Podcasts about Willamette Valley

valley in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States

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Latest podcast episodes about Willamette Valley

United Church of God Sermons

By Ben Light in Salem, OR - September 24, 2022 - The settlers that were headed west on the Oregon Trail faced a perilous journey in order to settle the Willamette Valley. It took 120-170 days to cross the United States by wagon, and along the way, they passed famous landmarks like Chimney Rock, Soda Springs, Fort Hall and the like. These landmarks helped them to understand where they were on the trail, and how much further they had yet to go. Jesus Christ provided His disciples with a series of prophetic landmarks in the Olivett Prophecy located in Matthew 24, Mark 13, and Luke 21. As the time of the end draws ever nearer, can we view these prophetic landmarks to consider where we are, and how much further yet we have to go?

Cork Rules
Episode 143: Dama, Los Angeles

Cork Rules

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 5:13


Grace Hood, wine educator and certified sommelier, and Robert Tas visit Dama, a Latin fusion-inspired restaurant Dama in LA's fashion district where the tapas are a must-try and Grace identifies the best wines to pair with the small plates. She points out a sparkling Austrian that will delight, a Spanish sparkling rose that will not disappoint, and an interesting, effervescent blend from the Talai Berri winery in Spain. Wines reviewed include: 2016 Melon de Bourgogne 2016 Lingua Franca, Willamette Valley 2016 Listan Negro Lanzarote For more information on today's episode, and the wines you love to love, visit www.corkrules.com.

The Giving Town
Support for Families Fighting Cancer - with Willamette Valley Cancer Foundation

The Giving Town

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 29:37


There is no way to prepare yourself for hearing those dreaded words: "You have cancer." But while the fight against cancer is itself often a difficult struggle, there is another very real struggle that people often do not consider. Between lost energy from treatments, time spent traveling to appointments, and other disruptions, many families dealing with cancer find that there is a very real strain on their income. This is where the Willamette Valley Cancer Foundation comes in. They understand there is often a financial need beyond treatment costs and they work to support families by directly assisting with various bills and financial obligations while a family member is in active treatment. In this episode, Patty Williams, Executive Director of the Willamette Valley Cancer Foundation, shares how this program helps families in Yamhill county and several surrounding counties as well. To learn more, visit https://willamettevalleycancerfoundation.org/ As mentioned in the episode, you can check out The Joyful Roberts Group YouTube channel here.The Joyful Roberts Group The Joyful Roberts Group is a real estate team led by Daniel Roberts, host of The Giving Town.Support the show

Fast and Fabulous
Episode 18 - Beth Anundi

Fast and Fabulous

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 38:10


Beth was born and raised in the stunning Willamette Valley in the middle of Oregon.  She taught literature, writing, and communications classes for 16 years at the college level before jumping into entrepreneurship. In 2011, Beth co-founded Capital Pawn & Couture with her husband, Adam. Their three grown children work in the business alongside them.  Beth is passionate about spending time with family and friend, a lover of wine, trees, travel, books, Disney, Converse, good food, and the pawn industry. Today, with two full years of successful fasting, she can say she is passionate about fasting as well as inspiring others to be the healthiest version of themselves.Support the show

Gus Clemens on Wine explores and explains the world of wine in simple, humorous, fun posts

This is the weekly newspaper column.Fermentation vessels 9-21-2022Winemakers have a choice of fermentation vessels—wood, stainless steel, and concrete. What is the difference between them?While there are various variables, here is a general overview:• Wooden wine barrels have been used for at least 2,500 years. The barrel we know today likely was developed by the Celts around 350 BCE. The Romans copied and improved the design and put them in common use by the 3rd century.Wood barrels typically are made of oak, but can be made from other wood. French oak has a tighter grain and impacts wine less than American oak, which imparts more oak flavors. Barrels allow a small amount of oxygen to interact with the wine, a process called micro-oxygenation, and can add additional tannins. New or nearly-new barrels deliver flavors and aromas such as toast, spice, vanilla, cedar, and chocolate, dependent upon the “toasting” of the barrel with fire during manufacture.Oak effects become more muted after each use. Many winemakers use a mix of barrels to reduce the impact of new oak, and just to save money. Barrels can cost as much as $1,000 depending on size and wood source.• Stainless steel tanks can be impermeable to oxygen and can be temperature controlled. They are easy to clean and use for years. Winemakers who want to emphasize pure fruit flavors and crispness often use stainless steel for white and rosé wines.• Concrete fermenters—called “eggs” because of their shape—fall between wood and stainless steel in affecting wine. They are neutral vessels, so they do not add flavors, but many winemakers believe they soften a wine's texture. Concrete allows a small amount of air to slowly mix in the wine, but less than oak. The egg shape promotes a gentle, natural circulation of the wine, mixing with the lees to add complexity. Thick concrete walls also reduce temperature fluctuations during fermentation.Since different vessels influence wine differently, some winemakers use up to all three to further refine their wine. The grape variety also influences the winemaker's choice of fermentation vessel.Tasting notes:• Cantine Ermes Vento di Mare Pinot Grigio, Terre Siciliane IGT 2020: Light, zesty with enough acidity to make it bright and fresh. $9-12 Link to my review• Marichal Premium Sauvignon Blanc, Canelones, Uruguay 2021: Substantial SB from quality maker in South America's third-largest wine-producing country. $13-14. Link to my review• Chehalem Inox Unoaked Chardonnay, Willamette Valley 2021: Light, fresh. Good acidity, pure, tasty fruit. $20-25. Link to my reviewLast round: What do clouds wear under their shorts? Thunder pants. Wine time.Thank you for reading Gus Clemens on Wine. This post is public so feel free to share it.Email: wine@cwadv.comNewsletter: gusclemens.substack.comWebsite:  gusclemensonwine.comFacebook:  facebook.com/GusClemensOnWine/posts/Twitter: @gusclemensLinks worth exploringDiary of a Serial Hostess Ins and outs of entertaining; witty anecdotes of life in the stylish lane.As We Eat Multi-platform storytelling explores how food connects, defines, inspires.Balanced Diet Original recipes, curated links about food systems, recipe reviews. This is a public episode. If you'd like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit gusclemens.substack.com/subscribe

Living Wholehearted Podcast With Jeff and Terra
Episode 147: Principles that shape a leader of integrity (and what runs interference) with Aubrey Sampson

Living Wholehearted Podcast With Jeff and Terra

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 42:18


The Mattsons are speaking with a kindred heart in this episode as Aubrey shares her own leadership journey and the principles she believes shapes a leader of integrity. Aubrey speaks from her experience of trying to prove herself as a leader, achieving and hiding in the shadows of performance. She attributes much of this to the shame she felt from her story of sexual assault. She tells of a season of great accomplishment met with deep sorrow and how her healing and forced rest has become the cornerstone of her intimacy with God. She shares how leaders can fight the temptations and pressures to build a brand over a faithfulness to their God and local community. Aubrey is passionate about leading a multi-ethnic church community and she tells how, as white pastors, she and her husband have taken intentional steps to creating a leadership that reflects their community.   If you are a leader caught in the performance based trap, running from shame, or looking for inspiration in the face of a busy season, or you just want to hear how one woman is leading in the heart of Chicago, you need to listen to this podcast. Learning to lead from being known by our Creator rather than trying to be known by the world is a transformational posture that breathes life and integrity.     Aubrey Sampson co-planted and serves on the teaching and preaching team at Renewal Church. She is an award-nominated author, a contributor to Propel Women and Christianity Today, Ann Voskamp's A Holy Experience, Proverbs 31 and more. She is the co-host of The Common Good Talk Show and the Nothing is Wasted Podcast. Aubrey preaches and speaks around the country at churches and ministry events. She and her husband and three sons live and minister in the Chicagoland area. Aubrey's books include: Known: How Believing Who God Says You Are Changes Everything, The Louder Song: Listening for Hope in the Midst of Lament, and Overcomer: Breaking Down the Walls of Shame and Rebuilding Your Soul.   To connect with Aubrey, visit: ONLINE - https://www.aubreysampson.com/ SOCIAL - Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/aubsamp/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/aubsamp Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/aubsamp/   BOOKS/PODCAST/RADIO - The Common Good Talk Show - https://1160hope.com/content/all/thecommongood Nothing is Wasted Podcast - https://www.nothingiswasted.com/podcast Known: How Believing Who God Says You Are Changes Everything - https://www.aubreysampson.com/known/ The Louder Song: Listening for Hope in the Midst of Lament (NavPress, 2019) - https://www.aubreysampson.com/louder-song/ Overcomer: Breaking Down the Walls of Shame and Rebuilding Your Soul (Zondervan, 2015) - https://www.amazon.com/Overcomer-Breaking-Walls-Shame-Rebuilding/dp/0310342589/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=overcomer+aubrey+sampson&qid=1592054361&sr=8-1     Want to grow as a leader? Consider joining our Wholehearted Leadership Cohort. Our 2023-2024 Wholehearted Leadership Cohort application is closing soon! If you are interested in taking a 2 year journey with other leaders from around the nation, check out the details on our website. You will get 15 one-to-one coaching sessions with one of our trauma-informed executive coaches, monthly group cohort meetings on a platform designed to create dialogue and community, and 4 in-person retreats in the beautiful Willamette Valley of Oregon. Learn more at www.livingwholehearted.com.   To connect with Jeff and Terra Mattson and Living Wholehearted, go to: Instagram @TerraMattson @Living_Wholehearted @MyCourageousGirls #living_wholeheartedpodcast #shrinkingtheintegritygap Facebook @MyCourageousGirls @WeAreLivingWholehearted Websites LivingWholehearted.com TerraMattson.com MyCourageousGirls.com MyCourageousBook.com   Resources Shrinking the Integrity Gap https://davidccook.org/shrinking-integrity-gap-book/ Shrinking the Integrity Gap e-Course https://www.livingwholeheartedstore.com/e-courses Courageous: Being Daughters Rooted in Grace https://mycourageousgirls.com/shop/p/book-courageous-being-daughters-rooted-in-grace Dear Mattsons https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLdPzQ_cUwCbRc-MQ40KL3a6ze06CiY38l Helping Moms Raise Confident Daughters http://cpguides.org/  

Through Inspired Eyes: Travel Can Heal
81: Honoring Indigenous People in Tourism & Beyond with Willamette Valley Visitors Association

Through Inspired Eyes: Travel Can Heal

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 47:02


What do you know about the Indigenous culture in America? Dawnielle Tehama, Executive Director of Willamette Valley Visitors Association, shares her story as a tribal member personally and professionally. From all of this, she is now leading diversity of thought in Oregon's wine country.  Visit Willamette Valley Connect with Dawnielle Tehama on LinkedIn or via email: dawnielle@willamettevalley.org  Message our host: jackie@inspiredjourneyconsulting.com  Work with IJC Buy the book! The Ultimate Guide to Creating Your Soul-Aligned Business

Dayspring Fellowship Podcasts
Wired: Brain Science & Spiritual Growth | Part 1 | How Do People Grow? | Chris Voigt

Dayspring Fellowship Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 40:36


How Do People Grow? Wired: Brain Science & Spiritual Growth September 11, 2022 Gardening season in our area is coming to a close. The skies have been a little dusty lately as farmers across the Willamette Valley have been harvesting crops and mowing fields. The local fruit stands are filled with late summer produce; and for those who enjoy preserving the season's bounty, this is a busy time of canning, freezing, and drying all sorts of deliciousness from the garden. Raise your hand if you enjoy gardening. Oh... well, I guess that doesn't work as well online as it does in person. How about comment below if you enjoy gardening and tell us what your garden has produced this year!   Gardening would not be on my list of favorite ways to spend my free time. It's just not my thing. I do have a few strawberry plants in the backyard, though that's mostly so I can enjoy them with my granddaughter, Avery. But I'm certainly thankful for the people in my life who bless me with the literal fruits of their gardening labors! And I do know that beautiful blueberries, delicious raspberries and vine-ripened tomatoes don't just magically appear. To produce the fruit or veggies you want, you need to invest time and energy creating the right conditions for a good harvest.   In much the same way, growth in other areas of life must be intentionally cultivated. Wishing you were stronger won't make it so. Hoping to increase your bank balance won't help your bottom line. Growth in just about every area of life requires effort.    I'm Chris Voigt, Lead Pastor at Dayspring Fellowship in Keizer, OR. This week we're beginning a new sermon series called Wired – Brain Science & Spiritual Growth. Over the next few weeks, we'll be taking a look at the amazing way that God has wired our brains for growth and what we can do to cultivate the healthy soil we need to thrive as God intended!   Understanding how God has created our brains will enable us to experience greater, deeper, and more lasting transformation as followers of Jesus. And that's what we're all about... becoming more like Him. It's an incredible journey. 

Weinnotes
Dave & Sara - Bells Up Winery located in the Willamette Valley (the heart of Oregon Wine Country)

Weinnotes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 74:39


Ten years ago, in 2012, Dave and Sara made a huge life change by moving from Ohio to Oregon in pursuit of starting a winery. Their hard work, dedication, and meticulous attention to detail have paid off! Their winery is Bells Up (http://bellsupwinery.com), where Dave, the winemaker, does all of the tastings providing an experience you will never forget! In our conversation, we dive into what got the couple into winemaking, how they ended up in Oregon, Seyval Blanc, a new Italian grape they planted, stories of community, and much more. Please enjoy this conversation with Dave and Sara!

Living Wholehearted Podcast With Jeff and Terra
Episode 146: How Our Stories Fuel Our Leadership with Scott Hatley (Part 2 of 2)

Living Wholehearted Podcast With Jeff and Terra

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 40:00


What beliefs do you hold about people with disabilities? Do you want to see positive change in education, the workplace, and the world for people with different abilities? Jeff Mattson hosts part 2 of a conversation with Scott Hatley. A native and resident of Portland, Oregon, Scott was born with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. He is Co-Founder and Executive Director of INCIGHT. In this episode, you'll hear how Scott's story influenced his call as he wanted more than what he saw others with disabilities experiencing. God seems to use what we see as limitations, disabilities, or struggles as the very vehicle to His call for our lives…if we are open to the adventure. Scott's commitment to positive change is evident in his collaborative creation of INCIGHT's mission. Scott serves on the Board of Directors for Exceed Enterprises and serves on the Partnership Council for All Hands Raised. He is recognized by several organizations for his service to the Disability Community, including the Muscular Dystrophy Association (Personal Achievement Award and 2004 national finalist), Exceptional Parent Magazine (2006 Distinguished Service Award), Oregon Parent Training and Information Center (2007 Youth Achievement Award) and Exceed Enterprises (2013 Londahl-Risley Award).   To connect with Scott Hatley, visit:   ONLINE - https://www.incight.org https://www.theunderstandingmagazine.com SOCIAL - LinkedIn - Scott Hatley (https://www.linkedin.com/in/scott-hatley-bb79974)     Our 2023-2024 Wholehearted Leadership Cohort application is open through September 15, 2022! If you are interested in taking a 2 year journey with other leaders from around the nation, check out the details on our website. You will get 15 one-to-one coaching sessions with one of our trauma-informed executive coaches, monthly group cohort meetings on a platform designed to create dialogue and community, and 4 in-person retreats in the beautiful Willamette Valley of Oregon. Learn more at www.livingwholehearted.com.   To connect with Jeff & Terra Mattson and Living Wholehearted, go to: Instagram @TerraMattson @Living_Wholehearted @MyCourageousGirls Facebook @MyCourageousGirls @WeAreLivingWholehearted Websites LivingWholehearted.com MyCourageousGirls.com   Resources Shrinking the Integrity Gap https://davidccook.org/shrinking-integrity-gap-book/ Shrinking the Integrity Gap e-Course https://www.livingwholeheartedstore.com/e-courses Courageous: Being Daughters Rooted in Grace https://mycourageousgirls.com/shop/p/book-courageous-being-daughters-rooted-in-grace Dear Mattsons https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLdPzQ_cUwCbRc-MQ40KL3a6ze06CiY38l Helping Moms Raise Confident Daughters http://cpguides.org/

Aging in the Willamette Valley
9/10/22: Bill Sweeney with AARP | How does the Inflation Reduction Act impact Medicare? | Aging In The Willamette Valley with John Hughes

Aging in the Willamette Valley

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 29:23


This week our guest is Bill Sweeney, Senior VP of Government Affairs at AARP, who joined us to explain how the Inflation Reduction Act impacts Medicare. Congress has just passed historic legislation to lower the prices of prescription drugs and put money back in the pockets of seniors. The new law requires Medicare to start negotiating the price of certain drugs, caps seniors' annual out-of-pocket costs for prescription drugs in Medicare Part D and limits the cost of insulin to $35 a month in Medicare. Find out when changes take effect. Don't miss this show!

Live Like the World is Dying
S1E50 - This Month In The Apocalypse

Live Like the World is Dying

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 74:57


Episode Notes Episode Summary For this This Month in the Apocalypse episode Brooke, Margaret, and Casandra all researched different topics and discuss them. Margaret talks about climate collapse, droughts, floods, wildfires, the cost of wheat, and the dangers of rising humidity for wet bulb temperatures. Casandra talks about Monkey Pox, rises in other viral and vector borne illness, and discovers why rain might actually be a bad thing for your food. Brooke talks about student loan forgiveness and things you, brave listener, might not be aware you are forgiven for. Everyone attempts to get us sponsored by 'Big' Rain Barrel. If you're out there 'Big' Rain Barrel. Please sponsor us. Host Info Casandra can be found on Twitter @hey_casandra or Instagram @House.Of.Hands. Margaret can be found on twitter @magpiekilljoy or instagram at @margaretkilljoy. Brooke is just great and can be found at Strangers helping up keep our finances intact and on Twitter @ogemakweBrooke Publisher Info This show is published by Strangers in A Tangled Wilderness. We can be found at www.tangledwilderness.org, or on Twitter @TangledWild and Instagram @Tangled_Wilderness. You can support the show on Patreon at www.patreon.com/strangersinatangledwilderness. Next Episode Come out Friday, September 23rd, and every two weeks there after. Might be about thru-hiking, Parenting, or Archiving. Transript An easier to read version is available on our website TangledWilderness.org. Margaret 00:16 Hello, and welcome to Live Like The World Is Dying, your podcasts for what feels like the end times. I'm one of your hosts, Margaret killjoy. I have Brooke and Casandra with me as well as cohosts today, because today, you will be very excited to know that the world's still ending...that we are doing our second monthly This Month in the Apocalypse and we're going to be talking about basically the last month and the I guess that's in the name. Okay. So, Brooke, Casandra, do you want to introduce yourselves? Possibly with Brooke going first. Casandra 00:52 Your name was first. Brooke 00:53 Yeah. Okay, alphabetically. Hi, everybody, it's Brooke Jackson again, coming to you live? Oh, wait, no, this will be recorded by the time you hear it. From the sunny lands of the Willamette Valley in Oregon. Casandra Johns 01:11 We're all in the Willamette Valley right now. Margaret 01:14 It's true. Casandra 01:15 It's true. This is Casandra. That's me. Margaret 01:19 Okay, and so this will be a very short episode, because actually, nothing bad has happened in the world, certainly not nything that feels end times ish, nothing out of the ordinary. I'm under the impression we have reversed most of the major...I mean, I think Biden passed a bill. So, I'm pretty sure climate change is over. And COVID is over. I learned that just the other day walking into a place where I thought everyone would be wearing masks, but it's over. So that's cool. Or, alternatively, let's talk about how China's in the worst heatwave in human history...in recorded history. We're gonna cut it up into segments. And I'm gonna go first with my segment. Casandra Johns 02:06 Do we need to say "Du duh duh duhh, Channel Zero? As part of the intro? Brooke 02:13 Do a Jingle? Margaret 02:16 Yes. Okay. You want to do it? Brooke 02:20 She just did. Casandra 02:21 Oh, yeah, I did. Duh duh duh duh! Margaret 03:19 Okay, and we're back. Okay, so, China...70 Day heatwave as of several days ago, now. And by the time you all are hearing this, I believe we're recording this about five days before this episode comes out. So, who knows what will have happened? There has been a lot of heat waves and floods all over the world this summer. And so China's in the middle of a 70 day heatwave. The drought has reduced hydroelectric output, which huge areas were reliant on the electricity because the water levels are so far down. And of course the electricity is what powers the AC. So no air conditioning is really fun as things get really hot. AC has been turned off in a lot of office buildings. It's cut power to tons of industry, including a bunch of car manufacturers where I'm a little bit like "Eh, whatever. Cars are bad." I mean, I drive cars so I'm kind of an asshole and hypocrite. Anyway. But also solar panel output and EV battery plants and like lots of stuff that's like being pitched as the alternative to things...y'all can feel free to cut me off too as I talk about these things. I'm just like going through my notes. And I don't know, it's breaking records all over the place by like four degrees in a lot of places. It's four degrees Fahrenheit. Brooke 04:44 What is heatwave in this context? Like are they having like, you know, 115 degree temperatures, are they just? Margaret 04:53 I mean, so. I mean, I believe in localized places. It's getting like crazy hot but what's interesting about this is that it's it's more the length of it and the abnormality to its usual that is, like, it's a lot of this stuff is like 106 degrees Fahrenheit and things like that. You know, things that are very not nice, but are...well, human survivable. Although we should probably at some point talk about wet bulb temperatures and how dry places are survivable at substantially higher temperatures than humid places. But yeah, so it's it's, it's an it's an abnormality causing problems as far as I understand, rather than like, just specifically, if you step outside, you will be scorched by the heatray that is the sun. It's affecting over a billion people, which is a lot of people. The area of the heatwave is 530,000 square miles, which for context is Texas, Colorado and California combined. Casandra Johns 05:57 Does that overlap with the area...like, isn't there like a massive wildfire happening in China right now? Margaret 06:04 I think you know, more about the wildfires than I do. Casandra Johns 06:07 I don't know what region it was in. Margaret 06:09 Okay. Casandra 06:09 I guess I'm curious. Of course, they're related because everything climate-y is related, ultimately. Margaret 06:16 Yeah. Casandra 06:19 Yeah, I'm curious how closely they're tied together. But, if you don't know, and I don't know, that's fine. Because there's also a massive wildfire. And that sucks. Margaret 06:27 Yeah. There's a massive wildfire. Brooke 06:31 Is that a continuous area, Margaret? That five? Whatever, something miles? Margaret 06:37 You all are exceeding my level of research that I did, because I did research about the entire world. So I don't know. Brooke 06:44 Okay, fair. Casandra 06:45 Oh, yeah. You have more. This is just like heat waves everywhere. Okay. Margaret 06:48 Yeah. Okay. And also joining us today on playing the squeaky toy in the background is Rintrah, the best dog in the world. Brooke 06:59 Can confirm. Margaret 07:00 The best dog in the world. No complaints? Okay. Yeah, I, you know, there's a lot more I don't know about this, right? But this was one that I haven't even seen really cropping up much in the media at all. And actually, one of the things that's sort of interesting and terrible and telling is that a lot of the information that I've been able to find about climate change disasters comes from the business media, like, a lot of this is about how it will affect stock prices, how it will affect, you know...300 Mines are shut down right now in China, or as of you know, two days ago when I did most of the research for this recording. And so it talks more about the 300 mines that have been shut down instead of the 119,000 people who have been evacuated from their homes. And it's just, it's a real problem. There's a lot of photos of like, low reservoirs that are like 20 meters below what they're supposed to be and things like that. And, of course, to tie everything into everything else, you know, things that happen in one place don't only effect that region. The drought is fucking up their harvest, and fertilizer for export has been affected, which will probably fuck up the world's food supply, which was otherwise very stable. So, I don't think that's gonna be a problem. Casandra Johns 08:16 The world's been chaos, but at least we know, food is cheap and available. Margaret 08:20 And will stay that way. Margaret 08:22 Okay, so then the one that I'm finally starting to see more get talked about in the media, thankfully, although it's annoying, because it's only been talked about because now there's like dramatic photos. But whatever. I mean, I'm not blaming people for not paying attention to everything that's happening in the world. Pakistan is having flooding, like just absolutely massive flooding. I've read reports saying that there's a half a million people living in refugee camps. It's taken at least 1000 lives, it's fucking up food production. Over a million homes have been destroyed. A third of the country is underwater. Have y'all seen the satellite image photos? Casandra 08:22 Yep Casandra Johns 08:59 Yeah, and they're referring to it as a 'lake.' Which makes me wonder like, are they anticipating at least some portion of it to remain? Like, "And look at our new lake!" Margaret 09:10 Yeah. Casandra 09:12 I heard I heard someone else I heard someone referred to it as a 'small ocean.' Margaret 09:18 Yeah. Margaret 09:19 Yeah. And, and Pakistan is the the fifth most populous country in the world after China, India, U.S., Indonesia, I think. Yeah. And so it's like, it's a big fucking deal and a big fucking problem. And one of the other problems because capitalism solves...makes everything worse. Pakistan has taken out a $1.1 billion dollar loan from the IMF, which for anyone following at home, the IMF is a predatory lending organization called the International Monetary Fund, that actually a lot of modern leftist politics, at least in the Western world and actually a lot of the developing world kind of cut its teeth in the...during the, the turn of the millennium fighting against the IMF and the World Bank, specifically because of the stuff that they do, which is that they loan predatory. It's like a payday loan. You know, it's like a paycheck loan place, but for entire countries, they loan you $1.1 billion, and then you're going to be paying off the interest for the rest of your life as a country. And of course, a lot of what's happening right now is that developing nations as they take out these loans are therefore forced to extract more fossil fuels from their own countries, in order to pay off the interest of their loan, not even touching the principal, trapping us further and further in the cycle of what's destroying everything. So that's all really fun. Okay, then, East Africa, particularly Kenya, Somalia, and Ethiopia, are also facing prolonged drought, rising food prices. A lot of this is because of Russia's invasion of Ukraine. This is projected to leave 20 million people hungry with an estimated 3 million potential deaths if aid isn't delivered, and these three countries represent 2% of the world's population, but 70% of the extreme food insecurity. And most of...about 90% of the wheat imported by East Africa comes from Russia and Ukraine, which are of course, having some issues right now. They're not famously friends. But you're thinking to yourself, "Well, I'm a wheat farmer in the US, and the high prices are good for me." They are not. Things are not good with domestic wheat production here in the United States, either, which, of course, affects large quantities of the world. Also, the US is a major grain exporter. And so this is things that affect the US do affect everyone else. And not just because we're the center of Empire. Drought is affecting wheat fields in Kansas, Oklahoma, and Nebraska. Kansas is estimating a 30% drop in their harvest. Oklahoma is estimating a 50% drop, in its harvest. And so even though you have these, like record high prices for wheat, farmers are expecting to lose money, because they're not able to grow enough. You look like you have a question. Brooke 09:19 Oh wow. Casandra Johns 12:24 And yeah, so we talked about this a little bit the other day, I think, like I'm not sure if people realize what it means when the wheat crop is devastated. You know, it's not just like, "Maybe I can't eat bread." Brooke 12:43 There's more to it than that? Casandra Johns 12:45 Right! I mean, the next thing I think of is like, who eats the wheat? Not just humans. You know, like, I can't eat wheat, but like, I eat beef. Margaret 12:58 Yeah. Casandra 12:58 And chicken. Margaret 13:00 Yeah. Brooke 13:00 Was does that matter, Casandra? Casandra 13:03 Maybe they eat wheat. Just the like domino effect. Margaret 13:07 Yeah. Casandra 13:08 Yeah. When we talk about rising food prices and rising fuel prices, and how those are connected to like rising everything prices. Margaret 13:15 Yeah. And book prices most famously. Brooke 13:16 Okay, well, like, I have a solution. Casandra 13:19 Okay, what's your solution? Is it Communism? Brooke 13:19 Cause, we're all about solutions here. Well, you started talking about Pakistan being all flooded like the country's a giant lake. And then you said drought in the US and I'm like, "Let's just pick up some water over there and just put it over here." And then there won't be a drought or flood. Margaret 13:36 So what's so great and I'm gonna get to in a moment is that drought and flood are entirely related. I think you knew this, and we're just setting me up to say this, but they're absolutely related. The more drought you have, the worse flooding you have, which of course, like boggles my immediate science, right? My non science brain is like, "But water is the opposite of drought," you know, and we're gonna get to them second. Okay, so also in the US, Lake Mead is drying up. It's the largest reservoir in the United States, it provides water to 25 million people. It's possible that soon it won't have enough water to feed the Hoover Dam, which provides electricity to about a million people. And the one upside of all of this drought..this is really selfish. It's kind of like interesting the stuff they keep finding in the water. They keep find... Margaret 14:26 Yeah. They're like finding like some guys like "Oh, look a barrel," and he like pops open some barrel from the 1920s. And just like a dead guy with a bullet in his skull, and they're like, "Oh, the mafia really did just drop people off in barrels," which led me to the conclusion that apparently leaving dead bodies in large body in large bodies of water is more effective of a strategy than I've been led to believe. Casandra 14:27 Well, they haven't they also...hasn't also revealed like Nazi...like sunken Nazi ships and shit. And then they're like the.... Casandra 14:27 Crime? Margaret 15:01 Yeah, not in Lake Mead, though. Casandra Johns 15:04 Right. But then..No, but I'm just saying like everywhere it's revealing interesting things like in Europe the...what are the stones called? Margaret 15:12 The Hunger Stones. Casandra 15:13 Hunger Stones? Margaret 15:15 Yeah. Casandra 15:15 So apparently, what's the context for this? Previously, in history when there were massive droughts and like rivers dwindled down to nothing, people made carvings in the stones at particular water levels with these like really epic, maybe Margaret's looking at some examples, of these really epic miserable statements about like, "Fear ye, fear ye, if the water gets this low..." Margaret 15:40 You're dead. Casandra 15:40 Yeah, but people are seeing those now, which is terrifying and interesting. Margaret 15:47 Yeah. Terrified and interesting is a good way to describe the current epoch. Brooke 15:52 Cool. That's the silverling, the mud caked lining. Brooke 15:52 Yeah. There was. It's not happening right at this moment. But here locally, when the Detroit reservoir got real low a couple of years ago, there was a town that had been flooded when they built the dam there and it was low enough that like, remnants of this town were visible, including like an old wagon, like covered wagon base kind of wagon and other cool artifacts. Brooke 16:27 See some history before we all die. Margaret 16:30 Yeah, yeah, exactly. Brooke 16:31 Great. Margaret 16:32 So, in California, heat and drought are also combining as power usages reaches a five year high power use, because people are running more and more air conditions. I didn't quite realize exactly how...I don't I don't have a percentage in front of me...But like, air conditioning is a really, really big use of electricity. And so in California, the grid is estimated...is expected to become unstable, although that might have already happened. It was supposed to happen like this week. So that might happen by the time y'all hear this. Or maybe it didn't happen. And I'm here I am chicken littling, all day long. And, of course, Jackson, Mississippi flooding. The capital of Mississippi, which is primarily black city has left 150,000 people without drinking water. Sooo... Brooke 17:18 I haven't heard about this at all? Margaret 17:20 Oh, yeah. And there's some mutual aid groups on the ground. Cooperation. Jackson is a long standing organization that works to sort of build dual power and do all kinds of awesome stuff in terms of cooperative economics and things like that. And they are doing a lot of mutual aid work. I believe there's also a group and maybe this is actually not maybe they're not directly related. I'm not sure there's a group called Hillbillies Helping Hillbillies that I've at least seen talk a lot about this issue. I don't know if they do most of their work down there or if they've been more focused on the Tennessee floods. Casandra Johns 17:54 I know Mutual Aid Disaster Relief is also doing work there. Margaret 17:59 Yeah. So "Why does all this stuff happen, Margaret?" you might ask. Brooke 18:07 Why does all this stuff happen, Margaret? Margaret 18:09 Well, I am an expert named Jennifer Francis, a senior scientist at the Woodward Climate Research Center in Falmouth, Massachusetts, and my quote, that is definitely me is, "As the air and oceans warm under a thicker blanket of greenhouse gases, more water vapor evaporates into the air providing more moisture to fuel thunderstorms, hurricanes, nor'easters and monsoons." Basically, as the temperature rise of the Earth, the warmer atmosphere can hold more water vapor, every degree of...every increase of one degree Celsius can boost the capacity for holding water vapor by about 7%. So that's fun. And also as things get more humid, you're like, "Okay, well, that's cool. It's like more tropical and stuff, right?" Higher humidity is substantially more dangerous, like heat and humidity is what kills people, because of the way that our bodies thermo regulate basically, like, if you're at 100% humidity, and the temperature goes above your body temperature, you die. Not like instantly, right? But your body loses its ability to thermo regulate. And so that is the wet bulb temperature is the temperature at 100% humidity, and that can be calculated out from there. So, for example, 105 degrees Fahrenheit at 5%. humidity is not that bad. It's like 61 degrees wet bulb, right? You're not in danger, I mean, you can be in danger zone from other parts of it, you need to get in shade, right? But like, whereas 105 degrees at 95% humidity is 103 degrees wet bulb. So, and for context, you know, it's like I used to never really think about the level of humidity that I lived in until I moved to the South and I had to worry about mold and all kinds of other shit. But, much of the South, and San Francisco and also I believe much of Alaska sit at around 80 to 90% humidity, whereas the Southwest might be at around 30% humidity. So, when you hear about temperatures at different levels in different parts of the country, the humidity that they're facing, like matters in terms of how catastrophic this type of thing is likely to be. And then the "What to do about it section!" Don't worry, we're almost done with the terrible climate shit part. Casandra Johns 20:20 I feel like earlier, you mentioned something about the relationship between flooding and drought. I was hoping you were gonna circle back to that. Margaret 20:28 Okay. Oh, yeah. So. So basically, the...some atmosphere shit I only half understand. But, as everything gets hotter, more of the air like sits...and more of the water sits in the air and that...it just fucks everything up. So, like, the rain falls off fucked up. I, I kind of like, wrap my head around it. And then I, it unraveled, you ever, like study things that are completely outside your thing? And then you like, you get your takeaway, and then the details like dissolve? That's what happened to me while I was researching this? Casandra Johns 21:00 No, that's I didn't realize it had I, I thought my assumption was it was going to be that, you know, you can look up videos of this where like, people put a cup of water upside down on like dry soil, you know, partially damp soil and like saturated wet soil. And the cup of water immediately, like seeps into the ground in the saturated soil, but it takes a really long time for the dry soil to absorb the water. Margaret 21:25 Yeah. Casandra 21:25 And so my assumption was like, "Oh, if there's a drought and the soil is bone dry, it can't absorb moisture very effectively." Margaret 21:33 Yeah. Casandra 21:33 Which is counterintuitive, maybe? But...then it floods. Margaret 21:36 I think that is a big part of it. Yeah. Casandra 21:38 Okay. Margaret 21:39 And then also, I was even just like...go ahead. Brooke 21:43 I was thinking about how matter can't be created or destroyed. And so the water still exist somewhere, even though it got sucked up from the dry places. And that might be why it ended up flooding in other places because the water still exists. Margaret 21:58 Well, a lot of places it's literally the same place will have droughts and floods. I think Texas was dealing with that I think it was Dallas, was having a record drought and might still be in a record drought and then had like, really fuck off flooding. I think it was about a week or two ago. That was like destroying everything. And, you know, because if the rain patterns are just completely different than Yeah, what the ground is used to absorbing and like, and which ties into what to do about it. A lot of what to do about it needs to happen at the scale that we're not necessarily going to talk about right now. But, rainwater catchment and drought areas is super important. And, you know, I was looking it up because there's this like. I'd always been sort of told that rainwater catchment like fucks up the water system of that area, you know, because Colorado has, they have re-legalized it a little bit in 2016. But it's been illegal for a very long time to catch rainwater in Colorado because they're like, "Oh, it's so dry here. We need all the groundwater." That was what I had always got told. The real reason's that Colorado made rainwater catchment illegal have a lot more to do with...capitalism, and the way that water rights are, you're basically stealing from people in entirely different areas if you catch the rainwater at the source or whatever. And, it it can affect things,right, if you like take water that could otherwise have ended up groundwater, but you're mostly it's mostly like shit that would have run off anyway. And so rainwater catchment increasingly in a lot of places, I believe Arizona has like new laws that like require new buildings to include rainwater catchment. There's entire countries who I didn't write down the names of that require rainwater catchment in all new buildings, especially island nations, I'm under the impression and so rainwater catchment is cool. And then, Arizona you can get rebates if you install rainwater catchment. In Colorado, it is now legal again for like home level and there's like all these like rules and shit. And you're, you're only allowed to store two barrels for a total of 110 gallons and you can only do it at like, home, or whatever. I'm sure there's ways that people could imagine catching rain water without getting caught. The CDC points out that rainwater is generally not safe to drink without treatment. You can use it to water non food plants without treatment. I say this, I showered with rainwater for the past three years and don't give a shit. But, maybe I shouldn't recommend that to other people. But, also filtering rainwater is like not the biggest deal in the world. And then... Casandra Johns 24:39 Also like, the idea of only using it on non food plants is really funny to me, because like it just rains on my plants, you know? And then I eat them. Margaret 24:51 Yeah. Brooke 24:52 You shouldn't let rain land of your plants. Margaret 24:54 You shouldn't be eating food from plants. Plants comes from stores, Casandra. Casandra Johns 24:59 Uh oh. Okay. And if they get rained on specifically then they're like poison. Margaret 25:06 Yeah, me, okay. Like, you walk out of a food store, the main place that people get food, like McDonald's, and you have your chicken nuggets, or... Casandra 25:14 And then they get rained on? Margaret 25:16 You wouldn't want to eat them now, would you? Casandra 25:18 Okay, I see what you mean. Margaret 25:20 Yeah, no, I like that part about the like non food plants or whatever is like to me is like that's what the CDC says. The CDC has lost a lot of...I don't trust it as much as I might have used to. Casandra 25:36 Interesting segue to... Margaret 25:39 Yeah. Well, there is one more part though that I believe one have you added to the notes about soil remediation and dry gardening? I'm wondering if you want to talk about some of that. Brooke 25:52 That has to be Casandra, cause it wasn't me. Casandra Johns 25:54 Oh, I mean, that was me thinking about like, how the what I was saying before how bone dry soil...the best place to store water is in the soil. Right? Margaret 26:04 Yeah. Casandra 26:06 Just like the best place to store nitrogen is in the soil. But, you know, if I lived in a super dry area, and this is only so effective for like the home gardener, this like ideally would happen on a large scale. But, if I lived in a really dry area, I'd be working really hard to like improve my soil health so that it can store more water. So that things like dry gardening are possible. So I can you know, have food even in a drought. Margaret 26:32 What is dry gardening? Casandra Johns 26:36 Dry gardening is gardening with little to no, like, manually added water. Margaret 26:43 Is that where you like mulch the shit out of it all to prevent evaporation? Casandra Johns 26:46 Yeah, you can do it that way. You can also...there. There's a...well, it's on my bookshelf, so I'm not gonna mention it because I can't remember the title right now. But yeah, mulching, spacing your plants a lot farther out, making sure that your soil can store water so that if you know we live, where I live, it rains a lot in the spring. And if the plants I plant have a room, and the soil is fluffy enough that they can send the roots really deep, then in the summer, when it's dry, they can still access the water that's stored in the soil. Does that make sense? Margaret 27:19 Cool, and then they grow chicken nuggets? Casandra 27:22 Yep. Margaret 27:23 Cool. Okay, so back to the clever segue that I broke about not trusting the CDC.... Casandra Johns 27:36 Yeah, yeah, I Okay. So, we realized we should probably say at least something about monkey pox. Because it's the thing that exists. My notes are titled monkey pox sucks. And... Brooke 27:52 Correct. Casandra Johns 27:53 Correct. Yeah. And I realized in researching this that I knew very little, I think I was just like, "We live in a time where there will be epidemic after epidemic," and I'm, you know, mentally overloaded on this topic. And had a lot of assumptions that were wrong. But, one interesting thing I found out is that the CDC is saying it's not transmitted....It's not airborne. Which, you know, they've kind of gone back and forth about whether masks are going to help...masks. I can't enunciate....whether masks are going to help prevent the spread. Brooke 28:37 If the mask prevents you from licking someone's open wounds, then then I say that would be helpful. Put your mask on. Casandra Johns 28:44 But, then there's there are other recommendations around like, avoiding close face to face contact with people. So that's all. I think I'm just affirming that I am also skeptical of CDC guidelines at this point, which is a bummer. Margaret 28:59 Yeah. Casandra 29:01 Anyway, do you want to hear all about monkeypox? Margaret 29:04 Yeah. Yay. Casandra 29:06 Yay. Margaret 29:06 What a fun show we make. Brooke 29:10 That's like a game, right? It's a children's game that you play. It's fun. Spread all over? Isn't it great? Casandra 29:18 No. Margaret 29:19 It's one of those games with a 1-3% death.... Okay, please continue. Brooke 29:24 That's pretty low. It's fine. Casandra Johns 29:26 Oh, my God, what a world that we live in. So apparently was discovered in 1958 in laboratory monkeys. So, you know, you can insert something here about blaming capitalism for everything. Because maybe it wouldn't have been a thing if monkeys were not in laboratories? Anyway, it's a cousin of smallpox in the first human case was recorded in 1970. When I first heard about monkey pox in May or whatever I was like, "Oh, cool and new disease." It's not new. It's been around for decades. So, it's really interesting that like, we don't have a vaccine that can quickly be rolled out. Do you want to guess why that is? Margaret 30:14 Is it Capitalsim? Brooke 30:14 I guess 'racism.' Casandra 30:15 Racism. Brooke wins with 'racism.' Brooke 30:23 Yay? Casandra 30:26 Yeah, so it was that to be uncommon in humans, but cases started increasing around 1980. And most of the cases have been documented in central and western Africa. That correct? In Africa. Margaret 30:41 Yeah, you said Nigeria is like one of the main spots of it? Casandra 30:45 For this outbreak. Margaret 30:46 Okay. Casandra 30:48 Yeah. So, and they think that one of the reasons....so there have been multiple outbreaks since it was first recorded in humans in 1970, which I didn't realize, because we don't hear about them, because mostly they've taken place in Africa. Which is just depressing. And I'll come back around to that in a minute. But, they think that that the increase in cases might be connected to the fact that it is related to smallpox. The smallpox vaccine, they think gives like, 85% that it is like, 85% effective against monkey pox. But most people don't get the smallpox vaccine anymore. Brooke 31:27 Yeah. Casandra 31:28 And I think that's related to the increase in monkey pox cases. Margaret 31:33 People don't get the smallpox vaccine anymore, because smallpox kind of went away because of vaccines? Casandra 31:40 Yeah, Brooke 31:41 No, it just stop being trendy. People were like, "That is not cool anymore. I'm not gonna take that one." Casandra Johns 31:48 Yeah, yeah. Which then is like, there's a whole tangent in here about who and how they decide a disease has been 'eradicated.' I'm doing air quotes that you can't see has been, 'eradicated.' Especially when something like monkey pox is trance was initially transmitted from animals to humans. And so, yeah, I don't know, is smallpox eradicated? I don't know. I'm not an epidemiologist. But I'm curious. So, let's see. Okay, so the current outbreak grew from one case in Massachusetts in the US, I'm talking about the US now, May 17. And at this point, you know, however many days it's been since May, there are almost 20,000 cases in the US, which is a lot of cases. Brooke 32:40 I mean, it sounds like a big number. But, also I know, there's a lot of people in the US, but also, I don't know how much cases of other things that we know about are common. So I don't have any frame of reference. Margaret 32:51 Yeah same. Casandra 32:53 Yeah. Brooke 32:54 Well, it's way smaller than Covid. Casandra Johns 32:57 Right. It is way smaller than Covid. But, you know, and it's, it's sort of like Covid, you're probably not going to die from it. But then there's the asterisk, 'unless you're immunocompromised already,' you know. So like, who are we? Who are we willing to throw under the bus for this? Brooke 33:13 So just Casandra. Casandra 33:13 Yeah, just me. Yeah. But then there's also public health experts are apparently warning that the virus is on the verge of becoming permanently entrenched here. Margaret 33:24 Cool. Casandra 33:25 So maybe 20,000 isn't, you know, a big chunk of the population, but in terms of like, a virus, it's bad news, because we don't really want it to become entrenched here, right? Brooke 33:38 Yeah, viruses, bad. Casandra 33:41 Virus equals bad. Okay. Okay, so, so there's been a lot of criticism about Biden's administration and their sluggish response to the outbreak. I read a really interesting report. I think WaPo [Washington Post] was the first place to report on this, but they said that, on August 4, US Health and Human Services officials plan to stretch the country's limited supply, or they announced, that they plan to stretch the country's limited supply of vaccines by splitting doses to cover five times as many people. This is after saying that they had plenty of doses. So, already sketchy. Yeah, cool, cool. And then the chief executive of Bavarian Nordic who's the vaccine manufacturer responded by accusing the Biden admin of breaching contract by planning to use them in this like inappropriate way by splitting the doses and then apparently threatened to cancel all future vaccine orders so that....Yeah, I'm not sure how that was resolved. Brooke 34:45 Capitalism. The other 'ism' now at play. Margaret 34:50 I was right. I was late. Casandra Johns 34:57 So the big concern for me in researching this was how it spreads, because I have a child who's about to go back to public school, so apparently animal to human transmission, it's spread by direct contact with blood, bodily fluids or cutaneous or mucosal lesions of infected animals. And then human to human transmission is close contact with respiratory secretions, which to me says airborne, right, right? Is that not what that means? Anyway, respiratory secretions, skin lesions of an infected person, or recently contaminated objects. So things like bedding, clothing, stuff like that. Um, but the CDC says it's not airborne. So, take that, as you will. I don't know. How are you gonna take that, Brooke? Brooke 35:41 Right. Well, I mean, respiratory secretions that does sound more significant than just like, you know, air droplets, like we talked about with covid, like, more moist, kind of things coming out of you, like sneezes and coughs and stuff that actually sprays more liquid matter? Casandra 36:07 So, use your imagination with that. Margaret 36:08 We could just go through and describe every act that could... Casandra 36:10 Don't spit in people's mouths. Brooke 36:14 Damn it, there goes half of my kink play. Margaret 36:18 I mean, it does seem like it's less contagious than like, because like, okay, right, like, because they said originally COVID wasn't airborne. And they weren't always wrong about that, right? But, the fact that it's been here for months, and is at 20,000 cases, is like, 'promising,' in that it seems less contagious than COVID? But that's, I guess I'm talking about like, the first or second most contagious virus that the world's ever faced. So, I guess it's a terrible benchmark to compare it to. Casandra Johns 36:49 Yeah, I think comparing everything to covid is probably not in our best interest, especially because a lot more people are comparing this to AIDS, in terms of the communities it's impacting, and how it's spreading. So it's, it's okay, let me go back to my list. Alright, so the incubation period is usually six to thirteen days, it's thought to be mainly spread through sexual activity, specifically, men who have sex with men and have multiple partners, though now they've sort of expanded that to include like queer and trans people, which is good. Not that it's spreading in queer and trans communities, but that they're changing language. So then I was like, "Well, is it an STI, right?" And I Googled "Is Monkey pox and STI? And the first two articles that came up, were: Number one, "Monkey pox is an STI and knowing that can help." And then number two is, "Monkey pox is spreading through sex, but it's not an STI." So you know, I'm not a doctor. Casandra Johns 37:02 It's not an STI. Casandra 37:29 Okay. Brooke 37:31 Because it's not it's, yeah, go ahead. Casandra Johns 37:52 But it seems to mainly be spreading through sex, probably because of the close contact involved. Margaret 38:02 Yeah, I mean, like, like, scabies is... Brooke 38:04 Yeah, like not through the sex itself. Casandra 38:06 Right. Brooke 38:07 But through the close physical contact of you know, that happens during sex. Casandra Johns 38:12 I think. I also saw a list. I think it's LA County. I was reading their like, list of eligibility criteria, and maybe risky behavior to avoid...'in void.' Would that even? Yeah, thank you. I was just trying to figure out what my made up word means. Risky behavior to avoid and they listed that, like, we're still learning about how it's transmitted, right, which is wild for a disease that's been around since the 70s. But, they listed that it could possibly be transmitted through semen. Like not solely but that could be another way that it's transmitted. Brooke 38:53 Sure, transmitted through bodily fluids, but the distinction when it when it's an STI is something that's sort of limited to being transmissible through kind of the genital region. Casandra Johns 39:10 Is that why one type of herpes is considered an STI, and the other isn't? Brooke 39:14 Yeah, so you can like can get both of them in both places because of oral sex. Casandra 39:21 Huh, that's interesting. Brooke 39:23 But yeah, technically. That's why. Casandra Johns 39:25 Thanks for knowing more about STI classification than me. I appreciate it. Brooke 39:29 Well, I fuck a lot. So I got to know these kinds of things. Casandra 39:35 All right, moving on with my notes. My next... Brooke 39:40 I just made everyone turn a scarlet blushing red color because I have non prude among this collective. Casandra Johns 39:48 I'm not blushing. I'm not prudish. I'm just Demi. Okay, so my next section is titled "Racism," which, yeah, so the virus isn't spreading in this specific outbreak of monkey pox is been spreading in Nigeria since 2017. Yet, somehow there are no clinical...there's no clinical trial data of the effectiveness of the vaccine or T pox, which is the antiviral they've developed. No human studies. I wonder why. Um, well, I as I said it's understudied because up until now, it's been isolated to central and west Africa. Yeah. What would have happened if we were vaccinating on a large scale in Nigeria? Would it have spread? Margaret 40:31 Yeah, I mean, that's like such a thing that I keep thinking about all this shit, where it's like, it's just seemed so obvious to me that, like the solutions to all the major things that we're dealing with right now, like don't make any sense in a world full of borders. You know? Being like, like, "We got ours. Fuck you," doesn't make any fucking it never made any fucking sense. But, it really doesn't make any fucking sense now, or it's like, yeah, if we had, like, I don't understand, even if I'm like a self interested, rich white American. I don't understand how I can be like, "Oh, new new disease just dropped and it's in another country." Let's go get rid of it in another country. That makes sense from...it's cheaper than building spaceships to Mars. Brooke 41:16 I think it's people still just not fundamentally understanding how deeply integrated we are now as a global society. Yeah. I mean, we shouldn't have figured especially in the last couple of years, if you haven't figured it out before, then like, you should understand that now. I feel like... Margaret 41:32 Yeah, acids been around for a long time. Casandra 41:39 Don't understand the reference? Margaret 41:43 Just like, oh, no, like, we're all one consciousness? Whatever. Casandra 41:52 Okay, my next subsection of notes is titled "Homophobia." Margaret 41:55 Hurray. Casandra 41:56 This is...I'm announcing these by way of a content warning. So yeah, so I read a few different, you know, I've seen like on Twitter and stuff, people talking about how homophobia relates to the way the language the government has been using and media outlets have been using around monkeypox, and also the government response to it and didn't fully understand that other than that it's mainly spreading in queer networks right now. But, I read an article that talked about how the homophobia they were seeing was mainly around the language that gay sex is quote, unquote, 'driving' the epidemic. Yeah, and just like really sex negative advice around how to keep from getting monkey pox. But, in reality, the drivers of the epidemic are the structures globally that have led to like vaccines and tests and treatments all existing for this virus, but not being accessible. Margaret 42:57 Yeah. Casandra 42:58 Yeah, I don't know if y'all have read any of the first person accounts of people trying to find access even to a test. Like I read an account of someone who went to their doctor was like, "I think a monkey pox." and the doctor, like, had to jump through all of these hoops just to access a test Margaret 43:14 Fucking hell. Margaret 43:16 So that's cool. Let's see, before I talk about the 'What we can do,' I want to circle back to climate change really quickly. Because, I think that in my brain, I know that epidemics and climate change are related, but I hadn't thought much about how in the particular mechanisms, but I read an interview that, that interested in me a lot. And they talked about how climate change is driving the risk of infectious diseases. I saw a report that 58% of the 375 infectious diseases they examined, have...this is a quote, "have been at some point aggravated by 'climatic hazards.'" So that's cool. Brooke 44:03 I...but how? I don't understand the connection. Casandra 44:06 Yeah. So. So one way is that climate change, they were talking about how it brings humans closer to animals, not in the sense that like "We are closer to nature," but just like, as we encroach on... Brooke 44:17 oh, sure. Casandra 44:20 And so, animal to human transmission is a thing. But, also if we're talking about like climate change and natural disasters, people get very sick of diseases and die after natural disasters. So, I'm sure that's part of what they mean by 'aggravated,' being 'aggravated by climatic hazards.' Warmer temperatures also attract insects and carriers of disease to parts of the world that they didn't used to exist in. Margaret. I feel like you were talking about...we were talking the other night and you mentioned like...no was it you? Maybe I was reading something? I've been reading too much lately. I was reading about a type of mosquito that is like, more likely to carry things like Dengue fever, and is now in the US, is now in the northern hemisphere. And. Margaret 45:08 Oh, that's exciting. Casandra 45:10 Yeah, and it has to do with warmer water temperatures where they can hatch their eggs and also with capitalism, because apparently they were transported here in 'tires.' Margaret 45:22 Huh? Casandra 45:23 Like when tires sit, you know outside in a wash, tje water pools? Yeah. Wild. Margaret 45:33 Which ties back to rain catchment and how don't do lazy rain catchment where you just put your downspout into the barrel, you should filter it, and you should prevent mosquitoes from breeding in there. Also algae, and all kinds of other stuff. Casandra 45:47 Yeah, it's true. Brooke 45:49 So today's episode is brought to you by capitalism and racism. Margaret 45:54 And I was thinking rain barrels. But Sure. Brooke 45:59 Well, the reason we have to talk about these horrible things is the 'isms.' Margaret 46:04 Right? Where as I was thinking about sponsors, Big Rain Barrel. The big sponsor of the show. Brooke 46:11 That'd be a great sponsor. I hope we get a free barrel. Casandra 46:14 Yeah. Brooke 46:14 Free barrel with every Ep [episode] Margaret 46:16 Yeah. I want to be able to talk about them personally. So, please contact us through the site. The advertisers. I want the I want Big Rain Barrel to...I just want a rain barrel. That's all. Please continue. Casandra 46:31 So in 2022, we're still experiencing the COVID outbreak, right? And now my monkey pox. And also polio. Margaret 46:40 Cool. Casandra 46:42 Yeah. Yeah, yes. Polio. Someone Someone got polio. For the second time since they declared polio like a...they don't use the word eradicated. But they were basically like, "Humans don't get this anymore." But two have since then. One was this summer. So that's...okay. Brooke 47:06 That's neat. Casandra 47:07 Yeah, what can we do about it? We can wash our hands a lot. I'm still gonna wear a mask, even though the CDC says it's not airborne, because I don't understand the difference. And also Covid's still a thing. We can research testing and vaccination in our areas, because it seems to be vastly different in different cities and counties and really confusing. So you can do the research ahead of time and share it through your network so people know where to access information and help. You can also get vaccinated if you qualify. However, I let's see, I looked at a few different counties and their eligibility criteria. And they all seem to have a few things in common. You have to be gay or bisexual men, or a transgender person who has had either 1) Multiple or anonymous sex partners in the last 14 days or 2) Skin to skin, skin to skin or intimate contact with people at large venues or events in the last 14 days. And then they're also starting to include people of any gender or sexual orientation who have engaged in commercial or [cuts out], so sex workers in the last 14 days. So yeah, if any of those are you, and you have a vaccination place near you, why not get it? Margaret 48:32 Because Bill Gates will be able to track all the sex you have? Brooke 48:38 Yeah, Casandra 48:39 The reason I agreed to research monkey pox for this episode is because, like I said, my kids about to go back to school. And I was really nervous. And I'm feeling a little bit less nervous for the moment about school because of the cases documented in children so far areextremely low. So, that's some good news for all of the other parents out there. Margaret 49:02 And the children listening Casandra 49:05 For any of the children listening. Margaret 49:06 It just occurred to me that children might listen to this podcast. I'm so sorry, children, about the world. Not about the cussing. I'm sorry about the world. Casandra 49:18 Speaking of school, Brooke 49:20 Hey, yo, student loan forgiveness that's been in the news. Right? And as the person with the background in economics, I feel like I have to talk about that. So, student loans, I'm fairly certain that of the two of you one of you has student loans and one of you does not. And I'm I'm curious how each of you feel about student loan forgiveness without...you can go ahead and not reveal which one of you it is and isn't for the moment. Just tell me if you like it? Is it good? Or bad? Casandra 49:56 Fucking-tastic I mean, not this version, this version is just like so. So, but like, should they forgive all of our student loans? Fuck yes, they should. Margaret 50:04 I agree. Brooke 50:05 Casandra says yes. Oh, and Margaret agrees Wait, but only one of you has student loans? Margaret 50:11 So, I don't have student loans. And...I can't imagine, I can't imagine anyone who doesn't have student loans giving a shit. Like I just like, I struggle so hard. Like, every time someone's like, "They did this with our taxpayer money," and I'm like, "Motherfucker, they invaded half the world with our tax money." Like... Casandra 50:35 There there other things you should be frustrated about being done with your tax dollars. Casandra 50:40 And this is not one of them. Margaret 50:40 Yeah! Margaret 50:42 Yeah. And then even with my like, even if I was like a self interest capitalist shit, it's like, I don't know, healthy economy is not one built on fucking debt. And I don't know, whatever. I'm just like... Brooke 51:00 Don't spoil my ending, Margaret. Margaret 51:02 Oh, sorry. Right. Casandra 51:04 But capitalism means that there have to be people who are suffering and poor so that I can feel superior and be stable and have more money. Margaret 51:13 Oh, that's a good point. Casandra 51:14 Yeah. Margaret 51:15 No, I take it back actually, Brooke. I'd like to change my answer. No one should. Casandra 51:21 Fuck Casandra. Margaret 51:26 No one should have the right to have debt forgiven. It should probably be transmitted to children and children's children. Oh, wait, that already happens. Just okay. Anyway. Casandra 51:36 What about corporations? Shouldn't they be able to get their debt forgiven, Margaret? Margaret 51:40 Oh, yeah. I mean, corporations, obviously should have their debt forgiven. I mean, otherwise, we wouldn't have an economy. Brooke 51:46 Like, God. Okay. You two know everything. My work is done here. Throw the topic and walk away. Excellent. Casandra 51:55 Sorry, Brooke. Brooke 51:56 No, I'm loving it. Casandra 51:58 This is how we cope with talking about money. Margaret 52:01 Yeah. Brooke 52:04 Oh, it's so good. No, I have you know, I have a couple of, of friends and or relations that are both on the against it side. Well, neither of whom went to college or have any students debt. Casandra 52:21 Why are they still your friends? Brooke 52:22 Well, Facebook friends, let's say that. Casandra 52:25 That's fair. Brooke 52:25 I think it's important to listen to what people say on the other side. So, I try and understand the arguments and can have a conversation back and hopefully bring them into the light. Margaret 52:34 Yeah, that's legit. But wait, what if we instead created an increasingly more insular and pure subculture? Brooke 52:44 It seems problematic I'm gonna say, but... Margaret 52:47 What? Brooke 52:47 That's probably for another episode. Okay. Margaret 52:50 Okay, I'll stop derailing you, Casandra Johns 52:52 it would only be the three of us. Everyone else is wrong in some way. Margaret 52:56 I think that that's probably true. I'm sorry Bursts, who's doing our editing, I'm sorry Inmn, who produce the podcast. Brooke 53:06 You better apologize to all the patrons right now too. Margaret 53:10 Yeah, if you want to be pure and join our pure culture. A $20 a month level. Brooke 53:19 No. No cults. No cults. Margaret 53:22 Everyone keeps saying that to me. Okay. Brooke 53:26 That's why I took away that book on cults that I showed you the other day, you don't need the help. Margaret 53:32 Please continue. Brooke 53:33 Oh, God. Right. So so the arguments against it. Like you were saying, you know, one of them's about the, "I don't want my tax dollars going to that," which, like you said, is a pretty wild argument, because we don't get to decide directly where our tax dollars go. There's plenty of things that I'm in...None of us like taxes...And amongst us, especially like, abolish the government abolish the taxes, but even people who are okay with taxes as a functioning society, we still, you know, you don't get to decide where each dollar goes. What's your question face? Casandra 54:10 You mean when I vote, it doesn't directly change things? Brooke 54:14 Oh, God, another topic for another whole podcast episode about how about how it actually works out there in the world. Yeah, so that argument is kind of wild. And then the other one that I that I have seen is the, you know, "Why should anyone else pay for their choices?" especially if it's their...other people's bad choices or whatever. Which again, is wild to me. Margaret 54:42 You mean the bad choice to loan $60,000 to a 17 year old? Brooke 54:47 Yeah, seems like maybe that should be not a not a thing. Margaret 54:51 Well, I just but it's a bad financial like, like come on. That's that's a that's part of loaning money is you take into account like, there's risk involved. It is a risky loan to loan a 17 year old money. Anyway, yep. Sorry. Brooke 55:07 Yeah, I saw one of my, you know, probably Gen X or Boomer aged relatives saying, "Hey, I signed up for the loans at 18. And I read the document, and I knew what I was getting myself into. And it was a choice. And it's everybody's choice." And it's so many bad takes so many bad takes... Casandra 55:24 I wonder how much their loan was compared to mine? Brooke 55:27 Yeah, and there's that. Casandra 55:28 I'm gonna guess significantly less. Brooke 55:30 Yeah, so let me get into a little bit of data here, because I love data. Let's talk also about what the loans are and aren't, because if you're only looking at the headlines there's a lot that's not captured in there. The number we see tossed around is the $10,000 of forgiveness. And that's up to $10,000 of forgiveness. So there's caveats on that, because there's a income limitation as to when you can get it. And it decreases a little bit based on what your income is. But also, if you were awarded a Pell Grant, at any point in your college education, you can actually get up to $20,000 in forgiveness, and Pell Grants are a federal grant, not a loan, but a grant, i.e. a gift, basically, that only go out to the lowest income kind of folks. So, if you qualified for a Pell Grant at the time that you also took out loans, then you can get a higher amount of loan forgiveness. And then it also only is it takes effect for people who had taken out a loan prior to June 30th of this year 2020. So if you're in school, right now, if you're just starting this fall, it doesn't apply to you. You had to have taken out a loan prior to that to qualify. Some of the cool things about it, though, are that it helps kind of all kinds of federal loans, which 95% of student loan debt is a federal loan. Only about 5% is private loans. So that's most people with loans, although it's only again, those income requirements, but that's still a large portion of folks. Where's the other one I was looking at? Oh, there's a type of loans that parents can take out to help their kids. So most of the federal loans that folks sign up for, they are signing up themselves, right, you're putting yourself in debt for it, even though you're only 18, or whatever. But parents can also get a loan, there's a federal loan called Parent PLUS, that you can take out to help your kids and those loans also qualify for forgiveness. And that is different than the student's loan. So if you're a parent who took out one of those loans for your kid, and your kid also took out loans, you both separately qualify for forgiveness. Casandra 57:48 Is this...Sorry, is this...I hadn't heard of those parent loans. Is the thought that they're taking out a loan to help pay for their kids college? Brooke 57:56 Yeah. Casandra 57:57 Okay. So, just like, "Look, another loan we can give to someone." Brooke 58:02 Yeah. And it's a federal federal one again, and you know, federal loans overall are, at least compared with like private student loans you can get they're way more reasonable, super low interest rates, longer repayment periods, you can get restructuring, if you're having financial issues or get a pause on it, there's more ways to get them forgiven, like working for a nonprofit or in the private sector, stuff like that. So, these are sort of nicer loans, which is one of the faults that people point out with it is that the the private loans that are the more of the predatory style loans, like we talked about with the IMF earlier, you know, higher interest rates, they don't care about how much you are or aren't making necessarily, they just say you have to start paying it at this point, and you have to pay this much and they'll come after your car or your dog or your firstborn child or whatever in order to get their repayments. And this federal forgiveness doesn't affect those folks. Margaret 58:59 Would you say that our listeners should take out predatory loans from payday loan places in order to buy rain barrels? Brooke 59:08 No. Because you should never support predatory loan places. You can steall from those places. Margaret 59:16 What if we, what if we start a rain barrel loan fund that offers predatory rates? Brooke 59:28 Then I would no longer call you an anarchist. You'd be an An-Cap [Anarcho-capitalist] and out of the club. Casandra 59:33 Is this you? Is this you segwaying into an ad break for our sponsors? Margaret 59:41 No, i was my brain's poisoned by how the fact that my other podcast is...has actual ad breaks. Casandra 59:48 Duh Duh duh duuuuh! I'm rain barrels! Brooke 59:49 Hey, if rain barrels would give away some, loan some rain barrels, I would let them plug a little ad on this ad-free anarchist podcast network. Yeah. Margaret 1:00:01 Yeah. Although, I'm holding out for big IBC tote. Brooke 1:00:05 Yes. Margaret 1:00:05 Cause IBC totes are 275 gallons, sort of 55 gallons. And that's what I showered with for the past three years, an IBC tote available from wherever you're willing to go get a really cheap thing that used to be full of detergent and wash it out vaguely. Margaret 1:00:11 Half an hour's drive, we can go grab some. Casandra 1:00:25 Wait, really? Margaret 1:00:26 Yeah, yeah. Casandra 1:00:28 We should talk about that after we're done doing a podcast which we are in fact doing right now. Margaret 1:00:32 Oh right, okay. Brooke 1:00:33 Okay, one of the other things that comes up when folks talk about student loans is you get like the the Boomer types that will say, you know, "I worked a part time job when I was in school and paid off my...paid for my school while I was going to school." And I think we all know that that's just not possible to do anymore. And that's because of the cost of education and how it has skyrocketed. So, if you look at the difference from 70s, 80s, or so, of like median income in the US with the average household makes, versus the average cost of college, the average income has gone up like half again as much since the 80s or so, whereas the cost of college is four times more expensive than it was. And then the other argument that comes up that people make is, well, "Everybody thinks they have to go to college. Now, you know, everybody's trying to enroll in college, not everyone needs to go to college. But everyone tries to." And when you look at the numbers of like, the portion of the population that has that's going to college and how that's changed in the last like 50 years, it's been pretty much steady for the last 25 years. It rose in the 60s, late 60s was kind of flat in the 70s then started to rise again through the 80s and the mid 90s. Probably because of the series of recessions that we had that were really severe in some places, like Oregon had a really severe recession. And when there was a recession, more people go back to school, but it hit a peak in the mid 90s And then dropped for a while and then has kind of been staying around that peak, on average, over the last 25 years. That and that's the number of people has gone up, but the portion of the population, right, so as a percent of the total population has actually been quite stable for a while now. Margaret 1:02:30 And like, I'm a big fan of having not gotten a degree, right? But, I even had a dream again last night where I like dropped out of school again. And I was like, "Fuck you, I quit." And it was really, but, but it's something that I think that a lot of people don't talk about when they talk about being like, "Oh, well, not everyone needs a college degree," or whatever it is they they don't understand that like how important upper higher education is to upward mobility and upward class mobility, especially for like people who are like, marginalized among other identities besides class, like specifically around race, you know, like, there's...so I think that...I think it's something that we can accidentally get a little to like, "Yeah!" like, you know, people get very, like "I'm so blue collar, everyone should drive forklifts," instead of going and studying gender studies or whatever, right? And just like not fucking getting how important class mobility can be for people and how that functions most of the time. And so I get really annoyed when people are like, "No one should ever go to college," or whatever, because I'm like, that is a really that is a position that comes from a specific place for some people, you know? Casandra 1:03:44 Yeah. Brooke 1:03:46 I think people also forget in that the fact that college classes can include courses for some of those types of jobs. So,talking about like the other four year degree, an apprenticeship. You know, if you're an electrician or a sheetmetal worker, you're probably you're going to take some classes and probably through a community college as part of your education to get those kinds of jobs. If you're doing a forklift or CNC, you have to take a course and they can be three months, six months, twelve months courses, and often again, through community college. So even though you're not getting a degree, you're still doing some post secondary education. Margaret 1:04:29 Yeah. Casandra 1:04:30 Do you want to know how much debt I have for my community college? Brooke 1:04:34 Oh, this is gonna hurt. Casandra 1:04:36 Forty Grand. Brooke 1:04:38 Shut the front door. Casandra 1:04:41 And that's like with grants and shit because like I good grades and all that. I was on the 'President's list.' Brooke 1:04:45 For a frame of reference, listeners, Casandra graduated more recently, like last couple years, or three or whatever it was, but fairly recently. Yeah. When I was looking at the numbers, here's my personal anecdote. The cost have the four year degree that I got 15 years ago. I'm taking some community college classes now. And if I did an associate's degree, it would cost me as much for two years of community college today as it did for a four year degree with two majors 15 years ago. Yeah, the cost has has exponentially risen again. Four times. It's it's four times higher than it was like 40 years ago. It's risen more than anything, any other good or commodity. The cost of college has increased. Margaret 1:05:40 I will say, my, like optimistic, putting on my optimism hat. I don't like hats. That's probably why I'm not great. Okay. When I think about like some of the most...the strongest that leftist movements, anarchist movements, I know more about anarchist movements, I do other movements. The strongest they've been is like often, while popular education, or the existing educational infrastructure is failing everyone. And, you know, like a lot of work around reframing education in both France and Spain was coming out of anarchists in the late 19th and early 20th century in the modern school movement, all this stuff, and people were getting, like, literally murdered for advocating for things like "What if boys and girls are taught in the same classrooms and shit," and it's like awild idea that anarchists came up with. And like not talking about God in the classroom. Oh, my god, we're actually losing on all of these. Okay, anyway. It's like, "Remember the fight for an eight hour workday?" And I'm like, "Man, I wish I had eight hour workday right now." Okay, and but, but so that's like, my like, my, like, optimism is that like, in a burned for us new weeds grow? You know, I think that there's a lot of opportunity for alternative educational systems, but not in a way where they could like, immediately step in and be like an accredited university that allows the sort of class mobility that we're talking about, or whatever, right, but like, it does seem like mutual aid schooling and education are like, probably in a better position to take a foothold than they used to be. I hadn't really...I'd only previously thought about this more for like, grade school type stuff, especially for the whole, like how public school is like also kind of like low key just like childcare. And like, hadn't quite thought about this in terms of like, how it ties into, you know, continuing education, but it could, we could have Anarchy University, and then everyone could have degrees and okay, I don't know where I'm going with this. Brooke 1:07:45 Anarcho-U. Casandra 1:07:45 You need another project, Margaret. So... Margaret 1:07:51 No, dear listener, you need a project. At Projects-R-Us, we will give you a project. Brooke 1:08:00 Wrong podcast. Wrong, wrong podcast. Margaret 1:08:02 Replace the continuing education system!. Brooke 1:08:04 Nope, wrong podcast. Margaret 1:08:04 Okay, fine. Brooke 1:08:06 Yeah, so, Casandra 1:08:07 That'd be like your ideal job, I think. Margaret 1:08:09 it really would be, yes, I have way better at coming up with things that I can dedicate my entire life to than dedicating my entire life to any of the individual things. Brooke 1:08:22 Oh, maybe, maybe you didn't need to start the cult just to find leaders fo

Blake's Take
Sun Devils Ignite New Season With Win Over NAU

Blake's Take

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 5:56


A personal take on local and national sports throughout the Willamette Valley and beyond.Website:  https://www.buzzsprout.com/1401094Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/blakes-take/id1534887286?at=1l3vwYfhttps://open.spotify.com/show/1AmHhZwYhizT72nPNjvOyLYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDb_XyBQlGfZ0hHbp-URINA?view_as=subscriberSupport the show

NexxtLevel Brands podcast
Getting a slice of a Staid Category, Willamette Valley Pie Company - On the NexxtLevel Brands Podcast

NexxtLevel Brands podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 39:33


My guest today is Austin Kelly, CEO at Willamette Valley Pie Company in Oregon. I speak with Austin about how Willamette is growing their business– carefully self-financing, planning their expansion slowly and naturally. Their products occupy a premium, artisanal spot in the frozen pie category, and continue to be hand-crafted from berries grown and frozen in their family-owned, vertically integrated manufacturing plant and farmland in Salem, OR since 1999. Austin’s own background started at the age of 15 working in a cherry orchard, and later at Dave’s Killer Bread, so as he puts it, “Berries plus baking equals pie.” Willamette Valley Pie Company has grown berries in the bountiful Willamette Valley for three generations and each of their pies and cobblers are still hand-crafted with all-natural ingredients. Willamette knows that sharing dessert can create special family connections. What began as a small cannery-style operation in a backyard warehouse quickly grew into Willamette Valley Pie Company – a family-owned and operated business – producing the best pies around! You can order pies directly online, or visit their country store which opened in 2009, located in Salem, OR on the same property as their processing plant and flagship bakery. Look for a new cream pie line to debut this fall. The “NexxtLevel Brands Podcast’ is hosted by G. Steven Cleere, Founder and “Chief Pot Stirrer” of NexxtLevel Brands. This show focuses on disruptors and thought-leaders from the Entrepreneurial Food, Beverage, and CPG Industry, but we also share tips from veterans and key suppliers that may help fellow CPG professionals achieve their goals. Discussion Points Background and history of Willamette Pie Austin’s bakery + fruit background and career led to ‘pie’! Coming in as leadership at Willamette – where were the areas for growth? Capturing space as a premium product in the frozen pie cases Covid effects? Frozen pies did very well Willamette continues to self-finance, no investors The response to inflation- created some innovation and smaller pies to contain costs 2022 is shaping up to be a good fruit harvest The origin of Marionberries Prepping for the fall/holiday pie season- new cream pie launch Organic– Willamette consumers are more interested in farm origin than organic Where to find? Shipping direct to consumer, Whole Foods and Kroger Words to grow by, Maya Angelou “People always remember how you made them feel.” Reach out to us with show and guest ideas Resources: Austin Kelly LinkedIn Willamette Valley Pie Website NexxtLevel Brands Website Steven Cleere LinkedIn

Living Wholehearted Podcast With Jeff and Terra
Episode 145: When Our Stories Fuel Our Leadership with Scott Hatley (Part 1 of 2)

Living Wholehearted Podcast With Jeff and Terra

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 29:33


What beliefs do you hold about people with disabilities? Do you want to see positive change in education, the workplace, and the world for people with different abilities? Jeff Mattson hosts part 1 of a 2 part conversation with Scott Hatley. A native and resident of Portland, Oregon, Scott was born with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. He is Co-Founder and Executive Director of INCIGHT. In this episode, you'll hear how Scott's story influenced his call as he wanted more than what he saw others with disabilities experiencing. God seems to use what we see as limitations, disabilities, or struggles as the very vehicle to His call for our lives…if we are open to the adventure. Scott's commitment to positive change is evident in his collaborative creation of INCIGHT's mission. Scott serves on the Board of Directors for Exceed Enterprises and serves on the Partnership Council for All Hands Raised. He is recognized by several organizations for his service to the Disability Community, including the Muscular Dystrophy Association (Personal Achievement Award and 2004 national finalist), Exceptional Parent Magazine (2006 Distinguished Service Award), Oregon Parent Training and Information Center (2007 Youth Achievement Award) and Exceed Enterprises (2013 Londahl-Risley Award).   To connect with Scott Hatley, visit:   ONLINE - https://www.incight.org https://www.theunderstandingmagazine.com SOCIAL - LinkedIn - Scott Hatley (https://www.linkedin.com/in/scott-hatley-bb79974)     Our 2023-2024 Wholehearted Leadership Cohort application is open through September 15, 2022! If you are interested in taking a 2 year journey with other leaders from around the nation, check out the details on our website. You will get 15 one-to-one coaching sessions with one of our trauma-informed executive coaches, monthly group cohort meetings on a platform designed to create dialogue and community, and 4 in-person retreats in the beautiful Willamette Valley of Oregon. Learn more at www.livingwholehearted.com. To connect with Jeff & Terra Mattson and Living Wholehearted, go to: Instagram @TerraMattson @Living_Wholehearted @MyCourageousGirls Facebook @MyCourageousGirls @WeAreLivingWholehearted Websites LivingWholehearted.com MyCourageousGirls.com   Resources Shrinking the Integrity Gap https://davidccook.org/shrinking-integrity-gap-book/ Shrinking the Integrity Gap e-Course https://www.livingwholeheartedstore.com/e-courses Courageous: Being Daughters Rooted in Grace https://mycourageousgirls.com/shop/p/book-courageous-being-daughters-rooted-in-grace Dear Mattsons https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLdPzQ_cUwCbRc-MQ40KL3a6ze06CiY38l Helping Moms Raise Confident Daughters http://cpguides.org/

Graining In
#165: Lisa Allen | Heater Allen Brewery

Graining In

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 66:18 Very Popular


We're joined this week by @HeaterAllenBeer head brewer and the brewery's heir apparent, Lisa Allen!We get into Lisa's background in the wine world and the decision to switch beverages and work for her Father's brewery; Heater Allen's approach to making and love for Marzen; the pros and cons of wet hops in a lager brewery; and, naturally, true crime. @Lisa_Loves_Lagers, we loved talking to her, and you're sure to love hearin' it — available NOW, wherever fining-free audio is found!

Had I Known
Jessica Mozeico, Co-founder, Et Fille Wines

Had I Known

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 54:15


As Jessica built a successful career in  biotech, she never imagined her father's interest in wine would lead her down an entirely new career path. This week she shares the story of how Et Fille came to be, how her early career prepared her for winemaking even if she didn't know it and she gives Dave a lesson in the business of wine.Learn more about Et FilleAll music by Doctuh Michael Woods

Aging in the Willamette Valley
9/3/22: Bill Sweeney with AARP | How does the Inflation Reduction Act impact Medicare? | Aging In The Willamette Valley with John Hughes

Aging in the Willamette Valley

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 29:23


This week our guest is Bill Sweeney, Senior VP of Government Affairs at AARP, who joined us to explain how the Inflation Reduction Act impacts Medicare. Congress has just passed historic legislation to lower the prices of prescription drugs and put money back in the pockets of seniors. The new law requires Medicare to start negotiating the price of certain drugs, caps seniors' annual out-of-pocket costs for prescription drugs in Medicare Part D and limits the cost of insulin to $35 a month in Medicare. Find out when changes take effect. Don't miss this show!

Craft Beer & Brewing Magazine Podcast
258: Tom Shellhammer of Oregon State Shares Research on Hop Terroir

Craft Beer & Brewing Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 65:22 Very Popular


Tom Shellhammer's research work in the brewing field has been crucial for helping brewers, as well as barley and hop growers, gain deeper understanding of brewing ingredients and how they actually work. As a food science professor at Oregon State University, he's led critical studies, including a well-known study on hop creep. His latest project is a wide-ranging, multi-year study to understand the impact of terroir on hops, and the results of the first year of the study have just been released (https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/03610470.2022.2089010). In this episode, Shellhammer discusses the study—what they studied, how they studied it, what the results show, and what we have yet to understand. Along the way, Shellhammer discusses: what hop terroir is (weather, soil, latitude), and what it isn't (geomorphology) the impact of farming management practices the goals and parameters of the project measuring compounds, but also expression through sensory, to understand terroir impact how hop growers measure maturity on the bine the logic behind the focus on cascade and mosaic varieties the compounds at play, including monoterpene alcohols and thiols clustering of groups of flavor and aroma compounds based on location how the chemical compound analysis translates into finished beer magnitude of the differences in terroir and the potential for impact impact of microbiome in soil the scale of difference in the qualitative and measured factors in the study And more. One takeaway? Leaning on hop variety alone is a not a perfect measure. As Shellhammer said, “The variation between these two regions was as large as the variation between the two hop varieties.” This episode is brought to you by: G&D Chillers (https://gdchillers.com): G&D Chillers' Engineers are committed to green technology design, while developing a more energy efficient chiller for the brewing industry. Contact G&D Chillers today at gdchillers.com (https://gdchillers.com) Probrew (https://www.probrew.com) Check out www.probrew.com (https://www.probrew.com) for info on patented ProCarb inline carbonation technology, ProFill rotary filling & seaming can fillers, the Alchemator inline alcohol separation system, 7–50bbl Brewhouses and more! Old Orchard (https://www.oldorchard.com/brewer): Looking for innovation in your next beverage break-through? Think outside the purée box and let your brand stand out with Old Orchard's craft concentrate blends. To join the core of Old Orchard's brewing community, learn more at oldorchard.com/brewer (https://www.oldorchard.com/brewer) Fermentis (https://fermentis.com): Fermentis, the obvious choice for beverage fermentation, provides brewers large and small with the most complete portfolio of dry lager yeast available anywhere. To learn more, visit Fermentis.com (https://fermentis.com). Brewmation (https://brewmation.com/cbbpod): Brewmation specializes in electric, steam, and direct fire brew houses, complete cellar solutions, and automated controls for the craft brewing industry. Visit them at brewmation.com/cbbpod (https://brewmation.com/cbbpod) to get started. Arryved (https://www.arryved.com): Arryved mobile point of sale powers places with personality. No contracts and no monthly fees make Arryved a no brainer for your craft business. Go to Arryved.com/cbb (https://arryved.com/cbb) to set up a free, customized demo.

Fish Hunt Northwest
Fish Hunt Northwest Episode #39 Chinook, Coho, Steelhead, Tuna, also Openings and Closings not to mention guest Kyle Buschelman, Willamette Valley Outfitters

Fish Hunt Northwest

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 66:05


On this weeks Episode... Host Duane Inglin and Cohost, Tommy Donlin are back In-Studio with tons of info to cover. There are several openings and closings and the boys will keep you up to date. Also. they have a great discussion with buddy Kyle Buschelman... Buoy 10, put a fork in it, He's done! Several Coho fisheries are on the agenda, where to be and when! The Columbia River has closed to salmon fishing, but the fella's will tell you where you need to be fishing...

Blake's Take
How Impactful Are Sports Contracts Today?

Blake's Take

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 7:21


A personal take on local and national sports throughout the Willamette Valley and beyond.Website:  https://www.buzzsprout.com/1401094Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/blakes-take/id1534887286?at=1l3vwYfhttps://open.spotify.com/show/1AmHhZwYhizT72nPNjvOyLYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDb_XyBQlGfZ0hHbp-URINA?view_as=subscriberSupport the show

Living Wholehearted Podcast With Jeff and Terra
Episode 144: Leadership at the University & Beyond with Joseph Clair

Living Wholehearted Podcast With Jeff and Terra

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 52:32


Jeff Mattson sits down with Joseph Clair, Executive Dean at George Fox University, to discuss life and leadership on the university campus and beyond. Joseph shares how he has integrated his passion for faith and learning, stemming from his own story, finding Christ in high school and being hungry for knowledge and intellectual challenge. He wants students to have the same experience where they do not have to compromise one or the other. Joseph also shares his observations on the changing landscape of college life for students from a pre-pandemic to a post-pandemic world. As an expert student of the Scriptures, Joseph shares his love for Augustine wisdom and what Augustine might say to both emerging and seasoned leaders today. Any leader who has a passion for the next generation, or a parent who is preparing to launch a child into adulthood, will find this podcast to be a powerful catalyst in your own leadership journey.   A native Oregonian, Joseph Clair followed his educational pursuit all over the world and earned degrees in both England and the United States. He became professor of Theology and Philosophy and now Executive Dean at George Fox University after receiving his doctorate in Religion, Ethics, and Politics from Princeton University in 2013. He earned his bachelor's degree at Wheaton College (IL), a master's in theological studies from Duke, a master's in philosophy at Fordham, and a master's in philosophy of religion from Cambridge where he studied as a Gates Cambridge Scholar. He is the author of Discerning the Good in the Letters and Sermons of Augustine (Oxford University Press, 2016) and On Education, Formation, Citizenship, and the Lost Purpose of Learning (Bloomsbury, 2017) along with numerous articles and essays on faith, culture, and ethics. He is currently co-authoring an essay on Christian medical ethics entitled, Love Your Patient As Yourself, due out in 2023. In his spare time, he likes to spend time with his wife, Nora, play with his four kids, fly fish Oregon's many rivers, and work on his hobby farm.   To connect with Joseph Clair, visit:   ONLINE - https://www.georgefox.edu/academics/undergrad/departments/religion/faculty/joseph-clair.html SOCIAL - Twitter - @_JosephClair_ Facebook - @joseph.clair.98   BOOKS/ESSAYS - Discerning the Good in the Letters and Sermons of Augustine (Oxford University Press, 2016) On Education, Formation, Citizenship, and the Lost Purpose of Learning (Bloomsbury, 2017) Love Your Patient As Yourself (essay due out in 2023)     Our 2023-2024 Wholehearted Leadership Cohort application is open through September 15, 2022! If you are interested in taking a 2 year journey with other leaders from around the nation, check out the details on our website. You will get 15 one-to-one coaching sessions with one of our trauma-informed executive coaches, monthly group cohort meetings on a platform designed to create dialogue and community, and 4 in-person retreats in the beautiful Willamette Valley of Oregon. Learn more at www.livingwholehearted.com. To connect with Jeff & Terra Mattson and Living Wholehearted, go to: Instagram @TerraMattson @Living_Wholehearted @MyCourageousGirls Facebook @MyCourageousGirls @WeAreLivingWholehearted Websites LivingWholehearted.com MyCourageousGirls.com   Resources Shrinking the Integrity Gap Shrinking the Integrity Gap e-Course Courageous: Being Daughters Rooted in Grace Dear Mattsons Helping Moms Raise Confident Daughters

PDX Executive Podcast
Jessica Mozeico, Co-Founder of Et Fille Wines

PDX Executive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 20:53


Jessica Mozeico co-founded Willamette Valley winery Et Fille Wines, which means “and daughter”, with her father Howard Mozeico in 2003. Jessica grew up helping her dad with his winemaking hobby in their garage. She fell in love with wine, though it was a passion she cultivated from the sidelines as she pursued an undergraduate degree from Hamilton College, an MBA from Wharton at the University of Pennsylvania, and a career in biotechnology marketing. After years of leading biotechnology drug launches and marketing teams, Jessica founded Mozeico Consulting to provide strategic planning services. Finally, Jessica and Howard decided to co-found Et Fille Wines. They ran the winery together until Howard's untimely death. Jessica learned everything about winemaking from her dad. Today, Jessica operates the business, making elegantly complex wines inspired by her late father's legacy and her daughter's future. She says, "I have the honor and responsibility to carry Et Fille forward in a manner that is consistent with my dad's vision, values, and palate. I will continue building the legacy of Et Fille for my daughter." She feels fortunate to be part of the collaborative and encouraging Oregon wine community

PDX Executive Podcast
Oregon Summer Travel Series: Explore Willamette Valley with Dawnielle Tehama

PDX Executive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 20:17


Dawnielle Tehama is the Executive Director for the Willamette Valley Visitors Association. Learn more at: https://willamettevalley.org/

Iroh's Corner
Suzor Wines: Mélissa Rondeau

Iroh's Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 74:12


Join us for tea with Mélissa Rondeau, co-owner of Suzor Wines, a small production winery crafting beautiful, sustainable wines from the Willamette Valley. Mélissa shares about growing up in Montréal and pivoting from business school to hospitality, working in vibrant hospitality establishments in Europe that shaped how she views hospitality today, moving to Oregon and meeting her husband and co-owner of Suzor Wines, Greg McClellan, all about how they make beautiful wines at Suzor through Methven Family Vineyards' custom crush program, and so much more. This episode was sponsored by Prompt'd Moments: Get 30% off your order at Prompt'd Moments using code TEA30 Episode Links: Suzor Wines website & IG @suzor_wines Video interview with Mélissa & Greg by Rich Schmidt Mentioned Rose + Lincoln juices Négociant wine shop and delicatessen Domaine Roy winery in Dundee, OR Aesthete Tea Show Links: Want to support Iroh's Corner? You can leave us a review on Apple Podcasts or buy Jessi a one-time tea here Visit host Jessi's Linkedin or website Check out the Iroh's Corner Tea Library with host and guest tea recommendations Questions or comments about the episode? Email Jessi at hello@irohscorner.com

Bullet Sponge
The Oregon Trail

Bullet Sponge

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 46:19


The Oregon Trail is a series of educational computer games. The first game was originally developed by Don Rawitsch, Bill Heinemann, and Paul Dillenberger in 1971 and produced by the Minnesota Educational Computing Consortium (MECC) in 1974. The original game was designed to teach 8th grade schoolchildren about the realities of 19th-century pioneer life on the Oregon Trail. The player assumes the role of a wagon leader guiding a party of settlers from Independence, Missouri, to Oregon's Willamette Valley via a covered wagon in 1848.

Blake's Take
What Happened to The Yankees?

Blake's Take

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 5:59


A personal take on local and national sports throughout the Willamette Valley and beyond.Website:  https://www.buzzsprout.com/1401094Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/blakes-take/id1534887286?at=1l3vwYfhttps://open.spotify.com/show/1AmHhZwYhizT72nPNjvOyLYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDb_XyBQlGfZ0hHbp-URINA?view_as=subscriberSupport the show

Garden Futurist
Episode XVII: Finding Connection to Place though Indigenous Knowledge with Judy BlueHorse Skelton

Garden Futurist

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 27:25


When we look at the Willamette Valley, we recognize that we see these remnant giants of Oregon white oak in the landscape. Those Oregon white oaks and the oak savanna have been historically managed with cultural burns since time immemorial. If we can look at the oak savanna—of which about 3 percent remains today, it's an endangered ecosystem, just like the redwoods or old growth forests—we can see that a lot of our native plant relatives like nettles (Urtica) and the prairies of camas (Camassia) that we are in the process of replanting. Judy BlueHorse Skelton is an Assistant Professor in Indigenous Nations Studies at Portland State University.

Blake's Take
Rookie Quarterbacks Show Out in NFL Debuts

Blake's Take

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 4:37


A personal take on local and national sports throughout the Willamette Valley and beyond.Website:  https://www.buzzsprout.com/1401094Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/blakes-take/id1534887286?at=1l3vwYfhttps://open.spotify.com/show/1AmHhZwYhizT72nPNjvOyLYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDb_XyBQlGfZ0hHbp-URINA?view_as=subscriberSupport the show

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 634 (8-15-22): Coyotes and Frogs Call Out on a Virginia Summer Night

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:33).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 8-12-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of August 15 and August 22, 2022. MUSIC – ~19 sec – instrumental. That's part of ‘To the Wild,” by the Virginia band The Steel Wheels.  It opens an episode about a chance hearing of two very different kinds of wild animals, and how they might be similar or different, including in relation to water.  Have a listen to their calls for about 20 seconds and see if you know these two types of animals.  And here's a hint: one's in a scientific family with, and the other rhymes with, dogs. SOUNDS  - ~21 sec. If you guessed coyotes and frogs, you're right!  You heard barks and other sounds from coyotes, along with calls of Gray Treefrogs.  This lucky recording on the night of July 5, 2022, in Blacksburg, got your Virginia Water Radio host exploring potential connections and contrasts between this terrestrial mammal in the dog family, and this partially aquatic amphibian.  Here are seven areas of note. 1.  Like other living things, both coyotes and frogs are largely made of water and require it for biological functions.  Unlike coyotes, frogs can absorb water through their naked skin, that is, skin without scales, feathers, or fur. 2.  As amphibians, Gray Treefrogs breed in water, which of course coyotes don't. 3.  Like other mammals, coyotes keep a constant body temperature, and they evaporate water through panting to cool themselves.  Frogs' body temperature fluctuates with the environment; having naked skin that's permeable to water, frogs are at risk of drying out if their habitat isn't moist. 4.  Coyotes and adult frogs both have lungs for exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide, but, in frogs, gas exchange also occurs across their skin. 5.  Both are notable for their sounds.  Coyotes use barks, howls, and other sounds to communicate to family members and to potential competitors, and frog males use calls to attract females, signal their presence to other males, and perhaps to startle away predators. 6.  These animals appear together in at least three Native American legends, including one from the Kalapuya people of Oregon, called “The Coyote and the Frog People.”  In this story, the coyote sneakily digs through a dam the frogs use to hold all of the world's water for themselves; this then creates all the rivers, lakes, and waterfalls and ends the frogs' water hoarding. And 7.  Both coyotes and Gray Treefrogs show remarkable adaptability to human environments.  Coyotes are noted for occupying habitats near humans, such as city and suburban parks.  Gray Treefrogs, meanwhile, can also be found in human spaces, such as in swimming pools or on house walls or decks.  One wildlife biologist consulted for this episode said that in his Virginia county coyotes seem to “saunter by houses like they own the place”; in the frog world, noted another biologist, Gray Treefrogs have a somewhat similar reputation. Thanks to several Virginia Tech faculty members for providing information for this episode.  Thanks also to The Steel Wheels for permission to use their music, and we close with about 30 more seconds of “To the Wild.” MUSIC - ~30 sec – Lyrics: “I'm gonna run to the wild.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Virginia Water Radio thanks Mark Ford, Kevin Hamed, and James Parkhurst, all in the Virginia Tech Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, for contributing information to this episode. The Coyote and Gray Treefrog sounds heard in this episode were recorded by Virginia Water Radio in Blacksburg, Va., on July 5, 2022, at approximately 10:15 p.m. “To the Wild,” by The Steel Wheels, is from the 2017 album “Wild As We Came Here,” used with permission.  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at https://www.thesteelwheels.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 490, 9-16-19. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES (If not otherwise noted, photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) Coyote, photographed in Virginia Beach, Va., February 27, 2016.  Photo by Shawn Dash, made available on iNaturalist at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/13877118(as of August 15, 2022) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Internbational.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/.Gray Treefrog on the deck of a residence in Blacksburg, Va., September 23, 2009.EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT ANIMALS IN THIS EPISODE The following information is excerpted from “Coyote” and “Gray Treefrog” entries of the Virginia Department of Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources' (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries) “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.  The Coyote entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?Menu=_.Taxonomy&bova=050125&version=19215; the Gray Treefrog entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?Menu=_.Taxonomy&bova=020007&version=19215. Coyote (Scientific name: Canis latrans) Occurrence“Coyotes are thought to have started being seen in the 1950's and the 1960's here in Virginia, particularly in the western part of the state, and they now have an established population throughout the state.  Current occurrence throughout the state is attributed to the steady eastward migration of this species, which is due to the elimination of other large carnivores, such as red wolves, from their former ranges and to coyotes being highly opportunistic feeders and thus are highly adaptable to many habitats.” Physical Description“The males are generally larger than the females...with a body length of 1.0-1.35 meters, and a tail length of 400 millimeters.  The coat color and texture shows geographic variation, but usually the coat color is a grey mixed with a reddish tint.  ...This species is generally smaller than the grey wolf.  ...The track (70mm by 60mm) is more elongated than the domestic dog but shorter than either the gray or red wolf.” Reproduction“Yearling males and females are capable of breeding.  The percentage of yearlings breeding is controlled by food supply.  Gestation lasts 63 days.  The mean litter size is 5.3 and is affected by population density and food supply.” Behavior“The home range size of the males is 20-42 kilometers (km), and for females 8-10 km.   The female home ranges do not overlap whereas male home ranges do.  The average daily travel is reported as 4.0 km, with dispersal movements of 160 km not uncommon.  Favorable den sites include brush-covered slopes, steep banks, thickets, hollow logs, and rock ledges.  The dens of other animals may be used.  ...Dens may be shared and used for more than one year. ...Coyotes use visual, auditory, olfactory and tactile signals for communications.  They eat mostly rodents and rabbits but also take berries fruits and carrion.  They are primarily nocturnal and their howls can be heard for miles.” Gray Treefrog (Scientific name: Hyla versicolor) Occurrence“In Virginia, this species is distributed in the mountains north of the New River drainage, in the Blue Ridge, and in the Piedmont.” Physical Description“This species is identical in appearance to Hyla chrysoscelis [Cope's Gray Treefrog] but they do not interbreed.  These two species can be distinguished by chromosome number and by male mating call. ...Both species are well camouflaged.  They are usually gray but coloration ranges from gray to whitish to brown to green dependent upon environment and activities.  There is a whitish mark beneath the eyes and a bright orange or yellow on the concealed surfaces of the hind legs.  The dorsal skin is warty.  This species ranges in length from 32 to 62 milllimeters (1.25-2.5 inches).” Reproduction“Males call between March and August.  ...Breeding generally occurs from March to June.  The female lays clumps of 10 to 40 eggs per group on the surface of shallow ditches, puddles, and ponds  ...Eggs typically hatch in 4 to 5 days, and metamorphosis occurs in 45 to 64 days.” Behavior“This species is not often seen on the ground or near the water's edge except during the breeding season.  It tends to forage while in small trees or shrubs near to or standing in water.  This species is an opportunistic feeder focusing primarily on larval Lepidoptera [butterflies and moths], Coleoptera [beetles], and other arthropods.” Limiting Factors“This species is fairly arboreal, foraging from trees and shrubs in the vicinity of water. ...In general, this species requires shallow ponds with fallen branches or herbaceous growth on the water's edge.” Aquatic/Terrestrial Associations“This species is typically associated with the following forest types: black willow, sweet gum-willow oak, white oak-red oak-black oak and mixed pine-hardwood.  They are frequently found in recently disturbed areas with shrub and herbaceous cover.” SOURCES Used for Audio Atlanta Coyote Project, “Coyote Activity Patterns, Ranges, and Vocalizations,” online at https://atlantacoyoteproject.org/coyote-activity-patterns-ranges-vocalizations/. Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, “Animal Fact Sheet: Coyote,” online at https://www.desertmuseum.org/kids/oz/long-fact-sheets/coyote.php. Burke Museum [Seattle, Wash.], “All About Amphibians,” online at https://www.burkemuseum.org/collections-and-research/biology/herpetology/all-about-amphibians/all-about-amphibians. Epic Ethics, “Coyote Returns Water from the Frog People—A Native Kalapuya Tale,” online at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=six1kVQS_tw. First People of North America and Canada, “Native American Legends,” online at https://www.firstpeople.us/FP-Html-Legends/. Kevin Hamed, Virginia Tech Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, personal communication, August 11, 2022. Richard W. Hill, Comparative Physiology of Animals: An Environmental Approach, Harper & Row, New York. 1976. Internet Sacred Text Archive, “The Coyote and the Frog,” identified as a Hopi contained in The Traditions of the Hopi, by H.R. Voth (1905), online at https://www.sacred-texts.com/nam/hopi/toth/toth065.htm. John D. Kleopfer and Chris S. Hobson, A Guide to the Frogs and Toads of Virginia, Bureau of Wildlife Resources Special Publication Number 3, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries [now Department of Wildlife Resources], Richmond, Va., 2011. Lane Community College [Eugene, Ore.], “Kalapuya: Native Americans of the Willamette Valley, Oregon,” online at https://libraryguides.lanecc.edu/kalapuya. Miami [Fla.] Children's Museum, YouTube video (4 min./39 sec.) of “The Coyote and the Frog People,” celebrating Native American Heritage Month, November 3, 2020, online at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9q4km_HDGeI. Brian R. Mitchell et al., “Information Content of Coyote Barks and Howls,” Bioacoustics: The International Journal of Animal Sound and its Recording, Vol. 15, pages 289–314 (2006); online (as a PDF) at https://www.uvm.edu/~bmitchel/Publications/Mitchell_Information_content.pdf. National Geographic, “Coyote,” undated, online at https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/facts/coyote. National Parks and Recreation Association, “Coyotes Have Moved into Parks Across the United States—Now What,” by Richard J. Dolesh, Parks & Recreation, April 6, 2018, online at https://www.nrpa.org/parks-recreation-magazine/2018/april/coyotes-have-moved-into-parks-across-the-united-states-now-what/. New Hampshire PBS, “NatureWorks/Gray Treefrog,” online at https://nhpbs.org/natureworks/graytreefrog.htm. Oregon Encyclopedia [Oregon Historical Society], “Kalapuyan Peoples,” by Henry Zenk, undated, online at https://www.oregonencyclopedia.org/articles/kalapuyan_peoples/#.YvPg_RzMJPY. James Parkhurst, Virginia Tech Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, personal communication, August 11, 2022. Roger Powell et al., Peterson Field Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians of Eastern and Central North America, Fourth Edition, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Boston, Mass., 2016. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources [formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries],“Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/; the Coyote entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=050125&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19215; the Gray Treefrog entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=020007&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19215. Ya-Native, “Coyote Takes Water From the Frog People—A Plains Legend,” online at

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Aging in the Willamette Valley
8/13/22: Shelby Murtha with CaptionCall | Did You Know You Can Get Transcriptions On Your Phone? | Aging In The Willamette Valley

Aging in the Willamette Valley

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 27:35


This week we talked with Shelby Murtha, Oregon, Account Manager from CaptionCall. She discussed CaptionCall phones that are optimized for individuals with hearing loss. They use voice-to-text technology, assisted by captioning agents and automated speech recognition, to transcribe your conversation so that other speakers' words appear on your CaptionCall screen. You can use CaptionCall with landlines or cell phones, which doesn't change your existing service or price. CaptionCall is FREE! Don't miss this show!

Blake's Take
Subway Sweep! Mets Sweep the Yankees

Blake's Take

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 4:35


A personal take on local and national sports throughout the Willamette Valley and beyond.Website:  https://www.buzzsprout.com/1401094Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/blakes-take/id1534887286?at=1l3vwYfhttps://open.spotify.com/show/1AmHhZwYhizT72nPNjvOyLYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDb_XyBQlGfZ0hHbp-URINA?view_as=subscriberSupport the show

Blake's Take
Marcus Mariota is Back

Blake's Take

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 4:05


A personal take on local and national sports throughout the Willamette Valley and beyond.Website:  https://www.buzzsprout.com/1401094Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/blakes-take/id1534887286?at=1l3vwYfhttps://open.spotify.com/show/1AmHhZwYhizT72nPNjvOyLYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDb_XyBQlGfZ0hHbp-URINA?view_as=subscriberSupport the show

Blake's Take
Legends Lost But Never Forgotten, Remembering Bill Russell and Vin Scully

Blake's Take

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 5:32


A personal take on local and national sports throughout the Willamette Valley and beyond.Website:  https://www.buzzsprout.com/1401094Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/blakes-take/id1534887286?at=1l3vwYfhttps://open.spotify.com/show/1AmHhZwYhizT72nPNjvOyLYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDb_XyBQlGfZ0hHbp-URINA?view_as=subscriberSupport the show

Cork Rules
Episode 106: Don Angie, NYC

Cork Rules

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 5:36


Wine educator and certified sommelier Whitney Grant and Robert Tas explore the wine list of Don Angie, a Michelin-starred restaurant in East Village that serves a fusion of American, Italian, and Asian cuisine. Whitney provides excellent pairing suggestions with select menu items, explains why present-day Lambruscos should be given a second chance, and recommends a natural orange wine on the list. Wines reviewed include: Vinous Obscura Fiano Blend, Willamette Valley 2017 Harlan Estate from Oakville, California Montanari, 'Opera' Lambrusco di Modena Secco For more information on today's episode, and the wines you love to love, visit www.corkrules.com.  

The Rural Woman Podcast
Diversifying your crops with Christina Fordyce

The Rural Woman Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 42:19


On this week's episode of The Rural Woman Podcast™, you'll meet Christina Fordyce. Christina grew up in the Willamette Valley as a homeschooler who one day aspired to grow her own garden. After graduating college in the midwest, she returned to her hometown to marry her childhood crush Graham - a farmer. She now co-owns Fordyce Farm inc. with her husband and father-in-law. The family farm has grown by leaps and bounds, now seeing the 4th generation of Fordyces running around in the strawberry fields. Christina and Graham have two toddler sons they are raising while running the family business. Fordyce Farm inc. has been in operation since 1959 and incorporated the business in 2021. The Fordyce family stays very busy all year in their very diversified operation. They offer u-pick and we-pick berries, a farm stand with local gifts and other produce, vegetable starts and nursery stock, baked goods with seasonal fruit, homemade ice cream and milkshakes, a pumpkin patch and corn maze in the fall, and now also Christmas trees.  For full show notes, including links mentioned in the show, head over to wildrosefarmer.com/151 . . . This week's episode is brought to you by https://the-rural-woman-podcast.captivate.fm/bin-manager (AGI BinManager ) . . . https://the-rural-woman-podcast.captivate.fm/ultimate-field-meal-guide (Ultimate Field Meal Guide) Let's get SocialFollow The Rural Woman Podcast on Social Media https://www.instagram.com/theruralwomanpodcast/ (Instagram) | https://www.facebook.com/theruralwomanpodcast (Facebook) Join our private Facebook group, https://www.facebook.com/groups/theruralwomanpodcast (The Rural Woman Podcast Community) Connect with Katelyn on https://www.instagram.com/wildrosefarmer/ (Instagram )| https://www.facebook.com/WildRoseFarmer (Facebook )| https://twitter.com/wildrosefarmer (Twitter )| https://www.pinterest.ca/wildrosefarmer/ (Pinterest) . . . Support the Showhttps://www.patreon.com/TheRuralWomanPodcast (Patreon) | https://wildrosefarmer.com/shop/ (Merch) | https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=FV87T87BJSTGL (PayPal) | Become a https://wildrosefarmer.com/sponsorship/ (Show Sponsor) Shop our https://wildrosefarmer.com/2020/05/21/show-sponsors/ (Show Sponsors) Leave a Review on https://podcasts.apple.com/ca/podcast/the-rural-woman-podcast/id1456194942 (Apple Podcasts) | Take the https://wildrosefarmer.com/2022/04/01/listener-survey/ (Listener Survey) Screen shot this episode and share on your socials! Tag @TheRuralWomanPodcast + #TheRuralWomanPodcast . . . Meet the TeamAudio Editor | https://www.xn--mixbr-jra.at/ (MixBär.) Admin Team | https://www.kimandco.online/ (Kim & Co Online) Patreon Executive Producers Sarah R. | https://happinessbytheacre.ca/ (Happiness by The Acre) Karri MV. | https://fermesleystone.com/ (Leystone Farms) . . . More with KatelynOne on One Podcast Coaching | https://wildrosefarmer.com/before-you-buy-the-mic-podcast-coaching/ (Learn More) Positively Farming Media | a hub for creators in the food & agriculture space | https://www.subscribepage.com/positivelyfarmingmedia (Learn More)

Weinnotes
Vincent Fritzsche - Oregon Wine Country Winemaker in the Willamette Valley

Weinnotes

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 61:45


It takes a certain type of person to become a winemaker, a surfer, an academic, and an all around genuine nice person. Vincent is one of those If You Know, You Know winemakers in Oregon. Plenty of people know who he is, but his marketing is all grassroots word of mouth. Making wines from some top name vineyards such as Zenith, Armstrong, Bjornson, and Temperance Hill to name a few. Vincent's quality and price point are amongst the best you can get. Vincent and I talk about his first wine epiphany at the age of four, a new project coming online with fruit from Napa, and team flip flop. Please enjoy my conversation with Vincent from Vincent Wine Company.

Italian Wine Podcast
Ep. 1026 Rachel Adams | Voices

Italian Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 36:38


Welcome to Episode 1026 Cynthia Chaplin interviews Rachel Adams, in this installment of Voices, on the Italian Wine Podcast. More about today's guest: Rachel Adams is the Founder and Executive Director of Assemblage, a 501c3 nonprofit organization based in Oregon's Willamette Valley that works to address disparities tied to race, ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, and ability in the global wine industry. Rachel was recognized among Wine Enthusiast Magazine's “40 Under 40 Tastemakers” in 2020. Before founding Assemblage in 2019, Rachel worked for over a decade contributing to some of the Willamette Valley's top winery sales and marketing teams including REX HILL and A to Z Wineworks, Bethel Heights Vineyard, and Lingua Franca. A passionate advocate for a more diverse and inclusive wine industry, Rachel has presented the Assemblage approach to DE&I to audiences in Portland, Seattle, and New York and infuses those methods into her work as Director at Play Nice PR, a Portland-based public relations agency representing independent food and wine businesses. To learn more visit: Website: assemblagesymposium.com Instagram: @assemblagesymposium / @radamsuo Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/rachel-adams-46b55637/ About today's Host: Cynthia Chaplin is a Vinitaly International Academy certified Italian Wine Ambassador, a professional sommelier with Fondazione Italiana Sommelier, a member of Le Donne del Vino, and a Professor of Italian wine and culture. Born in the USA, Cynthia moved to Europe in 1990 where she has lived in Spain, Belgium, England and Italy. She chose to center her career in Rome and immerse herself in the Italian wine sector, which is her passion. She has taught university students and expats, works with embassies, corporations and private clients, creating and presenting tastings, events, seminars and in-depth courses. Cynthia is a wine writer, translator, and a judge at international wine and sake competitions. She consults with restaurants and enotecas assisting in the development of comprehensive wine lists and excellent food pairings, as well as advising private clients who want to develop a comprehensive Italian wine collection. She lives with her British photographer husband on the shore of Lake Bracciano, north of Rome, where they share their beautiful garden with one massive grapevine, two border collies and an arrogant diva cat. To learn more visit: Facebook: Italian Wines in English Instagram: kiss_my_glassx Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/cynthia-chaplin-190647179/ Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodcast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ Until next time, Cin Cin!

Respect My Region Presents: The RMR Podcast
The RMR Podcast Ep 50: Willamette Valley Alchemy Talks Oregon Cannabis and Concentrates

Respect My Region Presents: The RMR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 30:54


The RMR Podcast: Music, Cannabis, and Marketing On this episode of the RMR Podcast, Mitch talks with Brice Sherman and Derek Panter from Willamette Valley Alchemy. Willamette Valley Alchemy was established in 2015 and is one of the premier concentrate companies in the Oregon cannabis market. Brice is one of the owners and Derek is the sales manager at the company. Today we talk about the Oregon cannabis market, concentrates, and more! More at www.respectmyregion.com

Will We Make It Out Alive?
S3E5, Why did the Caterpillar Cross the Road? To get to the Artillery Range

Will We Make It Out Alive?

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 53:23


Welcome to Season 3, Episode 5, Why did the Caterpillar Cross the Road? To get to the Artillery Range. A story about the metamorphosis of a prison into a butterfly rearing facility for endangered species recovery. This episode is all about the Sustainability in Prisons Project's (SPP) Taylor's Checkerspot Butterfly Program. In this episode, we learn more about the program with Mary Linders, endangered species biologist and we talk with Liz Louie, former butterfly technician, about her experience rearing Taylor's checkerspot butterflies. This season is all about the Sustainability in Prisons Project (otherwise referred to as SPP), how they bring education, nature and training into the prisons to reduce recidivism and protect and enhance our environment. This season (we now know) is 7 episodes long. In the first episode we got into how it all started; Episode 2 provided a background on the prison system and an introduction to SPP. Episode 3 was all about partnerships, which is really what SPP is, a network of partners working to bring education and nature into the prison system