Podcast appearances and mentions of Al Sharpton

American Baptist minister, civil rights activist and talk show host

  • 726PODCASTS
  • 1,328EPISODES
  • 1hAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 30, 2022LATEST
Al Sharpton

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about Al Sharpton

Show all podcasts related to al sharpton

Latest podcast episodes about Al Sharpton

The Chris Plante Show
11-29-22 Hour 3 - Don's Dinner with Kanye

The Chris Plante Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 37:52


In hour 3, Chris talks about the media obsession with a dinner Trump had with a hispanic white supremacist, and the absolute irony of having Al Sharpton on to discuss the issue... For more coverage on the issues that matter to you download the WMAL app, visit WMAL.com or tune in live on WMAL-FM 105.9 from 9:00am-12:00pm Monday-Friday.To join the conversation, check us out on twitter @WMAL and @ChrisPlanteShow See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Howie Carr Radio Network
Morning Minute: Al Sharpton Recruited to Denounce Hate - 11.30.22

The Howie Carr Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 1:56


Everybody knows that when you want to denounce anti-Semitism on your show you recruit the loudest anti-Semitic around! Al Sharpton wouldn't exactly be Howie's pick, but he was Joe Scarborough's yesterday on MSNBC!

Frank Morano
Local Spotlight | 11-29-2022

Frank Morano

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 12:48


Frank Morano brings you the issues that matter the most with style and wit in the Other Side of Midnight Local Spotlight. Frank discusses Al Sharpton's annual Thanksgiving address, the debacle that occurred with the nursing homes in New York under Governor Cuomo during COVID, the law that was passed back in May by the New York State legislature stating that no party may use independence or independent as part of its name, and incarceration of Tommy "Shots" Gioeli. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The DTALKS Podcast - Detoxing from Life
Episode 230 - A proximity to honesty (ft. Devan Sandiford)

The DTALKS Podcast - Detoxing from Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 49:58


What are you thankful for?  In this episode of the podcast Joe welcomes Devan Sandiford to the show and what follows is an extremely deep and thoughtful conversation around the way we move through life as individuals and collectively as a community. It truly feels like a conversation between old friends and we can't wait for Devan to come back on the show. Enjoy! About Devan Sandiford Devan is a published writer and four-time New York City Moth StorySLAM champion. His stories have been featured in the Washington Post, The Moth Podcast, Seattle NPR affiliate KNKX, Speak Up Storytelling, and several other outlets. His story—The Loudest Whisper—was chosen by The Moth to be the companion to a story told by Rev. Al Sharpton's for Black History Month 2020, and was downloaded over 1 million times and in 49 different countries as of February 2021. He is currently working on his debut book - a painfully honest memoir removing the curtain of race to reveal hard truths about how he lost his humanity and convinced himself it was no big deal until he became a dad. After finding his own voice, he founded Unreeling Storytelling—a Brooklyn-based organization providing a platform for people of color, women, and others who have been pushed to the margins of our culture.   Make sure to check out the NEW Dtalkspodcast.com website! Thanks to Empire Toys for this episode of the podcast! Nostalgia is something everyone loves and Empire Toys in Keller Texas is on nostalgia overload.   With toys and action figures from the 70's, 80's, 90's, and today, Empire Toys is a one-stop-shop for a trip down memory lane and a chance to reclaim what was once yours (but likely sold at a garage sale)   Check out Empire Toys on Facebook, Instagram, or at TheEmpireToys.com The DTALKS Podcast has also been ranked #9 in the "Top 40 Detox Podcast You Must Follow in 2020" according to Feedspot.com for our work in the Cultural Detox space. Thank you so much to the Feedspot team!  https://blog.feedspot.com/detox_podcasts/  

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand
Nick Reed PODCAST 11.29.22 - Fauci couldn't recall critical COVID decisions during deposition

Springfield's Talk 104.1 On-Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 43:29


Hour 3 -  Good Tuesday morning! Here's what Nick Reed covers this morning: Al Sharpton is MSNBC's hands-on expert on antisemitism... Do you remember this: Sharpton infamously used a tragic 1991 car accident to incite a three-day race riot in Crown Heights. Sharpton took advantage of the accidental death of a boy named Gavin Cato to spread conspiracies about a Jewish “nexus” between “Tel Aviv” and “South Africa” (then still an apartheid state) and the “diamond merchants” of Crown Heights. Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt said Friday during his seven-hour deposition with Dr. Anthony Fauci new information revealed that two months after Fauci told a friend masks were "ineffective," he supported mask mandates. Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry says the public is "going to be shocked" when it learns how little Dr. Anthony Fauci could recall during last week's deposition about "some of the most important actions and discussions" when he was chief medical adviser to Presidents Trump and Biden during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Howie Carr Radio Network
"Mourning Joe" Employs Expert Anti-Semitic and "Lunch Bucket Joe" Thinks He's Solved the Union Problems - 11.29.22 - Howie Carr Show Hour 2

The Howie Carr Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 41:04


Joe Scarborough brings the strangest guest on MSNBC to denounce bias and bigotry: Al Sharpton, one of the most outspoken racist, anti-Semitic homophobes around. Then, Howie talks the impending rail strike because of our Commander in Chief's pure incompetence.

Black Information Network Daily
BIN Daily Podcast. November 28, 2022

Black Information Network Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 18:13


On today's podcast, host Ramses Ja discusses a recent news article attacking the amount of compensation Rev. Al Sharpton receives from his National Action Network organization.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dominic Carter
The Dominic Carter Show | 11-25-2022

Dominic Carter

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 55:19


Today on The Dominic Carter Show: Crime in New York City is always an ongoing issue, and Dominic dives into the latest developments and how they pertain to New York City Mayor Eric Adams as well as discussing Reverend Al Sharpton. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rudy Giuliani on 77 WABC
Biden's Gonna Need a Pardon | 11-22-2022

Rudy Giuliani on 77 WABC

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 41:13


Rudy talks Eric Adams & Al Sharpton , Biden and his crimes , and The 2024 election. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Conservative Circus w/ James T. Harris
The Media Admits That The Hunter Biden Laptop Story Is Real. The Grift Is Real For Rev. Al. Protests At The World Cup Growing In Numbers.

The Conservative Circus w/ James T. Harris

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 108:54


The media has finally come around to admitting after two years that the Hunter Biden laptop story is indeed real. Rev. Al Sharpton and many around him are good at the grift of guilt. Protests around the World Cup are growing in numbers on many fronts.

Bernie and Sid
WABC Host Rudy Giuliani | 11-22-2022

Bernie and Sid

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 18:30


WABC Host Rudy Giuliani joins the program to talk about Al Sharpton, taking advice from former politicians, and Trump's return. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The John Steigerwald Show
The John Steigerwald Show - Monday November 21, 2022

The John Steigerwald Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 51:55


Never Trust a Preacher Who Owns More Than Two Suits             Today:  Comedian Lenny Bruce might have been thinking of Rev. Al Sharpton when he made that statement, and Al has a lot more than two nice suits.  Then, Gordon Chang, author of The Coming Collapse of China, warns that the Chinese parent company of TikTok has had access to sensitive U.S. user-data and parents should keep kids off it.  Later, journalist Eric Lipton with the N.Y. Times' Washington Bureau explains how the gambling industry's lobbying of lawmakers made sports betting ubiquitous.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Frank Morano
Local Spotlight | 11-21-2022

Frank Morano

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 12:36


Frank Morano brings you the issues that matter the most with style and wit in the Other Side of Midnight Local Spotlight. Frank discusses school districts across the state of New York being prohibited from using any American Indian mascots, team names, or logos, juniors at a high school in Brooklyn being given an assortment of third grade level assignments and were tested on it, taking the family car for an inspection, and Reverend Al Sharpton's charity doubling its compensation. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Mike Crispi Unafraid
HEY LIBS, GO MAKE YOUR OWN PLATFORM

Mike Crispi Unafraid

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 51:02


Twitter lights on absolute fire and the left melts down via Elon Musk's decision to reinstate Trump- Biden pushes a globalist agenda aimed at disarming the population while foreign heads of state take China's lead- The 2024 field is starting to shape up- What does Al Sharpton and Beto have in common?- Visit MikeCrispi.com for more!

Rudy Giuliani on 77 WABC
I Couldn't Be Happier | 11-21-2022

Rudy Giuliani on 77 WABC

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 41:27


Rudy talks Al Sharpton , Crime in the country , and attacks against the Jewish community. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Rehumanize Podcast
Black Lives Matter from Conception to Natural Death: A Roundtable from #Rehumanize2022

The Rehumanize Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 50:29


From abortion to police brutality and the death penalty, Black Americans suffer disproportionate amounts of state-sanctioned lethal violence. This roundtable discussion from our 2022 Rehumanize Conference brings together Black activists who hold a Consistent Life Ethic to discuss the critical importance of challenging racial injustice as we advocate for human rights for all human beings.   Watch the video version of this session on our Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j91o_IL63Kw   Transcript: Herb Geraghty: So this session is titled Black Lives Matter from Conception to Natural Death. I am so grateful to be joined by these three individuals. I'm going to just briefly introduce each of our participants and then hand the conversation over to them. First, Jack Champagne is a graduate of the University of Pittsburgh School of Law. He currently works as an educator in Albuquerque, New Mexico. He formerly worked for the Capital Habeas Unit of the Federal Public Defender's Office, the Innocence Project, the Project, and the Southern Poverty Law Center. He is also a staff writer for Rehumanize International. Cherilyn Holloway is the founder of Pro Black Pro-Life. She specializes in initiating tough conversations surrounding racial equity, including in the womb. She travels the country, educating her community about the negative messaging they receive regarding motherhood and the sanctity of life. Finally, Gloria Purvis is an author, commentator, and the host and executive producer of the Gloria Pur podcast. Through her media presence, she has been a strong Catholic voice for life issues, religious liberty, and racial justice. She has appeared in numerous media outlets, including The New York Times, the Washington Post, PBS News Hour, npr, Newsweek Live and she hosted Morning Glory, an international radio show. She recently debuted a video series entitled Racism, Human Dignity, and the Catholic Church through the Word on Fire. I. Again, I am so, so grateful for each of our participants. With that said, I am going to get out of here and give them the opportunity to discuss their work and tell us what Black Lives matter from conception to natural death means to you. Thank you all. Thank you.  Jack Champagne: Thank you, Herb.  Gloria Purvis: Jack, why don't you start us off.  Jack Champagne: Oh man, . I was, I'm, I'm a,  Cherilyn Holloway: I was gonna vote for Jack.  Yes. .  Jack Champagne: Ah, alright then. So yeah, I was, I was, I, I've spent most of my life kind of with the sort of mainstream understanding of, uh, of life issues, of kind of being, you know, kind of, not super, uh, decided on the issue. It was actually working at the capital habeas unit that I actually, developed a, I mean, you try working with condemned prisoners and not develop a healthy respect for human life. It's, you know, dealing with, you know, prisoners who do not have living victims and who are themselves usually scheduled to die at the hands of the state. Having to advocate for these people and, you know, if you don't have an opinion on the death penalty going in, you will definitely have one coming out. And, I mean, it, it's a, it's a powerful experience, you know, just looking at the conditions they live in, the legal issues, that, uh, that surround capital punishment, and, uh, you know, just working under, Marshall Diane, who I think is still working there, who was a, who was a very, you know, loud voice against the death penalty. Just kind of, just kind of, you know, uh, formed my thinking on that. And of course it's, you know, Uh, very short distance from there to, you know, you know, concern about the lives of the disabled and the unborn. And you know, that, that, that of course interacts with my, my perception of race, both as, uh, both as a black man and as somebody who was clientele was almost always black men as well. So, you know, that's, that's. Uh, you know, that's, that's, I I have a very tangible, you know, grasp on what that looks like for me. I don't know about the, I don't know about you, uh, you all, but that's kind of where I come from with it.  Gloria Purvis: Uh, you know, I, I think, I'm a child of south. I mean, I grew up in Charleston, South Carolina. Which is where the Civil War started. Long history of bad race relations, . Still, we have people having a love affair with the lost cause mythology that the South had race relations, uh, correct by subjugating black people and that we were happier with the way that it was and that they had it right in terms of human relations between men and women. Uh, right in terms of the race question, but it wasn't. And, this — growing up in that environment, but at the same time, growing up in a very strong black community, in that environment, in a strong black community of people who, despite all the obstacles were achievers, were people who created things within the black community. And so while I grew up down there, I also had an environment where black excellence was normal, was normative. And, encountering people there that thought that, you know, I shouldn't think so highly and be so sure of myself. And that was their problem, not mine, but at the same time also seeing the uneven application of law enforcement, the uneven application of good healthcare. You know what I mean? Things like that, that you just as a black person moving through the world is paying attention. You see these things. And then, as a person of faith, also as a person that, believed in the science, you know, and I studied biology, uh, I understood that the human person. It, you know, is a human person, is a human life, a member of the human family from that moment of conception. And it just made sense to me, that we'd wanna protect and defend that life from the moment of conception all the way through natural death. And it was inconsistent to me to, in, on the one hand, say, we wanna defend lives in this instance, and yet in another instance, get rid of that life it in as a means of empowering others. So it just seemed illogical to me, some positions that I've seen in different justice movements. So it made me question, well, what is justice really? And as a, a person of faith and studying with the Catholic church understands justice, being justice means every human person — life being, uh, gets what they, you know, they merit something their life merits, protection, nurturing, flourishing. And that's what each of us is entitled to. Whether we're, whether we're the condemned on death row, whether we're in the womb, whether we're on our deathbed as a sick person, our lives of worthy of protection. And, and, and now even I think people are struggling with the notion that the death penalty should be no more. You know, we, we have this idea that really is really vengeance if you ask me. It's not justice. This idea that, you know, people need to get what's coming to 'em in a negative way without ever looking, also, at the way racism influences how the death penalty, who gets the death penalty. How, someone's wealth or lack thereof, influences who gets the death penalty, influences who even gets arrested and prosecuted. So, uh, there's so much uneven in our legal system. I've learned to call it the legal system instead of the justice system. There's so much uneven in our legal system that, it, it, it really, in terms of fairness, makes no sense to have the death penalty. Not to mention that each and every person, no matter what they've done, has made the image and likeness of God and is worthy of dignity and respect. And we as believers, I'm speaking as myself, are called to respond differently to persons who have harmed the community. We want restorative justice, not, not vengeance. And I think that's a difficult thing for people, but we can get into that and, and all, uh, later, but just as a high level, that has influenced, you know, my views and understanding of the human person and, and the dignity and why their lives need to be respected and protected. Cherilyn Holloway: Yeah, that's, both of those are like, spot on. So I, got into this. I was a community outreach director for a pregnancy center. I had made two previous abortion choices and I came outta those really feeling duped. Like I wasn't given all my options. And had I been given all my options, I would've made different choices. And I didn't want another woman to have to go through that. I had no idea that there was like a pro-life, pro choice. I had no clue. I was completely ignorant. And even when I joined the first pregnancy center, it wasn't something that they talked about. Nobody ever talked about Roe versus Wade. Nobody ever talked about the March for Life. It was just kind of like hand to the plow. We're just helping women. And it wasn't until I moved back to Ohio. I'm originally from Oberlin, Ohio, where the college is, and I grew up just with this, bubble. And in the bubble we were all like working towards justice. And so , you know, racial justice, food equity, everything you could think of, you know, Oberlin College was a first college to openly accept gay and lesbian couples. It was before like, I don't know, there's a session earlier where someone was saying that like being trans really was, wasn't a big deal in the 2000s and now it's a big deal. Like that is, that was my world and. So I grew up in a very different community that was surrounded by all white rural communities that were extremely racist. And so it wasn't that we were going out somewhere far to do work. We were, had work to do right where we were in our county. And so I moved back to Oberlin. and, uh, became the executive director of my local pregnancy center. And that's where I learned about this pro-life, pro-choice, uh, overturning Roe versus Wade. But the biggest thing I learned about was the disparities of abortion in the black community. And I couldn't wrap — I'm very li I'm not very sensational. Like I'm not, nobody would describe me as sensitive. Nobody would describe me as overly emotional. I'm very logical, data driven, straight to the point. And to me it just, I couldn't figure out why the, why everyone didn't know this. Like why isn't this obvious to everyone else? Like, I know I'm not like crazy, but this is obvious. And so when I began to go to conferences and look around and see, you know, five to 10 people that look like me and wonder, and everyone's stopping me saying, Why isn't the black community enraged about the abortion numbers? And I'm like, Have you, I don't know. Like I'm trying to figure it out myself and like, Well, what can we do? And so then I started pushing back and asking, Well, what do you do for their other circumstances? Like what do you do to help them with the children that they already have? Like, what are you doing to help them find, you know, equitable jobs? Like how are you helping them in other ways? Like, what else are you doing aside from, you know, telling them that we're having too many abortions? and I've — I kept being met with the same response, which was, Oh, well we wanna keep to the main thing. The main thing. It doesn't really matter if the baby doesn't make it out the womb, but it does matter because unless you are pregnant, you're not really thinking about abortion. So it absolutely does matter. If we're not actually doing something in the community to help the lives that are earth side, then it does matter. And so there just became, Pretty obvious tension between me and, uh, some of my, uh, pro-life comrades , because I wasn't going to be the person who, who just stood and talked about, you know, racism and the abortion issue without tying everything else together. And that's how I began to reach my community, inadvertently just without knowing, just randomly talking to people at the barbershop in the grocery store and , uh, wherever I could, because I talked to people everywhere. Um right. And that led me to start Pro-Black Pro-life just to be able to have a place. Where people who thought like me, because I just like, I can't be the only one gonna keep me to have this place. And then I built it. People came . That was kind of my, uh, way into really thinking about how Black lives matter from womb to tomb and how to be able to communicate that to the greater black community.  Gloria Purvis: You, you know, Cherilyn. That question that you know, well, why aren't black people more outraged about abortion? I would hear a, a flavor of that just about everywhere I went. But it was asked in a way, like in some cases like, is your community stupid? You know? Right. It's so condescending. And so when I felt like it, 'cause a lot of times I was like, remain in your ignorance because I don't have the wherewithal right now emotionally to deal with this. But in, in cases where I felt that it was worth having the conversation, I help people understand that there's a difference between abortion and the kinds of racialized, other racialized violence that we experience. I said, So for example, abortion. An abortion is something somebody has to go out and get. I said, me walking through the street and getting cold jacked by the police, I have to do nothing except be me and move through the space. So in terms of, uh, actual threats, nobody's jumping out and putting an abortion on you per se, you know what I mean? Right. So in terms of actual threats, what I'm thinking about as I'm leaving out of the safety of my home are those things that I cannot control. So I cannot control being followed in the department store and having security called on me. I cannot control when the doctor is ignoring me. When I say I'm, I'm hurting, you know, I need help with this pain. I cannot control when, I come in for a job interview and although I'm qualified and my name hints my ethnicity, that I'm not given the job. But I can control whether or not, at least in some sense, of going to choose abortion. So the threats are perceived differently. You know, the existential threats are perceived differently. Even though our community is heavily targeted, uh, for abortion and heavily marketed to, for abortion and all that kind of stuff, it's just perceived as a different kind of threat. So while it's not that we're not outraged, it's just that we got a lot of other things we got like going on. We got a lot already going on. So it's not that we don't care, it's not that it's, it's frankly that the people asking question are so far removed and so uninvested in the black experience that they can't fathom that we move through the world differently than they do. Jack Champagne: Mm-hmm. . Yeah, I think, I think, I think Cherilyn gets at something. When she talks about how isolating it is to sort of be in the black community, but also be pro-life because you're kind of, you know, the, there's sort of some kind of, there's kind of a regulatory capture in black communities in which the most politically active of us also feel the need to go in, all in on being pro-abortion, because that's where the political allies are. And then on the flip side, you have, you know, pro-life movement, which is not, uh, not always responsive to black voices. And black voices are not always present, you know, and I had occasion to think about this, you know, when, uh, Kamala Harris, you know, had brought, brought those leaders together to talk about, you know, reproductive justice and how effectively they were able to, to, do the messaging on that as sort of a civil rights. Uh, sort of or group, you know, you had buy in from Al Sharpton, from Mark Morial of the Urban League, from the NAACP, from all of these groups, these big names, and it was, it was, and you know, it's stunning how easy it was and how effectively they had kind of, you know, seized on this black organizing tradition and had kind of made it into — you know, this is the natural continuity of, you know, this black organizing tradition and kind of how uncritically, you know, is kind of accepted in these communities. So, you know, that isolation, it does have real political results and, you know, we're seeing it become, you know, increasingly stark and, you know, sort of a post Dobbs reality where, you know, these sharp political lines are being drawn. Cherilyn Holloway: Yeah. And I think that, I mean, I, I feel like. We'd be remiss if we didn't address the fact that the idea of a black woman, woman, having the right to have an abortion really becomes a rights issue. It's a control issue of a right that she did not used to have. Mm-hmm. . And so we can't ignore that. Right? We can't ignore that. There was a time when black women were not in control of their bodies and were not in control of what, you know, when they had babies and how many they had, and their children were sold, you know, into, in being enslaved. We cannot ignore that. And so this, this idea, you know, overturning Roe and the Dobbs decision takes us back to to, you know, black women not being able to control their bodies is, is a very real fear for some black women. But, but on the flip side of that, on the flip side of that, there's a huge difference between women's rights and reproductive justice, right? And so what ends up happening is that the Women's Rights Movement does what the Women's Rights Movement does, right? It isolates black women. Because what women's rights are fighting for are very different than what black women are fighting for with reproductive justice, right? Black women are fighting for this idea, not just to have an abortion. The abortions like the caveat, like it's stuck on the end and doesn't actually make sense because all the other rights have to do with, maternal mortality, infant mortality, being able to take care of their children. Having healthy relationships, having healthy schools, healthy childcare, like all of those things are in the reproductive justice, like being able to have a good birth experience — and then abortion is like tacked on that, and it almost doesn't make any sense. Where, in the women's rights movement, it's solely about abortion. That's it. and what black women are saying, like our issues are more complex. And I feel like even on the pro-life side, that's what we're saying, right? We're saying, yes, we get it. We're pro-life, but our issues are more complex. If we cannot figure out why women are jumping in and go upstream and stop that, we're just gonna be steady pulling 'em off the river. And there is no, there is no relief when we're consistently pulling them out the river. We're not actually solving the problem. And for 50 years we have not actively solved this problem . And so now everyone's like, Oh, well, you know, what does post, you know, Dobbs look like? Well, it looks like what it should have looked like in 1973. Like, we should have been working to solve some of these systemic issues that Gloria just named in order to help women. If 70% of women, black women, are having abortions for financial reasons, and we're talking that they only need $20,000 more to, to make a choice, to say, to keep their baby. And I say only because I know that there are people who are donating $20,000 to pregnancy centers. Which they need to do. Don't stop doing that. But it's — there is no lack of funds in the pro-life movement.  Gloria Purvis: Okay. So couple things. I do think it's a temptation — and I think it's not, I think it's on purpose that, around abortion, it's always marketed to black women as if you're losing something. Oh, these rich white women can do it, and if you can't do it, therefore it's not equal. And I think that's the biggest bunch of hokey. Because frankly, the thing that we want that, that that white women take for granted, isn't abortion. We want safe and affordable housing, clean water, jobs for our spouses, a good education for our children. And I think it is an absolute insult that the thing that they're like, well, you can have this thing though. You can have abortion, and you should really be rallying for abortion because that makes you equal to these wealthy white women. I'm like, no it doesn't. All it does is remove our children from these substandard conditions, while we still remain in those substandard conditions. Let's remove the substandard conditions from our community. That is what we need to be focusing on. If you want equality for black women, for black men, for black families, for black children. And so it has just been. Just, I, I, it has just been shocking to me how much, how much energy and effort is put into abortion. I mean, I just saw a member of the Divine Nine say something positive about abortion. Kamala Harrison, I are both members of Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority. I'm hoping the sorority doesn't say anything along those lines, but they probably will, if they haven't already. So it is absolutely, like you say, Jack, going to all these large black organizations and getting their buy-in and getting them to send a message out to their membership. And I think we need to start speaking, you know, among our friends, among our families. So whoever wants to listen in our churches, our parishes, our sororities, fraternities, our fraternal groups, whatever, to challenge, you know, this notion that abortion is a good thing for the black community. I think we also need to understand the idea of rights. Rights cannot go contrary to the nature of a thing. And so for people to, at at least in my opinion, call abortion a right. I'm like, but that goes exactly against the nature of what it is to be female, to be able to conceive and bring life forward. So to me, to say that it's a right to terminate that pregnancy — as if our biology is some inherent injustice against being female. To me, it's very anti-woman. And it never allows us to have these broader conversations about what the economy, what our culture, what society needs to look like, to be more inclusive of women as we are. I mean, if, if the answer for every difficulty that we experience is, you know, get that abortion, that's gonna liberate you, that's gonna free you, you can go and achieve, you can make more money. Then we never really talk about the structures or the systems that hold us back from achieving and making money. And then one last thing I wanna say: when they do studies on who wants an abortion, it's typically those women or families making a combined income of more than a hundred thousand dollars a year. Those making less — like, let's say 40,000 or less — by and large want to keep their children. So abortion is even being marketed to the very communities, poor black women, as liberating with those poor black women do not want abortion. And then one lesson, I will say this: bell hooks, who died recently, talked about in the feminist movement, how black women's aims were very different from white women. They weren't pushing for abortion. But because white women carried the day, abortion became central to being feminist, to being liberated, but that is not at all what black women wanted. So yeah, I think we need to recapture what it means to, as black women, what, what, uh, equality and liberty really means. And I don't think, having the ability to end the lives of our children in the womb is the answer. Jack Champagne: We popped over to the Q and A real quick. There are two kind of related questions. I wanted to see what y'all thought about — uh, first one's anonymous. Uh, it says, As advocates for racial justice and people who have interacted with the pro-life movement, which is often tied to conservative circles, what are some strategies you might suggest for how we can push back against the racism that has grown so loud in the G O P and Trump movements. And then second one, uh, this is, uh, Miles Bedlan, I think. How can we make the pro-life movement appeal more to black Americans? I've noticed that the pro-life movement is overwhelmingly white.  Cherilyn Holloway: I'll do, I'll do the second question. Yeah.  Gloria Purvis: You know, sometimes I'm, sometimes I'm like, I really think some that's gonna be something that, white pro-lifers need to take up. I really am not interested in, to tell you the truth, I'm really not interested with the limited energy I have and having to fight the obvious racism. Right? And quite frankly, the people who are prone to those kinds of behaviors or coded, coded language, probably can't hear me when I talk to them about why something is racist or inappropriate. But they probably could hear, uh, their fellow white pro-lifers explaining or calling out why something is racist or dehumanizing to black people. And so I'm gonna really invite all my white pro-lifers to, to take up that, to take on that calling something out directly and helping people recognize that something's racist. Because I'm finding that unless the slur, a racial slur is used, people cannot recognize that something is racist. And I'm like, you know, there's a lot of coded language. There's a lot of — people know not to just come out with racial slurs, but they still can be very racist in their language and the way in which they address certain things. So, white pro-lifers, call 'em out, and also make room for black pro-lifers to come and just speak and be a part of the movement. Invite us to come and talk at your conventions, your meetings and things like that. If you want us to be more included and at the same time, call out, you know, these racist talking points that you see sometimes in the movement. Cherilyn Holloway: Oh, well I'm gonna tell you right now, like, don't invite me unless you're ready to burn it down. Like, if you're not ready, don't invite me, because I'm, I'm just, I'm gonna say what I wanna say and it may upset some people, and that's just the way it is. So, if you're not ready to restart, uh, or if you haven't recently restarted, you know, and I 100% agree with, like, I don't have the bandwidth. Like I, I don't, like, I spent a couple years very early on answering these questions and my final answer was — a very sweet southern white woman stopped me at a conference and said, how do we reach the black community? And I said, Let us do it. Like each state, like state, like if you're not there, like, that doesn't mean like there shouldn't be services or things like that, but we don't trust you. Yeah, like we do not trust, you know, the G O P, the Trumpist movements, we don't trust, you know — we don't trust it. And so, you know, I picked the name Pro Black, Pro-Life for a reason. Because I was done, but I felt like I wanted to still own the pro-life where like — you're not, I'm pro-life. You're not going to convince me to call myself something else. Like it is what it is, but I'm womb to tomb. I'm gonna tell you what it means to me and like it'll love it. Like it doesn't matter. It's not gonna change the way I feel. And so the pro-life movement itself is not going, we're not going to be able to make a mass appeal. What we, what we're gonna need to do is be more present, and seen, so that people who are sitting in the closet with their pro-life views, that they feel like they're, they're consistent, but everything around them is inconsistent, right? So like here, we all have a consistent life ethic. This — we know this exists, but people don't know this exists. And so when I talk to people, you know about being pro-life or about the womb, or about. They all say the same thing. I just went to a doctor and she goes, and she goes, Well, what do you do? And I told her what I did and she goes — It's just her and I there. And she's like, I'm pro-life too. I'm like, Why are we whispering? Because, right. It's just me and you. Right. But the idea was, she was like, But I don't wanna tell somebody else what not to do. And I told her, it's not about telling somebody else what to do, but people need to know. So when people know better, they do better. And most of the people in the black community, not the people that we see, you know, at these large national conventions, not, these are the people that I'm talking to. Most people in my church and in my community don't know the truth about abortion. They don't. They think that it's legal, so it must be okay. And so we just need to continue to speak the truth. You know, if you're gonna platform someone, you know, a black, you know, a black speaker, don't ask 'em what they're gonna say. Like, listen to a couple of their stuff. Ask 'em to come and let them have at it. Like, don't always tell people like, If you're gonna raise some money, don't ask me. Because I can't promise you people are gonna give. Gloria Purvis: Cherilyn let me ask you something because I think the name Pro-Black is in the name Pro-Black Pro-Life — putting Pro-Black right there. I think it sends a message because there are. Prominent black voices in the conservative pro-life movement who are def — definitely anti-black. I mean, I'm thinking of one woman in particular who I will not name because I feel like I'd conjur the devil if I ever mentioned the name. But, so anti-black in the things that she says and I'm like, how do people, in the pro-life movement, listen to this person and not hear the odious anti-gospel message in what she says. And I've come to recognize because they have not unlearned the racist conditioning that they've been exposed to just by mere fact of being born and going through the educational system or even entertainment, uh, system in the United States that has definite, uh, programming around blackness that seems to reinforce a criminality. A promiscuousness, an ignorance, a laziness, an untrustworthiness, just everything negative that you could think of, is out there. And so there hasn't been this unlearning and with people like this particular person and, and there are many of them, smaller level, you know, I, I can think of a number of people trying to, go for her crown, but they cater to that, those kind of, talking points about this inherent brokenness in black culture and which, you know, tries to imply there is something inherently criminal and broken in us, which is just nonsense. And so I will say, yeah, have the black person come speak, but please do check to make sure they're not reiterating a bunch of anti-black talking points, because we don't need more of that. No, you know, it, it doesn't, it, it does nothing to help the movement and it certainly says to other black people, other healthy, normal black people out there that they are not welcome.  Cherilyn Holloway: Yeah. And, and, and people, like the person you speak of, they're not talking to the black community. That is something that I often have to talk about in trainings and what I'm speaking is that they're, they're, they, they're saying that that's who they're talking to, but we're not listening to them. Right. So they're not. They're talking to you, like, they're talking to a white, conservative audience saying what the white, conservative audience wishes they could say to black people. But at the end of the day, ain't nobody saying that to black people. Cause black people ain't listening. Right. So Jack, do you have anything to say? I was gonna go to more questions cause I think we have 10 minutes.  Jack Champagne: So, so I'm very much in the Cherilyn Holloway school of Prepare To Get Your Feelings Hurt. , I'm gonna, I'm gonna answer it like this because it also tangentially answers Ben Conroy's question, which is that, you know, I was born Jackson, Mississippi, Heart of the Beast. Did a lot of work in Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, you know. Things that black people care about, voting rights, uh, rights for convicted felons, rights for housing. I see never one pro-life person involved with any of that. There are more black people in Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana than there are anywhere else in the country. And I didn't see one black person involved with any, you know, any pro-life, anything. And I didn't see any outreach from pro-life people to any of these groups. All of my volunteers were, you know, working for democrat, governors, governor candidates, pro — pro-choice people, you know, those are the people who were asking me to speak at events. Those are the people who are asking me, how can I help? Those who are people — you know, fundamentally it's a problem that conservative, uh, a lot of pro-life people, they fundamentally don't respect black voices and they don't care about black issues. And that is, that is probably the most fundamental problem. There's no, you know, magic tool. There's no, there's no way to speak about these issues. Sometimes it's just caring. Sometimes it's just caring about, uh, helping people that can't help you. You know, we shouldn't, we shouldn't really be having a conversation about how we convince, can convince pro-life people to care more about racial justice — that should just be an inherent part of their calculus. But it's not because they're not pro-life. They're anti-abortion. And some of them are self-conscious about that. Some of them were like, I don't wanna be pro-life, I just want to be anti-abortion. And you know, because it requires them to do it, requires them to do things that don't directly benefit themselves and instead benefit a community that they don't care about and can't get anything from. And, you know, you can't tell me. You cannot tell me you are working in some of the only counties in the country that have a majority black population and you can't find any black people that agree with you? Give me a break. Like that is not, That is, That is a, Wow. That is, That is, That requires such an instrumental view of black people. That, you know, it, it kind of makes you tell on yourself like, Oh yeah, they might agree with me on abortion, but they might be too militant. They might be, they might care too much about racism. You know, they might not talk about it in a way that, you might, you. You, you might, you might offend my audience and things like that, right? So, you know, you need to, you need to, you need to step, basically what you need is you need to step outside of this, this paradigm in which, "I will only care about black people if they can help me. I go, I can only care about black people if they're not too extreme." You know that, this is why, you know, we get anti-black, black people that are so highly valued in the movement because that's all the only voices that the movement values. And will tolerate.  Gloria Purvis: Exactly. And will tolerate. So. Well, you know, Jack, you made me actually think of a time that I went to Community Action Arkansas and there was a bunch of black people that I was down there with, and we were talking about the upcoming election. And this was before Trump. And the issue of abortion came up, and every single one of those persons that I spoke to was pro-life, but they also told me their experience of going down to — I don't know how they did the primaries or something, you had to vote by party or whatnot — so they had to go down where all the Republicans were, and the open hostility that they experienced from these white Republicans when they went over there to vote pro-life made them say, "They don't want us here." And so, they have no interest in our thriving as a community. And so their actual experience of the so-called pro-life movement in their state when it came time to exercise their right to vote, was that it was very much anti-black. And they didn't see, so, they don't vote Republican because of their particular experience of that party in their local experience, and what their party locally has done or not done, you know, for or against the black community. And so while they are pro-life, they cannot vote locally with the Republicans who are so called the party of life because of their overt racism. Mm-hmm. , so you know. I, I, So at the same time, and I get it, I was like, Hey, I'm not telling you to go vote with people who'd, you know, just as soon slit your throat or hang you up from a tree. You know, in reality, while they may say they're pro-life, they're not really talking about your lives in the womb. When they're saying that they're pro-life, That's not their vision of being pro-life. So maybe that's the reality for quite a number of folks. So.  Jack Champagne: Yeah, I mean, we, we, what we, what we want is, It's relatively simple. It's if you can be a pro-life candidate and have a stance against racism that is not limited or qualified, you're golden. You — there's no one — there's no one else like you in the country. Yeah. And it's so easy and people stumble on it so much, and I simply don't understand it.  Gloria Purvis: Can we, I see one question. Cheryl, did you wanna say something else?  Cherilyn Holloway: Yeah, I was gonna read a question. Yeah, go ahead. Go ahead. So Lisa Stiller said, How do you answer people that say reversal of Roe negatively impacts BIPOC communities the most? So my first response is always, Why? Why does it negatively impact — and they're gonna always say the thing. Same thing, right? Poverty. So we don't have an abortion issue. We have a poverty issue. Mm-hmm. . And so if you want to not negatively impact the black community, help them get outta poverty. Mm-hmm.  Gloria Purvis: and Lisa, please remind them. Killing the poor does not solve poverty. Never. Okay. And that's what what they're saying, you know, is the solution to poverty for these BIPOC communities is to eliminate their children. Again, eliminating children from a substandard condition instead of eliminating the sub standard conditions from the community. Cherilyn Holloway: ,  yeah, this is another good one. That I may have an answer to. I don't know. What are some things you've seen well-intentioned activists do in an attempt to be pro-black that have been unhelpful? Oh, so a big one for me. This is a huge pet peeve for me and I hate to say that like I was inadvertently a part of it. Like I didn't know I was beginning my years, you guys. So this is like a pass. This is my pass. I don't like it when people take sayings and, change them to fit what they want. I forget what the word is. There's like a word for this,  Gloria Purvis: Appropriation? Is that it?  Cherilyn Holloway: Like Black Lives Matter, right? Right. So when black activists take that and they put like pre-born in front of it or all, or like when someone does that, and I feel like that is well intentioned. I get it. I get the intention, but the saying Black Lives Matter is true. There's nothing wrong with that saying, right? And I feel like if you're saying Black Lives Matter as someone who's pro-life, you should mean from womb to tomb. So it, it, it, uh, irritates me or agitates me or aggravates me. Like it won't send me like off the rock or when people do that, like when there are activists that take things like that and that's just an example, but I've taken other things with other, like it picking up other issues and tried to like formulate them into. Gloria Purvis: Oh, conflating them? Cherilyn Holloway: Yes, Conflate. Thank you . Gloria Purvis: You're welcome. Yeah. I don't know if I've ever seen anybody be attempt to really be pro black. I mean, I just remember there was a big brouhaha about a, pro-life organization on their — was it their Instagram? Around the time of the George Floyd murder, for some reason they put up this unhelpful thing that more black children die in the womb than they do in police custody. Cherilyn Holloway: They're more safe. They're more safe in police custody.  Gloria Purvis: Oh, they're safer. I mean, what, how — Just yeah, as if they were trying to, redirect the conversation — again, we can walk and chew gum. And also why, why the need to have to downplay our real suffering? And the real threats to our lives by, uh, from, unjust policing, you know, and to try to say, Oh, no, no, no. You don't have time to be, You're safe actually. You're safer in police hands than you are as a black child of woman. Please shut up. That it was not only unhelpful, it was, it was, it, it was so insensitive. Was very insensitive. It was so insensitive. And I think there was another, one last instance that I'm sure you all aware of is there was a well known pro-life activist on Twitter that. Jumped into Bishop Talbot Swan's Twitter feed to tell him that he was a problem with the black community and, and that he was, you know, all this stuff on abortion, which clearly the person had no idea that Bishop Talbot Swan is a member of Church of God in Christ, which is like one of the largest black Christian denominations that is pro-life. Yep. And, and, and that Bishop Swan had actually written an open letter to Hillary Clinton, challenging her on her abortion support and its negative impact on the black community. But this very well known pro-life white activist just, I guess, felt that she needed to help him understand that the real racism. Because that's the words she used, that the real racism was an abortion or something like that. I can't remember what it was, but the, the idea that she was gonna tell this man, this civil rights activist, this pro-life, uh, bishop from the Church of God in Christ, that she knew better what the real racism was than he did as a black man moving through this earth. For the number of years that he did. It was clearly, I guess supposed to be pro-black because she's gonna educate about real racism. But it was just very, ignorant and, tone deaf and condescending.  Jack Champagne: Yeah, I mean, I can virtually guarantee you that just living as a black person in America makes you more of an expert on racism than just about anybody on the planet. You know, it, it's one of those things where if you feel the need to redirect discussion about issues that directly affect black communities to abortion. What you're saying is that you don't actually care about black lives. You care about this issue and you want to use that in order to draw attention to the issue you do care about. And you have to be very, you know, you need to be cognizant of the fact that that's what you're doing — intentionally or not, that's what you're doing. And you know, that is very off putting that, that's something,  Gloria Purvis: Well, it, it shows a sense of entitlement that you feel entitled to — that we don't have the agency to decide what we wanna discuss, uh, at a particular time and place. I had a girlfriend that was at, talking about racism and, uh, someone jumped up in the q and a and said, Well, why aren't you talking about abortion? Da da, da, da, as if we were not entitled to discuss racism at that time. You know, somehow we should not be concerned about racism, as it demonstrates itself through, uh, abuses in the legal system, through abuses and policing and whatnot — that over and above all else, we had to only always and everywhere discuss abortion. And it is so, uh, to me, indicative of that person's, like you said, Jack, lack of respect for us and also doesn't — don't respect that we have our own minds and we can decide what it is that we wanna talk about at any time. Uh, and we can decide what we wanna focus our conversation on a particular moment. It doesn't mean, uh, we will never address abortion. It means right now this is what we wanna talk about. And if you can't handle that, or you can't participate or listen quietly, please go. Leave. We, we don't need you to be a part of it. We certainly don't need you trying to deflect, you know, from it. Mm-hmm. .  Jack Champagne: Yeah. Oh, we just got the five minute warning.  Cherilyn Holloway: Okay. It's two minutes. It was two minutes. Two minute. Okay. There aren't, I think Aimee asked about books. One is Killing the Black Body. It used to be up there. It's up here and I can't remember who it's by. Killing the Black Body is a good one about reproductive justice and the history of black women and their bodies.  Gloria Purvis: Was that Harriet Washington? Oh, I'm thinking Medical Apartheid. Go ahead. Apartheid — oh, Dorothy Roberts. Killing the Black Body by Dorothy Roberts. Yeah.  Cherilyn Holloway: And the other one I would highly recommend is, So You Wanna Talk About Race, which is by, uh, Ijeoma Oluo. And that one is just really, really good. It's an easy read, like easy by, not a lot of tension, but a lot of like, true fact. I ha— I have eight kids. Like it just.  Gloria Purvis: That's gonna happen.  Cherilyn Holloway: Wouldn't be a live from me without a child showing up.  Gloria Purvis: When I mention Medical Apartheid, I will tell you how Washington is very much pro-choice for abortion. But just in terms of, getting some history of the abuses of the black body in the United States, Medical Apartheid by Harriet Washington was a, was a good read. But with warning, she is very much pro-abortion, pro-choice. And that kind of comes across. Maybe right before we go, if I, I wanna ask each of you maybe, what is the one thing I think that still gives you hope, in discussing racial justice?  Cherilyn Holloway: Go ahead, Jack. Jack Champagne: Well, when I, when I, was, uh, when I was, uh, when I was watching, John Lewis's, uh, funeral, uh, a couple years ago, I was, uh, I was with my grandfather. And He, he, he leaned over and told me and, uh, asked me: do you know anything he did while he was in Congress? And that was very funny to me. But I always thought that, you know, I always, you know, I always think to myself, it's kind of nice that my grandfather who was born in like 1927 is able to take something like that for granted. and, you know, it is, it is, which is to say that, you know, there's a lot of work to do, but we still have accomplished a lot in a relatively short amount of time. In about less than the eighth of the time that we've been here in this country. We've accomplished a lot and, uh, you know, being able to, uh, share that moment with my grandfather. Is a, is a, is a very nice experience. So, uh, I look forward to being able to, you know, uh, look at an all black Supreme Court with my grandsons. So.  Gloria Purvis: Hey. Hmm.  Cherilyn Holloway: Uh, I think the thing that gives me hope is, is people. I, you know, like I said, what I, what I know most is that people who live their everyday lives who don't think about the abortion issue, or even like the racism issue all the time like I do, are always open to these conversations and always seem like they just learned something. Like, there's always like a light bulb moment, like, Oh, I never thought about that. And so it's, you know, my hope is in the, that I'm like planting ideas in people's heads and concepts and things for them to continuously think about as they see the news stream, you know, going across. Is, is why I feel like I, I'm always hopeful it, you know, not what I see on the news, not where I see the media focusing attention, not where I see any of these, but the everyday people I talk to, that literally, have these light bulb moments. That's what continues to give me hope.  Gloria Purvis: I would say what gives me hope is the prevalence of these kinds of conversations that are happening now. The fact that I've, you know, I'm able to have this conversation with both of you, to me, is — it gives me hope because it signals two things or three things, maybe. A, we exist. B, we can be in community. And three, we can use the microphone that's not controlled by major media to still get our messaging out. To be able to use the current technology now to give another narrative about pro-life and pro black from the womb to the tomb. And so I hope that the, the three of us together can at some point do this again on a larger stage for more people. So that gives me hope.  Cherilyn Holloway: Thank you everybody.  Gloria Purvis: Thank you.  Herb Geraghty: Thank you. Thank you three. So, so, so, so, so much for this, uh, for this round table discussion. We are so grateful. I know that the chat has been very active and very grateful for your perspective. This was wonderful. Thank you so much. We are now going into our break. We will reconvene in the sessions at 7:15 Eastern. Thank you all.

The Beat with Ari Melber
NBC projects GOP wins control of House by razor thin margin as chaos hits party

The Beat with Ari Melber

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 58:43


MSNBC's Ari Melber hosts "The Beat" on Wednesday, November 16 and reports on the breaking news as NBC projects the GOP takes control of the House of Representatives. NBC News Chief Political Analyst Steve Kornacki joins. Plus, new legal heat on Trump as former WH aide Cassidy Hutchinson testified before the GA election probe grand jury and Michael Flynn ordered to testify next week. Chai Komanduri, David Kelley and Rev. Al Sharpton join.

The Daily Detail
The Daily Detail for 11.15.22

The Daily Detail

Play Episode Play 45 sec Highlight Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 10:32


AlabamaAG Steve Marshall now elected as chairman of Republican AG AssociationCDC keeps AL on the list of seven states with high flu like cases and activityJimmy Spencer is sentenced to death by Marshall County judgeDothan pastor who is stepbrother to Al Sharpton faces charges from DOJPolice seize 46lbs of marijuna in luggage at Birmingham-Shuttlesworth airportUS Coast Guard rescues 8 distressed boaters off coast of Fort MorganNationalFederal judge issues injunction against Biden's student loan debt forgivenessTX judge says Title IX use of "sex" does not include gender identitySome senators want vote delay on Mitch McConnell as party leaderDem Chuck Schumer wants McConnell to oust "MAGA Republicans"Greg Phillips of True the Vote weighs in on Arizona governor's raceFCC commissioner calls Tik Tok app in US  "digital fentanyl" from China

Deadline: White House
"A now-familiar, and unwelcome, and frankly dangerous practice”

Deadline: White House

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 92:17


Nicolle Wallace discusses the ex-president's baseless claims of election fraud in states like Arizona and Nevada after the midterm elections, Elon Musk's chaotic takeover of Twitter and whether the tech company can turn itself around, a conversation with Michael Cohen on the former president's very bad week and more. Joined by: Nick Corasaniti, Vaughn Hillyard, Tim Miller, Alicia Menendez, Kara Swisher, Ben Collins, Tim O'Brien, Rev. Al Sharpton, Michael Cohen, Kris Goldsmith, Igor Novikov and Michael McFaul.

Rumble in the Morning
Sports with Rod 11-10-2022 …Al Sharpton makes it into Rod's Sports Report

Rumble in the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 7:38


Sports with Rod 11-10-2022 …Jeff Saturday is Dang Sure he won't back down …Al Sharpton makes it into Rod's Sports Report …What was going on in the background?

Oh, Hell Yes: A Girlfriends Podcast
The Rabbit Died- S5 E2

Oh, Hell Yes: A Girlfriends Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 53:51


Everyone thinks Toni's pregnancy announcement is a desperate ploy to win Todd back. Meanwhile, Maya embarrasses William in front of his new client— Reverend Al Sharpton. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antoinette-q-smith/support

Jason in the House
Secretary Betsy DeVos' Reclaiming Your Child's Education

Jason in the House

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 51:14


On this episode, Jason shares his thoughts on a fugitive case that he's been following, of a man who posed as a billionaire to carry out countless security and wire fraud scams. Then, Jason brings on the stupid addressing Al Sharpton's comments that the influx in crime throughout the country is "an uncomfortable situation," and Ann Arbor Mayor Christopher Taylor's (D-MI) contradictory clean-energy rhetoric amidst reports that he installed a gas line in his home to heat his fireplace. Later, Jason sits down with former U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos to discuss her immense dedication to reshaping the American education system. Secretary DeVos shares anecdotes from her latest book, Hostages No More, and how she wants students as well as their parents to have more involvement in their education. Jason and Secretary DeVos discuss the impact distance learning had on teachers, students, and their families. Keep up with Jason on Twitter: @jasoninthehouse Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Karen Hunter Show
Rev. Al Sharpton - Star of Documentary LOUDMOUTH, Baptist Minister & Political, Civil Rights, and Social Justice Activist; Host of Keepin' It Real with Rev. Al Sharpton – Weekdays at 6pm ET on SiriusXM Urban View

Karen Hunter Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 21:43


Deadline: White House
"A surge in one of the oldest forms of hate”

Deadline: White House

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 93:44


Nicolle Wallace discusses how the rise in anti-Semitism is fueling the rise in political violence, Speaker Nancy Pelosi's first words since the attack on her husband, how voter intimidation is on the rise as we approach the midterm elections and more.Joined by: George Selim, Pete Strzok, Ben Rhodes, Luke Broadwater, Donna Edwards, Tim Miller, Mark Elias, Jen Psaki, Michael Cohen, Andrew Weissmann, Keith Beauchamp and Rev. Al Sharpton.

The Preachers Corner With Pastor JT & Lady Fenita
There's Nothing New under the Sun - The Cancel Culture SE II EP 42

The Preachers Corner With Pastor JT & Lady Fenita

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 36:50


In This Episode we take a listen to some clips from the qoutes of The King of Pop Micheal Jackson, Rev Al Sharpton, Minister Louis Farrakhan, The Presdient of Israel Isaac Herzog, and Prince. In each qoute there is truth, its up to you the listener to determine if their truth alligns with what you deem is the Truth. Pastor JT gives Scripture to support his thoughts and prayer. We pray that you enjoy this episode and can leave with some great insite. Leave us a review and follow us on what ever platform you are listening to this podcast on. Thanks for your support.Copyright Disclaimer under section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, education and research.Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing.Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.Clips used from : https://youtu.be/16rk0OPUkFEhttps://youtu.be/jXawTbQFGjQhttps://youtu.be/WRFU2SyCCF8https://youtu.be/633LtzbwYAghttps://youtu.be/Ex3JGJ-fDdc#kanyewest #podcast#pastorjt#alsharpton #michealjackson#adidas

The Rubin Report
Larry Elder Just Made the Next Election a Lot Harder to Predict | Direct Message | Rubin Report

The Rubin Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 58:55


Dave Rubin of “The Rubin Report” talks about Larry Elder considering running for president in the 2024 election; Barack Obama telling voters to trust Democrats to handle rising crime while campaigning for Gretchen Whitmer; the revelation by The Intercept that execs at Twitter and Facebook like Vijaya Gadde have been having secret meetings with the Department of Homeland Security, giving the government a larger role in social media censorship than previously known; NBC News Senior Reporter Ben Collins comparing Elon Musk to a QAnon conspiracy theorist for Tweeting an article that questioned the mainstream narrative of the attack on Nancy Pelosi's husband Paul Pelosi by David DePape; Kathy Hochul telling Al Sharpton that the rising crime narrative of Republicans is actually a myth; “The View” exploiting children to push politics on their Halloween episode; Chris Sununu telling Meet The Press' Chuck Todd how out of touch he is with the average voter and why his bubble makes him think that inflation isn't important; Joe Rogan talking to Bridget Phetasy about the massive red wave coming and how Democrats voters are flipping to vote for Ron DeSantis; and much more. ---------- Today's Sponsors: Blaze Election Guide- Need a a comprehensive guide to let you know exactly what you need to look out for on election night? Go to TheBlaze.com/ElectionGuide to receive a FREE copy of Blaze Media's Ultimate Guide to the Midterms delivered straight to your inbox. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rich Zeoli
Media is Blaming Republican Rhetoric for Assault on Paul Pelosi

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 42:07


The Rich Zeoli Show- Hour 4:  6:05pm- On Friday, Elon Musk officially purchased Twitter, Inc. for $44 billion. Almost instantaneously, traditional news outlets like the New York Times expressed concern over the purchase—alleging that Musk's pledge to respect free speech could result in hateful speech becoming widespread on Twitter's social media platform.    6:45pm- While speaking with Al Sharpton on MSNBC, New York Governor Kathy Hochul called Republicans “master manipulators”—claiming that violent crime is not a problem in Democrat-run states.    6:55pm- Who Won Social Media? + Zeoli's Final Thought 

Rich Zeoli
Biden Admin Attempted to Censor Unflattering Social Media Content + Clarence Thomas Destroys Lawyer's Argument for Race-Based Admissions (Zeoli Full Show 10-31-22)

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 183:30


3:05pm- According to reporting from The Intercept's Ken Klippenstein and Lee Fang, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) attempted to “influence tech platforms” via “a formalized process for government officials to directly flag content on Facebook or Instagram and request that it be throttled or suppressed through a special Facebook portal that requires a government or law enforcement email to use.” Klippenstein and Fang write that “disinformation” was not clearly defined in the leaks obtained—though, DHS was planning to target stories regarding the origins of COVID-19 and the Biden Administration's troop withdrawal from Afghanistan.   3:20pm- After voting in Delaware over the weekend, President Joe Biden addressed the home invasion and assault on the husband of Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi. Biden linked election denialism to the violent attack that left Paul Pelosi with a fractured skull. Earlier this month, Hillary Clinton accused Republicans, and the Supreme Court, of conspiring to steal the 2024 Presidential Election. Will Biden remain consistent and condemn members of his own political party?   3:45pm- Should the federal government decide what is, and is not, “disinformation”—ultimately censoring stories that don't meet their subjective definition?    4:05pm- On Monday, the United States Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard and Students for Fair Admissions v. University of North Carolina—which challenges the constitutionality of race-based admission practices established by Grutter v. Bollinger in 2003. North Carolina Solicitor General Ryan Park argued that “racially diverse schools” offer “educational benefits.” Justice Clarence Thomas seemingly dismissed the validity of that claim, stating: “I don't put much stock in that because I've heard similar arguments in favor of segregation, too.”   4:15pm- In her most recent Wall Street Journal, Allysia Finely explained the hypocrisy of Randi Weingarten and the American Federation of Teachers advocating in favor of race-based college admissions while concurrently condemning school choice for students in kindergarten through 12th grade.    4:25pm- According to Fox News correspondent Bill Melugin, the man charged with assaulting Paul Pelosi was in the United States illegally. 4:35pm- While speaking over the weekend, President Joe Biden mistakenly claimed the United States consisted of 54 states.   4:40pm- On Monday, President Joe Biden condemned U.S. oil companies for “excess profits” and using those profits to return cash to shareholders instead of investing in methods to increase oil production. However, as the Wall Street Journal editorial board points out, “current profits follow steep losses in the pandemic” and “the progressive climate lobby and [Biden's] own Administration's climate policies have been urging” against new drilling and refining. While running for president, Biden vowed “no more drilling on federal lands…No ability for the oil industry to continue to drill, period” and that under his leadership the country would transition away from fossil fuels.    4:55pm- On Meet the Press, host Chuck Todd blamed online extremism for the assault on Paul Pelosi—seemingly suggesting that social media must do more to censor rhetoric and “apocalyptic language.”    5:05pm- Jennifer Sey—former Levi's brand President—joins The Rich Zeoli Show to discuss her new book, “Levi's Unbuttoned: The Woke Mob Took My Job But Gave Me My Voice.” During the pandemic Sey spoke out against pro-longed remote learning for K-12 students—expressing concern over the potential impact on education quality. Because the sentiment was unpopular in corporate America, Sey was forced to leave her job. In the new book, Sey writes that corporate America has embraced “woke capitalism” and has managed to exploit “social-justice politics” and transformed “it into social-justice consumerism.” “Levi's Unbuttoned: The Woke Mob Took My Job But Gave Me My Voice” releases on November 15th and is available for pre-order now.    5:40pm- According to NJ.com, residents of Westfield, New Jersey are unhappy over their depiction in Netflix's new mini-series “The Watcher.”  6:05pm- On Friday, Elon Musk officially purchased Twitter, Inc. for $44 billion. Almost instantaneously, traditional news outlets like the New York Times expressed concern over the purchase—alleging that Musk's pledge to respect free speech could result in hateful speech becoming widespread on Twitter's social media platform.    6:45pm- While speaking with Al Sharpton on MSNBC, New York Governor Kathy Hochul called Republicans “master manipulators”—claiming that violent crime is not a problem in Democrat-run states.    6:55pm- Who Won Social Media? + Zeoli's Final Thought 

The Dom Giordano Program
Democrats Are A Bunch Of 'Data Deniers'

The Dom Giordano Program

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 43:59


Full Hour | In today's third hour, Dom continues the Dom Giordano Program by offering up some surprising polling results in battleground states by CBS, which suggests that voters believe many Democrats put the needs of immigrants over the needs of Americans. Then, Giordano tells about the media narrative centered around crime in the election, playing back a clip from Al Sharpton minimizing the spike in crime statistics, with the MSNBC host arguing that Republicans are twisting and exploiting numbers for political purposes. Then, Dr. Mehmet Oz, checks back into the Dom Giordano Program while on the final stretch of his campaign before Election Day. Today, Giordano and Oz discuss the Democratic attempt to reframe the narrative around crime, with Oz telling why that issue is so important to Pennsylvanians. Then, Dr. Oz gets into the detrimental nature of progressive policies that would come with John Fetterman, and tells of the importance of getting out to vote. Also, Dr. Oz updates Giordano and listeners on where he spent the weekend, and previews an upcoming appearance with Dom Giordano on Election Eve, and tells about another rally tomorrow in Bucks County. (Photo by Getty Images)

The Phillip Scott Audio Experience
Al Sharpton Says Black Men Are Insecure As Men If They Don't Vote For Stacey Abrams

The Phillip Scott Audio Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 21:44


Al Sharpton attempted to shame Black American men into voting for Stacey Abrams. Sharpton claims any Black man that doesn't vote for Abrams is insecure. Black men have been delivered from the power of vote shaming. Black men have the right to vote for whatever candidate they want. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/psae/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/psae/support

The Scoot Show with Scoot
Why aren't Al Sharpton and Ben Crump in New Orleans tonight?

The Scoot Show with Scoot

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 8:42


Scoot talks to a few Black WWL listeners about why they think the most high-profile Black leaders with a national profile don't insert themselves into matters of Black-on-Black crime

The Scoot Show with Scoot
New Orleans crime rate is ticking down - could Al Sharpton help push?

The Scoot Show with Scoot

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 34:32


Scoot talks to WWL listeners about the little boy shot in Marrero last night, and why high-profile and well-resourced Black thought leaders like Al Sharpton won't get involved

The Jason Rantz Show
Hour 1 - Adults don't dress up for halloween

The Jason Rantz Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 41:46


What's Trending: A Washington poll says abortion and inflation are the top issues this election cycle and AG bans unvaxxed reporters from press conferences. // Hilary Clinton releases a video saying Republicans will 'steal the next election' and Al Sharpton say democrats don't want to talk about crime. // How to handle Halloween costume etiquette at work.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dumb People Town
Will Miles - The Al Sharpton Diet

Dumb People Town

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 31:38


This week Will Miles comes to town to hang with Daniel, Randy and Jason. This week's story is about a terrible roofing mistake. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Officer Tatum Show
Brandon talks about how Pro-choice really means Pro-murder; Herschel Walker, Raphael Warnock face off in only debate with Senate control on the line; Al Sharpton- Herschel Walker Nomination an Insult GOP Wanted ‘Any Black Against Warnock'; Illinois no

The Officer Tatum Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 77:29


The Officer Tatum Show is now available on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, and SalemPodcastNetwork.com.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Opperman Report
Aftershow: Jacque Hollander The Real James Brown and Al Sharpton 2014 08 01

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 69:15


Our guest is Jacque Hollander, the music producer for James Brown. We discuss her brutal attack by Mr Brown, her music career, her information about Michael Jackson and Rev Al Sharpton. Jacque Hollander filed a lawsuit against James Brown, which stemmed from an alleged 1988 rape. When the case was initially heard before a judge in 2002, Hollander's claims against Brown were dismissed by the court as the limitations period for filing the suit had expired. Hollander claimed that stress from the alleged assault later caused her to contract Graves' Disease, a thyroid condition. Hollander claimed that the incident took place in South Carolina while she was employed by Brown as a publicist. Hollander alleged that, during her ride in a van with Brown, Brown pulled over to the side of the road and sexually assaulted her while he threatened her with a shotgun. In her case against Brown, Hollander entered as evidence a DNA sample and a polygraph result, but the evidence was not considered due to the limitations defense. Hollander later brought her case before the Supreme Court. 7 years ago #after, #al, #al sharpton, #brown, #ed, #jacque hollander, #james, #james brown, #opperman, #oppermanreport, #real, #report, #sharpton, #show

The Opperman Report
Is Rev Al Sharpton CIA as Well as FBI?

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 61:05


The Opperman Report
Jacque Hollander The Real James Brown and Al Sharpton 2014 08 01

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 113:41


Our guest is Jacque Hollander, the music producer for James Brown. We discuss her brutal attack by Mr Brown, her music career, her information about Michael Jackson and Rev Al Sharpton. Jacque Hollander filed a lawsuit against James Brown, which stemmed from an alleged 1988 rape. When the case was initially heard before a judge in 2002, Hollander's claims against Brown were dismissed by the court as the limitations period for filing the suit had expired. Hollander claimed that stress from the alleged assault later caused her to contract Graves' Disease, a thyroid condition. Hollander claimed that the incident took place in South Carolina while she was employed by Brown as a publicist. Hollander alleged that, during her ride in a van with Brown, Brown pulled over to the side of the road and sexually assaulted her while he threatened her with a shotgun. In her case against Brown, Hollander entered as evidence a DNA sample and a polygraph result, but the evidence was not considered due to the limitations defense. Hollander later brought her case before the Supreme Court. 7 years ago #after, #al, #al sharpton, #brown, #ed, #jacque hollander, #james, #james brown, #opperman, #oppermanreport, #real, #report, #sharpton, #show

The Opperman Report
Rev Al Sharpton Exposed

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 63:23


3News Now with Stephanie Haney
Men Caught Cheating In Cleveland Walleye Fishing Tournament Charged With Crimes, Boat Seized

3News Now with Stephanie Haney

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 6:16


**Update: The 2 men caught cheating in the Lake Erie walleye fishing tournament - Jacob Runyan and Chase Cominsky - have been charged with crimes: Cheating, Attempted Grand Theft, Possessing Criminal Tools, and the Unlawful Ownership of Wild Animals.** Wednesday, October 12, 2022: Find out what we know about a boat seized from Chase Cominsky who was caught cheating at the Lake Erie walleye fishing tournament, what jobs the Akron police officers who shot and killed Jayland Walker will be doing now, where to catch the ‘Black Voters Matter' bus tour in Cleveland, what Sherwin-Williams says about Rev. Al Sharpton's protest over the construction of its new headquarters, a recap of the Guardians loss to the New York Yankees, where to find a sapling from Olympic winner Jesse Owens' original tree, and more on 3News Daily with Stephanie Haney. Connect with Stephanie Haney here: http://twitter.com/_StephanieHaney http://instagram.com/_StephanieHaney http://facebook.com/thestephaniehaney Read more here: 2 fishermen indicted on criminal charges in Cleveland fishing tournament scandal https://www.wkyc.com/article/news/local/cleveland/2-fishermen-indicted-criminal-charges-cleveland-fishing-tournament-scandal/95-88b8df03-4ab3-42d0-bd0d-fc0aeedf3a78 Report: Boat, trailer from Cleveland fishing tournament controversy seized by investigators https://www.wkyc.com/article/sports/outdoors/report-boat-trailer-cleveland-fishing-tournament-controversy-seized-investigators/95-608d1316-e605-45f9-b7f5-737c0310485c Sherwin-Williams responds to Rev. Al Sharpton protest regarding Cleveland headquarters construction https://www.wkyc.com/article/news/local/cleveland/sherwin-williams-responds-rev-al-sharpton-protest-cleveland-headquarters-construction/95-d93cbe42-3588-46f0-b8c3-ef015ac08290 Black Voters Matter brings bus tour to Northeast Ohio weeks before November general election https://www.wkyc.com/article/news/politics/elections/black-voters-matter-bus-tour-northeast-ohio-november-general-election/95-5f638988-075c-45d1-a6f5-3ec231ffd148 VOTER GUIDE | November 8 general election in Ohio: See what's on the ballot and how to find your polling place https://www.wkyc.com/article/news/politics/elections/ohio-general-election-november-2022-vote-issues-ballot-polling-place-governor-mike-dewine-nan-whaley-us-senate-tim-ryan-jd-vance/95-1dcb7a39-3c05-44c8-aaf7-dde2a16dfd51 Sherwin-Williams responds to Rev. Al Sharpton protest regarding Cleveland headquarters construction https://www.wkyc.com/article/sports/mlb/cleveland-guardians/cleveland-guardians-vs-new-york-yankees-game-2-alds-weather-conditions/95-0cd45ad4-f912-4a2e-ba76-fe51d6c6dd76

Rich Zeoli
Biden Warns of Armageddon…Only One Person Can Save Us: Randi Weingarten

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 178:59


The Rich Zeoli Show- Full Show (10/10/2022): 3:05pm- According to a report from The Daily Beast, U.S. Senate candidate Dr. Mehmet Oz's campaign is focusing on crime—specifically John Fetterman's “soft-on-crime” preferences while serving as Mayor of Braddock and operating as Lieutenant Governor of Pennsylvania. Polling indicates that Fetterman enjoys a 4-point advantage over Oz—but Trafalgar believes conservative voters may be under-represented in polls. 3:25pm- Columbus Day: Why does the city of Philadelphia still have its Christopher Columbus statue hidden away? 3:40pm- Susan Crabtree—RealClearPolitics White House & National Political Correspondent—joins the show to discuss her latest article, “Tim Scott's Midterm Mission.” According to Crabtree's reporting, Senator Tim Scott has “raised more than $70 million” but has “spent tens of millions of dollars” on other Republican candidates and super PACs supporting their campaigns. During her time speaking with Scott, the U.S. senator from South Carolina refused to comment on a potential 2024 presidential run, though Crabtree explains he is “already painstakingly laying the groundwork, state by state, district by district.”  4:05pm- While speaking at a Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee fundraiser on Thursday night, President Joe Biden warned of a potential nuclear Armageddon stemming from Russia's aggression in Ukraine and Vladimir Putin's recent threats to escalate warfare. According to National Review, Biden stated: “We have not faced the prospect of Armageddon since Kennedy and the Cuban Missile Crisis.” Over the weekend, Russia unleashed a wide-spread missile strike on Ukraine that resulted in an estimated 11 deaths with 89 others wounded. Appearing on Fox News, former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo referred to Biden's comments as “reckless.” Meanwhile, White House National Security Council Spokesman John Kirby stated the President's comments accurately reflect the high stakes of the situation.  4:30pm- John Rambo is in Ukraine to fight Russian President Vladimir Putin?! Oh, wait…it's actually American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten! 4:50pm- On Friday, Florida Surgeon General Dr. Joseph Ladapo, citing scientific evidence, suggested that COVID mRNA vaccines may put me 18 to 39-years-old at heightened risk for dangerous heart conditions. Despite the citations from reputable studies, Twitter briefly censored Dr. Ladapo's message before eventually reinstating the original post.  5:05pm- In June, New York City Emergency Management released a Public Service Announcement advising citizens on how they could survive a nuclear blast—surprisingly, the tips offered didn't convince Rich that it would be enough to prosper following the nuclear apocalypse.   5:15pm- Is it ok to put shredded mozzarella cheese on homemade, brick oven pizza? Rich is horrified by his producer's pizza preferences.  5:35pm- While appearing with Al Sharpton on MSNBC, Congressional candidate Matt Castelli blamed his midterm opponent Rep. Elise Stefanik for rhetoric that inspires violence.  5:40pm- Dan McLaughlin—Senior Writer at National Review—joins the show to discuss his latest editorial, “Joe Biden is a Lawless Rogue Who Has Yet Again Violated His Oath of Office.” McLaughlin documents several occasions where President Biden has acted unilaterally, exceeding his Constitutional authority: forbidding landlords from evicting tenants who have not paid rent, cancelling college debts, issuing workplace vaccine mandates, and now a blanket pardon of all individuals convicted of minor marijuana offenses.    6:05pm- In August, Boston Children's Hospital posted a video to YouTube in which one of its doctors stated that babies are capable of selecting their gender identity from inside the womb—but by assigning personhood to a fetus, was the doctor accidentally making a pro-life argument? After going viral on social media last week, YouTube decided to remove the original video from its platform. 6:15pm- Speaking with Margaret Hoover of PBS, progressive Congresswoman Cori Bush revealed that while seeking an abortion at age 19 she asked doctors and nurses to stop the procedure, but her requests were ignored.  6:30pm- Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Director Rochelle Walensky and CNN/HBO Max host Chris Wallace talked about fictional adult films…yes, that actually happened…and the audio is even more awkward than you could ever possibly imagine! 6:45pm- While on CBS Sunday Morning, Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson announced he will not be running for President of the United States in 2024. 6:55pm- Who Won Social Media? + Zeoli's Final Thought

Rich Zeoli
How to Survive a Nuclear Apocalypse + Pizza Talk

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 45:12


The Rich Zeoli Show- Hour 3: In June, New York City Emergency Management released a Public Service Announcement advising citizens on how they could survive a nuclear blast—surprisingly, the tips offered didn't convince Rich that it would be enough to prosper following the nuclear apocalypse. Is it ok to put shredded mozzarella cheese on homemade, brick oven pizza? Rich is horrified by his producer's pizza preferences. While appearing with Al Sharpton on MSNBC, Congressional candidate Matt Castelli blamed his midterm opponent Rep. Elise Stefanik for rhetoric that inspires violence. Dan McLaughlin—Senior Writer at National Review—joins the show to discuss his latest editorial, “Joe Biden is a Lawless Rogue Who Has Yet Again Violated His Oath of Office.” McLaughlin documents several occasions where President Biden has acted unilaterally, exceeding his Constitutional authority: forbidding landlords from evicting tenants who have not paid rent, cancelling college debts, issuing workplace vaccine mandates, and now a blanket pardon of all individuals convicted of minor marijuana offenses. 

Deadline: White House
"Just too many avenues of investigation"

Deadline: White House

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 92:51 Very Popular


Nicolle Wallace discusses the new reporting that the DOJ believes that the former president did may not have returned all of the classified documents taken from the White House, a look at both the Arizona and Georgia Senate races, the latest from the Oath Keepers trial, examining President Biden's latest comments about Vladimir Putin and more. Joined by: Mike Schmidt, Harry Litman, Carol Leonnig, Pete Strzok, Tim Miller, Rev. Al Sharpton, Josh Gerstein, Tracy Walder, Ryan Reilly, Michael McFaul, Alexander Vindman, Michele Goodwin and Charlie Sykes.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
The Byron York Show: Joe Biden, the 82-year-old candidate?

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022


There’s a new report from NBC News that President Joe Biden has told a confidant, the Rev. Al Sharpton, of all people, that he will run for reelection in 2024. It’s not terribly well sourced, attributing the information to “an official of Sharpton’s National Action Network” who told NBC what Sharpton had told him. In […]

The Byron York Show
Joe Biden, the 82-year-old candidate?

The Byron York Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 21:21


There's a new report from NBC News that President Joe Biden has told a confidant, the Rev. Al Sharpton, of all people, that he will run for reelection in 2024. It's not terribly well sourced, attributing the information to "an official of Sharpton's National Action Network" who told NBC what Sharpton had told him. In any event, the story said Biden told Sharpton as the two posed for pictures after a White House meeting with civil rights leaders on Sept. 2: "I'm going to do it again. I'm going."

Deadline: White House
"An obvious, incredibly serious, criminal investigation"

Deadline: White House

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 89:44 Very Popular


Nicolle Wallace discusses the latest on Hurricane Ian after it makes a second landfall in South Carolina, the former president's lawyers warning in the Mar-a-Lago documents investigation, Vladimir Putin's dramatic escalation against the United States and the West and more.   Joined by: Kathy Park, Ali Velshi, Mike McNees, Carol Leonnig, Neal Katyal, Michael Steele, Rev. Al Sharpton, Michael McFaul, Alexander Vindman, Shaq Brewster, Blayne Alexander, Nicolete Vaughn, Mara Gay, Harry Litman and Stan Hays. 

Deadline: White House
"You can't legislate somebody having some shame”

Deadline: White House

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 93:58


Nicolle Wallace discusses next week's newest January 6th Selection Committee hearing, the latest news from GOP candidates around the country and a conversation with Michael Cohen, the former personal attorney for the former president. Joined by: Rep. Zoe Lofgren, Katie Benner, Andrew Weissmann, Dahlia Lithwick, Michael Steele, Rev. Al Sharpton, Michael Cohen, John Heilemann, Eddie Glaude and Marc Elias. 

Deadline: White House
“Playing very close to the line here”

Deadline: White House

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 89:57 Very Popular


Nicolle Wallace discusses a federal judge rejecting the DOJ's request to resume their investigation of the Mar-a-Lago documents. Plus, in 2021 the Trump team claimed the boxes at Mar-a-Lago were only news clippings, the immigration battle intensifies over migrants moved for political stunts, and new reports of mass graves in the city of Izyum, Ukraine.Joined by: Brandon Van Grack, Andrew Weissmann, Zoe Tillman, Jonathan Lemire, Charlie Sykes, Reverend Al Sharpton, Katie Benner, Barbara McQuade, David Enrich, Amb. Michael McFaul, Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, and Rep. Seth Moulton

Mea Culpa with Michael Cohen
DeSantis Is A Loser, But DEMS Are Weak + A Conversation With Cenk Uygur

Mea Culpa with Michael Cohen

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 89:14 Very Popular


Our guest today on Mea Culpa is the notorious, Cenk Uygur. Cenk is an activist, political commentator and businessman known for creating and hosting, 'The Young Turks' — a progressive online news network that supports independent journalism. He was a prolific attorney in Washington D.C. before embarking on a career as a political commentator. He enjoys a massive fan base in the USA due to his fearless activism and heated debates conducted on his show — always with a hint of satirical humor. Cenk has been seen as a political commentator on MSNBC, and before being replaced by Al Sharpton, he hosted a weeknight show on the network. He also served as the chief news officer at Current TV and succeeded Keith Olbermann. Cenk has been an activist since his college days and he has raised his voice against the oppression of minorities and Muslims in the gulf countries. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Mea Culpa with Michael Cohen
DeSantis Is A Loser, But DEMS Are Weak + A Conversation With Cenk Uygur

Mea Culpa with Michael Cohen

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 85:44


Our guest today on Mea Culpa is the notorious, Cenk Uygur. Cenk is an activist, political commentator and businessman known for creating and hosting, 'The Young Turks' — a progressive online news network that supports independent journalism. He was a prolific attorney in Washington D.C. before embarking on a career as a political commentator. He enjoys a massive fan base in the USA due to his fearless activism and heated debates conducted on his show — always with a hint of satirical humor. Cenk has been seen as a political commentator on MSNBC, and before being replaced by Al Sharpton, he hosted a weeknight show on the network. He also served as the chief news officer at Current TV and succeeded Keith Olbermann. Cenk has been an activist since his college days and he has raised his voice against the oppression of minorities and Muslims in the gulf countries. To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices