Podcasts about manufacturers

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Industrial activity producing goods for sale using labor and machines

  • 1,188PODCASTS
  • 2,057EPISODES
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  • Aug 19, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about manufacturers

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Latest podcast episodes about manufacturers

Dr. Berg’s Healthy Keto and Intermittent Fasting Podcast
5 Ways YOU Are Being Tricked with Misleading Food Labels

Dr. Berg’s Healthy Keto and Intermittent Fasting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 14:22


Manufacturers have interesting ways of tricking people when it comes to food labels. Learn more! Dr. Berg's Keto and IF Lab: https://www.facebook.com/groups/drbergslab/ How to Bulletproof your Immune System FREE Course: https://bit.ly/39Ry3s2 FREE MINI-COURSE ➜ ➜ Take Dr. Berg's Free Keto Mini-Course! ADD YOUR SUCCESS STORY HERE: https://bit.ly/3z9TviS Find Your Body Type: https://www.drberg.com/body-type-quiz Talk to a Product Advisor to find the best product for you! Call 1-540-299-1557 with your questions about Dr. Berg's products. Product Advisors are available Monday through Friday 8 am - 6 pm and Saturday 9 am - 5 pm EST. At this time, we no longer offer Keto Consulting and our Product Advisors will only be advising on which product is best for you and advise on how to take them. Dr. Eric Berg DC Bio: Dr. Berg, 51 years of age is a chiropractor who specializes in weight loss through nutritional & natural methods. His private practice is located in Alexandria, Virginia. His clients include senior officials in the U.S. government & the Justice Department, ambassadors, medical doctors, high-level executives of prominent corporations, scientists, engineers, professors, and other clients from all walks of life. He is the author of The 7 Principles of Fat Burning. Dr. Berg's Website: http://bit.ly/37AV0fk Dr. Berg's Recipe Ideas: http://bit.ly/37FF6QR Dr. Berg's Reviews: http://bit.ly/3hkIvbb Dr. Berg's Shop: http://bit.ly/3mJcLxg Dr. Berg's Bio: http://bit.ly/3as2cfE Dr. Berg's Health Coach Training: http://bit.ly/3as2p2q Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drericberg Messenger: https://www.messenger.com/t/drericberg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drericberg/ YouTube: http://bit.ly/37DXt8C Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/drericberg/

School Transportation Nation
Thrown A Wrench: Insights From School Bus Manufacturers & Mechanics

School Transportation Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 45:46


Collaboration and innovation are key as school starts back up and school bus manufacturers continue to face supply chain challenges. Mike Warner, associate director of fleet maintenance at Cobb County School District in Georgia, discusses the changes he's seen while managing buses through the years, as well as how the district is being affected by clean school bus discussions, the mechanic shortage and supply chain complications. Read more at stnonline.com/tag/bus-garage.  

ZOE Science & Nutrition
How healthy are meat and dairy alternatives?

ZOE Science & Nutrition

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 12:56 Very Popular


Vegan diets are increasingly popular. As more of us reduce our animal product consumption, countless new meat and dairy alternatives appear on our supermarket shelves. Manufacturers market these products as healthy options (unsurprisingly), but perhaps we shouldn't be so quick to trust them…  In today's short episode of ZOE Science & Nutrition, Jonathan and Sarah ask: are meat and dairy alternatives healthier than their animal-based counterparts? Follow ZOE on Instagram:https://www.instagram.com/zoe/ ( ) https://www.instagram.com/zoe/ (https://www.instagram.com/zoe/)   If you want to uncover the right foods for your body, head to http://joinzoe.com/podcast (joinzoe.com/podcast) and get 10% off your personalised nutrition program. Studies referenced in today's episode: How well do plant based alternatives fare nutritionally compared to cow's milk? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5756203/ (here) Risks of ischaemic heart disease and stroke in meat eaters, fish eaters, and vegetarians over 18 years of follow-up https://www.bmj.com/content/366/bmj.l4897 (here) This podcast was produced by https://fascinateproductions.co.uk/ (Fascinate Productions)

The BG Podcast
The passage of the CHIPS and Science Act w/Ed Latson, CEO, Austin Regional Manufacturers Association

The BG Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 11:16


Today's (161) episode features Ed Latson, CEO, Austin Regional Manufacturers Association. Ed and Bingham Group CEO A.J. discuss the recent of the CHIPs and Science Act, and the economic implications for Central Texas. The bipartisan bill includes more than $50 billion in incentives for manufacturers of semiconductors, or chips, to build domestic semiconductor plants. The semiconductor industry has had significant and growing presence in Austin and Central Texas for over 30 years. This includes Samsung's 2021 announcement to build at $17 billion semiconductor factory in Taylor. And recently last month the company filing paperwork with the state suggesting it could build 11 chip-making facilities in the Austin area over the next two decades. RELATED EPISODES: 2021 Sector Outlook with Ed Latson, CEO, Austin Regional Manufacturers Association -> https://www.bgmediagp.com/bgpodcast/episode132 ABOUT THE BINGHAM GROUP, LLC The Bingham Group, LLC is a Austin lobbying firm serving businesses, nonprofits and trade associations. Austin and Austin Metro lobbying and advocacy, along with Texas lobbying and advocacy are our largest service areas, covering municipal governments and the legislative and executive branches of Texas government. We are a HUB/MBE-certified Austin lobbying firm. Follow us on LinkedIn for content updates and the BG Reads: www.linkedin.com/company/binghamgp CONTACT US at: info@binghamgp.com FOLLOW US: Facebook -> www.facebook.com/binghamgp Instagram -> www.instagram.com/binghamgroup Twitter -> twitter.com/binghamgp PART OFTHE BG MEDIA NETWORK Released by: BG Media Group for The Bingham Group, LLC (www.binghamgp.com)

On Cloud
Harnessing AI and data to build the smart factory of the future

On Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 27:13


Manufacturers continue to respond to an increasing demand for products amid a volatile supply chain, labor shortages, and a fluctuating global economy. Improving production processes in the factory can help, but it's not the only answer. In this podcast, David Linthicum and Deloitte's Stephen Laaper talk about how companies can use AI and other cognitive tools to harness the vast streams of data collected from manufacturing operations to automate and increase safety, productivity, and quality and build the smart factory of the future.

Closing Bell
Closing Bell: Choppy Session to Start Week, Reaction to Inflation Reduction Act 8/8/22

Closing Bell

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 43:36


Stocks were mixed in Monday trading, with the Dow closing slightly higher, while the Nasdaq ticked lower, in part on an earnings warning from chipmaker Nvidia. But solar and EV stocks were outliers – climbing after the Senate advanced the Inflation Reduction Act over the weekend. National Association of Manufacturers president Jay Timmons joins with his objections to the bill, while the CEO of solar firm Sunnova makes the case for why it's a positive. Meantime former Fed governor Sarah Bloom Raskin discusses if the bill will indeed combat inflation. And the CEO of Chegg breaks down the current environment for tech stocks.

The New Yorker: Politics and More
Can Suing Gun Manufacturers Reduce Gun Violence?

The New Yorker: Politics and More

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 34:34 Very Popular


Gun manufacturers are the only industry explicitly protected by federal statute from liability lawsuits. Carmakers and cigarette companies can be taken to court if their products or marketing endanger the public. But a 2005 law called the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act (P.L.C.A.A.) has made it very difficult to sue a gunmaker. Jonathan Lowy has. He's the chief counsel and vice-president of legal at Brady, one of the country's oldest advocacy groups against gun violence. Faced with a hostile Supreme Court and a Senate filibuster, Lowy believes civil litigation is a path forward for gun-control advocates. Speaking with Michael Luo, who is this week's guest host and the editor of newyorker.com, Lowy explains his strategy of slowly chipping away at the P.L.C.A.A. to change how guns are made, marketed, and sold. 

The Mike Broomhead Show Audio
Christopher Netram, National Association of Manufacturers

The Mike Broomhead Show Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 8:38


Christopher Netram, VP of Tax and Economic Policy for the National Association of Manufacturers, joined Mike to talk about the Inflation Reduction Act and the impact US manufacturing is likely to see if it passesSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Dan Mason Show
8/3 HR 1 - Cali Says It's OK to Sue Gun Manufacturers.

The Dan Mason Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 30:56


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The TechEd Podcast
The Key to a More Diverse Workforce - Matt Kirchner, Host of The TechEd Podcast

The TechEd Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 19:13


Manufacturers are putting more emphasis on diversity efforts than ever before, but are they working?Executives, if you want to build a more diverse leadership team, then look no further than your frontline workforce.And if you want to implement diversity practices that truly impact your frontline workers - the ones who stand to gain the most from these efforts - then you need to listen to this episode.Our host Matt Kirchner combines decades of manufacturing leadership experience with recent data to uncover the key to building a more diverse workforce.3 Big Takeaways from this episode: Diversity in your workforce is good, and it's good business: Having a diverse team means your company can relate to any customer, any supplier, any team member. Having a diverse leadership team means there are more and better perspectives at the table when approaching solutions to problems and understanding how they'll impact the entire business and employee base.Most companies' diversity efforts have missed the group that stands to reap the most socio-economic benefits from them: 2/3 of office workers say diversity efforts are working. But only 4/10 frontline workers think so. Why? Because too often diversity initiatives ignore the interests of the frontline workforce, like giving them skills-building abilities and the path to upward mobility. Keep this in mind: the frontline employs 61% of the entire American workforce, which is also the most diverse workforce you'll find. If you want to invest in diversity, invest in your frontline workers.The key to a more diverse workforce is skills training for frontline workers, both hard skills and professional skills: Do you want diversity among your supervisors, administrators, managers, executive leadership? Look no further than your frontline workforce. The data tell us that these individuals want to learn new skills and grow into leadership roles. So invest in them. Provide opportunities to progress in their careers, and your entire business will benefit.ResourcesWall Street Journal Article - Black and Hispanic Employees Often Get Stuck at the Lowest Rung of the WorkplaceMcKinsey Report - Race in the Workplace: The Frontline ExperienceEpisode page: https://techedpodcast.com/diverseworkforce/

Dealerships Link Manufacturers To Customers | Well, For Now...

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 8:03


The pandemic has caused empty dealer lots, above-sticker prices and online sales—supply-chain issues making some customers shift towards electric vehicles which has accelerated changes in the car-buying process. I review here:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DpnLh0BXxPoGrab a copy of my book:https://partsmanagerpro.gumroad.com/l/qtqax"The Parts Manager Guide" - https://www.amazon.com/Parts-Manager-Guide-Strategies-Maximize-ebook/dp/B09S23HQ1P/ref=sr_1_4?crid=3UZYOGZJUNJ9K&keywords=parts+manager+guide&qid=1644443157&sprefix=parts+manager+guid%2Caps%2C244&sr=8-4Please remember to like, share and leave your comments.Videos are uploaded weekly.Check out my website:https://www.partsmanagerprof.com/For the full video you can find it here on my YouTube channel:https://youtu.be/g8G6Z1h0bhYIf you want me to continue making videos like these, please donate to our paypal account: paypal.me/partsmanagerproFair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use. No copyright infringement intended. ALL RIGHTS BELONG TO THEIR RESPECTIVE OWNERS*This video is for educational and entertainment purposes only.

Marketplace Minute
Manufacturers report slowing rate of price increases - Midday - Marketplace Minute - August 1, 2022

Marketplace Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 1:50


Manufacturing activity grew at slowest pace since June 2020, ISM reports; Heineken beer sales up worldwide; USDA proposes tougher rules for salmonella contamination in frozen chicken products; Lufthansa pilots threaten to strike To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Uncut With Q
STW: Marvel Studios Going Out Of Business, Video Games That Inspire Entrepreneurship, Gun Manufacturers Make 1.2 Billion in 2022

Uncut With Q

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 31:24


In Today's show Q & Trey Surf The Web and break down Marvel Studios recent drop in Movie hits. Why video games can help kids become millionaires, and 1.2B in sales on Firearms amidst active shooter scenarios being at an all time high.

AJ Daily
7-29-22 Angus Foundation Silent Auction raises more than $17,000; USDA extends flexibility helping manufacturers, states get formula to WIC families; fed-cattle slaughter numbers

AJ Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 3:11


7-29-22 AJ DailyAngus Foundation Silent Auction Raises More Than $17,000 at 2022 National Junior Angus ShowAdapted from a release by Peyton Schmitt, Angus Communications USDA Extends Flexibility That's Helping Manufacturers, States Get Formula to WIC Families Adapted from a release by the USDA Fed-cattle Slaughter Adapted from Len Steiner, Steiner Consulting Group This edition of the AJ Daily was compiled by Heather Lassen, proofreader for the Angus Journal. For more Angus news, visit angusjournal.net. 

Minds on Manufacturing
Supply Chain Challenges: "Like Playing a Game of Whack-a-Mole"

Minds on Manufacturing

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 53:43


Manufacturers continue to face supply chain challenges that are impacting delivery time, inventory management and costs. In this episode, MC Machinery Senior Purchasing Manager Brian Howard, Senior Buyer Sheila Uribe and CPG Group National Sales Manager George Johnson discuss the current supply chain challenges facing manufacturers, how they are adjusting to these challenges and expectations for the future. They discuss:Just-in-time manufacturing has become "just in case"How overseas port closures, California trucker protests and a contract labor dispute  between the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and the Pacific Maritime Association are impacting shipmentsShipping costs remain high, including surcharges and port feesSupply chain issues are dynamic and require finding creative solutions on the flyProduced by MC Machinery Systems, the Minds on Manufacturing podcast covers timely topics in fabricating, machining and manufacturing in general. For more information, visit https://www.mcmachinery.com/minds-on-manufacturing-podcast.

David Feldman Show
It's A Recession, Episode 1356

David Feldman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 367:27


David explains how economists will say anything if you pay them enough. Joe Manchin signs on to the climate bill, what's in it, and why did Manchin give in?  Trump is promising martial law. Manufacturers of AR-15s were brought before Congress on Wednesday. David takes a close look at how those hearings revealed the ways assault weapons are marketed to white nationalists and far Right members of The Proud Boys, The Oath Keepers and The Boogaloo Boys. Also, we continue to examine the right wing's growing "insurrectionary theory” of the Second Amendment, and the false belief that our Founding Fathers believed citizens needed guns to check an "overly intrusive" government. We look at the midterms, and ask if things might be looking better at least politically for Biden and the Democrats. Guests with Time Stamps: 00:01:50 Conservative Party televised debate cut short when moderator collapses 00:04:49 Should Democratic candidates distance themselves from Biden? 00:10:47 What do the Democrats have to run on for the Midterms? 00:14:28 Shocker: Manchin gets on board Biden's Climate Bill 00:16:16 Biden insists you can't be pro cop and pro insurrection 00:18:38 Trump falsely claims he's "pro cop" 00:20:23 Trump promises martial law 00:23:59 Congress forces manufacturers of AR-15s to testify 00:28:16 Congresswoman AOC takes on the CEO of Sturm Ruger 00:38:27 Louisiana Congressman Clay Higgins warns of a blood bath if the FBI and the ATF comes for the assault weapons 00:51:32 Democratic Congressman Gerald Connolly accuses GOP of threatening violence 00:54:43 Republicans insist the Second Amendment is for Insurrection   01:03:16 Biden administration says it's not a recession 01:10:48 David wants a Nobel prize in Economics 01:15:05 New documents reveal Uber hired economists to lie about Uber's impact on the economy 01:18:36 Academy Award Winning Movie "Inside Job" exposes academics for hire 01:20:21 Professor Frederic Mishkin, Columbia Business School, is a fraud 01:25:42 Glenn Hubbard, recently retired Dean of Columbia Business School, is a fraud 01:34:32 Professor Ben Burgis talks about his latest article in Current Affairs: "How Leftists Should Debate in Mainstream Spaces," and his forthcoming article in Jacobin: "Peter Thiel Wants You To Think He's An Evil Genius. He's Just A Rich Guy." 02:03:31 President Donald Trump, AKA Robert Smigel, tells us how he invented Rap 02:06:50 Dr. Philip Herschenfeld is a Freudian psychoanalyst.  Ethan Herschenfeld is a comedian and actor, and his new comedy special "Thug, Thug Jew" is streaming on YouTube. Buy Ethan's new book "Today Is Now." 02:36:22 Emil Guillermo is host of the PETA Podcast, and a columnist for The Asian American Legal Defense And Education Fund. 03:09:37 The Rev. Barry W. Lynn does a deeper dive into January 6 and other legal problems for Trump and the extreme Republican agenda on social issues. 04:09:00 "I'm On My Way" written and performed by Professor Mike Steinel 04:14:49 The Professors And Mary Anne: Professors Mary Anne Cummings, Ann Li, and Jonathan Bick PLUS ASMR for your eyeballs with Joe in Norway in the kitchen. 05:06:09 Professor Harvey J Kaye is the author of countless books, including “Take Hold of Our History”, “FDR on Democracy”, “Fight for the Four Freedoms”, and “Thomas Paine and the Promise of America”.   Alan Minsky is executive director of Progressive Democrats of America. He is a lifelong activist, who has worked as a progressive journalist for the past two decades. 05:59:17 "USA of Distraction" written and performed by Professor Mike Steinel We livestream here on YouTube every Monday and Thursday starting at 5:00 PM Eastern and go until 11:00 PM. Please join us!  Take us wherever you go by subscribing to this show as a podcast! Here's how: https://davidfeldmanshow.com/how-to-listen/ And Subscribe to this channel. SUPPORT INDEPENDENT MEDIA: https://www.paypal.com/biz/fund?id=PDTFTUJCCV3EW More David @ http://www.DavidFeldmanShow.com Get Social With David: Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/davidfeldmancomedy?ref=hl Twitter: https://twitter.com/David_Feldman_ iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/david-feldman-show/id321997239

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Manufacturers use 'shrinkflation' to pass costs on to consumers

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 5:40


With inflation at a 40-year high in the U.S., we are all spending more when we go to the store. But there is another dimension of inflation these days called "shrinkflation." Economics correspondent Paul Solman explains. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Political Rewind
Political Rewind: Gun manufacturers testify, Georgians respond to abortion law, Ossoff investigation

Political Rewind

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 51:24


Thursday on Political Rewind: The CEO of Daniel Defense claimed his company bore no responsibility for its use in the Uvalde shooting. Instead, he blamed an "erosion of personal responsibility." Plus, a majority of Georgians oppose the new abortion law and say they'll vote accordingly. The panel John Bailey, @gearfocused, editor, The Rome News-Tribune Kevin Riley, @ajceditor, editor, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution Riley Bunch, @ribunchreports, public policy and politics reporter, Georgia Public Broadcasting Tammy Greer, assistant professor of political science, Clark Atlanta University Timestamps 0:00- Introductions 3:04- U.S. House Committee hears testimony from gun manufacturers including Daniel Defense 21:35- Prof. Tammy Greer talks about debates at Clark Atlanta. 22:18- AJC polling reveals more data on what Georgians think about Roe v. Wade 39:01- John Bailey updates us on Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene's district 46:20- Sen. Jon Ossoff leads charge on review of prisons Please be sure to download our newsletter: www.gpb.org/newsletters. And subscribe, follow and rate this show wherever podcasts are found.

East Coast Radio Newswatch
ECR Newswatch @ 09H00

East Coast Radio Newswatch

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 3:28


Manufacturers and distributors in South Africa's liquor industry say a tighter grip on the illicit alcohol trade is needed now more than ever.

KGO 810 Podcast
Nikki Medoro - White House downplays recession fears, and gun manufacturers targeted

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 13:20


Inflation continues and the Federal Reserve will probably raise interest rates again today so the Morning Show with Nikki Medoro speaks with ABC White House Correspondent Karen Travers to outline how the Biden Administration is trying to manage the economy. Also, ABC Senior Investigative Reporter Aaron Katersky talks about the House Committee grilling gun manufacturer CEOs today.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Morning Show with Nikki Medoro Podcast
Nikki Medoro - White House downplays recession fears, and gun manufacturers targeted

The Morning Show with Nikki Medoro Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 13:20


Inflation continues and the Federal Reserve will probably raise interest rates again today so the Morning Show with Nikki Medoro speaks with ABC White House Correspondent Karen Travers to outline how the Biden Administration is trying to manage the economy. Also, ABC Senior Investigative Reporter Aaron Katersky talks about the House Committee grilling gun manufacturer CEOs today.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Growth Marketers - Digital Marketing Experts
101. 7 Growth Hurdles Manufacturers Face and How to Overcome Them

Growth Marketers - Digital Marketing Experts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 33:36


Lots of businesses today rely heavily on digital marketing for their growth. Unfortunately, many industrial and manufacturing companies are slow to adopt this change. We work with businesses that are thriving in the face of all the outside noise, and we also work with companies that are really struggling. There's a real opportunity for explosive growth. It's just a matter of knowing how to use digital marketing effectively. In today's episode, we are going to take a closer look at the seven growth challenges and hurdles that manufacturing companies face today and walk you through the ways how to overcome them. We'll specifically share the tactics and tips that we use while working with our clients and explain how we make that happen. Tune in! ►Follow OneIMS online: Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/OneIMS/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/oneims/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneims/Twitter: https://twitter.com/oneims?lang=en

WAM
#208 Why Social Media Matters for Manufacturers with Lauren LaDell a.k.a The Spindle Chick

WAM

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 17:26


While manufacturers are increasingly engaged in at least some level of social media participation, many are not optimizing it to reach their fullest potential! Today, Fran Brunelle sits down with Lauren LaDell, a.k.a. The Spindle Chick, to talk about why social media matters for manufacturing companies. Lauren is the National Sales Manager at Motor City Spindle Repair, a 25,000 square-foot spindle remanufacturing and ball screw manufacturing facility in Dearborn, Michigan, that specializes in motorized CNC spindle repair for HMC/VMCs, turning centers, grinding machines, and other precision spindle applications. With over 20,000 followers on Instagram and more than 14,000 on TikTok, Lauren sure knows how to leverage the power of social media! In this episode, she outlines some of the benefits manufacturers can get from social media, from LinkedIn to TikTok, and we touch on finding the right balance between relatable and professional content, how to boost your engagement, and more. Lauren also shares her top tips and ideas for the types of content that manufacturers can post, so make sure not to miss this thought-provoking discussion with The Spindle Chick, Lauren LaDell! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Manufacturing Talk Radio
Marketing For Manufacturers

Manufacturing Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 29:02


weCreate is a full-service agency that specializes in marketing and website design for manufacturers and B2B companies. Host Lew Weiss sits down with Nate Wheeler to discuss how weCreate uses digital marketing to help manufacturers grow their business in the 21st century. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Advanced Manufacturing Now
Real World Applications for Mixed-Reality Software

Advanced Manufacturing Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 27:18


Manufacturers are beginning to use mixed-reality technology for everything from training and remote inspections to aiding complex assembly, repair and maintenance, safety, and quality assurance. In this podcast, Yan Simard, CEO of Kognitiv Spark, and SME Media Senior Editor Steve Plumb discuss the various applications and benefits of the emerging technology.

Derek O'Shea Show | Comedy News Show
Nancy Pelosi's hubby Paul bought $5m of shares before vote to hand $52bn to chip manufacturers

Derek O'Shea Show | Comedy News Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 9:41


Support the SHOW https://www.buymeacoffee.com/derekosheashowWANT A MUG WITH MY FACE ON IT?https://store.streamelements.com/theoneminutenewsNancy Pelosi's hubby Paul bought $5m of shares before vote to hand $52bn to chip manufacturers#nancypelosi #Politics #stockmarket Source:https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11020345/Nancy-Pelosis-husband-Paul-accused-accessing-inside-information-buy-5m-shares-semiconductor-firm-days-congressional-vote-hand-52bn-chip-manufacturers.htmlNancy Pelosi's 'drink driver' husband Paul is blasted for buying $5m of shares in semiconductor firm days before congressional vote that could hand $52bn to chip manufacturers On June 17, 2022, Paul purchased 20,000 shares, of NVIDIA, known as one of the world's largest semiconductor companies, according to the disclosure The stock is estimated to be worth between $1 million and $5 million, which   Nancy filed with the House of Representatives on ThursdayThere's no suggestion of wrongdoing, but some have speculated as to whether Paul may have had a steer about the upcoming Senate vote Paul was arrested for drink-driving in Napa Valley in May, and accidentally killed his brother in a car crash in 1957 - Daily MailThe Pelosi's are among the wealthiest congressional couples, according to reports. Paul Pelosi, owner of Financial Leasing Services, has amassed a personal fortune of around $135 million. In 2021, the House Speaker is ranked as the 14th wealthiest member of Congress with an estimated net worth of at least $46,123,051, Insider reveals.   - Daily MailSUPPORT THE SHOW : https://streamelements.com/theoneminutenews/tipPolitically Homeless Daily Comedy News Show#breakingnews #politics #politicallyhomelessEmail: derekosheashow@gmail.comYoutube: https://www.youtube.com/derekosheashowRumble  : https://rumble.com/c/c-624233Podcast Audio Webpage: https://derekosheashow.buzzsprout.comApple Podcast : https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/derek-oshea-show-comedy-news-show/id1508917484Spotify : https://open.spotify.com/show/3BNCK8HjbDOtyOlHMOVGTXOdysee: https://odysee.com/@DerekOsheaShowWebsite : https://theoneminutenews.wixsite.com/derekosheashowTwitter: https://twitter.com/DerekOsheaShowInstagram : https://www.instagram.com/derekosheashow/Bitchute: https://www.bitchute.com/channel/LgKyzhcXmm52/Gab: https://gab.com/TheOneMinuteNewsFacebook : https://www.facebook.com/DerekOsheaShowTikTok : https://www.tiktok.com/@derekosheashow?Breaking News Live,Breaking News Today,breaking news today sri lanka now,nancy pelosi stocks,nancy pelosi stock trading,nancy pelosi stocks tracker,nancy pelosi stocks portfolio,nancy pelosi stock tracker 2022,nancy pelosi stocks return,nancy pelosi stock portfolio performance,Paul Pelosi,Nancy Pelosi invidia,nancy pelosi semiconductor,Nancy Pelosi getting rich,Politicians getting rich,Nancy Pelosi and Paul Pelosi worth,Political Satire,Political ComedySupport the show

The Oncology Nursing Podcast
Episode 216: Navigate Branded and Nonbranded Patient Education Industry Resources

The Oncology Nursing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 30:04


“What does the patient need to know? What are their knowledge gaps? What are they most in need of? Once you determine the areas you need to pinpoint, branded or nonbranded, then there's resources out there for you to use,” Chelsea Backler, MSN, APRN, AGCNS-BC, AOCNS®, VA-BC, oncology clinical specialist at ONS, told Stephanie Jardine, BSN, RN, oncology clinical specialist at ONS. Backler explained the differences between branded and nonbranded patient education resources, ways for oncology nurses to identify credible resources, and ONS's Seal of Approval Program for branded and nonbranded resources. You can earn free NCPD contact hours by completing the evaluation linked below. Music Credit: "Fireflies and Stardust" by Kevin MacLeod Licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 3.0 Earn 0.5 contact hours of nursing continuing professional development (NCPD) by listening to the full recording and completing an evaluation at myoutcomes.ons.org by July 15, 2024. The planners and faculty for this episode have no relevant financial relationships with ineligible companies to disclose. ONS is accredited as a provider of NCPD by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. Episode Notes Check out these resources from today's episode: Complete this evaluation for free NCPD. ONS Seal of Approval Library Oncology Nursing Podcast Episode 43: Sharing Patient, Provider, and Caregiver Resources Episode 87: What Are the Biggest Barriers to Patient Education? Episode 179: Learn How to Educate Patients During Immunotherapy Episode 183: How Oncology Nurses Find and Use Credible Patient Education Resources Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing article: Patient and Healthcare Provider Education Tip Sheets Oncology Nursing Forum article: The Internet as a Source of Health Information: Experiences of Cancer Survivors and Caregivers With Healthcare Providers Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) codes and guidelines PhRMA's Principles on Responsible Sharing of Truthful and Non-Misleading Information To discuss the information in this episode with other oncology nurses, visit the ONS Communities. To provide feedback or otherwise reach ONS about the podcast, email pubONSVoice@ons.org.

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast
Episode 88: The Future of Digital in Manufacturing

Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 43:47


Augmented reveals the stories behind the new era of industrial operations, where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. In episode 21 of the podcast @AugmentedPod, the topic is: "The Future of Digital in Manufacturing." Our guest is Çağlayan Arkan, VP of Manufacturing Industry at Microsoft (@Caglayan_Arkan).  In this conversation, we talk about where manufacturing has been in the past, why manufacturing has been lacking a sense of urgency in the sense of industry 4.0 but how everything we know about manufacturing has changed. We also discuss workforce transformation, democratizing operational technology, and the future of industrial innovation.After listening to this episode, check out  Microsoft's manufacturing approach as well as Çağlayan Arkan's social media profile:Microsoft Cloud for Manufacturing: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/industry/manufacturing/microsoft-cloud-for-manufacturing Çağlayan Arkan: LinkedIn, Blog: https://aka.ms/CaglayanArkanBlogTrond's takeaway: The future of digital in manufacturing is enormously impactful. Yet, even deep digitalization will not make workers obsolete. Rather, the challenge seems to be achieving a dramatic workforce transformation which also entails empowerment, upskilling, and autonomy through augmentation of frontline operations.Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at Augmentedpodcast.co or in your preferred podcast player, and rate us with five stars. If you liked this episode, you might also like episode 9, The Fourth Industrial Revolution post-COVID-19, episode 4, A Renaissance in Manufacturing or Episode 20, The Digitalization of Körber.Augmented--industrial conversations. Transcript: Augmented reveals the stories behind a new era of industrial operations, where technology will restore the agility of frontline workers. In Episode 21 of the podcast, the topic is The Future of Digital in Manufacturing. Our guest is Çağlayan Arkan, VP of Manufacturing Industry at Microsoft. In this conversation, we talk about where manufacturing has been in the past, why manufacturing has been lacking a sense of urgency in the sense of industry 4.0, but how everything we know about manufacturing has changed. We also discuss workforce transformation, democratizing operational technology, and the future of industrial innovation. Augmented is a podcast for leaders hosted by futurist, Trond Arne Undheim, presented by Tulip.co, the frontline operations platform, and associated with MFG.works, the manufacturing upskilling community launched at the World Economic Forum. Each episode dives deep into a contemporary topic of concern across the industry and airs at 9:00 a.m. U.S. Eastern Time every Wednesday. Augmented - the industry 4.0 podcast. Çağlayan, how are you today? ÇAĞLAYAN: I am very well. Great to be here. Thank you. TROND: So I am alerted to the fact that you're an outdoor person. And I wanted to cover that just because a technology discussion in manufacturing is not complete without a little bit of personality. And I think you said you are a backcountry skier. I was curious about this. ÇAĞLAYAN: I am. Skiing is my passion, one of them, but probably the one that makes me happiest, the one that I love the most. I like ski touring, and I like skiing the backcountry, the off-piste. I like climbing. I'm a very physical person. And on a similar note, I also am a cyclist. I'm a sailor, a windsurfer. I just love being out, and I love the wind on my face. TROND: So at some point in the future, when the pandemic is over and behind us, I think my next podcast with you we will simply go for a hike. ÇAĞLAYAN: Well, let's do it. But doing it with me has the following potential downside for you. The other piece of my outdoors work, or kind of world, if you will, is that I love miserable weather. I'm a winter person. I love my rain, my cold, my wind. [laughs] And people typically, even if they categorize themselves as outsiders, like outdoor people, they will just love fair weather, I don't. I'm not that person. I don't like the sun on my face. I don't like a lot of people out. I like trails to myself. I like mountains to myself. [laughs] If you're up for it, we'll do it together. TROND: Well, this is probably something you didn't realize. But I grew up in Norway, and there are no people. And we have plenty of bad weather. So admittedly, I don't live in Norway, so that could give you a clue. [laughter] But there is something there. ÇAĞLAYAN: All right, we're on. We're on. TROND: Yeah, we're on. Okay, so having settled that, I wanted to ask you this question. So we're going to talk about, I guess, the future and the current state, present state of manufacturing. But where has manufacturing been in the past? And by the way, when you think past, how far do you go back? I mean, is this just pre-COVID? Because I've heard you talk a little bit about manufacturing traditionally, and I want you to just give us a quick sense of where you think the industry was just a few moments ago. ÇAĞLAYAN: You started personally. Let me personalize manufacturing for me. I'm an industrial engineer with an MBA. And so, my whole education was in plants in the manufacturing environment. And I studied from operations research to metallurgical engineering, to electrical engineering, to construction, to electrical. You just name it. And so that has been something that I really really liked, the system's thinking, the optimization. I've done a lot in OR back in the day, linear and multiple. So maybe too much detail for now. But where is manufacturing? Manufacturing has been mostly manual siloed with a separation between information technology and the data estate that that brings to the table and operations technology that that brings to the table. Technology has never really been, particularly from an IT standpoint, top of mind. Digital transformation has not really been a sense of urgency in manufacturing because things worked. Yet people at the shop floor and things were working until the pandemic hit. So pandemic question, slap on the face for manufacturers. Business continuity none. You can't send people to the shop floor. You cannot operate. You don't see your inventory. You can't see your suppliers. You don't even know whether they're surviving or not, financially or otherwise. So it was a huge, huge, huge problem. But the silver lining of all of this is now there's acceleration into the transformation of manufacturing. Look, why is manufacturing important? Let's spend a minute on that. Manufacturing, unlike many other industries (And I kind of make fun of my peer industry leaders at Microsoft as well.), manufacturing is very real. Manufacturing creates employment. Manufacturing creates growth, builds the economy, builds capacity. Manufacturing is about innovation. Manufacturing is about competitiveness. So it is core to populations, countries. It's core to politicians, to business leaders, and it's just phenomenal. And so if you do things right in manufacturing, things work, including climate change, and sustainability, and a lot of other stuff. And if you do things wrong, you could see a lot of damage done. It collapses economies. It collapses, grids and stops, and creates a lot of disruption. So it is very real. And so I'm sorry I'm providing a long answer, but you can tell I'm passionate about it. It's very personal for me. But by and large, I'm actually excited about where we are. We are at an inflection point. And we'll see a lot of acceleration coming out of the pandemic, the crisis. And stuff we're working on is actually to ensure business continuity and resiliency. Those are the things that are the conversations going forward. TROND: Çağlayan, you took me in an interesting direction. I was just thinking as you were speaking, right before we go to the inflection, it's actually not just a little bit surprising but actually quite surprising that there haven't been any reported massive disruptions due to the pandemic. If you think about all of these mission-critical systems that we have around the world, in every manufacturing-related industry, how do you explain because, as you were saying, historically...and some of these silos are sort of still there, although obviously, we are at this inflection point so somehow already transitioned. But how do you explain that we haven't had more horror stories? And by horror stories, I guess I mean operations completely collapsing, or I guess grids falling apart, or that one manual worker couldn't go in. So X happened that they had never, never thought about. Why haven't we heard anything like that? Are those stories going to come out, do you think, or did nothing seriously happen? ÇAĞLAYAN: Well, it happened. I know for a fact because once this started, I started calling down on my customers, like, "How are you doing? What do you need?" For one, I think that from a table stakes standpoint, we've seen massive teams deployment because people wanted to communicate. They wanted continuity in terms of being able to talk to one another, being able to work, and then work from home, of course, because they couldn't go to their plants or to their offices. So there was a lot of pain. There was a lot of disruption. I talked to some of my customers, and they were like, billions of dollars are tied in inventory, and we have no idea where that sits. Again, they're disconnected from suppliers as well as their customers, and so there was disruption. But luckily, we've had some leaders actually having foreseen what is to come, or they were disruptors or at least early adopters. And they have taken pre-COVID pre-crisis steps for digital transformation. And I love my examples and partnerships where Erickson had started work pre-COVID in terms of digital manufacturing, Outokumpu, a leader in steel manufacturing, significant progress including during the pandemic, Airbus, Unilever. I mean, those are leading examples, only some of them. But you look at the World Economic Forum Global Lighthouse Network; there are so many lighthouse factories that are just like literally lighthouses for people to look at and look up to. That work started years ago. So there are some extremely encouraging examples. There are some very, very dark stories in terms of complete stoppage and horror stories. But by large, we are at a good place in terms of we understand the issues and we understand how to deal with them. And I think most importantly, that notion of time to value is accelerated in manufacturing. And we're coming from prohibitively expensive, I mean, we're talking hundreds of millions of dollars of IT projects that never end to now negligible cost and like 10-12 weeks, a couple of months, and then you stand up a digital factory capability. You have visibility into your supply chain by standing up a control tower. And then, in the case of Airbus or Alstom, you can have your 2,000 engineers still keep doing design and engineering work from home; examples go on. But we understand the issues. We have a very quick ability to build capability, to show that stuff works and you can operate remotely, et cetera, et cetera. TROND: But would you say that this is the definite end to, I guess what you were alluding to is kind of this pilot purgatory? Is COVID the definite end to pilot purgatory? Or is it just that this particular situation was so serious that everybody kind of scrambled, and most of them got it right? Or would you say that...I guess possibly because once you have made this transition, that is the hard work. Do you think that these pilots that everyone was waiting for will that problem disappear because people have learned that this is not the way to introduce technology? You sort of learned it the hard way. ÇAĞLAYAN: Oh, well, my view is if you take a step back, Trond, here's how I see it. One hundred years ago, we were by and large an agricultural society, and we had like 50% of the workforce in agriculture. Today we are by and large an industrial society. And we have like 2% of the workforce in agriculture, and we brought everyone along in terms of The Industrial Age. Today we are at the next junction; some call it industry 4.0, some call it other names. But we as a society assume...like humanity, we're moving from industrial to digital. So that's the higher order. Now, what's the role of the pandemic in this? I think it's that of acceleration. So in any major shift, there are behaviors and categories of actors or players. There are the disruptors. There are those who go and make a market, build a trend. And we have seen those, and we're still seeing them. They are the early adopters. We talked about some of them as well. And then there's going to be the slower adopters and the laggards. And then some of the laggards will not see the light of day or will not maybe exist after we transition to the new reality, new realm, or that notion of digital society. So what I'm saying is it was going to happen, those pilots or people's way, like, slow adopters' way of touching it, putting their toes in the water. For some, it's proving value and acceleration. Pandemic, again, that kind of disruption is going to accelerate and bring more to the table. But it certainly has a role to play. But the higher-level order is we are moving to a very, very different reality for manufacturers and supply chains and even as a society. TROND: Super interesting. Çağlayan, I've heard you talk earlier. And I guess we talked a little bit in the prep about whether this is a different wave of technology because I know you have some views on the democratization of basically operational technology because there are different waves of technology in manufacturing. And traditionally, like you said, the industry has been siloed. But one of the reasons the industry was siloed is that the technology then also turned into silos, arguably. And what is it about the technology these days? Is it getting simpler? Are you, for instance, in Microsoft spending more time on user interfaces than you were before? Or I guess even the introduction of your company so deeply into manufacturing is in and of itself a bit of a novelty. The tech players that weren't specialists are now going deep, deep into industry segments. Give me a sense of why this is happening. And what exactly is this democratization? Gartner calls it citizen developers. ÇAĞLAYAN: Yeah, that's one aspect of it. The way I see it is, very shortly, technology now works. TROND: [laughs] ÇAĞLAYAN: Honestly, I don't know, like five years ago, it just didn't. It was so hard for implementations, for integration, et cetera. It now works. There's virtually nothing technology cannot deliver today. It's up to the leader's vision, leader's ability to execute, and magic happens. There's so much at play right now, that's one. Secondly, technology is the business right now. I mean, technology was isolated. Trond, you will remember those days not too distant past. We had our own language. The CIO, it's like they were from Mars in the organization. [laughter] And they were not mainstream as an executive in the company. Company did their work, and CIO did stuff that nobody really understood. Now, technology is the business. I mean, if you look at any research, you will see that the mainstream business leader, whether it's the CMO, the Chief, Marketing Officer, Chief Digital Officer, Chief Financial Officer, whatever those may be, they're making more technology decisions and have bigger technology budgets than the technology people themselves. So that's the other piece that business is technology. Technology is business. The third piece is that the siloed nature of not only manufacturing, so many different industries, was because it was an application-led view into enterprises or into business. Now, it's data-driven work. And so data dictates everything, and data is actually end to end. So to the extent that you have a data architecture, enterprise-level data architecture, and a system-level approach to things, it's a completely different world. And to bring those three together as a business, you have to forget more than you remember. And then you have to reinvent yourself. And if you do that, everybody knows cliché examples here, but then you find yourself as a completely different company or services company or actually at the risk of being disrupted by competition in ways that were not thought of or unprecedented. So that's what's happening. So what we like to approach this whole kind of...I like to call this opportunity. It's a major opportunity. It's a huge inflection point. It's all about reinventing your business. None of that is about technology. Technology is a tool. It's a powerful tool. It's a tool that works. It's very capable. But it's about the business outcomes. Because we said, you have to reinvent your entire enterprise, starting from your culture, how you operate, your value proposition, all of that. It is where you start should be dictated by which outcome is most important for you, or the highest value for you, or the most burning for you. Whatever your drivers are, focus on the outcome. Go back to work to find the relevant data for it and get to that in weeks, literally seriously in weeks and get to the next outcome, the next outcome. And don't forget the people and culture. It's all about the people piece, and we can talk about that later. I think we should. But those are the things that I will say to your technology question. TROND: That's great. ÇAĞLAYAN: Focus on data, lead with culture, and always major prioritizations on the outcomes you want to drive. TROND: You said lead with culture, but it's not just company culture, I guess. It's the whole nature of the skills that are now needed in this new workplace. A lot of people are saying that that is changing and that the workforce needs are changing. So you initially said well, technology now works. So that's true, but what are the skills that then are needed? So okay, technology is easier. But what are some of the tasks that are, I guess, less relevant because of this influx of call it industry 4.0 type technologies? And what are some of the skills that are more relevant? And the frontline worker of the future, what should they be focused on? And your clients, what are they starting to teach their workforce? ÇAĞLAYAN: Great question. I will say at the highest level, Trond, it is a data-driven culture. I mean, in manufacturing, maybe other businesses and industries as well, we operate on the basis of past successes, habits. This has been delivering for me. This has been working for me, et cetera, or experience. You kind of listen to stuff. You kind of watch stuff. You anticipate stuff. And you're like, I've been doing this for 25 years. None of this has anything to do with data because, again, we established we were using less than 1% of our data, at least in manufacturing. Now the biggest cultural change is data-driven. And then once you go to data telling you what to do, data giving you predictions, data giving you systems of intelligence like the insights in terms of what to do, and when to do it, and how to do it, et cetera, then that dictates actually two things. Again, I'm trying to come down to it in terms of a hierarchy. Manufacturing had a skills gap, has a bigger skills gap in the face of digital. And we're not an attractive industry. The young generation does not see career opportunities in manufacturing. Actually, manufacturing is fantastic. It's real; it's innovative. So we have to change that, and so we're working on it. And secondly, the existing jobs, even if they may still be the most important jobs in manufacturing, those people have to learn new skills in terms of doing their jobs using technology. Let's see now a couple of examples. You talked about the frontline workers, first-line workers, or just shopfloor, the very people who get the job done. They typically did not use any technology. They were all mostly manual, what we called HMI, like Human-Machine interfaces, old, very, very, antique equipment, if you will, blue screens. I think anyone who's close to manufacturing will know that we used a lot of paper, et cetera. Today's frontline worker is actually acting on data, acting on predictions, double-clicking under the modern interface, and responding to traffic lights, responding to alerts. You got to be able to do those, wearing augmented or virtual reality devices. We call it mixed reality with the unique technology that we have in terms of HoloLens in our entire mixed reality platform. But you come to a job, and then you don't need to learn to do the job. You just wear your HoloLens. And the mixed reality platform will actually teach you how to do it with your two hands-free. If you're in the field service, someone at the back office, remote connections, or remote assist capabilities can actually guide you through as to how to deal with that; I don't know, grid asset, extruder, or packaging line because they know how to and you don't need to. And then this is the way you learn how to do stuff. So I guess the gist of it is some jobs will no longer exist. Most of the repetitive low-value-added jobs can be automated, robots, artificial intelligence, and other means in terms of process automation, et cetera. Most of the jobs, if not all of the jobs, will be rescaled in terms of technology. And at the highest level, probably 75 million jobs will go away. Again, this is a World Economic Forum study. One hundred thirty-five million new jobs will be created. What are those jobs? Data jobs, software jobs. And then how you do your design and engineering, you have to be able to understand AI-led generative design, additive manufacturing, 3D printing to be able to be successful. And so, all of that is a call to action for universities, policymakers, corporate learning officers, for all of us, and calls for partnerships to lean in. And again, I used agricultural example. Bring everyone along from the Industrial Age to the digital age. TROND: It's a fascinating challenge, and it's a big one. I was just curious; there's a lot of talk about middle jobs meaning jobs that are somewhere between more than high school but less than traditional college. But then you also have an echelon above that, of course, which traditionally certainly Microsoft was hiring into, which is more high-level cognitive jobs which required bachelors, and masters, and PhDs traditionally in computer programming. But I'm guessing now certainly in your field in sort of hybrid engineering studies where engineering plus IT. The middle jobs is a big challenge, even just from an operational point of view. It's hard to educate a billion people worldwide or whatever it is that we have to do continuously to keep the lights up. How is all that going to happen? And what sort of effort does this require? Can we use the existing institutions we have to do this? Or do you foresee that it's going to be a lot more on-the-job type of training in digital training? ÇAĞLAYAN: I'll say all of the above in the following ways; for one, we're already working with Purdue, University of Wisconsin, and many, many universities and education institutions. So for one, manufacturing-related jobs were kind of graduate jobs. We're trying to bring the curriculum to undergrad, if not high school, so there's that. So vocational training, et cetera, all of this is important. Secondly, we partner with the National Association of Manufacturers, MxD, Sesame, obviously Tulip, and many others in terms of call to action and doing institutionalizing, programatize, very, very important for all of that. Thirdly, I deliberately talked about corporate learning officers because a lot of people, tens if not hundreds of thousands of people in large corporations, actually had to learn new skills. And it is happening as we speak in multiple ways in many, many, many, many leading enterprises. But it's a huge part of the whole equation. And then, I talked about the World Economic Forum and the Global Lighthouse Network. Programs like that actually bring it to everyone's attention in terms of what is possible, and how it works, and how some leading institutions deal with it, which brings me to this notion of what I like to call art of possible. I think leadership at large, political leaders, enterprise leaders, any institution, education, leadership at large has to understand what I call the art of possible, and that is how technology has already transformed everyone's lives. And what is that leaders need to do differently? Starting from communication, setting new standards, to building the new curriculum, to encouraging everyone, bringing everyone along, and all the rest of it from cultural change to change management and defining the new normal. But by and large, just bringing everyone along. And so that is really, really important that we start that education and understanding with the leadership because it's all about leadership. It's all about them having the right vision and being able to execute to that. TROND: What is the role of actors such as startups? You mentioned Tulip. What are startups' role in the emerging manufacturing and frontline operations ecosystem? Tulip thinks of itself a little wider than manufacturing. But what is it that startups can do? Because clearly, this is a game, technology overall, and also industries. It's an industrial game. Industrial companies are massive traditionally. So the juxtaposition traditionally in the old world would be between the industrial conglomerates and then the SMEs. And the game was to get the SMEs to be useful providers and suppliers into the supply chain ecosystem was an educational challenge. But you now have startups somewhere in this picture as well. Can you address how you think these startups function in the ecosystem going forward? ÇAĞLAYAN: Yeah, I think the example that I would use is startups are like Tesla for automotive, Airbnb for hospitality. They're the disruptors. They have zero legacy. And so we're talking major change, major transformation. What happens in change? Lots of the legacy will drag their feet. They will want to protect status quo. They'll be slower. What startups do is they teach you the new normal. They teach you the art of possible, and they go on and do it. This is how you carry from years of implementation time to weeks. This is how you go from hundreds of millions of dollars to pennies and cents. And so Tulip and many, many others that I'm so excited to work together with, define the new normal. They make it happen. They go and make stuff. And actually, they are the ones who bring what I call art of possible to life. Let's take Tulip's example. Again, they go into the shop floor. And they look at that low-code/no-code citizen developers, a term that you used in this very conversation. And then they bring it to life in the context of manufacturing operations. And so suddenly, the human-machine interfaces are modernized. The legacy-heavy applications that do not necessarily connect the enterprise have changed, and there's a new workflow in place. And people just act on data and intelligence. The job is much easier to do, et cetera, and then you can build on it. And so what they do is just extremely important, actually much bigger than their sizes or the number of people that they employ. The role that they play is actually what's going to change economies. And this is one reason why we embrace and work very, very closely with the likes of Tulip at Microsoft through multiple, multiple tools and investments that we have from Microsoft for Startups to M12 and to many others. TROND: Yes, I understand. That's fantastic. However, it does remain the case that right now, you are a gorilla in the big space, and you do have a privileged position to analyze what you think is happening. So if you use that futurist hat that you have from your vantage point of a large player that does work with everyone, I guess, where is this now heading? You said it's a disruptive time. It's an inflection point. You were using big, revolutionary words. We're talking about industry revolutions. There's also some uncertainty, and we have been dealing with resilience issues. But you pointed out simplicity has improved. Where is all this taking us, all of these bits and pieces altogether? Where is the manufacturing industry heading? ÇAĞLAYAN: Manufacturing is very complex, and it's actually not one industry. So many industries are manufacturers. So let's kind of break it down and simplify to maybe customer-facing systems, sales, services, et cetera, design, and engineering making stuff which is really manufacturing, supply chains, and then maybe you look at people. In the customer systems, particularly the pandemic, taught us that online sales and delivery, omnichannel strategies, profit optimization, pricing, contact lifecycle management, all of that is here to stay. Connected field services or field services at large is going to be changed forever. Again, we talked about mixed reality, remote assistant, remote capabilities, all of that. So that is where that is headed. In terms of the design and engineering piece, we talked about AI-led generative design, where AI engines actually design stuff like mother nature. They don't have corners. They're not straight lines. So the existing manufacturing paradigms like welding, and bending, and et cetera, can go away, and 3D printing actually is very revolutionary in that it's the only way to actually make the stuff that is designed by AI engines which is faster, stronger, lighter, cheaper, et cetera. But again, you can only build them with the new 3D or additive paradigms, and so there's that. And obviously, from design and engineering, that whole design supply chain is moving to a virtual environment so that you do not have to send designs in paper when it comes to like...You look at Boeing, and they have like six million suppliers. You look at Rolls Royce, the same deal. And then what they do now is they send electronic drawings. You can validate. You can verify the source is correct. You can just keep building in the virtual environment, and you can run simulations and tests. I can go on and on, but that is completely disrupted and changed forever. Manufacturing as we know it is moving to...some call it lights-out manufacturing. But this whole remote capability being able to...business continuity, people at the shop floor being able to remotely operate, manage and monitor your assets, get predictions on them, actually have predictions visibility into your suppliers and be connected to their environment. Digital twins and digital threads are actually huge enablers from that perspective. So this whole kind of lights-out manufacturing conversation can happen. Again, technology is capable of delivering it. You have to optimize or rationalize for your own enterprise. Supply chains, completely moving to an autonomous and sustainable fashion. And then finally, at the highest level, what we're seeing perhaps the largest opportunity is go from your...even your own enterprise was siloed. Let alone your enterprise, go and reinvent the whole value chain that you operate in. We tend to think about industries, but actually, value chains are made up of multiple adjacent industries. Look at food; it starts with perhaps the farmer, but the farm equipment manufacturer, the likes of John Deere, Mahindra, et cetera, do play a huge role. There's a lot of data there. Then you look at warehouses, then you look at mills, and processors, and packagers, and shippers, and then you go all the way to retail. I've talked about seven different industries. The notion of I call it lead with opportunity as opposed to leading with risks. Share your data for the greater good. New value creation at the value chain level we haven't even begun starting that journey, really. And so, just some of the examples of how everything we know is already disrupted. Again, do all the leaders know, the world leaders know how to deal with it or where to take their enterprises, their people, their cultures, their businesses? And so that's kind of the conversation. TROND: Indeed it is. Disruption at the value chain level that seems to be at the core. And then I guess my last question for you really is to take this back to the human being because I know you think that fundamentally, this is not really about the technologies or even just the various industries at the center, and maintaining and constructing is the human being. The augmented human capabilities that these new structures and technologies enable, what does that look like? I mean, if you think augmented reality and mixed reality, HoloLens is like a beginning of that vision. But it seems like we're arguably going from a day where the idea was automate, but you have a vision of more augmenting, meaning you're supplementing the human as opposed to replacing them. How do you see the human being in this picture? What is going to be the role of the human worker? ÇAĞLAYAN: Well, it's going to be a combination of vision and maybe aspiration. But I'll say augmented society first because of diversity and inclusion. Let's start there. Let's bring everyone along. Let's not leave one person behind, wherever they may be, whatever background. Let's bring everyone along. And as a society, let's elevate everyone. Let's make everything accessible, technology, and data, and education, and health, and water, and safe food, all of that accessible to everyone. The new set of paradigms actually might create value at such a level in which we can give people more free time, more fulfillment, provide better work-life balance, provide other means of seeking reason and purpose in life and communicate and work together at very, very different levels. And so all of that is just, again, I think this whole kind of leader, art of possible, and what technology is capable of today. If we put the people in the center and go from there, I think we can remember these days as some of the best kind of inflection points in history. TROND: Wow, that's a great way to end. I thank you so much. This was a whirlwind of observations. [laughs] Thank you very much. ÇAĞLAYAN: Thank you. TROND: You have just listened to Episode 21 of the Augmented Podcast with host Trond Arne Undheim. The topic was The Future of Digital in Manufacturing, and our guest was Çağlayan Arkan, VP of Manufacturing Industry at Microsoft. In this conversation, we talked about where manufacturing has been in the past, workforce transformation, democratizing operational technology, and the future of industrial innovation. My takeaway is that the future of digital in manufacturing is enormously impactful, yet even deep digitalization will not make workers obsolete. Rather, the challenge seems to be achieving a dramatic workforce transformation which also entails empowerment, upskilling, and autonomy through augmentation of frontline operations. Thanks for listening. If you liked the show, subscribe at augmentedpodcast.co or in your preferred podcast player. View our YouTube channel and rate us with five stars. If you liked this episode, you might also like Episode 9: The Fourth Industrial Revolution, post-COVID-19, Episode 4: A Renaissance in Manufacturing, or Episode 20: The Digitalization of Körber. Augmented - upskilling the workforce for industry 4.0 frontline operations. Special Guest: Çağlayan Arkan.

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Pat Thurston: Legislation Allowing Californians to Sue Gun Manufacturers

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Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 37:34


Assemblyman Phil Ting joins Pat Thurston to explain AB 1594, the new legislation that allows Californians and local government to sue gun manufacturers for the harm caused by their products. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

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Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 37:34


Assemblyman Phil Ting joins Pat Thurston to explain AB 1594, the new legislation that allows Californians and local government to sue gun manufacturers for the harm caused by their products. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

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The Voices of Manufacturing

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 27:14


www.dozuki.com/podcastShow Notes:1:30 - 2:41  // The importance of employee confidence2:45 - 8:20 // High levels of workforce turnover in Food & Beverage manufacturing and production impacts8:21 - 9:55 // Practical solutions the root problem of poor training programs and missed production targets9:55 - 11:35 // Real tips to capturing expert knowledge to share with the new, inexperienced workforce11:35 - 15:28 // Engaging your retiring workforce to produce training content and capture process standards with digital tools. Younger and older generations working together — give them the "why"15:28 - 17:30 // Doing job shadowing the right way — developing a standard to train from it the future — consistency is key17:30 - 19:30 // Amplifying decades of expert knowledge before it retires — who is responsible?19:30 - 24:15 // Automation and the need for human expertise and training24:15 - 26:46 // The future of food and beverage manufacturingFollow Kiley Becker on LinkedIn Follow Brian Sallee on LinkedIn

RNZ: Checkpoint
Employers, Manufacturers Assoc on worker shortages

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 6:00


The findings of a staffing survey of more than 330 businesses by the Employers and Manufacturers Association show all those who responded had vacancies, and 40 percent had been trying to fill their positions for more than six months. Brett Oreilly from the EMA talks to Lisa Owen.

Manufacturers Alliance Podcast
Overcome the Talent Shortage With Data

Manufacturers Alliance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 29:42


  This week's episode is all about how you can overcome the talent shortage with data. Kate Brown is a Business Intelligence and Analytics Manager with over 10 years of experience helping Manufacturers gain more timely insight into operational performance, and surfacing information that team members need to make informed decisions across the organization. Her team at Wipfli implements Business Intelligence technologies that automate manual data consolidation processes and create one source of truth for all organizational reporting and analytics. Learn more about wipfli by visiting www.wipfli.com/manufacturing  

Chicago's Afternoon News with Steve Bertrand
MICRO Act aims to provide incentives for microchip manufacturers in Illinois

Chicago's Afternoon News with Steve Bertrand

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022


IL State Rep. Mike Halpin (D-Rock Island) joins Lisa Dent on Chicago’s Afternoon News to explain how the MICRO Act will help attract microchip manufacturers to set up operations in Illinois and fulfill the need for more domestic microchip production amid a worldwide shortage. Follow Your Favorite Chicago’s Afternoon News Personalities on Twitter:Follow @LisaDentSpeaksFollow @SteveBertrand Follow […]

Q-Cast
Quality 101 | Automation: Should Manufacturers Fight or Flight?

Q-Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 8:29


Straight Talking from Hogan Lovells
The complexities of conglomerates | Ep 1: What manufacturers need to know about data and digitalization

Straight Talking from Hogan Lovells

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 19:17


Jacky Scanlan-Dyas and Ben Higson talk to Mark Brennan, head of Hogan Lovells' global Technology and Telecommunications industry sector group and Lead Innovation Partner, about digitalization and what manufacturers should consider when navigating a myriad of jurisdictions and issues in an increasingly digital world.   Jacky Scanlan-Dyas co-heads the Manufacturing and Industrials industry sector, as well as the Conglomerates sub sector at Hogan Lovells. Jacky has over 25 years' cross-border transaction experience across the full range of structures, including M&A, investments, exits, joint ventures, complex commercial contracts, and restructuring and insolvency issues.   Ben Higson co-leads the Conglomerates sub sector group at Hogan Lovells. Ben has extensive experience and knowledge in domestic and international deals, across the full range of structures, including public and private deals, financial investor investments and exits, joint ventures and strategic alliances, and complex commercial contracts.

WBSRocks: Business Growth with ERP and Digital Transformation
WBSP347: Grow Your Business by Learning the eCommerce Nuances for Furniture Manufacturers w/ Robert Giovannini

WBSRocks: Business Growth with ERP and Digital Transformation

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 47:02


The furniture industry is extremely unique as while its distribution processes might be similar to other distribution industries, each product is custom-made. And this makes implementing eCommerce for furniture manufacturers extremely challenging. The manufacturers also need to make sure that there is no channel conflict. And their retailers are comfortable with their intention of going DTC and eCommerce. If communicated properly, the eCommerce efforts not only help in getting more business, it might increase the loyalty of their channels as they will be getting more business through OEMs' eCommerce efforts.In today's episode, our guest, Robert Giovannini, shares his insights into the eCommerce nuances for furniture manufacturers. He also discusses the cyclical nature of eCommerce processes for furniture manufacturers where the OEMs might generate the lead for retailers, but once they book the order, the transaction might need to come back to the manufacturer for fulfillment. Finally, he discusses other issues with eCommerce such as ADA compliance and how eCommerce brands might get penalized if their website might not be compliant with ADA regulations.For more information on growth strategies for SMBs using ERP and digital transformation, visit our community at wbs.rocks or elevatiq.com. To ensure that you never miss an episode of the WBS podcast, subscribe on your favorite podcasting platform.

You Guys Let Me Know
7-10-22 Manufacturers Returning To The United States Can Be More Dangerous Than You Think

You Guys Let Me Know

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 9:38


A strong economy is built on production and savings, however cheap imports can ruin a good thing. https://www.wsj.com/articles/fed-up-w... uneducatedeconomist.com uneducatedeconomist@gmail.com real mail P.O. 731 Astoria, OR 97103 Instagram uneducated.economist Patreon https://www.patreon.com/UneducatedEco... Want to buy me a coffee? https://www.paypal.me/meatbingo https://cash.app/$bingo503 https://venmo.com/code?user_id=211351... --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/youguysletmeknow/support

Auto Insider
You'll NEVER Buy a Car The Same Way Again | Episode 181

Auto Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 38:53


Today on Daily News You Can Use, Ray and Zach discuss the end of new car incentives. Manufacturers have slashed incentives since the beginning of the chip shortage, and now some automakers don't have them at all. Tune in to learn more!

You Guys Let Me Know
7-1-22 Inflation Peaked??? Inventory Up Manufacturers Down W/Freddy (YouTube Live Stream)

You Guys Let Me Know

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 124:03


Signs of economic contraction are now showing up everywhere https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articl... https://www.businessinsider.com/infla... uneducatedeconomist.com uneducatedeconomist@gmail.com real mail P.O. 731 Astoria, OR 97103 Instagram uneducated.economist Patreon https://www.patreon.com/UneducatedEco... Want to buy me a coffee? https://www.paypal.me/meatbingo https://cash.app/$bingo503 https://venmo.com/code?user_id=211351... --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/youguysletmeknow/support

Earth Wise
The Race For American Lithium Mining | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 2:00


The auto industry is making a massive transition from gas-powered cars to electric cars.  The exploding electric vehicle market has set off what some call a global battery arms race.  Battery manufacturers are urgently trying to source the raw materials needed to make batteries, which presently include cobalt, nickel, graphite, and lithium.  There is encouraging […]

How I Got That Way
AMFMA - Vinyl's big comeback

How I Got That Way

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 10:44


Larry says that people that like vinyl also like fancy coffee. Manufacturers struggle to keep pace with vinyl record demand 

Growth Marketers - Digital Marketing Experts
100. Marketing for Manufacturers: How to Get Everyone in Your Market to Recognize You | Nicole Koharik

Growth Marketers - Digital Marketing Experts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 38:51


Welcome to another episode of the Growth Marketers Podcast! Many manufacturers we work with struggle to break into the Healthcare space. Our today's guest will explain us how to make it possible. Meet Nicole Koharik - B2B Marketing Leader and Communications Expert currently working as a Senior Director of Enterprise Marketing and Corporate Communication at PartsSource. PartsSource is a 20 year old Healthcare technology company that serves over 5000 Healthcare providers and 6000 suppliers, including all major OEMs around the United States. A couple of points we discuss: - How to organize effective internal communication; - How to manage your brand as an industrial manufacturer; - How to develop and execute a successful content marketing strategy as a B2B organization; - How to distribute your marketing resources effectively; - How to measure success, what KPIs to track, and much more. Tune in! ►Follow OneIMS online: Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/OneIMS/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/oneims/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/oneims/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/oneims?lang=en

The WAN Show Podcast
Intel Messed Up - WAN Show June 24, 2022

The WAN Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 135:38 Very Popular


Get three months of Gusto FREE at: https://gusto.com/wan Get Exclusive NordSecurity deals here: https://nordsecurity.com/wan All products are risk-free with Nord's 30-day money-back guarantee! Timestamps: (Courtesy of NoKi1119 - Note: Timestamps may be off due to change in sponsors) 0:00 Chapters 1:18 Intro 1:51 Topic #1 - Intel's Arc early review 2:44 Performance compared to competitors 6:43 Thoughts on the naming scheme 9:54 Nvidia's impact on GPU box arts 12:30 The graphic's potential ft. Linus agreements 15:08 Support for AV1, YouTube's HDR & suggestions 22:18 Topic #2 - Leaked TikTok audio, data privacy 24:42 Impact on the internet, cybersecurity risks 29:11 LTTStore HDD hoodie, notebook & discounts 36:26 Topic #3 - Amazon's Alexa voice cloning 37:37 Deepfake Linus, ethicality & security risks 45:44 Sponsors 49:28 Merch Messages #1 ft. side discussions 50:16 Inovelli's "Project Linus" 54:24 Bidding on Artesian Builds, Linus's pitch 58:19 Linus bricks a Linux install before ShortCircuit 1:01:21 Steam summer sale, Linus on game displays 1:12:23 400 Stealth hoodies sold, games discussion 1:14:05 What happened to the Blackmagic cameras 1:15:03 Mattress suggestion 1:15:46 Was LTT ever compromised? LMG's finances 1:22:43 Biohacking, RFID implants 1:25:51 Possible LTT handtools after the screwdriver 1:25:58 Topic #4 - PCIE 70 standard 1:26:18 Specifications Do we really need this? 1:29:11 Topic #5 - Lab acoustics update 1:30:28 Crinacle's & chat's response to LMG's video 1:40:57 Priority for lab testing & hiring 1:42:34 Merch Messages #2 1:42:43 ARM processors, emulating X86 for gaming 1:43:43 Best way to handle a hot PC during the summer 1:44:47 Secure alternative for port-forwarding to NAS 1:46:44 Linus's remote hardware configuration 1:48:41 What happened to the $1 million computer series? 1:49:13 Screen protector creases on Linus's Fold 1:51:11 Unified doorbell 1:52:12 Matter smart home feature 1:52:40 Would Luke consider another mineral PC 1:54:42 eLeap OLED technology 1:55:34 Manufacturers moving to smart bulbs, cybersecurity 1:56:00 Aya Neo 2, AIR, Flip & Slide 1:57:06 Machining a solid block of acrylic 1:59:42 Linus & Luke on Steam Deck, comparing to Aya Neo 2:01:17 Recent books to read, Linus discusses reading 2:02:40 Removing the protector on Fold 3 2:04:55 Long-term hearing loss when sleeping with headphones 2:07:45 Linus's decision on the main TV & monitors 2:09:38 Test driving electric motorcycles, Linus's SV650S 2:13:27 Motivation behind switching from Hangouts to Teams 2:16:22 Outro

CannaInsider - Interviews with the Business Leaders of The Legal Cannabis, Marijuana, CBD Industry

Is it better to produce your own cannabis products? Or outsource to expert manufacturers while you focus on your brand? Here to tell us is Alex Rowland, CEO of NewTropic. Learn more at https://www.newtropic.com Key Takeaways: [00:51] An inside look at NewTropic, a leading cannabis manufacturer based in Santa Rosa, California [1:18] Alex's background in cannabis and how he came to start NewTropic [5:56] Examples of NewTopic's average clientele – particularly unlicensed brands looking to overcome California's strict regulatory hurdles [7:47] How NewTropic helps relieve two of the biggest pain points for cannabis companies: financial resources and compliance [17:05] Why removing the regulatory overhead of fulfillment allows companies to focus their attention on core competencies [18:45] NewTropic's extensive onboarding process and how the company's team works to ensure all your needs are met as a client [20:30] Alex's plans to expand NewTropic across the US [25:21] The requirements a company needs to meet before working with NewTropic [30:16] Alex's advice to new entrepreneurs on how to develop a successful business plan and pitch to investors [33:11] Alex's thoughts on the federal rescheduling of cannabis and where he sees the industry heading in the next few years

The Health Ranger Report
RAW INTEL: List of diesel engine oil additive manufacturers declaring "Force Majeure"

The Health Ranger Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 6:54 Very Popular


For more updates, visit: http://www.brighteon.com/channel/hrreport NaturalNews videos would not be possible without you, as always we remain passionately dedicated to our mission of educating people all over the world on the subject of natural healing remedies and personal liberty (food freedom, medical freedom, the freedom of speech, etc.). Together, we're helping create a better world, with more honest food labeling, reduced chemical contamination, the avoidance of toxic heavy metals and vastly increased scientific transparency. ▶️ Every dollar you spend at the Health Ranger Store goes toward helping us achieve important science and content goals for humanity: https://www.healthrangerstore.com/ ▶️ Sign Up For Our Newsletter: https://www.naturalnews.com/Readerregistration.html ▶️ Brighteon: https://www.brighteon.com/channels/hrreport ▶️ Join Our Social Network: https://brighteon.social/@HealthRanger ▶️ Check In Stock Products at: https://PrepWithMike.com

Citation Needed
Cigarettes

Citation Needed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 38:05


A cigarette is a narrow cylinder containing burnable material, typically tobacco, that is rolled into thin paper for smoking. The cigarette is ignited at one end, causing it to smolder; the resulting smoke is orally inhaled via the opposite end. Cigarette smoking is the most common method of tobacco consumption. Manufacturers have described the cigarette as "a drug administration system for the delivery of nicotine in acceptable and attractive form".[1][2][3][4] The term cigarette, as commonly used, refers to a tobacco cigarette, but the word is sometimes used to refer to other substances, such as a cannabis cigarette or an herbal cigarette. A cigarette is distinguished from a cigar by its usually smaller size, use of processed leaf, and paper wrapping, which is typically white. Our theme song was written and performed by Anna Bosnick. If you'd like to support the show on a per episode basis, you can find our Patreon page here.  Be sure to check our website for more details.

Firearms Radio Network (All Shows)
John Crump Live 953 – Ranking Gun Manufacturers

Firearms Radio Network (All Shows)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 68:34


The We Talk Sh*t Crew host the pre-roast every Friday at 7:30PM on YouTube. Topics:  Ranking Manufacturers Sponsored by: https://www.1776supplyco.com Listen Live: https://www.youtube.com/johncrumpliveHome Page: https://www.johncrumplivecomSupport the channel: https://johncrump.locals.comEmail Mailing List: https://crumpy.com/mailing-list/

John Solomon Reports
AG Morrisey (R-WV) wins big against major opioid manufacturers

John Solomon Reports

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 61:14 Very Popular


Attorney General Patrick Morrisey (R-WV) wins big in court over opioid manufacturing companies, Allergan Financial LLC and Teva Pharmaceuticals. The Attorney General is now focusing his fight against the Biden Administration as it regards the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission that proposed a new 'ESG rule' that encroaches on the privacy and work of farmers while weaponizing their bureaucracy into an 'environmental regulator.' See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Dan Bongino Show
Shocking News Breaks About The Ongoing Biden Disaster (Ep 1766)

The Dan Bongino Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 53:06 Very Popular


In this episode, I address the stunning breaking news about the ongoing Biden disaster.  News Picks: A thorough debunking of liberal fact-checks about 2000 Mules. Will the new White House press secretary be worse than Psaki? Why is Canada euthanizing its poor? Biden is losing black and hispanic support. Intelligence Bulletin on 'Right-Wing' Violence Is Why the Intel Community Is Hopelessly Compromised. Manufacturers under pressure from surging dollar as Fed grapples with inflation. Copyright Bongino Inc All Rights Reserved