Podcasts about Barnard

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  • 698PODCASTS
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  • 41mAVG DURATION
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  • Jan 16, 2022LATEST
Barnard

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Latest podcast episodes about Barnard

Choose You Now
Dr. Neal Barnard: Choosing to Be Hormonally Balanced

Choose You Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 27:16


Dr. Neal Barnard is the president of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine and author of a great many books on nutrition, including his latest, Your Body in Balance: The New Science of Food, Hormones, and Health. Dr. Barnard's research paved the way for viewing type 2 diabetes as a potentially reversible condition for many people. In his latest study, his research found a way to knock out menopausal hot flashes for many women, using just a simple diet change. Find out how this acclaimed doctor chooses himself bite for bite… Become a member of our Patreon page: patreon.com/chooseyounow to have access to exclusive content and send us your questions and comments at chooseyounowpodcast@gmail.com. For more about my Nutrition services and resources, visit me at PlantBasedDietitian.com

Student of the Gun Radio
Democrats: The Real Terrorists & 30 Super Carry | SOTG 1120

Student of the Gun Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 98:03


The Vice Prostitute of the United States said the January 6th, 2021 protests were akin to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. However, she forgot a few inconvenient historical facts. During our Duracoat Finished Firearm segment, Paul will display a custom-finished pistol. Our question for you is; do you like it rough? Also, for our Brownells Bullet Points feature we will discuss red versus green optics? Does it matter and how?   For our SOTG Homeroom from CrossBreed Holsters, we will consider the Gun Control agenda in the United States and over five decades of lies. Is the American public still falling for the propaganda of the left? Lastly, have you heard about the new 30 Super Carry cartridge from Federal? Thanks for being a part of SOTG! We hope you find value in the message we share. If you've got any questions, here are some options to contact us: Send an Email Send a Text Call Us Enjoy the show! And remember…You're a Beginner Once, a Student For Life! TOPICS COVERED THIS EPISODE [0:04:38] Bob Saget had gotten his Booster Shot not too long before dying of a Heart Attack https://youtu.be/86jcx5e0mUk [0:16:52] Duracoat Finished Firearms - DuracoatFirearmFinishes.com TOPIC: Canik TP9 SFL, Hell ‘n Back - Urban Mirage White [0:21:20] Brownells Bullet Points - Brownells.com TOPIC: Red Dot or Green Dot? Does it make a difference? Huge thanks to our Partners: SDS Imports | Brownells | CrossBreed | Duracoat | Hi-Point Firearms [0:38:30] SOTG Homeroom - CrossBreedHolsters.com TOPIC: Americans Not Buying Gun Control's ‘Crime Prevention' Ruse www.ammoland.com [0:47:45] Harris slammed for comparing Capitol riot to 9/11, Pearl Harbor attacks nypost.com/2022 [0:54:20] In the 1980s, a Far-Left, Female-Led Domestic Terrorism Group Bombed the U.S. Capitol www.smithsonianmag.com [1:01:00] Bomb explodes in Capitol building www.history.com [1:16:29] First Look: Federal Premium 30 Super Carry Ammunition www.shootingillustrated.com FEATURING: Duracoat Firearm Finishes, Brownells, CrossBreed Holsters, Ammoland, NY Post, Smithsonian Mag, History.com, Shooting Illustrated, Madison Rising, Jarrad Markel, Paul Markel, SOTG University PARTNERS: SDS Imports, Brownells Inc, CrossBreed Holsters, DuraCoat Firearm Finishes, Hi-Point Firearms FIND US ON: Full30, Parler, MeWe.com, TikTok, iTunes, Stitcher, AppleTV, Roku, Amazon, GooglePlay, YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, tumblr SOURCES From www.ammoland.com: Gun control groups worked for decades to impose Second Amendment restrictions that do little to reduce crime. They've used public relations campaigns, scare tactics, and rhetoric that never addresses those actually committing these tragedies. Over the past two years, though, Americans have experienced first-hand what happens when they are left defenseless against criminals that don't follow the law. A new poll shows law-abiding Americans have had enough of the gun control groups' schemes and the ruse is up. (Click Here for Full Article)   From nypost.com/2022: Vice President Kamala Harris caused outrage Thursday by comparing the Jan. 6 Capitol riot to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 and the Sept. 11 attacks on New York and Washington by al Qaeda terrorists. “Certain dates echo throughout history, including dates that instantly remind all who have lived through them where they were, and what they were doing when our democracy came under assault,” Harris said in remarks at the Capitol's Statuary Hall on Thursday morning. (Click Here for Full Article)   From www.smithsonianmag.com: Amidst the social and political turmoil of the 1970s, a handful of women—among them a onetime Barnard student, a Texas sorority sister, the daughter of a former communist journalist—joined and became leaders of the May 19th Communist Organization. Named to honor the shared birthday of civil rights icon Malcolm X and Vietnamese leader Ho Chi Minh, M19 took its belief in “revolutionary anti-imperialism” to violent extremes: It is “the first and only women-created and women-led terrorist group,” says national security expert and historian William Rosenau. (Click Here for Full Article)   From www.shootingillustrated.com: One of the fundamentals of growing a business is to identify a niche and fill it. That's all the folks at Federal were doing. There has long been a small space between the performance of 9 mm Parabellum and .380 ACP. Though they have the same diameters, the former is the NATO and law enforcement standard and has really been pressing its advantage over every other defensive cartridge over the last several years. The public has embraced it as well. Once new bullets and loadings came along that demonstrated the round's efficacy as being equal to that of the vaunted .40 S&W and .45 ACP, the reduced recoil of the 9 mm and the superior firepower of gun's chambered for it made for an easy choice. (Click Here for Full Article)

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee
Do Vegans Need Supplements? | Dr. Neal Barnard Live Q&A

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 44:46


Can vegans get all the vitamins and nutrients they need without taking a supplement? Is it even possible?   Get the answer from Dr. Neal Barnard when he joins “The Weight Loss Champion” Chuck Carroll on The Exam Room Live!   Dr. Barnard will also be answering viewer questions sent to the Doctor's Mailbag.    - Do older vegans need a calcium supplement? - How can you break an addiction to cheese? - How long does it take for tastebuds to change? - What does “eating the rainbow” look like?   Chuck also has details about a 12-year study on foods that can help prevent cognitive decline in older adults.   This episode of The Exam Room™ Podcast is sponsored by The Gregory J. Reiter Memorial Fund, which supports organizations like the Physicians Committee that carry on Greg's passion and love for animals through rescue efforts, veganism, and wildlife conservation.   — — — Gregory J. Reiter Memorial Fund https://gregoryreiterfund.org — — — Cognitive Decline Study https://bit.ly/CogNutritionStudy — — — Chuck Carroll Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ChuckCarrollWLC Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/ChuckCarrollWLC Facebook: http://wghtloss.cc/ChuckFacebook — — — Dr. Neal Barnard Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/drnealbarnard Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drnealbarnard Facebook: http://bit.ly/DrBarnardFB Your Body In Balance: https://amzn.to/2UvAfxW — — — 21-Day Vegan Kickstart App iOS: https://bit.ly/VegKStrt-iOS Android: https://bit.ly/VegKStrtAndrd Web: https://www.pcrm.org/kickstart — — — Barnard Medical Center Appointments https://bit.ly/BMCtelemed 202-527-7500 — — — Share the Show Please subscribe and give the show a 5-star rating on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or many other podcast providers. Don't forget to share it with a friend for inspiration!

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
When You Drink A Glass Of Milk Or Eat A Slice A Cheese, You Are Getting Estrogens From The Cow - by Neal Barnard, M.D.

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 2:24


When You Drink A Glass Of Milk Or Eat A Slice A Cheese, You Are Getting Estrogens From The Cow - by Neal Barnard, M.D.Neal Barnard, M.D.•           https://www.pcrm.org/about-us/staff/neal-barnard-md-facc•           Book - Foods That Cause You to Lose Weight: The Negative Calorie Effect Dr. Barnard has led numerous research studies investigating the effects of diet on diabetes, body weight, and chronic pain, including a groundbreaking study of dietary interventions in type 2 diabetes, funded by the National Institutes of Health, that paved the way for viewing type 2 diabetes as a potentially reversible condition for many patients. Dr. Barnard has authored more than 100 scientific publications and 20 books for medical and lay readers, and is the editor in chief of the Nutrition Guide for Clinicians, a textbook made available to all U.S. medical students. As president of the Physicians Committee, Dr. Barnard leads programs advocating for preventive medicine, good nutrition, and higher ethical standards in research. His research contributed to the acceptance of plant-based diets in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. In 2015, he was named a Fellow of the American College of Cardiology. In 2016, he founded the Barnard Medical Center in Washington, D.C., as a model for making nutrition a routine part of all medical care. Working with the Medical Society of the District of Columbia and the American Medical Association, Dr. Barnard has authored key resolutions, now part of AMA policy, calling for a new focus on prevention and nutrition in federal policies and in medical practice. In 2018, he received the Medical Society of the District of Columbia's Distinguished Service Award. He has hosted four PBS television programs on nutrition and health.#NealBarnard #TheRealTruthAboutHealth  #WholeFood #Vegan #Vegetarian #PlantBasedNutrition  CLICK HERE - To Checkout Our MEMBERSHIP CLUB: http://www.realtruthtalks.com Social Media ChannelsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConferenceInstagram : https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/Twitter: https://twitter.com/RTAHealthLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-real-truth-about-health-conference/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealth    Check out our Podcasts Visit us on Apple Podcast and Itunes search:  The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast Amazon: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/23a037be-99dd-4099-b9e0-1cad50774b5a/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RZbS2BafJIEzHYyThm83JGoogle:https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zaW1wbGVjYXN0LmNvbS8yM0ZqRWNTMg%3D%3DStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastAudacy: https://go.audacy.com/partner-podcast-listen-real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-real-truth-about-health-li-85932821/Deezer: https://www.deezer.com/us/show/2867272 Other Video ChannelsYoutube:  https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealthVimeo:  https://vimeo.com/channels/1733189Rumble:   https://rumble.com/c/c-1111513Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConference/videos/?ref=page_internalDailyMotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/TheRealTruthAboutHealthBitChute:  https://www.bitchute.com/channel/JQryXTPDOMih/ Disclaimer:Medical and Health information changes constantly. Therefore, the information provided in this podcast should not be considered current, complete, or exhaustive. Reliance on any information provided in this podcast is solely at your own risk. The Real Truth About Health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, procedures, or opinions referenced in the following podcasts, nor does it exercise any authority or editorial control over that material. The Real Truth About Health provides a forum for discussion of public health issues. The views and opinions of our panelists do not necessarily reflect those of The Real Truth About Health and are provided by those panelists in their individual capacities. The Real Truth About Health has not reviewed or evaluated those statements or claims. 

AtlasNexus
Ep. 9: Chris Barnard | Achieving Environmentalism with the Free Market

AtlasNexus

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 31:24


 Free-market process are better at protecting the environment than top-down solutions! Find out how in this episode of Borderless as Vale Sloane talks market environmentalism with Chris Barnard of the American Conservation Coalition. Leveraging property rights, market incentives, and supply and demand have shown to be effective in saving endangered species and key habitats, but few people think of capitalism when they hear "environmentalism."Barnard and his organization are working to change that through education and advocacy, showing that individuals who favor capitalism over big government do care about the environment and actually have the best, most effective tools to do so. Their efforts are reaching new heights with their "Market Environmentalism Academy" initiative. This free online resource provides in-depth analysis from experts on environmental issues and how the free market provides solutions.You can find out more about the American Conservation Coalition and Market Environmentalism Academy here: https://www.acc.eco/And don't miss our discussion on how the British Conservation Alliance is reaching university students in the United Kingdom with the message of market environmentalism.Stay in the know by following us on social media:https://twitter.com/AtlasNetworkhttps://www.instagram.com/atlasnetwork/https://www.facebook.com/atlasnetwork/Support the Atlas Network Mission Today: https://www.atlasnetwork.org/donate

How to Scale Commercial Real Estate
Brand SERP Optimization: Taking Marketing To The Next Level By Optimizing Your Online Business Profile With Jason Barnard

How to Scale Commercial Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 19:59


Most businesses have their website pages on social media platforms to increase customer engagement. But does this information appear when you Google your business? In this episode, Jason Barnard shares the importance of brand SERP optimization for you and your business. Jason is a digital marketer who specializes in brand SERP optimization and knowledge panel management. In this episode, he explains what brand SERP is and how it can be optimized to benefit your online business. He also shares some of the steps to create a desirable business profile for your brand. Tune in and take your marketing to the next level now!Love the show? Subscribe, rate, review & share! https://www.brickeninvestmentgroup.com/podcast

With Jason Barnard...
How Has Google Changed in 2021 and What's to Come? (Lily Ray and Jason Barnard)

With Jason Barnard...

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 42:40


Lily Ray talks with Jason Barnard about how has Google changed in 2022 and what's to come. Lily Ray has over a decade of SEO experience and is currently Sr. Director, SEO & Head of Organic Research at Amsive Digital, where she provides strategic leadership for the agency's SEO client programs. In this fantastic episode, Lily and Jason Barnard talk about the Google algorithm updates in 2021, and give some predictions for 2022.  Google algorithm updates are major events in the SEO calendar. 2021 has been especially rich in terms of the sheer number of them, and also the volatility they have caused in the SERPs. It feels like 2021 was a special year. Lily Ray walks us through 2021 and shares stories and insights on dozens of confirmed and unconfirmed updates, product launches, and changes to the SERP in 2021.  Finally, a bonus: You'll hear Lily's prediction (something big) of what's going to happen this coming year 2022.  What you'll learn from Lily Ray 00:00 Lily Ray with Jason Barnard01:05 Lily Ray's Brand SERP  & Knowledge Panel04:54 Thanksgiving, Cyber Monday, Black Friday - a run down on the end of year updates04:54 Thanksgiving, Cyber Monday, Black Friday - a run down on the end of year updates06:10 What type of website(s) will benefit the most from the Product Review update?09:27 Google spam updates in summer 202110:23 Is Google pushing E-A-T category by category?13:35 Google as a recommender - updates on unhelpful search results15:26 Product Review updates and guidelines18:28 Passage Indexing at the start of 202121:07 Why User Experience is important for Google22:05 Google Glitches in 2021 - Indexing bug, outage of Search Console, titles…27:15 MAching Learning - “the dance between humans and machines”28:06 The December product review update29:50 Are Google Core updates industry-specific?33:56 The June and July Google updates35:27 Dictionary sites were winners in summer 202136:12 The single biggest takeaway from the 2021 updates39:32 Lily Ray's Predictions for 2022 This episode was recorded live on video December 14th 2021 Recorded live at Kalicube Tuesdays (Digital Marketing Livestream Event Series). Watch the video now >>

Duckface Diaries: a World Trigger Podcast
WT Vol. 17 Retrospective | Duckface Diaries: a WORLD TRIGGER Podcast (ft. Maxy Barnard)

Duckface Diaries: a World Trigger Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 110:52


Change is the new pod! Welcome to Duckface Diaries, the World Trigger manga retrospective podcast! In this episode we invite manga industry savant Maxy Barnard to discuss Osamu's negotiation skills in Hyuse's induction to Border, the next volume cover (we guess wrong), the concept of strategy beds and how much the moon weighs. Find all the links and support the show at patreon.com/wensleydalecheddar Anchor // Youtube // Spotify // Apple Podcasts // Podbean // Breaker // Overcast // Radiopublic // Pocketcast // Podbay // Player.fm // Listennotes // Castro // Google Podcasts // Patreon // Twitter // Wensleydale's Twitter // Hovin's Twitter // Hovin's Hideaway Podcast // Twitch // Composer's Soundcloud // World Trigger Abridged Channel // Maxy's Twitter // Maxy's Ko-Fi Intro 0:00 Interview with Kendra 5:38 Volume summary 39:37 General thoughts 56:28 Ashihara comments corner 1:20:59 Spoiler corner 1:26:00 Q&A 1:36:11 Outro 1:42:21 Ashihara, D. (2019, January 20). (T. Aizawa, C. Cook, Trans. & A. Christman, Let.). Retrieved from https://mangaplus.shueisha.co.jp/titles/100028

Le pillole di Albano
Edward Emerson Barnard

Le pillole di Albano

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 3:28


Sparta Chicks Radio: Mindset | Confidence | Sport | Women
3rd Most Popular Episode of 2021 - Lucy Barnard

Sparta Chicks Radio: Mindset | Confidence | Sport | Women

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 61:11


Welcome to this special edition of Sparta Chicks Radio as we count down the 5 most popular episodes of 2021. The 3rd most popular episode of Sparta Chicks Radio in 2021 was Lucy Barnard on Year 4  of Walking the Length of the World Lucy is attempting to become the 1st woman to walk the length of the world. She set off in February 2017 from Tierra Del Fuego in Argentina to walk to Barrow, Alaska; a journey of 30,000km /20,000mi across 15 countries she anticipated would take her 5 years.  Yes, years. Lucy was first on the podcast in March 2018. And when I was preparing to speak to Lucy for that episode, I realised we share a unique connection; we both started our respective journeys - Lucy started walking and I published the first podcast - on the very same day in 2017. That conversation turned into our first anniversary / birthday celebration and we agreed to catch up each year for an update on her progress!  This is our 4th annual episode and Lucy joined me to share how 2020 unfolded for her. Get the full show notes for the episode here. — Visit the Sparta Chicks Radio website here Follow Sparta Chicks Radio on Facebook: facebook.com/SpartaChicks  Follow Lucy on Instagram: @tanglesandtail

Good Life Project
Elizabeth Lesser | Courage Over Comfort [Best Of]

Good Life Project

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 59:01


Even as a kid, my guest, Elizabeth lesser was the rebel, the activist, the feminist in the family. Growing up with three sisters, and one very traditional father, she could never understand why the women didn't make more decisions and have more power. Hers was not a voice that could be silenced, even from the earliest age. She eventually traveled down a path of activism, social justice, graduated from Barnard, became a student of a renowned Sufi mystic, and studied with a wide range of spiritual teachers. Her fierce devotion to discovering what is real and true, teamed with a passion for advocacy and intentional community, lead Elizabeth to co-found the iconic Omega Institute, a 140-acre communal gathering and learning retreat in Rhinebeck, New York, that has hosted everyone from Eckhart Tolle, Eve Ensler, and Maya Angelou, to Pema Chödrön, Ram Dass, Allen Ginsberg, Gloria Steinem, Pete Seeger, and thousands of other luminaries from every tradition and walk of life.Elizabeth also found an outlet in writing, eventually penning a series of moving memoirs and social commentary. Her book, Marrow: A Love Story, shares her experience of profound reconnection and healing between her and the sister, who she'd donate bone marrow to in a quest to save her life. Her most recent book, Cassandra Speaks: When Women Are the Storytellers, the Human Story Changes, reveals how humanity has outgrown its origin tales and hero myths, and empowers women to trust their instincts, find their voice, and tell new guiding stories. In today's deep-dive Best Of conversation, we explore the moments, stories and insights that awakened her call to action, community, and creativity, and how a personal crisis, in the form of her sister's cancer, led to unforeseen reconnection and reckoning that eventually led to reconciliation and healing. And, right now, we could all use a little more of this. You can find Elizabeth at: Website | InstagramIf you LOVED this episode:You'll also love the conversations we had with Glennon Doyle about honoring your deeper voice of truth and becoming untamed.My new book Sparked.Check out our offerings & partners: Outschool: Inspire kids to love learning with Outschool classes. It's 100% fun, live & teacher-led. Explore over 100,000 topics and learn in small groups via Zoom. Perfect for ages 3-18. Join for free. To learn more about all Outschool has to offer and to save $15 off your child's first class go to Outschool.com/GOODLIFESee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

逐工一幅天文圖 APOD Taigi
307. NGC 6822:Barnard 星系 ft. 阿錕 (20211202)

逐工一幅天文圖 APOD Taigi

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 2:08


大捲螺仔星系 定定會予人注意著。In 少年、光、閣有足媠 ê 藍色星團、kah 成對 ê 捲螺仔手骨。毋過較細 ê 星系嘛是會形成新 ê 恆星,像 厝邊星系 NGC 6822 就是,伊嘛叫做 Barnard 星系。NGC 6822 干焦 150 萬 光年遠爾爾,是 本星系群 ê 成員之一。伊 to̍h tī 人馬座 ê 星場外口,人馬座是一个有足濟恆星 ê 星座。NGC 6822 有 7000 光年闊,是一个不規則矮星系,kah 小麥哲倫星雲 欲仝欲仝。一寡較光 ê、leh 爍十字光 ê 前景星,是咱銀河系內底 ê 恆星。Tī 這張深色 ê 合成相片內底,後壁 ê Barnard 星系內底有足濟少年 ê 藍色恆星,閣有一搭一搭 ê 粉紅仔色水素光,這表示講遮是一个恆星形成 區。 ——— 這是 NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day ê 台語文 podcast 原文版:https://apod.nasa.gov/ 台文版:https://apod.tw/ 今仔日 ê 文章: https://apod.tw/daily/20211202/ 影像:Dietmar Hager, Eric Benson 音樂:PiSCO - 鼎鼎 聲優:阿錕 翻譯:An-Li Tsai (NCU) 原文:https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap211202.html Powered by Firstory Hosting

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
Women Are Recycling Their Hormones Without Enough Fiber In Their Diet - by Neal Barnard, M.D.

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 7:21


Women Are Recycling Their Hormones Without Enough Fiber In Their Diet - by Neal Barnard, M.D.Neal Barnard, M.D. •           https://www.pcrm.org/about-us/staff/neal-barnard-md-facc•           Book - Foods That Cause You to Lose Weight: The Negative Calorie Effect Dr. Barnard has led numerous research studies investigating the effects of diet on diabetes, body weight, and chronic pain, including a groundbreaking study of dietary interventions in type 2 diabetes, funded by the National Institutes of Health, that paved the way for viewing type 2 diabetes as a potentially reversible condition for many patients. Dr. Barnard has authored more than 100 scientific publications and 20 books for medical and lay readers, and is the editor in chief of the Nutrition Guide for Clinicians, a textbook made available to all U.S. medical students. As president of the Physicians Committee, Dr. Barnard leads programs advocating for preventive medicine, good nutrition, and higher ethical standards in research. His research contributed to the acceptance of plant-based diets in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. In 2015, he was named a Fellow of the American College of Cardiology. In 2016, he founded the Barnard Medical Center in Washington, D.C., as a model for making nutrition a routine part of all medical care. Working with the Medical Society of the District of Columbia and the American Medical Association, Dr. Barnard has authored key resolutions, now part of AMA policy, calling for a new focus on prevention and nutrition in federal policies and in medical practice. In 2018, he received the Medical Society of the District of Columbia's Distinguished Service Award. He has hosted four PBS television programs on nutrition and health.#NealBarnard #TheRealTruthAboutHealth  #WholeFood #Vegan #Vegetarian #PlantBasedNutrition  CLICK HERE - To Checkout Our MEMBERSHIP CLUB: http://www.realtruthtalks.com Social Media ChannelsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConferenceInstagram : https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/Twitter: https://twitter.com/RTAHealthLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-real-truth-about-health-conference/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealth    Check out our Podcasts  Visit us on Apple Podcast and Itunes search:  The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast Amazon: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/23a037be-99dd-4099-b9e0-1cad50774b5a/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RZbS2BafJIEzHYyThm83JGoogle:https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zaW1wbGVjYXN0LmNvbS8yM0ZqRWNTMg%3D%3DStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastAudacy: https://go.audacy.com/partner-podcast-listen-real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-real-truth-about-health-li-85932821/Deezer: https://www.deezer.com/us/show/2867272 Other Video ChannelsYoutube:  https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealthVimeo:  https://vimeo.com/channels/1733189Rumble:   https://rumble.com/c/c-1111513Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConference/videos/?ref=page_internalDailyMotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/TheRealTruthAboutHealthBitChute:  https://www.bitchute.com/channel/JQryXTPDOMih/ 

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee
Is Exercise Enough or Does It Come Down to Diet? | Dr. Neal Barnard Live Q&A

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 41:39


The shocking death of Mr. Big on the Sex and the City reboot has many wondering how someone who exercises regularly could still have a heart attack.   Dr. Neal Barnard joins “The Weight Loss Champion” Chuck Carroll to explain why riding a Peloton every day may not be enough to keep you heart healthy. Could proper nutrition actually be the most important factor for keeping your heart pumping in optimal fashion?   Plus, Dr. Barnard answers viewer questions from The Doctor's Mailbag.   - Are “healthy fats” overhyped? - How much benefit is there to eating a healthy diet just 75% of the time? - Do homemade nut-based cheeses have as much fat as brands sold in stores? - And many more!   Chuck also reports on a new study comparing the mortality rates of people who eat a predominately plant-based diet and those who eat the standard American diet for some of the leading causes of death.   This episode of The Exam Room™ Podcast is sponsored by The Gregory J. Reiter Memorial Fund, which supports organizations like the Physicians Committee that carry on Greg's passion and love for animals through rescue efforts, veganism, and wildlife conservation. — — — Gregory J. Reiter Memorial Fund https://gregoryreiterfund.org — — — Diet Mortality Study https://bit.ly/LancetDietStudy — — — Chuck Carroll Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ChuckCarrollWLC Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/ChuckCarrollWLC Facebook: http://wghtloss.cc/ChuckFacebook — — — Dr. Neal Barnard Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/drnealbarnard Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drnealbarnard Facebook: http://bit.ly/DrBarnardFB Your Body In Balance: https://amzn.to/2UvAfxW — — — 21-Day Vegan Kickstart App iOS: https://bit.ly/VegKStrt-iOS Android: https://bit.ly/VegKStrtAndrd Web: https://www.pcrm.org/kickstart — — — Barnard Medical Center Appointments https://bit.ly/BMCtelemed 202-527-7500 — — — Share the Show Please subscribe and give the show a 5-star rating on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or many other podcast providers. Don't forget to share it with a friend for inspiration!

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee
A Doctor's Private Battle with Endometriosis and Journey Back to Health

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 66:41


While Dr. Asha Subramanian was helping her patients get well, she was quietly suffering through her own health struggles. She battled endometriosis from an early age, and the debilitating pain only grew worse with time. As a young doctor, the disease had grown so bad that she was told if she didn't have children in the near future she would risk never being able to get pregnant.   The issues would continue for years as traditional therapies only provided scant relief. But she discovered that she could greatly improve her condition through food and began combining a plant-based diet with modern medicine. Finally, she found relief and was thrilled to become a proud parent of a healthy daughter.   Dr. Subramanian opens up about her struggle for the first time in hopes of helping others facing the same challenges. She shares her secrets for defeating endometriosis with diet!   Chuck also revisits a conversation with Dr. Neal Barnard in an Exam Room Rewind where Dr. Barnard delves into the story of an endometriosis patient who was in the middle of a hysterectomy when doctors declared she had been miraculously cured. Was it an actual miracle or was it the change she made to her diet that caused the disease to vanish? Dr. Barnard also details how a diet that is heavy on meat and dairy, but light on fruits and vegetables, can cause hormonal issues and fuel endometriosis.   — — — Dr. Asha Subramanian Web: https://www.diyalifestyleandwellness.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrAshaSub Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/diyalifestyleandwellness — — — Dr. Neal Barnard Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/drnealbarnard Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drnealbarnard Facebook: http://bit.ly/DrBarnardFB Your Body In Balance: https://amzn.to/2UvAfxW — — — Know Your Endo Order: https://amzn.to/3m0rZQW — — — Chuck Carroll Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ChuckCarrollWLC Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/ChuckCarrollWLC Facebook: http://wghtloss.cc/ChuckFacebook — — — 21-Day Vegan Kickstart App iOS: https://bit.ly/VegKStrt-iOS Android: https://bit.ly/VegKStrtAndrd Web: https://www.pcrm.org/kickstart — — — Barnard Medical Center Appointments https://bit.ly/BMCtelemed 202-527-7500 — — — Share the Show Please subscribe and give the show a 5-star rating on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or many other podcast providers. Don't forget to share it with a friend for inspiration!

Movers & Shapers: A Dance Podcast
MSP 125: Loni Landon

Movers & Shapers: A Dance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 57:01


Today's guest is Loni Landon.  Loni is a Dancer, Choreographer, and Movement Consultant based in New York City. In addition to creating dances for her own collective Loni Landon Dance Project, her work is commissioned by dance companies and film directors across the country. Born and raised in New York City, Loni performed with Aszure Barton and Artists, Ballet Theater Munich, Tanz Munich Theater, and The Metropolitan Opera, and is a Princess Grace Choreography Fellowship Winner.  As a sought after choreographer, her work has been commissioned by such institutions as The Joyce Theater, Keigwin and Company, BODYTRAFFIC, The Juilliard School, American Dance Institute, Northwest Dance Project, and Groundworks Dance Company.  Her company has performed at The Joyce Theater, Pulse Art Fair, Jacob's Pillow, Insitu Dance Festival, Bryant Park, Beach Sessions in Rockaway Beach and Guggenheim Works and Process Series. Loni has won numerous choreography awards, with residencies at New Movement Residency at USC Glorya Kaufman School of Dance, Alvin Ailey Dance Foundation New Directions Choreography Lab, ITE, NYU, CUNY Dance Initiative, Kaatsbaan, and Stephen Petronio's new residency center. She has been adjunct faculty at NYU, Barnard, SUNY Purchase, and Princeton University.  Loni is passionate about Entrepreneurship in the Arts and has co-founded THE PLAYGROUND, an initiative designed to give emerging choreographers a place to experiment, while allowing professional dancers to participate affordably. The Playground was recognized by Dance Magazine as a 25 To Watch. As well as four/four presents, a platform that commissions and presents collaborations betweens dancers and musicians. For more on this episode: Movers & Shapers: A Dance Podcast

With Jason Barnard...
Predictive SEO Using Big Data (Rebecca Berbel and Jason Barnard)

With Jason Barnard...

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 47:04


Rebecca Berbel talks with Jason Barnard about predictive SEO using big data. This is an extremely interesting and insightful episode where Rebecca Berbel and Jason Barnard discuss predictive SEO: where it came from, where it is now, and where it is going. Rebecca also cleared some misunderstandings between predicting in SEO and predictive SEO, ranking factors and features, and the explainable and unexplainable elements that contribute to the machine's predictions of ranking on the SERPs.  As always in SEO, there are loads and loads of “it depends”, so it doesn't look like predictive SEO will change that quirk in our industry :) Rebecca and Jason squeeze dozens of knowledge nuggets, tons of machine learning insights, and masses of SEO ranking analysis in this episode ;) Also, watch out for the answer to this pragmatic question: How can we present predictive SEO data to clients? What you'll learn from Rebecca Berbel 00:00 Rebecca Berbel with Jason Barnard01:53 Rebecca Berbel's Brand SERP and her event Knowledge Panels05:03 What is predicting in SEO and what is predictive SEO?07:55 Contexts where “it depends” for ranking09:51 Straight forward machine learning algorithms versus the black box12:37 Thinking of factors as ML features15:48 Why do you need to clean data? (garbage in, garbage out)21:30 The three types of people in SEO 24:55 Explainability with Shapley (game theory)29:20 Different sections of your site don't all behave the same way33:01 Examples of negative SEO factors evaluated by OnCrawl's predictive model36:36 Examples of positive SEO factors evaluated by OnCrawl's predictive model38:30 How to win Google's game with data40:33 How can we present predictive SEO to clients?41:59 What output does predictive SEO provide?44:11 The next steps in predictive SEO This episode was recorded live on video December 7th 2021 Recorded live at Kalicube Tuesdays (Digital Marketing Livestream Event Series). Watch the video now >>

NerdBrand
The Return of the Brand SERP Guy - Jason Barnard

NerdBrand

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 59:50


This episode we welcome back Jason Barnard. Jason Barnard is The Brand SERP Guy - a digital marketer who specializes in Brand SERPs and knowledge panels. Why “The Brand SERP Guy”? A Brand SERP is what your audience sees when they google your brand or personal name. Jason is the leading expert in this field - he has been studying, tracking, and analyzing Brand SERPs since 2013. Let's catch up with Jason since he was last on our podcast. Today we are talking about two things as time allows that are important to note about your search appearance. First, Google My Business page and it's elements. Second, why you should run a content strategy in your business. First up - Google My Business Page… or is it Google Business Profile now? Jason Barnard shares the number of elements in this panel that are controlled by the algorithms and those not by the business owner. As well as the importance of starting to proactively manage/influence them. The idea that local businesses can run content strategies and get rich elements/SERP features in their Brand SERP. This would include the fact that they can totally dominate their own Brand SERP with Twitter, FB, YT, videos, images, etc. - it takes a well organized approach, consistent work, and a little patience. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nerdbrand/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/nerdbrand/support

SaaS District
Inside Balsamiq: Education as a "Feature" of Your SaaS Product with Leon Barnard # 156

SaaS District

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 35:40


Leon Barnard is a Designer, Writer, and Educator at Balsamiq. He uses his 10+ years of experience as a UX designer to teach user interface design basics and wireframing to Balsamiq's audience of mostly non-designers. He loves helping people and technology get along better. During this interview we cover: 00:00 - https://getshoutout.com (ShoutOUT) SMS and Email Messaging That Converts 01:08 - Intro 02:29 - Marketing Strategy on Balsamiq 04:28 - Balsamiq Atypical Approach on Marketing 06:56 - The Whole Product Concept 10:11 - The "What Should I Make For Dinner" Feature 13:12 - Product Experience, Features & Wireframing 14:56 - The 4 Pillars Of Balsamiq's Sustainable Growth 17:23 - How Implement This Pillars as SaaS Founder 20:12 - Customer Service as A Marketing Tool 22:05 - How Balsamiq Uses Education As A Feature 29:39 - Leon's Favorite Hobbies To Get Into a Flow State 30:16 - Something People Usually Learn Only After It Is Too Late 31:31 - Career Path Tips For Professionals at Leon's Area 33:03 - What Motivates Leon To Continue Working Hard 34:13 - What Leon Loves The Most About Balsamiq Mentions: https://balsamiq.com/learn/articles/saas-website-design-lessons/ (Balsamiq SaaS Design Lessons) Get in Touch with Leon: https://www.linkedin.com/in/leonbarnard (Leon's LinkedIn) https://twitter.com/leonbarnard (Leon's Twitter) Tag us & Follow: https://www.facebook.com/SaaSDistrictPodcast/ (Facebook) https://www.linkedin.com/company/horizen-capital (LinkedIn) https://www.instagram.com/saasdistrict/ (Instagram) More About Akeel: https://twitter.com/AkeelJabber (Twitter) https://linkedin.com/in/akeel-jabbar (LinkedIn) https://horizencapital.com/saas-podcast (More Podcast Sessions)

With Jason Barnard...
The Value of Content Engineering (Mike King and Jason Barnard)

With Jason Barnard...

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 38:40


Mike King talks with Jason Barnard about the value of content engineering. Michael King is the Director at iPullRank which is a leading New York content marketing SEO agency. With 14 years of digital marketing experience and 25 years in web development, he has led the SEO campaigns of some of the world's leading brands: LG, Citi and Cartier.  In this episode, Michael King shares his unique procedure for content engineering that seamlessly stitches together technical SEO, content and marketing … a large step outside traditional SEO. Mike explains his thinking behind the term and dives into the techniques and subtleties of content engineering. He gives a new, more practical twist to the ever-so-common SEO phrase “it depends”. For once, “it depends” has helpful reasoning behind it.Listen now and take your SEO game to the next level! What you'll learn from Mike King 00:00 Mike King with Jason Barnard01:02 Michael King's Brand SERP across multiple countries03:10 What does content engineering mean?04:29 Requirements of a content engineering package06:07 Content engineering comes from reverse engineering07:28 Packaging content for the target personas10:22 How to create a content engineering brief14:01 Content should be written by copywriters, not SEOs16:37 How to content-engineer image and video content18:54 iPullRank's concept of 10x content19:32 Thinking through the concept plan, information plan and IAA components23:46 How does content engineering work at scale?27:12 What are the research techniques for a great content engineering strategy?31:40 Huge jump in rankings outside the traditional SEO bubble35:07 Improving rankings with topical authority This episode was recorded live on video November 30th 2021 Recorded live at Kalicube Tuesdays (Digital Marketing Livestream Event Series). Watch the video now >>

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee
Lower Blood Pressure the Natural Way | Dr. Neal Barnard Live Q&A

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 47:35


Did you know that people with high blood pressure can often experience dramatic improvement by eating certain foods?   Dr. Neal Barnard reveals the best foods to lower high blood pressure when he joins "The Weight Loss Champion" Chuck Carroll on The Exam Room LIVE. Plus, they discuss the foods to avoid when treating hypertension, whether high blood pressure can be genetically driven, how big of a role table salt plays, and whether foods marketed as healthy can still contribute to elevated blood pressure.   Dr. Barnard also discusses the Omicron variant of the coronavirus and how it may be possible that a plant based diet could reduce the risk of becoming severely infected.   Chuck has details on a study about a special juice that is being shown to reduce inflammation.   This episode of The Exam Room™ Podcast is sponsored by The Gregory J. Reiter Memorial Fund, which supports organizations like the Physicians Committee that carry on Greg's passion and love for animals through rescue efforts, veganism, and wildlife conservation.   — — — Gregory J. Reiter Memorial Fund https://gregoryreiterfund.org — — — Chuck Carroll Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ChuckCarrollWLC Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/ChuckCarrollWLC Facebook: http://wghtloss.cc/ChuckFacebook — — — Dr. Neal Barnard Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/drnealbarnard Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drnealbarnard Facebook: http://bit.ly/DrBarnardFB Your Body In Balance: https://amzn.to/2UvAfxW — — — 21-Day Vegan Kickstart App iOS: https://bit.ly/VegKStrt-iOS Android: https://bit.ly/VegKStrtAndrd Web: https://www.pcrm.org/kickstart — — — Barnard Medical Center Appointments https://bit.ly/BMCtelemed 202-527-7500 — — — Share the Show Please subscribe and give the show a 5-star rating on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or many other podcast providers. Don't forget to share it with a friend for inspiration!

Cultivate Relationships
STB047 | Hell + Pastor Michael Barnard [VIDEO]

Cultivate Relationships

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021


Nathan shoots the breeze with Pastor Michael Barnard. We discuss the light topics of evangelism, salvation, and hell. We also... Show notes and more at: https://cultivaterelationships.com/podcast

Cultivate Relationships
STB047 | Hell + Pastor Michael Barnard

Cultivate Relationships

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021


Nathan shoots the breeze with Pastor Michael Barnard. We discuss the light topics of evangelism, salvation, and hell. We also... Show notes and more at: https://cultivaterelationships.com/podcast

'The Mo Show' Podcast
Doug Barnard | The Mo Show 39 (Travel vlogger)

'The Mo Show' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 67:13


Doug Barnard is an American travel vlogger who explores places less traveled and is visiting Saudi Arabia for the second time. He shares the behind the scenes of having a Youtube channel, some of his most memorable travel moments, and what he loves most about Saudi. Doug inspires his viewers and makes friends globally by being a fearless tourist, an inspirational entrepreneur, and all around kind and open-hearted person.

With Jason Barnard...
Crafty Content Creation (David Bain and Jason Barnard)

With Jason Barnard...

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 42:52


David Bain talks with Jason Barnard about crafty content creation. David Bain is the Founder of Casting Cred, a podcast and video show production agency for B2B brands. He is also the groovy host of Digital Marketing Radio which is a weekly podcast and YouTube show for in-house, agency, and entrepreneurial marketers. To strategically create crafty content, we must always begin with the end goals in mind. We have to figure out how all our efforts fit with the outcome we're trying to achieve. These goals and tasks can only become clear when there is a tangible plan right in front of us ;)  So in this fantastic episode, David Bain joins Jason Barnard to share his crafty, clever content creation in combination with his super effective Funnel Marketing Model he has built ;) Also, watch out for his tips and tricks for building a better, more efficient content strategy as well as his kit recommendations for podcasting beginners and also producers aiming for professional quality audio. What you'll learn from David Bain 00:00 David Bain with Jason Barnard01:12 Casting Cred's Brand SERP and unclaimed Knowledge Panel02:16 How did David get the domain for his name?05:11 How to get “crafty” in creating content07:08 Good audio setup 10112:25 The REAL kit to take sound to the next level!14:10 Why you should start off with an audio only podcast15:20 Think about the mediums before creating content18:03 The efficient way to outsource your content25:12 Tips and tricks: How to craft a successful content strategy26:07 The standard customer buying cycle for B2B brands26:52 The Pump and Funnel Marketing Model28:15 Hero. Hub. Help. The YouTube Content Model 31:14 David adds three more Hs to the content model (making it craftier!)33:13 What pushed David to build and go beyond the common content models?35:19 Why is the Hub content sitting outside the Pump and Funnel Marketing Model? This episode was recorded live on video November 23rd 2021 Recorded live at Kalicube Tuesdays (Digital Marketing Livestream Event Series). Watch the video now >>

逐工一幅天文圖 APOD Taigi
283. Tī 仙王座方向 ê 烏暗海馬星雲 ft. 阿錕 (20211105)

逐工一幅天文圖 APOD Taigi

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 1:46


這个 tī 背景有足濟恆星嘛足光 ê 所在,有這个因為外形 去予人建議 愛號做 海馬星雲 ê 天體,伊差不多有 1 光年闊。Ùi 北方 ê 皇家星座仙王座看,這个厚塗粉、閘光 ê 雲,in 嘛是銀河分子雲 ê 一部份,離咱有 1200 光年遠。伊嘛叫做 Barnard 150 (B150),是天頂 182 个 暗天標記 ê 其中一个。這寡暗天標記是 20 世紀初 ê 天文學家 E. E. Barnard 編 ê。內底 有一陣低質量恆星當咧形成,毋閣 in 崩塌 ê 核心 愛 tī 長波長 ê 紅外線波段 才看會著。仙王座內底多彩 ê 恆星嘛 tī 這幅 美麗 ê 星系天景 內底。 ——— 這是 NASA Astronomy Picture of the Day ê 台語文 podcast 原文版:https://apod.nasa.gov/ 台文版:https://apod.tw/ 今仔日 ê 文章: https://apod.tw/daily/20211105/ 影像:Valerio Avitabile 音樂:PiSCO - 鼎鼎 聲優:阿錕 翻譯:An-Li Tsai (NCU) 原文:https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap211105.html Powered by Firstory Hosting

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
Study Shows PMS Symptoms Got Better With No Animal Products In The Diet- by Neal Barnard, M.D.

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 6:54


Study Shows PMS Symptoms Got Better With No Animal Products In The Diet- by Neal Barnard, M.D.Neal Barnard, M.D.•           https://www.pcrm.org/about-us/staff/neal-barnard-md-facc•           Book - Foods That Cause You to Lose Weight: The Negative Calorie Effect Dr. Barnard has led numerous research studies investigating the effects of diet on diabetes, body weight, and chronic pain, including a groundbreaking study of dietary interventions in type 2 diabetes, funded by the National Institutes of Health, that paved the way for viewing type 2 diabetes as a potentially reversible condition for many patients. Dr. Barnard has authored more than 100 scientific publications and 20 books for medical and lay readers, and is the editor in chief of the Nutrition Guide for Clinicians, a textbook made available to all U.S. medical students. As president of the Physicians Committee, Dr. Barnard leads programs advocating for preventive medicine, good nutrition, and higher ethical standards in research. His research contributed to the acceptance of plant-based diets in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. In 2015, he was named a Fellow of the American College of Cardiology. In 2016, he founded the Barnard Medical Center in Washington, D.C., as a model for making nutrition a routine part of all medical care. Working with the Medical Society of the District of Columbia and the American Medical Association, Dr. Barnard has authored key resolutions, now part of AMA policy, calling for a new focus on prevention and nutrition in federal policies and in medical practice. In 2018, he received the Medical Society of the District of Columbia's Distinguished Service Award. He has hosted four PBS television programs on nutrition and health.#NealBarnard #TheRealTruthAboutHealth  #WholeFood #Vegan #Vegetarian #PlantBasedNutrition  CLICK HERE - To Checkout Our MEMBERSHIP CLUB: http://www.realtruthtalks.com Social Media ChannelsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConferenceInstagram : https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/Twitter: https://twitter.com/RTAHealthLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-real-truth-about-health-conference/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealth    Check out our Podcasts  Visit us on Apple Podcast and Itunes search:  The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast Amazon: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/23a037be-99dd-4099-b9e0-1cad50774b5a/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RZbS2BafJIEzHYyThm83JGoogle:https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zaW1wbGVjYXN0LmNvbS8yM0ZqRWNTMg%3D%3DStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastAudacy: https://go.audacy.com/partner-podcast-listen-real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-real-truth-about-health-li-85932821/Deezer: https://www.deezer.com/us/show/2867272 Other Video ChannelsYoutube:  https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealthVimeo:  https://vimeo.com/channels/1733189Rumble:   https://rumble.com/c/c-1111513Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConference/videos/?ref=page_internalDailyMotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/TheRealTruthAboutHealthBitChute:  https://www.bitchute.com/channel/JQryXTPDOMih/ 

Edge of the Web - An SEO Podcast for Today's Digital Marketer
463 | EDGEFlash: November Google Core & Knowledge Graph Updates

Edge of the Web - An SEO Podcast for Today's Digital Marketer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 21:03


Jason Barnard and Lily Ray join Erin Sparks on an EDGEFlash - a breaking digital marketing news episode.  When it happens, we will get it to you as soon as possible!  We uncovered a relationship of factors that lead us to believe that this is not just another core update!  Breaking news, here on the EDGE! [00:02:24] The social media outcry regarding the November Google Core Algorithm updates [00:03:32] Ray: This is a tricky update due to the holiday season [00:05:28] Ray: How the Volatility Tools Work [00:06:39] Barnard: Does Dictionary site visibility increase = new entity knowledge? [00:09:08] Barnard: Completely new: core algorithm updates and knowledge graph update together [00:10:52] Barnard: 8% rise in the number Rich Elements [00:11:43] Increase in "People Also Search For" to 21% [00:12:34] BREAKING NEWS:  People Also Search For + Dictionary ranking spikes + Knowledge Graph Entity growth….Google's more confident, folks! [00:14:57] Ray: Intense shifts can change because of current events [00:17:57] Words of advice from Ray and Barnard

I Survived Theatre School
Carole Schweid

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 98:48


Intro: buzzsaws and clean slates, rage, Where the Wild Things AreLet Me Run This By You: MoneyInterview: We talk to Carole Schweid about Juilliard, Phoebe Brand, John Lehne, Michael Brand, Midnight Cowboy, musical comedy performance, open dance calls, starring in the original cast of A Chorus Line, Bob Fosse, Pat Birch, Martha Graham, Minnie's Boys, Mervyn Nelson, playing Fastrada in the first national tour of Pippin, being a lone wolf in theatre, Lewis J. Stadlen, doing West Side Story at Bucks County Playhouse, Shelly Winters, Mary Hinkson, Nellie Forbush in South Pacific, playing Tzeitel in Fiddler on the Roof, Peppermint Lounge, Nick Dante, Michael Bennett, Marvin Hamlisch, Public Theater, Gerry Schoenfeld, The Shubert, the wish for a job vs. the real experience of working, Theda Bara & The Frontier Rabbi, Agnes de Mille, Play With Your Food, Staged Reading Magic, Albert Hague.FULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited):2 (10s):And I'm Gina Pulice.1 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it. 20 years later,2 (16s):We're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense1 (20s):If at all we survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet? As more space is actually a huge thing.2 (36s):Yeah. I have to apologize for the sound of buzz saws. What is going to be going the whole time I'm talking, doing well, you1 (50s):Took some trees down, right.2 (53s):You know, that's how it started. Yeah. It started with actually, you know, it all was a surprise to me, basically one we've been talking about taking down all the trees in the front of our house. And one day Aaron said, they're coming tomorrow to take down the trees. And I'm like, how much did that cost? Because you know, taking down trees is usually really expensive. And so he says, well, he's going to do everything in the front for whatever. It was $5,000.1 (1m 22s):Yeah. She was pretty good for more than one tree. Cause one tree we had removed was $5,000 at my mom's.2 (1m 28s):Well, and it's not like they have to extract the whole tree. It's just, you know, just chopping it down. Like it's not, I don't know if it's different when they have to take out the, yeah,1 (1m 38s):I think it is when they have to take the stump out the roots and all that.2 (1m 43s):So that was fine. Although I did think to myself, Hmm. We have $5,000 to spend and this is what we're spending it on.1 (1m 54s):I've been there. Oh, I've been there2 (1m 56s):So the morning, but I'm letting it go. And so the morning comes and he tells me to go outside so we can talk about the trees and, and, and I, anyway, we, we designate some trees and they're all in the lower part of the front of our house.1 (2m 10s):Yes. You, and by the way, for people that don't know, like you have a lot of land for, for, for, for not being in the super super country, you have a lot of courage. I mean, you got a lot of trees.2 (2m 21s):Well, yeah, we have an acre and it's a lot of trees and it's a lot of junk trees. What they call junk trees. Because the idea here is once upon a time, when everybody got their heat from wood, you had to have fast growing trees. So it's these skinny trees. Yeah. Anyway, so I thought we were sort of on the same page about what we were going down. This is where I'm getting with this. And I had a couple of meetings yesterday and I was hearing the sound pretty close, but it wasn't until I looked outside that I saw, they took everything out.2 (3m 1s):The, every living thing out in the, in the front, in front of our house, including the only tree I was really attached to was I have a beautiful lilac tree.1 (3m 14s):Okay. Oh shit. And everything out.2 (3m 21s):What's that? Why they1 (3m 22s):Take everything out? Is that the plant? I think,2 (3m 25s):I think what happened was for the first couple of days, the boss was here. And then I think yesterday, the boss was like, you guys just go and finish up. And I don't know that anyway, you know what, I'm just choosing it to be, I'm choosing to look at it like, okay, well we're getting to start over and it can be exactly how we want it to be. So yeah,1 (3m 45s):That is a great attitude because there's nothing you can do you really do about it? Absolutely. Zero. You can do about threes coming out.2 (3m 53s):The only bummer is that it sounds like buzz saws all day at my house and at my neighbor's house, I'm sure they're annoyed with us too. Well,1 (4m 2s):What are you going to put? It is. Okay. So, so, okay. The good, that's the sort of wonky news, but what the good news is, what are you going to put in? Like, is there going to be a whole new,2 (4m 12s):I think it's just going to GRA, I mean, I think it's just going to be grass, which is fine. I mean, my thing was actually, it does a little bit of a metaphor because when we first moved here, we loved how quiet and private and everything is. And part of why everything feels very private at our house is there's trees and bushes blocking our view of anything. I mean, all we can see is trees and bushes when we're laying on the front, which for a while seemed cozy. And then it started to seem like annoying that we could never see. And actually there's kind of a really beautiful view of the mountains behind us. So our mountains Hills.1 (4m 51s):Yeah. But I mean, small mountains, like small2 (4m 53s):Mountains. Yeah. So I realized that it does coincide with our psychological spelunking and trying to just be like more open about everything. Like totally. You know what I mean? Like this is just be open to people seeing our house. This is open to seeing out and let's have, and actually my kids were kind of like, oh, but it's just also open and we don't have any privacy. And I'm like, yeah, well you have your room and bathroom. I mean, there's, there's places to go if you don't want people to, to see you, but let's just be open.1 (5m 31s):There's like a whole, yeah. It's a great metaphor for being visible. Like I am all about lately. I have found a lot of comfort and refuge in the truth of the matter, even if it's not pretty, even if I don't actually like it. So like getting the facts of the matter and also sharing the, of the matter without a judgment. So I appreciate this, like wanting to be seen and then letting go of what people make of that, whether your house is this way or that way, or the neighbors think this or that, I'm also the, I I'm all about it.1 (6m 15s):I'm like, you know, this is, there's something about transparency. That's very comforting for me. It's also scary because people don't like it when they can see, or they can say whatever they want, but the hiding, I think I'm pretty convinced hiding from myself and from others leads to trouble.2 (6m 37s):It leads to trouble. And any time you're having to kind of keep track of what you're, you know, being open about and what you're not, and what you've said, you know, it just it's like it's T it's listen. If I only have a certain amount of real estate in my mind, I really don't want to allocate any of it too. Right. Hiding something and trying to remember. Right.1 (7m 1s):And it's interesting, the more that we do this podcast, the more I see that, like, you know what I thought gene, I thought when we're dead, this podcast is going to remain. And then our children's children's children. I mean, I don't have kids, but my nieces and nephew and your children's children's children will have a record of this. And, and I'd rather it be a record of the truth, the truth and transparency, then some show about pretending. So I think it's going to be good for them to be able to look back and be like, for me, it's like the, my crazy aunt, like, what was she doing? And what did she think? And, and, oh my God, it's a record of the times too.1 (7m 43s):Yeah.2 (7m 43s):I think about that kind of a lot. And I think about, of course I say all this and my kids are probably like going to be, have no interests unless the, until they get to a certain age, I mean, I'll put it to you this way. If I could listen to a podcast of my mother in her, you know, in the time that I don't really the time of life, certainly before I was born, but in my life where I still didn't see her as a person until, you know, I'd love to just things like what her voice sounded like then, and that kind of thing. I mean, it's interesting.1 (8m 16s):I have nothing of my mom, like we have a very few, it was interesting because we didn't, you know, we, there was not a lot of video of my mother and today's actually the 10th anniversary of her passing.2 (8m 28s):Oh, wow. Wow. That's hard.1 (8m 31s):It is hard. You know, it is hard. And I'm working through, I started therapy with a new therapist, like a regular LCSW lady. Who's not because my last guy was an Orthodox Jewish man who wanted me to have children. Like it was a whole new, I just got involved in all the Shannon Diego's of like weirdness. I attracted that weirdest and whatever. So this lady is like a legit, you know, therapist. And they only bummer is, and I totally understand she's on zoom, but like, I I'm so sick of like, I would love to be in a room with a therapist, but I get it. She's in, she's an older lady, which is also great. I was so sick of having like 28 year old therapists.1 (9m 13s):Yeah,2 (9m 13s):Yeah, yeah. For sure.1 (9m 16s):I don't even seem right. Unless clients are like, you know, fit seven to 17. So anyway, so, but all this to say about my mom, I was thinking about it and I think what's harder than right. My mom's death right now is that there's I just, you know, and this is something I wanted to bring up with you is just like, I have a lot of rage that's coming up lately about my childhood and we weren't allowed to feel rage. And my mom was the only one allowed to feel rage. And so this rage mixed with perimenopause slash menopause. I mean, like I still get a period, but like, it's, it's a matter of time before that's over.1 (9m 58s):So, but the rage, so I guess, right. I get, you know, people like to talk about rage as some or anger as something we need to process and we need to do this and that, but the truth of the matter is since we're being transparent, like rage can be really scary. Like sometimes the rage, I feel, it's not like I'm going to do anything. Why wonky? I hope, but it's more like a, I don't know what to do with it. That is my, and I was talking in therapy about that. Like, I'm not actually sure. Practically when the feelings come up, what to do with rage. And I feel like it speaks to in our culture of like, we're all about now, this sort of like, we talk about this fake positivity and shit like that.1 (10m 41s):And also like embracing all your feelings, but there's not really practical things that we learn what to do when you feel like you're going to take your laptop and literally take it and throw it across the room and then go to jail. Like you, you. So I have to like look up things on the internet with literally like what to do with my rage.2 (11m 1s):I think that's why that's part of my attraction to reality. Television shows is a, is a performance of rage. That's that I wouldn't do just because I don't think I could tolerate the consequences. I mean, an upwards interpretation is, oh, it's not my value, but it's really just like, I don't think I can manage the content of the consequences. I'm totally at having all these blown up1 (11m 30s):And people mad at me and legal consequences. I can't,2 (11m 35s):It's something very gratifying about watching people just give in to all of their rage impulses and it's yeah. I, it it's, it may be particularly true for women, but I think it's really just true for everybody that there's very few rage outlets, although I guess actually maybe sports. Well, when it turns, when it turns sideways, then that's also not acceptable.1 (12m 3s):Yeah. I mean, and maybe that's why I love all this true crime is like, these people act out their rage, but like lately to be honest, the true crime hasn't been doing it for me. It's interesting. That is interesting. Yeah. It's sort of like, well, I've watched so much of it that like now I'm watching stuff in different languages, true crime. And I'll start again. No, no, just stories. I haven't all been the only stories that I haven't heard really, really are the ones from other countries now. So I'm watching like, like true crime in new, in Delhi.2 (12m 42s):Do you need your fix? I actually was listening to some podcasts that I listened to. There's always an ad and it's exactly about this. It's like, we love true crime, but we've heard every story we know about every grisly murder, you know, detail. And it was touting itself as a podcast of, for next time I listened to it. I'll note the name of it so I can share it with you. You know, about this crimes. You haven't heard about1 (13m 9s):T the thing is a lot of them now, because I'm becoming more of a kind of sewer. Like a lot of it is just shittily made. So like the, the they're subtitled and dubbed in India, like India. So you've got like the, the they're speaking another language and then they're and if they don't match, so then I'm like, well, who's right. Like, is it the dubbing that's right. Or the subtitles that are right. And, and actually the words matter because I'm a writer. So it was like one anyway, it's poorly done is what I'm saying in my mind. And so it sort of scraped scraping the bottom of the barrel. It's like deli 9 1 1. I swear to God. That's what it, and, and it's, and also it's, it's horrifying because the, you know, the legal systems everywhere fucked, but India has quite a system.2 (13m 57s):I think that to the rage, like, tell me more about what comes up for you with rage and where you,1 (14m 6s):Yeah. Okay. So some of it is physiological, like where I feel literally like, and I think this is what my doctor's talking about. The menopause symptoms. I literally feel like a gnashing, my teeth. Like, I feel a tenseness in my jaw. Like, that's literally that. And she's like, that could also be your heart medication. So talk to your heart doctor. I mean, we're checking out all the things, but like, but it's tension. That's what it really feels like in my body is like tight tension where I feel earth like that. If I had to put a sound effect to it, it's like, ah, so I, I feel that is the first symptom of my rage. And then I feel like, and, and I say out loud, sometimes I hate my life.1 (14m 54s):That's what I say. And that is something I have never allowed myself to say before. Like I, I think unconsciously, I always told myself, like, you just, you have to be grateful and you know, those are the messages we receive, but sometimes life just fucking sucks. And sometimes my life, I just, I just can't stand. And, and in moments, you know, I never loved myself. So it's mostly a physical symptom followed by this is intolerable, what someone is doing. Sometimes my dog or my husband, but even, even if the coworking space, you know, like the lady was talking too loud and I was like, oh my God, this is intolerable.1 (15m 34s):She has to shut up. So agitation, that's what it is. And, and then it passes when I, if I, if I can say, oh my gosh, I am so fricking in Rouge right now. Then it passes.2 (15m 52s):Yeah. Well, it, it kind of sounds like from, from you and probably for most people, the only real option is to turn it in on yourself, you know, like you're not going to put it elsewhere. So you've, you know, you have, which is, so I guess maybe it's okay if you turn it on yourself, if you're doing, if you're working, if you're doing it with acceptance, which is the thing I'm gathering from you, as opposed to stewing and festering. And1 (16m 21s):I mean, it becomes, it's interesting. Yes, it is. So it's like, so red, hot, and so sudden, almost that the only thing I can do is say, okay, this is actually happening. Like, I can't pretend this isn't happening. I, it I'm like physically clenching my fists. And then I, yeah, there is a level of acceptance. I don't get panicked anymore. Now that I, that something is wrong. I just say, oh, this is rage. I name it. I'm like, I feel enraged and white, hot rage, and then it, and then it, and then I say, that's what this is.1 (17m 3s):I don't know why. I don't know where it's coming from. Right. In this moment. It's not proportionate to the lady, like literally talking on the phone at my coworking space that she's not shouting. So it's not that. And I don't want to miss that. I'm not like I can't fool myself to think that it's really, that lady's problem. That I feel like throwing my laptop at her head. And then, and then it passes. But, but, but it is, it is more and more. And, and I think a lot of it, not a lot of it, but you know, my doctor really does think that it's, it's hormonal. A lot of it just doesn't help the matter. I mean, it's not like, oh, great. It's hormonal. Everything's fine. But it, it does help to make me feel a little less bonkers.2 (17m 45s):Maybe you should have like a, a whole rage. Like what, like a rate. Well, first I was thinking you should have a range outfit. Like, oh, for me, if I, I noticed I pee in the winter anyway, I pick like my meanest boots and my leather jacket. When I'm feeling, you know, maybe say maybe kind of a rage outfit, when did Pierce?1 (18m 9s):No, I, I scratched myself in my sleep. Oh no, it's okay. It happens all the time. I do it in my sleep. It's a thing that it's like a little skin tag that I need to get removed. It's2 (18m 23s):So you could have a rage outfit and then you could have a rage playlist, And then you might even have like rage props. I'm just trying to think about a way that your ma you, you could write because if, if how you process something is artistically creatively, then maybe you needed a creative outlet that's specifically for, for race.1 (18m 48s):Yeah. And you know, the, I, I love that. And now I'm thinking about like, as a kid, we, because we, anger was so off limits to us. I used to violently chew gum. Like I would chew on the gum. That was a way, and my mom did the same thing, even though she also got her rage out, but it was like, you know, when people violently chew on their gum, like that was a way I could get my aggression out. That's so sad that that's like the only way.2 (19m 16s):Well, I mean, you find it wherever you can find me. It's like water looking for whatever that expression is, right? Yeah. Huh. Well, I have to get more in touch with my rage because I I'm told that I seem angry a lot.1 (19m 33s):You do.2 (19m 35s):I, I do get told that, but, but that sucks for me because I feel like I'm not expressing my anger and I'm, but I'm not. So I'm not, and I'm being seen as angry at certain times. So that means I didn't even get the benefit of like letting out the anger that somebody is.1 (19m 56s):Right. You didn't even get to act out the anger. It's like, yeah. So for me, miles tells me that all the time, like, he's like, you seem really in couples therapy. Also, I have to admit yesterday was a big day. We had couples therapy on zoom. Then I had individual therapy. And in between I had all kinds of like, just stuff happening. So, but yeah, I'm told I a miles is like, you seem so angry and he's not wrong. And, and we take it out on the people that we live in a two by four apartment with. So I also feel like this office space is helping with that, but yeah, I dunno, I'm going to have to keep exploring my, my rage and that's what it is.1 (20m 37s):And also it is like, I am the character in where the wild things are that kid, that is what I feel like. And it feels it's like the perfect cause he wants to gnash his teeth and, and he does, and a thrash, thrash, thrashing mash, or the words 2 (21m 6s):Let me run this by you that I wanted to do when we're going to talk to Molly that we didn't get to do. And it was based on made, you know, and just about money and, and wondering like what your relationship is right now with money. And also, but when were you at your lowest with money? What do you remember as being your lowest moment? Sure, sure. With money with money.1 (21m 40s):Okay. I have moments of what first comes to mind was when right. I was at DePaul. So it's an apropos in college and there was obviously a sense. I had a sense of lack, always, even though based on whatever, but it was phone. Somehow my accounts were always negative, right? Like, and I would call the number, the banking number, incessantly to check, and it would always be negative. So I have this panic thoughts about that. Like being a time of like, and that's not the only time that happened like that.1 (22m 23s):Where, what is the feeling? The feeling was that, and this was in college where it started to happen, where I felt like there's never enough. No, one's going to help me. I'm irresponsible with money. Was the message I told myself and I probably was, I was in college, but I can't handle money. And literally that, that panic was also, I mean, it was true. I had no money, but my parents would have backed me, probably helped me out, but I was too scared to ask for help. So that's like, that's when, when you asked that question, that's where I go.1 (23m 4s):But, but that's also a college kind of me. So like in terms of an adult, me, that's a really great, great question. My lowest, I don't know. What about you?2 (23m 22s):Well, I've got a lot of Loma Loehmann's moments with money when I was in high school. The thing was, I lost my wallet all the time.1 (23m 35s):Oh, I remember this. I remember you talking about,2 (23m 38s):Yeah, that'd be still lose stuff all the time. That actually started at a young age with, you know, my mom would, she, my mom was really into jewelry and she would buy me destroyed. And there's nothing wrong with the fact that she brought me jewelry, but I lost it. You know, she buy me nice gold jewelry1 (23m 59s):Because she likes nice things. That's right. Yeah.2 (24m 4s):In college it was pretty bad. And the first time it was pretty bad. I had to move back in with my mom because I couldn't afford rent. And then the second time I just, I re I really, if I had more bravery, I probably would have signed up to be one of those girls in the back of the Chicago reader. Like, I, I, I just figured what ha how literally, how else? Because I had a job, but I only worked however much I could work given the fact that we were in rehearsals and like busy all day, so I never could make enough money. And then I just, I think I always have had a dysfunctional relationship with money.1 (24m 51s):Wait a minute, but I have to interrupt. Why, why didn't our parents fucking help us? Okay. Look, I know I sound like a spoiled asshole brat, but like, when I think of the anxiety that we were going through and I know your mom did, so I'm not going to talk shit about your mom or anything, but I'm just saying like, why did we feel so alone in this when we were so young, this is not right.2 (25m 11s):Yeah. Well, my mom did help me out as much as she possibly could, but I think part of it too, my dad certainly didn't think it was that. I mean, when my mom was 18 and my dad was 19, they bought a house and had a baby. So I think part of it is, has been like, what's the matter with you? Cause I didn't go to college, you know, that's the other thing. So, so then when I, then I had a period for like 10 years where I always had three jobs, me two, what1 (25m 46s):Did you have enough then? I mean like, could you make rapid enough?2 (25m 49s):I had enough then yeah, I had enough then. But then when Aaron decided he wants to go to medical school, it was really on me to, to bring in the income. I mean, his parents always gave him money. They helped, it was a lot more. I mean, and actually it's why he became a therapist because I thought, well, we're going to be living with no income because he's going to be a student. Right. So I better giddy up and get a job. So the whole time I was in social work school, I was bartending. I remember that. And then I went quickly into private practice so that I could make money.2 (26m 29s):And it turned out to be, it turned out to backfire on me. Tell1 (26m 35s):Me, tell me, tell me more.2 (26m 37s):It backfired in two ways. Number one, I was, I shouldn't have been operating a private practice without my LCSW. I had my MSW and I was working at the time in a psych hospital. And all of the psychiatrist said, you should start your private practice. You should start your private practice. And I remember saying at the beginning, I don't know if I'm allowed to oh yes, yes. You definitely can. I know tons of MSWs into plenty of people and it's true. I don't know if it's still true now in New York, but at that time you could walk around and see plenty of nameplates for offices where somebody in private practice and that just have an MSW.2 (27m 18s):They just had to have a supervisor1 (27m 19s):Or something.2 (27m 22s):I don't know. Okay. I dunno. Right. So that ended up coming to haunt me when a disgruntled patient. And they're all disgruntled in some way, a family who actually had been swindled by a con artist, like they, they were a blue blood, rich ass family and they got swindled by a con artist. And so they were talking about rage. They had a lot of rage about that. When this guy who was paying for his daughter's treatment, didn't think it was going where, you know, he wanted it to right.2 (28m 4s):He started pushing back about the fee and then he was submitting to his insurance company and they were not reimbursing because I didn't have the LCSW. So then he reported me to the New York state office of professional discipline or1 (28m 21s):Whatever yeah.2 (28m 21s):Regulation or whatever. Yeah. And I ha I had to go through a whole thing. I had to have a lawyer and I had to go, yeah, yeah. It was a nightmare. It was a complete and total nightmare. And I, and I said nothing, but like, yeah, I did that. I did do that. And I did it because I needed to make the money. I mean, in some ways I don't regret it because I did it worked for the time that it worked. And then by the time it stopped working, I was ready to leave private practice anyway. Oh my God. Yeah. But then it also backfired because we were taking in this money, which we desperately needed living in New York city with two kids.2 (29m 3s):And, and we were, we were spending it all and not hold withholding any for taxes. So then that started, that started, that started almost 10 year saga of just, I mean, I, it's embarrassing to even say how much money we've paid in just in fees, compounded fees. Nope. I'm sure. In the last 10 years we've given the government a million dollars.1 (29m 29s):That sounds, that sounds about right. And you know, I think the thing with money too, is the amount of forgiveness I've need to muster up for the financial decisions that I have made. So one of them that I'm super embarrassed about is that, and I, and I hear you when it's like, yeah, I, it, it's embarrassing. I, I, when I did my solo show, I inherited the year that my mom died. My great aunt also died, who I very barely knew. And I inherited like, like a lot of money. Well, to me, a lot, like 50 grand from her, and I spent 15,000 on a publicist for my solo show that did nothing.1 (30m 14s):So I was swindled. Oh,2 (30m 17s):I'm so sorry to hear that. That really did nothing.1 (30m 22s):I could have done it all on my own. I could have done it all on my own, on drugs, in a coma. Do you know what I'm saying? Like, like, come on. So I have done made some questionable decisions. I did the best we did the best we could with, with the information that we all had at the time. I would never make that decision. I wouldn't, I will never make that mistake again. So yeah. Money is very, very, obviously this is so like kind of obvious to say, but it is, it is. So it is a way in which we really, really use it to either prize or shame ourselves. Right. And, and, and w I do it either way, like I do it.1 (31m 2s):Oh, I'm so fancy. I inherited this dough. And then I also do it. It's that thing that they talk about in program, which is like, you're the worm, but you're the best worm for the festival, special worms. And like, you're not a worker among workers. I'm just like the best idiot out there. It's like,2 (31m 18s):Dude. Yeah. And you're making me realize that money might be the only very quantifiable way of understanding your psychology list. The money is like, understanding your psychology through math. It's going okay. If you're a person like me who gets offered a credit card at age 20 totally signs up and, and immediately maxes it out at whatever, to get 27% interest rate. So whatever little thousand dollars of clothes I got, I probably paid $10 for it. And for the longest time. So, so that's me being afraid of the truth of my financial situation, being unwilling to sacrifice, having, you know, whatever, cute clothes being about the immediate gratification of it all and not thinking longterm.2 (32m 15s):Yeah.1 (32m 16s):Okay. Well, not asking for help either. Like, like, I don't know who I'd asked, but someone had to know more than me. I didn't ask my parents. They didn't really know what was happening at, or that just was their generation of like, not teaching us about money. It was sort of like, good luck. Get it together. We got it together. You get it together. Okay. Fine. But like unwillingness and fear to ask, to be taught something about money. Like, I didn't know, Jack shit about credit or interest Jack shit.2 (32m 46s):Yeah. And I recently realized that I'm basically redoing that with my kids, because we supposedly have this allowance. Only one of my kids ever remembers to ask for it because you know, only one of my kids is very, you know, very interested in money, but like, in a way I can understand why the others don't because it's like, well, anytime they want something, I pay for it. I never say sometimes I'll say recently, I've gotten better about saying, if we're going to go back to school shopping I'll especially if the oldest one, I'll say, this is your budget. If you, if you spend it all on one pair of sneakers, then I hope you're okay with your sweat pants that don't fit and wear them everyday for the rest of the school year.2 (33m 31s):Right. But it's, we've, we've just been extremely inconsistent in tying, like, for example, chores to your allowance,1 (33m 42s):It's fucking miserable and hard. And I have trouble doing that for myself. I wouldn't be able to do that for my children. If I had children, I can't not give the dog people food. What are you talking about? How am I going to bring it? Doesn't shock me. We didn't learn the skills and I'm not blaming. I mean, I'm blaming, of course my parents, but I'm also just saying, it's just the facts. If we're going to be that in the truth, like, I didn't learn, I didn't educate myself and nobody educated me. So I'm really learning through trial and error. Mostly error, how to be okay with money. And it is you're right. Like finances, romance, and finance teach us the most about our psychology.2 (34m 24s):Yeah. Yeah. Romance finance. I love that. 1 (34m 28s):I think that my boss at Lutheran social services to say all the time, finance and romance, romance, and finance, that's what all these addictions are about is that's how you see them. I'm like, she's right. I mean, she was, I liked her. She was bonkers, but I liked her. She said some good. She, she also is famous for saying, and she didn't say it, but she would always quote, the, no one gets out of here alive. You know, none of us getting out of here life, we might as well start2 (34m 54s):. Well, today on the podcast, we were talking to Carol Schweid and original cast member of the original production of a chorus line on Broadway. She's got great stories to tell she's a fascinating person. And I think you're going to really enjoy this conversation with Carol Schweid. Exactly. Carol shrine. Congratulations. You survived theater school. I did. You did.2 (35m 34s):And where did you go to theater school. Okay. First of all,3 (35m 38s):Let me just take my coffee, my extra coffee off of the stove and put it on my table. Cause it's gonna burn because we don't want that.4 (35m 51s):Okay. You're I am looking for a cop. If you have one, you know, this is ridiculous.3 (36m 2s):Hi there. Hi. This is a riot that you talk about surviving theater school. I think it's great. Okay. So this is working, right? You can hear me. Yeah, no, totally. A hundred percent. So this is my, I started college at Boston university. I was an acting major, which I loved. I really did, but I, what I loved more than anything was I loved the history of the theater. We had a great professor who told the tales of the gladiators and the, you know, the gladiators on the island and the fighting, and then the island, the survivors, and then the island would slowly sink into the water.3 (36m 45s):What is this? What did I miss? It was the early history of the theater. It was starting on the church steps. It was, you know, the second, whatever all of that history was, I found it really interesting. I also loved the station shop crew stuff. I liked learning about lighting. I was terrible at it. I, you know, I would fall off ladder, but I, I, I enjoyed the backstage stuff as much as I enjoy. I just, I liked it. I, we did the rose tattoo and my, and my first job was to take care of the goat. I was on the prop crew.3 (37m 28s):I took care of the goat. Was it a stuffed goat? No, it was a real goat. Wow. What can I tell you? The rose tattoo. There's a goat in the play. I didn't realize you could have livestock and colleges, college, whatever it was. I look like I have jaundice with is that something's wrong with the light jump I sent you stop your, where is the microphone part of your, do you want me to hold it up better? Because when you move, it hits your shirt and it makes like a scratching, right? That's right. I'll do it this way. I won't move around. When you look tan, you look, you don't like jaundice at all. Okay. Well then that's all right. Good. Thanks. Were the goat handlers.3 (38m 8s):Good to talk to you. I mean, that was, and I didn't mind, I didn't mind being an usher. All of those things, you know, I remember somebody sitting us down and saying, you're you are the first person. The audience we'll meet tonight as an usher. I took all of the stuff I did, but the acting business was very confusing to me. I didn't quite know. I had done a lot of theater and dancing and been in the shows and stuff, but I really, I was a little more of a dancer than an actor. I'd taken class in the city. I'd followed some cute guy from summer camp to his acting class. But half the time, I honestly didn't understand a word.3 (38m 48s):Anybody said, I just, nobody does. I really didn't get it so much at the time I loved it, but I didn't always get it. And for some reason, and I have no idea where this, why this happened. I had a boyfriend in summer stock whose mother worked at Barnard and her best friend was a woman named Martha Hill. Martha Hill ran the dance department at a school called Julliard. Nope. I had no idea. Cool. Just a little, nothing school. This is back in the day. It's a long time ago. It was just a plain old school. It wasn't like a school, you know, where you bow down. And I really was a very good dancer and always loved dancing.3 (39m 33s):You know, I've been dancing since I'm like a kid, a little five or six or whatever. So I was a little disenchanted with my successes at Boston U even though I had friends, I was having a great time. I mean, Boston in the late sixties was amazingly fun, but I felt like I wasn't getting it. I mean, it wasn't a school that was cutting people. Thank God, because that would have been torture. I don't know how anybody survives that, but I audition for this dance department in this school called Juilliard and got in and then told my parents that I was going to change colleges. I remember making up a dance in the basement of my dorm in Boston.3 (40m 17s):Cause you had a sort of take class and then you had to show something that you should have made up. And somebody else from college was leaving school to come to New York to be a singer. So we decided we were going to be roommates. And then we had a summer stock. Somebody at BU started some summer theaters. So I had a job or two, I think I had some friends from there. So I ended up moving, changing colleges and going to Juilliard. And I spent three years there. I was a modern dancer major. So we had the Limone company, including Jose Lamone wow teachers and the Graham company.3 (40m 59s):I mean, Martha, Martha Graham did not teach, but her company did as a winter and Helen, I was Helen McGee. One of the, they were maniacs. I mean, they're, they're like gods and goddesses and their whole life is about dance. And I was one of those demonstrators for her eight o'clock beginning class, my third year of school. I mean, I, it was all about technique. We had amazing ballet teachers. We had Fiorella Keane who, I mean, Anthony tutor taught class there and he was Anthony. I mean, so I got a out of being at that school that I have never lost. I mean, I can, I'm making up the answers for high school kids now really.3 (41m 42s):I'm just finishing up a production of grease, which is really kind of boring, but whatever I liked Greece, tell me more. Yeah. It's okay. If you hear it enough, you really get sick of it. Well, that's true. Yeah. I mean high school kids doing high school kids is like, Jesus, God, you just want to slit your throat. The moodiness when it comes to the girls. I mean, I love them. I really love them. I love the guys because puppies, they fall all over each other and they're fabulous, but that's a lie anyway. So I did something that I don't know why I did it and how it worked out. That way I left. I had a very best friend in college that was, you know, and I came to New York and made, made and shared an apartment with this slightly crazy woman.3 (42m 32s):And a year later I got myself a studio apartment on west end avenue and 71st street. And my mom co-signed the lease. And I spent three years dancing, honestly dancing almost every day. I wanted to take sights singing, but they wouldn't let me because I was in the dance department. And I didn't know, you could advocate for that. Sure. I didn't know. You could take classes at Columbia. I mean, who had time anyway, but was it a three-year program? It was a four year program, but I had taken a music class at BU that was like music appreciation one. Yeah. And for whatever reason, they gave me credit for that.3 (43m 14s):So I had a full year credit. Yep. Three years of Juilliard where I really worked my tail off. What's weird about it is that I am, you know, just a plain old Jewish girl from New Jersey, you know, a middle-class Jewish girlfriend. And to, to think that I could have a profession where people don't talk and don't eat, which is what the answers do is a riot to me. Yeah. Yeah. It's an absolute riot because you know, I mean, that should be basically the manual for dancers. Don't talk, don't eat, but I always knew that I was heading to Broadway. I really have always wanted to do that.3 (43m 55s):And I, and, and w was not really ever in question that I would, I somehow assumed if I worked hard and figured it out enough, I would find my way to working on Broadway. And I, and I made the right choice in the sense of switching colleges. Because in the seventies, if you look at your list of Broadway shows, all the directors were choreographers. They were all dancers, all of them Fauci, Michael Bennett champion, all of them. So I started working when I got out of school, you know, it was, and I had already done a couple of summers of summer stock and I did a summer Bushkill pencil, you know, these ridiculous, stupid theaters all over, but it was a blast.3 (44m 36s):It was fun. Where, what was your first job out of school? I was still, I was in school and it was the Mount Suttington Playhouse, which was like a tin shell in Connecticut. And I think it was still in college. Cause two guys from school had opened this theater at the skiing place, but it wasn't skiing. Then it was a sh it was like a tin shell. So couldn't really do a show when it was raining very well. And I believe it was stopped the world. I want to get off and I can still remember the Alto harmony to some of the songs. So you okay. Wait, so you don't consider, you didn't consider yourself a, an actor or did you?3 (45m 20s):Well, I did, but I think what happened was I had to audition for something. It'd be you like, they had grad programs and it wasn't that I was unsuccessful there, but somebody came and I didn't get cast. I didn't get hired. And I didn't understand, you know, like they give you all these acting exercises. We do sense memory. Well, I didn't know they were exercises. I didn't, they were they're like plea aids. Right. They're like learning things. I took this all very seriously. I would stand in a room and try to feel it was like that song from chorus line, you know, try to feel the emotion, feel the, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah.3 (46m 5s):I did all of that. I didn't really understand the simple, what am I want here? And what's in my way of trying to get it. Yeah. It took me so long to find teachers that I really could understand and make me a better actor. So when did you find them? When did you start to find them? Oh, that's interesting. Well, I found a couple of good teachers in New York. I mean, honestly there was a woman named Mary Tarsa who had been in the group theater and an older lady. I mean, it's a long time ago anyway, you know, but I remember sitting in her class and she would talk about using imagery and th and I started to sort of understand a little bit, which is amazing to me because after I moved to Westport and I met, do you know the name Phoebe brand?3 (46m 58s):Yeah. Phoebe brand was in our theater workshop. Oh, taught a class. She was already up in her eighties and she taught a class, a Shakespeare class on Sunday mornings. And all of a sudden these things that I didn't understand from decades before. Hmm. It sort of pulled it all together. But for me, I went, I was in California after I got married and moved to LA for a couple of years, found a teacher named John LAN and Lee H N E and two years in his class. I started to really understand how to do it. And then when I came back to New York, he sent me to Michael Howard and Michael Howard, Michael Howard was a great teacher for me.3 (47m 44s):He's still a great, I don't know if he's still around if he's teaching or not, but he was a wonderful teacher. And I started to understand how to do it. Was Len the, did he teach the method or what was yes, he was, he was an actor studio teacher. And I started to understand about being present on the stage and being able to deal with people. All of it, it just changed dramatically. I mean, I started to understand what this was about and seeing other good actors and chipping away at it and finding people to rehearse with. And1 (48m 22s):You, you, from what I know, and what I'm gathering is that once you graduated Juilliard, you were cast in New York.3 (48m 30s):Well, you know, I did get my very, my V I I've. I mean, I, I remember going to see midnight cowboy, which was about the same time as I got out of college. And I remember going into a terrible panic of, oh my God. I mean, really scared about all of it. And I, I went, I joined a class that a friend of mine, somebody told me about this class, you know, I always follow somebody to a class. I'm always, I have good friends. And I, somebody says, oh, I love this guy come to class and I'd show up.3 (49m 12s):And this was a musical comedy singing class, kind of where there were writers in the class and actors in the class. And the writers in the class would work on a musical that they didn't have permission for. It wasn't like they were, we were doing this for money or for, for future. So my friend who I became friends with wrote her musical version of barefoot in the park and which has never been done, but I remember I was in it and this guy was in it. And we, it was the kind of a class where it was a very warm, funny group, funny group of wacko theater people. And I would go to open calls and I'd usually go to open dance calls because that was a door for me.3 (49m 59s):And also I used to have to sneak out of Jew, not sneak necessarily, but essentially sneak out to take my singing lessons. And I took singing lessons every, you know, every week for years, for three years, I would, you know, and I, and I was not really, I don't think a very good singer, but I became a good singer. I would sneak out of school and go to an acting class. I don't even know when I started that, but I know that I would find the time to do it and then talk about acting and find a teacher so that when I would audition for a musical and I would get through the dancing. Usually if I got through the first cut, I would make it to the end. I wouldn't always get the job, but if I made it through that first horrible, random cut, you know, where there's 200 people in your dancing across the stage and it's yes, no, yes, no.3 (50m 47s):Is it really?1 (50m 48s):Because I'm not a dancer. So I never had this. I, when my agents are like, oh, there's an open dance call. I'm like, ah, that's you sent the wrong person, the email. So it's really like that, like in, in chorus line where they say, you know,3 (51m 1s):Oh yeah. It's like all that jazz. It's really like that.2 (51m 6s):Wait, I have a question. I want to hear the re the rest of that. But I, I just, I've never asked anybody. What's the biggest difference between the people who got cut immediately. I mean, was it training or were there people that, in other words, were there people who were just walking in off the street with no training trying to audition? Yeah,1 (51m 29s):No, truly an open call.3 (51m 31s):No. And sometimes these were equity calls. Cause I, I, I did get my equity card on a summer. That one summer I worked for a non-union, you know, we were in either Bushkill Pennsylvania or Southern Eaton Connecticut, or I did a couple of those summers. And then the next summer, the choreographer from that show had an equity job. And he hired like three of us from our non-unions summer stock, because we were good enough. And1 (52m 4s):So when you went to these open calls, everyone, there was a bad-ass dancer. No one, there was like,3 (52m 10s):That's not true. That's not true. There were all different levels of dancers, but it was also a look await, you know, it was always, I was always like seven pounds overweight. It was like, the torture is thing of weight does enough to put anybody over the edge1 (52m 26s):That they literally3 (52m 27s):Weigh you, Carol. Oh God. No. Oh, but it's so look, and I will tell you there's one. There was one time when I remember auditioning for above Fossey show and there were a lot of people on the stage and we were whatever we were doing. And then at 1.3 Fossey dancers, it was their turn. And these three gals, okay. Their hair was perfect. Their makeup was fabulous. They had a little necklace, they had a black leotards, you know, cut up high, but not out of control. Good tights, no, no runs, nice shoes, nails done.3 (53m 7s):And they were fantastic. They were clean. They were technically, and we all sort of went, oh fuck.1 (53m 16s):Right.3 (53m 18s):Right. And I have friends who became Fossey dancers. I mean, I worked for Bob, but I have friends who did a lot of shows him. And they had that same experience where they saw other people, the way it should be. And then they would go back a month later and get the job because they knew what it took. It was all about knowing what it takes. But the thing about having studied acting and having slowly studied singing is that in the world of musical theater, I was ahead of the game because there's not that much time. So you have to be willing to spend all of your time.3 (54m 0s):Right.1 (54m 1s):There are some people I'm assuming Carol, that could dance wonderfully, but couldn't do the singing and the acting part. And that's where you were like, that's the triple threat newness of it all is like, you could do3 (54m 12s):Well, I could do them better than a lot of people. And I certainly could sing well, and I had, I could sing a short song and I knew that you sing a short song. I knew that you'd probably do an uptempo, you know? And also I tend to be a little angry when I go into an audition. It's like, why do I fuck? Do I have to audition? I better, duh. So I needed to find things that allowed me to be a little angry so I could be myself. And I could also be a little funny if I could figure out how to do that. So all of these things worked in my favor. And then of course, like everybody else in her, a lot of people, pat Birch, who was a choreographer, she had like a gazillion shows running, including Greece on Broadway. And now over here, I don't know if she did grease, but she did over here.3 (54m 55s):She did. She was very prolific choreographer. She had been a Martha Graham dancer and she had taught a couple of classes at Julliard. And when it came to my auditioning for her, she needed girls who could dance like boys. She didn't need tall leggy, chorus girls. We were doing the show she was working on, was a show called Minnie's boys. And it was a show about the Marx brothers and the last number of the show. We were all the whole chorus was dressed up like different Marx brothers. And she needed girls who could be low to the ground, who can, you could turn who and I was the right person.3 (55m 36s):And I remember being in that class, that wonderful musical theater class with a teacher named Mervin Nelson, who was just a great older guy who kind of worked in the business. I remember I had to go to my callback. I went to my class and the callback was at night. And I remember him walking me to the door, putting his arm around me and saying, go get the job. And if you don't get this one, we'll get you. The next one1 (56m 4s):That makes me want to3 (56m 4s):Cry. Well, it made me feel like part of the family, cause we all want to be part of that theater family. And so I tend to do that when I'm with an actor, who's going to go get a job or go get, you know, you want to feel like it's possible. Yeah. You feel like you can, you deserve it.1 (56m 29s):You said, you mentioned briefly that you worked for Bob3 (56m 32s):Fossey. I did.1 (56m 35s):Oh my gosh. Did you turn into one of those ladies that looked like a bossy dancer too? Like, did you then show up to those auditions? Like, oh3 (56m 43s):No, I don't think I, I couldn't, I didn't, I could not get into a chorus of Bob Fossey, but I did get to play for strata in Pippin in the, in the, in the first national tour. And he, Bob was the, he was the director and I, I knew I was the right person for that job. It was also a funny, kind of lovely circumstances that I was in some off-Broadway an off-Broadway show that had started as an awful off, off of a, that, that Bubba, that moved to an off-Broadway theater. I got some excellent reviews. And I think the day the review came out was the day I had my audition for Bob Fossey.3 (57m 24s):So I, and I played it. I had talked to people who knew him. I talked to, you know, I, I knew that I, I don't know, I just, I, I had done some work and I just, I don't know the right person at the right time, somebody, he needed it. That part required a good dancer. Who could, I don't know how I got the part. I just,1 (57m 57s):I'm kind of getting the impression that we're talking about being a strong dancer.3 (58m 0s):Well, let's strong dancer. And also being able to, being able to talk and sing was really the key. I'm not sure that I certainly, as a young person, I, I didn't do nearly as much comedy as I did when I got a little older, but, and also there were a lot of divisions. You sort of either did musicals or you did straight plays and it was hard to get into an audition even for a straight play. And the truth is I think that a lot of us who thought we were better than we were as you get better, you see when you really, wasn't a very strong actor.1 (58m 43s):Right. But there's something about that. What I'm noticing and what you're talking about is like, there's something about the confidence that you had by maybe thinking that you might've been a little better than you were that actually behooves young actors and performers that, you know, cause when Gina and I talked to these people were like, oh my God, they have a healthy ego, which actually helps them to not give up as where I was like, I'm terrible. I'm giving up at the first hour.3 (59m 9s):Exactly. Right. Right. And, and it, and it goes back and forth. It's like a CSO one day, you feel like, oh yeah, I'm good at this. I can walk it. I get, I'm like, I'm okay with this. And the next day you just to hide under the bed, I think that's sort of the way it goes. I didn't know that people who worked on Broadway even then all had coaches and teachers and support systems and you know, being kind of a little more of a lone Wolf, which I was, and still fight against in a way I come against that a lot, for whatever reasons, you know, whatever it doesn't work, what to be a lone Wolf.3 (59m 54s):Yeah. Yeah. You can't do this alone. You can't do it without a support system. It's just too hard because when I actually had the best opportunity I had, which was being part of a chorus line, it was harder than I thought to just be normal, come up with a good performance every night, you know, it was up and down and loaded and that you lost your voice and had nobody to talk to because you couldn't talk anyway. And we didn't have the internet yet. You know, there was so many, it was so much pressure and so much, and I hadn't really figured out how to create that support system up for myself.3 (1h 0m 42s):And it was harder, harder than it needed to be. Did you ultimately find it with the cast? No. Oh, not really where they mean, oh, none of the cast was fine. It wasn't that anybody was mean it's that I didn't take care of myself and I didn't know how I was supposed to take care of my shirt. How old were you when you were cast in a chorus line? 27? Maybe I was, I was young and, but I wasn't that young. I just, but it wasn't that C w it was a strange situation to, I was, I had already had one Broadway show, so I had done, and then I had gone out of town to bucks county Playhouse.3 (1h 1m 25s):And did west side story Romeo was your first Broadway show. I'm sorry. It was called Minnie's boys. Oh, that was it. That was my, I did. And it was a show about the Marx brothers. Right. And I don't know if you know who Louis. We would probably do Louis Stadol and Louis J Staglin who works with, he works with Nathan Lane a lot. Oh yeah. Yeah. He's like second bun and he's incredibly talented. He played Groucho. Okay. We were all 25 years old. We were kids. We were right out of college. And the weirdest part of all was that the mother was played by Shelley winters. And this was a musical. What a weird you've really. Okay. So then you went onto chorus line.3 (1h 2m 6s):Well then, well then in between that, this is like, you know, then, then I went out of town to bucks county. I love being in bucks county for a year. We did west side story. We did Romeo and Juliet during the week. We do them together, one in the morning, one in the afternoon for high school kids. And then on the weekends, we do one of the, and I was the only person in the cast who liked dancing at 10 o'clock in the morning. You know, I didn't mind doing west side at 10 in the morning. I'd been up at eight, being a demonstrator for Mary Hinkson, teaching people how to do a contraction. So I didn't care. I love working in the daytime. That's what I play with your food is such a nice success. My lunchtime theaters here, I get tired at night.3 (1h 2m 47s):I don't know.2 (1h 2m 49s):Most people do wait. So was the, was the audition process for chorus line?3 (1h 2m 56s):I have a great story. I can tell you what my story is. Okay. So I, I was in, I don't know what I was doing. I had done a lot of off-Broadway work. I had been doing, I had been working a lot. And then of course there were the year where I didn't work. And then I went off to south North Carolina and played Nellie Forbush in south Pacific, in the dinner theater for three months. And I loved that. Actually, I think it was one of those times I had a job and a boyfriend and it was like a relief. It was wonderful to have like a life and then do the show at night. You know, I, I enjoyed that a lot and I didn't, you know, it was a big part and I didn't panic about seeing it.3 (1h 3m 37s):And it was just, I learned a lot from doing a part like that. I was doing Fiddler on the roof at a dinner theater in New Jersey, down the street from where my folks lived. And occasionally my mom would stop by her rehearsal and watch the wedding scene. Honest to God. I'm not kidding. She's like, Carol, you ever gonna get married? Are you ever gonna? Okay. So I'm doing Fiddler on the roof, in New Jersey. And there's a guy in the cast, one of the bottle dancers who were dropping off at night on 55th street, because he's working on this little musical about dancers and he would bring in monologues and he'd asked me to read them at rehearsal because he wanted to hear them out loud.3 (1h 4m 25s):And there was some stuff about this place to ever hear the peppermint lounge back in the studio. Right. It was a disco thing, but it was also a place where there was something. I remember one the couch girls, girls who would just lie on the couches and the guys, I mean really crazy stuff that did not make it into the show, but some interesting stuff. And I was playing the eldest daughter sidle, and it's a terrific part for me. So I was good. Yeah. And Nick knew I was a dancer. Anyway, this little show called the chorus line was in its workshop. Second workshop. They had already done the I, cause I was not a Michael Bennett dancer. I didn't, you know, I, I, I had auditioned for my goal once for the tour of two for the Seesaw.3 (1h 5m 10s):And it was the leading part and I didn't get it. I auditioned, I sang and I read and I read and I sang and I didn't get the part. And I came home and I was like in hysterics for like five days. I just, you know, I, I didn't get the part year and a half later, I'm doing Fiddler on the roof with Nick, Dante in New Jersey. And somebody leaves the second workshop and Nick brings up my name because there's a job all of a sudden to cover, to be in the opening and to cover a couple of parts next, bring up my name. And Michael Bennett says, wait a minute. I know her. I know she's an actress and she's a singer. Can she dance?3 (1h 5m 52s):So I showed up the next morning and I danced for 10 minutes and I got the job. I mean, I think, wow. Yeah. That's a great story.2 (1h 6m 1s):No. So that means you didn't have to participate in3 (1h 6m 4s):Callbacks or nothing. Oh, I started that day. I mean, honestly, it was Fiddler on the roof, you know what, I don't remember whether, how it went. Cause we were already in performance tour or something, you know, I, I it's a long time ago, so I don't really remember, but I know that this particular story is the absolute truth. That's fantastic. That2 (1h 6m 27s):Was it a hit right away3 (1h 6m 29s):Chorus line. Well, it wasn't, we were in previews. I'm no, we weren't even previous the second workshop, which means it was still being figured out. And when I came to the first rehearsal and sat and watched what was going on, I could not believe what I was seeing because the truth of what was happening on stage and the way it was being built was astounding. It was absolutely astounding because something about it was so bizarre. Oh. And also, also Marvin Hamlisch was the rehearsal pianist on Minnie's boys.3 (1h 7m 10s):Wow. So I knew him a little bit, not well, you know, but he was the rehearsal pianist that nobody would listen to a show about the Marx brothers, Marvin would say, wait, this is the Marx brothers. You got to have a naked girl running out of the orchestra pit. You gotta, you gotta, and of course, nobody would listen to him. Wait a minute, just turn this off, stop, stop, turn off. Sorry. So I couldn't get over what I was seeing. And I, I knew from the beginning, of course, I think most of us did that. Something very, very unique was going on and it was always changing. Like Donna McKechnie came in late at the audition, all dressed up in like a fur thing.3 (1h 7m 56s):And it was like, I'm sorry, I'm late. I'm sorry. I'm late. And then Zach says, would you put on dance clothes? And she said, no, no, wait a minute. Anyway, you couldn't help. But know sort of, you just kind of put,2 (1h 8m 8s):I mean, I remember seeing it when I was a kid and not, not being able to relate as an actor, but now that I think back, it just must've felt so gratifying to be seen for all of the, you know, because like we w the Joe Montana episode, we3 (1h 8m 28s):Haven't listened to yet, but I'm looking forward to2 (1h 8m 30s):It here today. But he was saying, I love3 (1h 8m 33s):Him2 (1h 8m 34s):For you. You were saying that when he won the Tony and everybody would say, well, it's like to win the Tony, what's it? Like he said, it's like, you won the lottery, but you been buying tickets for 15 years. You know, that's the part of acting that people now, I think it's a pretty common knowledge that it's really difficult to be an actor, but I don't know how Hmm, how known that was then. And it just, must've been so gratifying for all of those people. I mean, who are living in their real life? The story of that musical. Yeah.3 (1h 9m 9s):I think that that's true. And also, I mean, it really did come out of people's experiences. Those stories are so, so to be part of something like that, and down at the public theater, which of course it was a vol place to be, you know, you, you knew that Meryl Streep was walking down the hallway and you knew that. I mean, talk about confidence. I mean, I don't know if you've read her new book, no book about her. No, it's worth the time I listened to it. Actually, I didn't read it. I listened to, it's quite wonderful because you see a very confident person who's working on creating who she is.1 (1h 9m 47s):Do you feel, I feel like you have a really strong sense of confidence about yourself too. Where did that come from? Would you agree? First of all, that you have, it sounds like you had some comps, some real chutzpah as a youngster and maybe now as well. Where'd that come from3 (1h 10m 5s):Beats me. I have it now because I, I, I, I've had a lot of, a lot of experience. And I, I think that, that, I, I think I know a lot about this, but I don't know that I had it. The trick was to have this kind of confidence when it really matters. Yes. And I think I had it, like if I was in an off-Broadway show, I could say, I don't think that's good enough. Could you restage this blah, blah, blah. Or if I'm in North Carolina, I'm not, I think we need to dah, dah, dah, dah, dah. But when it comes down to the real nitty gritty of standing up for yourself, when it really, really matters, boy, that's harder than it looks.3 (1h 10m 51s):You know, even things like, I mean, my character, when I eventually took over the role of Miralis, which I under, you know, I was we've covered all these parts. There were nine of us. We sang in the little booth in the wings. We had microphones and little headsets. And the coolest part of all was Jerry Schoenfeld, who was the chairman of the Schubert organization would bring any visiting dignitary who was visiting the city that he was showing around his theaters. He would bring them into our little booth. And then we would watch the show from stage left in our little booth while we're singing, give me the ball, give him the ball. Cause half the dancers on the stage, cause stop singing because they had a solo coming up.3 (1h 11m 31s):So, you know, singing in a musical is not easy. You know, there's a lot of pressure and you got to hit high notes and you, you know, you just wake up in the middle of the night going torture, torture, and you have to work through that and finally go, fuck it. You know, fuck it. I don't care what I weigh. Fuck it. I don't care if I, if I can't hit the high note, but it, it takes a long time to get there. You know, I see people who do this all the time. I don't know how they live. I don't know how they sleep at night. There's no wonder people like to hire singers who have graduated from programs where they really understand their voice, know how to protect that, which you don't, you know, you have to learn, you have to learn how to really take.3 (1h 12m 24s):That's why, you know, it's wondering about ballet companies now have misuses and we didn't have any of that. You were hanging out there alone. I felt maybe I'm wrong, but that's how I felt. And if I was vulnerable or if I didn't feel well, and I was like, oh, what am I going to do? I can't tell anybo

Shaping Success With Wes Tankersley
Nita Barnard | Building a Community

Shaping Success With Wes Tankersley

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 34:18


Nita Barnard owner of Revel Skin Therapy is doing more than building a business. Helping her small community grow, by taking part in City council and school board meetings. Nita's just loves to help people grow!Follow Nita@revelskintherapyCatch up with what is going on with Shaping Success!Follow the Independent Entertainment Networkhttps://www.facebook.com/indentnetFollow Me on Instagram @wes.tankersleyDo you have a Great story? Would you like to be a guest?Email wes@westankersley.com Check out our sponsor Tattooed and Successful @tattoedandsuccessfulco use code TANK at check out for a special Discount! https://tattooedandsuccessful.com/Follow Shaping Success https://shapingsuccesspodcast.buzzsprout.com/Email Wes@westankersley.com for guest ideas or to be on the show!Check out our sponsor Tattooed and Successful @tattoedandsuccessfulco use code TANK at check out for a special Discount! https://tattooedandsuccessful.com/Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=34976605)

With Jason Barnard...
Understanding Semantic SEO (Koray Tuğberk Gübür and Jason Barnard)

With Jason Barnard...

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021


Koray Tuğberk Gübür talks with Jason Barnard about understanding semantic SEO. Koray Tuğberk GÜBÜR is the founder and owner of Holistic SEO & Digital and has been doing SEO for more than 6 years. Today, he is a holistic SEO expert who learns a lot from Bill Slawski and a contributor to leading SEO online publications such as OnCrawl, JetOctopus and Authoritas. Koray also speaks at SEO events and on webinars about Semantic SEO and Search, Core Algorithm Updates, and more. Matching the best possible documents to provide the most helpful answer or solution to the user's query has always been (and will always be) the search engines' goal.  For the first years of the Internet, search engines had a lexical approach, but now they are what Koray calls semantic search engines. And, if they are to keep up with the algorithms, that means SEO practitioners need to pivot and have a semantic approach to their work.  In this podcast episode, Koray Tuğberk GÜBÜR joins Jason Barnard for a super geeky and fascinating discussion of Semantic SEO, what it means, what work needs to be done and how to properly use and apply our understanding of it to our websites. Koray takes the discussion further and also explains many concepts and practicalities of how the algorithms function, citing multiple patents and experiments. Amazing insights! This is a super fun, interesting and interactive episode with a lot of juicy information on how you can charm Google now that it has “gone semantic” ;) Further reading: How to create content hubs using the knowledge graph https://wordlift.io/blog/en/content-hub-seo/ Articles by Koray https://www.holisticseo.digital/ What you'll learn from Koray Tuğberk Gübür 00:00 Koray Tuğberk GÜBÜR with Jason Barnard01:45 Koray Tuğberk GÜBÜR - Brand SERP and video verticals03:24 Understanding Semantic SEO (Overview)03:59 What is semantic SEO?4:35 - 7:00 Are Web Users Markovian?8:30 - 9:35 Unknown Entities and Open Information Retrieval10:45 - 13:15 Candidate Passage Answers14:38 - 16:46 Core Algorithm Updates and Relevance Paths17:37 - 18:20 Lexical Semantics and Synonyms25:50 - 26:35 Semantic Relations27:00 - 29:25 Understanding Semantic Search Engine29:00 - 30:48 Cost of Retrieving37:45 - 36:00 Click Satisfaction Models36:00 - 36:25 Possible Answer Seeking Routes36:38 - 38:20 Query Path38:30 - 39:33 Re-ranking Tests40:00 - 42:00 Humor and Semantics42:00:43:00 Product Review, Sentiments and Authenticity This episode was recorded live on video November 16th 2021 Recorded live at Kalicube Tuesdays (Digital Marketing Livestream Event Series). Watch the video now >>

High Five To That
E 41- Clint Barnard - Model and Actor

High Five To That

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 32:40


Hello High Fivers!  Today we have the delightful Clint Barnard.Clint is a commercial and lifestyle model who has been in the fashion industry for over a decade. Originally signed to FORD Models in Chicago but after a brief stay, he now calls Select Model Management home (one of the top 5 agencies in the world) where he has been under contract for 6 years. He's represented by both Select Chicago and Miami. He's also signed to New Icon in New York City.His story is a bit unorthodox because unlike most models who start their careers in their late teens/early twenties he quit his Engineering job in Chicago in his late twenties, and flew 8,000 miles across 4 continents to Cape Town, South Africa for a chance to break into the business. This risky move proved to be worth it because after returning home, he was quickly signed, and his career took off. He's worked with notable clients such as Nike, Amazon, Target, Kohl's, Men's Health Magazine, Express, Crate & Barrel, L.L. Bean, and Neiman Marcus.He's on this week's show to offer some insight of what it's like being a working model and share his experience to help younger models avoid the pitfalls of this exciting, yet fickle business.Links:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/barnardclint/?hl=en*If you have a topic or organization that should be on the show, please send us a message at:HighFiveToThatPod@gmail.comIG: @HIghFivetoThatPod        @HighFiveARoo

Radio Cherry Bombe
Top Chef Winner Kelsey Barnard Clark Wants To Reorganize Your Fridge

Radio Cherry Bombe

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 47:05


It's no surprise Kelsey Barnard Clark won Season 16 of Top Chef. She put her drive, determination, French training, and affection for mise en place to work for her. Plus, she sprinkled in lots of love letters to her Alabama upbringing. Today, Kelsey is the force behind KBC, an eatery, bakery, and catering operation in Dothan, Alabama. She also is the author of a brand new cookbook, Southern Grit: 100+ Down-Home Recipes for the Modern Cook. Kelsey joins us to talk about her debut book, why her hairdryer is a crucial tool for her roast chicken recipe, and why we've been organizing our fridges all wrong. Thank you to Cypress Grove and Fridge No More for supporting this episode. Get 50% off your first grocery order from Fridge No More with code CHERRYBOMBE. Visit here for more

Radio Islam
William Bird: Henrico Barnard says K word 12 times in video rant…why are people so proudly racist ?

Radio Islam

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 6:11


William Bird: Henrico Barnard says K word 12 times in video rant…why are people so proudly racist ? by Radio Islam

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee
Can't Sleep? These Foods Should Help | Dr. Neal Barnard Live Q&A

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 43:07


What foods will help you sleep better? Discover the best and worst options for fighting insomnia when Dr. Neal Barnard joins "The Weight Loss Champion" Chuck Carroll on The Exam Room.   Did you know that one out of three adults struggle to get enough sleep every night? It's an unfortunate truth, but the difference between tossing and turning for eight hours and quality rest could be what you're eating.   Dr. Barnard also answers questions sent to The Doctor's Mailbag:   - What is the latest you should eat at night? - When should you eat if you work overnight? - Will a vegan diet help you sleep better? - And many more! — — — Gregory J. Reiter Memorial Fund https://gregoryreiterfund.org — — — Chuck Carroll Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ChuckCarrollWLC Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/ChuckCarrollWLC Facebook: http://wghtloss.cc/ChuckFacebook — — — Dr. Neal Barnard Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/drnealbarnard Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drnealbarnard Facebook: http://bit.ly/DrBarnardFB Your Body In Balance: https://amzn.to/2UvAfxW — — — 21-Day Vegan Kickstart App iOS: https://bit.ly/VegKStrt-iOS Android: https://bit.ly/VegKStrtAndrd Web: https://www.pcrm.org/kickstart — — — Barnard Medical Center Appointments https://bit.ly/BMCtelemed 202-527-7500 — — — Share the Show Please subscribe and give the show a 5-star rating on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or many other podcast providers. Don't forget to share it with a friend for inspiration!

Life In The Stocks
#242 Laurent "Lags" Barnard (Gallows)

Life In The Stocks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 87:08


We have another UK guest joining us today for Episode 242 of Life In The Stocks. I've decided I need to show more home country love and feature more British guests on the podcast, continuing today with Laurent Barnard, aka Lags, from Gallows - one of the most formidable UK punk bands of the last two decades. The band's guitarist and primary songwriter joins me to discuss Gallows Mk 1 with Frank Carter, and Gallows Mk 2 with Wade McNeil, as he reveals the full story of the band from a group of young punks on the DIY local music scene in Watford to signing with a major label for one million pounds, Frank's departure, Wade replacing, where the band is at now, and the future of the group going forward. We squeeze in all kinds of other stuff along the way, too.Follow me on Facebook / Twitter / Instagram: @mattstocksdjCheck out the Life In The Stocks Patreon page, support this podcast, and get all kinds of extras in return, from bonus podcasts & DJ mixes to archive print interviews & radio shows. www.patreon.com/lifeinthestocksMy first book, 'Life In The Stocks: Veracious Conversations with Musicians & Creatives (Vol. 01)' is also out NOW and is available via Amazon, Waterstones, Blackwell's & Rare Bird Publishing. https://rarebirdlit.com/life-in-the-stocks-veracious-conversations-with-musicians-creatives/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Steady Stater
Sensible Scientists, Stable Planet (with Phoebe Barnard)

The Steady Stater

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 31:46


Our guest this week is Dr. Phoebe Barnard, CEO and Executive Director of Stable Planet Alliance, a new organization working to "bend the curve" on population and hyper-consumption. Brian and Phoebe discuss this budding alliance, the World Scientists' Warning Into Action, and GirlPlanet.Earth, among other topics. If you want to know what forward-thinking scientists are up to, be sure to catch this one.

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 137: Part 1 - Tess Sholom: From the Runways of Paris to the Goldsmith's Studio with Goldsmith Tess Sholom

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 22:08


What you'll learn in this episode: What it was like to design jewelry for high-fashion runways in the 70s and 80s How the right piece of jewelry can transform the wearer  Why creative problem solving is the best skill you can have as a goldsmith How Tess' work wound up in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Smithsonian Institution and other museums How the jewelry field has changed with the popularization of social media Additional Resources: Website Instagram Facebook Photos: Blue Sky Chalcedony Byzantium Earrings Byzantium Necklace Circes Circle Necklace Illusion Necklace  Ionian Necklace  Its A Wrap Necklace Naiad Necklace About Tess Sholom Warm and malleable but also strong and enduring, gold shines with the spirit of life itself. For designer and jeweler Tess Sholom, gold is both medium and muse. Tess Sholom began her jewelry career in fashion jewelry in 1976, designing pieces that appeared on the runways of Karl Lagerfeld, Oscar de la Renta and James Galanos, and the pages of Vogue and Harper's Bazaar. Her fashion work is included in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Smithsonian Institution, Museum of the City of New York, the Racine Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, the Fashion Institute of Technology, and other museums. After two successful decades in fashion jewelry, she trained as a goldsmith and fell under the spell of high-karat gold. She decided to stop designing high-volume fashion jewelry and begin again as a hands-on studio artist, creating one-of-a-kind 22k gold jewelry in the workshop. Tess Sholom always had an eye for accessorizing, but she didn't realize it would lead her to a long and fruitful career as a jewelry designer. While working as a cancer researcher, a long-shot pitch to Vogue opened the door to a 30-year career as a jewelry designer for fashion runways. Her latest career move was opening Tess Sholom Designs, where she creates one-of-a-kind, high-karat gold pieces. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about how she designed jewelry for Oscar de la Renta, Bill Blass and Karl Lagerfeld; why problem solving is the thread that runs through all her careers; and how she plays on gold's timeless, mystical quality in her work. Read the episode transcript here.  Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Today, my guest is Tess Sholom. Many of you may have been aware of her fabulous statement pieces she designed for the runway, or you may have drooled over the pieces without knowing who the designer was. Today, she has taken a different path and is now both a designer and a jeweler in high-karat gold. She operates Tess Sholom Designs. We'll hear all about that today, her whole jewelry journey and about what she's doing. Tess, welcome to the program.   Tess: Thank you. It's good to be here.   Sharon: So glad to have you. Tell us about your jewelry journey. It must be an interesting one, because you've covered a lot of different areas.   Tess: It has covered a lot of different areas, and it's been on for a long time. When I graduated college, I actually went into cancer research. I was working in a laboratory and found that I didn't like the isolation, so I went to Physicians and Surgeons Medical Center for a year to become a physical therapist. That I liked; solving problems, helping people.    Then, the year I married my husband in 1976, we were invited to a wedding in the woods. We were told to wear jeans because we were going to be in the woods and rolling around in the woods, and I thought, “This is awful. A wedding? This is when I try to get all dressed up in my best, and I'm wearing jeans?” But I complied. I bought a pretty gauze top; they were in style in the 70s. I made a necklace of beads and seeds and ribbons, and I made a belt to go with it. At the wedding, people kept saying, “That's beautiful. Where did you get it?” Every time I said I made it, they would say, “Well, you should be doing this professionally.” It's crazy. It put a bug in my ear, and I've always been like that. When a path presents itself, I say, “O.K., let's try this. Let's try it. Let's see what'll happen.”   Sharon: I love that.   Tess: And so, I did. I started walking around looking in stores to see how necklaces were finished. What were the clasps like? Within a month, I took a couple of things to Vogue Magazine. They gave me an instant credit; they gave me an editorial credit right away. Saks Fifth Avenue bought that necklace, and it was featured as an editorial credit in the magazine. That's how I started. Within a very short time, Vogue Magazine called me and said, “Oscar de la Renta is looking for a jeweler to make jewelry for his runway.” After that, it just kept growing and growing. One designer, Bill Blass, saw my work in Women's Wear Daily and he got in touch with me; Giorgio di Sant'Angelo and on and on. Karl Lagerfeld sent his secretary to meet me in New York, and then I went to Paris and collaborated with him on one of his shows. I designed jewelry for that show.   Sharon: Did you turn around and go, “Oh my god! Look what I'm doing now”?   Tess: It was like having the tiger by the tail, seriously. I hadn't planned it. Adornment is old. It's probably the first attempt at art that man ever made, to separate his body with berry dyes, with beads, with leaves. It's a very old idea, adornment, and I've always felt the picture was not quite finished unless you were accessorizing. It ultimately was natural for me to think about making jewelry to complement a look, an action look, a closing look.   Sharon: I can imagine the peasant blouse you had in that era, but you actually said, “Oh, I need something,” and you made it yourself. I would have just said, “Oh, it needs something,” and gone through my closet or gone without anything.   Tess: That's interesting. I guess what makes me a maker—from the time I was little, my mother brought me up with the housewifely arts. One of them was embroidery. I learned to use my hands early, and I was always changing things around.  If I had a garment and I didn't like the way it looked, I just changed it. I would put a stitch here, a stitch there. I broke apart some costume jewelry beads of pearls at Claire's and sewed them on a sweater because I wanted that look. I've always done that. I've always done things with my hands making things.   Sharon: Would you say you were artistic from a young age? Besides knowing how to do this, were you creative? It sounds like you were.   Tess: I was creative, but my family was focused on medicine, lawyers, doctors, that kind of thing. They did not think I was artistic. They thought I was a little fussy because I wanted things to look the way I wanted them to look. They didn't really think of me as an artist.    Sharon: You studied what, biology in college?   Tess: I went to Barnard and I had a bachelor's degree. My major was in science. It was botany, but I had just as many credits in fine arts, actually. That should have given me a hint, but I was focused on science. That's where I wanted to be, but it turned out no, I did not like the isolation of a lab.   Sharon: I can understand that. Were you going full time? It seems like there was quite a swath of your career where you were doing jewelry for the runway. Did you do that full time for different designers for a while?   Tess: While I was doing that, I was also supplying boutiques and department stores. I started this in 1976 and very soon, I realized once again that I was alone. I looked in Vogue Magazine to see who else was doing this kind of jewelry, because it was different. High-fashion costume jewelry was very different from the prestigious houses, Monet, Coraux, Trifari. They made beautiful costume jewelry that to this day lasts, but our expression was quite different.    I found a number of other designers in the city who were doing the same thing more or less that I was. We got together and formed an association called the Fashion Accessories Designers Association, called FADA. My husband used to tease me and say, “You're the mada of FADA,” but we were all entrepreneurs from some other place. One was a court stenographer; one was a potter; one was a knitter, but we all made accessories. So, we formed this organization and sold to the same places, so that we had an ability to protect ourselves a little. Sometimes the big stores would try to take advantage, and because we were all selling to the same people, we were able to defend ourselves.   Sharon: That's very smart. How did you ferret the people out? How did you find these other people?   Tess: I looked in the back of Vogue Magazine. Wherever I saw a credit that looked more or less like the expression that I was doing, I would look them up and get in touch with them.    Sharon: I want to talk to you more about this, but I want to hear how you got into—now you make things in high-karat gold and precious, not diamonds and stuff, but nice gems, colorful gems. How did you get into making and goldsmithing?   Tess: I had a desire. I always had this desire to have my collection in a museum and to be recognized by a museum. It was a goal of mine somehow, but I never knew what to do about it. However, quite accidentally, the business began to change. The designers were not using accessories so much, so I began to shift my focus towards making sterling silver tea sets and boxes, because I was trying to make sure that if in fact the jewelry did begin to lessen, I would have some other outlet. At that time, someone came to my house for tea and saw a silver tea set. She was a curator from the Museum of the City of New York, and it was fascinating to see her expression. If you remember the scene in Julius Caesar where he's offered the crown, he wants it; he refuses it, but he's reaching for it. I saw that same kind of reaction from this lady who was looking at my tea set. Finally, she asked me for it for the museum. It was their first sterling silver acquisition of the 20th century.   Sharon: Did you make it or did you design it?   Tess: I designed it and it was made in my factory by my head metalworker. By this point, I had 20 employees. I literally had a tiger by the tail, because as an entrepreneur, I started out on my tabletop and eventually had to keep moving because I kept increasing. So, that was the first acquisition. I don't quite remember how the Metropolitan Museum of Art got to me, but they came to me. The Brooklyn Museum of Art came to me, the Museum at FIT. There were a couple of museums in the Midwest that some clients donated to.    That got me thinking about my jewelry as art. I took a couple of courses at Jewelry Arts Institute, and I was fascinated by working with gold. There's nothing like 22-karat gold. It is beautiful. It's very malleable; you can do so much with it. There's something a little mysterious, a little mystical about 22-karat gold, because gold is eternal; nothing can happen to it. It doesn't rust; it doesn't turn to ash. The only thing that happens is that you can melt it down and reuse it. So, any piece you have, it could have been a nose ring for a peasant girl; it could have been part of a tiara of queen or a pope. It could be anything, and because it doesn't really disappear, it has this timelessness, this eternal quality about it. So, that's how I got into fine jewelry. The gold is the main piece. The main thing about jewelry for me is the gold and the stones. I love color, so of course I'm drawn to stones, but the gold is a means of showing the stones off.    Sharon: Interesting. We will have to link to your website when we post this, and I'm encouraging everybody to look at your website and see the color in the jewelry. It's just amazing. It's really striking. It's beautiful. Were these curators at the museums interested in your things because they thought, “Oh, that's the most fantastic design?” I think of a museum as saying, “If Paul Revere made that, I'd like to put in a museum.”   Tess: It's also a history because they wanted a provenance. They wanted to know for whom it was made, who wore it, what season. It was also a means of collecting and annotating history.   Sharon: The same thing with the tea pots?    Tess: No, the tea pot, she just loved the design. That was a different story. That wasn't jewelry. That was something else and she just loved it. I wasn't going to argue.    Sharon: I can think of, “Oh, I love it. I want it for my living room,” as opposed to “Oh, I love it. I want to put it in a museum.” I'm not sure I understand the connection between putting these in museums. It's fabulous to do.   Tess: Why do we collect things in museums then? Museums have changed a lot, but museums essentially are treasure houses. They house treasures; they house things that are deemed to be beautiful. Also, they may spark your imagination or make you think about something differently. So no, I'm not surprised. I was thrilled and surprised that the museums wanted my work, but I'm not surprised that when they think something is beautiful, they want it for the museum.    Sharon: I have to say, I think my whole concept of what a museum is has been changing. I used to think that museums were all history. As I looked at museums in the west, anything over 50 years old is old. I used to think that when I went to a museum, “That's not ancient,” or “It's not 500 years old. It's just from a decade or two ago.” Because I see so many things that are current in museums, or current within the last 25 years, I'm realizing that my concept of what a museum is is outdated.    Tess: Museums are having a difficult time also. In order to survive, they are switching gears. They're trying many different things so they don't only look to the past. They're trying to stay current and be relevant to what's going on in the world, which is part of what fashion does. Fashion does indicate, mirror and explain an era, always.   Sharon: You fell in love with metalsmithing and silver and gold. Your accessory business where you were designing for the runway, was that still going on?   Tess: No, that began to change, and I decided to stop doing that kind of work. As I said, I foresaw that it was going to begin to change, so I stopped that. I devoted myself more to learning the ancient goldsmithing techniques so I could make everything myself, and then I started selling. First, I stared with semiprecious and silver, and then I moved on to gold. Now I work exclusively in gold and precious and semiprecious stones.   Sharon: And you're making everything yourself too.   Tess: I'm making everything myself.   Sharon: Wow!    Tess: I'm still learning things, and I still also use the jewelry arts as a studio. It's fascinating. We all feel so privileged to be able to work in gold. It's such a wonderful medium. We all have that same attitude of awe about this wonderful metal.   Sharon: It's really true. I was at a conference several years ago, and someone pointed out that once you take the gold out of the ground, that's it. It never goes back in, and I thought, “Yeah, that's really true.” What are the differences you find, besides the fact that everything is a one-off, in terms of what you're doing? How are you finding the audiences you're doing this for compared to what you were doing before?   Tess: I started the costume jewelry business in 1976 and for a while, I essentially retired. Now, I find that social media is a very, very different world. I need a lot of help with that. I need help with social media. The younger people understand social media and are good at it, so I need help in that area to perfect everything. I have found that it has been very successful, especially Instagram. Instagram and my website, all of that, has been helpful. Before, I went to an editor, she liked my work and then the rest just fell in step, but now it's different. For example, in October I'm going to California to do a luxury event. My work is gold; it's heavy; it's expensive. That is not something that is sold easily all the time. So, I go to these targeted events where people who are willing to spend the money attend.    Sharon: It is such a different world with social media. I entered the digital world in the mid-90s and the changes since then—it's a different world. It's amazing, and it keeps changing every two days.    Tess: I was in a restaurant the other day and this little, two-year-old girl was using her phone. I thought about how it took me many, many years to start using my phone.   Sharon: Yes, when I see kids on their phones, I'm like, “Oh my god!” When you see kids who speak a language you're trying to learn, it's amazing. Do you find that you get a response from Instagram and other social media?

With Jason Barnard...
Striking the Right Balance Between SEO & CRO (Luke Carthy and Jason Barnard)

With Jason Barnard...

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 45:42


Luke Carthy talks with Jason Barnard about striking the right balance between SEO and CRO. Luke Carthy is an eCommerce consultant delivering incredible (double to triple!!) results and sustainable growth for brands spanning both B2C and B2B verticals like Caterpillar, Renault and Chemist Direct.  Luke's principle is delivering sales growth first and SEO after. As a wise digital marketer, do you agree with Luke's take that SEO is not the be-all and end-all of delivering sustainable eCommerce growth? Before you give a thumbs up or a frown, take some time to listen to this podcast because that's what this episode is all about! We all love SEO, however not everything in SEO is under our control. Regardless of whether we have fixed the technical issues or not, there's no guarantee that we'll get the rewards we're expecting in terms of traffic growth, let alone sales… and this is where CRO changes the game ;) Join Luke and Jason as they dive into the realms of CRO where they dig into a lot of ‘client-consultant arguments' such as: One page checkout vs multi step checkoutClient's preferred payment option vs diversity of payment optionsHow offline stores display products vs how online should be doneand a lot more! This might just be the greatest guide in your ‘basket filling optimisation' journey, so hit that play button now :) Also, watch out for the groovy SERP experiment at the beginning where Jason attempts to revive Luke's dormant Twitter boxes live on air. Quite a risk to take. Question is, does it work out? Watch to find out! What you'll learn from Luke Carthy 00:00 Luke Carthy and Jason Barnard01:18 Luke Carthy's Brand SERP and a dormant Twitter experiment03:23 Will Luke Carthy consider implementing IndexNow?05:29 Striking the right balance between SEO & CRO13:28 Giving the customers checkout options16:50 Do you work on SEO and CRO at the same time?19:39 CRO and SEO = good business advice20:53 Does CRO include ‘basket filling optimisation'?22:37 The gamification of free shipping26:52 Are post purchase coupons effective for customer loyalty?30:19 Points of conflict between SEO and CRO34:50 Tips for A/B testing36:47 Balancing CRO and SEO  This episode was recorded live on video November 09th 2021 Recorded live at Kalicube Tuesdays (Digital Marketing Livestream Event Series). Watch the video now >>

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
Plant Based Diet Vs. A Conventional Diabetes Diet- by Neal Barnard, M.D.

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 4:39


Plant Based Diet Vs. A Conventional Diabetes Diet - Neal Barnard, MD Neal Barnard, M.D. • https://www.pcrm.org/about-us/staff/neal-barnard-md-facc • Book - Foods That Cause You to Lose Weight: The Negative Calorie Effect Dr. Barnard has led numerous research studies investigating the effects of diet on diabetes, body weight, and chronic pain, including a groundbreaking study of dietary interventions in type 2 diabetes, funded by the National Institutes of Health, that paved the way for viewing type 2 diabetes as a potentially reversible condition for many patients. Dr. Barnard has authored more than 100 scientific publications and 20 books for medical and lay readers, and is the editor in chief of the Nutrition Guide for Clinicians, a textbook made available to all U.S. medical students. As president of the Physicians Committee, Dr. Barnard leads programs advocating for preventive medicine, good nutrition, and higher ethical standards in research. His research contributed to the acceptance of plant-based diets in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. In 2015, he was named a Fellow of the American College of Cardiology. In 2016, he founded the Barnard Medical Center in Washington, D.C., as a model for making nutrition a routine part of all medical care. Working with the Medical Society of the District of Columbia and the American Medical Association, Dr. Barnard has authored key resolutions, now part of AMA policy, calling for a new focus on prevention and nutrition in federal policies and in medical practice. In 2018, he received the Medical Society of the District of Columbia's Distinguished Service Award. He has hosted four PBS television programs on nutrition and health. #NealBarnard #TheRealTruthAboutHealth #WholeFood #Vegan #Vegetarian #PlantBasedNutrition CLICK HERE - To Checkout Our MEMBERSHIP CLUB: http://www.realtruthtalks.com Social Media Channels Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConference Instagram : https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/RTAHealth Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-real-truth-about-health-conference/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealth • Check out our Podcasts Visit us on Apple Podcast and Itunes search: The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast Amazon: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/23a037be-99dd-4099-b9e0-1cad50774b5a/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcast Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RZbS2BafJIEzHYyThm83J Google:https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zaW1wbGVjYXN0LmNvbS8yM0ZqRWNTMg%3D%3D Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcast Audacy: https://go.audacy.com/partner-podcast-listen-real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcast iHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-real-truth-about-health-li-85932821/ Deezer: https://www.deezer.com/us/show/2867272 • Other Video Channels Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealth Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/channels/1733189 Rumble: https://rumble.com/c/c-1111513 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConference/videos/?ref=page_internal DailyMotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/TheRealTruthAboutHealth BitChute: https://www.bitchute.com/channel/JQryXTPDOMih/

With Jason Barnard...
The Low-down on IndexNow From Mr. Bingbot (Fabrice Canel and Jason Barnard)

With Jason Barnard...

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 40:36


Fabrice Canel talks with Jason Barnard about the low-down on IndexNow. Fabrice Canel is a Principal Program Manager leading the crawling, processing, and indexing team at Bing. He is a veteran at Microsoft Bing that has dealt with crawling web pages since the beginning of Bingbot and now deals with the hundreds of billions of new or updated web pages every day! In this episode, Fabrice Canel and Jason Barnard discuss IndexNow - a stunningly great change that is happening to search engine indexing.  One of the ultimate goals of search engines is delivering timely information to its users. However, crawling websites may take days or weeks so updated, added and deleted information often takes some time to reflect in search engines. This is a big problem for website owners and one they often struggle to deal with. So to relieve this pain point, Microsoft Bing has introduced IndexNow, a new protocol allowing websites to easily notify search engines whenever they make changes to website content. Because it's new, there are a lot of questions that need to be answered, and Jason asks Fabrice all the right questions, of course :) How does it work?Can it instantly crawl our websites?Is Google also adopting IndexNow?What CDN have adopted IndexNow?What CMS systems have adopted IndexNow?How does the API work? Fabrice (aka Mr. Bingbot) answers all these questions simply, clearly and extensively. That makes this episode a must-listen…. Especially as Fabrice makes it very clear he will not stop until he gets 80% adoption of IndexNow. He is absolutely convinced that this initiative will make everyone happy: website owners, users, and search engines. Tune in! What you'll learn from Fabrice Canel 00:00 Fabrice Canel and Jason Barnard00:35 The beginning of Bingbot01:59 Can Bingbot keep up with the infinite pages that need to be crawled?05:55 Fabrice Canel's Brand SERP on Bing and Google07:18 IndexNow: What it is, how it works and why it's helpful08:55 Why an API layer is better than a web form11:37 The early adopters of IndexNow14:52 Getting the CMS and the CDNs to do the work15:57 How long will it take for IndexNow to catch on?19:30 Will IndexNow be integrated into the core of WordPress?23:13 Why using IndexNow can reduce crawl on a website24:27 Why IndexNow matters to small websites30:05 Does IndexNow guarantee instant indexing?32:20 How fast can websites be caught for abusing IndexNow?33:21 Will this make XML sitemaps redundant?35:07 The IndexNow API is super simple This episode was recorded live on video November 2nd 2021 Recorded live at Kalicube Tuesdays (Digital Marketing Livestream Event Series). Watch the video now >>

Gumdrop Readers
“Squirrel's Busy Day” by Lucy Barnard

Gumdrop Readers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 3:51


Today I read, “Squirrel's Busy Day” by Lucy Barnard! I hope you enjoy it! If YOU would like to choose the next book to be read on the Gumdrop Readers Podcast then you can send me an email including your name, age, and book request! Ask an adult to help you send it over to; gumdropreaders@gmail.com. If you would like to support the podcast, you can donate at, https://anchor.fm/trinity-love-rocho/support Thanks for listening! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/trinity-love-rocho/support

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
Your Body In Balance: The New Science Of Food, Hormones, And Health - Neil Barnard, M.D. - Offstage

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 59:50


Your Body In Balance: The New Science Of Food, Hormones, And Health - Neil Barnard, M.D. - Offstage Interview 2021 Neal Barnard, M.D. • https://www.pcrm.org/about-us/staff/neal-barnard-md-facc • Book - Foods That Cause You to Lose Weight: The Negative Calorie Effect Dr. Barnard has led numerous research studies investigating the effects of diet on diabetes, body weight, and chronic pain, including a groundbreaking study of dietary interventions in type 2 diabetes, funded by the National Institutes of Health, that paved the way for viewing type 2 diabetes as a potentially reversible condition for many patients. Dr. Barnard has authored more than 100 scientific publications and 20 books for medical and lay readers, and is the editor in chief of the Nutrition Guide for Clinicians, a textbook made available to all U.S. medical students. As president of the Physicians Committee, Dr. Barnard leads programs advocating for preventive medicine, good nutrition, and higher ethical standards in research. His research contributed to the acceptance of plant-based diets in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. In 2015, he was named a Fellow of the American College of Cardiology. In 2016, he founded the Barnard Medical Center in Washington, D.C., as a model for making nutrition a routine part of all medical care. Working with the Medical Society of the District of Columbia and the American Medical Association, Dr. Barnard has authored key resolutions, now part of AMA policy, calling for a new focus on prevention and nutrition in federal policies and in medical practice. In 2018, he received the Medical Society of the District of Columbia's Distinguished Service Award. He has hosted four PBS television programs on nutrition and health. Passionate believers in whole food plant based diets, no chemicals, minimal pharmaceutical drugs, no GMO's. Fighting to stop climate change and extinction. Connect with The Real Truth About Health: Sign Up for our Membership Club and Get 30 Days Free

Mastering Diabetes Audio Experience
Do Plant-Based Ketogenic Diets Reverse Insulin Resistance? - with Dr. Barnard | Mastering Diabetes EP 139

Mastering Diabetes Audio Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 48:52


In today's podcast, you'll hear a very special interview from our 2019 online summit with Dr. Neal Barnard. In this episode, you'll hear him speak about the connection between the foods you eat and your risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Dr. Barnard has written an authoritative book on the topic of cheese. So we asked him why it's so addicting and why cheese is so bad for your health.  He gave us some insight into the connection between casein from cow's milk and type 1 diabetes Dr. Barnard and his team at PCRM conduct a lot of scientific research that's published in top journals. In this interview, we asked about his research findings and the underlying cause of insulin resistance based on his experience.  And of course, we talked all about ketogenic diets, including the plant-based version of a ketogenic diet.  There is a lot of gold in this interview so make sure to listen all the way to the end.  Before we get started, I'm quite excited to announce our 2021 summit.  So Cyrus and I have been running Mastering Diabetes summits since 2017. It's a highlight of our year getting to bring together the world's top experts in so many disciplines for one jam-packed event.  Register for free today! https://bloodsugarrevolution.com/ Join The World's Top Health Experts At The 2021 Blood Sugar Revolution Summit Discover how to lower your fasting blood sugar and A1c, lose weight permanently, gain energy, clear brain fog, and stop yo-yo dieting by fixing one thing: INSULIN RESISTANCE.   ===   Make sure to subscribe so you don't miss future episodes! Please leave us a review to ensure that the Mastering Diabetes message reaches as many people living with diabetes as possible. Connect with us on Instagram and Facebook

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee
Is Olive Oil Healthy? | Dr. Neal Barnard Live Q&A

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 39:27


Should you eat olive oil? It does have proven health benefits but could they be erased by all the fat found in it?   Get the answers from Dr. Neal Barnard when he joins "The Weight Loss Champion" Chuck Carroll on The Exam Room™ Live.   Dr. Barnard will also be answering questions sent to The Doctor's Mailbag:   - Are flaxseed oil and coconut oil healthy? - Do vegans with low white blood cell counts have a weakened immune system? - Which foods are most likely to cause a migraine? - What are the first foods a new vegan should buy? - And many more   Chuck also reports on a new study that reveals another reason why dairy is scary for your health! There is new evidence showing it can significantly increase your risk of cancer.   This episode of The Exam Room™ Podcast is sponsored by The Gregory J. Reiter Memorial Fund, which supports organizations like the Physicians Committee that carry on Greg's passion and love for animals through rescue efforts, veganism, and wildlife conservation.   — — — Gregory J. Reiter Memorial Fund https://gregoryreiterfund.org — — — 21-Day Vegan Kickstart App iOS: https://bit.ly/VegKStrt-iOS Android: https://bit.ly/VegKStrtAndrd Web: https://www.pcrm.org/kickstart — — — Scary Dairy and Cancer Study https://bit.ly/ScaryDairyStudy — — — Your Body In Balance https://amzn.to/2UvAfxW — — — Chuck Carroll Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ChuckCarrollWLC Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/ChuckCarrollWLC Facebook: http://wghtloss.cc/ChuckFacebook — — — Dr. Neal Barnard Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/drnealbarnard Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drnealbarnard Facebook: http://bit.ly/DrBarnardFB — — — Barnard Medical Center Appointments https://bit.ly/BMCtelemed 202-527-7500 — — — Share the Show Please subscribe and give the show a 5-star rating on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or many other podcast providers. Don't forget to share it with a friend for inspiration!

Plant Trainers Podcast - Plant Based Nutrition & Fitness
Having A Kind Kitchen with Dreena Burton - PTP428

Plant Trainers Podcast - Plant Based Nutrition & Fitness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 33:12


In this episode of The Plant Trainers Podcast, we talk with Dreena Burton all about her kind kitchen and pressure-free, no stress cooking. First, we catch up with her and see how she and her children navigated plant-based living over the last 6 years while they were teens. Then we talk about ways for making plant-based cooking pressure-free with batch cooking ideas, the use of sauces, and ideas for things to freeze you may not have thought about before. Dreena gives some ideas for home and school lunches as well as shares some of her favourite recipes from her new cookbook Dreena's Kind Kitchen: 100 Whole-Foods Vegan Recipes to Enjoy Every Day. Dreena Burton is the OG vegan cookbook author. Vegan for 25 years, Dreena is also a mom to three “weegans.” She has charted her journey as a plant-based cook and mother of three through five bestselling cookbooks. Dreena has also collaborated with renowned plant-based physician Dr. Barnard on The Cheese Trap and coauthored their most recent Cookbook for Reversing Diabetes. Dreena's recipes have been featured with groups including PCRM, Forks Over Knives, Blue Zones, and The Food Network. Dreena was also the Culinary Coordinator with The Food Revolution Network's Whole Life Club. Dreena also runs an online kitchen and community. In this episode we discuss:  Plant-based living for your teens Setting foundations  Taking the pressure out of plant-based  The imperfectness of the diet  Batch cooking  Sweet potato magic  What you can freeze - Surprise! School (or home) lunch ideas Dreena's Kind Kitchen cookbook faves  Tips for newbies

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee
Does Intermittent Fasting Work and More Questions Answered | Dr. Neal Barnard Live Q&A

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 38:24


Intermittent fasting is the most popular diet in the world, according to some estimates. But are its supposed health benefits legitimate?   Dr. Neal Barnard shares the upside of fasting and cautions about the things many people do unknowingly that erase its positive effects.   Dr. Barnard also answers other diet and health related questions when he joins "The Weight Loss Champion" Chuck Carroll on The Exam Room Live.   Among the questions answered in the Doctor's Mailbag:   - How much fat should be in a low-fat diet? - How can vegans get enough protein without eating nuts or legumes? - Which plant-based foods are good for calcium? - Are protein shakes healthy? - Plus, many more!   Chuck also reports on a large study showing that a plant-based diet can protect against prostate cancer.   This episode of The Exam Room™ Podcast is sponsored by The Gregory J. Reiter Memorial Fund, which supports organizations like the Physicians Committee that carry on Greg's passion and love for animals through rescue efforts, veganism, and wildlife conservation.   — — — Gregory J. Reiter Memorial Fund https://gregoryreiterfund.org — — — Fight Hot Flashes with Food Classes Register: https://bit.ly/HotFlashFood — — — Prostate Cancer Study https://bit.ly/3zTNtDp — — — Healthy For A Lifetime Register: https://www.healthyforalifetime.org — — — Chuck Carroll IG: @ChuckCarrollWLC Twitter: @ChuckCarrollWLC Facebook: http://wghtloss.cc/ChuckFacebook — — — Dr. Neal Barnard Twitter: @drnealbarnard IG: @drnealbarnard Facebook: http://bit.ly/DrBarnardFB — — — Barnard Medical Center Appointments https://bit.ly/BMCtelemed 202-527-7500 — — — Share the Show Please subscribe and give the show a 5-star rating on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or many other podcast providers. Don't forget to share it with a friend for inspiration!

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee
Think Positive for Good Health With Bryan Cressey + Bonus Q&A with Dr. Neal Barnard and Dr. Michael Greger

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 45:14


A positive mindset can be ultra-important to improve your health.   Bryan Cressey, co-founder of one of the largest private equity firms in the U.S., has been vegan since 1997. He joins “The Weight Loss Champion” Chuck Carroll to share how eating a plant-based diet for more than a quarter century has helped him excel in business as much as with his own well-being. To Bryan, the benefits begin with your personal health and spill over into other areas of your life.   Also, revisit the day that Dr. Michael Greger and Dr. Neal Barnard broke the vegan internet! Chuck dives into The Exam Room archives to revisit a special live Q&A with two of the leading voices in health and nutrition!   Dr. Barnard and Dr. Greger answer these questions from The Doctor's Mailbag:   -  How many nuts should you eat every day? -  Can vitamin D improve the immune system? -  What nutrient can naturally lower estrogen? -  How do the nutrients in white rice differ from brown rice? -  Should vegans have regular blood tests to check nutrient levels? -  And more! — — — Bryan Cressey Be A Winner Book: https://amzn.to/3CSs8fq IG: @bryancressey — — — Dr. Michael Greger How To Survive A Pandemic Book: https://amzn.to/3dofBng Twitter: @nutrition_facts IG: @michaelgregermd — — — Chuck Carroll Twitter: @ChuckCarrollWLC IG: @ChuckCarrollWLC Facebook: https://wghtloss.cc/ChuckFacebook — — — Dr. Neal Barnard Twitter: @DrNealBarnard IG: @DrNealBarnard Facebook: http://bit.ly/DrBarnardFB — — — Physicians Committee Twitter: @PCRM IG: @PhysiciansCommittee Facebook: https://wghtloss.cc/PCRMFacebook — — — Barnard Medical Center Schedule Appointment: https://bit.ly/BMCtelemed — — — Share the Show Please subscribe and give the show a 5-star rating on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or many other podcast providers. Don't forget to share it with a friend for inspiration!

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee
Kidney Stones: Foods That Help | Dr. Neal Barnard Live Q&A

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 35:52


One out of every 10 people will develop painful kidney stones in their lifetime. In many cases a person's diet can play a large role.   What foods help kidney stones? What foods can cause them?   Those are the two key questions answered by Dr. Neal Barnard as he joins “The Weight Loss Champion” Chuck Carroll on The Exam Room LIVE.   Dr. Barnard also answers questions from viewers:   - Does caffeine cause kidney stones? - Can eating too much spinach cause kidney stones? - Is vegan cheese addictive? - Do any plant-based foods raise cholesterol? - How many Alzheimer's cases could be prevented with a healthier diet? - Plus, many more!   This episode of The Exam Room™ Podcast is sponsored by The Gregory J. Reiter Memorial Fund, which supports organizations like the Physicians Committee that carry on Greg's passion and love for animals through rescue efforts, veganism, and wildlife conservation.   — — — Gregory J. Reiter Memorial Fund https://gregoryreiterfund.org — — — Goodbye To Hot Flashes Event Register: https://bit.ly/HotFlashEvent — — — Chuck Carroll IG: @ChuckCarrollWLC Twitter: @ChuckCarrollWLC Facebook: http://wghtloss.cc/ChuckFacebook — — — Dr. Neal Barnard Twitter: @drnealbarnard IG: @drnealbarnard Facebook: http://bit.ly/DrBarnardFB — — — Barnard Medical Center Appointments https://bit.ly/BMCtelemed 202-527-7500 — — — Share the Show Please subscribe and give the show a 5-star rating on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or many other podcast providers. Don't forget to share it with a friend for inspiration!

That Sounds Fun with Annie F. Downs
Episode 314: Bethany Barnard

That Sounds Fun with Annie F. Downs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 55:04


Maybe you still love Bethany Dillon's music like I do? Well she's back with an absolutely beautiful album, All My Questions, and this conversation dives into the deep end quickly, which I think we all need a lot. Depression, OCD, heartache, questions, and laughter and joy and all the things. Gracious I love Beth so much. What a gift of a conversation. (Find all the show notes at https://www.anniefdowns.com/podcasts/) . . . . . Pre-order my first kids' book What Sound Fun To You today! https://whatsoundsfuntoyou.com/ . . . . . Sign up to receive the AFD Week In Review email and ask questions to future guests! #thatsoundsfunpodcast . . . . . Thank you to our partners! BetterHelp: As one of my friends, you'll get 10% off your first month by visiting BetterHelp/thatsoundsfun. Humann: Go to SuperBeets.com/THATSOUNDSFUN and when you buy two bags, they'll throw in the third for free.