (Pakistan), January 17, 2022 Local health authorities on Monday announced the completion of a successful clinical trial of Chinese traditional herbal medicine for treating Covid-19, as Pakistan enters a fifth wave of the pandemic driven by the Omicron variant. The Chinese medicine, Jinhua Qinggan Granules (JHQG) manufactured by Juxiechang (Beijing) Pharmaceutical Co Ltd, is already being used in the treatment of Covid-19 patients in China. “Since it was tried on patients with different variants of Covid-19, we expect it to be effective on Omicron as on other variants,” Professor Iqbal Chaudhry, director of the International Center for Chemical and Biological Science (ICCBS) in Karachi, where trials were conducted The trials were conducted on 300 patients who were treated at home, and would work on mild to moderate Covid-19 cases, Dr Raza Shah, principal investigator in the trials, told reporters, adding that the efficacy rate was around 82.67 per cent.   Berry compounds' heart health benefits linked to impact on platelets Sun Yat-sen University (Taiwan), January 14, 2022 The new study, published in Nutrition & Metabolism , deepens our understanding of the heart health benefits of anthocyanins, pigments found in many fruit like black raspberries, blueberries, blackberries, and blackcurrants. Chinese scientists report that 320 mg per day of purified anthocyanins, equivalent to about 100 g of fresh blueberries and blackcurrants, for 24 weeks were associated with significant reductions in platelet chemokine levels, which correlated to lower levels of inflammatory markers in people with elevated cholesterol levels. “Platelet chemokines are involved in inflammatory reactions, immune responses, and other aspects of the development of atherosclerosis,” explained researchers from Sun Yat-sen University. “These findings indicate a potential mechanism by which anthocyanins exert protective effects on the cardiovascular system, achieved through the comprehensive regulation of platelet chemokines, lipid metabolism and inflammation, in which platelet chemokines may play pivotal roles.”   OTHER NEWS Time to Boycott - Companies Discriminating Against Their Unvaccinated Employees The Naked Emperor, January 17, 2022 Suddenly, employment and discrimination laws don't exist. Here is an ever-growing list of companies that are discriminating against their employees. They need boycotting until they change their policies. ·  Finance o    Citigroup - Employees to lose their jobs by the end of the month if unvaccinated; o    Goldman Sachs - Told employees they will require a booster to work in the office from 1 February; o    JPMorgan Chase - Won't pay unvaccinated employees because they aren't allowed to go to the office; o    OneAmerica - Requiring vaccines for all employees; Healthcare o    National Health Service - Staff with direct contact with patients must have had a 1st dose by 3 February or risk losing their job at the end of March; o    Mayo Clinic - Has fired 700 unvaccinated employees; Retail o    Columbia Sportswear - Will begin firing unvaccinated employees from 1 Feb; o    Ikea - Has cut sick pay for unvaccinated staff forced to self-isolate; o    Kroger - Eliminated paid leave for unvaccinated employees who get COVID-19 and require them to pay monthly health insurance surcharges; o    Next - Sick pay cut for unvaccinated staff forced to self-isolate; o    Nike - If employees remain unvaccinated by 15 January they will be fired; o    Morrisons - Cut sick pay for unvaccinated staff in October 2021; o    Ocado - Unvaccinated isolating staff to have sick pay cut; o    Tyson Foods - Require COVID-19 vaccinations for its U.S workforce and providing $200 to full vaccinated frontline team members; o    Vans, Supreme, Timberland & The North Face (Parent company = VF Corporation) - will start firing unvaccinated employees by 31 January without severance; Services o    Wessex Water - To cut sick pay for unvaccinated staff who need to self-isolate; Tech o    Apple - Starting 24 January, employees will need proof of booster. Unvaccinated will need negative tests to go to work; o    Google - Tells unvaccinated employees they'll lose pay and will eventually be fired; o    Intel - Employees to go on unpaid leave if unvaccinated by 4 January;     The Age of Intolerance: Cancel Culture's War on Free Speech John and Nisha Whitehead, January 11, 2022 Cancel culture—political correctness amped up on steroids, the self-righteousness of a narcissistic age, and a mass-marketed pseudo-morality that is little more than fascism disguised as tolerance—has shifted us into an Age of Intolerance, policed by techno-censors, social media bullies, and government watchdogs. Everything is now fair game for censorship if it can be construed as hateful, hurtful, bigoted or offensive provided that it runs counter to the established viewpoint. In this way, the most controversial issues of our day—race, religion, sex, sexuality, politics, science, health, government corruption, police brutality, etc.—have become battlegrounds for those who claim to believe in freedom of speech but only when it favors the views and positions they support. This tendency to censor, silence, delete, label as “hateful,” and demonize viewpoints that run counter to the cultural elite is being embraced with a near-fanatical zealotry by a cult-like establishment that values conformity and group-think over individuality. This authoritarian intolerance masquerading as tolerance, civility and love (what comedian George Carlin referred to as “fascism pretending to be manners”) is the end result of a politically correct culture that has become radicalized, institutionalized and tyrannical. J.K. Rowling, author of the popular Harry Potter series, has found herself denounced as transphobic and widely shunned for daring to criticize efforts by transgender activists to erode the legal definition of sex and replace it with gender. Rowling's essay explaining her views is a powerful, articulate, well-researched piece that not only stresses the importance of free speech and women's rights while denouncing efforts by trans activists to demonize those who subscribe to “wrongthink,” but also recognizes that while the struggle over gender dysmorphia is real, concerns about safeguarding natal women and girls from abuse are also legitimate. Ironically enough, Rowling's shunning included literal book burning. Yet as Ray Bradbury once warned, “There is more than one way to burn a book. And the world is full of people running about with lit matches.” Indeed, the First Amendment is going up in flames before our eyes, but those first sparks were lit long ago and have been fed by intolerance all along the political spectrum. Consider some of the kinds of speech being targeted for censorship or outright elimination. Offensive, politically incorrect and “unsafe” speech:  Bullying, intimidating speech: Dangerous, anti-government speech:  The problem as I see it is that we've allowed ourselves to be persuaded that we need someone else to think and speak for us. And we've bought into the idea that we need the government and its corporate partners to shield us from that which is ugly or upsetting or mean. The result is a society in which we've stopped debating among ourselves, stopped thinking for ourselves, and stopped believing that we can fix our own problems and resolve our own differences. In short, we have reduced ourselves to a largely silent, passive, polarized populace incapable of working through our own problems and reliant on the government to protect us from our fears. We have allowed our fears—fear for our safety, fear of each other, fear of being labeled racist or hateful or prejudiced, etc.—to trump our freedom of speech and muzzle us far more effectively than any government edict could. Ultimately the war on free speech—and that's exactly what it is: a war being waged by Americans against other Americans—is a war that is driven by fear. By muzzling free speech, we are contributing to a growing underclass of Americans who are being told that they can't take part in American public life unless they “fit in.” Be warned: whatever we tolerate now—whatever we turn a blind eye to—whatever we rationalize when it is inflicted on others will eventually come back to imprison us, one and all.   Spain police officers in Valencia: "We are with the people, not with corrupt politicians. We are in contact with Portugal, Italy, France, Austria, Switzerland, Sweden, Germany and the Netherlands to unite all the police in Europe. Down with the health passport."     There Is Currently No COVID Medical Emergency Only Psychological Engineering Says Senior Israeli Immunologist GREAT GAME INDIA,  January 16, 2022 The attempts of governments across the globe at “psychological engineering” the population on Covid related matters has now been fully exposed after several years. A well respected immunologist in Israel heavily criticized the approach of every administration globally. In a scathing letter addressed to the Israeli Ministry of Health, a renowned immunologist denounced mass vaccination against COVID-19 and chastised officials who've already “branded” the unvaccinated “as spreaders of the disease.” The letter, penned by Professor Ehud Qimron, who is the head of Tel Aviv University's Department of Microbiology and Immunology, rips off vaccine-focused COVID tactics endorsed by authorities across the globe, which Qimron labels “doomed to fail.” “Two years late, you finally realize that a respiratory virus cannot be defeated and that any such attempt is doomed to fail,” he wrote to the Israeli health ministry. “You do not admit it, because you have admitted almost no mistake in the last two years, but in retrospect it is clear that you have failed miserably in almost all of your actions, and even the media is already having a hard time covering your shame.” Qimron reprimanded Israeli authorities for failing to recognize that COVID-19 vaccines will neither eliminate the virus or provide herd immunity, as the government's immunization campaign “failed” to do. “You refused to admit that the infection comes in waves that fade by themselves, despite years of observations and scientific knowledge,” he said. “You refused to admit that recovery is more protective than a vaccine, despite previous knowledge and observations showing that non-recovered vaccinated people are more likely to be infected than recovered people.” “You refused to admit that the vaccinated are contagious despite the observations. Based on this, you hoped to achieve herd immunity by vaccination — and you failed in that as well.” According to research, immunizations essentially inflict more harm than that of the virus on its own in younger demographics. According to a study released last month by British researchers, the jabs dramatically raise the chance of potentially life-threatening heart inflammation in males under 40 years old compared to COVID-19 and may lead in more lethal types of the heart ailment. “You have ignored many reports of changes in menstrual intensity and menstrual cycle times,” Qimron noted in his letter to the health ministry. “You hid data that allows for objective and proper research. Instead, you chose to publish non-objective articles together with senior Pfizer executives on the effectiveness and safety of vaccines.” “The truth is that you have brought the public's trust in you to an unprecedented low, and you have eroded your status as a source of authority,” he alleged, citing increased incidences of mental illness and misbehavior among Israeli pupils amid COVID regulations. “You have destroyed the education of our children and their future,” said Qimron. “You made children feel guilty, scared, smoke, drink, get addicted, drop out, and quarrel, as school principals around the country attest. You have harmed livelihoods, the economy, human rights, mental health and physical health.” You slandered colleagues who did not surrender to you, you turned the people against each other, divided society and polarized the discourse. You branded, without any scientific basis, people who chose not to get vaccinated as enemies of the public and as spreaders of disease. You promote, in an unprecedented way, a draconian policy of discrimination, denial of rights and selection of people, including children, for their medical choice. A selection that lacks any epidemiological justification. “There is currently no medical emergency,” the immunologist continued. “The only emergency now is that you still set policies and hold huge budgets for propaganda and psychological engineering instead of directing them to strengthen the health care system.” “This emergency must stop!”   Serious Health Risks of Covid-19 Vaccines: Open Letter to Cornell University Board of Trustees and President Martha Pollack Cornell University Community, January 12, 2022 Dear President Pollack and Cornell Board of Trustees, We are students, parents, alumni, faculty, and staff of Cornell University. We are grateful for Cornell's efforts at keeping students and the Ithaca community safe during this pandemic. As concerned members of the global Big Red family, we write this open letter to express our strong opposition to Cornell's Covid-19 booster mandate. In light of new data available about both the vaccine and the virus, we urge you to change the “mandate” to a “recommendation” based on the factors outlined below.  We appreciate that the booster mandate and new procedures for the spring term stem from the good intention to prevent severe illness. But as with any public health policy, many factors — scientific, ethical, and legal — must be considered and weighed. We are concerned that Cornell, in issuing this booster mandate, has overlooked recent and evolving scientific data regarding the vaccine and the virus that makes a booster mandate inappropriate and unnecessary, raising serious ethical and legal questions. In December 2021, Cornell identified over 1,600 Covid-19 positive cases with “every case of the Omicron variant to date [being] found in fully vaccinated students, a portion of whom had also received a booster shot.” Cornell's own data highlights that vaccination, even with the booster, has very limited capability in stopping virus transmission. A similar conclusion has been reached by CDC's research: vaccinated people seem to transmit Covid-19 similarly to unvaccinated people. The virus will continue to be transmitted among our highly vaccinated campuses. In a recent campus-wide email, Cornell explicitly acknowledged the impossibility of containing or eliminating Omicron, the flu, or other respiratory illnesses, which is why it will “shift from counting positive cases.”  As so many students test positive, they are, in essence, receiving a natural booster based on the very latest variants of the virus. And yet, Cornell is ignoring the natural immunity in these students and mandating a booster injection based on older variants, which Cornell knows is ineffective at stopping the spread of Covid-19 in the Cornell community. This decision is counter to science and seems like it was made less to promote students' health and more to achieve some other unstated goal of the administration. Otherwise, why require a booster injection that is ineffective, and potentially dangerous, for students who are naturally contracting and fighting off a virus that many scientists believe is becoming more endemic than pandemic? Mounting evidence points to serious risks from exposure to the Covid-19 vaccines. The latest scientific research shows that Covid-19 vaccine side effects such as myocarditis, thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome, and pericarditis are more common in young people than we think (see references 1-5 listed below). Recently, an Oxford-conducted study of men under the age of 40 demonstrated that the risk of myocarditis after one dose mRNA exceeds the risk of myocarditis from an actual Covid-19 infection. Even more alarmingly, the CDC's Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) indicates that there were over 15,000 Covid-19 vaccine related death cases in 2021, compared with the previous average of 158 vaccine related deaths per year (Pre-Covid-19), in the context of a yearly total of 280 million injections and 70 different vaccines. This data shows that, compared to other vaccines, Covid-19 injections carry around 100 times the risk of death. Considering new data on the virus and the vaccine, the university may very well cause disability or death by imposing further vaccine requirements, and it will have to bear the responsibility. Please do the right thing, and end this unnecessary and unethical mandate. EU Regulators, WHO Call for End to COVID Boosters, Citing Evidence Strategy Is Failing EU drug regulators, World Health Organization experts and the former chairman of the UK's COVID task force all cited mounting evidence mRNA COVID boosters aren't working and the strategy should be dropped. Childrens Health Defense, January 12, 2022   European Union drug regulators warned frequent COVID boosters could adversely affect the immune system and said there are currently no data to support repeated doses. According to the European Medicines Agency (EMA), continued booster doses every four months could pose a risk of overloading people's immune systems and lead to fatigue. Instead, the agency recommended countries space out the intervals between boosters and coordinate their programs with the onset of the cold season in each hemisphere — following blueprints of influenza vaccination strategies. Boosters “can be done once, or maybe twice, but it's not something that we can think should be repeated constantly,” Cavaleri said. “We need to think about how we can transition from the current pandemic setting to a more endemic setting.” The World Health Organization's (WHO) Technical Advisory Group on COVID-19 Vaccine Composition (TAG-CO-VAC) on Jan. 11 warned, “a vaccination strategy based on repeated booster doses of the original vaccine composition is unlikely to be appropriate or sustainable.” The expert group, created by the WHO to assess the performance of COVID vaccines, said providing fresh doses of already existing vaccines as new strains of the virus emerge is not the best way to fight a pandemic. “It's over, people,” Alex Berenson, former New York Times reporter and best-selling author, wrote. “Aside from a few unlucky Israelis, no one is going to receive a fourth dose of the original vaccine.” Berenson wrote: “Everyone with eyes can see it doesn't work against Omicron — and if you haven't gotten a third dose, at this point, why would you? You are getting at most weeks of marginally improved protection for potentially severe side effects. “Instead the WHO is now promising/demanding vaccines based on whatever the dominant Sars-Cov-2 strain is at the moment. That promise is as empty as all the others the health bureaucrats and vaccine companies have made.”   60% Of Omicron Hospitalization Numbers Were Incorrect Admits Canada's Chief Medical Officer GREAT GAME INDIA. January 17, 2022 Shocking statistics regarding Canada's Omicron hospitalizations being incorrect has come to light recently. The Premier of Alberta has claimed a staggering 60% disparity between the actual figures. Alberta Premier Jason Kenney and Alberta Chief Medical Officer Deena Hinshaw both confirmed that public figures for ICU capacity and COVID admissions were up to 60% incorrect. “Of the 163 omicron patients in hospital, 66 have a primary COVID diagnosis … and of the 14 omicron patients in ICU, 11 have a primary COVID diagnosis,” he stated. As per Kenney, this indicates that 60% of individuals labelled as staying in the hospital for an omicron ailment weren't there because they arrived sick with COVID, and also that the ICU statistics reflect the same rationale, with more than 20% of recorded stays being unintentional. This is consistent with developments found throughout Canada, as provincial medical authorities have shifted their focus and begun to release increasingly specific data on hospitalizations.

Bitcoin Audible (previously the cryptoconomy)
Chat #66 - Will the Real Web3 Please Stand Up, with John Carvalho

Bitcoin Audible (previously the cryptoconomy)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 133:02


"Our goal is basically to realize this concept we have created called the atomic economy. This is just my way to create a narrative and mental model to represent hyperbitcoinization, or a future world where we actually broke free from having government regulations control the economy, having big tech control our data, and having big banks control our assets. If we actually ended up in that world, what would it actually look like?" - John Carvalho Today we dive into an amazing conversation with John Carvalho that I've been eager to get at for a while now. Through Bitcoin and Lightning we have inadvertently been given the Holy Grail of a decentralized web, millions of individuals with a public and private key pair. Do we really need this bloated & scammy system with 10s of 1000s of shitcoins and blockchains for everything? Or is there something far simpler, and more fundamental that could be the beginnings of something massive? Find out in today's interview with the Bitcoin OG, cypherpunk, CEO of Synonym... John Carvalho. Don't forget to check out the incredible stuff being built by Synonym: https://synonym.to/ Mounting a Torrent to your file system with HyperCore: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BTCsSwCpGP8&t=1016s For the best products and services to get you started in Bitcoin, our sponsors are literally a handful of those that I use most in this space: • Get Bitcoin rewards on literally everything you buy with the Fold Card (20% discount code BITCOINAUDIBLE) • Buy Bitcoin automatically and painlessly with SwanBitcoin • Keep your Bitcoin keys safe on the secure, open source BitBox02 (5% discount code GUY) • Get tickets to the biggest & most exciting Bitcoin conference in the world! Bitcoin 2022 (10% discount code GUYSWANN) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Charlie Kirk Show
Ask Charlie Anything 90: Will the Mandates Survive SCOTUS? Killer Grizzly Bears? Mounting a School Board Run and MORE!

The Charlie Kirk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 32:43


On the first installment of ‘Ask Charlie Anything' of the new year, Charlie walks through the Supreme Court oral arguments that happened last Friday with a recap of what we heard from the high bench in response to listener questions sent in to Freedom@CharlieKirk.com. He also talks broadly about what makes a good Justice, and whether or not the court will uphold Biden's vaccine mandates before answering an inquiry about running for school board as well as a question about whether or not to delay your schooling over vaccine mandates. He also talks about the weather in Alaska before diving in to a topic he's strangely enough well-versed in: Killer Bears—all in the name of making a much broader and more important point than those in the media and even The Court seem to be missing.  Support the show: http://www.charliekirk.com/support See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Cincinnati Edition
A mounting number of COVID patients continue to report lingering aftereffects

Cincinnati Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 24:57


Some Greater Cincinnati "long haul" patients and medical experts say the effects of COVID can stick around long after the virus itself clears up.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 01.05.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 59:04


Most Comprehensive Study To Date: Omega-3 Reduces Heart Risks The most in-depth analysis to date confirms the importance of omega-3 fats for heart health. If fatty fish is not a regular part of your diet, you may need to consider supplementing omega-3 fatty acids to keep your heart happy and healthy. University of Idaho and University of Queensland, December 30. 2021 The most in-depth analysis to date confirms the importance of consuming sufficient quantities of omega-3 fats for preventing cardiovascular disease. The meta-analysis, published in the peer-reviewed journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings, reviewed 40 clinical trials, and the multi-disciplinary team of researchers delivered an authoritative rallying cry for including more EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) omega-3 fats in your diet, citing their significant cardioprotective effects. (NEXT) Honey and Nigella sativa against COVID-19: A multi-center placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial Riphah University (Pakistan), Harvard University, University of Louisville, December 30, 2021 BACKGROUND No definitive treatment exists for Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). Honey and Nigella sativa (HNS) have established antiviral, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. Hence, we investigated efficacy of HNS against COVID-19. wide Three hundred and thirteen patients - 210 moderate and 103 severe - underwent randomization from April 30 to July 29, 2020. Among these, 107 were assigned to HNS whereas 103 to placebo for moderate cases. For severe cases, 50 were given HNS and 53 were given placebos. HNS resulted in ∼50% reduction in time taken to alleviate symptoms as compared to placebo. HNS also cleared the virus 4 days earlier than placebo group in moderate (6 versus 10 days. HNS further led to hospital discharge in 50% versus 2.8% in severe cases In severe cases, mortality rate was four-fold lower in HNS group than placebo CONCLUSION HNS significantly improved symptoms, viral clearance and mortality in COVID-19 patients. Thus, HNS represents an affordable over the counter therapy and can either be used alone or in combination with other treatments to achieve potentiating effects against COVID-19. (NEXT) Promoting exercise rehabilitation as new and powerful tool for managing symptoms of multiple sclerosis   University of Worcester (UK) and University of Illinois,  December 29, 2021. Citing recent evidence, experts in rehabilitation research advocate for integrating exercise into the care plans of persons with multiple sclerosis. The central role of the neurologist in clinical care offers an opportunity for this provider to promote exercise as fundamental for managing the physical and cognitive symptoms of MS. Mounting evidence supports exercise as an important tool for managing the manifestations of MS, including fatigue, depression, and declines in physical mobility, balance, and cognition. While disease-modifying therapies can slow the progression of disease and disability, they do not alleviate symptoms or functional decline that adversely affect quality of life. Despite the advantages of exercise, physical inactivity is reported by 80 percent of people with MS. (NEXT) Sustainable diet leads to fewer blood clots in the brain Aarhus University (Denmark), January 4, 2022 The risk of bleeding or blood clots in the brain is lower if your diet is sustainable. This is shown by a new research result from Aarhus University. The results have just been published in the scientific journal Stroke. There should be more vegetables and less meat on the plate in front of us. A study from the Department of Public Health shows that a sustainable diet not only benefits the climate, but also benefits your health. "If adult men or women follow a sustainable diet for dietary fibre intake, then we see a lower risk of bleeding or blood clots in the brain," says Christina Dahm, who is behind the study. The seven official Danish climate-friendly dietary guidelines Eat plant-rich, varied and not too much. Eat more vegetables and fruit. Eat less meat – choose legumes and fish. Eat whole grains. Choose vegetable oils and low-fat dairy products. Eat less of the sweet, salty and fatty. Quench your thirst in water. (NEXT) Eating when we are not hungry is bad for our health University of Illinois, December 30, 2021 With the wide availability of convenient foods engineered for maximum tastiness— such as potato chips, chocolates, and bacon double cheeseburgers— in the modern food environment and with widespread advertising, the contemporary consumer is incessantly being bombarded with the temptation to eat. This means that, in contrast to people in traditional societies, people in contemporary societies often eat not on account of hunger but because tasty food is available and beckoning at all hours of the day. New research published in the Journal of the Association for Consumer Research, found that the tendency of today's consumers to eat when they are not hungry might be less advantageous for health than eating when they are hungry. (NEXT) Black raspberries a contender for best antioxidant fruit, says study University of Agriculture (Poland), January 4, 2022 Black raspberries show greater health benefits than its closely related cousins the red raspberry and blackberry, research suggests. The research looked at the content of phenolics and anthocyanins in black raspberries, red raspberries and blackberries, assessing their antioxidant potential and health promoting properties. The study, which took place at the University of Agriculture in Krakow, discovered the amount of antioxidants in black raspberries was three times higher than the other fruits investigated. One discovery of note was the black raspberries' anthocyanines content, which was found to be approximately 1000% more than the raspberry and blackberry. Interestingly, black raspberries also contained a higher content of secondary metabolites, which have been proved equally beneficial for human health. (NEXT) Only 9% of teens meet physical activity guidelines during the pandemic, down from 16% pre-pandemic by  University of Toronto A new national study finds that only 9% of teens met the recommended 60 minutes of physical activity per day during the pandemic—a decline from 16% pre-pandemic. "The pandemic led to the cancelation of in-person physical education classes and organized sports, gym and recreational facility closures, and rises in screen use, which all contributed to lower physical activity for teens," said lead author Jason Nagata, MD, assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco. The study found that lower physical activity was linked to poorer mental health, greater stress, and more worry about the pandemic. On average, teens reported two hours of physical activity per week during the pandemic. These estimates were lower for teens of color—Black, Latino, and Native American teens reported an average of 90 minutes of physical activity per week. (NEXT) RESPONSE TO COLUMBIA DOCTOR - Cases among fully vaccinated Back in late November in an interview with NBC News reported Fauci had stated that there was a significant increase in ER visits and hospitalizations among fully vaccinated people As usual, Fauci stated that most hospitalizations were among the unvaccinated according to studies – a trope he often repeats without ever mentioning what studies prove that. But for greater transparency we need to look at report overseas by health officials Dr Kristiaan Deckers from the GZA Hospital network in Belgium reported that 100% of ICU admissions were among the vaccinated. In the UK- the government's Public Health Data division reported that during the months of August to early December that persons who were double or triple vaccinated accounted for 6 in every 10 Covid cases, 7 in every 10 hospitalizations and 9 in every 10 Covid-19 deaths In the month of November alone, the fully vaccinated accounted for 62% of cases, 71% o hospitalizations and 85% of deaths And just before Xmas, the UK Office of National Statistics reported that triple vaccinated persons are 4.5 times more likely to test positive for the omicron variant compared to the unvaccinated and partially vaccinated Again last month ,South Korea reported record covid cases. The adult Korean population is almost completely fully vaccinated at 92% In France, the nations top virologist Prof Christian Perrone, and a long time health policy advisor to the French government has called for the lockdown of vaccinated people as being the super spreaders The very recent Danish study showed that the vaccines plus boosters showed a strong NEGATIVE efficacy against omicron – 78% of omicron cases are among the fully vaccinated which represents 77.5% of the Danish population – in other words, the vaccines have zero efficacy against omicron A German study based on the government's data by Prof emeritus Rolf Steyer at Fredrick Schiller University medical school also last month found that the higher the vaccination rate, the higher the excess mortality Recently was the Columbia University study – vaccine induced fatality rates are underreported by a factor of 20. Consequently thee actual number of deaths due to the Covid vaccines is between 146,000 and 187,000 Finally there are increasing reports by doctors and nurses in the field, in hospitals, clinics and emergency rooms who are reported that the large majority of covid cases are among the vaccinated.  In a large Rochester NY hospital – one ER professional reported that 90% of individuals admitted into the hospital are vaccinated (NEXT) VIDEOS Video - POLICE STATE: Australians Mass Protest After Churches Raided, Moms Arrested, Citizen Snitches - 7.5 minutes

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast
Tensions mounting over the build up of Russian troops on Ukraine's border

RN Breakfast - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 10:59


The United States and Russia will hold talks next week as tensions simmer over the presence of tens of thousands of Russian troops along the border of Ukraine. Already there have been two tense phone calls between US President Joe Biden and Russian leader Vladimir Putin over the matter, with Biden threatening sanctions if Russia does invade.

CTV Question Period Podcast
CTV QP Podcast # 380: Mounting pressure on Canada's health system

CTV Question Period Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 44:38


Host Evan Solomon discusses the week's top political stories with Dr. Katherine Smart. president of the Canadian Medical Association, The Globe and Mail's Robert Fife, Kevin Page from the Institute of Fiscal Studies and Democracy, the Toronto Star's Stephanie Levitz, former Assembly of First Nations national chief Perry Bellegarde, executive director of Clean Prosperity Michael Bernstein, and CTV political commentator Tom Mulcair.

SENTrack
The Mounting Yard (31/12/2021)

SENTrack

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 5:21


Cam Luke and Sammy Hyland provide their best tips for the day on a big New Year's Eve edition of Trackside.

kPod - The Kidd Kraddick Morning Show
Best Of- J-Si's TV Mounting Victory

kPod - The Kidd Kraddick Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 13:22


J-Si celebrates his manly win!

SENTrack
The Mounting Yard - Thursday (30/12/21)

SENTrack

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 6:24


Cam Luke and Taggs went through their best bets of the day!

SENTrack
The Mounting Yard - Wednesday (29/12/21)

SENTrack

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 9:30


Catch up on Sam Hyland and David Taggarts best bets around the country today.

SENTrack
The Mounting Yard - Tuesday (28/12/21)

SENTrack

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 6:58


Catch up on Campbell Brown and Sam Hyland's best bets around the country today.

Trots Life
The Mounting Yard - Tuesday (28/12/21)

Trots Life

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 6:58


Catch up on Campbell Brown and Sam Hyland's best bets on a big Tuesday afternoon of Racing!

SENTrack
The Mounting Yard - Monday (/)

SENTrack

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 7:38


Catch up on Campbell Brown and Sam Hyland's Best Bets around Asutralia!

Birdland
Mahavishnu Orchestra: The Inner Mounting Flame

Birdland

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 26:27


La fine degli anni '60 e l'inizio del decennio successivo è un periodo nel quale si assiste ad una serie di trasformazioni e rivolgimenti del mondo musicale che favorisce la nascita di nuove forme di espressione, anche a livello discografico, in molti ambiti.Questa serie di trasmissioni vuole mettere in evidenza, a cinquant'anni di distanza, la straordinaria annata che fu il 1971 per il jazz.Saranno considerati due album di piano solo realizzati da chi la storia sancirà poi maestri del pianismo jazz moderno. "Facing You" di Keith Jarrett e il primo volume delle Piano Improvisations" di Chick Corea sono lavori che tra l'altro inaugurano la fortunata serie di ECM in questo particolare format. Joe Zawinul e Wayne Shorter da una parte, John McLaughlin dall'altra – fatto tesoro della loro esperienza con l'estetica rivoluzionaria proposta da Miles Davis in quegli anni – propongono in quel 1971 i visionari esordi di due gruppi che illumineranno il jazz-rock nascente: i Weather Report e la Mahavishnu Orchestra.Uno spazio sarà infine dedicato a Oliver Nelson, in relazione alla prestigiosa serie di registrazioni live realizzate a Montreux che contribuirono sin dai primi anni alla diffusione del nome del festival nel mondo. Nella quinta ed ultima edizione al vecchio Casinò, che sarà distrutto per il noto incendio nel dicembre di quell'anno, l'esperto sassofonista, arrangiatore e direttore d'orchestra si presentò sul palco ospitando Gato Barbieri, il cui nome sboccerà definitivamente proprio in quel 1971 grazie anche al concerto con il suo gruppo sullo stesso palco di Montreux, ben presto pubblicato su disco con il titolo "El Pampero".

The Daily Dive
The Rise of Godless America and Law Graduates Face Mounting Student Debt

The Daily Dive

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 26:42


We have been seeing a decline in those identifying as religious for some time now and in the absence of religious belief many have channeled that into political belief. What is America supposed to mean or what does it mean to be un-American? Politics has become the new religion and ideological intensity has risen driving a divide in the country. Shadi Hamid, contributing writer at The Atlantic, joins us for more. Next, another story of students taking on mountains of debt only to have the high paying jobs they were promised out of reach. Law school, which was once seen as a great path to a well-paying job is the latest to be scrutinized as students often take out six figure federal loans. Recent graduates of the University of Miami School of Law borrowed a median of 163,000 and two years later, half of them were earning 59,000 or less, making it difficult to pay down their loans. Just 15% of recent grads were able to begin repaying their student loans after two years. Andrea Fuller, reporter at the WSJ, joins us for more. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

SENTrack
The Mounting Yard - Thursday (23/12/21)

SENTrack

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 7:30


Catch up on Cam and Taggs best bets across the country today!

All CNET Video Podcasts (HD)
How to get permanent mounting tape off your car

All CNET Video Podcasts (HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021


You can pull and scrape, but this official technique from 3M is cleaner and easier.

Cooley On Cars (HD)
How to get permanent mounting tape off your car

Cooley On Cars (HD)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021


You can pull and scrape, but this official technique from 3M is cleaner and easier.

SENTrack
The Mounting Yard - Wednesday (22/12/21)

SENTrack

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 11:55


Catch up on the Mounting Yard as David Taggart and Sam Hyland give their best bets across the country today!

SENTrack
The Mounting Yard - Tuesday (21/12/21)

SENTrack

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 5:23


Catch up on Cam Luke and Campbell Browns best bets around the country today!

KNX In Depth
KNX In Depth: Mounting evidence that COVID boosters are effective extra protection -- LAPD caught once again scouring social media with questionable motives -- Winter COVID surge hits NHL, NFL, NBA -- Michael Connelly is back

KNX In Depth

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 46:42


On the menu for today's show: The evidence continues to mount: if you want the best protection possible against the COVID omicron variant, get your booster shot. Why was the LAPD paying a Polish company to monitor social media for the use of terms like "black lives matter" and "defund the police?"  And LAUSD's new superintendent will be among the highest-paid leaders of any major school district in the country -- is he worth it? The NBA, the NFL and the NHL -- are all undergoing a winter COVID surge among players and coaches -- we'll ask what that means for the rest of us. The new Trump media company is marketing like crazy..........even though it doesn't really have anything to show yet. And at the end of the show ... a friend of the show... author Michael Connelly will be back to talk about "The Dark Hours." Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Viewpoints
The Mounting Student Loan Crisis

Viewpoints

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 11:14


Federal student loan debt has ballooned in recent years. In 2007, debt totaled $642 billion dollars. 14 years later, this number has risen to close to $1.7 trillion. More than 43 million Americans have student loan debt, with the average person owing around $39,000. With payments on student loans expected to restart early next year after an almost two-year freeze due to the pandemic, will more people struggle to pay back what they've taken out? What should students know before heading to college?

Sports Day Tampa Bay
Bucs Injuries Mounting Including Bruce Arians & How The Offense Has Been Taken Over By Tom Brady

Sports Day Tampa Bay

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 42:51


Rick Stroud and Steve Versnick with the latest on the Buccaneers injuries including Head Coach Bruce Arians, why Richard Sherman might play some safety, how the Bucs Offense is now completely Tom Brady's, looking ahead to this weekend's game vs the Bills. Plus Mario Cristobal coming home to Miami, Heisman Trophy finalists named, looking as some Bowl game matchups and the Lightning had a good weekend. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Back Country Pa
Whitetail Taxidermy

Back Country Pa

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 115:28


On This episode Ethan and Cody get back in the BCPA Studio to have an in person guest! Join the crew as they chat with the owner of Little Stream Taxidermy, Landon Martin, based out of Lebanon Pa. -Hear about how Landon Started in taxidermy  -Why he went from doing all kinds of critters to just specializing in Whitetails -Steps for Mounting a Shoulder mount from start to finish & some tips for future taxidermist. The News: - Hunters are on track to kill the most Maine deer since LBJ was president (https://wgme.com/amp/news/local/hunters-are-on-track-to-kill-the-most-maine-deer-since-lbj-was-president) - Ride-along with a Pa. game warden: here's what we saw on patrol during deer season opener (https://lancasteronline.com/sports/outdoors/ride-along-with-a-pa-game-warden-here-s-what-we-saw-on-patrol-during/article_0f647fe0-4fda-11ec-a842-07ba84c699d5.html) - Pa. hunter reflects on what's in a name, harvests 3 deer, bear this fall (https://amp.goerie.com/amp/6364130001)

GZero World with Ian Bremmer
Don't Believe the “Taliban 2.0” Hype, Cautions Journalist Ahmed Rashid

GZero World with Ian Bremmer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 26:49


With the US gone and the Taliban back in control, Afghanistan faces a long winter. Mounting food insecurity and a crumbling economy have left many Afghans feeling abandoned. The international community could help solve this humanitarian crisis, but can they trust the Taliban? Ian Bremmer sat down with journalist and author Ahmed Rashid to learn more about the Taliban today. Few people know more about the Taliban than Rashid, who wrote the book on the group — literally. In the months after 9/11, his critically acclaimed 2000 study Taliban became a go-to reference as the US geared up to invade Afghanistan and knock the militant group from power. Twenty years later, how much has the group changed since the days of soccer-stadium executions, television bans, and blowing up world heritage sites?

Dinner with Schmucks
Ep 158 "Frog Mounting"

Dinner with Schmucks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 87:40


Dinner with Schmucks Episode 158 “Frog Mounting” Cast: Chris, Yajaira & Dieter Dinner: Hello Fresh “Home-Do” - xxxxxx Holy SHIT! It's been forever since we last dropped a new episode! “It'll be like riding a bike” - Topher B It's Chris & Yajaira's Anniversary, and how do we start the podcast, how about a discussion about Doggystyle? Dieter sets us down that path with his latest TikTok video he's obsessed with. We talk about our Hello Fresh “Home Do”, and cooking with Yajaira & Topher. What is Sexual Tourism, and how is it different from a Sexual Tourist? It's that time of year to watch Christmas movies again! Dr. Dieter is going legit, and has an opportunity for a hot new podcast with Yajaira. We also discuss the new season of SNL and particularly Pete Davidson. John Mayer & Taylor Swift make an appearance as we discuss celebrity math. Finally we discuss some new podcasts that Topher discovered, and that sent us down a slight rabbit hole. We'll be back with a new episode in 2 weeks (hopefully!) Enjoy! We love reviews! Leave us one, and if it's 5 stars, we'll be your best friends! Keep up with us on Social Media: www.facebook.com/dinnerwithschmucks www.instagram.com/dinnerwithschmucks www.twitter.com/dwspodcast DWS Swag is just a click away! www.dinnerwithschmucks.threadless.com Also don't forget about our friends: High Stick Creative www.highstickcreative.com 5 Seven 0 Designs www.5seven0designs.threadless.com New Season 5 intro/outro music: Intro - Brain Dead - A Dinner with Schmucks Original Outro - Grape Juice - Alien Disco Get it here! - https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/alien-disco/1513753114

Tee Time on 1500 ESPN
Is Tiger Mounting Another Comeback?!

Tee Time on 1500 ESPN

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 35:15


On this episode of 10,000 Swings, the guys break down Tiger sending out a video of his new swing and the response it received from the golf world! LISTEN TO MINNESOTA'S FAVORITE GOLF PODCAST, 10,000 SWINGS ON THE SKOR NORTH APP, PODMN, OR WHEREVER YOU LISTEN TO YOUR PODCASTS. OR WATCH ON THE SKOR NORTH YOUTUBE CHANNEL.

kPod - The Kidd Kraddick Morning Show
Best Of- J-Si's TV Mounting Victory

kPod - The Kidd Kraddick Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 12:41


J-Si feels really manly after completing this task!

On the Ground w Esther Iverem
‘ON THE GROUND’ SHOW FOR NOVEMBER 19, 2021 – The F-Word: The Mounting Fascist Threat from Right-Wing Violence, Censorship and Conspiracy Theories… 200 Activists Arrested Demanding Federal Voting Rights Legislation… Plus More

On the Ground w Esther Iverem

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 61:26


PEASE SUPPORT OUR YEAR-END DRIVE! Under the pressure of extreme Republican gerrymandering and voter suppression around the country, activists demand federal voting rights legislation and Democrats take the next steps to provide promised benefits for America's working families. And in this months episode of the F-Word on fascism, we speak to Professor Gerald Horne about mounting threats from right-wing violence, censorship and conspiracy theories in the United States. Plus headlines. The show is made possible only by our volunteer energy, our resolve to keep the people's voices on the air, and by support from our listeners. In this new era of fake corporate news, we have to be and support our own media! Please click here or click on the Support-Donate tab on this website to subscribe for as little as $3 a month. We are so grateful for this small but growing amount of monthly crowdsource funding on Patreon. PATREON NOW HAS A ONE-TIME, ANNUAL DONATION FUNCTION! You can also give a one-time or recurring donation on PayPal. Thank you!

Dukes & Bell
What's the Falcons plan to deal with mounting injuries?

Dukes & Bell

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 35:43


(Hour 3 11-17-21) Dukes & Bell talk DAWGS with Connor Riley, Falcons with D-Led and have some Guy Talk! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

End Time Headlines
Tensions are mounting on the EU Border

End Time Headlines

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 20:09


In today's segment, We discuss a recent report regarding tensions escalating on the EU border regarding Russia and Ukraine along with how this region of the World will one day in the future be a hotspot regarding Bible Prophecy and the Book of Revelation.

The Morning Roast with Bonta, Kate & Joe
Shanahan Questions Mounting

The Morning Roast with Bonta, Kate & Joe

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 10:09


Bonta and Kolsky react to Kyle Shanahan's practice press conference.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WSJ Tech News Briefing
Alibaba Looks to Grow 'Singles Day' Amid Mounting Pressures

WSJ Tech News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 11:41


Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba is facing a variety of hurdles, from increased regulation to supply-chain constraints. How have those affected the company's famed shopping holiday, Singles Day? Asia tech reporter Stephanie Yang joins host Zoe Thomas to discuss how the company is coping and what investors are watching for ahead of next week's earnings report. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Locked On Spurs - Daily Podcast On The San Antonio Spurs
Fan Episode - Are the Spurs' early season losses mounting on the fanbase?

Locked On Spurs - Daily Podcast On The San Antonio Spurs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 39:52


On this episode of Locked On Spurs, host Jeff Garcia welcomes Spurs fan Danny Sandoval to get the pulse of the fanbase. Are the team's mounting losses getting to the fans and are fans worried about the subpar start of the season for guard Derrick White? Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

CATS Roundtable
Dick Morris - President Biden facing mounting troubles.

CATS Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 3:37


Dick Morris - President Biden facing mounting troubles. by John Catsimatidis

Talking Markets with Franklin Templeton Investments
Macro Perspectives: Mounting Variables Globally

Talking Markets with Franklin Templeton Investments

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 28:47


Templeton Global Macro CIO Michael Hasenstab and Director of Global Macro Research for Brandywine, Francis Scotland, speak with our Stephen Dover about the direction of China, variables that could determine whether labor and inflation concerns will last more long-term, what may be driving energy prices up, beyond just supply and demand, and views on the dollar vs other currencies around the world.

TSR Speed Shop RC podcast
TSR Speed Shop RC podcast ” Mark Vyne and his Time”

TSR Speed Shop RC podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 229:55


TSR podcast Episode 151 “Mark Vyne #2” Hosts: Tim Smith and Colin Branch   Show introduction and welcome.   Tim Notes: Give us the story Tim… it was an exciting two days, but whats new… You should always protect your character DRC vs VooDoo vs Reactions, Wide wheels, standard wheels and really wide wheels. Mounting voodoo's on Traxxas wide wheels…. I got a plan for that. Testing: folding tires, air is a pain, can needs more work now to handle the new power. shock angle, driveline angle, tune adjustments. Stopped off at the prep track…. Oops… lol Az trip News items RC Tip Of the Week (brought to you by Colin) Main Topic: MARK VYNE and his Apollo car Featured Item of the week MaxAmps 7250 mah brick   Thank you to MaxAmps, Maclan racing, MKS Servo, CowRC, All you awesome fans, We love you all!

Himeros LIVE
Episode 181: The Mounting

Himeros LIVE

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 61:56


Davey Wavey, creator of Himeros.tv, is joined by gay porn star Ray Dexter and writer and journalist Duane Wells in a conversation about Disney, being a gay porn star, normalizing trans men in porn and more. Leave us questions and comments at 612-470-5729

TSR Speed Shop RC podcast
TSR Speed Shop RC podcast ”Dustin Malicoat”

TSR Speed Shop RC podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 186:32


TSR podcast Episode 150 “Dustin Malicoat” Hosts: Tim Smith and Colin Branch Show introduction and welcome. Tim Notes: Back from Maui, Pineapple, ziplines and Luaus filled the air Covid update: Christy family Testing Testing, is this thing on? The long road to end up back where we started. Bitty design body results DRC vs VooDoo vs Reactions, Wide wheels, standard wheels and really wide wheels. Mounting voodoo's on Traxxas wide wheels…. I got a plan for that. New MaxAmps pack….. Battery posting fun, if the test is not recent its pointless. News items Ryan Cav wins 1000 bucks and the entire no prep world broke out in laughter… Dawn of the drags winner Taylor Spencer SDRA (prep track) outlaw winner William Smashey Backyard Boogie 10/30 (Poway) Fall nationals 11/20 RC Tip Of the Week (brought to you by Colin) Main Topic:   Apollo car Listener questions   Featured Item of the week Curved Lexan scissors, buy a set and thank me later   Thank you to MaxAmps, MKS Servo, Maclan racing, Graupner USA, CowRC, All you awesome fans, We love you all!

Good Show
Frustration Mounting in Leafsland

Good Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 86:38


The group breaks down the Leafs' 7-1 blowout loss to Penguins, and the lingering frustration among fans (0:51). Next, DailyFaceoff.com's Frank Seravalli joins to discuss the Kraken's home opener, realistic expectations for Seattle this season, the Leafs' struggles, why he expects the organization to triple-down on the roster, the Jack Eichel situation, and why Vegas […]

The Current
Mounting public anger over soaring COVID-19 cases in Saskatchewan

The Current

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 8:40


Murray Mandryk, a political columnist with the Regina Leader-Post, discusses the public anger over soaring COVID-19 cases in Saskatchewan.

Aaron Torres Sports Podcast
EMERGENCY POD: Coach O fired, who's next at LSU, defending Tennessee fans, can anyone beat Georgia + pressure mounting for Dan Mullen

Aaron Torres Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 74:28


We had to release Monday's Aaron Torres Podcast early, as Aaron discusses Coach O's firing, who's next at LSU and defending Tennessee fans after the craziness of Saturday. Plus, who is best equipped to beat Georgia and is the pressure mounting on Dan Mullen? Here's the full rundown:Coach O OUT + Who's next at LSU: Aaron reacts to the shocking news, that Coach O is officially out as LSU's head coach (2:00). He has all the details, and then begins to look at who could potentially replace Coach O as the next head coach (7:30). He looks at the plusses and minuses of guys like Jimbo Fisher, Lane Kiffin, James Franklin, Mario Cristobal and wonders who is realistic and who isn't?Craziness in Knoxville, Georgia + Dan Mullen: Next up, Aaron reacts to the rest of a WILD college football weekend, starting with the craziness at Tennessee. He explains what happened, separates fact from fiction and says why you can't *only* blame Tennessee fans for what happened on Saturday night (30:30). Finally, he asks, which team is best suited to beat Georgia (48:30) and wonders - is it time to start asking some tough questions on Dan Mullen, after a loss on Saturday dropped his team to 4-6 in his last 10 games dating back to last year (1:00:03)

The Coconuts Podcast
Fresh Tunes Friday: Behind the Back To The Middle EP, with Bryan Estepa | The Coconuts Podcast | Oct 15, 2021

The Coconuts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 59:23


It's the start of Fresh Tunes Friday, where we showcase a musical guest every third Friday of the month. We kicked things off with Sydney's own Bryan Estepa, a Filipino-Australian singer-songwriter, who just released his Back To The Middle EP. What's it like recording music in lockdown? Listen in to find out!Other stories include:Indonesia finally confirms 19 eligible countries as Bali reopens to foreign tourism today | Come Saturday, Bangkok can stay out till 11pm | Man who murdered taxi driver was psych patient, once threatened mass shooting | Mounting calls in Indonesia to ban new Superman comic featuring bisexual character | Legoland Malaysia reopens theme park tomorrow | LOOK: Over 100 rescued by Philippine Coast Guard from floods due to ‘Maring' | Singapore Telegram channel attracts claims of vaccine magnetism | Let's go to the movies? Junta wants to reopen Myanmar's cinemasThe Coconuts Podcast delivers impactful, weird, and wonderful reporting by our journalists on the ground in eight cities: Singapore, Bangkok, Hong Kong, Manila, Jakarta, Kuala Lumpur, Yangon, and Bali. Listen to headline news and insightful interviews on matters large and small, designed for people located in – or curious about – Southeast Asia and Hong Kong.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 10.08.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 59:38


Raspberries, ellagic acid reveal benefits in two studies Oregon State University, October 1, 2021.    Articles that appeared recently in the Journal of Berry Research report that raspberries and compounds present in the fruit could help support healthy body mass and motor function, including balance, coordination and strength.   In one study, Neil Shay and colleagues at Oregon State University fed mice a high fat, high sugar diet plus one of the following: raspberry juice concentrate, raspberry puree concentrate, raspberry fruit powder, raspberry seed extract, ellagic acid (a polyphenol that occurs in a relatively high amount in raspberries), raspberry ketone, or a combination of raspberry ketone and ellagic acid. Additional groups of animals received a high fat, high sugar diet alone or a low fat diet.   While mice that received the high fat and sugar diet alone experienced a significant increase in body mass, the addition of raspberry juice concentrate, raspberry puree concentrate or ellagic acid plus raspberry ketone helped prevent this effect. Of note, mice that received raspberry juice concentrate experienced gains similar to those of animals given a low fat diet. "We hope that the findings from this study can help guide the design of future clinical trials," Dr Shay stated.   In another study, Barbara Shukitt-Hale, PhD, and her associates at Tufts University's Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging gave 19 month old rats a control diet or a diet enhanced with raspberry extract for 11 weeks. Psychomotor behavior was assessed during week 7 and cognitive testing was conducted during weeks 9-10.   Animals that received raspberry performed better on psychomotor coordination and balance, and had better muscle tone, strength and stamina than those that received a control diet. "These results may have important implications for healthy aging," stated Dr Shukitt-Hale. "While further research in humans is necessary, animal model studies are helpful in identifying deficits associated with normal aging."       Massage doesn't just make muscles feel better, it makes them heal faster and stronger Harvard University, October 6, 2021 Massage has been used to treat sore, injured muscles for more than 3,000 years, and today many athletes swear by massage guns to rehabilitate their bodies. But other than making people feel good, do these "mechanotherapies" actually improve healing after severe injury? According to a new study from researchers at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), the answer is "yes." Using a custom-designed robotic system to deliver consistent and tunable compressive forces to mice's leg muscles, the team found that this mechanical loading (ML) rapidly clears immune cells called neutrophils out of severely injured muscle tissue. This process also removed inflammatory cytokinesreleased by neutrophils from the muscles, enhancing the process of muscle fiber regeneration. The research is published in Science Translational Medicine. "Lots of people have been trying to study the beneficial effects of massage and other mechanotherapies on the body, but up to this point it hadn't been done in a systematic, reproducible way. Our work shows a very clear connection between mechanical stimulation and immune function. This has promise for regenerating a wide variety of tissues including bone, tendon, hair, and skin, and can also be used in patients with diseases that prevent the use of drug-based interventions," said first author Bo Ri Seo, Ph.D., who is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the lab of Core Faculty member Dave Mooney, Ph.D. at the Wyss Institute and SEAS. Seo and her coauthors started exploring the effects of mechanotherapy on injured tissues in mice several years ago, and found that it doubled the rate of muscle regeneration and reduced tissue scarring over the course of two weeks. Excited by the idea that mechanical stimulation alone can foster regeneration and enhance muscle function, the team decided to probe more deeply into exactly how that process worked in the body, and to figure out what parameters would maximize healing. They teamed up with soft robotics experts in the Harvard Biodesign Lab, led by Wyss Associate Faculty member Conor Walsh, Ph.D., to create a small device that used sensors and actuators to monitor and control the force applied to the limb of a mouse. " The device we created allows us to precisely control parameters like the amount and frequency of force applied, enabling a much more systematic approach to understanding tissue healing than would be possible with a manual approach," said co-second author Christopher Payne, Ph.D., a former Postdoctoral Fellow at the Wyss Institute and the Harvard Biodesign Lab who is now a Robotics Engineer at Viam, Inc.  Once the device was ready, the team experimented with applying force to mice's leg muscles via a soft silicone tip and used ultrasound to get a look at what happened to the tissue in response. They observed that the muscles experienced a strain of between 10-40%, confirming that the tissues were experiencing mechanical force. They also used those ultrasound imaging data to develop and validate a computational model that could predict the amount of tissue strain under different loading forces. They then applied consistent, repeated force to injured muscles for 14 days. While both treated and untreated muscles displayed a reduction in the amount of damaged muscle fibers, the reduction was more pronounced and the cross-sectional area of the fibers was larger in the treated muscle, indicating that treatment had led to greater repair and strength recovery. The greater the force applied during treatment, the stronger the injured muscles became, confirming that mechanotherapy improves muscle recovery after injury. But how? Evicting neutrophils to enhance regeneration To answer that question, the scientists performed a detailed biological assessment, analyzing a wide range of inflammation-related factors called cytokines and chemokines in untreated vs. treated muscles. A subset of cytokines was dramatically lower in treated muscles after three days of mechanotherapy, and these cytokines are associated with the movement of immune cells called neutrophils, which play many roles in the inflammation process. Treated muscles also had fewer neutrophils in their tissue than untreated muscles, suggesting that the reduction in cytokines that attract them had caused the decrease in neutrophil infiltration. The team had a hunch that the force applied to the muscle by the mechanotherapy effectively squeezed the neutrophils and cytokines out of the injured tissue. They confirmed this theory by injecting fluorescent molecules into the muscles and observing that the movement of the molecules was more significant with force application, supporting the idea that it helped to flush out the muscle tissue. To pick apart what effect the neutrophils and their associated cytokines have on regenerating muscle fibers, the scientists performed in vitro studies in which they grew muscle progenitor cells (MPCs) in a medium in which neutrophils had previously been grown. They found that the number of MPCs increased, but the rate at which they differentiated (developed into other cell types) decreased, suggesting that neutrophil-secreted factors stimulate the growth of muscle cells, but the prolonged presence of those factors impairs the production of new muscle fibers. "Neutrophils are known to kill and clear out pathogens and damaged tissue, but in this study we identified their direct impacts on muscle progenitor cell behaviors," said co-second author Stephanie McNamara, a former Post-Graduate Fellow at the Wyss Institute who is now an M.D.-Ph.D. student at Harvard Medical School (HMS). "While the inflammatory response is important for regeneration in the initial stages of healing, it is equally important that inflammation is quickly resolved to enable the regenerative processes to run its full course." Seo and her colleagues then turned back to their in vivo model and analyzed the types of muscle fibers in the treated vs. untreated mice 14 days after injury. They found that type IIX fibers were prevalent in healthy muscle and treated muscle, but untreated injured muscle contained smaller numbers of type IIX fibers and increased numbers of type IIA fibers. This difference explained the enlarged fiber size and greater force production of treated muscles, as IIX fibers produce more force than IIA fibers. Finally, the team homed in on the optimal amount of time for neutrophil presence in injured muscle by depleting neutrophils in the mice on the third day after injury. The treated mice's muscles showed larger fiber size and greater strength recovery than those in untreated mice, confirming that while neutrophils are necessary in the earliest stages of injury recovery, getting them out of the injury site early leads to improved muscle regeneration. "These findings are remarkable because they indicate that we can influence the function of the body's immune system in a drug-free, non-invasive way," said Walsh, who is also the Paul A. Maeder Professor of Engineering and Applied Science at SEAS and whose group is experienced in developing wearable technology for diagnosing and treating disease. "This provides great motivation for the development of external, mechanical interventions to help accelerate and improve muscle and tissue healing that have the potential to be rapidly translated to the clinic." The team is continuing to investigate this line of research with multiple projects in the lab. They plan to validate this mechanotherpeutic approach in larger animals, with the goal of being able to test its efficacy on humans. They also hope to test it on different types of injuries, age-related muscle loss, and muscle performance enhancement. "The fields of mechanotherapy and immunotherapy rarely interact with each other, but this work is a testament to how crucial it is to consider both physical and biological elements when studying and working to improve human health," said Mooney, who is the corresponding author of the paper and the Robert P. Pinkas Family Professor of Bioengineering at SEAS. "The idea that mechanics influence cell and tissue function was ridiculed until the last few decades, and while scientists have made great strides in establishing acceptance of this fact, we still know very little about how that process actually works at the organ level. This research has revealed a previously unknown type of interplay between mechanobiology and immunology that is critical for muscle tissue healing, in addition to describing a new form of mechanotherapy that potentially could be as potent as chemical or gene therapies, but much simpler and less invasive," said Wyss Founding Director Don Ingber, M.D., Ph.D., who is also the Judah Folkman Professor of Vascular Biology at (HMS) and the Vascular Biology Program at Boston Children's Hospital, as well as Professor of Bioengineering at SEAS.   Vitamin E could help protect older men from pneumonia University of Helsinki (Finland), October 7 2021.    An article that appeared in Clinical Interventions in Aging reported a protective role for vitamin E against pneumonia in older men.   For the current investigation, Dr Harri Hemilä of the University of Helsinki, Finland analyzed data from the Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-Carotene (ATBC) Cancer Prevention Study conducted in Finland. The trial included 29,133 men between the ages of 50 to 69 years who smoked at least five cigarettes daily upon enrollment. Participants received alpha tocopherol (vitamin E), beta carotene, both supplements, or a placebo for five to eight years.   The current study was limited to 7,469 ATBC participants who started smoking at age 21 or older. Among this group, supplementation with vitamin E was associated with a 35% lower risk of developing pneumonia in comparison with those who did not receive the vitamin.  Light smokers who engaged in leisure time exercise had a 69% lower risk compared with unsupplemented members of this subgroup. The risk in this subgroup of developing pneumonia by age 74 was 12.9%.   Among the one-third of the current study's population who quit smoking for a median period of two years, there was a 72% lower risk of pneumonia in association with vitamin E supplementation. In this group, exercisers who received vitamin E experienced an 81% lower pneumonia risk.   Dr Hemilä observed that the benefit for vitamin E in this study was strongest for older subjects—a group at higher risk of pneumonia.   "The current analysis of individual-level data suggests that trials on vitamin E and pneumonia on nonsmoking elderly males are warranted," he concluded.       Toxic fatty acids to blame for brain cell death after injury New York University, October 7, 2021 Cells that normally nourish healthy brain cells called neurons release toxic fatty acids after neurons are damaged, a new study in rodents shows. This phenomenon is likely the driving factor behind most, if not all, diseases that affect brain function, as well as the natural breakdown of brain cells seen in aging, researchers say. Previous research has pointed to astrocytes—a star-shaped glial cell of the central nervous system—as the culprits behind cell death seen in Parkinson's disease and dementia, among other neurodegenerative diseases. While many experts believed that these cells released a neuron-killing molecule to "clear away" damaged brain cells, the identity of this toxin has until now remained a mystery. Led by researchers at NYU Grossman School of Medicine, the new investigation provides what they say is the first evidence that tissue damage prompts astrocytes to produce two kinds of fats, long-chain saturated free fatty acids and phosphatidylcholines. These fats then trigger cell death in damaged neurons, the electrically active cells that send messages throughout nerve tissue. Publishing Oct. 6 in the journal Nature, the study also showed that when researchers blocked fatty acid formation in mice, 75 percent of neurons survived compared with 10 percent when the fatty acids were allowed to form. The researchers' earlier work showed that brain cells continued to function when shielded from astrocyte attacks.  "Our findings show that the toxic fatty acids produced by astrocytes play a critical role in brain cell death and provide a promising new target for treating, and perhaps even preventing, many neurodegenerative diseases," says study co-senior author Shane Liddelow, Ph.D. Liddelow, an assistant professor in the Department of Neuroscience and Physiology at NYU Langone Health, adds that targeting these fats instead of the cells that produce them may be a safer approach to treating neurodegenerative diseasesbecause astrocytes feed nerve cells and clear away their waste. Stopping them from working altogether could interfere with healthy brain function. Although it remains unclear why astrocytes produce these toxins, it is possible they evolved to destroy damaged cells before they can harm their neighbors, says Liddelow. He notes that while healthy cells are not harmed by the toxins, neurons become susceptible to the damaging effects when they are injured, mutated, or infected by prions, the contagious, misfolded proteins that play a major role in mad cow disease and similar illnesses. Perhaps in chronic diseases like dementia, this otherwise helpful process goes off track and becomes a problem, the study authors say. For the investigation, researchers analyzed the molecules released by astrocytes collected from rodents. They also genetically engineered some groups of mice to prevent the normal production of the toxic fats and looked to see whether neuron death occurred after an acute injury. "Our results provide what is likely the most detailed molecular map to date of how tissue damage leads to brain cell death, enabling researchers to better understand why neurons die in all kinds of diseases," says Liddelow, also an assistant professor in the Department of Ophthalmology at NYU Langone. Liddelow cautions that while the findings are promising, the genetic techniques used to block the enzyme that produces toxic fatty acids in mice are not ready for use in humans. As a result, the researchers next plan is to explore safe and effective ways to interfere with the release of the toxins in human patients. Liddelow and his colleagues had previously shown these neurotoxic astrocytes in the brains of patients with Parkinson's, Huntington's disease, and multiple sclerosis, among other diseases.   Clinical trial for nicotinamide riboside: Vitamin safely boosts levels of important cell metabolite linked to multiple health benefits University of Iowa Health Care, October 3, 2021   In the first controlled clinical trial of nicotinamide riboside (NR), a newly discovered form of Vitamin B3, researchers have shown that the compound is safe for humans and increases levels of a cell metabolite that is critical for cellular energy production and protection against stress and DNA damage.   Studies in mice have shown that boosting the levels of this cell metabolite -- known as NAD+ -- can produce multiple health benefits, including resistance to weight gain, improved control of blood sugar and cholesterol, reduced nerve damage, and longer lifespan. Levels of NAD+ diminish with age, and it has been suggested that loss of this metabolite may play a role in age-related health decline.   These findings in animal studies have spurred people to take commercially available NR supplements designed to boost NAD+. However, these over-the-counter supplements have not undergone clinical trials to see if they work in people.   The new research, reported in the journal Nature Communications, was led by Charles Brenner, PhD, professor and Roy J. Carver Chair of Biochemistry at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine in collaboration with colleagues at Queens University Belfast and ChromaDex Corp. (NASDAQ: CDXC), which supplied the NR used in the trial. Brenner is a consultant for ChromaDex. He also is co-founder and Chief Scientific Adviser of ProHealthspan, which sells NR supplements under the trade name Tru NIAGEN®.   The human trial involved six men and six women, all healthy. Each participant received single oral doses of 100 mg, 300 mg, or 1,000 mg of NR in a different sequence with a seven-day gap between doses. After each dose, blood and urine samples were collected and analyzed by Brenner's lab to measure various NAD+ metabolites in a process called metabolomics. The trial showed that the NR vitamin increased NAD+ metabolism by amounts directly related to the dose, and there were no serious side effects with any of the doses.   "This trial shows that oral NR safely boosts human NAD+ metabolism," Brenner says. "We are excited because everything we are learning from animal systems indicates that the effectiveness of NR depends on preserving and/or boosting NAD+ and related compounds in the face of metabolic stresses. Because the levels of supplementation in mice that produce beneficial effects are achievable in people, it appears than health benefits of NR will be translatable to humans safely."   The next step will be to study the effect of longer duration NR supplementation on NAD+ metabolism in healthy adults, but Brenner also has plans to test the effects of NR in people with diseases and health conditions, including elevated cholesterol, obesity and diabetes, and people at risk for chemotherapeutic peripheral neuropathy.   Prior to the formal clinical trial, Brenner conducted a pilot human study -- on himself. In 2004, he had discovered that NR is a natural product found in milk and that there is pathway to convert NR to NAD+ in people. More than a decade of research on NR metabolic pathways and health effects in mice and rats had convinced him that NR supplementation had real promise to improve human health and wellness. After consulting with UI's institutional review board, he conducted an experiment in which he took 1 gram of NR once a day for seven days, and his team analyzed blood and urine samples using mass spectrometry. The experiment showed that Brenner's blood NAD+ increased by about 2.7 times. In addition, though he reported immediate sensitivity to flushing with the related compound niacin, he did not experience any side effects taking NR.   The biggest surprise from his metabolomic analysis was an increase in a metabolite called NAAD, which was multiplied by 45 times, from trace levels to amounts in the micromolar range that were easily detectable.   "While this was unexpected, I thought it might be useful," Brenner says. "NAD+ is an abundant metabolite and it is sometimes hard to see the needle move on levels of abundant metabolites. But when you can look at a low-abundance metabolite that goes from undetectable to easily detectable, there is a great signal to noise ratio, meaning that NAAD levels could be a useful biomarker for tracking increases in NAD+ in human trials."   Brenner notes this was a case of bidirectional translational science; having learned something from the initial human experiment, his team was able to return to laboratory mice to explore the unexpected NAAD finding in more detail.   Brenner's mouse study showed that NAAD is formed from NR and confirmed that NAAD levels are a strong biomarker for increased NAD+ metabolism. The experiments also revealed more detail about NAD+ metabolic pathways.   In particular, the researchers compared the ability of all three NAD+ precursor vitamins -- NR, niacin, and nicotinamide -- to boost NAD+ metabolism and stimulate the activity of certain enzymes, which have been linked to longevity and healthbenefits. The study showed for the first time that oral NR is superior to nicotinamide, which is better than niacin in terms of the total amount of NAD+ produced at an equivalent dose. NR was also the best of the three in stimulating the activity of sirtuin enzymes. However, in this case, NR was the best at stimulating sirtuin-like activities, followed by niacin, followed by nicotinamide.   The information from the mouse study subsequently helped Brenner's team design the formal clinical trial. In addition to showing that NR boosts NAD+ in humans without adverse effects, the trial confirmed that NAAD is a highly sensitive biomarker of NAD+ supplementation in people.   "Now that we have demonstrated safety in this small clinical trial, we are in a position to find out if the health benefits that we have seen in animals can be reproduced in people," says Brenner, who also is co-director of the Obesity Research and Education Initiative, professor of internal medicine, and a member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center at the UI.   Protecting the ozone layer is delivering vast health benefits Montreal Protocol will spare Americans from 443 million skin cancer cases National Center for Atmospheric Research, October 7, 2021 An international agreement to protect the ozone layer is expected to prevent 443 million cases of skin cancer and 63 million cataract cases for people born in the United States through the end of this century, according to new research. The research team, by scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), ICF Consulting, and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), focused on the far-reaching impacts of a landmark 1987 treaty known as the Montreal Protocol and later amendments that substantially strengthened it. The agreement phased out the use of chemicals such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) that destroy ozone in the stratosphere. Stratospheric ozone shields the planet from harmful levels of the Sun's ultraviolet (UV) radiation, protecting life on Earth. To measure the long-term effects of the Montreal Protocol, the scientists developed a computer modeling approach that enabled them to look to both the past and the future by simulating the treaty's impact on Americans born between 1890 and 2100. The modeling revealed the treaty's effect on stratospheric ozone, the associated reductions in ultraviolet radiation, and the resulting health benefits.  In addition to the number of skin cancer and cataract cases that were avoided, the study also showed that the treaty, as most recently amended, will prevent approximately 2.3 million skin cancer deaths in the U.S. “It's very encouraging,” said NCAR scientist Julia Lee-Taylor, a co-author of the study. “It shows that, given the will, the nations of the world can come together to solve global environmental problems.” The study, funded by the EPA, was published in ACS Earth and Space Chemistry. NCAR is sponsored by the National Science Foundation. Mounting concerns over the ozone layer Scientists in the 1970s began highlighting the threat to the ozone layer when they found that CFCs, used as refrigerants and in other applications, release chlorine atoms in the stratosphere that set off chemical reactions that destroy ozone. Concerns mounted the following decade with the discovery of an Antarctic ozone hole. The loss of stratospheric ozone would be catastrophic, as high levels of UV radiation have been linked to certain types of skin cancer, cataracts, and immunological disorders. The ozone layer also protects terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, as well as agriculture. Policy makers responded to the threat with the 1987 Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, in which nations agreed to curtail the use of certain ozone-destroying substances. Subsequent amendments strengthened the treaty by expanding the list of ozone-destroying substances (such as halons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons, or HCFCs) and accelerating the timeline for phasing out their use. The amendments were based on Input from the scientific community, including a number of NCAR scientists, that were summarized in quadrennial Ozone Assessment reports. To quantify the impacts of the treaty, the research team built a model known as the Atmospheric and Health Effects Framework. This model, which draws on various data sources about ozone, public health, and population demographics, consists of five computational steps. These simulate past and future emissions of ozone-destroying substances, the impacts of those substances on stratospheric ozone, the resulting changes in ground-level UV radiation, the U.S. population's exposure to UV radiation, and the incidence and mortality of health effects resulting from the exposure. The results showed UV radiation levels returning to 1980 levels by the mid-2040s under the amended treaty. In contrast, UV levels would have continued to increase throughout this century if the treaty had not been amended, and they would have soared far higher without any treaty at all.  Even with the amendments, the simulations show excess cases of cataracts and various types of skin cancer beginning to occur with the onset of ozone depletion and peaking decades later as the population exposed to the highest UV levels ages. Those born between 1900 and 2040 experience heightened cases of skin cancer and cataracts, with the worst health outcomes affecting those born between about 1950 and 2000. However, the health impacts would have been far more severe without the treaty, with cases of skin cancer and cataracts rising at an increasingly rapid rate through the century.  “We peeled away from disaster,” Lee-Taylor said. “What is eye popping is what would have happened by the end of this century if not for the Montreal Protocol. By 2080, the amount of UV has tripled. After that, our calculations for the health impacts start to break down because we're getting so far into conditions that have never been seen before.” The research team also found that more than half the treaty's health benefits could be traced to the later amendments rather than the original 1987 Montreal Protocol. Overall, the treaty prevented more than 99% of potential health impacts that would have otherwise occurred from ozone destruction. This showed the importance of the treaty's flexibility in adjusting to evolving scientific knowledge, the authors said. The researchers focused on the U.S. because of ready access to health data and population projections. Lee-Taylor said that the specific health outcomes in other countries may vary, but the overall trends would be similar. “The treaty had broad global benefits,” she said.     What is Boron? The trace mineral boron provides profound anti-cancer effects, in addition to maintaining stronger bones. Life Extension, September 2021 Boron is a trace mineral found in the earth's crust and in water. Its importance in human health has been underestimated. Boron has been shown to have actions against specific types of malignancies, such as: Cervical cancer: The country Turkey has an extremely low incidence of cervical cancer, and scientists partially attribute this to its boron-rich soil.1 When comparing women who live in boron-rich regions versus boron-poor regions of Turkey, not a single woman living in the boron-rich regions had any indication of cervical cancer.2(The mean dietary intake of boron for women in this group was 8.41 mg/day.)  Boron interferes with the life cycle of the human papillomavirus (HPV), which is a contributing factor in approximately 95% of all cervical cancers.1  Considering that HPV viruses are increasingly implicated in head and neck cancers,3,4 supplementation with this ultra-low-cost mineral could have significant benefits in protecting against this malignancy that is increasing in prevalence. Lung cancer: A study conducted at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center between 1995 and 2005 found that increased boron intake was associated with a lower risk of lung cancer in postmenopausal women who were taking hormone replacement therapy. Prostate cancer: Studies point to boron's ability to inhibit the growth and spread of prostate cancer cells.  In one study, when mice were exposed to boric acid, their tumors shrank by as much as 38%.6 One analysis found that increased dietary boron intake was associated with a decreased risk of prostate cancer.7 Several human and animal studies have confirmed the important connection between boron and bone health. Boron prevents calcium loss,8 while also alleviating the bone problems associated with magnesium and vitamin D deficiency.9 All of these nutrients help maintain bone density. A study in female rats revealed the harmful effects a deficiency in boron has on bones, including:10 Decreased bone volume fraction, a measure of bone strength, Decreased thickness of the bone's spongy inner layer, and Decreased maximum force needed to break the femur. And in a study of post-menopausal women, supplementation with3 mg of boron per day prevented calcium loss and bone demineralization by reducing urinary excretion of both calcium and magnesium.8 In addition to its bone and anti-cancer benefits, there are nine additional reasons boron is an important trace mineral vital for health and longevity. It has been shown to:1 Greatly improve wound healing, Beneficially impact the body's use of estrogen, testosterone, and vitamin D, Boost magnesium absorption, Reduce levels of inflammatory biomarkers, such as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), Raise levels of antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, Protect against pesticide-induced oxidative stress and heavy-metal toxicity, Improve the brain's electrical activity, which may explain its benefits for cognitive performance, and short-term memory in the elderly, Influence the formation and activity of key biomolecules, such as S-adenosyl methionine (SAM-e) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), and Potentially help ameliorate the adverse effects of traditional chemotherapeutic agents. Because the amount of boron varies in the soil, based on geographical location, obtaining enough boron through diet alone can be difficult. Supplementing with low-cost boron is an effective way to maintain adequate levels of this overlooked micronutrient.

Around the Horn
Pressure Mounting

Around the Horn

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 26:24


Tony Reali and the national panel discuss the Red Sox big win over the Yankees in the AL Wild Card before previewing the NL Wild Card game tonight.

Bucs Pewter Nation Podcast
Pewter Report Podcast: Bucs Injuries Mounting, Leftwich Struggles vs. Patriots

Bucs Pewter Nation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 64:01


Jon is joined by Kasey Smith and later on Matt for episode 419. They get into the pile of injuries to the Bucs secondary and how it will impact them over their next couple of games, starting with next week. Then they break down the usage of Antonio Brown on Sunday night along with the performance of Tom Brady and the decisions made by offensive coordinator Byron Leftwich in the second half. Hear it all on the Pewter Report Podcast, energized by CELSIUS.

The FOX News Rundown
Evening Edition: The United States Facing Mounting Supply Chain Issues

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 12:41


Dozens of freight containers at ports in Los Angeles and Long Beach, California, two of the largest ports in the United States, cannot be unloaded because of a shortage of workers is an example of one of the key issues causing supply chain delays. Other issues, including rising gas prices, the Delta variant surge and Biden Administration policy changes can all be argued to be a part of the overall problem. FOX's John Saucier speaks to FOX's Edward Lawrence, White House Correspondent for FOX Business, about the multiple issues causing delays in the supply chain which look to be getting worse.  

First Take
Hour 2: Pressure Mounting?

First Take

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 44:40


Stephen A. Smith, Sam Acho and Ryan Clark debate more about the Bucs at Rams, if Big Ben or Fields is under more pressure, if Eli Manning is a hall of famer and more.

OutKick 360
NFL QB Injuries Mounting, Jameis STRUGGLES

OutKick 360

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 44:18


This is the OutKick 360 for Tuesday September 21, 2021.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.