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Swiss food and beverage company

  • 1,244PODCASTS
  • 1,631EPISODES
  • 39mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jan 5, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about nestle

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Latest podcast episodes about nestle

Jobber Knocker Podcast
Jobber Knocker Episode 298 In Shock Over Brock

Jobber Knocker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 65:40


Nestlemania and JC discuss... Brock becoming WWE Champion. What happens with Heyman, what happens with Roman? Do you think Big E will ever get back to the mountain top? Miz/Maryse vs Edge/Phoenix? Do you want to see it? What will happen in the next couple of weeks? We finally get Lashley vs Brock but will it deliver? New Year's Evil. Pluses and Minuses. JC and Nestle go over their New Year's Resolutions for all of the wrestling companies. All this and much more this week on the Jobber Knocker! Check out the merch at www.TeePublic.com/Jobberknocker! Follow us on Twitter! @JobberKnocker @Nestlemania @JCoftheJK @TJoftheJK @RayRayoftheJK @JoePollock47 @DommyFeds33 @Danyfab @SSJPegasus Follow us on Facebook & Instagram @JobberKnocker! Visit Jobberknocker.com for some great wrestling articles! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jobberknocker/message

Scaling Culture
Krispy Kreme: Culture Change Management & Hybrid Workplace - Episode 70

Scaling Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 45:50


Our guest is Badia Rebolledo Abud, Chief People Officer at Krispy Kreme. Badia offers three decades of extraordinary success in a series of high-level roles at top-tier companies that include Krispy Kreme, Beiersdorf, Siemens, BEDEK, Nestle, and Procter & Gamble. At Krispy Kreme, Badia's main focus is to build the Human Resource strategy for the region from the ground up for this food and beverage company, including an expansion roadmap and a cultural vision for the region. Prior to Krispy Kreme, Badia achieved over two decades of experience driving positive outcomes across Executive HR Leadership, Personnel Development, HR Technologies, Change Management, and Employee Relations. In this episode of Scaling Culture, Ron and Badia discuss: Why it's harder to change culture than to create it How to effectively create and implement change in the workplace environment How to develop a results-driven mindset The power of language and humbleness to be able to speak to employees' hearts  For more information about Badia, please connect with her on LinkedIn. For more information about our podcast or to purchase the Scaling Culture Masterclass online course please go to ScalingCulture.Org And if you're enjoying the Scaling Culture podcast, please subscribe and share. We'll be back soon with another incredible guest! 

Aim to Win Podcast
Managing Brilliant Jerks with Dr. Katrina Burrus

Aim to Win Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 29:11


Dr. Katrina Burrus, CEO/founder of Excellent Executive Coaching LLC , is known for "Fast-tracking leaders to the C-Suite and Beyond "and for "Transforming Brilliant Jerks Into Inspiring Leaders. "Clients often comment that working With Katrina enlightens leaders to empower co-workers to walk the extra mile. She is a keynote speaker and published, "Managing Brilliant Jerks" and, "Global Leadership" a body of work used by Nestle, Novartis, the World Health Organization, the International Labor Organization, the United Nations, and Many more. She was most recently featured in Mexico, India, The U.S., Kazakhstan, and Russia. Dr. Burrus has 18 years of experience as the first Master Certified Coach and Founding Board Member from the (ICF) International Coaching Federation Switzerland.

Business Standard Podcast
Market Wrap: Sensex ends record-breaking year with a bang; up 22% in 2021

Business Standard Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 4:35


Top headlines   ·        Sensex gains 460 points to end record-breaking year with a bang; up 22% in 2021 ·        Indigo Paints zooms 16% after brokerage firm Motilal Oswal gives Buy rating ·        SmallCap Responsive Industries zooms 65% in 3 days on FY22 half-yearly turnaround ·        CMS Info Systems rallies smartly after a listless listing ·        GST Council defers rate hike in textiles, refers issues to group of ministers   The key benchmark indices ended the record-breaking year 2021 on a higher note. The BSE Sensex and NSE Nifty displayed a firm trend throughout the day on the back of steady gains in auto, financials, FMCG and index heavyweight Reliance Industries.   The Sensex touched a high of 58,409 before ending the day with a gain of 460 points at 58,254. In total, the total gain for the index this week was 1,130 points.   The Sensex finished the calendar year with a solid gain of 22%. It touched a new life-time high of 62,245 on October 19, 2021. The NSE Nifty today settled 150 points higher at 17,354, and was up a whopping 24% through 2021.   Titan was the top gainer among the Sensex 30 stocks. It ended 3.5% higher at Rs 2,522. UltraTech Cement and Kotak Bank were up around 2.5% each. Maruti, Axis Bank, SBI, Bajaj Finserv, HDFC Bank, Nestle and Sun Pharma were the other major gainers.   Among losers for the day, IT stocks underperformed on selective profit-taking and NTPC slipped 2%.   The broader markets outperformed the benchmark indices. The BSE Midcap and Smallcap were up 1.4% and 1.2%, respectively.   Textile stocks ended with strong gains after the GST Council decided to defer implementation of the GST rate increase. TT Ginni Filaments and Super Spinning were the major gainers, up 10-11% each. Salona Cotspin, SPL Industries, GTN Textiles, Digjam and Bombay Dyeing were among the other major gainers, All of them rose about 5% each.   Among sectors, the BSE Metal and Consumer Durables indices were up over 2% each. The auto and telecom indices gained 1.7% each. The Bankex, FMCG, Oil & Gas and Realty indices also finished with gains of over 1% each.   Among individual stocks, Indigo Paints was in the spotlight. The stock rallied nearly 16% on the BSE after Brokerage firm Motilal Oswal initiated a coverage on the stock with a 'Buy' rating and a target of Rs 2,270. The brokerage said the company had successfully surpassed the high entry barriers of the Indian paints industry.   Further, CMS Info Systems had a muted debut, with the stock getting listed at Rs 218.50 on the BSE - a 1.2% premium to its issue price of Rs 216 per share. The stock, however, rallied in the latter half of the trading day and ended 10% higher than its issue price.   Lastly, among small caps, another paints and furniture company Responsive Industries rallied over 19% on the BSE after the company recently announced its quarterly and half-yearly numbers for the the period until the end of September. The company reported a turnaround, with a net profit of Rs 6.60 crore, against a net loss of Rs 4.13 crore in the same period a year earlier. The stock has zoomed a whopping 68.7% in the past three trading sessions alone.

RecTech: the Recruiting Technology Podcast
TriNet and Paradox in the News

RecTech: the Recruiting Technology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 4:31


TriNet, a leading provider of human resources solutions for small and medium-size businesses(SMBs), today announced it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Zenefits.  Details of the stock and cash transaction were not disclosed. Zenefits is a leading cloud HR platform which provides innovative and intuitive HR, benefits, payroll and employee engagement software purpose-built for small and medium-size businesses.  Through the acquisition of Zenefits, TriNet diversifies its product offering to include an Administrative Services Organization (ASO), enabling TriNet to dynamically service SMBs throughout their lifecycle.  Upon deal close, Zenefits will become a wholly owned subsidiary of TriNet and Francisco Partners will become a TriNet stockholder. TriNet is also expected to become a preferred supplier of PEO and HRIS services to Francisco Partners portfolio companies across the country after closing. The acquisition is expected to close in the coming months, subject to customary closing conditions, including the receipt of regulatory approvals. https://hrtechfeed.com/trinet-to-acquire-zenefits/ Company Now Valued at $1.5 Billion Paradox, the conversational recruiting platform built to give every recruiter, hiring manager, and talent professional an assistant to get work done, today announced a $200M Series C investment. The round was led by Stripes, Sapphire, and Thoma Bravo, and included participation from Workday Ventures, Indeed, Willoughby Capital, Twilio Ventures, Blue Cloud Ventures, Geodesic, Principia Growth, DLA Piper Venture Fund and current investor Brighton Park Capital.  Paradox's vision is embodied by Olivia — the conversational AI assistant helping companies like Unilever, Nestle, McDonald's, CVS Health, and General Motors automate tasks like candidate screening, interview scheduling, onboarding, and more through smart, simple, mobile-first experiences. In just five years, Olivia has helped 500+ global clients save millions of hours of manual work — freeing their teams up to spend time with people, not software.  https://hrtechfeed.com/paradox-raises-200m-series-c/

BEautifully Unwinding
56. Psychology & Technology: Enable Simple Systems For Individuals & Communities To Thrive With Kariz Matic

BEautifully Unwinding

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 70:25


Today on the podcast Kariz Matic and I have an insightful conversation exploring psychology and technology and how connected the two are. Kariz has spent 20+ years creating systems and technology for companies like Cisco, Nestle and Genentech with work that has led to 7-figure cost reductions and revenue growth. She is the CEO of The Matic (a consultancy that helps ambitious leaders, their teams and their products become more productive, competitive and profitable), a mom, philanthropist, maker, mentor and so much more. She believes systems make space for us to discover more ways to share our talents, serve our community and deliver our value. That's why she's dedicated her career to finding those refinements one product, workflow and data point at a time. I recently took a systems building course from Kariz and I was blown away by Kariz and also about the constant ah ha moments of how similar technology and everything I have been learning about psychology relate to one another.  During this episode we explore: Psychology & Technology: Enable Simple Systems For Individuals & Communities To Thrive It's more important to learn than be perfect The cycle of continuous improvement and self discovery - always asking the question - who am I? How systems building relates to community building Rewiring the limiting beliefs around embracing femininity in a masculine dominated industry Technology is the enabler - manifestation of many individuals ideas put together The power of breaking it down to simple, small steps with psychology & technology AND SO MUCH MORE! Thank you so much for listening in today for being open to the curiosity of what healing might look like for you. If this conversation has you curious and wanting more you can find Kariz's contact information in the show notes below. In addition, I have created a FREE journal prompt pdf to help you breakthrough the cycles that are causing you to feel stuck! - to access click > FREE JOURNAL PDF : BEautifully Unwind One Page at a Time Have a magical day my friends! CONNECT WITH KARIZ   Instagram Personal: @karizmatic Professional: https://www.linkedin.com/in/karizmatic/ https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-matic-inc/ CONNECT WITH TISHA Instagram : @beautifullyunwinding Blog: www.beautifullyunwinding.com Subscribe to the BEautifully Unwinding Podcast so you never miss one of these powerful and impactful conversations. 

Heroes in Business
Jennifer Maxwell CoFounder PowerBar, grew to 130Million sold to Nestle, Founder JamBar

Heroes in Business

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 13:47


What you need to transform your life. Jennifer Maxwell CoFounder PowerBar, grew to 130Million sold to Nestle, Founder JamBar is interviewed by David Cogan Founder of Eliances and famous celebrity host The Heroes Show.  

Heroes in Business
Jennifer Maxwell CoFounder PowerBar, grew to 130Million sold to Nestle, Founder JamBar

Heroes in Business

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 13:48


What you need to transform your life. Jennifer Maxwell CoFounder PowerBar, grew to 130Million sold to Nestle, Founder JamBar is interviewed by David Cogan Founder of Eliances and famous celebrity host The Heroes Show.  

Snakebird Podcast
Episode 107: Profiles | Anna, Simeon, Zechariah, Pt.2

Snakebird Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 28:10


Hey Snakebirds, it's that time again where we focus in on the reason for the season! Except this time, we are going to look at the birth of our Savior from a little different angle than usual. In this three-person profile we will be looking at the time period of Jesus' birth through the eyes of three specific individuals that the Gospel of Luke zeros in on. Nestle in as we meet Zachariah, Simeon, and Anna during this Christmasy profile episode.Part 2 of 2

More Than A Muse
Ruth Wakefield: The Inventor of the Chocolate Chip Cookie

More Than A Muse

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 30:32


This week, Sadie introduces us to Ruth Wakefield, the inventor of the famous chocolate chip cookie! Wakefield inventor her classic cookie while experimenting in her kitchen at Tollhouse Inn, which she owned and operated with her husband. Not only would it go on to be an American classic, but it also would inspire the invention of chocolate chips themselves! We talk about her famous meals, cookbook, her deal with Nestle chocolate, and much more!Want to check out some of our favorite books? Check out our booklist Follow Us on Instagram @morethanamuse.podcast

Ken and Robin Talk About Stuff
Episode 477: Not For That, But Not Not For That

Ken and Robin Talk About Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 71:02


Nestle your rattling dice and thumping miniatures with care for our final episode of 2021. In the Gaming Hut beloved Patreon backer Bob Grider seeks the connection between the King in Yellow and locally celebrated fast food chain White Castle. The History Hut goes nautical once more as formidable backer Dave Munro requests the rundown […]

Business Standard Podcast
Market wrap: Sensex ends 612 pts higher; RIL, L&T and Bharti Airtel shine

Business Standard Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 4:59


Top headlines   Sensex ends 612 pts higher; RIL, L&T and Bharti Airtel shine Metro Brands makes a tepid debut with 13% discount ZEE falls 5% after inking merger pact with Sony Pictures, trims losses later RateGain Travel Technologies surges 28% in two sessions, hits new high CMS Info Systems IPO subscribed 65% on day 2   The bulls were in control on Dalal Street today as key benchmark indices remained in the positive zone throughout the session. The BSE benchmark index hit an intra-day high of 56,989, led by strong gains in index heavyweights Reliance Industries, Bharti Airtel and financial stocks. By close, the Sensex stood 612 points higher at 56,931. With this, the index has gained over 1,100 points in two trading sessions.   The NSE Nifty climbed to a high of 16,971, before eventually ending with a gain of 184 points at 16,955.   Reliance Industries surged 2.4 per cent and accounted for more than a quarter for Sensex gains today. According to Edelweiss Alternative Research, RIL's weight on the Sensex and Nifty is likely to rise from December 29 and December 30, respectively, after a rebalancing of weighting. The total cumulative inflows for RIL are expected to be $245 million.   Bharti Airtel, Larsen & Toubro and Tata Steel were the other major gainers. They closed between 2 and 2.7 per cent higher. Gains in the financial shares were led by Bajaj Finance, IndusInd Bank and ICICI Bank.   The stock of the day was Zee Entertainment, which ended almost flat after recouping losses made earlier in the day. The stock fell up to 5% on the back of profit booking after the company said it had entered into a definitive agreement with Sony Pictures to complete its proposed merger. Technical charts suggest the stock has the potential to surge as much as 35%.   ITC, Nestle, and Wipro were among the few Sensex losers.   The broader markets, on the other hand, ended with significant gains. The BSE Midcap and Smallcap indices were up around 1.5 per cent each. The overall market breadth was extremely positive, with over 2,400 advancing shares against 907 declining stocks on the BSE.   Among individual stocks, the shares of India Cements surged 9% on the BSE after billionaire investor Radhakishan S Damani, Gopikishan Shivkishan Damani & family increased their stake in the company to 22.76 per cent. Since March 30, 2020, they have acquired an additional 2.03 per cent stake in the company through open-market purchases.   That apart, shares of recently listed RateGain Travel Technologies rallied 10 per cent in intra-day trade to hit a new high at Rs 402, extending its previous day's 9 per cent surge on the National Stock Exchange. The stock today bounced back 28 per cent from its Monday's low. On December 17, Goldman Sachs Funds had bought 0.7 million equity shares of the company through bulk deal on the NSE.   Electronic components maker Hind Rectifiers also hit a 52-week high of Rs 244.35, surging 13 per cent on the BSE. The stock has zoomed 35 per cent in the past three trading days, and 47 per cent in the past month.   Further, Rakesh Jhunjhunwala-backed Metro Brands had a muted debut on the bourses. It was listed with a 13 per cent discount on the BSE at Rs 436, against its issue price of Rs 500 per share. The stock, however, ended at Rs 493, down 1 per cent against the issue price.   Lastly, in the primary market, the initial public offering of CMS Info Systems remained sluggish on the second day of bidding. It was subscribed only 65% as at 4:30 pm. The retail portion, however, was fully subscribed.

Understanding Kindness
E42 An Ode to Water.

Understanding Kindness

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 23:23


In this episode, Dani talks about our Water, how she's being used and abused, and what we can do about it.They recommend appreciating and being grateful for the fresh, clean Water you do have. Also, following @mmiwhoismissing on instagram and listening to Total Liberation's episode 77 called, "Water is Life: The US War Machine Poisons Hawaii" for more information on the current Water crisis on O'ahu. They recommend watching and sharing The Story of Stuff's videos titled, "The Story of Water" and "5 Things Nestle Doesn't Want You To Know" to learn more about Water privatization. And to learn more about your most-local pipeline resistance, try visiting StopLine3.org, TinyHouseWarriors.com and Secwepemculecw.org, and listening to It's Going Down's podcast episode "This is America #151". To learn about divesting yourself and your Community from supporting these projects, visit MazaskaTalks.org.You can also listen to the Warrior Life podcast, specifically episode 2 titled "Water is Life" if you'd like to hear where Dani got their inspiration to create this episode.  Lastly, Dani recommends It's Going Down, a resource for anarchist, anti-fascist, and autonomous anti-capitalist and anti-colonial analysis and news.For a glimpse into Dani's friendships, check out her other podcast, Better When Awkward, co-hosted by her childhood best friend, Jasmine!Go to UnderstandingKindness.com for transcripts, blog entries, and links to the social media accounts!Follow the podcast on instagram, facebook, or twitter for more recommendations & posts when a new episode comes out!To contact Dani, please email UnderstandingKindness@protonmail.com or send Dani a DM on social media!To financially support Dani & the show, visit the podcast's patreon or give a one-time or recurring donation on paypal!      ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

Explore the Circular Economy
How are key actors making nature-positive food the norm?

Explore the Circular Economy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 40:38


In this episode, we discuss the role of nature-positive food in providing a solution to global challenges such as biodiversity loss and climate change. The Ellen MacArthur Foundation recently published The Big Food Redesign, highlighting the critical role that food manufacturers and retailers can play in catalysing the shift to a regenerative food production system. We will be joined by Garbriela Hernandez-Galindo, Global Sustainability Director for Essential Dairy & Plant Based at Danone and Karen Cooper, R&D Program Manager for Climate Change at Nestle. They both share how their work is catalysing this shift to regenerative food production through redesigning product portfolios, developing iconic products and creating a new dynamic with farmers.-- Explore more circular economy examples and case studiesFind out more about the Ellen MacArthur FoundationDiscover more about the companies featured in this episode:NestleDanone

Snakebird Podcast
Episode 106: Profiles | Anna, Simeon, Zechariah, Pt.1

Snakebird Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 43:12


Hey Snakebirds, it's that time again where we focus in on the reason for the season! Except this time, we are going to look at the birth of our Savior from a little different angle than usual. In this three-person profile we will be looking at the time period of Jesus' birth through the eyes of three specific individuals that the Gospel of Luke zeros in on. Nestle in as we meet Zachariah, Simeon, and Anna during this Christmasy profile episode.Part 1 of 2

Cross Street Coaching
Leadership: Dialogue w/ Maddie Gupta

Cross Street Coaching

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 33:18


What does using education and experience to lead by example look like? My guest today is Maddie Gupta, VP of Strategy at VaynerMedia, who comes on the show to talk about her journey as a double major in her industry, and a dual role as a Market Strategist and a leader. Maddie discusses the challenge of leadership in a young industry and how it is a little different than traditional corporate hierarchies. Sometimes, this is a balance between forging new territory and solid leadership values, when the previous industry leadership models don't directly map on to the new way. She also shares some of her application of soft skills to move her team of creatives forward, and practical experience of the book, Radical Candor by Kim Scott, when she develops others to challenge ideas, even her own! Maddie Gupta (or Madhurim) is a story-seeker and a storyteller - always on the lookout for ideas, insights, and inspiration. She has over 13 years of experience in the field of marketing and advertising strategy and has had the good fortune of working on iconic brands like P&G, J&J, L'Oreal, Pepsi, Cheetos, McDonald's, Nestle, Coca-Cola, Chase among others. She holds an M.A. in Media, Culture, and Communications ('15) from New York University where she also studied Human Rights, Transnational Feminism, and Marxist theories of Walter Benjamin just to round out the jagged edges of the corporate world. She has an MBA ('05) from MICA - Mudra Institute in Ahmedabad, India with a specialization in Brand Communications and BA with honors in English Literature ('03) from Lady Shri Ram College in Delhi, India You can connect with Maddie on LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/madhurim-gupta/) and Twitter (https://twitter.com/_madhurim).

Real Estate Breakthrough
#128: Jen Maldonado- Don't Focus on the Process, Focus on the End Goal

Real Estate Breakthrough

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 36:46


"One of the things I did good was build relationships and a relationship that was adding value. It was never about what I can get, it was always about how can I help?" -Jen Maldonado Today I am interviewing Jen Maldonado who I have known since 2012. She is a professional Capital Raiser, Investor, Entrepreneur, High Performance Coach and is one of the Executive Leaders and Speakers for WREN Inspires. As a mentor and coach, Jen has inspired and helped jumpstart womens investing careers all over the country. She was interviewed by the Huffington Post in 2015 for her inspiration, consulting practice and how she has helped people strive and create wealth using real estate. In 2019 she co authored the book "You Got This!," in collaboration with other women investors taking charge in the real estate field. She is a speaker and can be found on many podcasts and interviews as well as hosting events at real estate clubs and teaching workshops.  Jen Maldonado: Was an engineer at Nestle before she made the decision to become an entrepreneur. She wanted to decide who and what she spent her time on and went into real estate dabbling at the many options it had to offer. After a deal gone wrong, Jen found herself in a position where she thought she would need to return to work. At a meeting the day before an interview, she met someone that told her about capital raising. The next day she made a few phone calls and had closed on a deal, granting her the strength to turn down a job and continue her journey in real estate.    TOPICS COVERED IN THE EPISODE: What was Jens reasoning for wanting to get into real estate  What is WREN Inspires  How was it transitioning from corporate to entrepreneur  Rich Dad Poor Dad, the purple bible  The importance of freedom of time  Ways to find a different path  When and how was Jen introduced to capital raising  What does a Capital Raiser do How to avoid the shiny objects in real estate and focus on one thing  How losing a deal propelled Jen onto her own path  What happens when you dont structure a deal properly  Using other people's money  How quickly do you learn what not to do  The development of strong relationships  Using risk assessment  Why Jen only does deals that create impact How to avoid putting people in the wrong investments    Listen now on Spotify or Apple iTunes or watch on Youtube to find out how Jen found her Real Estate Breakthrough! The Real Estate Breakthrough Show with Christina Suter is where we talk about the reality of real estate, the mindset you need and the tips and tricks to get you moving forward in investing. Join us every week and learn everything you need to know to invest in real estate education and create real wealth for a lifetime.   Find out more about Jen here:  Website JenMaldonado.com Instagram @investwithJenMaldonado 

Movie Retakes
Movie Retakes - Christmas Special 2021

Movie Retakes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 36:41


Nestle in and don't mind that clatter. It's Movie Retakes on your roof!With special guest Vanessa Sully, the Sully Brothers go head to head on Christmas movie quote trivia and share their favorite moments from Christmas films of past and present. Happy Christmas to all and may all nerds unite!

Kassenzone Podcast | Interviews zu den Themen E-Commerce, Handel, Plattformökonomie & Digitalisierung
K#370 Nestle, Project A 2021, Podcastwerbung und Aktienrückblick

Kassenzone Podcast | Interviews zu den Themen E-Commerce, Handel, Plattformökonomie & Digitalisierung

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 73:23


Ich schaue mit Florian Heinemann zurück aufs Jahr und bewerte wie sich unsere Aktienprognosen entwickelt haben. Wir bewerten außerdem im Detail die neue Nestle Digitalsierungsstrategie und fragen uns, ob diese wirklich ambitioniert genug ist. Nicht zuletzt feiern wir die Entwicklung von Project A in 2021 mit vielen neuen Finanzierungsrunden, Exits und Unicorns und Florian erzählt wie leicht/schwer das Fundraising mittlerweile ist. Jetzt bewerben: https://spryker.com/en/career/ Feedback zum Podcast? Mail an alex@kassenzone.de Disclaimer: https://www.kassenzone.de/disclaimer/ Alexander Graf: https://www.linkedin.com/in/alexandergraf/ https://twitter.com/supergraf Feedback zum Podcast? alex@kassenzone.de Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/KassenzoneDe/ Blog: https://www.kassenzone.de/ E-Commerce Buch: https://www.amazon.de/gp/product/3866413076/ Tassen kaufen: http://www.tassenzone.com

Theories of the Third Kind

Nestle is one of the most hated companies in the World. They are involved in Human Trafficking, Child Labor, Exploitation of Poverty stricken Mothers, Unethical Business Practices, and is one of the Biggest Polluters to the Environment.

Business for Good Podcast
Ep. 79 | From Sophomore to CEO: Jessica Schwabach of Sundial Foods is Flying on Plant-Based Wings

Business for Good Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 30:58


For real: What were you doing during your sophomore year of college? Probably not what Jessica Schwabach was doing, which was starting her own plant-based meat company. Two years later, Jessica has gone through two prestigious accelerator programs, created products that have been sold in dozens of stores, and just raised a $4 million seed round, including investment from food giant Nestle. Just what is this new founder CEO doing that has so many people so interested? Well, she and her team at Sundial Foods have created some alt-chicken wings, with skin and all, that are apparently knocking people's socks off.

Aim to Win Podcast
Managing Brilliant Jerks with Dr. Katrina Burrus

Aim to Win Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 29:11


Dr. Katrina Burrus, CEO/founder of Excellent Executive Coaching LLC , is known for "Fast-tracking leaders to the C-Suite and Beyond "and for "Transforming Brilliant Jerks Into Inspiring Leaders. "Clients often comment that working With Katrina enlightens leaders to empower co-workers to walk the extra mile. She is a keynote speaker and published, "Managing Brilliant Jerks" and, "Global Leadership" a body of work used by Nestle, Novartis, the World Health Organization, the International Labor Organization, the United Nations, and Many more. She was most recently featured in Mexico, India, The U.S., Kazakhstan, and Russia. Dr. Burrus has 18 years of experience as the first Master Certified Coach and Founding Board Member from the (ICF) International Coaching Federation Switzerland.

Truck N' Hustle
#121 - Make 70K In One Month With Heavy Haul Trucking Business - Wadley St Pierre

Truck N' Hustle

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 62:33


Wadley St. Pierre, a driver who worked for Nestle, decided to embark on a journey in the trucking industry and earned 380k as a profit within 2 by delivering heavy loads. In this podcast, we have Mr. Pierre himself, who shares his view on how he started the business and got his first set of truck-trailer, from here he found the heavy loads, where did he find new opportunities, and how he earned 380k. What is heavy haul trucking? Heavy haul trucking includes anything beyond conventional dimensions, including oversized freight, wide loads, and heavy equipment such as excavators & army tanks to airplane parts. Generally, these loads can exceed 53ft in length and 80,000 lbs. in gross weight. Heavy Haul trucking operators require specialized trailers, loading and offloading skill, and a knowledge base. As a result, you can expect to be paid in proportion seeing anywhere from 10k to 50k paying loads https://truckingblueprint.thinkific.com/courses/trucking-blueprint Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

TrueLife
The Opportunity of Despair

TrueLife

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 44:03


Speaker 1 (0s): Welcome back to the TrueLife podcast. It is December. I haven't spoken to everybody for a while, but I've been thinking about you. I hope you're all doing well. I hope your kids are out of school. I hope they're learning. I hope your parents are healthy and all your loved ones, or are still talking to you. I have been fascinated by the world that we live in. As of recently, in some ways it's incredibly depressing and I'll go into that in a minute. However, I think it was Rami manual who said never let a good crisis go to waste. And it's so true that the opportunities that surround us right now are equally as overwhelming as the feeling of despair. Let me try to flesh that out a little bit, you know, right now is as much as people are being locked down. I think there's a whole lot of freedom. I think right now, people in positions of authority are desperately trying to reorganize society in a way that they seem to see fit. They want to change what we're thinking about. They want to change the world we live in and they want to change the environment around us, fundamentally changing small businesses for large corporations, changing the tax structure, changing society. It's the great reset. And it's the build back better. If you want to look into more detail on that, like there's certain think tanks that you could subscribe to, like the McKinsey Institute, you know, you can look at the bill and Melinda gates foundation website, and you can kind of see the direction in which people want to go, but just because people want to go in a direction, doesn't mean that's the direction we're going to go into. And that is where the freedom and the opportunity, I believe lie for everyday working people now more than ever. I think that we, and by we, I mean, obviously anybody who's listening to this has the opportunity to make big changes. Let me give an example of education as an, as just a quick example. So think for a moment about this great experiment that COVID-19 has thrust upon the world of education. There's a fantastic study at a, I think it's education.gov or in ces.gov. And it talks about the educational aspects of what happened in 2021. And it's, it's, it's really fascinating it's it goes into different ethnic groups. It goes into a single parents and then it classifies how all the kids are performing. It says, I think there's all these different charts and it's pretty much a child's education performance. And then it breaks down into other charts about it goes into different races. And it says like, you know, white parents who are married are about 70% and 20% of white children live with their mom and 10% live with their dad. And then it goes into like Asian parents, Asian parents. This is probably no surprise to anybody who, who can, who sees Asian, Asian children excelling at school, Asian children have their parents married at about 84%. And you know, it's like 6% live with their mom. And then the remainder of what their dad, it's sad to see that in the black community, there is something like 50% of black children come from a home with married parents and then like, you know, 40% or 45% live with their mom and a single mother household. And then like a small percentage of what their dad. And then it goes into Pacific Islander, which is a rather high percent. I think it's 60% and it really breaks down stuff. Not, I don't, I don't say to, to, to make it like a race thing, but more like a, a cultural thing kind of, you know, it's and then if it continues to go on and talks about schools that don't have a lot of money and how they perform during the pandemic. And obviously the poorer schools performed worse. The children that only had one parent performed considerably worse. And you can understand why. I mean, if your kid's on has to learn on zoom and they're five or six years old, and then you as a parent have to be there to help them be on zoom, you know, and you're a single person you're probably working. You might not be able to be there. You know, the reason I bring all this up is we were talking about education and COVID-19 and, and opportunities will this process of education. This process of COVID-19 is a transition. You see, I don't know. Let me try to put it in pop culture a little bit. Has anybody seen that movie ready player one, or hopefully you read the book because the book is a million times better than the way they actually wrote the movie, the movies, it looks kind of lame. However, it doesn't change the fact that people put on a headset and they go to school, right? They put on a headset and they, they learn from people from God knows where. And you think about that. Like, if you think about it in an imaginative creative way, it sounds kind of awesome. Imagine being in a digital school where you could have the best teachers from the world, giving you a virtual tour of the Colosseum and you could, you know, you could probably be like a, a Roman warrior and you could be in the Coliseum fighting and you could learn so much about it. And that ideal sounds awesome. The problem is that's not what's happening and it's not, what's going to happen. It's, that's more of a, that's a headset with rose colored glasses. What we see is that without discipline, without structure, children are not going to learn. You know, and it's this, I deal, listic utopian vision of saving every child. But in reality, it's just a way for corporations to, you know, force people into a virtual world because the real world around them is crumbling and dying. Not to mention, if you think about a lot of education in public school, you know, you have to ask yourself, is it education or is it indoctrination? It's more indoctrination, I think. And so the opportunity comes in where you as an individual right now, like you, you could start a YouTube channel, you could start your own method of teaching kids things. And if it could catch on, like, there's no reason why it can't catch on my daughter watches this show called Ryan's world. And it's just about this family that like plays games and they do experiments and they're like a really good family. And they do these things together. And a lot of kids watch it. And it's a, it's a beautiful understanding of what a loving family could contribute to the world, I think. And so that's where the opportunity is, especially if you know, everybody, you know, is probably unique in some way and has different ways of expressing themselves or communicating ways. Or everybody knows that person who is like really good with kids, or it's just interesting or has fun things to say there's always positive. And the chances are you listening to this, probably have some of those qualities. And if you have those qualities that are beneficial to society, I think you're almost obligated to share them. I know what can be scary to start a channel or start a podcast. However, think about what you're doing now. Like, what are you doing right now? Are you I'm working on a Saturday? Like I had to get up, leave my house, leave my family. So I could work six days a week, you know, like 60 plus hours a week. And I would much rather take some time to provide awesome ideas and content to try and make the world a little bit better than get up and leave my family and everything I love and help a large corporation make tons of money. So it's just an idea that there is opportunity out there for everybody. And I want to try to shine a light in some of these darker times on the topic of education. You know, I've recently got to meet with some of my child's teachers and I got to ask them some questions about, you know, we had some great conversations and here's a few questions I asked and I'll speak a little bit upon how I felt about it and how our discussion went. Some of the questions I asked were, how do you feel that children wearing masks today is going to influence the world in 20 years? And I'm happy to tell you that the majority that every teacher I spoke to was doing everything they can to be the best teacher, they can, but also understood the damage that was being done. And it was sad in a way because while the teachers are the teachers at my kid's school are amazing and they're doing everything they can to be part of the children's future. And they really work hard. But I could see the sadness in their eyes when they spoke about other children from different schools who were unable to have the privileges that maybe some of their children have. And the truth is COVID-19, as far as an educational experiment is going to widen the gap in education to a point where the children that didn't go to school for a year that were on the border of falling behind are now so far behind that they'll never catch up and that's going to lead to the fact that they were gone for a year. The fact that they have to wear masks when they go to school. Now, you know, it's important to understand that a large part of communication comes from facial cues. You know, the rise, smile on the girl with dry humor or the small smile that kind of pulls to the side. When someone is joking or the stern look of a teacher to tell you to shut up, you know, all these nonverbal cues that you learn when you're a kid or, you know, all these communication cues we use with our face are being denied to the children of the future. And just the fact that a kid wears a mask is a way to shut them up, right? Like it's a way of symbolizing compliance. It's a way of symbolizing. Your opinion. Doesn't matter. It's a way of symbolizing that you're not worthy of speaking. And while these things are not being said, they, the mask alone being a medical looking mask and hospitals being, you know, places where people go to die, the mask is a symbol of fear and think about how sinister it is to subject a child to fear all day long. You don't have to think too hard because you as an American or you as a citizen of a country are under the same totalitarian propaganda instrument, a fear all day long. Like that's what COVID is. It's an, it's a, it's an instrument of fear. Oh no, you're all going to die. You're not going to die. COVID is the flu albeit maybe a, maybe a heightened strain of flu. Maybe it leaks from a lab. Maybe it is a new variant of some kind. I don't thoroughly understand exactly what it is, but I know it's not what they're telling me. And the way you know, that is to look at the propaganda that's coming out of the television, look at the propaganda that's coming out of the actual government right now, you know, think about, Think, think about the laws being passed in the name of COVID think about the slogan, build back better. How can you build anything back until you've broken everything down? I think In my opinion, what COVID is, is the beginning of a decade long plan to re-engineer humanity. And let me be clear on what I mean by that. I think it's important to note the strategies of tech companies and their slogans move fast and break stuff, you know, think about that slogan. Like that is, that is the driving force behind the majority of tech companies. And I'll give you an example. Look at Uber, Uber came out of nowhere and they completely disrupted the ride sharing economy. They invented a ride sharing economy and they got so big, so fast. They became too big to fail, you know, similar with Amazon, Amazon got government contracts and next thing you know, they're the biggest baddest out there and now they're too big to fail. Well, what's been happening over the last probably 20 years is that we have seen the corporate takeover of governments. And you're hearing a lot of rhetoric right now about how governments are horrible and they're dumb and they're stupid and they're corrupt and that's all true. However, it's important to note what, one of the greatest philosophers John Dewey said, and what he said is that governments are the shadows cast upon people by business. And I think that puts things in perspective. Our government has been bought and paid for for a long time. And what's happening now is that they're just taking the mask off. You know, they are sick and tired of having to play the game of, okay, we're going to write the bills and we're gonna give them to a Congressman. And then the Congressman is going to pretend to go up there and read it. They're sick of paying the bribes. They're sick of all the red tape, you know, and they're just taking the mask off and saying, look, we fucking have been running this show for the last 20 years. We're done playing games. It's just better that everybody knows. And that's difficult for a lot of people to understand. You know, I heard a quote one time that said, if you were born before 1970, you live in 1950. If you're born after 1970, you live in 2010. You know, a lot of people today, if you think about the older generation, like they believe the United States is 50 states that are run by, that are stayed true to a constitutional document. And they have these rights and you know, nothing is further from the truth. If the United States is not the United States that you were told, when you went and learned civics in high school, that's not what we live in anymore. The constitution unfortunately is not the law of the land. It is not something that people stand by or behind. It is something that is used when it's purposeful. Let me give you another example of, of this idea, this antiquated idea of nation states that we all hold dear to us. Like we, we believe we live in nation states, but let me tell you, at least in my opinion of some things that will help you at least maybe try to see my, you may not agree with me, but let me try to illuminate to you why I think what I think, do you guys remember the Bundy ranch for those of you that don't know there was a guy and his family that lived on this ranch and it had been in his family for generations and he raised all his cattle on there. And one day the ATF and the parks and forest came in and they said, oh yeah, sorry, Mr. Bundy, this ranch is ours. And they wanted to take something, you know, maybe 150 acres. I don't know. I forgot the exact amount, but they just came in and they said, this is ours. And he said, no, fuck you. It's not yours. Get off my property or I'll shoot you. And so he ran him off his property and he went and told his local, all his neighbors and everybody, and, and the CA you know, the, the, they had a big meetings about it. And then the, the government said, listen, we're going to come and take this property. It's no longer yours. It's a national park. And so about a month later, 150 troops came, you know, ATF, CIA guys, FBI guys, you know, they brought in like a, a, a militant group of people to seize the land. And when they showed up, they were surprised to see that Bundy had recruited his own militia. And his guys were sitting up on the Hills and they had the government surrounded. And, you know, he walks out there and it was, it was almost like a, it would look like a couple captains getting ready for the coin, toss at a football game. So you have Bundy go out and you have some, some big wig government guys go out. And they're, you know, they are S both of them are escorted on each side by guys with like AR fifteens. And they're sitting there talking, and, you know, the government's like, it's our land and Bundy's lag well, come and take it. You know, when they like a, a good old fashioned Mexican standoff, but the government was outnumbered and they ultimately backed down because they realized it had national attention. And they realized what they were doing was wrong. The most important question about that particular scenario is why do they want to seize his land? Well, they wanted to seize his land because one Senator had sold that land to China. They had sold that land to be used as a solar farm. And so that's an example of what our government has been doing, not only in our country, but in all countries, then that's the process of globalization what's been happening is that, you know, government officials have been selling resources in our country to other countries, to other corporations. The same thing happened with uranium. One when Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton were in office, they were selling uranium from the United States, taking it to Canada, and then selling it to Russia, which the people, some people say it made its way over to Iran, which would be the ultimate irony. If we got hit with a nuclear weapon where the uranium came from our own country, you know, you can, you can begin to see the problems there. And this is a great segue into globalization being a form of resource allocation. Right. We hear a lot about climate change, and we hear a lot about saving the planet, but these are all just euphemisms for seizing resources. You know what I mean by that? Like, why is it that Nestle can suck all the water out of California? And like, no one even talks about it. Like it's, it's because the state of California has sold their water rights to a corporation that's what's happening. And it's happening all throughout the world. In fact, it's kind of the Chinese model, you know, when, when you hear Elon Musk or some of these big tech guys say that China's the model for the future. They're not saying that communism is the future. What they're saying is the merger of government power with corporate structure is the future. Right? And that's why you hear, when you hear people talk about, build back better. You hear a lot of rhetoric about public, private partnerships, public, private partnerships, what's a public private partnership. Well, it has a nice flow to it. Doesn't like, oh yeah, the public, I was just going to be working with this private company and it's going to be great. But is it, you know, when I think of public private partnerships, I think of, of privatizing profits and socializing losses, and that's exactly what they're going to do. You're going to see large infrastructure projects begin to happen. However, it doesn't necessarily have, like if you're in California, you're going to see some Chinese companies coming in and building huge roads, huge rails. And that's going to be funded on your dime as a taxpayer. So you're the public, and you will pay this foreign corporation to build in your state. And this is the, this is what's going on in Congress. This is what's going on at the world economic forum. And this is what's going on throughout our world right here. It's also, what's going to continue to be going on and it's hitting some snags right now. And like that, that is why you're seeing the COVID crisis continue to be what it is in order for the large multinational corporations from all countries to seize control of the entire financial apparatus. It's imperative that small businesses be cast aside. They can't ha there's no room for you as a business owner to be competing with the likes of Walmart or Amazon, or, you know, whatever giant conglomerate the government has decided will take over that industry. In the name of efficiency and effectiveness, a small number of technocrats have decided that as the arbiters of the greater good, they know what's best for everybody. Let's think about healthcare for a minute. The healthcare system in the United States is, is a problem for a lot of reasons. You know, we tried to pass healthcare for everybody. It didn't work the amount of strings attached by insurance companies and big drug companies are so incredibly tied in this Gordian knot of corruption. That it's an it's, you're not able to untangle them. We're one of only two countries in the world where you're allowed, where, where drug companies are allowed to advertise on television. And you can see this happening. You can see the effect of this happening on your own family. At least I can, like, I remember when I talked to my dad a while back and he was telling me about, oh man, you gotta go get your shingles shot, George. And I said, what are you talking about? He's like, oh yeah, man. There's a lot of shingles going around right now. And I thought to myself, like, I don't know, I've never, I don't know anybody that has shingles. I haven't even heard of that term in like 20 years. And I started thinking to myself like, oh, well, you know, he came from Oregon. Maybe there's was an outbreak there or something. And maybe it's just not where I am. And then, because he came to stay in, in Hawaii where I am, I went to go hang out with them for the day. And he was at his place and he had the TV on and he goes, Hey, I'm going to get ready. And then I'll be ready to go in a little bit. So I sat there and I was kind of reading. And I had had the TV on, in the background. My dad was watching like Fox news or something like that. And on the TV, I hear ask your doctor about getting the new shingles shot. Most people who are over the age of 50 are in danger of getting shingles. If they've had chicken pox and it just kinda hit me like a ton of bricks, like, oh my God, my dad has this goddamn TV on five hours a day. And like, he clearly leaves it on when he's walking around the house. And it's just, you know, this propaganda is just seeping into his head. He went out and got a shingle shot because the TV told him to, you know what I th I think it's the, the most vulnerable people are being targeted. And by most vulnerable, I mean like the kids who are home alone, whose parents let them watch TV. And you know, our parents like the boomer generation who are retired and maybe their kids are out of the house. So they just sit home and watch TV all day. You know, TV is a drug, TV is something you take into your, into your body. And it changes your perception about how you see the world. Imagine, imagine doing a drug for like five or seven hours a day, man. Like you see the world differently. Like imagine some crack just doing a bunch of blow for seven hours a day. They're a fucking wreck, you know, or if you just, you know, it it's, it's probably worse than Coke or meth, man. Like it just gets in your head and it makes you do shit that is wrong. And that's a big part of you. Don't look at it this way. If, if you look out your window right now, it probably looks pretty peaceful. Like you probably look out there and you can see some, like right now I can see some Palm trees swinging some cars passing. It's, it's pretty quiet. But if you look through your TV as a lens, it's chaos, there's people in the streets where people shooting everybody, everyone's dying to COVID and you got to get all these shots. Like it's, it's a different lens in which you're being shown reality. But in reality, it's not reality. It's the reality that people in positions of authority want you to see it's behavior modification and it's fundamentally changing the way we work as a society. And so in some ways I think it's, it's, it's so silly. It's so dumb. Then it's causing those who have eyes to see. And those who have ears to hear are beginning to see the cracks in the foundation. In some ways I believe the internet is the great equalizer. Even with the censorship, you know, I think it was Julian Assange's who said that censorship is a something to celebrate. I know it sounds crazy, but he says, censorship is something that should be celebrated because that means that the power structure is so fragile that they must stop people from hearing certain words like that's how fragile it is. And there's a lot of truth to that right now. Like our entire economy is built on a lie. Our entire system of healthcare is built on lies. And Ms. COVID 19 is a distraction to stop you from thinking critically it's to stop you from going, Hey, how much money are the, are the drug companies making? No, let's think about the rhetoric sometimes you'll hear, oh, this is a, this is a pandemic of the unvaccinated. Think about that really. It's a, it's a crisis of the  the problem with that is that, you know, I think like 8% or 9% of Africa is unvaccinated. You know why they're unpacked? Because the pharmaceutical companies will not allow their patent product to be given to third world countries. They will only sell it to them at the highest price possible. So if this is a pandemic of the  are not the drug companies responsible for that. Instead, they want everybody in your country to get two shots, three shots, four shots, five shots, you know, it's, it doesn't take a whole lot of mental horsepower to understand the new model for health care is to there's a new variant. Okay. We're going to make a new vaccine. It's Medicare on demand. It's a subscription service, and it doesn't even really work. I don't think there are some echoes of doctors. I think Dr. Robert Malone, he invented the RNA technology. And what he says is that the are the variants. So you get a vaccine and it stops the one, the original variant. It may stop that. However, it causes the vaccine to mutate. And that's where these mutations are coming from. You know, Gibraltar, 100% vaccination rate. They have like the biggest outbreak of the army, Chrome Omni chrom, or whatever the hell it is. You know, something to think about. If you jumble the words around an Omnicom, it spells moronic. Just think about that for a minute. Same thing with Israel, they're like one of the highest vaccinated places they have the highest counts of COVID. You know, they want you to wear a mask and stay six feet apart. But the Omnicom virus came from South Africa. It jumped over the whole fricking Atlantic ocean. If it can jump the Atlantic ocean and only vaccinate people can travel on planes. How did they get here? What good is a mask or what good is six feet. If the virus can jump the ocean, you see it doesn't make logical sense. The only logical explanation is that it's a distraction. It's a lie. And you have to peel back that onion. And it's difficult because when you peel back the onions, you might want to start crying. Our country is being gutted. The financial infrastructure is being debated right now. When you hear about it, three and a half trillion dollar spending bill for infrastructure that is large corporations and corrupt government officials trying to decide who should get the pay off. That's what that is. You know, I, there's a great, there's a very interesting woman called Catherine Austin Fitts. And she used to be the secretary of housing under the George Bush administration. I recommend that you all take a look and, and, and look up some of her videos. I think she has a site called Solari report.com and she has just some fascinating information about what's happened over the last 20 years. She talks a lot about how the tangible dollar bills, the actual money of the United States was taken out of our economy. And now all we have left are like these digital representations of ones and zeros. And she talks a lot about how during nine 11, what nine 11 was according to Catherine Austin Fitts was the destroying of the evidence of the looting of our country. And she says that in tower seven, you had all the records of like Enron. You had all these records of these black budget operations, where they just stole all the money. The wing of the Pentagon that blew up was actually a part of the Pentagon. It was investigating the loss of like $21 trillion. And she says, effectively today, what you have running the government is a conglomerate of defense contractors, pharmaceutical companies, and insurance companies. And it kind of makes sense. I mean, who do you think makes the rules, the like AOC and Chuck Schumer, and you think those guys make the rules, or do you think insurance companies make the rules like, think about how powerful insurance companies are they just say to you? Well, if you don't do what I say, then you can't go to the doctor. If you don't do what I say, then I'm going to raise your premium to point where you can't even afford it. You know, the insurance companies have the ability to legislate behavior and that's what they do. I think that's a big reason why I read an article that talked a lot about how much money that insurance companies are paying out right now because of COVID. And that's a big part of why they want everyone to get a vaccine. If you get a vaccine, it takes away the liability of the corporation. It takes away the liability from the insurance companies, because you can't Sue. You cannot have any sort of real recourse against the drug agencies because you sign that away. When you go to get your shot, you sign a waiver that says, I will not Sue people. I don't know what's in this thing, but I promise that I won't Sue anybody. And as soon as you do that, you no longer have any recourse. And that's what, that's what a lot of insurance companies need you to do, because they don't have the money to pay everybody out for this. Not only do they have not have money to pay out people for COVID, but they don't have enough money to pay out the annuities, the social security benefits like that. They don't have the money to pay people. So they find themselves in a crisis where like, holy shit, what are we going to do? That's why you see the fed printing money. There's, you know, there's still, the federal reserve is still in a point of quantitative easing where they're buying $36 billion a month. Think about that $36 billion a month. Think about how much money that is. That's just to fill the hole. Imagine having like a big bucket and you're pouring water in there. And 36 billion gallons are just falling out of the bottom. And as that, as they're pumping in 36 billion society is still crumbling. Like it can't continue that way. And that's why we have COVID. That's why we have camps being built in Australia. That's why you're seeing people in the streets all over Europe. The shit is about to hit the fan. And I think it's amazing that we've held it together this long. I think another point is the supply chain issue. Like if there's clearly a supply chain issue, and if everybody's seen what they call shrink inflation, if you go to Costco, the 40 ounce bottle is now a 20 ounce bottle, but it's the same price. You know, if you get a bag of chips, it's half the size. It used to be. It might have some cool new colors and a new design, but it's half the size, you know, less is more, only at cost. More. I think about your house. Do you own a house? You own a condo. Is your house and property going up in value or is the dollar going down in value? Which one you think it is? What do you think happens to middle managers? When the CEO's just pull the plug on them? You know, what happens to the guy who gets up and goes to work everyday and has like six kids living paycheck to paycheck and having a tough time at work. And all of a sudden, you know, his 20 bucks an hour is now worth five bucks an hour. You know, it's the same 20, but now he can only buy five. It's only $5 worth of purchasing power, but he's still making 20, but food is going up. Housing is going up, electricity is going up like that guy is going to fucking going to start having some ideas of workplace violence, right? And he's not going to take out. The CEO is not going to get the board of directors. He's going to take out the middle manager who thinks that they're somehow doing good. And in a weird way, like if you're conspiracy minded, look at all the people that we've put in positions of authority lately, they're not the best. And the brightest they're like mascots. We have put a bunch of people in positions of authority that are fucking dummies, man. Like they, they at, at a lot of places, the people in charge, the people with the most authority would be the people who were picked last for kickball in fifth grade. You know what I mean by that? Like, they're there because they'll do exactly what they're fucking told to do. They're there because they got a chip on their shoulder because they've never made it in life and are going to be the people that get that face. The brunt of the manifestation of anger, of the working people. They're going to catch the pitchforks, not the guys up top, not the guys in the boardroom. Those guys are going to walk away with everything, but the middle managers, the ones that finally feel as if they've accomplished something in life, because they're, they've begun climbing the corporate ladder. The only problem is they've been climbing the corporate ladder their whole life. And when they get to the top, they find out that the ladder was against the wrong wall. And now they're fucked, but that's what I got for now, guys. I, I, I love all of you and I hope you're preparing, I hope I'm wrong about most of this stuff I do. And maybe I'm just a lunatic. That's that parts for sure. I'm definitely a lunatic, but you know, I, I think a lot of what I'm telling you is at least half true. And if you just think about some of these things, I'm saying, I think it'll start making sense. Like, if you just, it's hard because you don't want to think about this stuff, but you have to, if you choose not to think about what I'm telling you, then you, if you think about it, you can write it off. Know, Hey, George's crazy. But I, I honestly think if you just take time to research some of this stuff I'm telling you you'll find that it's true, or it's at least true enough, the policies people are putting out don't make any sense unless the whole thing's coming down, the lies are being put out for everybody to see. And I, I, I do. I think there's opportunity. I think that if people wake up and see what's happening, we as a group can make conscious decision to do what's best for our future. So that's what I got for right now. I love you guys. I hope everything's going great. I hope you spend time with your family and you tell him, you love him and you do your own research and you know, you fight for what you believe in. I'm a big believer in people should have the freedom to choose. And I want my kid and your kid and you and your family to be able to choose to do what you think is right, because that's what I think is right. A lot. 

Unknown Origins
Andrew Dobbie on Entrepreneurship

Unknown Origins

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 58:30


Andrew Dobbie founded the global strategic brand agency, MadeBrave, with £1,000 of personal cash in the bank and a two-week-old baby at home – very brave, and as everyone knows, bravery always pays off. A Photographer and Graphic Designer by trade, he has 20 years of experience in the creative industry. With a turnover of circa £5.5m, MadeBrave helps large global giants like VELUX, Diageo, Medtronic, Edrington, First Group plc, KPMG, and Nestle to grow and strengthen their brands.Creativity Without Frontiers available at all relevant book retailersStay in touch with Unknown OriginsMusic by Iain Mutch Support the show (https://www.paypal.com/unknownorigins)

FactSet U.S. Daily Market Preview
Financial Market Preview - Wednesday 8-Dec

FactSet U.S. Daily Market Preview

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 4:34


Service Alert: The Market Preview Podcast will be on hiatus from 17-Dec through 2-Jan. The comment will resume publication on 3-Jan-2022 US futures are indicating a higher open as of 05:00 ET. European equities mixed on Wednesday, Asia tracked US and European gains overnight. The bounce in risk appetite continues, largely supported by early data that suggests the Omicron variant symptoms are milder, and that vaccines should still confer some protection. Companies mentioned: Nestle, L'Oreal, Stanley Black & Decker, Securitas, Dare Biosciences

Squawk Box Europe Express
SQUAWK BOX, WEDNESDAY 8TH DECEMBER, 2021

Squawk Box Europe Express

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 26:45


U.S. markets surge with the Nasdaq enjoying its best session since March, and Asian equities also climb on diminishing fears of the Omicron variant. U.S. President Joe Biden holds a two-hour video call with his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin, warning him of potential economic sanctions should he invade Ukraine. Evergrande's shares hit a record low as the developer reportedly misses an offshore debt payment deadline. And Nestlé announces plans to sell back $10bn worth of L'Oréal shares to the cosmetics company. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Good Morning Business
Le Journal de l'économie - 08/12

Good Morning Business

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 5:20


Ce mercredi 8 décembre, Hélène Cornet a présenté le Journal de l'économie dont voici les premiers sujets : la grande bataille des salaires, pénurie de main d'œuvre, Nestlé réduit sa participation dans L'Oréal. Retrouvez l'émission du lundi au vendredi et réécoutez la en podcast.

Aim to Win Podcast
Visionary Leaders Play Bigger with Nancy Giordano

Aim to Win Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 30:36


Nancy built a formidable career at several of the most influential ad agencies in NY, Chicago, and LA and for more than a decade has been the Founder/CEO of Play Big Inc., a strategic inspiration company. Her current work dives deeply into the emerging intersection of tech, business and society.Nancy has a rich history of advising and learning with some of the top companies in the world, including Nestle, Brinker International, The Coca Cola Company, Sprint and Acumen. More recently, she has helped build the team for an artificial intelligence start-up, produced a conference on the seven most disruptive technologies for enterprise, is board member for a non-profit trade organization focused on the future of retail, and is working with a leading fintech/martech provider to ensure the survival of community banks and credit unions nationwide. She is also helping usher in the world of distributed applications and computing by championing emergent cryptographic technologies Holochain + Holo.

Workplace Warrior®
Ep 54: Dr Katrina Burrus: Transforming Brilliant Jerks into Inspiring Leaders

Workplace Warrior®

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 41:36


About Dr Katrina Burrus: She is a master certified coach and is one of the world's leading experts on international leadership. She facilitates a mastermind for CEOs of international companies and she's also the author of three books: “Abrasive Leaders”, “Global Nomadic Leaders”, and “Managing Brilliant Jerks”. She's worked with Nestle, Navartis, and even the United Nations. She's especially good at helping executives succeed in a new assignment.    In this episode, Jordan and Dr Katrina Burrus discuss: Brilliant jerks vs. demanding leaders How culture impacts how a leader is perceived Understanding the motivation of brilliant jerks Transforming brilliant jerks to inspiring leaders Helping brilliant jerks understand the problem  Key Takeaways Brilliant jerks are highly competent. When things aren't done right, they react by attacking, dominating, or humiliating. Often they are unaware of their impact on others.  Polite in one culture can be seen as unassertive or unsure in another. Demanding leaders adapt their leadership style to the situation. The ego of brilliant jerks are attached to results, achievement, recognition and success. The only way they know that they're doing good is if things are getting done. This often originates from childhood experiences.  As a coach, give them control right off the bat. Ask them what they think about why they're being coached right now and walk them through questions that will make them curious about themselves and how they have treated others.  Bring data and research to the coaching to help them honestly recognize how they need to change to be more effective.   “A lot of these people are unaware of the consequences of their behavior. If they're made aware and can practice different behaviors for the situation, they can change and they can be more empathetic. It's a message of hope.” —  Dr Katrina Burrus   Get 3 complimentary bonuses at Dr. Burrus's website: www.ExcellentExecutiveCoaching.com   Leadership Quotes Exercise: How to develop your EQ to your IQ and prepare for a review with your employee 18 Tips to Stop Abrasive Behavior   Get the complimentary guide: How To Select An Executive Coach at www.selectcoach.workplacewarrior.com    Get the Am I Abrasive Self Test at abrasive.workplacewarrior.com    Connect with Dr Katrina Burrus:   Website: https://mkbconseil.ch/  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/katrinaburrus/ | https://Linkedin/in/ExcellentExecutiveCoaching  Twitter: https://twitter.com/KatrinaBurrus | https://twitter.com/intlcoaching  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/katrina.burrus/ | https://www.facebook.com/ExcellentExecutiveCoaching  Instagram: https://instagram.com/drKatrinaBurrus    Connect with Jordan:  Get the complimentary guide: How To Select An Executive Coach at www.selectcoach.workplacewarrior.com  Get the Am I Abrasive Self Test at abrasive.workplacewarrior.com  Website: www.workplacewarriorinc.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/jordangoldrich1 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jordan.goldrich Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jordangoldrich/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jgoldrich/  

Sarahs Country
No longer fairy land, the rubber of regen ag is hitting the road I Hamish Reid, Synlait

Sarahs Country

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 18:06


When the directive from global food giants, such as Danone and Nestle pledges to source nearly a quarter of their milk globally from regenerative dairy farms by 2025, you pay attention. Announced this week was a unique partnership between Synlait Milk and Danone, AgResearch and the Ministry for Primary Industries' (MPI) Sustainable Food and Fibre Futures Fund to study soil health between conventional and regenerative practices on 10 farms in Waikato, Canterbury & Otago over five years. This week's Change Maker, Hamish Reid, Head of Sustainability & Brand at Synlait says we will achieve added value by profiting from purpose and regenerative meet our consumer's demands. Thanks to our partners at Farmlands for supporting Sarah's Country this season.

Scene Invaders
Dan Returns | Movies/ TV Shows Coming Out To End 2021 | Hawkeye Talk | Spider-Man : No Way Home Speculation

Scene Invaders

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 53:23


Dan makes his return after one month off. He is joined by Coach Dave Hendricks & Roland as we all talk about what Movies/ TV Shows we are excited for that is still yet to come out this year. Want to end this year with a bang / AKA having something to watch? Then this episode is perfect for you. We talk about what is coming out on Netflix, Apple TV +, Movie Theatre's, and much more. Why don't you take a seat, right over here. Nestle in. Subscribe to our Podcast wherever you listen to Podcasts! We are on all of them, but the most popular links are below. Scene Invaders Links: Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/2Uzl1JcV9WlncUufpvW4No iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/scene-invaders/id1289489168?uo=4 Google Play Music: https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy8xMDFkYTk4OC9wb2RjYXN0L3Jzcw== Stitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/scene-invaders-productions/scene-invaders Anchor: https://anchor.fm/scene-invaders . Social Media Pages: Twitter--> https://twitter.com/SceneInvaders Instagram--> https://www.instagram.com/sceneinvaders/ Facebook--> https://www.facebook.com/SceneInvadersPodcast . Email Us! We will cover anything you want us to --> SceneInvaders@gmail.com

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast
Understanding Uber Freight with Raj Subbiah

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 55:24


Understanding Uber Freight with Raj Subbiah Raj Subbiah and Joe Lynch discuss understanding Uber Freight. Raj is Head of Product for Uber Freight, a logistics platform built on the power of Uber with the goal to reshape global logistics and deliver reliability, flexibility and transparency for shippers and carriers. About Raj Subbiah Raj Subbiah is Head of Product for Uber Freight, Uber's logistics business that seamlessly connects shippers and carriers across the US, Canada, and Europe. Raj comes to Uber from Yelp, where he led a range of product teams for over five years, most recently as VP of Marketplaces for the global review platform. Prior to Yelp, Raj served for nearly five years at Microsoft, improving the relevance, recall and user experience of the Bing search product. Raj holds a Master's degree in computer science from Texas A&M University, an MBA from the University of California Berkeley, and a computational mathematics and statistics degree from the University of Washington. About Uber Freight Uber Freight is a logistics platform built on the power of Uber with the goal to reshape global logistics and deliver reliability, flexibility and transparency for shippers and carriers. Since launching in 2017, Uber Freight has built one of the world's largest digitally-enabled carrier networks and transformed entrenched practices around pricing and booking freight to reduce inefficiencies and increase opportunities for business growth and industry collaboration. Today, the business counts over 100,000 carriers in its network and thousands of shippers as customers, from small businesses to Fortune 500 companies, including AB Inbev, Nestle, LG, Land O'Lakes and many more. Key Takeaways: Understanding Uber Freight Raj Subbiah is Head of Product for Uber Freight, Uber's logistics business that seamlessly connects shippers and carriers across the US, Canada, and Europe. In the podcast interview, Raj Subbiah helps the audience gain a better understanding of Uber Freight. Problems in the transportation and logistics business: Logistics has traditionally been underserved by technology perhaps because of the decentralized nature of the industry – lots of different shippers, carriers, brokers, etc. Too many manual functions where decisions lead to “local optimum.” Local optimum is the best solution to a problem within a small neighborhood of possible solutions. This concept is in contrast to the global optimum, which is the optimal solution when every possible solution is considered. Lots of tribal knowledge, which by it's nature is not distributed throughout the organization. Ideally, tribal knowledge is captured, verified, and codified so it can be used by the whole organization. Shipper expectations are rising. Shippers informed by consumer technology expect a superior customer experience enabled by intuitive technology. Shippers are also increasingly interested in sustainability. Supply chains are responsible for 80% of greenhouse gas emissions – consumers and regulators want the freight industry to literally clean up their act. Freight's fundamental matching problem: Only 79% of miles are loaded. Empty miles are about 1.5% of US greenhouse gas emissions. Supply chains have been volatile since the beginning of the pandemic, with elevated rates and fragile capacity highlighting the need for innovative procurement solutions. Raj and the Uber Freight team believe they can address and solve many of the problems listed above. Uber Freight is a logistics platform built on the power of Uber with the goal to reshape global logistics and deliver reliability, flexibility and transparency for shippers and carriers. Since launching in 2017, Uber Freight has built one of the world's largest digitally enabled carrier networks and transformed entrenched practices around pricing and booking freight to reduce inefficiencies and increase opportunities for business growth and industry collaboration. Today, the business counts over 100,000 carriers in its network and thousands of shippers as customers, from small businesses to Fortune 500 companies, including AB InBev, Land O'Lakes, LG, Nestlé and many more. Learn More About Understanding Uber Freight Raj Subbiah LinkedIn Uber Freight Uber Freight's blog with latest news/developments Uber Freight Launches Market Access, a strategic procurement channel that enables shippers to meet evolving demands and reliably source capacity directly on the Uber Freight marketplace Uber Freight Expands into Less than Truckload (LTL) Uber Freight Launches Self-Service Shipper Platform in Canada Uber Freight Opens Chicago Office The Logistics of Logistics Podcast If you enjoy the podcast, please leave a positive review, subscribe, and share it with your friends and colleagues. The Logistics of Logistics Podcast: Google, Apple, Castbox, Spotify, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Tunein, Podbean, Owltail, Libsyn, Overcast Check out The Logistics of Logistics on Youtube

The Leading Voices in Food
What Food Policy Advocates Can Learn from Tobacco Industry Strategies

The Leading Voices in Food

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 41:43


This is "The Leading Voices in Food" podcast but today we're speaking with a leading voice in tobacco control. "How come," you might ask, "why?" So I believe for many years that the parallels between the tobacco industry and food industry practices are nothing short of stunning, and that our field would do very well to learn lessons learned from the pioneers in the tobacco wars. Our guest today is Dr. Kenneth Warner, Distinguished Emeritus Professor and former Dean of the School of Public Health at the University of Michigan. Ken's research focuses on the economic and policy aspects of tobacco and health. Interview Summary   So Ken, you and I have a long history, and I thought it might be instructive to mention just a little bit of it because you really helped shape some of the ways I think about addressing food policy. So I first became familiar with your work long before I met you in person, when I was teaching classes at Yale. I was assigning papers you wrote on tobacco control and I was especially interested in work that you'd done on tobacco taxes. It really gave me the idea of pushing ahead with food-related taxes. Then finally I got a chance to meet you in person at a meeting that was hosted by the first President George Bush in Kennebunkport, Maine, on cancer control. You and I got to talking about similarities between the tobacco industry behavior and the way the food industry was behaving. We were both struck by the similarities. That led us to write a paper together that was published in 2009 in "The Milbank Quarterly." And I have to say, of all the papers I've published over my career, this was one of my favorites because I really enjoyed working with you. I learned a ton from it, and it really, I thought, made some very important points. And I'd just like to mention the title of that paper because it pretty much summarizes what it found. So the title was, "The Perils of Ignoring History: Big Tobacco Played Dirty and Millions Died. How Similar Is Big Food?" In my mind, the playbooks are still very similar, and that's why it's really interesting to talk to you today, get a little sense of what's happening more recently, and importantly, think about what lessons are learned from tobacco control. I wanted to bring up one thing from that paper that I always found fascinating, which was the discussion about something called "The Frank Statement to Cigarette Smokers." Could you describe what that was and what role you think it played in history?   Sure. Just to give you some context for it, the first two major papers that implicated smoking in lung cancer were published in major medical journals in 1950. In December of 1952 there was an article in the "Reader's Digest," which incidentally was the only major magazine that did not accept cigarette advertising, that was entitled, "Cancer by the Carton." And this was the American public's first real exposure to the risks associated with smoking, and it led to a two-year decline in cigarette smoking, a very sharp decline, something that was unprecedented in the history of the cigarette. Following that there was some research published on mice and cancer. And needless to say, the tobacco industry was getting pretty nervous about this. So the executives of all the major tobacco firms met in New York City in December of 1953, and they collaborated on what became a public relations strategy, which drove their behavior for many years thereafter. The first thing they did was to publish "A Frank Statement to Cigarette Smokers" in January of 1954. This "Frank Statement" was published in over 400 magazines and newspapers, and it reached an estimated audience of some 80 million Americans, which would be a very good percentage of all Americans in those years. And they talked about the fact that there was this evidence out there, but they said, "We feel it is in the public interest," this is a quote, "to call attention to the fact that eminent doctors and research scientists have publicly questioned the claimed significance of this research." Then they went on to say, and I quote again, "We accept an interest in people's health as a basic responsibility, paramount to every other consideration in our business. We believe the products we make are not injurious to health and," and this is the kicker, "we always have and always will cooperate closely with those whose task it is to safeguard the public health," end quote. They went on to say that they would support research on smoking and health, and, of course, that they would always be the good guys in this story. This was designed as part of a strategy to obfuscate, to deceive the public, basically, to lie about what they already knew about the health hazards associated with smoking. And it was essentially a first very public step in a campaign that, one could argue, in many ways has persisted ever since, although, obviously, now the tobacco companies admit that they're killing their customers and they admit that smoking causes cancer and heart disease and lung disease and so on. But that was kind of the beginning of the strategy that drove their behavior for decades.   You know, that was one of the issues we raised in our paper. How similar were the big food companies in talking about concern for the health of their customers, planting doubt with the science, pledging to make changes that were in the interest of public health, agreeing to collaborate with public health officials? All those things played out in the food arena as well. And that's just one of many places where the food industry behave very, very similar to what the tobacco industry has done. But boy, is it interesting to hear that particular anecdote and to learn of the cynical behavior of the industry. So fast forward from there, and you think about the tobacco industry executives testifying before Congress that nicotine wasn't addictive, and you have that same process playing out many years later. These similarities are really remarkable.   So let's talk about your work and some of the issues that I think apply to the food area, and let's talk about taxes at the beginning. So I worked for years on the issue of soda taxes, and these taxes now exist in more than 50 countries around the world and in a number of major cities in the US, including San Francisco, Philadelphia, Seattle, and Oakland. And these taxes have been shown to have really positive effects, and they seem to be growing around the world. And I'd like to understand what you see as the overall findings from the work on tobacco taxes. But before we do that, you have a very interesting story to tell about how the tobacco control community responded when you first began speaking about taxes. It turns out to be taxes on tobacco have had whopping effects. But what was the initial reaction to people in that field?   Yeah, it is kind of an interesting story. So around 1980, when I first started writing and talking about tobacco taxation as a method of reducing smoking, I used to have public health audiences booing me. If they had rotten tomatoes with them, they would have been throwing them.   You know, Ken, it's hard to imagine because now these taxes are completely routine and accepted.   Yes, they're not only routine and accepted, they are a first principle of tobacco control. They are enshrined in the World Health Organization's Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. So they really are kind of the first thing we turn to because we know that they work. We know that they reduce smoking.   But let me give you a story about how I learned that this is not only a phenomenon with people smoking. It's a phenomenon with people using all other drugs, and it turns out it's a trans-species law, the Law of Demand. And that law says, basically, that if you increase price, the demand for the commodity will decrease. Well, in the beginning, the public health audiences believed two things. They believed that smokers were so addicted that they would not be affected by price, so it was ridiculous to even think about it. And they said, you have to have intrinsic motivators to get people to quit smoking. They have to care about their kids. They want to see their kids grow up, their spouses, and so on, and not extrinsic forces like a tax. So those were their two objections. So the story that I think is really kind of fun. I was on a plane flying to a small conference in Kansas City. This is sometime in the early '80s. And I happened to be seated next to Jack Henningfield, who is probably the preeminent psychopharmacologist dealing with nicotine, maybe in the world. And we were talking about price response, the fact that cigarette taxes work. And he said, "You know, I've got something I want to show you here." And he pulled out some what are called response cost curves from the psychology literature. And this is where you take a laboratory animal, in this instance addicted to narcotics or other addictive substances, and you give them a challenge to get their drugs. So first, I should note that these animals are so addicted that if they're given the choice between food and their drug, they will choose their drug, and they will in fact end up dying because they place a preference for the drug over food. But it turns out that when you increase the price of the drug to them, they decrease the amount that they consume. So what do I mean by that? If they have to push a lever, a bar, a certain number of times to get a dose of their drug, and you raise the number of bar pushes per dose, they will dose themselves with fewer doses. I took a look at these curves, and basically, a response cost curve for these lab animals is essentially a demand curve as we economists see it. And I calculated the price elasticity of demand, which is our standard measure of the responsiveness to price. And it turns out that addicted laboratory rats have essentially the same price elasticity of demand, the same price responsiveness that human beings do to cigarettes.   That's an absolutely fascinating story. And, you know, I know Jack, and have admired his work, as you have, and it's amazing to think about that conversation on a plane, and what sort of scientific work it led to, and how that, in turn, found its way into policies that exist around the world. So tell us then about tobacco taxes, and how high do they have to be in order to affect consumption in an appreciable way, and have they worked in reducing tobacco use, and what's your overall take on that?   So we have, quite literally, hundreds of studies in countries around the world, and we know a lot but we don't know everything. So we don't know, for example, if there's a particular price above which, you know, nobody will use the product. We don't have even really good data suggesting of, you know, what's the minimum increase in price that you have to have to have a noticeable impact. Overall, the literature suggests that if you increase the price of cigarettes by 10%, you will decrease the quantity demanded by 3 to 4%. Now, what this means is that roughly half of that decreased demand reflects decreases in the number of cigarettes that continuing smokers use, while the other half represents decreases in smoking, people quitting or kids not starting. So the demand is what we call price inelastic. The price change itself is larger, proportionately, than the decrease in consumption. But that decrease in consumption is still substantial and it's enough to have a large impact.   Now, cigarette prices vary all over the world, and cigarette prices vary primarily because of taxation differences. So if you go to the Scandinavian countries, you'll find that a pack of cigarettes will run $15 or more. If you go to Australia, you're looking at $30 or more a pack. In the US, currently, we're looking at an average price in the range of about 7 to $8. In some jurisdictions, like New York City, it's $10 or more. But the prices in the US are actually relatively low among the more developed nations in the world. Any tax increase will have an impact but obviously the larger tax increases will have larger impacts. And there's some good and bad news in tobacco taxation, particularly in a country like ours, and this is, again, true for most of the developed world. Smoking is now concentrated in marginalized populations. I'm talking about low socioeconomic groups, the LGBTQ community, and racial minorities, in particular. If you think of this as an economic phenomenon, when you raise the price on cigarettes, you're going to hit the worst-off economically segments of the population hard. That's the bad news. The good news is that those people, precisely because they are poor, tend to be much more price responsive than high-income smokers, and more of them will quit. So we have this problem that the tax is regressive, it imposes a larger burden on the poor, but the health effect is progressive. It will reduce the gap between the rich and poor in terms of smoking rates. And of great importance, there's an enormous gap between the rich and poor in this country in life expectancy, and as much as half of that may be differences in smoking rates.   Ken, there's a hundred follow-up questions I could ask, and I find this discussion absolutely fascinating. One thing that came into my mind was that some years ago I looked at the relationship of taxes, state by state in the US, and rates of disease like lung cancer and heart disease. And there was plenty of data because there was a huge range in tobacco taxes. Places like New York and Rhode Island had very high taxes, and the tobacco Southern states, like North Carolina, had very low taxes. But what's the sort of recent take on that, and the relationship between taxes and actual disease?   Well, it's still true. And there are, in fact, what you suggest, the southeastern block of tobacco states have unusually low rates of taxation. And I haven't seen any recent data but one presumes that they are suffering more from smoking-related diseases because their smoking rates are higher. I mean, that has to be true. So I don't know that we have any particularly good data recently, but there have been studies that clearly relate tobacco or cigarette prices to health outcomes associated with smoking.   I'm assuming US scientists have played a prominent role in producing the literature showing the negative health consequences of using cigarettes, and yet you said the United States has relatively low taxes compared to other developed countries. Why, do you think?   I think we're going to get into a very philosophical discussion about the US right here. It has to do with individual responsibility. We know for sure that the initial reason the taxes were so low was that the tobacco block was so influential in the Senate, particularly in the days when Jesse Helms, the senator from North Carolina, was in the Senate. He was the most feared senator by the other senators, and if you wanted to get anything done for your cause, you had to go along with his cause, which was keeping cigarette prices low and doing everything they could to support smoking. So there's clearly been a built-in bias in the Senate, and basically in the Congress as a whole, against tobacco policy. You see a huge variation from state to state in tobacco policies, and it's reflective of basically their political leanings in general.   You brought up this issue of personal responsibility, and boy, does that apply in the food area. You know, the food companies are saying: if you have one sugar beverage every once in a while, it's not going to be harmful. And it's not use of the products but it is overuse of the products. Thereby saying, it's not corporate responsibility we're talking about here, it's personal responsibility. That same argument was made by the tobacco industry, wasn't it?   It was. They would be less inclined to do that today, for a couple of reasons. One is that we know that even low levels of smoking are harmful and indeed cause many of the diseases that we were referring to earlier. And I think all the companies have now admitted publicly that smoking does cause all of these diseases that we've long known it causes. And all of them are claiming that they would like to move away from a society with smoking to one that has alternative products that would give people choices and ways to get their nicotine without exposing themselves to so much risk. I mean, we have to remember, the fact that cigarettes kill their consumers is a real drawback as far as the industry is concerned because they're losing a lot of their consumers, you know, 10, 20 years before they normally would, and they have to deal with all these lawsuits. So it's unfortunate for them. Having said that, cigarettes are the goose that lays the golden egg. They cost very little to manufacture. The industry is sufficiently oligopolistic that the profits are enormous, and their profitability has continued even while smoking has dropped rather precipitously ever since the mid-1960s.   Is that because the markets outside the US have been growing?   They certainly have helped. Although now, and this is only true within the last few years, the aggregate cigarette sales in the world are declining. They've actually started dropping. So we were seeing a relatively stable situation as smoking decreased in the developed world and was rising in the developing world. The only place now where we're seeing increases in smoking are areas in Africa, which, by the way, is the one place in the world where we might be able to forego the tobacco epidemic because smoking rates are still quite low in most of the countries, not all of them, and also parts of the Middle East. But elsewhere we've been seeing smoking declining all over the world. That doesn't mean the profits have to drop because one thing that the companies can do, is, they can raise their prices. Now, if prices go up because of taxes that hurts the companies. But if they raise their own prices because demand is inelastic, what that means is that the percentage increase in the price is larger than the percentage decline in the demand for cigarettes. So they're actually adding to their profitability by doing that. They've always played this very interesting game for years of keeping price below what we would think to be the profit-maximizing price. And I think the reason for that has to do with addiction because they know that they have to have what are called replacement smokers, kids coming in to take the place of the smokers who are dying or quitting. And for years, I think, they kept their prices down because they didn't want to discourage young people from smoking. Now, I think they see the writing on the wall. Smoking is declining very rapidly. Smoking prevalence, which was 45% in the mid, early-1960s, is now a little over 12% in the US, and I think they're raising their prices with the understanding that they want to take as much advantage of the opportunity with the addicted smokers, the adults, as they possibly can, even though smoking among kids is becoming vanishingly small.   I think of so many parallels with the soda taxes that now exists in a number of places, and the companies have responded somewhat differently. And perhaps it's the level of addiction issue that kicks in here, and the need to have replacement customers. Maybe that's another key difference. But with the soda taxes, the companies have not increased prices beyond the level of the tax. You know, to delight of public health experts, the companies have tended to pass along the entire tax so the companies are not eating that difference in order to keep prices the same. Higher tax gets reflected in the ultimate price that they charge, but they're not increasing prices beyond that. Do you think it might be the addiction issue that's different here?   I don't know. I mean, that certainly could be an element of it. The other thing is that they're manufacturing other drinks that are being used in place of some of the sodas. So they've got waters, they've got juices. I mean, obviously these sugary juices are no better, but they do make other products. They make the diet drinks. And to the extent that they can find substitutes for those products within their own companies, it may be that they're content to allow people to make those substitutions.   Interesting comment. The results so far on the soda tax suggest that the most common substitution as people drink less soda, is water, which is of course better than a lot of the alternatives that people might be consuming, so that's a bit of really good news. Even though the companies do sell water, Coke and Pepsi have Aquafina and Dasani, for example, they face a basic problem. Number one is that these companies are the biggest sellers of sugary beverages but not bottled water. That happens to be Nestle. So if people migrate to bottled water, they're likely to migrate from the big companies, like Coke and Pepsi, to Nestle. Also, people tend not to be very brand-loyal to water. They tend to buy whatever is on sale or whatever they find available to them, and that creates a problem for these companies like Coke and Pepsi that do rely on brand loyalty for their marketing. So it's very interesting. And also, I wonder, based on the research on food and addiction, if the companies don't take a hit if people switch from full sugar beverages even to diet beverages that they might sell because there wouldn't be as much addictive potential, and therefore the customers wouldn't have to have as much just to keep the habit going. So it's really interesting to think this through.   That's certainly very plausible. The whole thing would also depend on the price elasticity of demand for sodas, and specifically for the brands that they're concerned about. If there is greater elasticity there than what we observe for cigarettes, then raising those prices aren't necessarily going to help them all that much.   You mentioned that the elasticity estimates for tobacco suggested that a 10% increase in price led to a 3 to 4% reduction in consumption, and the numbers are even more positive in the case of the sugar beverages, where if you get a 10%, 15% increase in price, you end up with 10, 15% reduction in consumption. So that's good news in the food arena.   That's good news but it also means that they can't do as easily what the tobacco industry can do, which is to raise their prices and expect to see profits rise. Because if they're losing as much in sales as they're gaining in price, it's no win.   So Ken, let's talk about product formulation because you mentioned that earlier, and this is a really interesting issue that, again, connects tobacco and food products. So you think about the tobacco companies mainly selling cigarettes, but now there's vaping, there's cigarettes with things like menthol and other flavors, or low-fat foods, or artificial sweeteners. The list of product reformulations in order to attract customers goes on and on and on. So I know a controversial topic in your field has been e-cigarettes. Can you explain what these are?   E-cigarettes have been around now for about a decade, let's say. Basically, they're devices that allow people to inhale nicotine and other substances, but the purpose is to give them their nicotine without combustion. And we know that the major problem associated with smoking is the products of combustion. There's 7,000 chemical compounds in cigarette smoke. 70 of them are known human carcinogens, causes of cancer in humans. Many of them are cardiotoxic. They cause lung disease and so on. The e-cigarettes have about two orders of magnitude fewer toxins in their emissions than do cigarettes. And it turns out that the amount of the comparable toxins, when they are in fact comparable, that you find in the e-cigarette emissions is much lower, usually a 10th to a 400th, of what you find in cigarette smoke.   So logically, and based on a fair body of evidence at this point, vaping, use of e-cigarettes to get nicotine, is substantially less dangerous than is cigarette smoking. However, the controversy here is incredible. This is the most divisive issue that I have witnessed in my 45 years of working in the tobacco control field. It has torn the field asunder. The mainstream of public health, and by that I'm including governmental agencies, the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, the Truth Initiative, the American Cancer Society, heart and lung associations, all of mainstream public health is strongly opposed to e-cigarettes, and for one reason. They're concerned about kids' uptake of e-cigarettes, which has been substantial. It's been decreasing the last couple of years, but it has been substantial. And there are a number of things they're concerned about in that regard, and they're completely ignoring the fact that there's pretty good evidence that e-cigarettes are increasing smoking cessation for a subset of smokers. And a number of us on the science side of this, believe that the net effect of e-cigarettes is beneficial, that it's actually, possibly, a tool to add to the armamentarium of things like cigarette taxation, like smoke-free workplaces, like restrictions on advertising, and that it will help a group of inveterate smokers, those who either can't quit nicotine or don't want to, to move to a less dangerous alternative to smoking. I am not saying that e-cigarettes have no risk associated with them. They almost certainly do. But it is substantially lower.   Now, historically, this is divisive within the field in part because all of the earlier attempts at, quote-unquote, tobacco harm reduction have been produced by the major cigarette companies, and they've been fraudulent. So cigarette filters were manufactured and sold, starting in the 1950s, in response to the scare that I referred to earlier about cancer. And they were sold with a message that the filters block the dangerous stuff but let the flavor through. And people bought this. That decrease in smoking in the early 1950s reversed, smoking went up sharply, as sales of filtered cigarettes went up. By the way, the first successful filtered cigarette was Kent, and it used what it referred to as the miracle Micronite filter. Well, that miracle Micronite filter turns out to have been made of asbestos. And there are lawsuits continuing to the present day by workers in the factories that made the filter tips for Kent cigarettes, who themselves ended up with lung cancer or other diseases due to the asbestos. Then came low-tar and nicotine cigarettes, and we actually have ample evidence from the documents that had been revealed by lawsuits, that the industry knew that this was a public relations device. It was not a harm reduction device. And in fact, because people believed that low-tar and nicotine cigarettes were less dangerous, it's likely that it actually increased the toll of smoking because people who would have quit, switched to low-tar and nicotine cigarettes instead. So there's some pretty awful history here that makes people legitimately concerned about alternative products. A critical element of this story is that the alternative products, in this case, the e-cigarettes were introduced by non-cigarette, non-tobacco companies, and their goal was to replace smoking. Now the major companies are all making their own e-cigarettes as well because they have to do it from a defensive point of view, but basically they don't have any great interest in slowing up the sale of cigarettes. They want to benefit from that as long as they can.   So I should know the answer to this but I don't, but are e-cigarettes taxed? And wouldn't it be optimal to tax e-cigarettes but less than regular cigarettes so you discourage use of both but discourage the use of regular cigarettes more?   That is very insightful. Two colleagues and I actually published a paper saying that in 2015 in "The New England Journal of Medicine," that we should be taxing e-cigarettes modestly, the reason being that we want to discourage kids from using them, and kids are far more price-sensitive than our adults. Kids have a very elastic response to cigarette prices. Adults do not, and in particular, older adults have even lower price responsiveness. So yes, there should be some taxation of e-cigarettes to discourage youth use of it but that taxation should be dramatically lower than the taxation of cigarettes. Some states are now taxing e-cigarettes. Not all of them. The federal government is actually looking into a proposal to double the tax, the federal tax, on cigarettes, which would take it up to $2.01 a pack, and at the same time, to establish an equivalent tax, similar to the $2 tax, on all vaping products. This would be a disaster because it would definitely discourage kids from vaping, but it would also discourage adults from using e-cigarettes as an alternative to smoking, and the most addicted, the inveterate smokers, those are the ones that need these alternatives. So that's a bad policy proposal. A much better one would be to increase the cigarette tax by more than a dollar, raise it to 3 or $4 or something, and impose a modest tax on e-cigarettes. This would discourage people from smoking, both adults and kids, but especially kids. It would discourage kids from using e-cigarettes but it would create a price differential that would encourage the inveterate smokers to switch to e-cigarettes. Now, part of the problem, and this has gotten worse over time, is that the American public believes that e-cigarettes, that vaping, is as dangerous and even maybe more dangerous than cigarette smoking. Nothing could be further from the truth but so far the mainstream of public health has sold that message to the public, and the public, including smokers, believe it.   That's a fascinating story about how the public health field might be getting in its own way with this.   And maybe doing damage to public health.   So let's loop back a little bit to the behavior of the tobacco industry. So in 2017, the Phillip Morris Company funded and launched an organization called Foundation for a Smoke-Free World. So I think, hmm, a tobacco company saying they want less smoking, and one could view this with pretty high cynicism but what do you think about it?   I've always shared your sense of cynicism about it. There's an interesting anecdote related to this. The individual who negotiated the deal by which Phillip Morris offered $1 billion over a 12-year period to establish this foundation, that individual was the main actor in the World Health Organization during the development of the global treaty on tobacco control, the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. He also became director of the organization and served in that capacity until just the other day. He has stepped down from being director. But let me give you a little context for it. Philip Morris International that needs to be distinguished from Altria and Philip Morris Domestic, but Philip Morris International sells the leading brand of what is known as heated tobacco products, HTPs. These are products that actually have tobacco in them. E-cigarettes have no tobacco in them but these products actually have tobacco in them. But instead of burning the tobacco, they heat it. They volatilize it, and the nicotine is inhaled. Like e-cigarettes, they appear to be substantially less dangerous than smoking, although it's not clear that they're as less dangerous as, than, e-cigarettes. But they're produced only by the major cigarette companies. Philip Morris is now selling these products successfully in many countries, many cities around the world. While they actually have the authorization to sell an older version of the product in the US, it's not very popular at this point. But in Japan, over the last four years there's been a drop in cigarettes sold of about a third at the same time that there's been this great increase in the use of these heated tobacco products manufactured by Philip Morris International and by Japan Tobacco. They have a product called Ploom. Philip Morris' product is called IQOS, I-Q-O-S, which, I was told, originally stood for I Quit Ordinary Smoking. So they are the leader of the theme song that the industry is singing these days about how they want a smoke-free world and they want to move toward one. But the only way they're ever going to do that, willingly, is if they can sell other products like these heated tobacco products and make large sums of money on them. Philip Morris has a good start at that. They claim that about a third of their revenue now is coming from IQOS, this heated tobacco product.   So whether that foundation ultimately has beneficial effects or not, forget corporate beneficial effects but on the public good, would pretty much depend on who's choosing to use these e-cigarettes, I'm imagining. That if it's people switching from normal cigarettes to them, or using them instead of normal cigarettes, it's one thing. But if they're recruiting new people who otherwise wouldn't smoke, then it would be a bad thing. So how do you think that'll all play out?   That's actually a critically important question, Kelly. And one of the great concerns that the opposition to e-cigarettes has, is that they're addicting lots of kids to nicotine, and that many of them will go on to smoke, and that that will reverse the progress that we made on smoking. Now, it turns out that there is no evidence to support the latter contention. And in fact, there's evidence to the contrary. I think it's entirely possible that some kids who would not have touched a cigarette otherwise are vaping and then trying cigarettes in the future. Whether they become regular smokers, remains to be seen. But I think there certainly are some kids like that. But what we do know is that the rate of smoking among kids, what we call current smoking, and smoking among kids means that they've had at least one puff on a cigarette in the last 30 days, that number has plummeted over the last quarter century, and, and this is the interesting thing, it has gone down at its fastest rate precisely during the period in which vaping has been popular among kids.   So one theory is that vaping is displacing smoking to some extent. That kids who would've smoked are vaping instead. It's a very complicated area and we don't know the answer. Among adults who vape, and they are relatively few in number except for very young adults, we observe mostly dual use, but the question is how much of this is a transition to vaping only, and then, maybe, a transition to nothing after that. In the UK, where vaping has been advertised by the health organizations as a way to quit smoking, and they have encouraged its use, and they use it in their smoking cessation clinics, and you'll even find it in hospitals, in the UK we have seen that more than half of the people who have quit smoking by using e-cigarettes have also quit vaping. So it is no longer the case in the UK that a majority of the people who vape are also currently smoking.   In the US, the data have been moving in that direction but it's still a majority who are dual users rather than vaping only. But we have evidence of four or five completely different kinds of studies, commercial data, other products in other countries, that all lead to the conclusion that vaping is already increasing the rate of smoking cessation in the US and in the UK by probably 10 to 15%. That's a hard thing to see in the data but it is something that, if you dig into the data, you will see it, and as I say, we see it all over the place. Let me give you one example of the tobacco harm reduction story that's fabulous. 40 to 50 years ago, large numbers of Swedish males started using a smokeless tobacco product called snus, S-N-U-S. It's a relatively low nitrosamine product, nitrosamine being a carcinogenic element, and they substituted it for cigarettes largely because cigarette taxes were going way up and there weren't any significant taxes on snus. So what you observe today, some three, four decades or more later, is that Swedish males have the lowest male smoking rate of any country in Europe, and maybe in the world. They do not have a low tobacco use rate. Their tobacco use rate is pretty typical but it consists mostly of snus. And they also have by far the lowest rate of tobacco-related diseases, like lung cancer, of men in all of the European Union countries, and the second lowest is typically a rate twice or more that of what you see in the Swedish males. Swedish females, who did not quit smoking in large numbers and did not take up snus until fairly recently, have rates of lung cancer and other diseases that are average or above-average for the European Union. So that's a great example of tobacco harm reduction in action, and it's one that's been around now, as I say, for decades.   Ken, this is a remarkable history and you're just bringing it alive beautifully. But let me ask you one final question. So given that you've been working in this field for more than four decades now, and have really been a pioneer, a leader, a warrior, and a hero, all those things could be applied to you and your work, if I asked you to sum up what's been learned from all these decades of work on tobacco, what would you say?   There are a lot of lesson. Certainly, we have learned specific kinds of interventions that really matter. You and I spoke about tax at some length. That's the preeminent one. Smoke-free workplaces, including smoke-free restaurants and bars, have not only themselves had a direct impact on health but have also set the tone for a more smoke-free society. So we have seen quite dramatic changes. I mentioned we're going from a 45% rate of smoking for the nation as a whole down to a little over 12%. That, however, has taken us six to seven decades. So it's kind of a good news, bad news story. It's a very complicated area. Tobacco control was ranked by CDC as one of the 10 most important public health measures of the 20th century, and also the first decade of the 21st century. And I think that's completely legitimate, and it is something about which all of us who care about public health can feel very proud about. The problem still remains. It is an enormous problem, as you alluded earlier, in many parts of the developing world, the low- and middle-income countries, and it's a growing problem in some of those countries, and it's just not going to disappear real fast. The lesson that I've taken most recently has been a discouraging one, and that's how divisive our field has become. We really have a chasm between the people who are opposed to tobacco harm reduction and those who are supportive of it. They're good people on both sides, they believe what they're saying, but they can't talk to each other civilly at this point. I hope that that will not become the case for those of you who are fighting the good fight in dealing with unhealthy foods.   Bio   Kenneth E. Warner is the Avedis Donabedian Distinguished University Professor Emeritus of Public Health and Dean Emeritus at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. A member of the faculty from 1972-2017, he served as Dean from 2005-2010. Presented in over 275 professional publications, Dr. Warner's research has focused on economic and policy aspects of tobacco and health. Dr. Warner served as the World Bank's representative to negotiations on the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, WHO's first global health treaty. He also served as the Senior Scientific Editor of the 25th anniversary Surgeon General's report on smoking and health. From 2004-2005 he was President of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco (SRNT). He currently serves on the FDA's Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee. In 1996 Dr. Warner was elected to the National Academy of Medicine. He is a recipient of the Surgeon General's Medallion, the Luther Terry Award for Exemplary Achievement in Tobacco Control, and the Doll-Wynder Award from SRNT. Dr. Warner earned his AB from Dartmouth College and MPhil and PhD in economics from Yale University.  

Seattle Kitchen
Seattle Kitchen

Seattle Kitchen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 74:51


Peak season – Duck – no need to be tentative about cooking it // In the food news – contrast Nestle's announcement to make fake chickens with the continued success of “Diet for a Small Planet” // Is there better butter? - is there any different result from the commercial vs the artisan? // Local sake maker Andy Neyes, from Tahoma Fuji // Great grain recipes from the stunning new book Grist // Lastly, we will play our Rub with Love Tasty Trivia Challenge! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Seriously…
Could I Regenerate My Farm To Save The Planet?

Seriously…

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 29:14


Regenerative Farming is gaining traction around the world as a means of increasing biodiversity, improving soil quality, sequestering carbon, restoring watersheds and enhancing the ecosystems of farms. The shepherd James Rebanks, author of English Pastoral, is on a quest to find out if it is possible to adopt these methods on his farm in the Lake District. He meets leading proponents of these methods in the UK, US and Europe and discovers how mimicking natural herd movements, stopping ploughing and adding costly chemicals could make his farm economically sustainable. This is becoming an urgent question as not only is the global population projected to rise to nearly 10 billion by 2050 but according to the UN's Food and Agriculture organisation within 60 years we may literally no longer have enough arable topsoil to feed ourselves. Meanwhile our reliance on meat products is being blamed for increasing CO2 and climate change. But can James,and indeed other farmers, make the switch to these techniques when industrial farming has been the paradigm for so long? When so many people believe turning vegan and shifting to plant-based ecological farming is the way forward, should he continue breeding sheep and cows? And as companies like Nestle, Walmart, Unilever, McCain and Pepsi all pledge to invest in regenerative farming to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions, do the claims about carbon sequestration stand up? How can he use his farm to save the planet?

Farming Today
24/11/21 - Pesticide regulation, breeding disease resistance in seeds, regenerative dairy farming

Farming Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 13:40


New research questions whether the rules assessing the toxicity of pesticides are doing enough to prevent harm to pollinators. Regulation of pesticides usually focuses on the impact of the active ingredients of a product, but this study found a additional chemical used in commercial fungicides in the UK can damage the health of bumblebees. We visit a seed breeding organisation where they're developing winter wheat that can resist diseases like yellow rust and septoria. And ‘regenerative farming' has been gaining attention around the world as a means of improving soils, increasing biodiversity and mitigating climate change. Big companies like Nestle, Unilever, McCain and Pepsi have announced they'll be investing in the idea, but so far there's little data-driven proof of its impact. We find out about a project run by the dairy co-operative Arla which will gather data from 24 farms across Europe. Presented by Anna Hill Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Heather Simons

Psychopath In Your Life
NESTLE style Infant EUGENICS

Psychopath In Your Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 5:46


Get In Touch Website: https://psychopathinyourlife.com/ Contributions to the show are greatly appreciated. Support the Show – Psychopath In Your Life   The post NESTLE style Infant EUGENICS appeared first on Psychopath In Your Life.

Boozed and Confused
Episode 61: Cargill: ”The Worst Company” You‘ve Never Heard Of

Boozed and Confused

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 46:32


Companies like Nestle are often publicly taking heat for unethical business practices. What if I told you there's a company on the same level of Nestle that manages to stay out of most headlines? Join Matt and Carolanne this week as they talk about Cargill, a company given the title of "the worst company in the world" by Mighty Earth. Warning: this episode contains entirely too many wine-induced soap boxes.  Our linktree: linktr.ee/boozedandconfused This week's booze of choice: Ruby Red by Warner Vineyards  Sources: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-08-06/crop-giant-cargill-reports-biggest-profit-in-156-year-history https://stories.mightyearth.org/cargill-worst-company-in-the-world/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cargill https://ceoworld.biz/2021/01/03/ranked-top-50-richest-families-in-the-united-states-2021/ https://www.brainerddispatch.com/business/3435856-ex-cargill-manager-sentenced-five-months-prison-river-waste-dumping-case

YAP - Young and Profiting
Episode #142: Make a Powerful First Impression with Mark Bowden

YAP - Young and Profiting

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 82:45


Want to learn how to influence people and learn their values just by their language? In this episode, we talk with Mark Bowden! Mark is a best-selling author, Founder, and Human Behavior/Body Language expert! He is credited with pioneering nonverbal analysis of human behavior where it pertains to influence and/or persuasion. His techniques have been used by G7 leaders, including Canadian Prime Minister and Stephen Harper. He is the Founder and President of TRUTHPLANE, a communication training company that offers a unique methodology for anyone who has to communicate with impact to an audience. His bestselling books on body language and human behavior are: Winning Body Language; Winning Body Language for Sales Professionals; Tame the Primitive Brain; and Truth & Lies, What People are Really Thinking. Mark is a regular instructor for Canada's #1-ranked EMBA program at Kellogg-Schulich School of Business, and he is President of the National Communication Coach Association of Canada.  Mark uses his unique system of cutting-edge and effective nonverbal communication techniques to instantly help audiences become more confident, collaborative, and credible in their communication. His highly acclaimed TEDx talk, “The Importance of Being In-Authentic”, and YouTube Channel have reached millions of people, and he has presented to many of the most prestigious organizations in the world, including Microsoft, Toyota, VW, Samsung, Johnson & Johnson, KPMG, GSK, Walmart and Nestle.  In today's episode, we cover Mark's childhood, how he learned to live with his dyslexia, and how it brought him to his passion for human behavior. We'll also learn the difference between influence and persuasion, how to learn other people's values from small talk, and making a powerful first impression. If you want to learn how to read behaviors from others fast, keep listening! Sponsored by - Kraken - Visit kraken.com/yap now to learn more or search for "Kraken" in the app store Eight Sleep - Go to eightsleep.com/yap to check out the Pod Pro Cover and save $150 at checkout Jordan Harbinger - Check out jordanharbinger.com/start for some episode recommendations Social Media: Follow YAP on IG: www.instagram.com/youngandprofiting Reach out to Hala directly at Hala@YoungandProfiting.com Follow Hala on Linkedin: www.linkedin.com/in/htaha/ Follow Hala on Instagram: www.instagram.com/yapwithhala Follow Hala on Clubhouse: @halataha Check out our website to meet the team, view show notes and transcripts: www.youngandprofiting.com Timestamps: 00:52- Mark's Childhood and Living with Dyslexia  9:22- The Animal and Reptile Brain 12:37- How Influence and Persuasion Are Different 16:27- Understanding Other People's Values  28:30- How to Influence People Using Their Values 30:21- Difference Between Traits, States, and Moods 39:39- Making a Powerful First Impression 46:52- How to Take Up Space 50:45- Mark's Best Advice for Dating Phases 1:01:57- The Need to Be Inauthentic 1:08:36- What Makes a Great Story 1:12:45- Mark's Secret to Profiting in Life Mentioned in the episode: Mark's Website: https://truthplane.com/

BRAVE COMMERCE
Nuun Hydration's Ingrid Cordy on attracting the mass consumer while staying true to your brand

BRAVE COMMERCE

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 19:24


Ingrid Cordy, Head of Digital & eCommerce at Nuun Hydration,  analyzes how health & wellness categories have skyrocketed recently, and how this sector is evolving as the world starts to normalize. She also discusses Nuun's recent acquisition by Nestle, and maintaining your brand identity and value while still relating to mass consumers and reaching national distribution level. 

What The Flux
CommBank's biggest share price drop in yonks | Nestle gets aggressive online | Crypto fans bid for legit US Constitution

What The Flux

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 5:51


CommBank shares had their biggest single-day drop since March 2020 earlier this week, as investors worry about competition in the mortgage space and the record low cash rate.   Nestle expects to almost double e-commerce sales to 25% of total company sales by 2025 - by pushing sales to consumers directly via its own online channel.   Crypto fans are uniting to spend millions of dollars worth of crypto to bid for an original copy of the US Constitution.   ---   November = Flux Savings Month: https://bit.ly/flux-savings-month Save money and win cash prizes up to $250k weekly: https://www.flux.finance/win-the-week Get your credit score for free: https://bit.ly/fluxcreditscore Download the free app (App Store): http://bit.ly/FluxAppStore Download the free app (Google Play Store): http://bit.ly/FluxappGooglePlay Daily newsletter: https://bit.ly/fluxnewsletter Instagram: http://bit.ly/fluxinsta TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@flux.finance   ---   The content in this podcast reflects the views and opinions of the hosts, and is intended for personal and not commercial use. We do not represent or endorse the accuracy or reliability of any opinion, statement or other information provided or distributed in these episodes. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Making a Marketer
Improve Marketing by Understanding the Primal Brain with Tim Ash

Making a Marketer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 28:52


The brain is complicated, but our guest on this episode does a great job of breaking it down for us! Understanding how and why we think can really help us as we work in marketing / business - and in LIFE. Creating disruption or including an element of surprise is one way to make our marketing more memorable. We talk about this, the power of sleep, dreams, and more on this brief and value-packed episode. Tim was recommended to us, and he delivered -- getting our brains really working on this one! His book: Unleash Your Primal Brain: Demystifying how we think and why we act. And you can get a chapter of his book by email to see what you think - HERE! Our guest... Tim Ash  Tim Ash is an acknowledged authority on evolutionary psychology and digital marketing. He is a sought-after international keynote speaker, and the bestselling author of Unleash Your Primal Brain and Landing Page Optimization. Tim has been mentioned by Forbes as a Top-10 Online Marketing Expert, and by Entrepreneur Magazine as an Online Marketing Influencer To Watch. For nineteen years he was the co-founder and CEO of SiteTuners – a digital optimization agency. Tim helped to create over 1.2 billion dollars in value for companies like Google, Expedia, eHarmony, Facebook, American Express, Canon, Nestle, Symantec, Intuit, Humana, Siemens, and Cisco. His book reco: Never Split the Difference by Chris Voss (2nd time it's been recommended!) If you'd like to watch the video - we recorded this one LIVE.   We are "Making a Marketer"... in all ways. Check out episode 93 -- and please take a minute to follow, rate, & review us on iTunes & get each ep. when it drops! https://bit.ly/mamITuneNEW ::: This episode is made possible by Powers of Marketing - emPOWERing strategic communication ::: ** Our show music is provided by our GIFTED editor, MUSICIAN, Avri. Check out his song, "Too Close"! **

Trade Show University
Ep 122 - Maximize Exhibitor Reach with Virtual Platforms - Erica Bishaf of Campfire Social

Trade Show University

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 26:41


In today's ever changing event world, it's critical to figure out new ways for exhibitors to reach their target audience. To give tips and advice is Erica Bishaf - the Founder & CEO of CampfireSocial, the first-of-its-kind private social network and commerce platform designed for trade verticals. Erica is a 20+ year award winning strategy & insights veteran who has worked for consumer packaged goods companies such as Kraft, Nestle, Kimberly-Clark, & MillerCoors and through her consulting business she worked on strategy projects for associations & event organizers including Freeman, GES, the American Library Association, the Audiovisual and Integrated Experience Association (AVIXA), the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), the National Retail Federation (NRF), and more. In this episode we discuss: Generating leads through virtual platforms such as communities, marketplaces, and virtual events How exhibitors can maximize their reach when on a virtual platform Tactics to deploy on communities vs. marketplaces vs. virtual events Erica's Top Takeaways: Content marketing and relationship building tactics will produce more leads and stickier customers. The modern digital audience is more receptive to slow and steady - building relationships over time. Digital platform marketing requires strategy and exhibitors/sponsors should be dedicating the time to formulating in order to maximize their investment Exhibitors should not accept low ROI from their show organizers and should speak up asking for better tools and more support. Contact Erica Bishaf: Email: erica.bishaf@campfiresocial.io Website: https://www.campfiresocial.io/ Phone: 312.350.5270 Don't Miss an Episode!! Subscribe to Trade Show University at your favorite podcast platform like Apple, Google, Spotify, Stitcher, Amazon, Gaana and more! Get Top 52 Trade Show Tips - go to tradeshowu.biz

Trust The Process
TRUST THE PROCESS Season 4, Ep. 5: The Nestle Clapback

Trust The Process

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 132:19


Everything in Canucksland is burning again, after an embarrassing 7-1 loss to the Colorado Avalanche. Is there anything that can be done to turn this ship around? Is it the coach? The GM (well, yeah), the Owner? (again, yeah). We also talk about the Sixers slump and Rich Paul going to bat for his client in a pretty transparent way. All that plus TTP Misery Index, Lose Your Own Adventure, Your Questions from Twitter, (kind of) a Footy segment, our thoughts on Clones and an old feud between Bowman and Nestle is dug up. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The MAP IT FORWARD Podcast
EP 508 Is Nescafé Coming For Your Specialty Coffee Business? (The Daily Coffee Pro Podcast by MAP IT FORWARD)

The MAP IT FORWARD Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 10:09


In a recent MAP IT FORWARD coffee roaster's group coaching session, we took a question from a specialty coffee roaster asking what seemed like a peculiar question: "How do I compete with Nescafe?" The discussion that followed uncovered a number of interesting discoveries about Nestle's Nescafe new roasted coffee wholesale program being sold not to supermarkets, but to cafes! It begs the question, are the supply chain, logistical, and labor constraints we're living through, paving the way for further industry consolidation that sees powerful, cash-flushed brands like Nescafe (previously synonymous with instant coffee) make headway into the specialty coffee wholesale roasted coffee market?********************** SPONSOR: BARATZA ********************** https://www.baratza.com @baratza This episode of the MAP IT FORWARD podcast is brought to you by manual brewing grinder manufacturer, Baratza. The company that's known for innovation, value, quality, and consistency. Baratza designs precision burr grinders with a small footprint - perfect for both home and commercial environments. Head to www.baratza.com to pick up your favorite grinder today or enquire about becoming a wholesaler of Baratza grinders. Baratza - We Grind, You Brew. ***********************Watch The Global Coffee Townhall in English Spanish, Arabic, and Portuguese at: https://bit.ly/3B9Oho1***************FURTHER INFO***************Website: https://www.mapitforward.orgSocial media: @imapitforward & @mapitforwardmiddleeastMailing-list: https://mapitforward.org/mailinglistAlso available as audio Podcast: Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Play, and all other podcast-listening apps on Apple and Android devices

the morning shakeout podcast
Episode 181 | Jenny Maxwell

the morning shakeout podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 68:45


“I've always had an entrepreneurial spirit. When I was a little girl I was selling lollipops at school. I had this relative who had these big lollipops, the 8-inch ones that were really colorful but not healthy to eat, but I would go to school—as long as they let me—selling lollipops until they said no. But I've always liked to be a groundbreaker and the thing about me is I don't operate out of a mode of fear. I just don't operate out of fear. I never have. And you have to have that to be an entrepreneur—you can't have a lot of fear. Success is going to be hard to come by.”  This week's episode is with Jenny Maxwell. She's the founder and CEO of JAMBAR, an energy bar for promoting community and eating healthy organic nutrition. This isn't Jenny's first foray into the energy bar market: she and her late husband Brian practically created it in the mid-1980s when they launched Powerbar, which they worked on together for 15 years until it was acquired by Nestle in 2000. Jenny is also a runner, a drummer, a nutritionist, and a mom of 6 kids—in full disclosure, I coach one of them, her son Chris, who is a heck of a marathoner in his own right. In this conversation, we talk about launching JAMBAR after 20 years away from the energy bar industry, how the space has evolved and grown over the past two decades, and what she's doing to make her new company and product different from the rest. Jenny and I also discuss playing the long game and taking a patient, sustainable approach to both business and life, aligning yourself with the right people, the similarities in how athletes and musicians approach their respective crafts, and a lot more. As a thank you for listening to this episode, Jenny would like to extend a 10% discount on JAMBAR products to morning shakeout listeners. Simply place an order at Jambar.com and use the code BERP at checkout. And just to be fully transparent, I am not getting paid by JAMBAR, I am not an affiliate of the company, and I get nothing out of you using this discount code. It's a gift from Jenny and an invitation to try out her latest culinary creation. This episode is brought to you by: — Tracksmith. Tracksmith crafts performance running apparel, inspiring publications, and distinct experiences that allow runners to indulge in the sport's rich culture. Tracksmith is offering new customers $15 off your first purchase of $75+. Just use code MARIO15 when you check out at tracksmith.com/mario. — Goodr: If you want to support the podcast and treat yourself to a pair of goodr sunglasses, head over to goodr.com/MARIO or enter the code MARIO at checkout for 15% off your order. Look good, run goodr! Complete show notes: https://themorningshakeout.com/podcast-episode-181-with-jenny-maxwell/ Sign up here to get the morning shakeout email newsletter delivered to your inbox every Tuesday morning: https://themorningshakeout.com/subscribe/ Support the morning shakeout on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/themorningshakeout

Freight Broker Boot Camp Audio Experience
Freight Broker Training - 10 Industries Where Freight Brokers Can Make Money (Part 1)

Freight Broker Boot Camp Audio Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 7:44


Topics Discussed: Part 1 - 10 Industries Where Freight Brokers Can Make Money Construction equipment Food and Beverage Lumber Steel Auto industry   Timestamps: [00:14] Part 1 - 10 industries where freight brokers can make money where you can specialize and develop over time.   [02:33] # 1 - Constructive equipment is one of the many industries that require specialized knowledge but can be highly profitable. An example of a company is Caterpillar,   [03:13] #2 - Food and beverage is highly lucrative with billions of daily consumers around the world, most notably Nestle.   [04:39] # - As the population continues to grow, homes are in higher demand and all buildings need lumber as part of their infrastructure.   [05:45] #4 - The steel industry is very popular when it comes to freight and logistics. It also requires specialized knowledge to run on flatbread.   [06:17] #5 - The auto industry is a huge niche where freight brokers can do very well in. Beyond working with popular car companies, automotive product creators, developers, and suppliers also fall under the auto niche.   [07:04] Recap ---------------------------------- If you enjoyed this episode, please RATE / REVIEW and SUBSCRIBE to ensure you never miss an episode. Connect w/ Dennis & Learn More! Connect with me on LinkedIn Learn to Become A Freight Broker/Agent in 30 Days or Less! Watch Freight Broker Training Videos FREE

The Lifestyle Investor - investing, passive income, wealth
054: Alan Olsen on Why Collaboration is Your Ticket to Freedom

The Lifestyle Investor - investing, passive income, wealth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 42:01


In this episode, I'm speaking to Alan Olsen, who is a tax expert with over 25-years of tax advisory experience serving some of the most influential and successful entrepreneurs and venture capitalists in the world. Alan started out as an IRS agent and a CPA, but was destined for something greater. His grit, determination and community involvement brought him early success, and an understanding of the value of relationships.  As a father of seven, Alan always prioritized family and leaned on his faith, but it wasn't until his kids went to college that he had an epiphany. He decided to share his wealth with less fortunate families, and virtually bankrupted himself to fund a low-cost college tuition program for disadvantaged children. Despite the uncertainty, following this unconventional path would lead to success far beyond his imagination!  Today, Alan's a Managing Partner at GROCO, which is recognized as one of the top Silicon Valley CPA firms, and host of the podcast The American Dreams Show. He's a master at connecting the right people and telling their stories. In our discussion, I speak with Alan about the common denominators that make us human, why he believes problem-solving generates true wealth (not just the monetary kind), the power and importance of relationships, and the secret to creating a thriving business during challenging economic times. That, and a whole lot more! Here's just some of the things we get into: Alan Olsen entrepreneurial journey Going broke to help disadvantaged kids get back on track Why Alan was offered ownership of a $7.5M piece of property for FREE—and the reason he turned it down Why the foundation of life is never about money How to make a business thrive in challenging economic times The power and importance of relationships—and the BIG epiphany Steve Jobs had on his deathbed A better measure of true wealth What does a multi-family real estate office do? Want the Full Show Notes? To get access to the full show notes, including audio, transcripts, and links to all the resources mentioned, visit JustinDonald.com/54 Free Gifts from Alan Olsen He's giving away the preface to his new book. Inside, you'll hear an incredible story about one man's journey to live life to the fullest. The story is about a man that Alan interviewed named Gary Rogers, who most notably bought Dreyer's Ice Cream for $1M in the 70's and later sold it to Nestle for $3.2 billion. If you want to know what it means to live a fulfilled life, you won't want to miss the powerful advice that Gary shared before he passed away.  Go get the story by visiting JustinDonald.com/54 Get the Lifestyle Investor Book! To get access to The Lifestyle Investor: The 10 Commandments of Cashflow Investing for Passive Income and Financial Freedom visit JustinDonald.com/book Rate & Review If you enjoyed today's episode of The Lifestyle Investor, hit the subscribe button on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Castbox, Google Podcasts, iHeart Radio, or wherever you listen, so future episodes are automatically downloaded directly to your device. You can also help by providing an honest rating & review. Reviews go a long way in helping us build awareness so that we can impact even more people. THANK YOU! Connect with Justin Donald Facebook YouTube Instagram LinkedIn Twitter

Business Wars Daily
Candymakers Get Creative for a Booming Trick or Treat

Business Wars Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 3:07


Today is Monday, November 1, and we're looking at Mars, Inc. vs. Hershey's vs. Nestle.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.