Podcasts about bq

SI derived unit of activity referred to a radionuclide

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Latest podcast episodes about bq

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News
S26E14: First Brown Dwarf Imaged in the Hyades Open Star Cluster // Comparing Notes // Rocket Lab US Launch

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary | Astronomy, Space & Science News

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2023 22:56


*First Brown Dwarf imaged in the Hyades open star cluster Astronomers have imaged a brown dwarf in the Hyades open star cluster for the first time. *BepiColombo and Solar Orbiter Compare Notes at Venus The convergence of two spacecraft at Venus back in August 2021 has given a unique insight into how the planet is able to retain its thick atmosphere without the protection of a global magnetic field. *Rocket Lab's first launch from America New Zealand based company Rocket Lab has successfully launched its first mission from the United States. *The Science Report Warnings that vaccinated people produce fewer antibodies to the new BQ.1.1 and XBB.1 COVID variants Growing light pollution taking the stars out of the night skies. Study claims eating almonds helps with recovery after exercise. Alex on Tech: New updates for IOS users and bad news for augmented reality fans. Listen to SpaceTime on your favorite podcast app with our universal listen link: https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com/listen For more SpaceTime and show links: https://linktr.ee/biteszHQ If you love this podcast, please get someone else to listen to. Thank you… To become a SpaceTime supporter and unlock commercial free editions of the show, gain early access and bonus content, please visit https://bitesz.supercast.com/ . Premium version now available via Spotify and Apple Podcasts. For more podcasts visit our HQ at https://bitesz.com Your support is needed... SpaceTime is an independently produced podcast (we are not funded by any government grants, big organisations or companies), and we're working towards becoming a completely listener supported show...meaning we can do away with the commercials and sponsors. We figure the time can be much better spent on researching and producing stories for you, rather than having to chase sponsors to help us pay the bills. That's where you come in....help us reach our first 1,000 subscribers...at that level the show becomes financially viable and bills can be paid without us breaking into a sweat every month. Every little bit helps...even if you could contribute just $1 per month. It all adds up. By signing up and becoming a supporter at the $5 or more level, you get immediate access to over 280 commercial-free, double, and triple episode editions of SpaceTime plus extended interview bonus content. You also receive all new episodes on a Monday rather than having to wait the week out. Subscribe via Supercast (you get a month's free trial to see if it's really for you or not) ... and share in the rewards. Details at Supercast - https://bitesznetwork.supercast.tech/ Details at https://spacetimewithstuartgary.com or www.bitesz.com#space #astronomy #science #news #podcast #spacetime

WDW MainStreet
Episode 740 Go Birds & Our Sunday News!

WDW MainStreet

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 29, 2023 90:11


Hello everyone and welcome to the WDW Mainstreet podcast. Pull up your stool with John and Doug as they discuss all of the latest news from around Walt Disney World and their worlds. First things first GO BIRDS! Second good by old friend Splash Mountain is closed for good and Doug is very sad. Walt Disney World union members possibly could go on strike, what is John's thoughts? New food coming out around the parks for Black History month and Woody's BQ the guys discuss all of it. Barges on their way out for replacement show at EPCOT, DVC at Poly on it's way out of the ground, No Q for Tron plus so much more! Grab yourself a cold one, sit back, relax and enjoy the show!

A Runner’s Life
#149 - Fiona English - Changing the Boston Marathon deferral policy

A Runner’s Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 43:50


In episode 149, I spoke with Fiona English who posted an open letter to the Boston Marathon in January 2023 to ask them to review their deferral policy, for women like herself who earned a Boston Qualifying (BQ) entry before becoming pregnant. The Boston marathon and the qualifying time is held in high regard globally. After running 17 marathons, through hard work and determination, she qualified running a BQ time at Paris Marathon in April 2022 running 3:27:05, after running 5:47 for her first marathon. When this podcast was recorded, the Boston Athletic Association (B.A.A.) policy had a strict no deferral policy. However during the recording of the podcast unbeknownst to Fiona and I, the B.A.A. posted on Instagram noting they changed their policy to allow for entry deferral post pregnancy. This is thanks to everyone that spoke following the post, but more importantly the pioneers before that made this final push possible. There's definitely more that needs to be done, one of those things is focused on the remaining three marathon majors, to follow suit in having progressive deferral policies. Further information on resources to create a level start line for women include: She Races https://www.sheraces.com &Mother https://andmother.org You can follow Fiona on Instagram at @englishruns Thank you to everyone that supports this podcast and this episode and thank you to my patreons who support the show. You can support the show by becoming a patreon at www.patreon.com/ARunnersLife --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/marcus-brown9/support

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK
Clear Evidence of Vital Immune Evasion, Immune Prejudicing, Original Antigenic Sin

AMERICA OUT LOUD PODCAST NETWORK

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 59:05


Dr. Paul Alexander Liberty Hour – Suddenly, we have this flurry of research papers showing immune evasion from BQ and XBB sub-variants/clades. It is clear. The booster has failed. Yet we warned them, McCullough, Vanden Bossche, Risch, Yeadon, Tenenbaum, Oskoui, Ladapo, Cole, myself, etc. What did we know that they did not?

Ali on the Run Show
605. Camila Ramón, Peloton Instructor & Marathoner

Ali on the Run Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 61:58


"I got to the top and I was like, 'Wow." Like so proud of myself. I have no idea how much I weigh relative to then. I do not care to see the difference in a photo between what I look like then and what I look like now. All I know is that I'm so happy with myself, I'm so proud of myself, and I feel so strong." Camila Ramón started running in elementary school. Not because she loved it. Not because it made her feel good. Not because she was on the track or cross-country teams. Camila started running at a young age because she thought she needed to lose weight. In this conversation, Camila talks about the pressure she felt and the comments she received about her body while growing up in Argentina, and later in Miami. She talks about how, as an adult and professional dancer, she rediscovered running, and this time it stuck. She found a community of like-minded runners, she started trail running in L.A., and she completed her first marathon (and earned a Boston Marathon qualifying time, which meant she then ran the 2019 Boston Marathon as her second marathon). Today, Camila is best known as a Peloton instructor, where she teaches cycling and tread classes in both English and Spanish. (Her playlists will have you dancing, guaranteed.) She's open, honest, and always vulnerable when talking about her complicated history with running and with her body (her "Biscayne Bridge story" is likely to resonate), and above all, she wants runners to know that, just by showing up, "You are enough." SPONSOR: Tracksmith: New customers, use code ALINEW for $15 off your first Tracksmith order over $75. Returning customers, use code ALIGIVE for free shipping, plus a portion of the proceeds from your order will be donated to Moms Demand Action. What you'll get on this episode: What's making Camila happy today? (2:15) On teaching in both English and Spanish (3:10) Did Camila ever envision this future for herself? (7:30) All about Camila's childhood growing up in Argentina, and then Miami (10:30) How to prepare for fame (14:30) How Camila found running (16:20) Camila reflects on her first marathon — and her second! (22:00) What Camila's relationship with running is like now (28:25) Camila's “Biscayne Bridge” story, and how her relationship with running and with her body has evolved over the years (35:15) The messages Camila wants everyone to take away from her classes (43:45) Camila shares her most memorable running experience (48:55) Follow Camila: Instagram @milamariana Follow Ali: Instagram @aliontherun1 Join the Facebook group Twitter @aliontherun1 Support on Patreon Subscribe to the newsletter Blog Strava SUPPORT the Ali on the Run Show! If you're enjoying the show, please subscribe and leave a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. Spread the run love. And if you liked this episode, share it with your friends!

The Training With Tucker Podcast
62: Story Time - My First BQ 2:59:47

The Training With Tucker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 27:21


In this episode I tell the story of my first BQ back in 2019 at the Mount Desert Island Marathon. I talk about how the weekend went for me, what it was like to run a marathon with the flu, the day after a wedding.. I discuss how my Aunt Barb battling cancer for the third time helped me keep things in perspective and get to the start line. What it felt like to cross the finish line 13 seconds under 3 hours and accomplish the goal I had set out to do back in 2013. The 3 big takeaways: - You are capable of so much more than you think! - You have another gear at the end of any race, you just have to find it! - Running for something bigger than you helps you find strength you didn't know you had For more information on my coaching services please visit: Website: https://www.trainingwithtucker.com/ IG and Facebook: @trainingwithtucker Email: tuckergrosecoaching@gmail.com

Solving Healthcare with Dr. Kwadwo Kyeremanteng
#220 Lessons From The Pandemic with Drs. Chagla, Baral & Chakrabarti (The Last Dance)

Solving Healthcare with Dr. Kwadwo Kyeremanteng

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 83:19


Episode SummaryIn this livecast episode, we welcome back Dr. Zain Chagla, Dr. Stefan Baral, and Dr. Sumon Chakrabarti to address some of the issues we've seen throughout the pandemic, new variants and what to expect with future variants, discussing what we've done well over the past few years, misinformation, the effect of social media and the messaging on Twitter, the role media plays and the influence of experts on policy, public health agencies, booster shots to combat new variants and who actually needs them, where we are at with public trust, and much more!SHOW SPONSORBETTERHELPBetterHelp is the largest online counselling platform worldwide. They change the way people get help with facing life's challenges by providing convenient, discreet and affordable access to a licensed therapist. BetterHelp makes professional counselling available anytime, anywhere, through a computer, tablet or smartphone.Sign up today: http://betterhelp.com/solvinghealthcare and use Discount code “solvinghealthcare"Thanks for reading Solving Healthcare with Dr. Kwadwo Kyeremanteng! Subscribe for free to receive new posts and support my work.Thank you for reading Solving Healthcare with Dr. Kwadwo Kyeremanteng. This post is public so feel free to share it.Transcript:KK: Welcome to ‘Solving Healthcare' I'm Kwadwo Kyeremanteng. I'm an ICU and palliative care physicianhere in Ottawa and the founder of ‘Resource Optimization Network' we are on a mission to transformhealthcare in Canada. I'm going to talk with physicians, nurses, administrators, patients and theirfamilies because inefficiencies, overwork and overcrowding affects us all. I believe it's time for a betterhealth care system that's more cost effective, dignified, and just for everyone involved.KK: All right, folks, listen. This is the first live cast that we have done in a very long time, probably a year.Regarding COVID, we're gonna call it a swan song, folks, because I think this is it. I'm gonna be bold andsay, this is it, my friends. I think what motivated us to get together today was, we want to learn, wewant to make sure we learned from what's gone on in the last almost three years, we want to learn that,in a sense that moving forward the next pandemic, we don't repeat mistakes. We once again, kind ofelevate the voices of reason and balance, and so on. So, before we get started, I do want to give acouple of instructions for those that are online. If you press NL into the chat box, you will be able to getthis. This recording video and audio sent to you via email. It'll be part of our newsletter. It's ballin, you'll,you'll get the last one the last hurrah or the last dance, you know I'm saying second, secondly, I want togive a quick plug to our new initiative. Our new newsletters now on Substack. Everything is on therenow our podcasts our newsletter. So, all the updates you'll be able to get through there. I'm just goingto put a link in the chat box. Once I find it. Bam, bam, bam. Okay, there we go. There we go. That's itright there, folks. So, I feel like the crew here needs no introduction. We're gonna do it. Anyway, we gotDr. Zain Chagla, we got Dr. Stef Baral, we got Dr. Sumon Chakrabarti back in full effect. Once again, like Isaid, we were we chat a lot. We were on a on a chat group together. We were saying how like, we justneed to close this out, we need to address some of the issues that we've seen during the pandemic. Talkabout how we need to learn and deal with some of the more topical issues du jour. So, I think what we'llstart with, well get Sumon to enter the building. If you're on Twitter, you're gonna get a lot of mixedmessages on why you should be fearful of it or why not you should be fearful of it. So, from an IDperspective, Sumon what's your what's your viewpoint on? B 115?SC: Yeah, so, first of all, great to be with you guys. I agree, I love doing this as a as a swan song to kind ofmove to the next stage that doesn't involve us talking about COVID all the time. But so yeah, I think thatwe've had a bit of an alphabet soup in the last year with all these variants. And you know, the most oneof the newest ones that we're hearing about recently are BQ 1, xBB. I think that what I talked aboutwhen I was messaging on the news was taking a step back and looking at what's happened in the last 14months. What that is showing us is that we've had Omicron For this entire time, which suggests a levelof genomic stability in the virus, if you remember, variants at the very beginning, you know, that wassynonymous with oh, man, we're going to have an explosion of cases. Especially with alpha for the GTAdelta for the rest of, of Ontario, and I'm just talking about my local area. We saw massive increases inhospitalizations, health care resources, of patients having been sent all over the province. So, it was itwas awful, right. But you know, I think that was a bit of PTSD because now after anybody heard theword variant, that's what you remember. As time has gone on, you can see that the number ofhospitalizations has reduced, the number of deaths has reduced. Now when omicron came yeah, therewas an explosion of cases. But you know, when you look at the actual rate of people getting extremely illfrom it, it's much, much, much less. That was something that, you know, many of us were secretlythinking, Man, this is great when this happened. So now where we are is we're in January 2023, we'vehad nothing but Omicron, since what was in late November 2020, or 21? Maybe a bit later than that.And x BB, if you remember, be a 2x BB is an offshoot of BH two. Okay. Yeah, if you're noticing all thesenew variants are their immune evasive, they tend to be not as they're not as visually as, I see this in myown practice, like all of us do here. You know, they are, well, I'm kind of piecemeal evolution of thevirus. Now, there's not one variant that's gonna blow all the other ones out of the water, like Oh, microndid or delta. Right. I think this is a good thing. This is showing that we're reaching a different stage of thepandemic, which we've been in for almost a year now. I think that every time we hear a new one, itdoesn't mean that we're back to square one. I think that this is what viruses naturally do. And I thinkputting that into perspective, was very important.KK: Absolutely. Zain just to pick your brain to like, I got this question the other day about, like, what toexpect what future variants like, obviously, is there's no crystal ball, but someone alluded to the ideathat this is what we're to expect. You feel the same?ZC: Yeah, absolutely. It's interesting, because we have not studied a Coronavirus this much, you know, inhistory, right. Even though we've lived with coronaviruses, there probably was a plague ofcoronaviruses. What was the Russian flu is probably the emergence of one of our coronaviruses areseasonal coronaviruses. You know, I think we had some assumptions that Coronavirus is when mutate,but then as we look to SARS, cov two and then we look back to see some of the other Coronavirus has,they've also mutated quite a bit too, we just haven't, you know, put names or other expressions tothem. This is part of RNA replication of the virus is going to incorporate some mutations and survival ofthe fittest, the difference between 2020, 2021, 2022, and now 2023 is the only pathway for this virus tokeep circulating is to become more immune evasive. This is what we're seeing is more immune evasion,we're seeing a variant with a couple more mutations where antibodies may bind a little bit less. But Ithink that the big difference here is that that protection, that severe disease, right, like the COVID, thatwe saw in 2020/2021, you know, that terrible ICU itis, from the COVID, you know, for the level ofantibody T cell function, non-neutralizing antibody functioning mate cell function, all of that that's builtinto, you know, humanity now through infection, vaccine are both really, you know, the virus can evolveto evade some of the immunity to cause repeat infections and, you know, get into your mucosa andreplicate a bit, the ability for the virus to kind of, you know, cause deep tissue infection lead to ARDSlead to all of these complications is getting harder and harder and harder. That's us evolving with thevirus and that's, you know, how many of these viruses as they emerge in the population really have kindof led to stability more than anything else? So, yes, we're going to see more variants. Yes, you know, thisis probably what what the future is, there will be some more cases and there may be a slight tick inhospitalizations associated with them. But again, you know, the difference between 2020/2021/2022/2023 is a syrup prevalence of nearly 100%. One way or another, and that really does define how thisdisease goes moving forward.KK: Yeah, absolutely. Maybe Stef we could pipe it a bit on, the idea that, first of all, I just want toreinforce like as an ICU doc in Ottawa with a population of over a million we really have seen very littleCOVID pneumonia since February 2022. Very minimal and it just goes to show know exactly whatSumon and Zain were alluding to less virulent with the immunity that we've established in thecommunity, all reassuring science. One question I want to throw towards Stef, before getting into it. Youdid an interview with Mike Hart. As you were doing this interview, I was going beast mode. I was hearingStef throw down. I don't know if you were, a bit testy that day, or whatever. There was the raw motionof reflecting on the pandemic, and how we responded and far we've gone away from public healthprinciples, was just like this motivator to say, we cannot have this happen again. I gotta tell you, boys,like after hearing that episode, I was like ‘Yeah, let's do this'. Let's get on. Let's go on another, doanother show. I'm gonna leave this fairly open Stef. What has been some of the keyways we'veapproached this pandemic that has really triggered you?SB: Yeah, I mean, so I guess what I'd say is, in some ways, I wish there was nobody listening to this rightnow. I wish there was like, I don't know what the audience is. I don't know if it's 10 people or underpeople, but I think it's like, I wish nobody cared anymore. I want Public Health to care. I want doctors tocare, we're going to keep talking because you know, Kwadwo, you've had folks in the ICU we we'vewe've seen cases in the shelters, we have outbreaks, like public health is always going to care aboutCOVID, as it cares about influenza cares about RSV, and other viruses, because it needs to respond tooutbreaks among vulnerable folks. That will never stop COVID, it was just clear very early, that COVID isgoing to be with us forever. So that means tragically, people will die of COVID people. I think that, youknow, there's that that's a reality, it's sometimes it's very close to home for those of us who areproviders, as it has for me in the last week. So COVID never ends. I think the issue is that like when doesCOVID And as a matter of worthy of discussion for like the average person? The answer is a long timeago. I mean, I think for the folks that I've spoken to, and the way that we've lived our lives as a family isto focus on the things that like bring folks joy, and to kind of continue moving along, while also ensuringthat the right services are in place for folks who are experiencing who are at risk for COVID and seriousconsequences of COVID. Also just thinking about sort of broader systems issues that I think continue toput folks at risk. So, one: I think it's amazing, like how little of the systematic issues we've changed,we've not improved healthcare capacity at all. Amazingly, we've not really changed any of the structuresthat put our leg limitations on the on the pressures on the health system, none of that has changed. Allof it has been sort of offset and downloaded and just like talking about masks and endless boosterswhen we've never really gotten to any of the meaty stuff. As you said three years into it, andeverybody's like, well, it's an emergency. I'm like, it was an emergency and fine. We did whatever wasneeded, even if I didn't agree with it at the time. But irrespective of that, whatever that was done wasdone. But now it's amazing that like the federal money expires for COVID In next few months, and allwell have shown for this switch health guys got became millionaires like a bunch of people, I don't mindnaming and I don't care anymore. These folks, these Grifters went out and grabbed endless amounts ofmoney. These cash grabs that arrival, the ArriveCan app with, like these mystery contractors that theycan't track down millions of dollars. So it's like all these folks like grabbed, you know, huge amounts ofmoney. And I think there's a real question at the end of it of like, what are we as a country? Or youknow, across countries? What do you have to show for it? How are you going to better respond? Andthe answer right now is like very little, like we have very little to show for all this all these resources thathave been invested, all this work that has been done. That I think should be the conversation. That tome needs to be this next phase of it is like billions and billions and billions of dollars trillion or whatever,like 10s of billions of dollars were spent on what? and what was achieved? And what do we want to donext time? And what do we have to show for it? that, to me feels like the meat of the conversationrather than like silly names for these new variants that do nothing but scare people in a way that isn'thelpful. It does not advance health. It doesn't you know, make the response any more helpful. It justscares people in a way that I think only detracts them from seeking the care that we want them to beseeking.KK: Yeah, I think you brought up a point to about or alluded to how some of this was the distraction.That was one of the points that really stuck home is that we, we didn't really dive into the core s**t, thecore issues. This is why at the end of it all, are we that much more ready for the next pandemic that wellsee, you know, and so like maybe Sumon, what do you think in terms of another tough one, are weready for the next pandemic? Do you think we've done enough? do we think are in terms of what we'veinvested in, how we've communicated to the public. The messaging to the public. Are we learning? Is myquestion, I guess.SC: I'm a clinician and I don't work with the public health and the policy aspect as closely as Stefan does.But I will say that, obviously, I've been in this realm for quite a long time, since in ID, I think that, youknow, what that's important to remember is that for SARS 1 we actually had this document thatoutlined all of this, you know, masking, social distancing, what to do with funding and all that kind ofstuff. Basically, I was actually interviewed about this, I remember back way back in 2020, and half of itwas basically just thrown out the window. I think that a lot of what happened is that fear came indecisions were made from emotion, which is, by the way, understandable, especially in April 2020. I'veshared with you guys before that, in February 2020, I was waking up at night, like nervous, that I wasgonna die. I that that's where I was thinking I it was, it was terrible. I completely understand makingthose decisions. I think as time went on, I wish that, you know, there's a bit more of public healthprinciples. You know, making sure that we're dealing with things without, you know, stepping onpeople's bodily autonomy, for example, you know, doing things in an equitable way, where you, youknow, we all know that every intervention that you do is squeezing a balloon, you must remember theunintended consequences, I think that we did. So, kind of putting that all together. I think, right now, aswe stand in Canada if we do have another pandemic. I fear that a lot of these same mistakes are goingto be made again, I should say, a disruptive pandemic of this because it's not forgotten H1N1, thepandemic it that was a pandemic, right. It wasn't nearly as disruptive as COVID was, but I do think thatinquiry and like you mentioned at the beginning, Kwadwo was talking about what we did, well, we didn'tdo well, and making sure the good stuff happens, and the bad stuff doesn't happen again, because this islikely not the last pandemic, in the information age in our lifetimes.KK: Zain, was there anything that stuck out for you? In terms of what you'd really want to see usimprove? Or whether it is messaging, whether it is public health principles, does any of those stick out inyour mind?ZC: Yeah, I mean, I think the one unique thing about this pandemic that is a lesson moving forward andfor us to kind of deal with I think we talked about messaging. This was the first major pandemic thatoccurred with social media and the social media era, right, and where, information, misinformation,disinformation, all the things that were all over the place, you know, we're flying, right, and there doesneed to be some reconciliation of what's been we have to have some reconciliation of some of thebenefits of the social media era in pandemic management, but also the significant harms the people,you know, we're scared that people got messaging that may not have been completely accurate, thatpeople had their biases as they were out there. I will say even that social media component penetratedinto the media. This is also the first time that I think we saw experts you know, including myself andSuman and all of us you know, that you know, could be at home and do a news interview on NationalNews in five minutes and be able to deliver their opinion to a large audience very quickly. So, you know,I think all of that does need a bit of a reconciliation in terms of what worked, what doesn't how youvalidate you know, good medical knowledge versus knowledge that comes from biases how we evaluatepsi comm and people you know, using it as a platform for good but may in fact be using it you know,when or incorporating their own biases to use it for more, more disinformation and misinformationeven if they feel like they have good intentions with it. I you know, I think this is a, you know, for thesociologists and the communications professionals out there, you know, really interesting case exampleand unfortunately, I don't think we came out the other side. Social media being a positive tool, it mayhave been a positive tool, I think in the beginnings, but, you know, I think I'm finding, it's nice tocommunicate with folks, but I'm finding more harm and more dichotomy and division from social mediathese days is compared to the beginnings of the pandemics where, you know, I think, again, there's justbeen so much bias, so much misinformation so much people's clouds and careers that have been, youknow, staked on social media that it's really become much, much harder to figure out what's real andwhat's not real in that sense.KK: Absolutely, I fully agree Zain. At the beginning, in some ways, I'll tell you, ICU management, thatwhole movement for us to delay intubation, as opposed to intubation early, I really think it was pushedby in social media. So, I think it saved lives, right. But then, as we got through more and more thepandemic, wow, like it, like the amount of just straight up medieval gangster s**t that was going on thatin that circle, in that avenue was crazy. Then just like, I mean, this might be controversial to say, I don'tknow, but news agencies got lazy, they would use Twitter quotes in their articles as, evidence, or asproof of an argument. It's like, what is happening? It? Honestly, when you think about it, it was it wascrazy. It still is crazy.ZC: Yeah. And I think expertise was another issue. Right. And, you know, unfortunately, we know of, youknow, certain experts that were not experts that weren't certified that weren't frontlines and a varietyof opinions and various standpoints and epidemiology, public health, intensive care, infectious diseases,whatever is important. But, you know, there were individuals out there that had zero experience thatwere reading papers and interpreting them from a lens of someone that really didn't have medicalexperience or epidemiologic experience, that chased their clout that made money and, we know someexamples that people that eventually had the downfall from it, but you know, at the end of the day,those people were on social media, and it penetrated into real media, and then that is a real lesson forus is that validation of expertise is going to be important. You know, as much as we allow for anyone tohave an opinion, you know, as they get into kind of real media, they really have to be validated that thatopinion comes from a place that's evidence based and scientific and based on a significant amount oftraining rather than just regurgitating or applying one small skill set and being an expert in many otherthings.KK: SumonSC: So we're just gonna add really quickly is that, in addition to what Zain saying. When this stuff bledover from social media to media, the thing that I mean, at least what it seemed like is he was actuallyinfluencing policy. That's, I think that's the important thing is, so you can have 10 people 20 peopleyelling, it doesn't matter if they're extreme minority, if it's influencing policy that affects all of us, right.So, I think that's important.KK: I'll be honest with you, like, I got to the point where I really hated Twitter, I still kind of hate Twitter.Okay. It was conversation. I remember Sumon that you and I had I don't remember it was we weretexting. I think we talked about this. But the fact that policy could be impacted by what we're throwingdown the facts or the messages that we were doing on media that this can impact policy, you had tolike, especially when there was some badness happening, we had to step up. We had to be a voice oflogic, whether it was mandates, whether it was you know, lockdown school closures, whatever it mighthave been like, the politicians, we heard about this politicians looking at this, the mainstream medialooking at this, and for us not to say anything at this point, like we had, we had to do something Sorry,Stef, you're gonna jump in?SB: Yeah, I think I think what was interesting to me to see and I think a clear difference between H1N1was that in a lot of places, and including in Ontario, across the US, where this sort of emergence of theselike the science tables, these task forces, these whatever you want to call them, it was like a new bodyof people often whom had never spent a day in a public health agency. Often academics that you know,are probably good with numbers, but really don't have a lot of experience delivering services, you know,all of a sudden making decisions. So I think there's a real interesting dynamic that when you compare,for example, Ontario and British Columbia, one has this science table one does not, and just howdifferent things played out, I mean, given it's a, you know, an end of have to, or no one in each camp,but I think what you see is like, there's a place there where like public health or you know, let's say,Sweden, you know, as a public health agency that didn't strike up its own taskforce that used itstraditional public health agency. I think was in a place to make more like reasoned and measureddecisions, and just was better connected, like the relationships exist between the local healthauthorities and the provincial health authorities and the national ones. I think when you set up these,the one thing that I hope we never do, again, is that something like the science table never happensagain. That's not to sort of disparage most of the people. Actually, most of the folks on the science tableI like, and I respect, say many of them, maybe not most, but many of them, I like and respect, but it isthe case that there was it was they weren't the right group of people. They weren't representativeOntarians he was like, ten guys and two women, I think, I don't know many of them white, they weren'trepresentative socio economically, racially diverse, anything. They didn't have the right expertise onthere. I would have liked to see some like frontline nurses on there to say ‘listen, this stuff is silly' orsome frontline, whoever just some frontline folks to be say ‘listen, none of the stuff that you're sayingmakes any sense whatsoever'. And luckily, there was some reason, voices on there, but they were theminority. But luckily, they prevailed, or we would have had outdoor masking and even tougherlockdowns. I don't know how folks really; it was really close. I think we fortunately had thatrepresentation, but that should have never even happened, we should have had public health Ontario,being its agency and making recommendations to the ministry and to the government. There shouldhave never been a science table. Then second thing, I just want to say I've we've talked about thisforever and I do think we should talk about this more, not in the context of like this, this podcast, but isalso just absolutely the role of the media. I do want to say that, like historically, media had to do a lot ofwork, they had to go to universities or hospitals and ask for the right expert, and then the media orcomms team, ‘you should really talk to Zain Chagla' Because he has good example, you know, it givesgood expertise on this or you start to like, I don't know, like Dr. so and so for this or that, and they puttogether the right person, they organize the time and then they talk. Now you know that it was reallylike the story I think was more organically developed on based on what the experts had to say. Nowyou've got reporters, for people who are not from Ontario, there's a sports reporter in the city ofToronto that I looked historically, I can't see that they've ever done anything in public health suddenlybecame like the COVID reporter in the city of Toronto, for a major newspaper. It's like this person hasnot a clue of what they're talking about, just like has no clue they've never trained in. I don't disparagetheir sports reporter like why should they? but they became the voice of like public health for like theaverage person. It just it set us up where that person just had a story and then just found whateverpeople on Twitter that they could to like back up their story irrespective to drive controversy, to driveanger towards the government based on sort of political leanings. Even if maybe my political leaningsare aligned with that person, it's a relevant because it's not about politics, it's about public health. So Ithink the media, we have to think about, like, how do we manage the media's need for clicks and profit,you know, during this time, in with, like, their role as like, the responsible are an important part of like,you know, social functioning, in terms of the free press. So, I, there's no easy answers to that. But I'll justsay, I think there was a fundamentally important role that the media played here. And I have to say, itdidn't play out positively, in most places.KK: I gotta say, like, this is gonna be naive talk. But we're in a pandemic, there had to be so many of ushad a sense of duty, like, I was surprised at the lack of sense of duty, to be honest with you. Even if youare about your cliques, ask yourself, is this is this about the greater good here? Is this really gonna get usfurther ahead? I've said this a few times on my platform, I would have a balance of a mess. The balancedmessage on was usually one specific network that would bail on the interview. They would literally bailon the interview because my message might not be as fearful. What the actual f you know what I mean?Like it's crazy.(?) I will say there were some good reporters. I don't want to say that that you know, there were someincredible folks. I was talking to someone the other day, I won't mention who but I think the mark of thegood reporter was, you know, they have a story, they want to talk about it. They contacted us. And theysaid, what time can we talk this week, right? They didn't say I need to get this filed in three hours. If yousay you need to get this filed in three hours, the expert you're gonna go to is the one that's available inthe next three hours, right? They wanted to hear an opinion, they wanted to get multiple opinions onthe table, but they would carve out the time so that everyone could give their story or, what theiropinion was or what evidence they presented. They made sure it rotated around the experts rather thanthe story rotating around being filed. I think it's important and, you know, you can get a sense of certainthings that are on the need to be filed this day, or even on the 24/7 news cycle, where they may not beas well researched, they're they're a single opinion. They're quoting a Twitter tweet. Now, I think insome of these media platforms, you can just embed that Twitter tweet, you don't even have to, youknow, quote it in that sense, you just basically take a screenshot of it basically. Versus again, thosearticles where I think there was there more thought, and I think there were some great reporters inCanada, that really did go above and beyond. Health reporters, particularly that really did try to presenta picture that was well researched, and evidence based, you know, with what's available, but therecertainly are these issues and it's not a COVID specific issue, but with media ad reporting, in that sense.Yeah, it's and it's important to say like, it's not actually just the reporter, it's the editors, its editorialteams, like I had said, OTR discussions with reporters very early on, I've tried to stay away from themedia, because I think the folks who have done it, I've done it well. But it was interesting, because BobSargent, who sadly passed away, an internal medicine physician, and an amazing mentor to manyclinicians in Toronto. Put me in touch with a couple of reporters. He's like, you know, you're a publichealth person, you should really talk to these reports. We had this; can we talk to you privately? It wasso weird. This was summer of 2020. So, we had a very private discussion where I said ‘Listen, I haveconcerns about lockdowns for like, these reasons' I think it's reasoned, because it's not it, I've got noconspiracy to drive, like, I've got no, there's no angle in any of it. So, but it was just fascinating. So, theywere like we might be able to come back to you, and maybe we'll try to do a story around it. Then theycame back and said, we're not going to be able to pursue it. I said that's fine. It's no problem. It just sortof showed that I think, similar as academics, and clinicians, and all of us have been under pressure basedon everything from like CPSO complaints, the complaints to our employers, to whatever to just saw, youknow, the standard attacks on Twitter. I think there was also a lot of pressure on reporters based on thiswhole structure, and of it. So I think, I don't mean to disparage anybody, but I do think the point thatyou made is really important one is. I'll just say, in our own house, you know, my wife and I both werelike talking at the beginning of this and being like, what do we want to know that we did during thistime? So, my wife worked in person, as a clinician alter her practice all throughout her pregnancy? Shenever didn't go, you know, she did call she did all of that, obviously, I have done the work I've done interms of both clinically and vaccine related testing. But this just idea of like, what do you want toremember about the time that you would like what you did when s**t hit the fan? And, you know,because first, it'll happen again, but just also, I think it's important to sort of, to be able to reflect andthink positively about what you did. Anyways,KK: I hear you both, part of it, too, for me, I'll just straight up honesty. In some ways, I'm just pissed, I'mpissed that a lot of the efforts that were that a lot of people put into to try and get a good message outthere. The backlash. Now people reflecting saying, ‘Oh, I guess you did, you know, many of you do tohad a good point about lockdowns not working out'. I know it may be childish in some way, but it's just,you know, a lot of us have gone through a lot to just try and create a balanced approach. I think therewas a little bit of edge in this voice, but I think it comes with a bit of a bit of reason to have a bit of edge.I think in terms of the next couple questions here are areas to focus on. A lot of people in terms of like,decisions regarding mandates, boosters, and so forth, like we talk a lot about it on public health, it's thedata that helps drive decisions, right. That's really what you would think it should be all about. So, one ofthe many questions that were thrown to us, when we announced that this was happening was, the needfor like, almost like universal boosters, and Sumon, I'll put you on the spot there, at this stage in thepandemic, where I'm gonna timestamp this for people on audio, we're on January 10th, 2023. There aresome questions that we get, who really needs to push through to we all need boosters? What's yourthoughts on that?SC: So, I think that one of the things that I said this, as Zain makes fun of me throughout the pandemic, Icame up with catchphrases, and my one for immunity is the way that we've conceptualized immunity inNorth America. I think a lot of this has to do with an actual graphic from the CDC, which likens immunityto an iPhone or a battery, iPhone battery. So, iPhone immunity, where you have to constantly berecharging and updating. I think that has kind of bled into the messaging. That's what we think of it. Iremember back in I think it was October of 2021, where they were also starting to talk about the thirddose. The third dose, I think that at that time, we knew that for the higher risk people, it was probablythe people who would benefit the most from it. We had Ontario data from it was I think, was ISIS.There's vaccine efficacy against hospitalization, over 96% in Ontario in health care workers 99%, if you'reless than seventy-seven years of age, yet this went out, and everybody felt like they had to get thebooster. So, I think that the first thing that bothered me about that is that there wasn't a kind ofstratified look at the risk level and who needs it? So now we're in 2023. I think that one of the big thingsapart from what I said, you know, who's at higher risk, there's still this problem where people think thatevery six months, I need to recharge my immunity, which certainly isn't true. There wasn't a recognitionthat being exposed to COVID itself is providing you a very robust immunity against severe disease, whichis kind of it's coming out now. We've been we've all been talking about it for a long time. And you know,the other thing is that the disease itself has changed. I think that I heard this awesome expression, thefirst pass effect. So, when the COVID first came through a completely immune naive population, ofcourse, we saw death and morbidity, we saw all the other bad stuff, the rare stuff that COVIDencephalitis COVID GB GBS tons of ECMO, like 40-year old's dying. With each subsequent wave asimmunity started to accrue in the population, that didn't happen. Now we're at a different variant. Andthe thing is, do we even need to be doing widespread vaccination when you're with current variant, andyou can't be thinking about what we saw in 2021. So, putting that now, all together, we have as Zanementioned, seroprevalence, about almost 100%, you have people that are well protected against severedisease, most of the population, you have a variant that absolutely can make people sick. And yes, it cankill people. But for those of us who work on the front line, that looks very different on the on the frontlines. So, I really think that we should take a step back and say, number one: I don't think that thebooster is needed for everybody. I think number two: there are under a certain age, probably 55 andhealthy, who probably don't need any further vaccination, or at least until we have more data. Numberthree: before we make a widespread recommendation for the population. We have time now we're notin the emergency phase anymore. I really hope that we get more RCT data over the long term to seewho is it that needs the vaccine, if at all. And you know, who benefits from it. And let's continue toaccrue this data with time.KK: Thanks Sumon. Zain, are you on the along the same lines assume on in terms of who needs boostersand who doesn't?ZC: Yeah, I mean, I think number one: is the recognition that prior infection and hybrid immunityprobably are incredibly adequate. Again, people like Paul Offit, and we're not just talking about youknow, experts like us. These are people that are sitting on the FDA Advisory Committee, a man thatactually made vaccines in the United States, you know, that talks about the limitations of boosters andprobably three doses being you know, The peak of the series for most people, and even then, you know,two plus infection probably is enough is three or even one plus infection, the data may suggest maybe isas high as three. Yeah, I think, again, this is one of these things that gets diluted as it starts going downthe chain, if you actually look at the Nazi guidance for, you know, bi-Vaillant vaccines, it's actuallyincorporates a ‘should' and a ‘can consider' in all of this, so they talked about vulnerable individuals,elderly individuals should get a booster where there may be some benefits in that population, the restof the population can consider a booster in that sense, right. And I think as the boosters came out, andagain, you know, people started jumping on them, it came to everyone needs their booster. Andunfortunately, the messaging in the United States is perpetuated that quite a bit with this iPhonecharging thing, Biden tweeting that everyone over the age of six months needs a booster. Again, wereally do have to reflect on the population that we're going at. Ultimately, again, if you start pressing theissue too much in the wrong populations, you know, the uptake is, is showing itself, right, the peoplewho wanted their bi-Vaillant vaccine got it. Thankfully the right populations are being incentivized,especially in the elderly, and the very elderly, and the high risk. Uptake in most other populations hasbeen relatively low. So, people are making their decisions based on based on what they know. Again,they feel that that hesitation and what is this going to benefit me? and I think as Sumon said, theconfidence is going to be restored when we have better data. We're in a phase now where we can docluster randomized RCTs in low-risk populations and show it If you want the vaccine, you enter into acluster randomized RCT, if you're in a low-risk population, match you one to one with placebo. You wecan tell you if you got, you know, what your prognosis was at the end of the day, and that information isgoing to be important for us. I don't think that policy of boosting twice a year, or once a year is gonnaget people on the bus, every booster seems like people are getting off the bus more and more. So, wereally do have to have compelling information. Now, as we're bringing these out to start saying, youknow, is this a necessity? especially in low-risk populations? How much of a necessity is that? How muchdo you quantify it in that sense? And again, recognizing that, that people are being infected? Now, thatadds another twist in that sense.KK: Yeah, and we'll talk a little bit about public trust in a bit here. But Stef, you were among someauthors that did an essay on the booster mandates for university students. As we've both alluded toZain, and Sumon there's this need to be stratified. From an RCT booster point of view that we're not wellestablished here. When Stef's group looked at university mandates and potential harm, when we'redoing an actual cost benefit ratio there, their conclusion was that there's more room for harm thanbenefits. So, Stef I want you to speak to that paper a bit.SB: Sure. So, I will say this, I don't actually have much to add other than what Zain and Sumon said. Runa vaccine program we are offering, you know, doses as it makes sense for folks who are particularlyimmunocompromised, multiple comorbidities and remain at risk for serious consequences related toCOVID-19. We'll continue doing that. And that will, you know, get integrated, by the way into like, sortof a vaccine preventable disease program, so offering, shingles, Pneumovax, influenza COVID. And alsowe want to do a broader in terms of other hepatitis vaccines, etc. That aside, so this, this isn't about, youknow, that it was really interesting being called antivax by folks who have never gotten close to avaccine, other than being pricked by one. Having delivered literally 1000s of doses of vaccine, so it'salmost it's a joke, right? but it's an effective thing of like shutting down conversation. That aside, I thinkthere's a few things at play one as it related to that paper. I find it really interesting, particularly foryoung people, when people are like, listen, yes, they had a little bit of like, inflammation of their heart,but it's self-resolving and self-limiting, and they're gonna be fine. You don't know that. Maybe sure we'llsee what happens with these folks twenty years later. The reality is for younger men, particularly, thishappens to be a very gender dynamic. For younger men, particularly, there seems to be a dynamicwhere they are at risk of myocarditis. I don't know whether that's a controversy in any other era for anyother disease, this would not be a controversy would just be more of a factual statement, the data wereclearer in I'd say, probably April, May 2021. I think there's lots of things we could have done, we couldhave done one dose series for people who had been previously infected, we could have stopped at two.There are a million different versions of what we could have done, none of which we actually did. In thecontext of mandating boosters now for young people, including at my institution, you were mandated toget a booster, or you would no longer be working. So obviously, I got one. There's a real dynamic ofwhat is it your goal at that point? because probably about 1011 months into the vaccine programbecame increasingly clear. You can still get COVID. Nobody's surprised by that. That was clear even fromthe data. By the way, wasn't even studied. I mean, Pfizer, the way if you just look at the Pfizer, Moderna,trials, none and look to see whether you got COVID or not, they were just looking at symptomaticdisease. That aside, I think that it just became this clear thing where for younger men, one or two doseswas plenty and it seems to be that as you accumulate doses for those folks, particularly, it's alsoimportant, if somebody had a bad myocarditis, they're not even getting a third dose. So, you're alreadyselecting out, you know, some of these folks, but you are starting to see increased levels of harm, as itrelated to hospitalization. That what we basically did, there was a very simple analysis of looking ataverted hospitalization, either way, many people say that's the wrong metric. You can pick whatevermetric you want. That's the metric we picked when terms of hospitalization related to side effects of thevaccine versus benefits. What it just showed was that for people under the age of 30, you just don't seea benefit at that point, as compared to harm that's totally in fundamentally different. We weren't talkingabout the primary series, and we weren't talking about older folks. So indeed, I think, you know, thatwas that was I don't know why it was it was particularly controversial. We it was a follow up piece tomandates in general. I'll just say like, I've been running this vaccine program, I don't think mandateshave made my life easier at all. I know, there's like this common narrative of like mandates, you know,mandates work mandates work. I think at some point, and I'll just say our own study of this is like we'rereally going to have to ask two questions. One: what it mandates really get us in terms of a burdenCOVID-19, morbidity, mortality? and two: this is an important one for me. What if we caught ourselvesin terms of how much pressure we put on people, as it relates to vaccines right now, in general? Thevery common narrative that I'm getting is they're like, oh, the anti Vax is the anti Vax folks are winning.And people don't want their standard vaccines, and we're getting less uptake of like, MMR andstandard, you know, kind of childhood vaccines, I have a different opinion. I really do at least I believesome proportion of this, I don't know what proportion, it's some proportion, it's just like people beingpushed so hard, about COVID-19 vaccines that they literally don't want to be approached about anyvaccine in general. So, I just think that with in public health, there's always a cost. Part of the decisionmaking in public health as it relates to clinical medicine too. It's like you give a medication, theadvantage and then you know, the disadvantages, side effects of that medication. In public health, thereare side effects of our decisions that are sometimes anticipated and sometimes avoidable, sometimescan't be anticipated and sometimes can't be avoided. You have to kind of really give thought to each ofthem before you enact this policy or you might cost more health outcomes, then then you're actuallygaining by implementing it.KK: Yeah, number one: What was spooky to me is like even mentioning, I was afraid even to use a termmyocarditis at times. The worst part is, as you said, stuff, it's young folk that were alluding to, and for usto not be able to say, let's look at the harm and benefit in a group that's low risk was baffling. It reallywas baffling that and I'm glad we're at least more open to that now. Certainly, that's why I thought thatthe paper that you guys put together was so important because it's in the medical literature that we'reshowing, objectively what the cost benefit of some of these approaches are. Sumon: when you think ofmandates and public trust, that Stef was kind of alluding to like, every decision that we madethroughout this thing. Also has a downside, also has a cost, as Stef was mentioning. Where do you thinkwe are? In terms of the public trust? Talking about how the childhood vaccines are lower. I don't knowwhat influenza vaccine rates are like now, I wouldn't be surprised if they're the same standard, but whoknows them where they're at, currently. Based on your perspective, what do you think the public trust isright now?SC: Yeah, as physicians, we obviously still do have a lot of trust in the people we take care of. People arestill coming to see us. I wish they didn't have to because everyone was healthy but that's not the case. Ido think that over the last two and a half, we're coming up on three years, I guess right now, that peoplethat we have burned a lot of trust, I think that mandates were part of it. I do think that some of it wasunavoidable. It's just that there's a lot of uncertainty. There was back and forth. I think that one thingthat were that concern me on social media was that a lot of professionals are airing their dirty laundry tothe public. You could see these in fights, that doesn't, that's not really a good thing. We saw peoplebeing very derisive towards people who were not listening to the public health rules. You know what Imean? There's a lot of that kind of talk of othering. Yeah, I think that that certainly overtime, erodedpublic trust, that will take a long time to get back, if we do get it back. I think that the bottom line is that,I get that there are times that we have to do certain things, when you have a unknown pathogen comingat you, when you don't really know much about it. I do think that you want to do the greatest good forthe, for the population or again, you always must remember as Stefan alludes to the cost of what you'redoing. I do think that we could have done that much early on. For example, Ontario, we were lockeddown in some areas, Ontario, GTA, we were locked down in some regard for almost a year and a half. Ifyou guys remember, there was that debate on opening bars and restaurants before schools. It's just like,I remember shaking my head is, look, I get it, I know you guys are talking about people are going to beeating a burger before kids can go to school, that might ruin everything. But the problem is, is that youmust remember that restaurant is owned by someone that small gym is someone's livelihood, you'remoralizing over what this is, but in the end, it's the way somebody puts food on the table. For a yearand a half, we didn't let especially small businesses do that. I'm no economist, but I had many familymembers and friends who are impacted by this. Two of my friends unfortunately, committed suicideover this. So, you know, we had a lot of impact outside of the of the things that we did that hurt people,and certainly the trust will have to be regained over the long term.KK: It's gonna take work. I think, for me, honestly, it's, it's just about being transparent. I honestly, I putmyself in some in the shoes of the public and I just want to hear the truth. If we're not sure aboutsomething, that's okay. We're gonna weigh the evidence and this is our suggestion. This is why we'resaying this, could we be wrong? Yes, we could be wrong but this is what we think is the best pathforward, and people could get behind that. I honestly feel like people could get behind that showing alittle bit of vulnerability and saying ‘you know, we're not know it alls here' but this is what our beststrategy is based on our viewpoint on the best strategy based on the data that we have in front of usand just be open. Allowing for open dialogue and not squash it not have that dichotomous thinking ofyou're on one side, you're on the other. You're anti vax, you're pro vax, stop with the labels. You know,it's just it got crazy, and just was not a safe environment for dialogue. And how are you supposed to he'ssupposed to advance.SB: Yeah, I do want to say something given this this is this idea of our swan song. I think there was thissort of feeling like, you know, people were like ‘you gotta act hard, you gotta move fast' So I thinkeverybody on this, you guys all know I travel a lot. I like to think of myself as a traveler. In the early2020's I did like a COVID tour, I was in Japan in February, then I was in Thailand, and everywhere Ilanded, there were like, COVID here, COVID here, COVID here. Then finally, I like got home at the end ofFebruary, and I was supposed to be home for like four days, and then take off. Obviously things got shutdown. It was like obvious like COVID was the whole world had COVID by, February, there may have beena time to shut down this pandemic in September 2019. Do you know what I mean? by November 2019,we had cases. They've already seen some and Canadian Blood Services done some showing someserological evidence already at that time. There was no shutting it down. This thing's gonna suck. Thereality is promising that you can eliminate this thing by like, enacting these really like arbitrary that canonly be described as arbitrary. Shutting the border to voluntary travel, but not to truckers. Everythingfelt so arbitrary. So, when you talk about trust, if you can't explain it, if you're a good person do it. If youdon't do it, your white supremacist. Kwadwo you were part of a group that was called ‘Urgency ofNormal' you are a white supremacist. It's so ridiculous. You know what I mean? It creates this dynamicwhere you can't have any meaningful conversation. So, I really worry, unless we can start having somereally meaningful conversations, not just with folks that we agree with. Obviously, I deeply respect whateach of you have done throughout this pandemic, not just actually about what you say, but really whatyou've done. Put yourselves out there with your families in front of this thing. That aside, if we can't dothat, we will be no better off. We will go right back. People will be like ‘Oh, next pandemic, well, let'sjust get ready to lock down' but did we accomplish anything in our lock downs? I actually don't think wedid. I really don't think we got anything positive out our lock downs, and I might be alone in that. I mightbe wrong, butut that said it needs to be investigated and in a really meaningful way to answer that,before it becomes assume that acting hard and acting fast and all these b******t slogans are the truthand they'd become the truth and they become fact. All without any really meaningful evidencesupporting them.KK: I gotta say, I'll get you Sumon next here, but I gotta say the idea of abandoning logic, I think that'sthat's a key point there. Think about what we're doing in restaurants, folks. Okay, you would literallywear your mask to sit down, take off that bloody thing. Eat, chat, smooch even, I mean, and then put itback on and go in the bathroom and think this is meaningful. Where's the logic there? You're on a plane,you're gonna drink something, you're on a six hour flight, you know what I'm saying.(?) During the lockdown, by the way, you're sending like 20 Uber drivers to stand point. If you ever wentand picked up food, you would see these folks. It'd be like crowding the busy restaurants all like standingin there, like arguing which orders theirs, you know what I mean? then like people waiting for the foodto show up.KK: I mean, that's the other point. The part that people forget with the lockdowns, tons of people willwork. I'm in Ottawa, where 70% are, could stay home, right? That's a unique city. That's why we werevery sheltered from this bad boy.(?) Aren't they still fighting going back to the office?KK: Oh, my God. Folks, I'm sorry. Yeah, it's like 70% could stay home, but you're in GTA your area. That'sa lot of essential workers. You don't have that option. So, how's this lockdown? Really looking at the bigpicture? Anyway, sorry. Sumon you're gonna hit it up.SC: We just wanted to add one anecdote. I just think it kind of talks about all this is that, you know therewas a time when this thing started going to 2020. Stefan, I think you and I met online around that time.You put a couple of seeds after I was reading stuff, like you know about the idea of, you know, risktransfer risk being downloaded to other people. That's sort of kind of think of a you know, what, like,you know, a people that are working in the manufacturing industry, you're not going to receive them alot unless you live in a place like Brampton or northwest Toronto, where the manufacturing hub of, ofOntario and in many cases, central eastern Canada is right. So, I remember in, I was already starting touse this doing anything. And when I was in, I guess it would have been the second wave when it was itwas pretty bad one, I just kept seeing factory worker after factory worker, but then the thing that stuckout was tons of Amazon workers. So, I asked one of them, tell me something like, why are there so manyAmazon workers? Like are you guys? Is there a lot of sick people working that kind of thing? Inretrospect, it was very naive question. What that one woman told me that her face is burned into mymemory, she told me she goes, ‘Look, you know, every time a lockdown is called, or something happenslike that, what ends up happening is that the orders triple. So, then we end up working double and tripleshifts, and we all get COVID' That was just a light went off. I was like, excuse my language, guys, but holys**t, we're basically taking all this risk for people that can like what was it called a ‘laptop class' that canstay home and order all this stuff. Meanwhile, all that risk was going down to all these people, and I wasseeing it one, after another, after another, after another. I'm not sure if you guys saw that much, but Iwas in Mississauga, that's the hardest, Peele where the manufacturing industry is every single peanutfactory, the sheet metal, I just saw all of them. That I think was the kind of thing that turned me andrealize that we what we'll be doing. I'll shut up.ZC: Yeah, I would say I mean, I think Stefan and Sumon make great points. You know, I think that thatwas very apparent at the beginning. The other thing I would say is 2021 to 2022. Things like vaccinationand public health measures fell along political lines. That was a huge mistake. It was devastating. Iremember back to the first snap election in 2021. Initially great video of all the political partiesencouraging vaccination and putting their differences aside. Then all of a sudden, it became mudslingingabout how much public health measure you're willing to do, how much you're willing to invest in, andit's not a Canadian phenomenon. We saw this in the United States with the Biden and Trump campaignsand the contrast between the two, and then really aligning public health views to political views, andthen, you know, really making it very uncomfortable for certain people to then express counter viewswithout being considered an alternative party. It's something we need to reflect on I think we havepublic health and public health messengers and people that are agnostic to political views but are reallythere to support the health of their populations, from a health from a societal from an emotional fromthe aspects of good health in that sense. You really can't involve politics into that, because all of asudden, then you start getting counter current messaging, and you start getting people being pushed,and you start new aligning values to views and you start saying, right and left based on what peopleconsider, where again, the science doesn't necessarily follow political direction. It was a really bigmistake, and it still is pervasive. We saw every election that happened between 2021 to 2022 is publichealth and public health messaging was embedded in each one of those and it caused more harm thangood. I think it's a big lesson from this, this is that you can be proactive for effective public healthinterventions as an individual in that society that has a role, but you can't stick it on campaigns. It reallymakes it hard to deescalate measures at that point when your campaign and your identity is tied tocertain public health measures in that sense.KK: Amen. I am cognizant of the time and so I'm gonna try to rapid fire a little bit? I think, there's only acouple points that people hit up on that we haven't touched on. There was a push for mass mandates inthe last couple months because of of RSV and influenza that was happening. It still is happening in,especially in our extreme ages, really young and really old. Any viewpoint on that, I'll leave it open toalmost to throw down.(?) I think mass mandates have been useless. I don't expect to ever folks to agree with me, it's like it's aninteresting dynamic, right? When you go and you saw folks who were on the buses, I take the bus to theairport. Our subway in Toronto just for folks only starts at like, 5:50am. So, before that, you gotta jumpon buses. So the construction workers on the bus who were wearing masks during the when the maskmandates were on taking this what's called, it's like the construction line, because it goes down Bloorare basically and takes all the construction workers from Scarborough, before the subway line, get todowntown to do all the construction and build all the stuff that you know, is being built right now.Everyone is wearing this useless cloth mask. It's like probably the one thing that the anti-maskers who Ithink I probably am one at this point. The pro-maskers and all maskers can agree on is that cloth masksare useless. That's what 100% of these folks are wearing. They're wearing these reusable cloth masksthat are like barely on their face often blow their nose. So, to me, it's not so much about like, what couldthis intervention achieve, if done perfectly like saying the study you were involved with the help lead,it's like everybody's like, but all of them got COVID outside of the health care system, they didn't get itwhen they're wearing their N95. That's like, but that's the point, like public health interventions live ordie or succeed or fail in the real world. I was seeing the real world, I would love to take a photo but Idon't think these folks have been friendly to me taking a photo of them, but it was 100%, cloth masks ofall these folks in the morning all crowded, like we're literally like person to person on this bus. It's like aperfect, you know, vehicle for massive transmission. I just I just sort of put that forward of like, that'swhat a mask mandate does to me. I think to the person sitting at home calling for them, they are justimagining, they're like ‘Oh but the government should do this'. But they didn't. The government shouldbe handing out in N95's. How are you going to police them wearing a N95's and how are you gettingthem? It would be so hard to make a massive program work. I would say it's like if you gave me millionsand millions and millions of dollars, for me to design a mass program, I don't know, maybe I could pull itoff you really with an endless budget. But for what? So, I just think that like as these programs went outin the real world, I think they did nothing but burn people's energy. You know because some people itjust turns out don't like wearing a mask. Shocking to other folks. They just don't like wearing a mask.Last thing I'll say is that just as they play it out in the real world, I think we're functionally useless, otherthan burning people's energy. I'm a fervent anti masker at this point because it's just an insult to publichealth. To me everything I've trained in and everything I've worked towards, just saying these two wordsmask mandate, as the fix. That is an insult to the very thing that I want to spend my life doing .ZC: Yeah, I mean, three points, one: you know, masks are still important in clinical settings. I think we allunderstand that. We've been doing them before we've been continuing to do them. So I you know,that's one piece. Second: I mean, to go with the point that was raised here, you know, the best study wehave is Bangladesh, right? 10% relative risk reduction. It's interesting when you read the Bangladeshstudy, because with community kind of people that pump up masking that are really trying to educateand probably are also there to mask compliance. Mask's compliance people, you get to 54% compliance,when those people leave compliance drops significantly. Right. You know, I think you have to just lookaround and see what happened in this last few months, regardless of the messaging. Maybe it's thecommunities I'm in, but I didn't see mass compliance change significantly, maybe about 5%. In thecontext of the last couple of months. You must understand the value of this public health intervention,Bangladesh has actually a nice insight, not only into what we think the community based optimalmasking efficacy is, but also the fact that you really have to continue to enforce, enforce, enforce,enforce, in order to get to that even 10%. Without that enforcement, you're not getting anywhere inthat sense. That probably spells that it's probably a very poor long term public health intervention in thecontext that you really must pump it week by week by week by week in order to actually get compliancethat may actually then give you the effects that you see in a cluster randomized control trial. Again, youknow, the world we live in is showing that people don't want to mask normally. Some people can, i

林氏璧孔醫師的新冠病毒討論會
230110 變種病毒監測 中國以BF.7 BA.5.2為主 美國XBB.1.5後續

林氏璧孔醫師的新冠病毒討論會

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 33:28


幾個關於變種病毒的速報。 美國最新一週XBB.1.5佔比有修正,還有台灣,日本針對中國入境驗到的病毒株初步都是BA.5.2還有BF.7為主。 1.美國新的一週病毒定序有修正。過去三周XBB.1.5 校正回歸為11.5-->18.3-->27.6%,增加占比的速度沒有上週直接衝到40%看起來這麼嚇人。BQ家族還是占最多 55.8%,BF.7,BA.5都繼續減少。但東北新英格蘭區域以紐約為主的確XBB.1.5已經成主流,也開始看到長輩的住院人數開始增多,值得繼續追蹤。 2.台灣指揮中心昨天公布,自1月1日至1月4日針對中國入境採檢,共採檢3999件,825名陽性,陽性率為20.6%。入境陽性率約莫在17.6%至25%之間挪移,每日陽性率會隨著入境地區感染情況不同而有所異動,這4天觀察陽性率約20%左右。1月1日自中國來台陽性個案有100多件,指揮中心針對Ct值26以下的10多件進行定序,目前以BA.5.2、BF.7為主,另外有少數BA.5.1,都是已知且常見的病毒株,不過目前尚未完全完成定序,詳細數據待累計更多資料後再公布。 3.日本從12月30日開始中國入境日本做落地快篩,七天檢查了4895人,其中陽性是408人,約8%。半數以上是無症狀。厚勞省目前公布了主要是12月30日入境的病毒監測,來自中國的64人中,全部都是Omicron。BA.5.2佔28例,BF.7佔32例。沒有驗到XBB或XBB.1.5。 04b解讀: 1.台灣和韓國針對中國入境的PCR陽性率大概是20~30%之間。台灣前幾天採檢657人時新聞有寫其中陽性164人,陽性率為25%,其中Ct值小於或等於30者計有42人,就是其中大概只有四分之一是病毒量比較高的。其他四分之三可能多半是幾個月內感染過的陰陽人。當然也有機會是正好抓到病毒量正在上升的人就是了。但我們大概在現階段是不太需要大費周章去釐清這件事了。 2.對比日本這個數字是落地快篩病毒量較高的才會抓出,落在8%,是很合理的數字。 3.如果後續資料大概就和中國自己公布的差不多,都以BA.5.2、BF.7為主,沒有看到令人擔心的新朋友,累積資料量再大一些後,我想應該就可以比較安心一點了。反而美國這邊XBB.1.5的動向更值得關注。 歡迎追蹤前台大感染科醫師。04b的發聲管道! 我的電子名片 https://lit.link/linshibi 希望大家當我的種子教師,推廣正確的新冠衛教。科學防疫,不要只以恐懼防疫! 歡迎贊助林氏璧孔醫師喝咖啡,讓我可以在這個紛亂的時代,繼續分享知識努力做正確新冠相關衛教。 https://pay.firstory.me/user/linshibi Powered by Firstory Hosting

This Week in Virology
TWiV 972: Clinical update with Dr. Daniel Griffin

This Week in Virology

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 42:12 Very Popular


In his weekly clinical update Dr. Griffin discusses the infectiousness of SARS-CoV-2 breakthrough infections and reinfections during the Omicron wave, virological characteristics of the SARS-CoV-2 XBB variant derived from recombination of two Omicron subvariants, antibody evasion properties of rising SARS-CoV-2 BQ and XBB subvariants, comparative effectiveness of third doses of mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccines in US veterans, time to negative PCR conversion among high-risk patients with mild-to-moderate Omicron BA.1 and BA.2 COVID-19 treated by Sotrovimab or Nirmatrelvir, COVID drug Paxlovid was hailed as a game-changer, what happened?, the Fc-effector function of COVID-19 convalescent plasma contributes to SARS-CoV-2 treatment efficacy in mice, SARS-CoV-2 infection and persistence in the human body and brain at autopsy, long-term cardiovascular outcomes of COVID-19, and how heart-disease risk soars after COVID — even with a mild case. Subscribe (free): Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Infectiousness of breakthrough infections & reinfections during Omicron wave (Nature) Virological characteristics of the SARS-CoV-2 XBB variant (bioRxiv) Antibody evasion properties of BQ and XBB subvariants (Cell) Comparative effectiveness of third doses of mRNA vaccines in US veterans (Nature) Time to negative PCR conversion among high-risk patients treated by Sotrovimab or Nirmatrelvir (CMI) Paxlovid patient eligbiliity screening checklist (FDA) COVID drug Paxlovid was hailed as a game-changer. What happened? (Nature) Fc-effector function of COVID-19 convalescent plasma contributes to treatment efficacy (Cell) SARS-CoV-2 infection and persistence in the human body and brain at autopsy (Nature) Long-term cardiovascular outcomes of COVID-19 (Nature) Heart-disease risk soars after COVID (Nature) Contribute to our MicrobeTV fundraiser at PWB Dr. Griffin's treatment guide (pdf) Letters read on TWiV 972 Timestamps by Jolene. Thanks! Intro music is by Ronald Jenkees Send your questions for Dr. Griffin to daniel@microbe.tv

The Teddy Brosevelt Show
Teddy Brosevelt Show | Episode #41: Swamp Thing Kevin McCarthy Loses 11 Rounds, Doctors Predicted mRNA vaccine would cause new variants like XBB, Damar Hamlin, More mRNA conspiracies come true

The Teddy Brosevelt Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 60:27


Episode #41 of ‘The Teddy Brosevelt Show' was recorded on Thursday night, January 5th. EPISODE 41 TOPICS:* Kevin McCarthy has lost 11 rounds of voting for Speaker of the House. Hopefully, the 20 hold-outs will stand their ground for at least two years. This way, no one can be sworn in and the Uniparty can't turn any of their awful ideas into laws. When creepy pervert / serial molester Kevin Spacey was researching his role of Frank Underwood on ‘House of Cards', he shadowed Kevin McCarthy to learn how swamp creatures operate. * Democrat reaction: “This is a total embarrassment. We are all totally united, and they can't even elect a Speaker of the House.” The reason why the Democrats are “totally united” is because all members of that party must hold the exact same views on every single issue or face excommunication. Screw the optics - I don't care how many days it takes, as long as Swamp Thing McCarthy doesn't win. * I've been experimenting with these new A.I. tools everyone is buzzing about: DALL-E and ChatGPT. I tried to get ChatGPT to crank out this substack post, but it didn't turn out that great. Then I asked DALL-E to generate images of (a) Bitcoin miners taking down the Texas power grid and (b) Teddy Roosevelt fighting the Covid vaccine. The first one was pretty good (for a robot):Not sure about this one: Thanks for reading Teddy Brosevelt! Subscribe now to receive new posts and podcasts as soon as they hit the internet.* XBB is becoming the dominant Covid variant of Winter 2023. The CDC and Biden Admin are still shaming Americans for not getting their fifth shot - despite scientific evidence showing that it has virtually zero effect against BQ or XBB. Last month, a study in the journal Cell, found that the BQ and XBB subvariants have “alarming antibody evasion properties”. The study revealed that, “titers against BQ and XBB subvariants were lower by 13- to 81-fold and 66- to 155-fold, respectively, far beyond what had been observed to date”. * Seems like everyone on the internet is confident they know why NFL player Damar Hamlin suffered cardiac arrest on Monday night football. Some believe it was commotio cordis, which is a rare lethal disruption of heart rhythm that occurs from a blow to the area directly over the heart. There are under 30 cases of commotio cordis in the USA every year. In nearly every case, the patient was under 20 years old and got struck in the chest by a baseball, lacrosse ball or hockey puck. But one thing is for certain. There's no chance that Hamlin's cardiac arrest was related to the vaccine. Medical experts have confirmed that the vaccine is 100% safe and effective, while fact checkers have debunked the conspiracy theory that the vaccine causes any medical issues (except in extremely rare and isolated cases). * NFL superstar and current Arizona Cardinals defensive lineman JJ Watt is retiring after this weekend. He's only 33 years old. Back in October, Watt tweeted that he went into atrial fibrillation (AFib) and had to have his heart shocked back into rhythm. Totally normal. Last month, the New York Jets placed their rookie right tackle Max Mitchell on injured reserve due to “blood clots in his right calf and lung”. Last week, former Jacksonville Jaguars lineman Uche Nwaneri died at age 38 from a heart attack. Don't you dare say the v-word. * Remember when they told us that the mRNA spike protein would never leave your deltoid area? Latest issue of Circulation magazine shows they lied about that, too. Researchers found elevated levels of full-length spike protein detected in the plasma of individuals with postvaccine myocarditis. Read: “Circulating Spike Protein Detected in Post–COVID-19 mRNA Vaccine Myocarditis” * Follow Ethical Skeptic on Twitter. The last couple weeks he's dropped some huge data bombs, showing a 13-sigma increase (!) in cancer cases and a disturbing rise in non-Covid excess mortality in highly vaccinated countries like the USA. But this three tweet thread might be his best analysis ever… * It's actually good thing that the vaccinated are putting evolutionary pressure on Covid, since Covid is now going to help us cure cancer.Subscribe and listen to ‘The Teddy Brosevelt Show' podcast on all major streaming platforms:* Spotify* iHeartRadio* Apple Podcasts* TuneIn Radio* Substack This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit teddybrosevelt.substack.com

台視新聞 每日頭條 Taiwan TTV NEWS
晚間頭條 20230105|歐美流行BQ.1和XBB.1.5 王:算不上大魔王

台視新聞 每日頭條 Taiwan TTV NEWS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 4:08


本節新聞重點: ▲歐美流行BQ.1和XBB.1.5 王:算不上大魔王 ▲李秉穎稱「出國帶克流感」 藥師:苦了第一線 ▲楊梅地震狂晃 伴隨巨響嚇壞民眾:氣爆? ▲首件國民法官案 台中審理業務員殺人案 ▲新竹棒球場152項缺失 不辦WBC熱身賽 ▲不忍了!小甜甜揭開家暴真相 長文轟宋逸民 ▲北韓無人機入侵! 南韓坦承1架直闖總統府領空 |更多新聞| ◎台視新聞訂閱→https://www.youtube.com/c/ttvnewsview ◎台視直播訂閱→https://www.youtube.com/c/twlivenews ◎台視臉書粉絲團訂閱→https://www.facebook.com/ttvnews/ ◎台視新聞IG訂閱→https://www.instagram.com/ttvnews_tw/

天方烨谈
多地监测到XBB.1.5,二次感染是否会来临?

天方烨谈

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 4:34


XBB自去年10月份在美国被发现以来,仅用了两个月时间就迅速取代了BQ.1.1和BQ.1,成为美国新增确诊病例中占比超过40.5%的头号流行毒株。它的强势崛起,需要引起我们足够的警惕。但是当下不管是“阳康”还是没阳,更重要的还是得做好防护。

Run4PRs
186. Should you try to “make up” a missed workout? Ask the coaches

Run4PRs

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 72:29


How do I increase my calories in a healthy manner Calorie dense foods PB, nuts flax seed More carbs: fruit juices, maple syrup, honey Favorite season to train in & race in Depends on where I live Fall is ideal because summer training is ideal with temps never hitting more than 75-80 degrees in the early morning Humidity is poor man's altitude How to do you pick a run coach? Personality fit Open responsiveness : some people don't care but take it as a red flag if someone doesn't understand Philosophy fit Opennesses Understands your goals Has a clear plan for how to get you to your goals Communicates the plan to you Can help you learn and grow from experiences Not all races will go well We learn from each race 3:38 PR long term goal to BQ but wants to get pregnant 1st Have something to train for when TTC that you have a lower investment in like 5ks Postpartum comeback slowly and give yourself grace Lots of unknowns but consistency is helpful What to do when life happens and you miss a workout Depends on what happens Illness- going to take time off and not try to make anything up Other situation- might have you make up the workout Either way these both require you to probably re-work the entire plan because you are going to have less time in between workout days, etc. Depends on what you missed for a run 20 mile long run vs 5 mile easy run totally different How long until i expect to see muscle gains with the strength program How are you measuring progress Progress pictures Weight gain Measurements Gaining muscle is hard to do if you are in a catabolic state (undereating, over exercising with cardio) What are your goals with lifting?

天方烨谈
新一波感染又来了?先来认识什么是“地狱犬”和“鹰头狮”

天方烨谈

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 9:31


“地狱犬”(BQ.1.1)和“鹰头狮”(XBB)已在多地检出,可能会带来第二波的感染高峰。“地狱犬”“鹰头狮”威力是否真如其名?这一波感染后的抗体能否抵抗“地狱犬”“鹰头狮”?

林氏璧孔醫師的新冠病毒討論會
230104 六百集特別節目 孔醫師給你問 誰該打次世代疫苗?新冠疫情何時結束?

林氏璧孔醫師的新冠病毒討論會

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 64:15


本集由凱勝電訊贊助播出。感謝本節目的第一個乾爹! 凱勝的eSIM卡網頁: https://bit.ly/3Sk4Nvj 04b讀者可直接九折!eSIM詳細的說明或其他上網方式請見部落格文章! https://linshibi.com/?p=40550 本集回答聽友們的種種問題如下: 若已經打過三劑COVID-19疫苗,建不建議打次世代針對BA5的疫苗? 農曆年應該是疫情高峰,請問現在要去打ba.5次世代疫苗?還是等第四劑,未滿50歲的人。謝謝您! 對於第四劑不想打次世代,但是選擇與之前前三劑不同的疫苗(例如AAB之後打novavax ), 孔醫師的想法跟建議是? 請問已經打過次世代ba1 ,有需要三個月後再加打ba5 嗎? 目前已接種第4劑次世代莫德納BA.4/5,打完隔天發高燒+身體痠痛一天就好了。 但3、4天後發現喉嚨腫痛跟咳嗽應該不是副作用,一快篩立馬出現兩條線…這樣身體的抗體會有什麼影響嗎?一般確診不是建議3個月後才能施打? 8歲小孩還沒打過疫苗,去年七月確診過,當時並未有嚴重併發症,只有發燒一天半,這樣還需要打疫苗嗎? 請問確診過還要再打第四劑疫苗嗎?之前家醫科醫師是說不會這麼容易再中一次(我存疑就是了),要不要打看個人選擇(就等於沒回答

林氏璧孔醫師的新冠病毒討論會
230102 日本進入第八波疫情高峰 寒假到日本旅遊的防疫建議

林氏璧孔醫師的新冠病毒討論會

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 32:14


日本第八波疫情單日415人死亡創三年來新高 在台灣的大家好像覺得疫情已經離我們遠去,很多人都在籌畫出國行程。但該提醒大家的事情還是要說。你知道為何文雄這次動作如此快,馬上針對中國入境加上管制?因為從11月開始日本進入第八波,此波前面以BA.5為主,進入12月以BQ家族為主,日本自己疫情在冬天進入高峰,針對任何未知變數都要小心以對。 1.日本今年的三波Omicron疫情,現在這個第三波創下了單日死亡新高。 2.日本12月27日新增21萬6219例確診,這高峰雖沒超過第七波,但日本目前不需逐例掌握,通報比率應較夏天低。 3.在死亡病例部分,新增415例死亡病例,是三年來首度單日新增逾400例,比今年9月2日第七波時的347人更高。11月單日新增都在兩位數或百例左右,到12月單日新增已多達200多例或300多例。 4.日本政府總務省消防廳12月27日表示,救護車載運患者遭醫療機構拒絕收治逾3次的「急救困難案例」,最近一週在全國主要城市的52處消防本部統計共有6800件,較前一週增加12%,也超過第7波疫情時的6747件,創史上新高紀錄。這6800件急救困難案例中,疑似感染新冠的件數為2130件,較前一週增加21%。 5.NHK今天發專文討論,擔心日本接下來進入連假大移動後感染會擴大,另外幾個擔心的點是隨時間過去疫苗效力降低,免疫逃逸更強的BQ.1會持續增加,還有流感是否會一起大流行等。 6.回頭看2022年和2021年相比,各自三波疫情,2022年到28日的時點日本確診2704萬人,2021年僅有150萬人,這是18倍之多。 死亡人數的話,2022年到28日的時點是3萬7843人,2021年的Alpha和Delta則是1萬4926人,這是2.5倍。 第七波的2022年8月,一個月有7295人死亡。現在第八波的12月,也已經有6584人死亡。 7.今天專家會議也有討論是否能將新冠降級視為流感。日本政府是希望最快在2023年春天降級。但專家們指出目前視新冠和流感是同等傳染病的條件應該還沒有滿足。厚勞省後續會在一月開會,看年後的感染狀況再做修正。 8.寒假有去日本計畫的朋友,請檢視自己的疫苗施打狀態,建議要帶基本的症狀治療藥物,體溫計,口罩等同行,有重症風險者建議帶快篩,考慮保有給付新冠確診醫療的旅行平安險。回台灣後,也請務必注意自我健康管理喔。 我如何在第七波BA.5疫情的日本40天全身而退 五招防疫措施 https://linshibi.com/?p=40264 有無重症風險因子請見此文後面說明 https://linshibi.com/?p=40964 針對訪日外國人專用的旅平險 東京海上日動,但這70歲以上無法保。且要入境日本後才能連上網頁投保。 https://tokiomarinenichido.jp/zh-hant/china2/ 損害保險JAPAN株式會社,完美行網站代理 https://reurl.cc/858Vqy 美商安達 https://www.chubb.com/tw-zh/personal/personal-travel-insurance.html 我建議去日本要帶快篩,和恐慌仔,道德感,我覺得確診一定要通報什麼一點關係都沒有。我也完全沒有要大家在日本時每天戳鼻子看自己確診了沒有的意思。 我是針對有新冠重症風險因子的人,建議應該要帶。在有症狀時可以自我診斷。 我自己就是這樣的人。我下半年在日本待了兩個月,一直帶著自費清冠一號,若我確診了我就要開始服用,作為症狀治療之用。 發燒,呼吸道症狀還有其他鑑別診斷,不一定就是新冠,我也不希望沒確診就開始喝清冠一號呀。 且理論上有症狀五天內要服用抗病毒藥才能有效降低重症風險。若確診了我要掌握何時該去就醫的時機。(你甚至可以帶體溫計和手指血氧監測儀,我不反對) 這和去日本要不要保醫療保險其實是一樣的問題,和哪些人確診了該在前五天給予口服抗病毒藥物,都是一樣的問題。 如果你年輕力壯,完全沒有新冠重症風險因子,疫苗已經至少打三劑,那你去日本不需要帶快篩。有症狀也不用篩也不用看醫生,不舒服就在旅館休息吧。有點公德心,有症狀時戴上口罩不要去人多的場所,不要外食。你重症的風險極低,因此你不一定需要保險,也不用帶快篩的。但當然還是建議你要帶一些症狀治療的藥物備用。 Powered by Firstory Hosting

#WakeUpCLT To Go
'Too many uncertainties' to say pandemic is over amidst holiday surge in respiratory viruses: Friday, Dec. 30

#WakeUpCLT To Go

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 2:05


Clinics and hospitals have been slammed with flu patients for the last several months, and now doctors are starting to see some more COVID-19 circulating.  The full impact holiday gatherings had on viral spread won't be obvious for a few more weeks but Thanksgiving did lead to an increase in flu and COVID-19 cases. There are at least two dozen different variants of COVID-19 spreading in Mecklenburg County. The latest data shows Omicron subvariant BQ.1.1 is the most dominant. READ MORE: https://www.wcnc.com/article/news/health/holidays-impacting-viral-spread-health/275-06b318c8-d619-4622-a2c9-d3cde63af0a3 Southwest Airlines said it expects to return to normal operations Friday after more than a week of widespread flight cancellations that started with a winter storm and spiraled out of control because of a breakdown with staffing technology. If Thursday turns out to be the last day of the Southwest crisis, it will be marked by about 2,350 canceled flights, nearly 60% of the airline's schedule. READ MORE: https://www.wcnc.com/article/news/nation-world/southwest-flight-chaos-continues/507-3a4befa3-7465-4f95-87df-a2ecc195ca67 Watch Wake Up Charlotte each weekday morning from 4:30 to 7 a.m. on WCNC Charlotte, and as always, join the conversation on social media using #WakeUpCLT! 

The Impact Lounge
Jordynne & Mickie Team Up, Rich Swann Returns, IMPACT Review (Last Streaming Podcast)

The Impact Lounge

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 47:53


BQ with the FINAL streaming podcast until Summer of 2023.  For future content please subscribe to the Impact Lounge on YouTube. We will return to streaming platforms in the middle of 2023 so DON'T Unsubscribe! 

The Teddy Brosevelt Show
Teddy Brosevelt Show | Episode #39 - FBI, Hunter Biden and the Twitter File Drops, Crypto Collapse Rapid Acceleration Coming with Binance and Tether, Long Covid and New Variants

The Teddy Brosevelt Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 68:37


Teddy's back with an action-packed 68 minute episode of ‘The Teddy Brosevelt Show' - recorded live in Austin, Texas last night (Tuesday, December 20).Episode #39 is dedicated to every unvaccinated American who is celebrating Christmas this weekend. According to this memo issued by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security on September 11th: All unvaccinated Christians who plan on celebrating the birth of Jesus Christ this weekend are considered potential terror threats.Asking questions about the past two U.S. elections means you hit the Terror Threat Trifecta: * Opposing Covid-19 measures* Questioning why election night lasts for three weeks * Observing religious holidays like ChristmasIn the eyes of the Deep State, ALL Y'ALL are a bunch of Osama Bin Laden's in Santa caps singing terror carols like White Christmas and Frosty the Snowman. Shout-out to all the new Substack subcribers and podcast listeners in The Philippines.According to Chartable, ‘The Teddy Brosevelt Show' is now ranked among the Top 100 most-listened to news podcasts halfway around the world. The Phillipines ranks among the Top 5 most crypto-savvy counties on the planet. I'm guessing a ton of Filipinos got taken to the cleaners by SBF (Scam Bankman-Fraud). Now they want to hear Teddy's take on what the hell happened. In today's show, we explain why Tether and Binance will collapse next. EPISODE #39 TOPICS: * Elon Musk teams up with three Substack journalists (Matt Taibbi, Bari Weiss and Michael Schellenberger) to unleash the Twitter Files: Parts 1 to 7. This Twittergate scandal is a million times worse than Watergate and it's getting zero coverage in the mainstream press. * Twitter hired dozens of former FBI and intelligence community officers, took direct orders from FBI agent Elvis Chan, and accepted over $3 million in bribes to censor the Hunter Biden laptop story and ban any twitter users from sharing links. Federal agencies were actively monitoring, censoring and banning regular, everyday Americans from expressing their thoughts on the world's digital town square. We haven't seen the Covid files yet, but I guarantee it's the same thing. Just replace the FBI with the CDC, FDA and the White House. * The collapse of FTX and the arrest of Scam Bankman-Fraud is just the beginning of the Crypto Nuclear Winter. There's no doubt in my mind that the stablecoin Tether and the world's biggest crypto exchange Binance are totally fraudulent ponzi schemes. * Tether has never shown any proof that they have $66 billion in liquid US capital to back their fake Chuck E. Cheese digital stablecoin token. * Bloomberg calls Tether the “Next Big Short”. Hedge funds Fir Tree and Viceroy are placing heavy bets against Tether. * Wall Street Journal: “The company behind the tether stablecoin has increasingly been lending its own coins to customers rather than selling them for hard currency upfront. The shift adds to risks that the company may not have enough liquid assets to pay redemptions in a crisis."* Twitter is filled with Crypto Bros who are deep underwater and desperate to believe that everything is really going to be okay bro. People like Teddy Brosevelt are just FUDfluencers who are getting paid by Hedge Funds to spread Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt to tank the industry. I trust CZ bro. * Binance is sketchy AF. They refuse to say where Binance.com is actually based. It doesn't disclose basic financial data like profit and revenue. The company has its own crypto coin, but doesn't reveal what role it plays on its balance sheet. It lends customers money against their crypto assets and lets them trade on margin, with borrowed funds. But it doesn't detail how big those bets are, how exposed Binance is to that risk, or the full extent of its reserves to finance withdrawals.* Binance minted their own $BNB shitcoin, manipulated the price and somehow claim that their totally worthless digital token with no intrinsic value is magically worth $260. Subscribe to the Teddy Brosevelt Substack right now, and receive a special gift: two new posts / podcasts delivered before Santa gets here this weekend. HO HO HO! MERRY CHRISTMAS!* Just like FTX.US was supposed to be a wholly different entity from FTX, the Binance.US exchange is supposed to be totally separate from Binance. But this substack from Dirty Bubble Media shows that “Binance.US both transfers customer deposits to Binance and pays customer withdrawals using transfers back from the offshore exchange's wallets”* The Wall Street Journal finally covered the Tether story: “Rising Tether Loans Add Risk to Stablecoin, Crypto World”. “The company behind the tether stablecoin has increasingly been lending its own coins to customers rather than selling them for hard currency upfront. The shift adds to risks that the company may not have enough liquid assets to pay redemptions in a crisis.”“Tether, which is incorporated in the British Virgin Islands, doesn't publish audited financial statements or a complete balance sheet, leaving outsiders with an incomplete picture of the company's financial health.”* Bloomberg also raised enormous red flags about Tether back in the halcyon days of October 2021, when everyone was drunk on Krypto Kool-Aid.Bloomberg - “Anyone Seen Tether's Billions?” (October 2021):“Tether is what's come to be known in financial circles as a stablecoin — stable because one Tether is supposed to be backed by one dollar. But it's actually more like a bank.”“There are now 69 billion Tethers in circulation, 48 billion of them issued this year. That means the company supposedly holds a corresponding $69 billion in real money to back the coins — an amount that would make it one of the 50 largest banks in the U.S., if it were a U.S. bank and not an unregulated offshore company.”“Every day, on cryptocurrency exchanges, traders buy and sell Tether coins as if they're just as good as dollars. Some days, more than $100 billion in Tether changes hands.”“The size of Tether's supposed dollar holdings is so big that it would be dangerous even assuming the dollars are real. If enough traders asked for their dollars back at once, the company could have to liquidate its assets at a loss, setting off a run on the not-bank. The losses could cascade into the regulated financial system by crashing credit markets.”* Teddy is not a financial advisor. But I have a world-class b******t detector. The crypto industry is accelerating towards a catastrophic nuclear winter. * The White House, Fauci and CDC keep shaming Americans who haven't got the “bivalent booster” yet. Anyone who injects FIVE experimental gene therapy shots into their body without knowing the long-term side effects is quite the risk-taker. But it seems like the people in charge of public health should tell Americans about this new article in Cell: “Alarming antibody evasion properties of rising SARS-CoV-2 BQ and XBB subvariants”. This new bivalent booster shot was designed to fight delta and omicron. It doesn't do jack s**t against these new variants sweeping the nation (BQ.1, BQ.1.1, XBB, and XBB.1). * First rule of Long Covid: do not ask a Long Covid sufferer about their vaccination status. * Twitter STILL hasn't restored my account @_teddybrosevelt - I thought Elon said he was granting amnesty to any accounts that were wrongly suspended for telling the truth about Covid? I'm still pissed off about this patronizing, passive-aggressive violation letter. “We here at Twitter understand that during times of crisis and stability, it is difficult to know what to do to keep yourself and your loved ones safe. We require the removal of content that may pose a risk to people's health. An illiterate, unvaccinated plague rat who does their own research and celebrates Christmas is considered a “potential terror threat” by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.” Subscribe and listen to ‘The Teddy Brosevelt Show' podcast on all major streaming platforms:* Spotify* iHeartRadio* Apple Podcasts* TuneIn Radio* SubstackThanks for reading Teddy Brosevelt! Subscribe for free to receive new posts and support my work. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit teddybrosevelt.substack.com

The Impact Lounge
Tommy Dreamer Cries, Jonathan Gresham Signs & IMPACT Review

The Impact Lounge

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 44:15


林氏璧孔醫師的新冠病毒討論會
221220 日本第八波疫情 新冠何時降階?

林氏璧孔醫師的新冠病毒討論會

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 34:20


新型コロナ “第8波” 年末年始は? わかってきたこと【12/9】 https://www3.nhk.or.jp/news/special/coronavirus/eighthwave/detail/detail_23.html 東京都のデータでは、11月1か月間では、ゲノム解析を行った変異ウイルスのうち、主流は「BA.5」で76.7%ですが減少傾向で、「BQ.1」は2.2%、「BQ.1.1」は7.5%と徐々に増えてきています。11月21日までの1週間では「BA.5」は73.5%でしたが、「BQ.1」は2.6%、「BQ.1.1」は9.3%と増加してきています。 国立感染症研究所の鈴木基感染症疫学センター長が12月7日、厚生労働省の専門家会合に示した資料によりますと、12月11日までの1週間では ▽「BA.5」が54%、 ▽「BQ.1」系統が36%、 ▽「BA.2.75」が8%、 ▽「XBB」が3%になると推定されています。 コロナ「2類相当」見直し議論本格化「5類」に?なぜ今? https://www3.nhk.or.jp/news/special/coronavirus/restrictions/detail/detail_107.html 歡迎追蹤前台大感染科醫師。04b的發聲管道! 我的電子名片 https://lit.link/linshibi 希望大家當我的種子教師,推廣正確的新冠衛教。科學防疫,不要只以恐懼防疫! 歡迎贊助林氏璧孔醫師喝咖啡,讓我可以在這個紛亂的時代,繼續分享知識努力做正確新冠相關衛教。 https://pay.firstory.me/user/linshibi Powered by Firstory Hosting

This Week in Virology
TWiV 964: Clinical update with Dr. Daniel Griffin

This Week in Virology

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 42:04 Very Popular


In his weekly clinical update Dr. Griffin discusses Dr. Griffin discusses progress toward poliomyelitis eradication in Afghanistan, reduced risk for Mpox after receipt of 1 or 2 doses of JYNNEOS vaccine compared with risk among unvaccinated persons, reduced airborne transmission of SARS-CoV-2 BA.1 Omicron virus in Syrian hamsters, authorized updated (Bivalent) COVID-19 vaccines for children down to 6 months of age, low neutralization of SARS-CoV-2 Omicron BA.2.75.2, BQ.1.1, and XBB.1 by parental mRNA vaccine or a BA.5-bivalent booster, efficacy of antiviral agents against omicron subvariants BQ.1.1 and XBB, incidence of viral rebound after treatment with Nirmatrelvir-Ritonavir and Molnupiravir, and the effectiveness of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine in the prevention of post–COVID-19 conditions. Subscribe (free): Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Progress toward Poliomyelitis eradication in Afghanistan (CDC) Reduced risk for Mpox after receipt of 1 or 2 Doses of JYNNEOS vaccine (CDC) Reduced airborne transmission of BA.1 Omicron virus in Syrian hamsters (PLOS) Authorized bivalent vaccines for children down to 6 months of age (FDA) Low neutralization of BA.2.75.2, BQ.1.1, and XBB.1 by parental mRNA vaccine (Nature) Efficacy of antiviral agents against Omicron subvariants BQ.1.1 and XBB (NEJM) Viral rebound after treatment with Nirmatrelvir-Ritonavir and Molnupiravir (JAMA) Paxlovid patient eligbiliity screening checklist (FDA) Effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines in prevention of post–infection conditions (ASHE) Contribute to our MicrobeTV fundraiser at PWB Dr. Griffin's treatment guide (pdf) Letters read on TWiV 964 Timestamps by Jolene. Thanks! Intro music is by Ronald Jenkees Send your questions for Dr. Griffin to daniel@microbe.tv

C dans l'air
COVID : INQUIÉTUDES EN FRANCE... ET CHEZ LES BLEUS ? – 16/12/22

C dans l'air

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 63:38


EXPERTS DR PATRICK PELLOUX Médecin urgentiste au SAMU de Paris - Président de l'AMUF PR ANNE-CLAUDE CRÉMIEUX Professeure en maladies infectieuses - Hôpital Saint-Louis Membre de l'Académie de médecine EVE ROGER Journaliste, spécialiste des questions de société NICOLAS BERROD Journaliste - « Le Parisien - Aujourd'hui en France » La neuvième vague de Covid-19 continue de gagner du terrain en France et de tuer. Une centaine de personnes sont décédées de cette maladie en moyenne chaque jour cette semaine, ce qui porte à plus de 160 000 morts du coronavirus dans le pays depuis le début de l'épidémie il y a trois ans. Parallèlement, les hospitalisations augmentent toujours : 24.125 (+ 383 en 24h) malades du Covid-19 sont actuellement pris en charge à l'hôpital dont 1.374 (+ 33 en 24h) en réanimation selon Santé publique France. Le taux d'incidence est lui à 630,79 et les contaminations sont élevées (+ 62.541 nouveaux cas confirmés en 24h) alors que les pharmaciens constatent depuis des semaines une baisse du nombre de tests et des retards de vaccination chez les plus fragiles. « Il va y avoir des morts » a alerté la semaine dernière le ministre de la Santé, conscient que la vaccination contre le coronavirus patinait dans le pays. D'après François Braun, « 25 % des plus de 80 ans sont à jour de leur vaccination contre le Covid-19, et de l'ordre de 40 % des 60 à 80 ans ». Une couverture vaccinale insuffisante contre le Covid-19 mais aussi contre la grippe. Evoquant une « situation sérieuse », le ministre de la Santé a regretté que les messages de prévention « sont moins bien passés ». Il a également appelé solennellement les Français à un « sursaut » avant les fêtes de fin d'année, les enjoignant à se faire vacciner et à remettre le masque. Du côté des hôpitaux, la tension s'accroît et l'inquiétude gagne les services qui craignent une saturation face à une triple épidémie de Covid, grippe, bronchiolite. Et les nouveaux rassemblements attendus, un peu partout en France pour suivre les Bleus en finale de la Coupe du monde n'est pas pour rassurer les soignants à l'approche des réunions de famille à Noël. Alors que sait-on du variant BQ.1.1 qui gagne du terrain en France ? Où en est la campagne de vaccination des personnes fragiles ? Faut-il craindre un pic des épidémies de Covid et de grippe à Noël ? Enfin alors que les pharmaciens alertent depuis plusieurs semaines sur des ruptures de stock de médicaments. Pourquoi une telle situation ? DIFFUSION : du lundi au samedi à 17h45FORMAT : 65 minutes PRÉSENTATION : Caroline Roux - Axel de Tarlé REDIFFUSION : du lundi au vendredi vers 23h40 RÉALISATION : Nicolas Ferraro, Bruno Piney, Franck Broqua, Alexandre Langeard, Corentin Son, Benoît Lemoine PRODUCTION : France Télévisions / Maximal Productions Retrouvez C DANS L'AIR sur internet & les réseaux : INTERNET : francetv.fr FACEBOOK : https://www.facebook.com/Cdanslairf5 TWITTER : https://twitter.com/cdanslair INSTAGRAM : https://www.instagram.com/cdanslair/

台視新聞 每日頭條 Taiwan TTV NEWS
每日頭條 20221215|冷颼颼 雙北疑似低溫一夜釀7死

台視新聞 每日頭條 Taiwan TTV NEWS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 3:15


【沙巴有氧旅行】滿足想要鬆一下的你!馬來西亞航空台北-亞庇12月起,每週兩班3.5小時直達慢活天堂—沙巴,還有春節好命5天全包假期1/20-22限量搶訂中,立即下訂出發去! http://bit.ly/3VTWDuH ----以上訊息由 SoundOn 動態廣告贊助商提供---- 本節新聞重點: ▲冷颼颼 雙北疑似低溫一夜釀7死 ▲網瘋傳BQ.1.1新型變異株致死率非常高!指揮中心破除謠言 ▲明年4月上路! 北北基計程車「起跳價」調高至85元 ▲「中國鬆綁防疫前」 世衛:病例早已大爆發 ▲美援烏「愛國者防空系統」? 克宮:「肯定」成為俄軍合法打擊目標 ▲開賽第5分鐘閃電進球 法國2:0踢贏摩洛哥 |更多新聞| ◎台視新聞訂閱→https://www.youtube.com/c/ttvnewsview ◎台視直播訂閱→https://www.youtube.com/c/twlivenews ◎台視臉書粉絲團訂閱→https://www.facebook.com/ttvnews/ ◎台視新聞IG訂閱→https://www.instagram.com/ttvnews_tw/

Better Health While Aging Podcast
131 COVID Winter Holidays Update for Aging Adults (12.8.22 Edition)

Better Health While Aging Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 43:43


Dr. K covers what to know about COVID and flu this winter, including what to expect from the new BQ.1 subvariants, and how to stay safer during winter gatherings. She also covers how well the fall bivalent booster is working and how to use a HEPA filter for safer home gatherings. The post 131 COVID Update for Aging Adults (12.8.22 Edition) appeared first on Better Health While Aging.

The Impact Lounge
The ”Death” of Eric Young & IMPACT Review

The Impact Lounge

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 38:44


BQ will a late solo episode talking about this past IMPACT

This Week in Virology
TWiV 959: Clinical update with Dr. Daniel Griffin

This Week in Virology

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 48:08


In his weekly clinical update Dr. Griffin discusses effectiveness of influenza vaccination of pregnant women for prevention of maternal and early infant Influenza-associated hospitalizations in South Africa, a multivalent nucleoside-modified mRNA vaccine against all known influenza virus subtypes, single and 2-dose vaccinations with modified vaccinia Ankara-Bavarian Nordic induce durable B cell memory responses comparable to replicating smallpox vaccines, whether the risk of still and preterm birth is affected by the timing of symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy, medical masks versus N95 respirators for preventing COVID-19 among health care workers, alarming antibody evasion properties of rising SARS-CoV-2 BQ and XBB subvariants, real-world evidence of novel treatments for COVID-19 on mortality: a nationwide comparative cohort study of hospitalized patients in the 1st, 2nd, 3rdand 4th wave in the Netherlands, and effectiveness and safety of extended thromboprophylaxis in post-discharge patients with COVID-19. Subscribe (free): Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Effectiveness of Influenza vaccination in pregnant women (OFID) Multivalent nucleoside-modified mRNA vaccine against Influenza subtypes (Science) Single and 2-dose vaccinations with modified vaccinia Ankara-Bavarian Nordic (JID) Is the risk of still and preterm birth affected by the timing of symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection? (AJOG) Medical masks versus N95 respirators for preventing COVID-19 among health care workers (ACP) Bebtelovimab fact sheet for providers (FDA) Alarming antibody evasion properties of rising SARS-CoV-2 BQ and XBB subvariants (bioRxiV) Paxlovid patient eligbiliity screening checklist (FDA) Real-world evidence of novel treatments for COVID-19 on mortality (OFID) Effectiveness and safety of extended thromboprophylaxis in post-discharge patients with COVID-19 (Thrombosis Research) Contribute to our MicrobeTV fundraiser at PWB Dr. Griffin's treatment guide (pdf) Letters read on TWiV 959 Timestamps by Jolene. Thanks! Intro music is by Ronald Jenkees Send your questions for Dr. Griffin to daniel@microbe.tv

Big Rich, TD & Fletch
Brady Quinn talks NFL and College Football

Big Rich, TD & Fletch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 11:53


BQ of Two Pros and a Cup of Joe and Big Noon Kickoff joins the guys to talk some NFL QB's and College Football.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
How scientists use wastewater to track the spread of COVID

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 7:18


As the newest dominant COVID subvariants BQ.1 and BQ.1.1 emerge, scientists are looking beyond traditional methods to track its spread. One important tool in their arsenal is wastewater surveillance. Special correspondent Cat Wise reports from California, one of the first states to test wastewater for COVID. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Health
How scientists use wastewater to track the spread of COVID

PBS NewsHour - Health

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 7:18


As the newest dominant COVID subvariants BQ.1 and BQ.1.1 emerge, scientists are looking beyond traditional methods to track its spread. One important tool in their arsenal is wastewater surveillance. Special correspondent Cat Wise reports from California, one of the first states to test wastewater for COVID. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Portable Practical Pediatrics
Dr. M's SPA Newsletter Audiocast Volume 12 Issue 45

Portable Practical Pediatrics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 22:25


Covid Update # 73: Omicron US strains: as of October 22nd data - variants make up: BA.4.6 is 11%, BA.2.75 is 2%, BF.7 is 7%, BA.5 is 62%, BQ.1 is 9%, BQ1.1 is 7% BA.5 is losing ground to many new Omicron variant offshoots. BF.7, BQ.1 and BQ1.1 are very interesting as they are apparently more infectious than BA.5. That is amazing. We look at new PASC Long Covid data as well as the world of vaccine effectiveness. And much more... Dr. M

fit4life | fitgirl weekly chat
301 - 跑崩了但也PB了,我的杭州马拉松心路历程

fit4life | fitgirl weekly chat

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 73:09


2022年,也许唯一的一场马拉松,被姥姥盼星星盼月亮般盼来了。但也可能是太激动了,前半程跑太快,结果后半程崩了个稀碎,第一次体会到“撞墙”是什么神奇的体验。和BQ - 波士顿马拉松门槛差一分钟,失之交臂。比赛过程中差点停表弃赛,但咬牙坚持到全程,发现收获也许比没崩的比赛更多。

Rádio Gaúcha
Nova onda de Covid-19, BM notifica manifestantes pela 6ª vez na Capital e mais - 18/11/2022

Rádio Gaúcha

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 5:12


A Brigada Militar notificou pela sexta vez os manifestantes que bloqueiam vias em Porto Alegre. Uma nova onda de coronavírus causada pela subvariante BQ.1 deve chegar ao Rio Grande do Sul nas próximas semanas, segundo infectologistas e o governo do Estado. O Tribunal de Justiça do Rio Grande do Sul decidiu suspender a implementação de novas escolas cívico-militares no Estado. O primeiro dia de vacinação contra a covid-19 para crianças com idades entre seis meses e três anos incompletos, com comorbidades, foi marcado por baixa procura nas unidades de saúde de Porto Alegre. O técnico Tite comandou hoje o quarto treino da seleção brasileira em Turim, na Itália, onde está sendo feita a preparação para a Copa do Mundo do Catar. Mais notícias em gzh.com.br

Rose Unplugged
NEW COVID STRAINS? Dr. Peter McCullough Joins Rose Unplugged

Rose Unplugged

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 34:46


- What do the new strains indicate? What about those who have had one strain of COVID already? The new mutation site appears to be critical in terms of its resistance to vaccines and antibodies…. - Deprivation of “Shared Decision Making” – Medication reconciliation is explained by Dr. McCullough - Where are we with the virus now? Are we still talking Vax, Mask, and test? - We are out of ammo again: BA.4 and BA.5 viruses started to disappear. The emergent strains are BQ.1 and BQ1.1. The antibodies against BA.4 and BA.5 don't cover the new variants at all or at the VERY least have a very limited effect. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rose-unplugged/support

O Assunto
A mais nova onda de Covid

O Assunto

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 20:45


Foram meses de relaxamento de medidas de proteção, com índices de transmissão e de novos casos em baixa. O alerta voltou a soar no início de novembro, com o aumento exponencial na busca por exames em laboratórios e farmácias. Na sequência, veio a alta na média móvel de casos, puxada pela subvariante BQ.1, da ômicron. “Estamos vendo apenas a pontinha do iceberg”, avalia a infectologista Rosana Richtmann em conversa com Julia Duailibi. Para ela, o número real de casos é muito maior do que o registrado. “É importante que as pessoas se testem e tomem o cuidado para não expor os outros”, lembra. Ela explica que a BQ.1 tem transmissibilidade maior, ainda sem indicar maior gravidade. E argumenta o caminho para frear novas variantes: a adoção de vacinas atualizadas. “Mais uma vez estamos atrasados” na aquisição desses imunizantes, diz. Rosana reforça ainda situações em que é essencial voltar a usar máscaras: no transporte público, dentro de farmácias, em unidades de saúde e para todos os imunossuprimidos.

E Tem Mais
Alta dos casos de Covid-19: quais os riscos de uma nova onda da doença

E Tem Mais

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 20:23


Neste episódio do E Tem Mais, Carol Nogueira apresenta um panorama das preocupações com a alta de casos de Covid-19 no Brasil e no mundo e das lições aprendidas sobre as melhores alternativas para conter a doença. A circulação de novas variantes do coronavírus tem elevado as taxas de transmissão da doença mesmo em países com acesso à vacina, como Alemanha, Estados Unidos e França. Apesar de não estar acompanhada da alta de casos graves e mortes, a maior presença do vírus entra a população tem preocupado os médicos, inclusive no Brasil. Uma das mutações da variante Ômicron, a BQ.1, foi identificada em 20 de outubro no Amazonas e já circula em outros estados brasileiros. Diante do aumento dos casos no país, especialistas alertam para a necessidade de ampliar a parcela da população imunizada com as doses adicionais recomendadas da vacina contra a doença. Para descrever os riscos e os cuidados com o novo aumento de casos da Covid-19, participam deste episódio os médicos infectologistas Rosana Richtmann, do Hospital Emílio Ribas, e Renato Kfouri, diretor da Sociedade Brasileira de Imunizações (SBIm). Com apresentação de Carol Nogueira, este podcast é produzido pela Maremoto para a CNN Brasil. Você também pode ouvir o E Tem Mais no site da CNN Brasil. E aproveite para conhecer os nossos outros programas em áudio. Acesse: cnnbrasil.com.br/podcasts.

Durma com essa
Aumento de casos e subvariante: a covid voltando a preocupar

Durma com essa

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 17:59


A cidade de São Paulo registrou a primeira morte de uma pessoa infectada pela BQ.1, nova subvariante da ômicron. O caso ocorreu em meio a um aumento no número de infecções por covid-19 no país, que é acompanhado de uma diminuição da cobertura vacinal: apenas 16% da população tomou as quatro doses da vacina. O Durma com Essa desta quarta-feira (9) fala sobre a perspectiva de uma nova onda da doença e sobre as iniciativas para responsabilizar gestores pela tragédia brasileira no enfrentamento à crise sanitária. O programa também conta com a participação da redatora Mariana Vick, que fala sobre a morte da cantora Gal Costa, e de Lucas Lopes, que dá ideias para reconstruir a capacidade de operação do Estado em relação à infância.

PokerFraudAlert - Druff & Friends
Poker Fraud Alert Radio - 11/04/2022 - I'm Going to Disneyland

PokerFraudAlert - Druff & Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 402:03 Very Popular


Topic begins at (0:19:14) mark: Druff predicts 1994-like red wave in 2022 midterms coming up.... (0:35:57): Druff goes to Disneyland for the first time in almost 7 years, gives his impression & tips.... (1:19:39): Rip's wife reverses course, claims to believe him, and goes at it with Garrett and Doug Polk.... (1:56:51): Was there really a car recently unearthed from 1992 with the license plate "LEW J4"?.... (2:00:54): Arrest warrant issued for chip thief Bryan Sagbigsal, but police can't find him.... (2:15:38): Former Live at the Bike and Hustler Casino Live employee Patrick Curran speaks out on Twitter.... (2:35:33): Aaron "Daliman" O'Rourke claims he was scammed by Quincy "Q" Collins out of $4,000.... (3:23:17): Career thief wins $1.732 million from Isle Waterloo (Iowa Caesars property) after security fails to stop fellow patron attacking him after theft of player points.... (3:49:58): Massachusetts man pleads guilty to illegal sports betting and extortion.... (4:00:33): Three states attempt to crack down on NFT online casino ownership scheme.... (4:08:00): Kalshi seeks ability to allow Americans to bet on politics, similar to soon-to-be-closed Predictit.... (4:32:10): Cincinnati Reds legend -- and banned baseball figure -- Pete Rose will place Ohio's first legal sportsbet on January 1.... (4:42:01): Casino tycoon Tilman Fertitta bought 6% of Wynn Resorts -- what does this mean?.... (4:49:11): Chinese developer accused of giving Los Angeles councilman casino chips, cash, and hookers in order to get major project approved.... (5:02:59): Shocking, mostly suppressed data shows that almost nobody under 65 without major preexisting conditions is dying of COVID in US.... (5:26:02): Did social media figure Julie Powell really die of "Black Hairy Tongue"?.... (5:42:43): Author Emily Oster proposed a "pandemic amnesty" for mistakes made during COVID times -- is this reasonable?.... (6:03:38): Druff explains new COVID variants BQ.1 and BQ1.1, and whether you should be concerned.

Gist Healthcare Daily
Friday, November 4, 2022

Gist Healthcare Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 6:18


Physicians groups are gearing up to lobby Congress over pay cuts from CMS. Medicare fines for hospital readmissions declined last year but a number of hospitals were still penalized. And New York and California are hotspots for the new BQ strains of the COVID-19 virus and it could soon spread to the rest of the country. That's coming up on today's episode of Gist Healthcare Daily. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Bill Handel on Demand
Handel on the News [EARLY EDITION]

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 32:23


Wayne Resnick and Jennifer Jones Lee accompany Bill for the Early Edition of Handel on the News. The three of them discuss news topics that include: Cooler weather, wind and rain are expected to hit SoCal today and throughout the week, Orange County has declared a health emergency as RSV surges with cases continuing to rise in LA as well, and new Omicron subvariants BQ.1 and BQ.1.1 make gains as BA.5 cases fade.

林氏璧孔醫師的新冠病毒討論會
221102 台灣本土首例XBB和BF.7變異株出現 下一波疫情是何時?

林氏璧孔醫師的新冠病毒討論會

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 24:20


Nespresso 雙11節慶咖啡大賞,年末最優惠,全機型優惠$3300起,再贈價值$820品牌杯組11/14前podcast聽眾購買任一咖啡機加5條膠囊,於結帳頁面輸入折扣碼[podcast200],即可獲得200抵用金,可於下次購買五條膠囊時折抵,折抵期限至12/31!https://link.fstry.me/3SWs6L2 —— 以上為 Firstory DAI 動態廣告 —— XBB、BF.7變異株皆驗出本土首例 研判社區感染 https://www.cna.com.tw/news/ahel/202210310167.aspx 指揮中心今天公布,新增165例Omicron亞型變異株確定病例,國際關注的XBB、BF.7首見本土社區感染,個案曾接種3劑疫苗。 指揮中心公布,國內新增165例Omicron亞型變異株確定病例,分別為139例本土個案(134例BA.5、1例BF.7、1例XBB、3例BA.2),XBB、BF.7為本土首例;境外移入有26例(14例BA.5、5例XBB、1例BQ.1/BQ.1.1、5例BA.2.75、1例BA.2) 根據指揮中心的資料,XBB變異株本土個案為北部本國籍40多歲男性,有接種3劑疫苗,未曾接觸國外返台人士,8月30日曾確診,10月15日出現發燒咳嗽流鼻水,10月17日快篩陽性,就醫以後醫師評估重複感染確診,因為沒有境外接觸史,所以評估為社區感染。 驗出BF.7本土個案為南部本國籍60多歲女性,有接種3劑疫苗,10月19日發病,當天因症狀就醫,PCR陽性確診,並非重複感染,經實驗室定序為BF.7,無國外接觸史,研判為社區感染。 另外,根據指揮中心對BA.5國內最新基因定序結果,新驗出BA.5本土個案驗出率為96%,驗出BA.2變異株有3例,占2%。 指揮中心同時公布上週境外移入確診者感染的病毒各變異株檢驗結果,BA.5占一半(54%),至於Omicron最新亞型變異株BQ.1或BQ.1.1,上週未驗出。 今天新增6例XBB變異株境外移入,來源為新加坡2例,其餘印尼、印度及泰國各1例;BQ.1變異株境外移入,來自加拿大。個案皆是入境時有症狀,機場採檢檢出,症狀為發燒、喉嚨痛、咳嗽、流鼻水、頭痛、嘔吐。 指揮中心醫療應變組副組長羅一鈞說,WHO 10月27日分析新加坡、印度等國資料認為,相較於其他Omicron主要流行株,XBB變異株未增加疾病嚴重度,但有較高重複感染機率,主要發生於Omicron流行前(如Alpha或Delta)的感染者。尚無證據顯示XBB對於近期感染Omicron有免疫逃脫。 世衛10月26日指出,全球已發現超過390種Omicron次分支變異株,目前BA.5變異株占比約為77.1%,仍為全球主流株且持續變異,演化的新型變異株BQ.1及其子代變異株傳播快速,受影響國家數及病例數持續增加,已於至少65個國家檢出,占比約6%。另外,BA.4.6變異株及其子代已於至少87個國家檢出,占比約4.4%;BA.2.75變異株及其子代已於至少63個國家檢出,占比約為3.2%;另XBB變異株及其子代已於至少35個國家檢出,占比約1.3%,需密切監測國際間之病毒株演變與流行。 羅一鈞說,依現有研究顯示,接種次世代疫苗追加劑對BA.5等變異株仍具保護力,並可降低因感染COVID-19造成的重症、住院或死亡風險。民眾仍須落實勤洗手、戴口罩等個人防疫措施,並儘速完成疫苗接種,以獲得保護力。 WHO 10月27日報告 https://www.who.int/news/item/27-10-2022-tag-ve-statement-on-omicron-sublineages-bq.1-and-xbb 歡迎追蹤前台大感染科醫師。04b的發聲管道! 我的電子名片 https://lit.link/linshibi 希望大家當我的種子教師,推廣正確的新冠衛教。科學防疫,不要只以恐懼防疫! 歡迎贊助林氏璧孔醫師喝咖啡,讓我可以在這個紛亂的時代,繼續分享知識努力做正確新冠相關衛教。 https://pay.firstory.me/user/linshibi Powered by Firstory Hosting

The Rambling Runner Podcast
#482 - Mind, Body, and Sole with Tommie Runz: Tommie's 3 Marathon Adventure

The Rambling Runner Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 68:09 Very Popular


Mind, Body, and Sole with Tommie Runz is back! Tommie is in the midst of an audacious three marathon adventure. First, Tommie wanted to get another BQ. Check! Then he wanted to run a solid effort at Chicago. Check, and then some! Tommie's fall marathon triumvirate will conclude at the New York City Marathon where he hopes to set a new PR. In this episode, Tommie discusses the physical and mental demands of this season, how he has approached each marathon, the ways he's stayed sharp mentally after each effort, and, or course, some shoe talk. About Tommie: Tommie Runz is making big moves within the broader running community. Several years back Tommie was the picture of ill-health. He had an alcohol problem, was eating poorly, and was doing little exercise. They one-by-one he addressed all of these issues until he became the man and runner he is today - fast, fit, vegan, host of the Run Eat Sleep Show, and owner of Chip Time Running. A truly magnificent transformation for a man who's an even better person than he is a runner. Follow Tommie - www.instagram.com/tommie_runz Chip Time Running and Run Eat Sleep Show - https://linktr.ee/ChipTimeRunning Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

林氏璧孔醫師的新冠病毒討論會
221025 台灣疫情脫離高原期 11月7日起防疫鬆綁新制 BQ家族(BQ.1/BQ.1.1)被歐盟CDC指定為重點變異株

林氏璧孔醫師的新冠病毒討論會

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 27:59


11/7起確診者可7+0、接觸者免居家隔離 公共場所不強制量體溫 https://www.cna.com.tw/news/ahel/202210245005.aspx 國內新冠疫情連續5天低於4萬例,下降趨勢明朗,有望脫離高原期,為了回歸正常生活,王必勝宣布4項11月7日起執行的防疫鬆綁新制。取消健身房、遶境等3劑令及公共場所體溫量測,接觸者改0+7自主防疫、確診者調整為7+0天。 台灣2至3個月後恐爆BQ或XBB「新變異株疫情」?羅一鈞這樣說 https://health.gvm.com.tw/article/95576 羅副今天報告的,BQ家族變異株(BQ.1/BQ.1.1)已於10月20日被歐盟CDC正式指定為COVID-19重點變異株,需要特別留意。並且歐洲也進一步進行風險評估,目前BQ家族變異株所佔佔比為確診病例的10%至20%,美國大概也是這樣的比例。 模型預估也推測,大概到11月中至明2023年初之間,BQ家族變異株有可能會成為歐美最主流的流行病毒株,佔比恐達到50%;到明年初大概會到80%以上。故現階段他們預測BQ家族恐將成為下一波秋冬流行最主要的COVID-19病毒株。 Spread of the SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant sub-lineage BQ.1 in the EU/EEA 21 October 2022 https://www.ecdc.europa.eu/sites/default/files/documents/Epi-update-BQ1.pdf 本集由凱勝電訊贊助播出。感謝本節目的第一個乾爹! 凱勝的eSIM卡網頁: https://bit.ly/3Sk4Nvj 04b讀者可直接九折!若沒有請手動輸入萬年優惠代碼 linshibi。 eSIM詳細的說明請見部落格文章! https://linshibi.com/?p=40550  日本10月11日開放免簽證自由行 https://linshibi.com/?p=40268 歡迎追蹤前台大感染科醫師。04b的發聲管道! 我的電子名片 https://lit.link/linshibi 希望大家當我的種子教師,推廣正確的新冠衛教。科學防疫,不要只以恐懼防疫! 歡迎贊助林氏璧孔醫師喝咖啡,讓我可以在這個紛亂的時代,繼續分享知識努力做正確新冠相關衛教。 https://pay.firstory.me/user/linshibi Powered by Firstory Hosting

Here Lies Me
Listen Now: In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt

Here Lies Me

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 45:13


The producers of this series wanted to share another Lemonada Media podcast with you. Every day, the world seems on the brink of crisis. Join Andy Slavitt and experts, policymakers, journalists and thought leaders to stay informed, safe and … entertained. As a White House advisor, author, crisis response leader, non-partisan counselor to policymakers here and abroad, Andy has been called the ultimate outsider's insider for a reason. In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt has new episodes every Monday, Wednesday and Friday.  How bad will this winter's COVID-19 wave be? That's what Andy asks epidemiologist Katelyn Jetelina, who's been watching Europe closely and combing through the data on new variants. She predicts that a winter wave is about 90% likely and explains her biggest worries – an Omicron subvariant called BQ.1.1 and a simultaneous flu wave with fewer masking requirements. She and Andy also discuss how the fall bivalent booster will hold up against new winter variants, why uptake is still so low, and how to plan for gatherings with friends and family this holiday season. To hear more of In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt, head to https://link.chtbl.com/InTheBubble Keep up with Andy on Twitter @ASlavitt. Follow Katelyn Jetelina on Twitter @dr_kkjetelina. Joining Lemonada Premium is a great way to support our show and get bonus content. Subscribe today at bit.ly/lemonadapremium. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Tell Me What to Do with Jaime Primak Sullivan
Listen Now: In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt

Tell Me What to Do with Jaime Primak Sullivan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 45:13


The producers of this series wanted to share another Lemonada Media podcast with you. Every day, the world seems on the brink of crisis. Join Andy Slavitt and experts, policymakers, journalists and thought leaders to stay informed, safe and … entertained. As a White House advisor, author, crisis response leader, non-partisan counselor to policymakers here and abroad, Andy has been called the ultimate outsider's insider for a reason. In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt has new episodes every Monday, Wednesday and Friday.  How bad will this winter's COVID-19 wave be? That's what Andy asks epidemiologist Katelyn Jetelina, who's been watching Europe closely and combing through the data on new variants. She predicts that a winter wave is about 90% likely and explains her biggest worries – an Omicron subvariant called BQ.1.1 and a simultaneous flu wave with fewer masking requirements. She and Andy also discuss how the fall bivalent booster will hold up against new winter variants, why uptake is still so low, and how to plan for gatherings with friends and family this holiday season. To hear more of In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt, head to https://link.chtbl.com/InTheBubble Keep up with Andy on Twitter @ASlavitt. Follow Katelyn Jetelina on Twitter @dr_kkjetelina. Joining Lemonada Premium is a great way to support our show and get bonus content. Subscribe today at bit.ly/lemonadapremium. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Our America with Julián Castro
Listen Now: In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt

Our America with Julián Castro

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 45:13


The producers of this series wanted to share another Lemonada Media podcast with you. Every day, the world seems on the brink of crisis. Join Andy Slavitt and experts, policymakers, journalists and thought leaders to stay informed, safe and … entertained. As a White House advisor, author, crisis response leader, non-partisan counselor to policymakers here and abroad, Andy has been called the ultimate outsider's insider for a reason. In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt has new episodes every Monday, Wednesday and Friday.  How bad will this winter's COVID-19 wave be? That's what Andy asks epidemiologist Katelyn Jetelina, who's been watching Europe closely and combing through the data on new variants. She predicts that a winter wave is about 90% likely and explains her biggest worries – an Omicron subvariant called BQ.1.1 and a simultaneous flu wave with fewer masking requirements. She and Andy also discuss how the fall bivalent booster will hold up against new winter variants, why uptake is still so low, and how to plan for gatherings with friends and family this holiday season. To hear more of In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt, head to https://link.chtbl.com/InTheBubble Keep up with Andy on Twitter @ASlavitt. Follow Katelyn Jetelina on Twitter @dr_kkjetelina. Joining Lemonada Premium is a great way to support our show and get bonus content. Subscribe today at bit.ly/lemonadapremium. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

In Recovery
Listen Now: In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt

In Recovery

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 45:19


The producers of this series wanted to share another Lemonada Media podcast with you. Every day, the world seems on the brink of crisis. Join Andy Slavitt and experts, policymakers, journalists and thought leaders to stay informed, safe and … entertained. As a White House advisor, author, crisis response leader, non-partisan counselor to policymakers here and abroad, Andy has been called the ultimate outsider's insider for a reason. In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt has new episodes every Monday, Wednesday and Friday.  How bad will this winter's COVID-19 wave be? That's what Andy asks epidemiologist Katelyn Jetelina, who's been watching Europe closely and combing through the data on new variants. She predicts that a winter wave is about 90% likely and explains her biggest worries – an Omicron subvariant called BQ.1.1 and a simultaneous flu wave with fewer masking requirements. She and Andy also discuss how the fall bivalent booster will hold up against new winter variants, why uptake is still so low, and how to plan for gatherings with friends and family this holiday season. To hear more of In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt, head to https://link.chtbl.com/InTheBubble Keep up with Andy on Twitter @ASlavitt. Follow Katelyn Jetelina on Twitter @dr_kkjetelina. Joining Lemonada Premium is a great way to support our show and get bonus content. Subscribe today at bit.ly/lemonadapremium. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

As Me with Sinéad
Listen Now: In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt

As Me with Sinéad

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 45:13


The producers of this series wanted to share another Lemonada Media podcast with you. Every day, the world seems on the brink of crisis. Join Andy Slavitt and experts, policymakers, journalists and thought leaders to stay informed, safe and … entertained. As a White House advisor, author, crisis response leader, non-partisan counselor to policymakers here and abroad, Andy has been called the ultimate outsider's insider for a reason. In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt has new episodes every Monday, Wednesday and Friday.  How bad will this winter's COVID-19 wave be? That's what Andy asks epidemiologist Katelyn Jetelina, who's been watching Europe closely and combing through the data on new variants. She predicts that a winter wave is about 90% likely and explains her biggest worries – an Omicron subvariant called BQ.1.1 and a simultaneous flu wave with fewer masking requirements. She and Andy also discuss how the fall bivalent booster will hold up against new winter variants, why uptake is still so low, and how to plan for gatherings with friends and family this holiday season. To hear more of In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt, head to https://link.chtbl.com/InTheBubble Keep up with Andy on Twitter @ASlavitt. Follow Katelyn Jetelina on Twitter @dr_kkjetelina. Joining Lemonada Premium is a great way to support our show and get bonus content. Subscribe today at bit.ly/lemonadapremium.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Kottke Ride Home
Tue. 10/18 - How Quickly Would Vampires Make Humans Extinct?

Kottke Ride Home

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 17:00


Could vampires exist, mathematically speaking? Plus, an update on COVID variants of concern as we head into winter. And the United Kingdom has ruled that GIFs are still relevant and Meta can't hog them all.Sponsor:Shopify, Get a 14-day free trial at shopify.com/coolLinks:Here's How Long it Would Take for Vampires to Annihilate Humanity (Atlas Obscura)The transylvanian problem of renewable resources (RAIRO) Cinema Fiction vs Physics Reality: Ghosts, Vampires, and Zombies (Skeptical Inquirer) Mathematical Models of Interactions between Species: Peaceful Co-existence of Vampires and Humans Based on the Models Derived from Fiction Literature and Films (Applied Mathematical Sciences) Trick or Treat Month: Gourds with Jackson Bird (SciShow Tangents)New COVID variant BQ.1 now makes up 1 in 10 cases nationwide, CDC estimates (CBS News)BA.5 is finally fading—sublineages BQ.1 and BQ.1.1 rise from variant stew (Ars Technica)XBB, BQ.1.1, BA.2.75.2 — a variant swarm could fuel a winter surge (Washington Post)What to Know About COVID-19 Variants BQ.1 and BQ.1.1 (TIME)Meta Forced to Sell Giphy in UK Antitrust Case (Gizmodo) Jackson Bird on TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt
COVID-19 Winter Wave Warning Signs (with Katelyn Jetelina)

In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 44:14


How bad will this winter's COVID-19 wave be? That's what Andy asks epidemiologist Katelyn Jetelina, who's been watching Europe closely and combing through the data on new variants. She predicts that a winter wave is about 90% likely and explains her biggest worries – an Omicron subvariant called BQ.1.1 and a simultaneous flu wave with fewer masking requirements. She and Andy also discuss how the fall bivalent booster will hold up against new winter variants, why uptake is still so low, and how to plan for gatherings with friends and family this holiday season. Keep up with Andy on Twitter @ASlavitt. Follow Katelyn Jetelina on Twitter @dr_kkjetelina. Joining Lemonada Premium is a great way to support our show and get bonus content. Subscribe today at bit.ly/lemonadapremium.    Support the show by checking out our sponsors! CVS Health helps people navigate the healthcare system and their personal healthcare by improving access, lowering costs and being a trusted partner for every meaningful moment of health. At CVS Health, healthier happens together. Learn more at cvshealth.com. Click this link for a list of current sponsors and discount codes for this show and all Lemonada shows: https://lemonadamedia.com/sponsors/    Check out these resources from today's episode:  Subscribe to Katelyn's newsletter, “Your Local Epidemiologist”: https://yourlocalepidemiologist.substack.com/about Find vaccines, masks, testing, treatments, and other resources in your community: https://www.covid.gov/ Order Andy's book, “Preventable: The Inside Story of How Leadership Failures, Politics, and Selfishness Doomed the U.S. Coronavirus Response”: https://us.macmillan.com/books/9781250770165  Stay up to date with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram at @LemonadaMedia.  For additional resources, information, and a transcript of the episode, visit lemonadamedia.com/show/inthebubble.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.