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Best podcasts about Goose Creek

Latest podcast episodes about Goose Creek

Grace Christian Fellowship
What is Repentance? | Matthew 13:1-17

Grace Christian Fellowship

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 48:51


Series: All!Scripture: Matthew 13:1-17Acts 2:37-38, 3:19, 8:22, 20:21, 26:20Title: What is Repentance?Heavy credit: David Platt and Douglas Sean O'Donnell (See below for bibliography)Summary of chapter: “John the Baptist begins his ministry and baptizes Jesus. The Holy Spirit descends upon Jesus and God declares that he is pleased with his Son.” (Outline Bible)Bottom Line: Repentance is a change of mind that results in a change of living. Entering the Kingdom of God requires repentance of sins.Story: CWP letter, finger prints and my trip to the Goose Creek police department on a Friday afternoon. (3:58)“Lord, keep me close and keep me clean.” -Dr. Bill Bennett, pastor and professorDiscussion questions for group and personal study:Note: We encourage you to use our sermons and discussion questions to gather with some friends and talk about the passage together. Pray and ask God to guide you. He is faithful. Questions? Email us at info@GraceToday.netFind our sermons, podcasts, discussion questions and notes at https://www.gracetoday.net/podcastGoal: The goal isn't to ask every question. The goal is to encourage people to engage the scriptures together.1. Why is it significant that John's first command had to do with repentance?2. What is the difference between regretful confession and true repentance?3. How are some church attenders similar to the Jews who counted on family heritage for salvation?4. How would you counsel someone who professes Christ but shows no marks of repentance?5. How did the arrival of the kingdom point to the nearness of both salvation and damnation?6. How would you explain to a non-Christian that a"hellfire and damnation" sermon expresses love?7. Explain why John's baptism and Christian baptism appear to exclude infants.8. How are all three members of the Trinity present in Matthew 3:15-17?9. Why was Jesus baptized if He had no sin?10. What is the difference between resolving to be good before salvation In resolving to be obey God after salvation?Scripture:“In those days John the Baptist came, preaching in the wilderness of Judea and saying, “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven has come near.” This is he who was spoken of through the prophet Isaiah: “A voice of one calling in the wilderness, ‘Prepare the way for the Lord, make straight paths for him.' ” John's clothes were made of camel's hair, and he had a leather belt around his waist. His food was locusts and wild honey. People went out to him from Jerusalem and all Judea and the whole region of the Jordan. Confessing their sins, they were baptized by him in the Jordan River. But when he saw many of the Pharisees and Sadducees coming to where he was baptizing, he said to them: “You brood of vipers! Who warned you to flee from the coming wrath? And do not think you can say to yourselves, ‘We have Abraham as our father.' I tell you that out of these stones God can raise up children for Abraham. The ax is already at the root of the trees, and every tree that does not produce good fruit will be cut down and thrown into the fire. “I baptize you with water for repentance. But after me comes one who is more powerful than I, whose sandals I am not worthy to carry. He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and fire. His winnowing fork is in his hand, and he will clear his threshing floor, gathering his wheat into the barn and burning up the chaff with unquenchable fire.” Then Jesus came from Galilee to the Jordan to be baptized by John. But John tried to deter him, saying, “I need to be baptized by you, and do you come to me?” Jesus replied, “Let it be so now; it is proper for us to do this to fulfill all righteousness.” Then John consented. As soon as Jesus was baptized, he went up out of the water. At that moment heaven was opened, and he saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove and alighting on him. And a voice from heaven said, “This is my Son, whom I love; with him I am well pleased.”” Matthew‬ ‭3:1-7, 9-17‬ ‭NIV‬‬ https://matthew.bible/matthew-3-17Opening:"…Additionally, the ancestry was important to demonstrate that Matthew's Gospel did not pertain to a mythical character or hero. To the Jew, the ancestry testified to historical reality.Several years ago a friend of mine, a missionary with Wycliffe Bible Translators, worked among a people who had never heard the gospel in their language. The people could not write or read, so all their communication was oral. The missionary's first task was to learn the language of the tribe. Then she had to change that oral language into written form and teach the people to read and write it. It was a laborious task that took many years. Only after all that was accomplished could she undertake the task of translating the Bible into this language. She began with the Gospel of Matthew. To expedite the project she skipped the genealogy to get to the meat and substance of the story of Christ, and then she sent her translation work off to be printed by a publisher in a distant city. She waited months for the first copies of Matthew to arrive at the compound, and when the trucks came in with the Bibles, or, at least, the Gospel of Matthew, the people were much more interested in the trucks than they were in the translation. After having spent ten years on the project, she was crushed when she saw that the people didn't care at all.Nevertheless, she persevered in her task, and in the second edition of Matthew she included the genealogy. When that arrived the missionary explained the genealogy to the tribal chief, and he said, "Are you trying to say that this Jesus you've been telling us about for ten years was a real person?" She replied, "Yes, of course." He said, "I thought you were telling us a story about some mythical character."Once he understood that this Christ was real in space and time, the chief came to Christ, and shortly thereafter the whole tribe came to Christ.”—Douglas Sean O'DonnellOutline based largely on David Platt and Douglas Sean O'DonnellI. The ministry of the Baptist: Prepare the Way (aka Tell the World)A. The manProphesying boldlyLiving simplyBaptizing openlyServing humblyB. The message (What we do and Why)Repent…How?What is repentance?It is changing your mind in such a way that you change your actions; 180 degree about-faceIt's necessary to believe and follow Jesus Christ and enter into his KingdomRepentance involves confession (admission of sin)Repentance involves contrition (sorry over sin)Repentance involves conversion (turn from sin)…for the Kingdom of Heaven has come near (which means that the King has come near as well)Repentance is for everyoneSee Acts for other sermons and thoughts on repentance including:Acts 2:37-38 “They were cut to the heart…what shall we do? Repent and be baptized”Acts 3:19 “Repent then and turn to God so that your sins may be wiped out”Acts 8:22 “Repent of this wickedness and pray…that he may forgive you”Acts 20:21 “they must turn to God in repentance and have faith in our Lord Jesus.”Acts 26:20 “I preached that they should repent and turn to God and demonstrate their repentance but heir deeds”See the 7 churches of Revelation 2-3 as wellC. The methodThe baptism of JewsRenounce your dependence on selfRely on mercy of GodThe baptism of JesusThe Son obeysThe Spirit anointsThe Father speaksII. The ministry of the Church today: Tell the WorldA. Repent and be baptized.B. Resolve to proclaim this good news yourself. (Bearing fruit…leading others)ConclusionThis is what we want to be known for. Loving our neighbors so well we're willing to risk rejection to show and tell them about the mercy and grace of God found in and through Jesus Christ.Let's do this and lead others to do the same!PrayOther notes:Why do people get baptized?Because the Bible says to.Because they see others who trust Christ do this.To go public with their faith.To testify to what Jesus Christ did for usTo testify to what Jesus Christ did in themIn our country, this is no big deal. They will likely not be threatened or abandoned because of this.In other countries, they would do this a great personal threat to their literal lives.Why do it then? Because they have come and seen who Jesus is and what he's done. God has opened their eyes to see clearly. And they have believed what they have seen as more evidence that all God has said is trustworthy.What about you?What do I want you to know? The gospelWhat do I want you to do? Believe and receive the gospel and live accordingly. It's more than a game-changer. It's true life-change. Transformational.At the end I will invite you to do what many in this room have already done. To consider who Jesus is and what he's done and then responding as you see fit.My hope is that by believing you'll find true and abundant life in his name. At the very least, I hope it will lead to more conversations about this for you in the near future.We're going to look at this through the eyes of a couple of women who witness stuff before anyone else does. Just walking through these 10 verses as if we were these ladies. They are not telling us what they believe happened. They are telling us what they saw and heard. We have it recorded reliably in the thousands of biblical texts/transcripts. Over 25,000 partial and/or complete. Overwhelming evidence.References/Bibliography:“Preaching the Word” Commentary, Douglas Sean O'Donnell, Edited by Kent Hughes“Matthew” by RC Sproul“The Bible Knowledge Commentary” by Walvoord, Zuck (BKC)“the Bible Exposition Commentary” by Warren Wiersbe (BEC)“Exalting Jesus in Matthew” by David Platt (CCE)Outline Bible, D WillmingtonNIV Study Bible (NIVSB)ESV Study BibleESV Gospel Transformation Bible (GTB)

The Remote Real Estate Investor
Is Charleston SC one of the hottest real estate markets in the US?

The Remote Real Estate Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2022 31:11


Joe Porter is a Roofstock Certified Agent and the founder of Lighthouse Real Estate LLC in Charleston SC. Joe is focused on helping clients buy and sell homes, while offering his considerable experience in construction and the large network of tradesmen he gained during his acquisition years. In this episode, Joe shares his knowledge of the Charleston market; economic factors, demographics, neighborhood scores, geographic considerations and the current environment on the ground Episode Links: joe@lighthouscharleston.com  http://lighthousecharleston.com/ https://learn.roofstock.com/blog/charleston-real-estate-market --- Transcript   Before we jump into the episode, here's a quick disclaimer about our content. The Remote Real Estate Investor podcast is for informational purposes only, and is not intended as investment advice. The views, opinions and strategies of both the hosts and the guests are their own and should not be considered as guidance from Roofstock. Make sure to always run your own numbers, make your own independent decisions and seek investment advice from licensed professionals.   Michael: Hey, everyone, and welcome to another episode of the Remote Real Estate Investor. I'm Michael Albaum and today with me, we have our certified agent Joe Porter for the Charleston, South Carolina Market. He's going to be talking to us today about all the things we need to know as investors before getting involved in that space. So let's get into it.   Joe Porter, what's going on, man? Thanks for taking the time to hang out with me today.   Joe: Hello, you're welcome. Thanks for having me.   Michael: My pleasure. I am super excited to talk to everybody with you about Charleston, South Carolina.   Tell us a little bit Joe, first off who you are, where you come from? How long have you been an agent? And are you an investor personally, quickfire questions to get started…   Joe: Absolutely, ready to go. So I moved to Charleston to attend the College of Charleston about 22 years ago. And like many other people, never left. I came from the Washington DC area and visited the region one time and never looked back. So shortly after graduating from the College of Charleston, I was one of the many residual recipients of ninja loans, okay, so, you know, I knew a ton of people who needed rooms for rent, and I got the bright idea, let's buy a house. And I was working at a bartender out on Folly Beach at the time, and was making tips and Wells Fargo decided to give me $200,000, which I bought my first house with that sort of kicked off my real estate career.   Once I found that house, I kind of got the bug and never stopped looking. So I went in from there and got my real estate license. I'm not a very sales oriented person. So I knew from there, I wanted to embark on sort of the investing side of things. So I signed on as a buyer for: the we buy ugly houses franchise home investor.   Michael: Okay.   Joe: So that sort of gave me the framework of looking how to, you know, analyze a deal, the repairs, and how to present an offer to the seller. And right about that time, I established a brokerage to sort of dovetail my, you know, investing, dealings and offers to then list retail, I experienced some success there. And then the bottom of the market fell off and I just had a bunch of listings and no buyers. At that point, I guess this was around, you know, 2000/ 7, 8, 9 I came up with a bright idea to start buying houses. So I put together a little mean, machine of a crew with the idea to have the acquisitions improvement and management all under one umbrella. And we started buying houses, okay.   So the first house I bought was in North Charleston, it was a single family detached home for $12,000.   Michael: What?   Joe: It pulled… Yeah, oh yeah. Someone had yanked all the copper plumbing out of it, all the copper wires. It had been, you know, sitting vacant as a foreclosure, you know, owned by, you know, the Bank of New York and so that was the first house. And we went in, renovated it, rather quickly. And, you know, rented it out and that was my proof of concept. I said, this works out great. You know, at the time, I rented it out for $800 a month. Today, I still have that house, you know, what now almost 15 years later, and it's a 1200 a month rental for me.   Michael: And what did you spend on the rehab? Do you recall?   Joe: You know, at this point, I did everything myself. You know, I knew enough to be dangerous, but now, I know I really didn't know anything about renovations and construction. So I cut some corners but you know, and I was buying used materials, things like that. I spent about seven grand on the rehab   Michael: So you bought it for 12, put seven into it and then rented it for a 50. Dude…   Joe: Yes, and didn't take an accountant to, to like those returns.   Michael: That's incredible. I don't think I've ever heard of it like, that's like a 4% plus property.   Joe: Yes, indeed. So after that, you know, I brought in more people on the construction side to help me out, we put… put a crew together, and I continued to participate in the labor, we bought one house after another. And then, you know, we did about 10/ 12 houses a year. And I currently own and manage about 55 rental units in the Charleston area. So they're all scattered site, single family detached. And, you know, so I spent a solid about eight years just doing that cumulating. And then, since the market has shifted, I've focused more on my brokerage activities, I brought my wife, Claire in on the business, and she helps with buying and selling. So last year, we did about 15 million in transactions, but 50 sites. Year before we did about 14 million. So right now, we are solely focused on the brokerage activity. And if you know something should present itself from an acquisition standpoint, we jump on it, our business model is, you know, will present when we go on a listing appointment, will present an array of options.   So, you know, first option is, you know, hey, I see what you got, we could sell it as is, for this price, we can also help you with some of the repairs, and we'll pitch in on the repair costs, bring our crew in to help maximize the cost of the or maximize the value, we do a cost value approach there. And then the third and final option, when it's appropriate, we can buy directly from you, no commissions, no closing costs, you know, on your timeline, whatever, whatever you want to do there. So doing that we have, we'll add a couple to the portfolio, we'll buy maybe one or two a year that will be flips, and then we'll list you know, about 50 years.   Michael: Joe, this is amazing. Man, there's so much here that I want to unpack, we'll have to have you back on just to talk about that side of your business. But I want to, I want to shift gears here a little bit and talk about Charleston, as a market so that all of our listeners can get an idea of what they could expect why they should be excited about the market.   So can you give us just some high level overview of: Are people moving to Charleston? And if so why? You know, what companies are headquartered there? What jobs are available for folks?   Joe: Yes, so the secret is out on Charleston. It is currently, I think ranked the 12 fastest growing metro area in the United States, we have about 38 people a day moving to the region. Especially over the past two years, we've seen a bit of a migration of both, you know, people trying to leave more crowded, you know, urban environments, or baby boomers coming to retirement age. And so those are the type of migration that we're seeing in the area. You know, Charleston, people might know it, as, you know, the historic downtown. You know, 20 years ago, our economy was based on tourism, and hospitality. So we were, you know, just in that service sector, and that was about it. But since then, you know, our economy has exploded, we now are anchored in manufacturing. So the state of South Carolina is very sort of, you know, company friendly. We're offering incentives for companies to move here and set up shop. You know, there's not a lot of labor unions or, you know, thing it's a right to work state, so companies like that. So that's lured Boeing from Seattle, to North Charleston. Volvo's setting up here, Mercedes, Daimler, Chrysler, Bosch, new core. Those are examples of some of the companies here in the Charleston area in the manufacturing sector.   We also have a military presence. Okay, we have a joint base, that's Air Force. We have a naval, naval weapons station, and a nucular submarine school based in Goose Creek, which is just 15 minutes north of Charleston. And there's also going to be developing one of the larger Coast Guard schools here, so we have military and then education, my alma mater, College of Charleston, the Citadel and the Medical School of South Carolina. You know that along with our port activity, so Charleston, has just completed a port deepening. So that makes us the deepest port on the east coast. So lots of importing, exporting, is bringing a bunch of, you know, auxilary businesses with it to the…     Michael: Yeah, oh my gosh, that's really interesting. I had no idea. So…okay…   Joe: …there's a lot happening here.   Michael: Uh, yeah, sure, sounds like it. Joe, I'm wondering if you could do a screen share and kind of give everybody who's watching this online, a visual tour of the city, if you will. And if you could share with us, where do you like to look for your investments? And where should folks be looking for there's based on if they're targeting cash flow, or some appreciation potential?   Joe: So one of the things I like about Charleston is, you know, our sub markets, okay, this is a unique region that's geographically defined by all this water here, okay. So if you could see my cursor, here, we have the downtown Peninsula, okay. So everybody knows, the historic Charleston downtown. There is a district within the Peninsula downtown, that's been designated for short term rentals, okay. And as a result, you know, prices are up your average property will sell for over a million dollars. But that's situated in the middle of the peninsula here where, you know, you know, vacationers guests can come and, you know, walk the city, which is very walkable, you can see it's not very big the, the downtown Peninsula, okay.   You know, one of the things that makes Charleston so unique is the fact that they've kept all their historic buildings. So there's buildings, you know, 1800s just beautiful along the battery here, which makes it a big attraction. They also have lots of rules to what you can and can't do with properties. So, for example, we have a height restriction. The buildings cannot be higher than the large, you know, the tallest church steeple. So they call it the holy city, you look at the skyline, and you see nothing but church steeples, okay, downtown. So as a result, they have lifted the height restriction, we call this the neck area, which is part of the Peninsula, that sort of, you know… isn't very wide. And so there's a bunch of growth here in this area, where, you know, there's some high rises, some more development happening, as opposed to the downtown area, which you know, was full about 200 years ago.   Michael: Okay.   Joe: Then, of course, you have your barrier islands, okay. This is a great place for short term rentals. So we have Folly Beach out here, we have Kiawah Island. And to the north here, we have island homes, and Solomon's Island. These are excellent places to invest in that beach house. Okay, I got one on Folly Beach, where it's a five bedroom, three and a half bath, where we'll do $100,000 in gross rental revenue this year, from our season that's getting ready to start in mid-March and go through September.   Michael: Holy smokes, and what do you buy it for Joe?   Joe: I bought that house for just over a million dollars.   Michael: That's incredible.   Joe: And then we have our more suburban communities to the south James Island. That's where I live most of the year. John's Island, one of the largest Sea Islands on the East Coast, that's mostly residential and upcoming area. A lot of this, you know, you could drive not very far outside of Charleston, say 30 minutes to get you through Johns Island, and to more rural places like Guatemala, where you think you're in the middle of nowhere, but you're still a stone's throw away from Charleston. One area of significant growth would be the Somerville area. Okay. So some of these manufacturers that I'm talking about Volvo Chrysler, Daimler, they are setting up shop along this I-26 corridor. And so as a result, we're seeing a lot of newer developments such as: Next in, you know, nicely done, new schools that are becoming great areas to invest. For example, you might see a, you know, three bedroom, single family home, new construction in the mid three hundreds low for hundreds come available, that type of property would rent for about $2,200 a month.   Michael: This is great, this is great. And do you have more like entry level price point neighborhoods and suburbs?   Joe: Yes. So entry level for Charleston would be right around that mid $300,000. So there's areas Mount Pleasant would be the most sort of desirable suburb. The entry level there is about 700,000, James Island entry level about 400,000. Now John's, we still were in the three hundreds. And then areas north North Charleston, this area of Goose Creek. This outlined area in gray here is the Naval Weapons Station. So this is a great area for rentals, and buying newer homes in Goose Creek, where you can get a house in, you know, around 300 to 350,000 and have a bunch of good renter's here.   There's also some areas of North in the south end of North Charleston that are quite popular. This area is referred to as Park Circle, sort of Old North Charleston community developed in the 40s, 50s. And then these areas here where I own a bunch of rental properties, this is called Dorchester Terrace Waylon, where you could still get a house for under 200,000. This was all developed in the 30s and 40s. Because we had the naval base, huge naval base here on the Cooper River. So the houses are 80 years old, but they represent a good location and, you know, high demand for rentals.   Michael: Fantastic and Joe, can you give everyone listening and watching an idea of some traditional things to be aware of if they are going to be thinking about investing in Charleston? So for instance, how do property taxes work? And then what kind of natural hazards or catastrophes are known to hit the Charleston area and that people should be aware of?   Joe: Okay, well, I'll start with, with the second question here, of course, with all the water, okay, flood insurance, okay. Lots of properties, lots of areas are in flood, well, everything's in a flood zone, but a lot are in A, E, V zones, that would represent, you know, flood risk, and therefore, most properties carry flood insurance.   Michael: Okay.   Joe: Certainly the ones on the barrier islands do downtown, there are certain areas to be aware of where there's drainage issues. However, in the suburbs here, you get a little bit out of you know, that this 526 corridor here, your typical flood insurance policy in A zone will run you about $700 a year. So nothing, you know, cost prohibitive. However, if you get into some of these beach or low lying areas, you're looking at, you know, 2500- 5,000 a year, as well as you know, the risk of flooding. So there's always something to be aware of. That's one of the first questions I'll ask property owners or sellers: Okay, do you have an elevation certificate detailing how high your house is in relationship to the base flood elevation? And how much is your flood insurance policy? And is that policy assumable? So that's one thing to be aware of, in this area. Property taxes to address that are, I would say relatively affordable or cheaper than other areas. So your average price home, you know, say 350,000, which is the median price here in Charleston, your property taxes will be about $5,500 a year. So I think that's relatively pretty, you know, affordable.   Michael: Got it, got it. So like one and a half percent 1.4%, roughly, of the purchase price,   Joe: Correct, yeah. And so, um, we do a point of sale assessment. So a property's value is reassessed at the point of purchase and it's assessed for that amount, and then from there, there's a cap it can't, the value cannot go up more than 10% and then it's milled down from there. So it's not that you're there's a cap that it'll jump 10%, is the assessed value. So once you're there, you're locked in, basically, you know, incrementally increase if the, you know, if the market continues to do so.   Michael: Okay, got it. And everyone's talking right now we're recording this middle of February, about how crazy and red hot the market seems to be. And we always like to remind folks that hey real estate is done locally and so well, one market might be red hot, others might be less so. So talk to us a little bit about what you're seeing in the Charleston market, how much supply do you have? How fast are these homes going for? And kind of that, what percentage of the list price are they moving at?   Joe: So we've had a similar supply and demand dynamic as most markets, we have very little supply in high demand. Currently, in our more Tri County area in the MLS, there's about 900 properties for sale, if you strip out new construction or proposed construction, it comes closer to 500. Okay, that would represent under one month of inventory, so about three weeks. So you know, if another house doesn't come online, in three weeks, we'll be down to zero. So I've never seen it this low. So it's definitely inventory is constrained. As a result, you know, we've received, we've, you know, had basically 22% price appreciation over last year, so prices are skyrocketing. And, you know, it is a tough market. It's, you know, but investors who are willing to, you know, take on maybe a house that needs repairs, or act quickly, or have the ability to, you know, go in on an offer cash, they certainly have a leg up in this environment.   Michael: Okay. Okay, and where are you coaching your buyers to do to win offers?   Joe: As quickly, of course, sometimes, will awaive appraisals, or put in appraisal buffers, stating that, you know, if we are going to use financing, you know, we'll be able to kick in extra money towards the down payment. Sometimes we'll pitch a cash offer and be able to submit proof of funds in in, you know, saying we're willing to close with cash, and then we'll substitute with financing at the closing. Other times, we'll you know, say we're, you know, based on a walkthrough inspection, or you know, you do enough due diligence upfront that will buy the house as is. Average days on market are about three. So the speed of which you act is, is very important. And then average selling price to list price is about 98%. So, you know, if you're going to, you know, make an offer, you better bring it. So that's some of the things we do to coach our buyers in this market.   Michael: It makes total sense and great insights. Joe, I'm curious to get your opinion kind of thoughts around as you're looking at properties to post to Roofstock because you're obviously our certified agent out in the Charleston market. What is it that you're looking for what makes a great investment property, in your opinion?   Joe: One thing I'm super excited about is, Roofstock short term rental market, okay. And we don't have Charleston online quite yet, but we're working towards it. But I think some of the higher rate of return will be in this Isla palms, Folly Beach, Keola, on the short term rental side, as well as downtown Charleston. The numbers that are being produced here are amazing. So once we get the short term rental stuff up and running, I'd love for everybody to you know, hone in on, on some of those properties. Because, you know, we have properties on Cuba, for example, that are producing over well over $350,000 a year on a short term basis.   Michael: Holy smokes and what are the list price on some of those just to give people some perspective?   Joe: So that particular one I'm referencing, it's called the ocean blue and it's listed on our website: http://kiawahislandgetaways.com/ . And that was a million dollar, it was $1.4 million attached, so it's condo regime stuff, oceanfront home, that the owners spent a million on the interior. I mean, this thing looks like it's out of Southern Living…   Michael: Holy Smokes…   Joe: …and that's on Kiawah Island, which is a resort, I don't know if anybody saw the PGA Championship on the ocean course here. This past year Kiawah Island has five amazing golf courses, they have great amenities pools and a very nice beach. It's very walkable, there's, you know, parks and pass throughout the island. And so that's a nice spot for everybody to know about. But back on, you know, the majority of people doing the long term, buy and hold investing, I am on the outskirts of Charleston. Okay, so I'm looking at this more entry level pricing for the area around 350 and below, I'm looking for some of the newer builds, I'm looking for houses that are not in, you know, flood zones, not within expensive HOA areas, and ones that are within the path of progress. So, for example, this Summerville area here that is continuing to grow and flourish. I'm posting things in Goose Creek by the Air Force Base Hanahan, you know, that have good school districts, I'm posting those type of properties where there's been a strong demand for that type of housing, and strong growth in that area.   Michael: Love it, love it. Joe, this has been super insightful man, I'm curious to know, though, in your opinion, how can buyers be best prepared to work with you in the Charleston market?   Joe: Well, I think, you know, come and visit, you know, come, come take a look for yourselves. And I'd be happy to show people around and, you know, show them the different areas, you know, back to my point about these different sub markets. Okay, so, you know, we have these islands and sub markets, and each one has its own little flavor, each one has its, you know, is unique for different reasons. So, it really depends on, you know, whether the investors, you know, purely return driven, or maybe they want to have a place they can stay sometimes when they visit, there's, there's a lot of different angles here. So it really comes down to the investors, you know, needs, and, you know, from there, we could turn them on to different areas. So, come and visit, come hang out with me, that would be one suggestion, you know, and then, you know, get, make sure to have all your ducks in the row. And, you know, make sure of course, financing, if you're going to finance a property, you know, proof of funds ready to go and be ready to pull the trigger, you know, I'll be able to do a walk through inspection, I'm underwriting these properties for repairs, I have a strong knowledge base of, you know, the rental market, and know when it's appropriate to push on that rental price. And where we can eke out some more money and have a pretty good understanding of, you know, where the activity is, and where the growth is going to be.   So, you know, give me a call, you can get in touch with me, you know, my website: http://lighthousecharleston.com/ , or email me at: joe@lighthouscharleston.com , and we can, you know, further the conversation, but, you know, in short, you have to act fast, and throw your hat in the ring to get in.   I do think that, you know, we had a little bit of a law, as many markets did, you know, ended December, early January, but then, you know, really started pick up this first year, lots of activity, you know, more houses are being built, you know, you know, sellers now, you know, we're trying to convince, you know, people who are ready to exit the market to do so. So, you know, there'll be more opportunities coming and so just, I'm on the MLS checking every single day, you know, what's being listed, and posting those opportunities straight to Roofstock. So you're getting the, you know, up to date information because once something's posted, you'll probably see it go pending within a day or two.   You know, you'll see multiple offer scenarios. One other tool we're using, you know, we're introducing escalation clauses. So we're setting a cap on the purchase price, based on you know, what type of return you want, or you know, the deal itself where it's priced, and we're saying we'll beat the next offer by, you know, depending on the price point 1000, $5,000. And so that way you're not going in blind leaving money on the table, we're just escalating that purchase.   Michael: That's great, that's great. Joe, this has been super insightful. I know I'm getting really excited about the Charleston market, definitely want to be in touch with you. Thanks again for coming on, I appreciate you.   Joe: My pleasure, thank you for having me.   Michael: You're welcome and I will talk to you, I'm sure, take care.   Okay, well, that was our episode, a big thank you to Joe for coming on. I know, I got super excited about the Charleston market, I need to do some more research on my own. Looking forward to seeing many of you out there. As always, if you liked the episode, please feel free to leave us a rating or review wherever it is, you listen to our podcasts, and we look forward to seeing the next one.   Happy investing…

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 617 (2-21-22): Ice on the River

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:37).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 2-18-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of February 21, 2022.  This revised episode from February 2018 is part of a series this year of winter-relatedepisodes. MUSIC – ~15 sec - Lyrics: “Mama, oh mama, it was out by the water's edge.”This week, that excerpt of “Waters Edge,” from the Harrisonburg and Rockingham County, Va.-based band, The Steel Wheels, sets the stage for going to a water body's edge to explore freezing water.  Have a listen for about 15 seconds to the following mystery sounds, and see if you can guess what cold-water experience was taking place.   And here's a hint: the speaker and the water were both running. SOUNDS - ~15 sec If you guessed, wading into an icy river, you're right!  You heard me at the edge of the New River in Giles County, Va., on January 1, 2018, wading—very quickly!—into the partially iced-over river.  After nighttime temperatures in the teens or lower for several days, about half of the river's surface in some locations on that New Year's morning was covered in ice.Rivers throughout Virginia will freeze during notably cold winter spells, but it's not a routine occurrence.  River freeze-ups are really noteworthy in the tidal sections of the James, Rappahannock, and other Commonwealth rivers in the Chesapeake Bay watershed; in those sections, the water is somewhat salty, called brackish, so it has a lower freezing point. When rivers do freeze, ice typically forms first at the river edges, where in slow currents surface water can lose heat to colder air while not being mixed with warmer water.  This border ice can also form in slower currents around rocks or other obstacles well away from shore.  In stronger currents that keep the water mixed, if the whole water column drops just below the freezing point, ice can form around tiny particles; this type of ice is called frazil.  Sometimes frazil gets transported to the river bottom and attaches there, forming what's known as anchor ice.   If the water keeps losing heat to colder air, these and other kinds of ice can accumulate horizontally and vertically, eventually covering the river and perhaps filling much of its depth.Ice may also be carried along by the current, particularly after warming temperatures break up a solid ice cover.   If these ice floes get blocked by natural or human-made structures, ice jams can occur.  Ice jams can block a river's flow, leading possibly to upstream flooding.  And when an ice jam eventually breaks, it can suddenly release large amounts of water and ice, causing possible hazards downstream. Thanks to Blacksburg friends for recording the New Year's Day New River wade-in.  Thanks also to The Steel Wheels for permission to use this week's music, and we close with about 15 more seconds of “Waters Edge.” MUSIC - ~16 sec – Lyrics: “Mama, oh mama, it was out by the water's edge.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 406, 2-5-18. “Waters Edge,” from the 2013 album “No More Rain,” is copyright by The Steel Wheels, used with permission. More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at http://www.thesteelwheels.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 529, 6-15-20. The New River wade-in sounds were taken from a video recording on January 1, 2018, below McCoy Falls in Giles County, Va.  Thanks to Virginia Water Radio friends Sarah, John, and Alan for making the recording possible. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGESVirginia Water Radio host Alan Raflo in the New River in Giles County, Va., January 1, 2018.  Photo courtesy of John Imbur.Ice on the New River at McCoy Falls in Montgomery County, Va., January 1, 2018.Ice on Goose Creek in Loudoun County, Va., January 20, 2018.Ice jam in the Potomac River near Washington, D.C., February 1918.  Photo from the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, accessed online at https://www.loc.gov/item/npc2008011359/, as of 2-22-22.  For more historic Potomac River ice photos in the Library of Congress, see https://www.loc.gov/photos/?q=Potomac+River+Ice. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT ICE IN FLOWING WATERThe seriousness of the threats river ice can pose is highlighted in the following information from the National Weather Service, Chicago Forecast Office, “Volunteer River Ice Spotter Network,” online at https://www.weather.gov/lot/river_ice_spotter_network, accessed 2/17/22: “The National Weather Service (NWS) Chicago/Rockford, IL, office uses information from volunteer spotters along area rivers to monitor the development of river ice which may lead to flooding.  Ice jams are often localized and may occur away from river gauges.  River ice spotters share important information such as extent of ice cover, ice cover trends, and location of ice jams which is very important for issuing timely warnings. “River ice can be a serious problem during some winters.  Chronic ice jam locations on the Rock, Fox, and Kankakee Rivers have up to a 1-in-2 chance of experiencing an ice jam in any given year, and almost a 1-in-3 chance of experiencing ice jam flooding in a given year.” The Chicago office is one of several NWS offices that seek river ice spotters in winter.SOURCES USED FOR AUDIO AND OFFERING MORE INFORMATION  Kevin Ambrose, The Potomac River has a history of disastrous ice floes during a rapid thaw, Washington Post, January 10, 2018. Spyros Beltaos, ed., River Ice Jams, Water Resources Publications LLC, Highlands Ranch, Colo., 1995. Spyros Beltaos, ed., River Ice Breakup, Water Resources Publications LLC, Highlands Ranch, Colo., 2008. Tamara Dietrich, Arctic blast not enough to freeze James, York rivers, [Newport News, Va.] Daily Press, February 19, 2015. Don M. Gray and Terry D. Prowse, “Snow and Floating Ice,” Chapter 7 of Handbook of Hydrology, David R. Maidment, ed., McGraw-Hill, Inc., New York, N.Y., 1993. Erica Leayman, Frozen Potomac River, Lakes Show Just How Cold It Is; From boats stuck on the ice to people skating on reflecting pools, here's a visual reminder of the bitter cold around the DC area, Old Town Alexandria [Va.] Patch, January 3, 2018. National Weather Service, Blacksurg, Va., Forecast Office, “Observed Weather Reports/Preliminary Monthly Climate Data for Blacksburg,” online at https://www.weather.gov/wrh/climate?wfo=rnk. National Weather Service, Chicago, Illinois, “River Ice Guide,” online (as a PDF) at https://www.weather.gov/media/lot/hydro/outreach/NWS_River_Ice_Guide_2020.pdf. University of Minnesota-Duluth/Minnesota Sea Grant, “Lake and River Ice: Formation and Classification,” by John A. Downing, February 25, 2021, online at https://seagrant.umn.edu/news-information/directors-column/lake-river-ice-formation-classification.  RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Weather/Climate/Natural Disasters” subject categories. Following are links to several other winter-related episodes, including episodes (listed separately) on some birds that reside in Virginia typically only in winter. Frost – Episode 597, 10-4-21.Freezing and ice – Episode 606, 12-6-21 (especially for grades K-3).Ice on ponds and lakes – Episode 404, 1-22-18(especially for grades 4-8).Polar Plunge®for Special Olympics – Episode 356, 2-20-17.Snow physics and chemistry – Episode 407, 2-12-18 (especially for high school grades).Snow, sleet, and freezing rain – Episode 613, 1-24-22.Snow terms – Episode 612, 1-17-22.Surviving freezing – Episode 556, 12-21-20.Winter precipitation and water supplies – Episode 567, 3-8-21.Winter weather preparedness – Episode 605, 11-29-21.Water thermodynamics – Episode 610, 1-3-22. Bird-related Episodes for Winter Audubon Society Christmas Bird Count – Episode 607, 12-13-21.American Avocet – Episode 543, 9-21-20.Brant (goose) – Episode 615, 2-7-22.Canvasback (duck) – Episode 604, 11-22-21.Common Goldeneye (duck) – Episode 303, 2-15-16.Green-winged Teal (duck) – Episode 398, 12-11-17.Grebes (Horned and Red-necked) – Episode 233, 9-29-14.Loons – Episode 445, 11-5-18.Fall migration – Episode 603, 11-15-21.Northern Harrier – Episode 561, 1-25-21.Snow Goose – Episode 507, 1-13-20.Tundra Swan – Episode 554, 12-7-20.Winter birds sampler from the Chesapeake Bay area – Episode 565, 2-22-21. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post.

music new york university new year chicago earth rock education washington work college water state fall zoom energy tech research government green dc illinois environment dark normal surviving web natural va force rain ocean snow washington post ps ice weather citizens lake agency stream priority motion physics environmental bay images chemistry rivers grade chronic arctic index commonwealth frost patch handbook pond arial signature phases virginia tech library of congress accent atlantic ocean natural resources freezing special olympics msonormal compatibility classification colorful times new roman brant colo sections teal watershed montgomery county freshwater wg chesapeake mcgraw hill national weather service chesapeake bay policymakers earth sciences shenandoah blacksburg acknowledgment loudoun county cosgrove newport news loons cambria math style definitions worddocument saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves physical sciences trackformatting msonormaltable lidthemeother stormwater snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules lidthemeasian x none mathpr latentstyles deflockedstate centergroup donotpromoteqf subsup undovr latentstylecount harrisonburg mathfont brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin defjc wrapindent rmargin virginia department intlim narylim defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority potomac river lsdexception locked qformat latentstyles semihidden unhidewhenused table normal sols polar plunge hydrology nws bmp name title name normal name strong name emphasis name colorful shading name subtle reference name colorful list name intense reference name colorful grid name book title name default paragraph font name light shading accent name bibliography name subtitle name light list accent name toc heading name light grid accent name revision name table grid name list paragraph name placeholder text name quote name no spacing name light shading name intense quote name light list name dark list accent name light grid name colorful shading accent name medium shading name colorful list accent name medium list name colorful grid accent name medium grid name subtle emphasis name dark list name intense emphasis new river highlands ranch water's edge daily press grades k name e msohyperlink space systems light accent dark accent colorful accent name list steel wheels name plain text goose creek name date name table web name normal indent name balloon text name table theme name list bullet name normal web name plain table name list number name normal table name grid table light name closing name no list name grid table name signature name outline list cumberland gap name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic name list continue name table colorful name list table name message header name table columns name salutation name table list name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name table elegant name note heading name table professional name block text name table subtle name document map rockingham county rappahannock name mention name hashtag name unresolved mention ben cosgrove canvasback photographs division giles county audio notes tmdl water center virginia standards
Lead Like a Woman
Don't Quit Until You Make It

Lead Like a Woman

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 26:57


Congresswoman Nancy Mace grew up in the Lowcountry of South Carolina. She is the daughter of a retired Army General and a retired school teacher. Before being sworn into Congress, Nancy earned accolades as one of the most fiscally conservative members of the South Carolina General Assembly. She is also one of the most pro-conservation lawmakers in that state. She grew up in Goose Creek, South Carolina, and dropped out of high school at the age of 17. She immediately became a waitress at the Waffle House. After earning her high school diploma a few months later, she entered The Citadel (the Military College of South Carolina), where she was the school's first female to graduate from its corps of cadets in 1999. In 2004, Nancy earned a master's degree from the University of Georgia. She is the author of In the Company of Men: A Woman at The Citadel, published by Simon and Schuster in 2001. In 2008, she started her own company. Her background in business is in technology, PR, and marketing, and more recently, commercial real estate before coming to Congress. Amongst her other achievements and responsibilities, Nancy is a single mom of two children, aged 12 and 14. She also has two cats, Tyler and Tiger, and a puppy named Liberty. In this episode… Being the first female to graduate from The Citadel, Congresswoman Nancy Mace was taught a lot of valuable life lessons. She learned the importance of being courageous, confident, and believing in herself. Now she's here to empower women to speak up for themselves, for others, and to give a voice to the voiceless. Nancy advises fellow women leaders to never quit until they achieve what they want. Other people's opinions and perceptions should never define who they are or what they are capable of doing. If a woman doesn't believe in herself, then others will not believe in her and her abilities. Congresswoman Nancy Mace is Andrea Heuston's guest in this episode of the Lead Like A Woman Show where she talks about being the first female to graduate from The Citadel and how that impacted her work in Congress. Nancy also talks about her experience growing up in a military family, the lessons she learned from working as a waitress at Waffle House, and how she runs her own business. Stay tuned.

The Story Ship‘s Podcast
The Story Ship Voyage 20 Halloween With Bobby Norfolk and The Worst

The Story Ship‘s Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 7:05


Halloween is coming fast! Internationally known story performer and teaching artist, Bobby Norfolk is with us this episode. He is a three-time Emmy Award winner, multiple Parents' Choice Gold and Silver Award winner, and a National Storytelling Network Oracle Award recipient. His story, "Turn Me Over" will get your spine tingling and even get you to laugh  This story has a hot ending you won't believe. We also have a short Shel Silverstein poem called, "The Worst!" told by the kids of Howell Hall Elementary in Goose Creek, SC. We turned it into a song and made a green screen music video. It's adorable! Watch it on our YouTube Channel at the link below.              https://youtu.be/NwSROnj2slQ            You can book Bobby Norfolk at his website:  http://www.bobbynorfolk.com or purchase his books at:  https://www.bobbynorfolk.com/shop-1 Please visit online to find out how you can get you school or organization on, "The Story Ship Podcast." You can also see information about our workshops teaching you how to setup your own podcast for your school. We also offer amazing live and virtual theater shows. Drop us an email at info@thestoryship.com. We would love to hear from you. Happy listening everyone! Captain Sean

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 596 (9-27-21): Water and Muscles

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:09).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImageExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 9-24-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of September 27, 2021.  This episode is part of a series this fall on water connections to the human body and human biology.  This week, we start with some mystery sounds.  Have a listen for about 25 seconds, and see if you know the body system you can hear at work in all of these sounds.  And here's a hint: it'll be a show of strength if you guess this. SOUNDS  - ~23 sec If you guessed the muscular system, you're right!  Walking, dribbling a basketball, lifting weights, and jumping rope all involve some of the over 600 skeletal muscles in the human body.  Skeletal muscles, also called striated or voluntary muscles, are one of three muscle types in the body.  The other two are smooth, or involuntary muscles, found in internal organs; and cardiac muscle in the heart.  Whatever their location or function, muscles have several important connections to water, including the following six. First, water is a major component of muscles, making up over 70 percent of muscle mass. Second, cell volume, that is, the space within cells, is affected by the amount of water that cells contain, or the cells' hydration state.  This is believed to be related to muscle strength and contraction capacity by affecting the shape and function of muscle proteins. Third, water is the medium containing all the dissolved biochemicals that the body needs to function, including those involved in muscular contraction and in nourishing muscle cells. Fourth, water is involved in reactions that release energy from the molecule ATP, and water is associated with the important energy-storage molecule glycogen. Fifth, water helps regulate body temperature, including the heat generated by muscular activity. And sixth, water helps lubricate moveable joints, the structures upon which skeletal muscles act to move parts of the body. Overall, water plays a significant role in muscle strength and function, and muscle, in turn, is an important area of water storage for the body. We close with some music whose title speaks of one of the most common uses of our muscles.  Here's the closing 25 seconds of “Walk This Way For Awhile,” by the Harrisonburg and Rockingham County, Va.-based band, The Steel Wheels. MUSIC - ~25 sec – Lyrics: “…you walk this way for awhile; will you walk this way for awhile?  I think you will, I know you still, I hope you will.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The sounds heard in this episode were recorded by Virginia Water Radio in Blacksburg, Va., on September 23, 2021. “Walk This Way for Awhile,” by The Steel Wheels, is from the album “Live at Goose Creek,” recorded October 14, 2010, at Franklin Park Performing Arts Center, Purcellville, Va., and produced by Goose Creek Music; used with permission of The Steel Wheels.  The song is also on The Steel Wheel's 2010 album, “Red Wing.”  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at http://www.thesteelwheels.com/.  More information about Goose Creek Music is available online at http://www.goosecreekmusic.com/.  More information about the Franklin Park Arts Center is available online at http://www.franklinparkartscenter.org/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 286, 10-19-15. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGE Structure of a representative human skeletal muscle.  Illustration from National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Module, “Muscular System/Structure of Skeletal Muscle,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/muscular/structure.html. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT THE HUMAN MUSCULAR SYSTEM The following information is quoted from the National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Module, “Muscular System/Introduction” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/muscular/. “The muscular system is composed of specialized cells called muscle fibers.  Their predominant function is contractibility.  Muscles, attached to bones or internal organs and blood vessels, are responsible for movement.  Nearly all movement in the body is the result of muscle contraction.  Exceptions to this are the action of cilia, the flagellum on sperm cells, and amoeboid movement of some white blood cells. “The integrated action of joints, bones, and skeletal muscles produces obvious movements such as walking and running.  Skeletal muscles also produce more subtle movements that result in various facial expressions, eye movements, and respiration. “In addition to movement, muscle contraction also fulfills some other important functions in the body, such as posture, joint stability, and heat production.  Posture, such as sitting and standing, is maintained as a result of muscle contraction.  The skeletal muscles are continually making fine adjustments that hold the body in stationary positions.  The tendons of many muscles extend over joints and in this way contribute to joint stability.  This is particularly evident in the knee and shoulder joints, where muscle tendons are a major factor in stabilizing the joint.  Heat production, to maintain body temperature, is an important by-product of muscle metabolism.  Nearly 85 percent of the heat produced in the body is the result of muscle contraction.” SOURCES Used for Audio Ann Baggaley, ed., Human Body, Dorling Kindersley Publishing, New York, N.Y, 2001. Cedric Bryant and Daniel Green, eds., Essentials of Exercise Science, American Council on Exercise, San Diego, Calif., 2017. Michael Houston, Biochemistry Primer for Exercise Science, 3rd Edition, Human Kinetics, Champaign, Ill., 2006. Isabel Lorenzo et al., “The Role of Water Homeostasis in Muscle Function and Frailty: A Review,” Nutrients, Vol. 11, No. 8 (August 2019, accessed online at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6723611/(subscription may be required for access).  National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Modules, “Muscular System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/muscular/. Science Direct, “Synovial Fluid: Structure and Function,” excerpted from Textbook of Pediatric Rheumatology, 5th Edition, Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2005; accessed online at https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/synovial-fluid(subscription may be required for access). Scott Powers and Edward Howley, Exercise Physiology: Theory and Application to Fitness and Performance, 8th Edition, McGraw-Hill, New York, N.Y., 2012.U.S. Geological Survey, “The Water in You: Water and the Human Body, online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/water-you-water-and-human-body?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. For More Information about Water and the Human Body American Society of Hematology, “Blood Basics,” online at https://www.hematology.org/education/patients/blood-basics. Cleveland [Ohio] Clinic, “Heart & Blood Vessels: How Does Blood Travel Through Your Body,” online at https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/heart-blood-vessels-blood-flow-body. Cleveland [Ohio] Clinic, “Lymphatic System,” online at https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/21199-lymphatic-system.Eric Cudler, “Neuroscience for Kids,” online at https://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/neurok.html. Franklin Institute of Philadelphia, Penn., “Blood Vessels,” online at https://www.fi.edu/heart/blood-vessels. Mayo Clinic Health System, “Water: Essential to your body,” online at https://www.mayoclinichealthsystem.org/hometown-health/speaking-of-health/water-essential-to-your-body. Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, “Facts About Blood and Blood Cells,” online at https://www.mskcc.org/cancer-care/patient-education/facts-about-blood-and-blood-cells. National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Modules, “Nervous System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/nervous/. National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Module, “Skeletal System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/skeletal/.National Institutes of Health/National Library of Medicine, “Blood, Heart and Circulation,” online at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/bloodheartandcirculation.html. University of Bristol (England), School of Medical Sciences, “Brain Basics: The Fundamentals of Neuroscience,” online at http://www.bris.ac.uk/synaptic/basics/basics-0.html. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Science” subject category. Another episode related to human exercise is Episode 483, 7-29-19.  It focuses on buoyancy and drag in the water and is designed for middle school and high school students. Following are links to other episodes on connections of water to human biology.  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in fall 2021; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes.  Episode 195, 1-6-14 – Water thermodynamics.Episode 393, 11-6-17 – Disease: Influenza.Episode 466, 4-1-19 – Water intake and sports.Episode 517, 3-23-20 and Episode 519, 4-6-20 – Disease: Water connections to COVID-19.Episode 592, 8-30-21 – Overview of water's roles in the body.Episode 593, 9-6-21 – Circulatory system connections to water.Episode 594, 9-13-21 – Neurological system connections to water.Episode 595, 9-20-21 – Skeletal system connections to water. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-3 plus 5: Force, Motion, and Energy5.2 – Energy can take many forms.5.3 – There is a relationship between force and energy of moving objects. Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes4.2 – Plants and animals have structures that distinguish them from one another and play vital roles in their ability to survive. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment. Life ScienceLS.2 – All living things are composed of one or more cells that support life processes, as described by the cell theory.LS.4 – There are chemical processes of energy transfer which are important for life. BiologyBIO.2 – Chemical and biochemical processes are essential for life.BIO.3 – Cells have structure and function. Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rdgrade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade.Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16

covid-19 music new york university live kids school science education college water state zoom energy tech research blood government fitness heart philadelphia performance walking medicine san diego environment exercise dark normal web natural heat va force rain ocean snow netherlands amsterdam citizens agency stream structure priority plants biology vol motion application environmental neuroscience essentials bay grade bio national institutes function index lyrics processes penn posture pond chemical signature american society virginia tech muscles cells ill illustration scales calif accent atlantic ocean life sciences atp natural resources nervous system exercise science textbooks msonormal compatibility nutrients colorful times new roman ls human body sections circulation watershed walk this way neurological medical science calibri american council exceptions chesapeake mcgraw hill champaign policymakers awhile new standard blacksburg acknowledgment memorial sloan kettering cancer center hematology elsevier cambria math style definitions skeletal worddocument red wing saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves blood vessels msonormaltable trackformatting stormwater lidthemeother snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules lidthemeasian x none mathpr latentstyles deflockedstate centergroup donotpromoteqf subsup undovr latentstylecount harrisonburg mathfont brkbin brkbinsub dispdef lmargin smallfrac rmargin defjc wrapindent geological survey ar sa intlim narylim virginia department defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority qformat lsdexception locked semihidden latentstyles unhidewhenused table normal sols lymphatic system bmp human kinetics name title name normal name strong name emphasis franklin institute name medium list name colorful grid accent name medium grid name subtle emphasis name dark list name intense emphasis name colorful shading name subtle reference name colorful list name intense reference name default paragraph font name colorful grid name book title name subtitle name light shading accent name bibliography name light list accent name toc heading name light grid accent name table grid name revision name placeholder text name list paragraph name no spacing name quote name light shading name intense quote name light list name dark list accent name light grid name colorful shading accent name medium shading name colorful list accent cripple creek daniel green skeletal muscle living systems grades k name e scott powers msohyperlink light accent dark accent colorful accent name list steel wheels name plain text circulatory name date goose creek name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle cumberland gap name table web name normal indent name balloon text name list bullet name normal web name table theme name list number name normal table name plain table name closing name no list name grid table light name signature name outline list name grid table name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic name list continue name table colorful name message header name table columns name list table name salutation name table list name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant purcellville rockingham county blood cells bristol england mayo clinic health system audio notes msobodytext tmdl water center donotshowrevisions virginia standards
The Bert Show
Can You Help Clear This Teacher's Classroom Wish list?

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 5:55


TODAY'S TEACHER: TIFFANIE KESSLER AT DEVON FOREST ELEMENTARYTiffanie Kessler is a 4th grade teacher at Devon Forest Elementary in Goose Creek, SC. She's been teaching for 12 years.Last year was rough on everyone – one of her student's lost their mom to Covid and she's had students suffer in their education because of the quarantine. She used a lot of supplies last year, but they couldn't share supplies, so once supplies went out, they stayed out. So she needs lots more supplies!Here's her wish list!Tiffanie also went on a personal journey and lost over 100 lbs. and became a runner and a hiker. She used her new found fitness to become one of the coaches for the running club for the 4th and 5th graders! Can you help her out and buy one or two items off her classroom wish list?We'll feature another teacher tomorrow – it could be you! Leave us a voicemail and let us know how you need help: 1-844-827-8368. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 589 (8-9-21): A Musical Tour of Rivers and Watersheds

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021


CLICK HERE to  listen to episode audio (5:22).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Image and Extra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 8-3-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of August 9, 2021.  This revised episode from February 2015 is the last in a series of eight episodes this summer related to watersheds and river basins. MUSIC – ~12 sec – Lyrics: “Take me down to the riverside.” This week, that excerpt of “Riverside,” by the Rockingham County- and Harrisonburg, Va.-based band, The Steel Wheels, opens an episode giving musical tour of some of Virginia's major river watersheds.  Have a listen for about 90 seconds to parts of six other songs, and see if you can guess the six Virginia watersheds being represented.  Three may be obvious, but the other three may challenge your musical and hydrological knowledge. MUSIC – ~ 94 sec “Shenandoah” by Timothy Seaman – ~18 sec – instrumental. “Sandy Boys” by Sara Grey – ~11 sec – Lyrics: “Do come along, Sandy boys, waitin' for the bug-eye-boo.” “Banks of New River” by Whitetop Mt. Band – ~13 sec – Lyrics: “I'm sitting here on the banks of New River.” “Clinch Mountain Quickstep” by Timothy Seaman – ~14 sec – instrumental. “Rappahannock Running Free” by Bob Gramann – ~10 sec – Lyrics: “I love the Rappahannock and its waters running free; the rapids of this river, that's where I want to be.” “James River Blues” by Old Crow Medicine Show – ~10 sec – Lyrics: “James River blues.” “All Quiet on the Potomac” – ~18 sec – instrumental. You heard parts of “Shenandoah,” performed by Timothy Seaman; “Sandy Boys,” by Sara Grey, referring to the Big Sandy River; “On the Banks of New River,” by Whitetop Mountain Band; “Clinch Mountain Quickstep,” also by Timothy Seaman, selected here for its connection to the Clinch River; “Rappahannock Running Free,” by Bob Gramann; “James River Blues,” by Old Crow Medicine Show; and “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight,” by Chloe Benner and Stewart Scales. The watersheds of these rivers are part of 14 major watersheds in Virginia, as identified by the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation.  Wherever you are in the Commonwealth, you're in one of the those watersheds, as well as being—in turn—in one of the larger watersheds of the Chesapeake Bay, Albemarle Sound in North Carolina, the Atlantic Ocean, or the Gulf of Mexico.  They all deserve to have songs written about them, because they're part of Virginia's varied, complex, and historic system of waterways and landscapes.Thanks to all of the artists mentioned for permission to use this week's music. We close this episode, and Water Radio's summer 2021 series on watersheds and rivers, with about 30 more seconds of The Steel Wheels' “Riverside.” MUSIC – ~29 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 251, 2-2-15. “Riverside,” by The Steel Wheels, is from the album “Live at Goose Creek,” recorded October 10, 2014, at Franklin Park Performing Arts Center, Purcellville, Va., and produced by Goose Creek Productions; used with permission of The Steel Wheels.  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at http://www.thesteelwheels.com/. More information about Goose Creek Productions is available online at http://www.goosecreekmusic.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 295, 12-21-15.The “Shenandoah” version in this episode's musical tour is by Timothy Seaman and Paulette Murphy, from the start of “Shenandoah/Hazel River” on the 1997 album “Here on this Ridge,” copyright Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at https://timothyseaman.com/en/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 447, 11-19-18. “Sandy Boys,” by Sara Grey, is from the 2009 album “Sandy Boys,” copyright by Sara Grey and Fellside Records, used with permission.  More information about Sara Grey is available online at http://www.saragrey.net/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 436, 9-3-18. “On the Banks of New River,” by Whitetop Mountain Band, is from the 2008 album, “Bull Plus 10%,” copyright Whitetop Mountain Band and Arhoolie Records, used with permission.  More information about Whitetop Mountain Band is available online at http://whitetopmountainband.tripod.com/index.html.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 546, 10-12-20. “Clinch Mountain Quickstep,” from the 2002 album “Sycamore Rapids,” is copyright by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at http://timothyseaman.com/en/. This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 435, 8-27-18.“Rappahannock Running Free,” by Bob Gramann, is from the 2008 album, “Mostly Live,” copyright by Bob Gramann, used with permission.  More information about Bob Gramann is available online at http://www.bobgramann.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 304, 2-22-16.“James River Blues,” by Old Crow Medicine Show, is from the 2006 album “Big Iron World,” copyright Nettwork Records, used with permission.  More information about Old Crow Medicine Show is available online at http://www.crowmedicine.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 373, 6-19-17. The version of “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight” heard here was performed by Chloe Benner and Stewart Scales, used with permission.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 318, 5-30-16. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGE AND EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT VIRGINIA'S MAJOR WATERSHEDS Map showing Virginia's major watersheds.  Map from the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at http://www.dcr.virginia.gov/stormwater_management/wsheds.shtml. Four large watersheds containing, collectively, all of Virginia's lands are the Chesapeake Bay, Albemarle Sound in North Carolina, the Atlantic Ocean, and the Gulf of Mexico.  The watersheds of the Chesapeake Bay and Albemarle Sound are also contained within the Atlantic Ocean watershed.The following table of information about Virginia's 14 major watersheds is from the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, “Virginia's Major Watersheds,” online at https://www.dcr.virginia.gov/soil-and-water/wsheds.  (This table was also included in the show notes for Virginia Water Radio Episode 581, 6-14-21.)  WATERSHED AREA IN SQUARE MILES MAJOR TRIBUTARIES Albemarle Sound Coastal 577 Dismal Swamp, North Landing River, Back Bay Atlantic Ocean Coastal 580 Chincoteague Bay, Hog Island Bay Chesapeake Bay Coastal 2,577 Chesapeake Bay, Piankatank River Chowan 3,675 Nottaway River, Meherrin River, Blackwater River James 10,236 James River, Appomattox River, Maury River, Jackson River, Rivanna River New 3,068 New River, Little River, Walker Creek Potomac - Shenandoah 5,702 Potomac River, S. Fork Shenandoah River, N. Fork Shenandoah River Rappahannock 2,714 Rappahannock River, Rapidan River, Hazel River

music university time live earth education college water state mexico zoom land tech research government tour north carolina north america band environment musical dark normal web natural va rain ocean snow types maine citizens status agency stream banks priority environmental bay rivers grade conservation divide figures recreation index map gulf commonwealth pond streams arial signature riverside virginia tech accent atlantic ocean natural resources continental geology msonormal compatibility roanoke colorful times new roman clinch sections potomac watershed freshwater wg chesapeake confluence policymakers chesapeake bay earth sciences shenandoah madison county blue ridge acknowledgment ohio river cosgrove cambria math water resources style definitions worddocument saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent environmental quality punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves trackformatting msonormaltable stormwater lidthemeother snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules x none mathpr lidthemeasian latentstyles deflockedstate centergroup subsup undovr latentstylecount donotpromoteqf harrisonburg mathfont brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin geological survey rmargin defjc wrapindent virginia department intlim narylim defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority potomac river bluffs lsdexception locked qformat latentstyles semihidden unhidewhenused environmental protection agency epa table normal sols yarmouth old crow medicine show back bay james river bmp all quiet name title name strong name emphasis name normal name bibliography name subtitle name light shading accent name toc heading name light list accent name light grid accent name table grid name revision name list paragraph name placeholder text name quote name no spacing name intense quote name light shading name dark list accent name light list name colorful shading accent name light grid name colorful list accent name medium shading name colorful grid accent name medium list name subtle emphasis name medium grid name intense emphasis name dark list name subtle reference name colorful shading name intense reference name colorful list name book title name default paragraph font name colorful grid new river tennessee river watersheds big sandy little river grades k name e msohyperlink space systems light accent dark accent colorful accent powell river steel wheels name list goose creek name date name plain text name list bullet name normal web name table theme name list number name normal table name plain table cumberland gap name closing name no list name grid table light name signature name outline list name grid table name body text name table simple name body text indent name table classic name list continue name table colorful name list table name message header name table columns name salutation name table list name table 3d name body text first indent name table contemporary name note heading name table elegant name block text name table professional name document map name table subtle name normal indent name table web name balloon text purcellville rockingham county rappahannock smith river sara grey rappahannock river ben cosgrove dismal swamp headwater yadkin audio notes msobodytext dan river roanoke river tmdl water center donotshowrevisions virginia standards
Knockin' Doorz Down
Gary Busey | From Cocaine Addiction & Severe Head Trauma to Sober Author, Actor & Musician.

Knockin' Doorz Down

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2021 77:45


Gary was born in Goose Creek, Texas to a middle-class military family. He became active in football, where he got a college scholarship to Oklahoma State University.  He became interested in acting and eventually starring in small roles, and exploring his love of music on recordings for musicians such as Leon Russell. His first major role in his acting career was Kris Kristofferson’s manager in the blockbuster “A Star Is Born”.  But his big breakthrough was playing the iconic Buddy Holly, in “The Buddy Holly Story”, where he earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Actor.  Since then, Gary has been acting for 51 years, starred in over 170 films, and has been playing music since 1962. Along with his newfound fame, came excessive partying and drug use.  Gary abused cocaine heavily, which led to overdoses and some of the lowest points of his life. On December 4, 1988, Busey was severely injured in a motorcycle accident in which he was not wearing a helmet. His skull was fractured, and he suffered permanent brain damage.  His road to recovery was tough.  Eventually, Gary needed help.  In 1996, Busey publicly announced that he was a Christian.  Busey cites the motorcycle accident, as well as a 1995 cocaine overdose, as events that strengthened his religious faith. During the filming of the second season of Celebrity Rehab with Dr. Drew in 2008, Busey was referred to a psychiatrist on the show, Charles Sophy.  Sophy suspected that Busey's brain injury has had a greater effect on him than realized. He described it as essentially weakening his mental "filters" and causing him to speak and act impulsively.  In writing his book “Buseyisms”, Gary was recorded using a tape recorder, just saying what was on his mind, and what phrases worked for him in positive ways.  For example, his ‘Buseyism’ for the word ‘Sober’ is “Son of A Bitch Everything’s Real” He says the best way to stay sober is to get out of your own way. Gary also shares some stories from some of his most famous roles and films, including Point Break, Rookie of The Year, Lethal Weapon, Under Seige & more. This is Gary Busey in his own words, on Knockin’ Doorz Down. For Carlos Vieira's autobiography Knockin' Doorz Down https://www.kddmediacompany.com/ For 51FIFTY use the discount code KDD20 for 20% off! https://51fiftyltm.com/ https://www.facebook.com/51FIFTYLTM https://www.instagram.com/51fiftyltm/ https://twitter.com/51fiftyltm For Manscaped use the code KDD for 20% of at https://www.manscaped.com/ For more on the Knockin' Doorz Down podcast and to follow us on social media https://www.kddmediacompany.com/podcast https://www.instagram.com/knockindoorzdown/ https://www.facebook.com/knockingdoorsdown/ https://twitter.com/kddmediacompany https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUSJ5ooBFqso8lfFiiIM-5g/ For more information on the Carlos Vieira Foundation and the Race 2B Drug-Free, Race to End the Stigma and Race For Autism programs visit: https://www.carlosvieirafoundation.org/ https://www.facebook.com/CVFoundation/ https://www.instagram.com/carlosvieirafoundation/ For more on Gary Busey https://www.garybusey.com/ https://www.facebook.com/garybusey https://www.instagram.com/thegarybusey/ https://twitter.com/THEGaryBusey  

Dr. Howard Smith Oncall
Goose Creek and COCO TKO Hand Sanitizers On Recall

Dr. Howard Smith Oncall

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2021 0:47


  Vidcast:  https://youtu.be/ApsEl0iI3u0   The FDA and Scentsational Soaps & Candles, Inc. are recalling Goose Creek and COCO TKO Hand Sanitizers.  These sanitizers contain the poisons methanol, benzene, and acetaldehyde.  Exposure to these poisons may cause blindness, seizures, coma, permanent neurologic damage, cancers including leukemia, and death.  They are particularly dangerous if accidentally ingested by children.  Stop using these products, and return them to the place of purchase.  Questions to Scentsational by calling 1-855-554-8050.   https://www.fda.gov/safety/recalls-market-withdrawals-safety-alerts/scentsational-soaps-candles-inc-voluntarily-expands-nationwide-recall-scented-hand-sanitizers-due   #sanitizer #goosecreek #cocotko #methanol #benzene #acetaldehyde #poisoning #recall    

South Carolina from A to Z
“S” is for St. James Goose Creek Parish

South Carolina from A to Z

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2021 0:59


“S” is for St. James Goose Creek Parish. A long rectangle extending northwestward from the Cooper River through modern Charleston, Berkeley, and Orangeburg Counties, St. James Goose Creek was one of the ten original parishes created by the Church Act of 1706. By 1672 a group of settlers from Barbados had settled with their enslaved property on Goose Creek, a meandering tributary of the Cooper River. The “Goose Creek Men” were experienced colonists and accomplished planters and they quickly came to dominate the colony both politically and economically. Colonial Goose Creek was the most prosperous and populous community outside Charleston, attributes that are reflected in its ornate parish church that was completed in 1719. With the abolition of the parish system in 1865, St. James Goose Creek Parish became a part of Berkeley County.

Carolina Crimes
EPISODE 10: "Where There's Smoke....There's Secrets": The Disappearance of Annie Tehan

Carolina Crimes

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2021 78:42


A Navy Man with a footlocker full of secrets' girlfriend and mother of his child disappears without a trace. Police were baffled and the case ran ice cold for 6 years, until NCIS got involved.Goose Creek, SC. Annie Tehan, Micheal Paalan. Berkley County, NCISPlease follow us on Social Media:Facebook: Carolina Crimes PodcastTwitter: @SCcrimespodEmail: carolinacrimespod@gmail.com

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 572 (4-12-21): Warblers Announce Spring Bird Migration

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2021


Click to listen to episode (4:26) Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.) Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 4-12-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of April 12, 2021.  This revised episode from April 2013 is part of a series this year of spring-related episodes. MUSIC – ~ 18 sec – Lyrics: “I went outside, the rain fallin’ on the branches bare.   And I smiled, ‘cause I could feel a change in the air.” That’s part of “The Coming Spring,” on Andrew VanNorstand’s 2019 album, “That We Could Find a Way to Be,” featuring Kailyn Wright on vocals.  It opens an episode about the feathered “changes in the air” that take place each spring in Virginia.  We start with a series of mystery sounds.  Have a listen for about 15 seconds, and see if you can guess what’s making these three different high-pitched songs, each heard just once.  And here’s a hint: These small creatures make big journeys, twice a year.SOUNDS  - ~12 sec If you guessed warblers, you’re right!  And if you’re an experienced birder, you may have recognized the songs of a Bay-breasted Warbler, Palm Warbler, and Tennessee Warbler.  These three species breed in Canada and the northern United States, but they winter in Central and South America, and they’re among the birds that may pass through Virginia during spring or fall migration.  Virginia’s location along the Atlantic coast and Chesapeake Bay allows Commonwealth birders to have a chance to see songbirds, waterfowl, and birds of prey that migrate along the broad, eastern North American route known as the Atlantic Flyway, one of four main migratory routes on this continent.  For example, while about 100 bird species breed in the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge in southeastern Virginia and northeastern North Carolina, over 200 species have been identified there, particularly during the spring migration from April to June. The Colorado-based organization Environment for the Americas, which has helped coordinate an annual World Migratory Bird Day, has called bird migration, quote, “one of the most important and spectacular events in the Americas.”  Virginia’s part of that spectacle, every spring and fall. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the three warbler species sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs.  Thanks also to Andrew VanNorstrand for permission to use part of “The Coming Spring.”  We close with part of another song, whose title captures how many people may feel about spring’s arrival after a long winter.  Here’s about 20 seconds of “At Long Last,” by the Harrisonburg and Rockingham County, Va.-based band, The Steel Wheels, from their 2011 album, “Live at Goose Creek.” MUSIC – ~ 22 sec – instrumental SHIP’S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 157, 4-15-13, The sounds of the Bay-breasted Warbler, Palm Warbler, and Tennessee Warbler were taken from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot’s work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. “The Coming Spring,” from the 2019 album “That We Could Find a Way to Be,” is copyright by Andrew VanNorstrand, used with permission.  The music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 509, 1-27-20.  More information about Andrew VanNorstrand is available online at https://www.andrewvannorstrand.com/. “At Long Last,” from the 2011 album “Live at Goose Creek,” is copyright by The Steel Wheels, used with permission.  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at https://www.thesteelwheels.com/. Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGESNorth American migratory bird flyways.  Map by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, accessed online at https://www.fws.gov/birds/management/flyways.php, 4/9/21.    Bay-breasted Warbler painting originally published between 1827 and 1838 by John James Audubon in Birds of America (plate 154).  Image made available for public use by the National Audubon Society, online at https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america; specific URL for this image is https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america/bay-breasted-warbler. Palm Warbler painting originally published between 1827 and 1838 by John James Audubon in Birds of America (plate 163).  Image made available for public use by the National Audubon Society, online at https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america; specific URL for this image is https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america/palm-warbler.Tennessee Warbler painting originally published between 1827 and 1838 by John James Audubon in Birds of America (plate 154).  Image made available for public use by the National Audubon Society, online at https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america; specific URL for this image is https://www.audubon.org/birds-of-america/tennessee-warbler. SOURCES Used for Audio Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin’s Press, New York, 2001. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org.The Bay-breasted Warbler entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bay-breasted_Warbler.The Palm Warbler entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Palm_Warbler.The Tennessee Warbler entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Tennessee_Warbler. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home(subscription required).The Bay-breasted Warbler entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/babwar/cur/introduction.The Palm Warbler entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/palwar/cur/introduction.The Tennessee Warbler entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/tenwar/cur/introduction. Environment for the Americas, “World Migratory Bird Day,” online at http://www.birdday.org/birdday. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Great Dismal Swamp National Refuge, “Wildlife and Habitat,” online at https://www.fws.gov/refuge/Great_Dismal_Swamp/wildlife_and_habitat/index.html.  The Refuge’s bird brochure, with checklist, is online (as a PDF) at https://www.fws.gov/uploadedFiles/Region_5/NWRS/South_Zone/Great_Dismal_Swamp_Complex/Great_Dismal_Swamp/GDSbirds.pdf. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, “Migratory Bird Program,” online at https://www.fws.gov/birds/index.php.  Information on bird migratory flyways is online at https://www.fws.gov/birds/management/flyways.php. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.  Warblers are online at this link.The Bay-breasted Warbler entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040324&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18726.The Palm Warbler entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040329&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18726.The Tennessee Warbler entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040309&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18726. ___, “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, April 2018,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. National Audubon Society, online at https://www.audubon.org/. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/.Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation Web site, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” subject category. Following are links to other spring-themed episodes.  (Please note: some of these may be redone in spring 2021.  As that occurs, the links below will include directions to the blog post for the updated episodes.) Eastern Phoebe – Episode 416, 4-16-18.Frog and Toad Medley – Episode 408, 2-19-18.Spring arrival episode – Episode 569, 3-22-21.Spring forest wildflowers – Episode 212, 5-5-14.Spring Peepers – Episode 570, 3-29-21.Spring reminder about tornado awareness – Episode 568, 3-15-21.Spring signals for fish – Episode 571, 4-5-21.Spring sounds serenades – Episode 206, 3-14-14 and Episode 516, 3-16-20.FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode’s audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.”