Podcast appearances and mentions of John Phillips

  • 233PODCASTS
  • 743EPISODES
  • 46mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 14, 2023LATEST

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about John Phillips

Latest podcast episodes about John Phillips

Kym McNicholas On Innovation
New Innovation That Gamifies Your Gut Exam

Kym McNicholas On Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2023 46:03


If you are over age 50, your physician may urge you to have a colonoscopy to check for cancer. You might also be urged to have your lower gastrointestinal tract checked using a colonscope and upper GI tract checked using a camera held on to a flexible tube called an endoscope that slips down your throat. An alternative to a procedure which some facilities offer is to swallowing an imaging device shaped like a pill that follows your intestinal tract down through excretion. The limitation with that versus a manual scope is that the current device you swallow can't be directed and so it may miss problem areas. That's why inventor and entrepreneur Torrey Smith started Endiatx. It's a company that's building a newer version called a Pillbot, a type of robot you can swallow, that can be controlled remotely while you are in clinic with your healthcare team. He talks to hosts Kym McNicholas and Dr. John Phillips about gamifying the gut exam and future use cases for robotics in examining the arteries and other areas of the body. Smith sees microrobotics as a game-changer in diagnostics and interventional medicine, at some point even sprouting surgical instruments to treat real-time. Prior to this project, Smith helped invent a device that would remove plaque from the arteries, which is still in use today.

Kym McNicholas On Innovation
How To Survive an AAA or Aortic Dissection

Kym McNicholas On Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 45:51


To continue honoring her Mom, Marilyn Lou Baum McNicholas, who transitioned almost one year ago due to an undetected Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA), Kym McNicholas and cohost Dr. John Phillips are keeping the conversation about detection, prevention, and treatment alive to prevent others from suffering the same fate. While Kym's Mom couldn't get diagnosed and treated in time, David Williams is a survivor of an aortic dissection, who shares his long, painful, but successful, fight for his life. The physician who David credits for saving his life joins the discussion. It's aortic specialist, Dr. George Arnaoutakis, Cardiothoracic Surgeon at University of Texas (UT), Austin, who recently moved from the University of Florida, Gainesville, to build a specialty center at UT. He and Dr. Phillips talk about the prevalence of aortic dissection and aneurysms, the difference between the two life-threatening conditions, how to prevent them, and how to know if you need to seek treatment for one.

Kym McNicholas On Innovation
A Spiritualistically Innovative Approach To Healing

Kym McNicholas On Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 50:26


Mindset is medicine for both the physician and patient. Medicine already recognizes the persuasive power of beliefs. The use of placebos is a great example of that. But it's much more than that, especially with chronic, painful vascular ailments such as peripheral artery disease (P.A.D.), which is restricted blood flow in mainly the leg arteries due to plaque build-up. Patients with P.A.D. feel at times as though a tourniquet is wrapped tightly around their legs when they walk. Sometimes the leg pain and cramping wake them up at night. Dr. Paramjit Romi Chopra joins hosts Kym McNicholas and Dr. John Phillips to talk about the powerful combination of science and spirituality to help patients and physicians persevere in challenging life and limb-saving situations.

Kym McNicholas On Innovation
Treats for You Feet To Weather Through The Winter

Kym McNicholas On Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 51:39


Podiatrist Dr. David Alper joins co-hosts Kym McNicholas and Dr. John Phillips to talk about the cold weather dangers for those with poor circulation and how to protect their life and limb, especially feet.

Band Room Podcast
BRP 86 | Midwest Memories

Band Room Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 63:20


The Band Room Podcast is back at the Midwest Clinic! Join Dylan and his old and new friends: Kenley Kristofferson, Matt Klohs, Matt Neufeld, Lt. Cmdr. Gregory Fritz, Nicole Piunno, John Phillips, Harrison J. Collins, Marie A. Douglas, Katherine Bergman, Dontay L.  Douglas, Omar Thomas, Giovanni Santos, Kelijah Duton, Jonathan Dagenais, Keith Kelly and David Lum speak about some of their favorite Midwest memories!Help support the Band Room Podcast by becoming a patron through Patreon:https://www.patreon.com/bandroompodHelp support the Band Room Podcast by getting your merch at the BRP Storehttp://www.bandroompod.com/storeMusic used in this episodeBRP Theme Music: Skyline by EKR HammellPerforming Ensemble: University of Toronto Wind EnsembleDr. Gillian MacKay – ConductorLake Superior Suite - Pancake Bay & Pukaskwa by Cait NishimuraPerforming Ensemble: University of Toronto Wind EnsembleDr. Gillian MacKay – ConductorChasing Sunlight (Piano Version) by Cait NishimuraArranged and performed by Brian BarberEpisode LinksKenley Kristoffersonhttps://kenleykristofferson.com/Matt Klohshttps://mattklohs.com/Matt Neufeldhttps://www.mattneufeldmusic.com/Lt. Cmdr. Gregory Fritz - U.S Navy Fleet Bandhttps://www.navyband.navy.mil/navymusic/roster/fritz-bioNicole Piunnohttps://www.nicolepiunno.com/John Phillipshttps://www.conn-selmer.com/en-us/education/clinician/profile/john-phillipsHarrison J. Collinshttps://harrisonjcollins.squarespace.com/Marie A. Douglashttps://www.marieadouglas.com/Katherine Bergmanhttps://www.katherinebergman.net/Dontay L.  Douglashttps://www.dontayldouglas.com/aboutOmar Thomashttps://www.omarthomas.com/Giovanni Santoshttps://giosantosmusic.com/Kelijah Dutonhttps://kelijah.com/Jonathan Dagenaishttps://en.jonathandagenais.com/Keith Kellyhttps://www.globalbandroom.com/keith-kellyDavid Lumhttps://www.conn-selmer.com/en-us/education/clinician/profile/david-lumBRP is Supported ByCanadian Band Associationhttps://www.canadianband.org/Interprovincial Music Camphttps://www.campimc.ca/Kaleidoscope Adventureshttps://www.kaleidoscopeadventures.com/Support the show

Kym McNicholas On Innovation
Healthcare Call Center Fails and How to Fix Them

Kym McNicholas On Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 46:06


Open Enrollment just wrapped up and call centers were center stage, handling a high volume of calls from patients looking to secure their health insurance for 2023. On the front lines ready to prevent call center failure was Cyara, a quality assurance technology company that helps organizations, including those in healthcare, spot problems and find resolve of them before the customers discover them and hang up. Show hosts Kym McNicholas and Dr. John Phillips talk to Cyara Senior Vice President of Customer Experience Dennis Renos about the biggest call enter fails and how to fix them. Also, a former Highway Patrol Call Center Supervisor, Connie, shares her limb saving story in our Save My Piggies series. She continued to help facilitate potentially life-saving calls for others while fighting for her own life.

The Farm Podcast Mach II
Film, Mounds, Smiley Face Killers & Other Mysteries w/ JJ Vance & Recluse

The Farm Podcast Mach II

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 130:11


Smiley Face Killers, Native American Earthworks, mounds, effigy sites, Wisconsin, La Crosse, La Crosse's earthworks & many bars, the mystical Catholicism of La Crosse, Cathedral of St. Joseph the Work Man, Franciscan Order, Riverside Park, Mississippi River, Wisconsin River, Frank Lloyd Wright, Taliesin, gifted program, high number of gifted kids among Smiley victims, "Chinatown," "Chinatown" depicting a Smiley murder, Menomonie, Eau Claire, Neil Gaiman, "American Gods," David Lynch, Madison, Nirvana, Kurt Cobain, William S. Burroughs, DC Sniper, University of Wisconsin system, Luke Helder, Hartland, Smiley victims who attended the same high school, Lake Geneva, industrial metal scene, Elkhorn, Whitewater, Michigan dogmen, Beast of Bray Road, Smiley in Ohio, US Route 23, Cincinnati, Covington, Piep Piper clock tower in Covington, John Phillips, Michelle Phillips, Brett Easton EllisMusic by: Keith Allen Dennishttps://keithallendennis.bandcamp.com/ Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Small Caps
Blue Energy (ASX: BLU) shores-up Sapphire block gas reserves to underpin major supply agreements (w/ John Phillips)

Small Caps

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 28:08


Blue Energy (ASX: BLU) managing director John Phillips joins Small Caps to discuss the company's pilot well appraisal program at its Sapphire coal seam gas block within ATP-814 in Queensland's north Bowen Basin. A well appraisal program is nearing completion at the block, which is adjacent to Arrow's Moranbah gas operation, and aims to build reserves to underpin supply agreements with Origin, Energy Australia and QPM. Blue's wider ATP-814 permit hosts 3,000PJ in gas resources, which Mr Phillips says is equivalent to eight years' supply for Australia's east coast. Article:https://smallcaps.com.au/blue-energy-completes-drilling-phase-sapphire-coal-seam-gas-block-production-testing/ For more information on Blue Energy:https://smallcaps.com.au/stocks/BLU/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Kym McNicholas On Innovation
Preventing Premature Death From Aortic Aneurysms

Kym McNicholas On Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 45:54


Show co-host Kym McNicholas is dedicating this how to her Mom Marilyn Lou Baum McNicholas who transitioned earlier this year due to an undetected abdominal aortic aneurysm that ultimately ruptured. Marilyn's cardiologist told Kym that there's still so much doctors don't know about aneurysms and because of that, there are gaps in care, which lead to premature death. Marilyn was diagnosed with having a 4cm thoracic aneurysm six months prior to her transition. Her cardiologist would only say it's not at a size to worry about since a surgeon typically does not treat an aneurysm until it's at least 5cm. Her cardiologist never discussed how to preventthe aneurysm from growing, what symptoms to look for, or her increased risk of having an abdominal aortic aneurysm because of it. So, not further testing was done despite textbook symptoms of symptoms of increasing erratic blood pressure, tachycardia, a pulsating feeling around her belly button, an abdominal mass, and severe radiating pain in her back. Her cardiologist, a vascular surgeon, and an emergency room doctor told her there was nothing life-threatening with her symptoms. They told her to take muscle relaxers and prescribed physical therapy, along with traction. The autopsy revealed what doctors missed.    Should Marilyn's 4cm thoracic aneurysm have been taken more seriously? Should she have been tested for an abdominal aortic aneurysm after being diagnosed with a thoracic aneurysm? Should her symptoms have been a red flag for doctors? In this episode, co-host Dr. John Phillips leads the discussion with guest Cardiac Surgeon Dr. Arnaoutakis, about specifically thoracic and thoraco abdominal aneurysms. For those who aren't familiar with what an aneurysm is and how it forms, they will go through the basics. But the primary discussion will be around the current gaps in care, new innovative approaches to diagnosis and treatment, as well as critical questions to discuss with your healthcare team.  Also, Retired Veterinarian, triathlete, and author Dr. Kevin Morgan shares his personal story about how he diagnosed his own aortic aneurysm, found the right treatment, and continues to compete in running and cycling events.

C86 Show - Indie Pop
Renegade Soundwave & Rema Rema- Gary Asquith

C86 Show - Indie Pop

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 83:08


Gary Asquith - Renegade Soundwave & Rema Rema- in conversation with David Eastaugh Debuting on Rhythm King label with the "Kray Twins" single, their early records mixed together the sound of the then embryonic dance scene, hip-hop, dub, sampling and electro-industrial noise. Later singles such as "Biting My Nails" (a cover version of a song by Genevieve Waite, from her 1974 album, Romance is on the Rise, produced by her husband, John Phillips of The Mamas and the Papas) and "Probably a Robbery" eventually reaching number 38 in the UK Singles Chart in 1990, mostly due to the AA side "Ozone Breakdown", a popular dance track, which featured a sample from the film, The Warriors. A switch to Mute Records brought the release of the debut long-player Soundclash in 1989, swiftly followed by In Dub. The Japanese version of In Dub featured a second disc of the cuts, previously available only on their early 12" singles. At this point, Bonnie exited to pursue a solo career (citing musical differences), leaving Briottet and Asquith to continue as a duo. After two more albums, the group formally disbanded in 1995, leaving behind a legacy of four albums and 12 singles.

Kym McNicholas On Innovation
Innovative Holdiay Gifts for Vascular Patients

Kym McNicholas On Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 47:06


A great time for family and friends to show support for those with vascular diseases such as coronary artery disease (CAD), restricted blood flow in the arteries around the heart that restricts blood flow, and peripheral artery disease (PAD), which is restricted blood flow in the leg arteries due to plaque build-up, also chronic venous insufficiency (CVI), diabetes, and Raynaud's Syndrome. Hosts Kym McNicholas and Dr. John Phillips, along with guest co-hosts Nurse Practitioner Kay Smith and Revitalist CEO Kathryn Walker offer some innovative ideas to help with mental well-being, exercise regimens, health monitoring and more. PAD Warrior and PAD Life Outdoors Youtube channel creator Robert Castleberry joins to share his favorite holiday gift gets for those who are seeking adventure!

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 158: “White Rabbit” by Jefferson Airplane

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022


Episode one hundred and fifty-eight of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “White Rabbit”, Jefferson Airplane, and the rise of the San Francisco sound. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-three-minute bonus episode available, on "Omaha" by Moby Grape. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Erratum I refer to Back to Methuselah by Robert Heinlein. This is of course a play by George Bernard Shaw. What I meant to say was Methuselah's Children. Resources I hope to upload a Mixcloud tomorrow, and will edit it in, but have had some problems with the site today. Jefferson Airplane's first four studio albums, plus a 1968 live album, can be found in this box set. I've referred to three main books here. Got a Revolution!: The Turbulent Flight of Jefferson Airplane by Jeff Tamarkin is written with the co-operation of the band members, but still finds room to criticise them. Jefferson Airplane On Track by Richard Molesworth is a song-by-song guide to the band's music. And Been So Long: My Life and Music by Jorma Kaukonen is Kaukonen's autobiography. Some information on Skip Spence and Matthew Katz also comes from What's Big and Purple and Lives in the Ocean?: The Moby Grape Story, by Cam Cobb, which I also used for this week's bonus. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript Before I start, I need to confess an important and hugely embarrassing error in this episode. I've only ever seen Marty Balin's name written down, never heard it spoken, and only after recording the episode, during the editing process, did I discover I mispronounce it throughout. It's usually an advantage for the podcast that I get my information from books rather than TV documentaries and the like, because they contain far more information, but occasionally it causes problems like that. My apologies. Also a brief note that this episode contains some mentions of racism, antisemitism, drug and alcohol abuse, and gun violence. One of the themes we've looked at in recent episodes is the way the centre of the musical world -- at least the musical world as it was regarded by the people who thought of themselves as hip in the mid-sixties -- was changing in 1967. Up to this point, for a few years there had been two clear centres of the rock and pop music worlds. In the UK, there was London, and any British band who meant anything had to base themselves there. And in the US, at some point around 1963, the centre of the music industry had moved West. Up to then it had largely been based in New York, and there was still a thriving industry there as of the mid sixties. But increasingly the records that mattered, that everyone in the country had been listening to, had come out of LA Soul music was, of course, still coming primarily from Detroit and from the Country-Soul triangle in Tennessee and Alabama, but when it came to the new brand of electric-guitar rock that was taking over the airwaves, LA was, up until the first few months of 1967, the only city that was competing with London, and was the place to be. But as we heard in the episode on "San Francisco", with the Monterey Pop Festival all that started to change. While the business part of the music business remained centred in LA, and would largely remain so, LA was no longer the hip place to be. Almost overnight, jangly guitars, harmonies, and Brian Jones hairstyles were out, and feedback, extended solos, and droopy moustaches were in. The place to be was no longer LA, but a few hundred miles North, in San Francisco -- something that the LA bands were not all entirely happy about: [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Who Needs the Peace Corps?"] In truth, the San Francisco music scene, unlike many of the scenes we've looked at so far in this series, had rather a limited impact on the wider world of music. Bands like Jefferson Airplane, the Grateful Dead, and Big Brother and the Holding Company were all both massively commercially successful and highly regarded by critics, but unlike many of the other bands we've looked at before and will look at in future, they didn't have much of an influence on the bands that would come after them, musically at least. Possibly this is because the music from the San Francisco scene was always primarily that -- music created by and for a specific group of people, and inextricable from its context. The San Francisco musicians were defining themselves by their geographical location, their peers, and the situation they were in, and their music was so specifically of the place and time that to attempt to copy it outside of that context would appear ridiculous, so while many of those bands remain much loved to this day, and many made some great music, it's very hard to point to ways in which that music influenced later bands. But what they did influence was the whole of rock music culture. For at least the next thirty years, and arguably to this day, the parameters in which rock musicians worked if they wanted to be taken seriously – their aesthetic and political ideals, their methods of collaboration, the cultural norms around drug use and sexual promiscuity, ideas of artistic freedom and authenticity, the choice of acceptable instruments – in short, what it meant to be a rock musician rather than a pop, jazz, country, or soul artist – all those things were defined by the cultural and behavioural norms of the San Francisco scene between about 1966 and 68. Without the San Francisco scene there's no Woodstock, no Rolling Stone magazine, no Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, no hippies, no groupies, no rock stars. So over the next few months we're going to take several trips to the Bay Area, and look at the bands which, for a brief time, defined the counterculture in America. The story of Jefferson Airplane -- and unlike other bands we've looked at recently, like The Pink Floyd and The Buffalo Springfield, they never had a definite article at the start of their name to wither away like a vestigial organ in subsequent years -- starts with Marty Balin. Balin was born in Ohio, but was a relatively sickly child -- he later talked about being autistic, and seems to have had the chronic illnesses that so often go with neurodivergence -- so in the hope that the dry air would be good for his chest his family moved to Arizona. Then when his father couldn't find work there, they moved further west to San Francisco, in the Haight-Ashbury area, long before that area became the byword for the hippie movement. But it was in LA that he started his music career, and got his surname. Balin had been named Marty Buchwald as a kid, but when he was nineteen he had accompanied a friend to LA to visit a music publisher, and had ended up singing backing vocals on her demos. While he was there, he had encountered the arranger Jimmy Haskell. Haskell was on his way to becoming one of the most prominent arrangers in the music industry, and in his long career he would go on to do arrangements for Bobby Gentry, Blondie, Steely Dan, Simon and Garfunkel, and many others. But at the time he was best known for his work on Ricky Nelson's hits: [Excerpt: Ricky Nelson, "Hello Mary Lou"] Haskell thought that Marty had the makings of a Ricky Nelson style star, as he was a good-looking young man with a decent voice, and he became a mentor for the young man. Making the kind of records that Haskell arranged was expensive, and so Haskell suggested a deal to him -- if Marty's father would pay for studio time and musicians, Haskell would make a record with him and find him a label to put it out. Marty's father did indeed pay for the studio time and the musicians -- some of the finest working in LA at the time. The record, released under the name Marty Balin, featured Jack Nitzsche on keyboards, Earl Palmer on drums, Milt Jackson on vibraphone, Red Callender on bass, and Glen Campbell and Barney Kessell on guitars, and came out on Challenge Records, a label owned by Gene Autry: [Excerpt: Marty Balin, "Nobody But You"] Neither that, nor Balin's follow-up single, sold a noticeable amount of copies, and his career as a teen idol was over before it had begun. Instead, as many musicians of his age did, he decided to get into folk music, joining a vocal harmony group called the Town Criers, who patterned themselves after the Weavers, and performed the same kind of material that every other clean-cut folk vocal group was performing at the time -- the kind of songs that John Phillips and Steve Stills and Cass Elliot and Van Dyke Parks and the rest were all performing in their own groups at the same time. The Town Criers never made any records while they were together, but some archival recordings of them have been released over the decades: [Excerpt: The Town Criers, "900 Miles"] The Town Criers split up, and Balin started performing as a solo folkie again. But like all those other then-folk musicians, Balin realised that he had to adapt to the K/T-event level folk music extinction that happened when the Beatles hit America like a meteorite. He had to form a folk-rock group if he wanted to survive -- and given that there were no venues for such a group to play in San Francisco, he also had to start a nightclub for them to play in. He started hanging around the hootenannies in the area, looking for musicians who might form an electric band. The first person he decided on was a performer called Paul Kantner, mainly because he liked his attitude. Kantner had got on stage in front of a particularly drunk, loud, crowd, and performed precisely half a song before deciding he wasn't going to perform in front of people like that and walking off stage. Kantner was the only member of the new group to be a San Franciscan -- he'd been born and brought up in the city. He'd got into folk music at university, where he'd also met a guitar player named Jorma Kaukonen, who had turned him on to cannabis, and the two had started giving music lessons at a music shop in San Jose. There Kantner had also been responsible for booking acts at a local folk club, where he'd first encountered acts like Mother McCree's Uptown Jug Champions, a jug band which included Jerry Garcia, Pigpen McKernan, and Bob Weir, who would later go on to be the core members of the Grateful Dead: [Excerpt: Mother McCree's Uptown Jug Champions, "In the Jailhouse Now"] Kantner had moved around a bit between Northern and Southern California, and had been friendly with two other musicians on the Californian folk scene, David Crosby and Roger McGuinn. When their new group, the Byrds, suddenly became huge, Kantner became aware of the possibility of doing something similar himself, and so when Marty Balin approached him to form a band, he agreed. On bass, they got in a musician called Bob Harvey, who actually played double bass rather than electric, and who stuck to that for the first few gigs the group played -- he had previously been in a band called the Slippery Rock String Band. On drums, they brought in Jerry Peloquin, who had formerly worked for the police, but now had a day job as an optician. And on vocals, they brought in Signe Toley -- who would soon marry and change her name to Signe Anderson, so that's how I'll talk about her to avoid confusion. The group also needed a lead guitarist though -- both Balin and Kantner were decent rhythm players and singers, but they needed someone who was a better instrumentalist. They decided to ask Kantner's old friend Jorma Kaukonen. Kaukonen was someone who was seriously into what would now be called Americana or roots music. He'd started playing the guitar as a teenager, not like most people of his generation inspired by Elvis or Buddy Holly, but rather after a friend of his had shown him how to play an old Carter Family song, "Jimmy Brown the Newsboy": [Excerpt: The Carter Family, "Jimmy Brown the Newsboy"] Kaukonen had had a far more interesting life than most of the rest of the group. His father had worked for the State Department -- and there's some suggestion he'd worked for the CIA -- and the family had travelled all over the world, staying in Pakistan, the Philippines, and Finland. For most of his childhood, he'd gone by the name Jerry, because other kids beat him up for having a foreign name and called him a Nazi, but by the time he turned twenty he was happy enough using his birth name. Kaukonen wasn't completely immune to the appeal of rock and roll -- he'd formed a rock band, The Triumphs, with his friend Jack Casady when he was a teenager, and he loved Ricky Nelson's records -- but his fate as a folkie had been pretty much sealed when he went to Antioch College. There he met up with a blues guitarist called Ian Buchanan. Buchanan never had much of a career as a professional, but he had supposedly spent nine years studying with the blues and ragtime guitar legend Rev. Gary Davis, and he was certainly a fine guitarist, as can be heard on his contribution to The Blues Project, the album Elektra put out of white Greenwich Village musicians like John Sebastian and Dave Van Ronk playing old blues songs: [Excerpt: Ian Buchanan, "The Winding Boy"] Kaukonen became something of a disciple of Buchanan -- he said later that Buchanan probably taught him how to play because he was such a terrible player and Buchanan couldn't stand to listen to it -- as did John Hammond Jr, another student at Antioch at the same time. After studying at Antioch, Kaukonen started to travel around, including spells in Greenwich Village and in the Philippines, before settling in Santa Clara, where he studied for a sociology degree and became part of a social circle that included Dino Valenti, Jerry Garcia, and Billy Roberts, the credited writer of "Hey Joe". He also started performing as a duo with a singer called Janis Joplin. Various of their recordings from this period circulate, mostly recorded at Kaukonen's home with the sound of his wife typing in the background while the duo rehearse, as on this performance of an old Bessie Smith song: [Excerpt: Jorma Kaukonen and Janis Joplin, "Nobody Loves You When You're Down and Out"] By 1965 Kaukonen saw himself firmly as a folk-blues purist, who would not even think of playing rock and roll music, which he viewed with more than a little contempt. But he allowed himself to be brought along to audition for the new group, and Ken Kesey happened to be there. Kesey was a novelist who had written two best-selling books, One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest and Sometimes A Great Notion, and used the financial independence that gave him to organise a group of friends who called themselves the Merry Pranksters, who drove from coast to coast and back again in a psychedelic-painted bus, before starting a series of events that became known as Acid Tests, parties at which everyone was on LSD, immortalised in Tom Wolfe's book The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. Nobody has ever said why Kesey was there, but he had brought along an Echoplex, a reverb unit one could put a guitar through -- and nobody has explained why Kesey, who wasn't a musician, had an Echoplex to hand. But Kaukonen loved the sound that he could get by putting his guitar through the device, and so for that reason more than any other he decided to become an electric player and join the band, going out and buying a Rickenbacker twelve-string and Vox Treble Booster because that was what Roger McGuinn used. He would later also get a Guild Thunderbird six-string guitar and a Standel Super Imperial amp, following the same principle of buying the equipment used by other guitarists he liked, as they were what Zal Yanovsky of the Lovin' Spoonful used. He would use them for all his six-string playing for the next couple of years, only later to discover that the Lovin' Spoonful despised them and only used them because they had an endorsement deal with the manufacturers. Kaukonen was also the one who came up with the new group's name. He and his friends had a running joke where they had "Bluesman names", things like "Blind Outrage" and "Little Sun Goldfarb". Kaukonen's bluesman name, given to him by his friend Steve Talbot, had been Blind Thomas Jefferson Airplane, a reference to the 1920s blues guitarist Blind Lemon Jefferson: [Excerpt: Blind Lemon Jefferson, "Match Box Blues"] At the band meeting where they were trying to decide on a name, Kaukonen got frustrated at the ridiculous suggestions that were being made, and said "You want a stupid name? Howzabout this... Jefferson Airplane?" He said in his autobiography "It was one of those rare moments when everyone in the band agreed, and that was that. I think it was the only band meeting that ever allowed me to come away smiling." The newly-named Jefferson Airplane started to rehearse at the Matrix Club, the club that Balin had decided to open. This was run with three sound engineer friends, who put in the seed capital for the club. Balin had stock options in the club, which he got by trading a share of the band's future earnings to his partners, though as the group became bigger he eventually sold his stock in the club back to his business partners. Before their first public performance, they started working with a manager, Matthew Katz, mostly because Katz had access to a recording of a then-unreleased Bob Dylan song, "Lay Down Your Weary Tune": [Excerpt: Bob Dylan, "Lay Down Your Weary Tune"] The group knew that the best way for a folk-rock band to make a name for themselves was to perform a Dylan song nobody else had yet heard, and so they agreed to be managed by Katz. Katz started a pre-publicity blitz, giving out posters, badges, and bumper stickers saying "Jefferson Airplane Loves You" all over San Francisco -- and insisting that none of the band members were allowed to say "Hello" when they answered the phone any more, they had to say "Jefferson Airplane Loves You!" For their early rehearsals and gigs, they were performing almost entirely cover versions of blues and folk songs, things like Fred Neil's "The Other Side of This Life" and Dino Valenti's "Get Together" which were the common currency of the early folk-rock movement, and songs by their friends, like one called "Flower Bomb" by David Crosby, which Crosby now denies ever having written. They did start writing the odd song, but at this point they were more focused on performance than on writing. They also hired a press agent, their friend Bill Thompson. Thompson was friends with the two main music writers at the San Francisco Chronicle, Ralph Gleason, the famous jazz critic, who had recently started also reviewing rock music, and John Wasserman. Thompson got both men to come to the opening night of the Matrix, and both gave the group glowing reviews in the Chronicle. Record labels started sniffing around the group immediately as a result of this coverage, and according to Katz he managed to get a bidding war started by making sure that when A&R men came to the club there were always two of them from different labels, so they would see the other person and realise they weren't the only ones interested. But before signing a record deal they needed to make some personnel changes. The first member to go was Jerry Peloquin, for both musical and personal reasons. Peloquin was used to keeping strict time and the other musicians had a more free-flowing idea of what tempo they should be playing at, but also he had worked for the police while the other members were all taking tons of illegal drugs. The final break with Peloquin came when he did the rest of the group a favour -- Paul Kantner's glasses broke during a rehearsal, and as Peloquin was an optician he offered to take them back to his shop and fix them. When he got back, he found them auditioning replacements for him. He beat Kantner up, and that was the end of Jerry Peloquin in Jefferson Airplane. His replacement was Skip Spence, who the group had met when he had accompanied three friends to the Matrix, which they were using as a rehearsal room. Spence's friends went on to be the core members of Quicksilver Messenger Service along with Dino Valenti: [Excerpt: Quicksilver Messenger Service, "Dino's Song"] But Balin decided that Spence looked like a rock star, and told him that he was now Jefferson Airplane's drummer, despite Spence being a guitarist and singer, not a drummer. But Spence was game, and learned to play the drums. Next they needed to get rid of Bob Harvey. According to Harvey, the decision to sack him came after David Crosby saw the band rehearsing and said "Nice song, but get rid of the bass player" (along with an expletive before the word bass which I can't say without incurring the wrath of Apple). Crosby denies ever having said this. Harvey had started out in the group on double bass, but to show willing he'd switched in his last few gigs to playing an electric bass. When he was sacked by the group, he returned to double bass, and to the Slippery Rock String Band, who released one single in 1967: [Excerpt: The Slippery Rock String Band, "Tule Fog"] Harvey's replacement was Kaukonen's old friend Jack Casady, who Kaukonen knew was now playing bass, though he'd only ever heard him playing guitar when they'd played together. Casady was rather cautious about joining a rock band, but then Kaukonen told him that the band were getting fifty dollars a week salary each from Katz, and Casady flew over from Washington DC to San Francisco to join the band. For the first few gigs, he used Bob Harvey's bass, which Harvey was good enough to lend him despite having been sacked from the band. Unfortunately, right from the start Casady and Kantner didn't get on. When Casady flew in from Washington, he had a much more clean-cut appearance than the rest of the band -- one they've described as being nerdy, with short, slicked-back, side-parted hair and a handlebar moustache. Kantner insisted that Casady shave the moustache off, and he responded by shaving only one side, so in profile on one side he looked clean-shaven, while from the other side he looked like he had a full moustache. Kantner also didn't like Casady's general attitude, or his playing style, at all -- though most critics since this point have pointed to Casady's bass playing as being the most interesting and distinctive thing about Jefferson Airplane's style. This lineup seems to have been the one that travelled to LA to audition for various record companies -- a move that immediately brought the group a certain amount of criticism for selling out, both for auditioning for record companies and for going to LA at all, two things that were already anathema on the San Francisco scene. The only audition anyone remembers them having specifically is one for Phil Spector, who according to Kaukonen was waving a gun around during the audition, so he and Casady walked out. Around this time as well, the group performed at an event billed as "A Tribute to Dr. Strange", organised by the radical hippie collective Family Dog. Marvel Comics, rather than being the multi-billion-dollar Disney-owned corporate juggernaut it is now, was regarded as a hip, almost underground, company -- and around this time they briefly started billing their comics not as comics but as "Marvel Pop Art Productions". The magical adventures of Dr. Strange, Master of the Mystic Arts, and in particular the art by far-right libertarian artist Steve Ditko, were regarded as clear parallels to both the occult dabblings and hallucinogen use popular among the hippies, though Ditko had no time for either, following as he did an extreme version of Ayn Rand's Objectivism. It was at the Tribute to Dr. Strange that Jefferson Airplane performed for the first time with a band named The Great Society, whose lead singer, Grace Slick, would later become very important in Jefferson Airplane's story: [Excerpt: The Great Society, "Someone to Love"] That gig was also the first one where the band and their friends noticed that large chunks of the audience were now dressing up in costumes that were reminiscent of the Old West. Up to this point, while Katz had been managing the group and paying them fifty dollars a week even on weeks when they didn't perform, he'd been doing so without a formal contract, in part because the group didn't trust him much. But now they were starting to get interest from record labels, and in particular RCA Records desperately wanted them. While RCA had been the label who had signed Elvis Presley, they had otherwise largely ignored rock and roll, considering that since they had the biggest rock star in the world they didn't need other ones, and concentrating largely on middle-of-the-road acts. But by the mid-sixties Elvis' star had faded somewhat, and they were desperate to get some of the action for the new music -- and unlike the other major American labels, they didn't have a reciprocal arrangement with a British label that allowed them to release anything by any of the new British stars. The group were introduced to RCA by Rod McKuen, a songwriter and poet who later became America's best-selling poet and wrote songs that sold over a hundred million copies. At this point McKuen was in his Jacques Brel phase, recording loose translations of the Belgian songwriter's songs with McKuen translating the lyrics: [Excerpt: Rod McKuen, "Seasons in the Sun"] McKuen thought that Jefferson Airplane might be a useful market for his own songs, and brought the group to RCA. RCA offered Jefferson Airplane twenty-five thousand dollars to sign with them, and Katz convinced the group that RCA wouldn't give them this money without them having signed a management contract with him. Kaukonen, Kantner, Spence, and Balin all signed without much hesitation, but Jack Casady didn't yet sign, as he was the new boy and nobody knew if he was going to be in the band for the long haul. The other person who refused to sign was Signe Anderson. In her case, she had a much better reason for refusing to sign, as unlike the rest of the band she had actually read the contract, and she found it to be extremely worrying. She did eventually back down on the day of the group's first recording session, but she later had the contract renegotiated. Jack Casady also signed the contract right at the start of the first session -- or at least, he thought he'd signed the contract then. He certainly signed *something*, without having read it. But much later, during a court case involving the band's longstanding legal disputes with Katz, it was revealed that the signature on the contract wasn't Casady's, and was badly forged. What he actually *did* sign that day has never been revealed, to him or to anyone else. Katz also signed all the group as songwriters to his own publishing company, telling them that they legally needed to sign with him if they wanted to make records, and also claimed to RCA that he had power of attorney for the band, which they say they never gave him -- though to be fair to Katz, given the band members' habit of signing things without reading or understanding them, it doesn't seem beyond the realms of possibility that they did. The producer chosen for the group's first album was Tommy Oliver, a friend of Katz's who had previously been an arranger on some of Doris Day's records, and whose next major act after finishing the Jefferson Airplane album was Trombones Unlimited, who released records like "Holiday for Trombones": [Excerpt: Trombones Unlimited, "Holiday For Trombones"] The group weren't particularly thrilled with this choice, but were happier with their engineer, Dave Hassinger, who had worked on records like "Satisfaction" by the Rolling Stones, and had a far better understanding of the kind of music the group were making. They spent about three months recording their first album, even while continually being attacked as sellouts. The album is not considered their best work, though it does contain "Blues From an Airplane", a collaboration between Spence and Balin: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Blues From an Airplane"] Even before the album came out, though, things were starting to change for the group. Firstly, they started playing bigger venues -- their home base went from being the Matrix club to the Fillmore, a large auditorium run by the promoter Bill Graham. They also started to get an international reputation. The British singer-songwriter Donovan released a track called "The Fat Angel" which namechecked the group: [Excerpt: Donovan, "The Fat Angel"] The group also needed a new drummer. Skip Spence decided to go on holiday to Mexico without telling the rest of the band. There had already been some friction with Spence, as he was very eager to become a guitarist and songwriter, and the band already had three songwriting guitarists and didn't really see why they needed a fourth. They sacked Spence, who went on to form Moby Grape, who were also managed by Katz: [Excerpt: Moby Grape, "Omaha"] For his replacement they brought in Spencer Dryden, who was a Hollywood brat like their friend David Crosby -- in Dryden's case he was Charlie Chaplin's nephew, and his father worked as Chaplin's assistant. The story normally goes that the great session drummer Earl Palmer recommended Dryden to the group, but it's also the case that Dryden had been in a band, the Heartbeats, with Tommy Oliver and the great blues guitarist Roy Buchanan, so it may well be that Oliver had recommended him. Dryden had been primarily a jazz musician, playing with people like the West Coast jazz legend Charles Lloyd, though like most jazzers he would slum it on occasion by playing rock and roll music to pay the bills. But then he'd seen an early performance by the Mothers of Invention, and realised that rock music could have a serious artistic purpose too. He'd joined a band called The Ashes, who had released one single, the Jackie DeShannon song "Is There Anything I Can Do?" in December 1965: [Excerpt: The Ashes, "Is There Anything I Can Do?"] The Ashes split up once Dryden left the group to join Jefferson Airplane, but they soon reformed without him as The Peanut Butter Conspiracy, who hooked up with Gary Usher and released several albums of psychedelic sunshine pop. Dryden played his first gig with the group at a Republican Party event on June the sixth, 1966. But by the time Dryden had joined, other problems had become apparent. The group were already feeling like it had been a big mistake to accede to Katz's demands to sign a formal contract with him, and Balin in particular was getting annoyed that he wouldn't let the band see their finances. All the money was getting paid to Katz, who then doled out money to the band when they asked for it, and they had no idea if he was actually paying them what they were owed or not. The group's first album, Jefferson Airplane Takes Off, finally came out in September, and it was a comparative flop. It sold well in San Francisco itself, selling around ten thousand copies in the area, but sold basically nothing anywhere else in the country -- the group's local reputation hadn't extended outside their own immediate scene. It didn't help that the album was pulled and reissued, as RCA censored the initial version of the album because of objections to the lyrics. The song "Runnin' Round This World" was pulled off the album altogether for containing the word "trips", while in "Let Me In" they had to rerecord two lines -- “I gotta get in, you know where" was altered to "You shut the door now it ain't fair" and "Don't tell me you want money" became "Don't tell me it's so funny". Similarly in "Run Around" the phrase "as you lay under me" became "as you stay here by me". Things were also becoming difficult for Anderson. She had had a baby in May and was not only unhappy with having to tour while she had a small child, she was also the band member who was most vocally opposed to Katz. Added to that, her husband did not get on well at all with the group, and she felt trapped between her marriage and her bandmates. Reports differ as to whether she quit the band or was fired, but after a disastrous appearance at the Monterey Jazz Festival, one way or another she was out of the band. Her replacement was already waiting in the wings. Grace Slick, the lead singer of the Great Society, had been inspired by going to one of the early Jefferson Airplane gigs. She later said "I went to see Jefferson Airplane at the Matrix, and they were making more money in a day than I made in a week. They only worked for two or three hours a night, and they got to hang out. I thought 'This looks a lot better than what I'm doing.' I knew I could more or less carry a tune, and I figured if they could do it I could." She was married at the time to a film student named Jerry Slick, and indeed she had done the music for his final project at film school, a film called "Everybody Hits Their Brother Once", which sadly I can't find online. She was also having an affair with Jerry's brother Darby, though as the Slicks were in an open marriage this wasn't particularly untoward. The three of them, with a couple of other musicians, had formed The Great Society, named as a joke about President Johnson's programme of the same name. The Great Society was the name Johnson had given to his whole programme of domestic reforms, including civil rights for Black people, the creation of Medicare and Medicaid, the creation of the National Endowment for the Arts, and more. While those projects were broadly popular among the younger generation, Johnson's escalation of the war in Vietnam had made him so personally unpopular that even his progressive domestic programme was regarded with suspicion and contempt. The Great Society had set themselves up as local rivals to Jefferson Airplane -- where Jefferson Airplane had buttons saying "Jefferson Airplane Loves You!" the Great Society put out buttons saying "The Great Society Really Doesn't Like You Much At All". They signed to Autumn Records, and recorded a song that Darby Slick had written, titled "Someone to Love" -- though the song would later be retitled "Somebody to Love": [Excerpt: The Great Society, "Someone to Love"] That track was produced by Sly Stone, who at the time was working as a producer for Autumn Records. The Great Society, though, didn't like working with Stone, because he insisted on them doing forty-five takes to try to sound professional, as none of them were particularly competent musicians. Grace Slick later said "Sly could play any instrument known to man. He could have just made the record himself, except for the singers. It was kind of degrading in a way" -- and on another occasion she said that he *did* end up playing all the instruments on the finished record. "Someone to Love" was put out as a promo record, but never released to the general public, and nor were any of the Great Society's other recordings for Autumn Records released. Their contract expired and they were let go, at which point they were about to sign to Mercury Records, but then Darby Slick and another member decided to go off to India for a while. Grace's marriage to Jerry was falling apart, though they would stay legally married for several years, and the Great Society looked like it was at an end, so when Grace got the offer to join Jefferson Airplane to replace Signe Anderson, she jumped at the chance. At first, she was purely a harmony singer -- she didn't take over any of the lead vocal parts that Anderson had previously sung, as she had a very different vocal style, and instead she just sang the harmony parts that Anderson had sung on songs with other lead vocalists. But two months after the album they were back in the studio again, recording their second album, and Slick sang lead on several songs there. As well as the new lineup, there was another important change in the studio. They were still working with Dave Hassinger, but they had a new producer, Rick Jarrard. Jarrard was at one point a member of the folk group The Wellingtons, who did the theme tune for "Gilligan's Island", though I can't find anything to say whether or not he was in the group when they recorded that track: [Excerpt: The Wellingtons, "The Ballad of Gilligan's Island"] Jarrard had also been in the similar folk group The Greenwood County Singers, where as we heard in the episode on "Heroes and Villains" he replaced Van Dyke Parks. He'd also released a few singles under his own name, including a version of Parks' "High Coin": [Excerpt: Rick Jarrard, "High Coin"] While Jarrard had similar musical roots to those of Jefferson Airplane's members, and would go on to produce records by people like Harry Nilsson and The Family Tree, he wasn't any more liked by the band than their previous producer had been. So much so, that a few of the band members have claimed that while Jarrard is the credited producer, much of the work that one would normally expect to be done by a producer was actually done by their friend Jerry Garcia, who according to the band members gave them a lot of arranging and structural advice, and was present in the studio and played guitar on several tracks. Jarrard, on the other hand, said categorically "I never met Jerry Garcia. I produced that album from start to finish, never heard from Jerry Garcia, never talked to Jerry Garcia. He was not involved creatively on that album at all." According to the band, though, it was Garcia who had the idea of almost doubling the speed of the retitled "Somebody to Love", turning it into an uptempo rocker: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Somebody to Love"] And one thing everyone is agreed on is that it was Garcia who came up with the album title, when after listening to some of the recordings he said "That's as surrealistic as a pillow!" It was while they were working on the album that was eventually titled Surrealistic Pillow that they finally broke with Katz as their manager, bringing Bill Thompson in as a temporary replacement. Or at least, it was then that they tried to break with Katz. Katz sued the group over their contract, and won. Then they appealed, and they won. Then Katz appealed the appeal, and the Superior Court insisted that if he wanted to appeal the ruling, he had to put up a bond for the fifty thousand dollars the group said he owed them. He didn't, so in 1970, four years after they sacked him as their manager, the appeal was dismissed. Katz appealed the dismissal, and won that appeal, and the case dragged on for another three years, at which point Katz dragged RCA Records into the lawsuit. As a result of being dragged into the mess, RCA decided to stop paying the group their songwriting royalties from record sales directly, and instead put the money into an escrow account. The claims and counterclaims and appeals *finally* ended in 1987, twenty years after the lawsuits had started and fourteen years after the band had stopped receiving their songwriting royalties. In the end, the group won on almost every point, and finally received one point three million dollars in back royalties and seven hundred thousand dollars in interest that had accrued, while Katz got a small token payment. Early in 1967, when the sessions for Surrealistic Pillow had finished, but before the album was released, Newsweek did a big story on the San Francisco scene, which drew national attention to the bands there, and the first big event of what would come to be called the hippie scene, the Human Be-In, happened in Golden Gate Park in January. As the group's audience was expanding rapidly, they asked Bill Graham to be their manager, as he was the most business-minded of the people around the group. The first single from the album, "My Best Friend", a song written by Skip Spence before he quit the band, came out in January 1967 and had no more success than their earlier recordings had, and didn't make the Hot 100. The album came out in February, and was still no higher than number 137 on the charts in March, when the second single, "Somebody to Love", was released: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Somebody to Love"] That entered the charts at the start of April, and by June it had made number five. The single's success also pushed its parent album up to number three by August, just behind the Beatles' Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band and the Monkees' Headquarters. The success of the single also led to the group being asked to do commercials for Levis jeans: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Levis commercial"] That once again got them accused of selling out. Abbie Hoffman, the leader of the Yippies, wrote to the Village Voice about the commercials, saying "It summarized for me all the doubts I have about the hippie philosophy. I realise they are just doing their 'thing', but while the Jefferson Airplane grooves with its thing, over 100 workers in the Levi Strauss plant on the Tennessee-Georgia border are doing their thing, which consists of being on strike to protest deplorable working conditions." The third single from the album, "White Rabbit", came out on the twenty-fourth of June, the day before the Beatles recorded "All You Need is Love", nine days after the release of "See Emily Play", and a week after the group played the Monterey Pop Festival, to give you some idea of how compressed a time period we've been in recently. We talked in the last episode about how there's a big difference between American and British psychedelia at this point in time, because the political nature of the American counterculture was determined by the fact that so many people were being sent off to die in Vietnam. Of all the San Francisco bands, though, Jefferson Airplane were by far the least political -- they were into the culture part of the counterculture, but would often and repeatedly disavow any deeper political meaning in their songs. In early 1968, for example, in a press conference, they said “Don't ask us anything about politics. We don't know anything about it. And what we did know, we just forgot.” So it's perhaps not surprising that of all the American groups, they were the one that was most similar to the British psychedelic groups in their influences, and in particular their frequent references to children's fantasy literature. "White Rabbit" was a perfect example of this. It had started out as "White Rabbit Blues", a song that Slick had written influenced by Alice in Wonderland, and originally performed by the Great Society: [Excerpt: The Great Society, "White Rabbit"] Slick explained the lyrics, and their association between childhood fantasy stories and drugs, later by saying "It's an interesting song but it didn't do what I wanted it to. What I was trying to say was that between the ages of zero and five the information and the input you get is almost indelible. In other words, once a Catholic, always a Catholic. And the parents read us these books, like Alice in Wonderland where she gets high, tall, and she takes mushrooms, a hookah, pills, alcohol. And then there's The Wizard of Oz, where they fall into a field of poppies and when they wake up they see Oz. And then there's Peter Pan, where if you sprinkle white dust on you, you could fly. And then you wonder why we do it? Well, what did you read to me?" While the lyrical inspiration for the track was from Alice in Wonderland, the musical inspiration is less obvious. Slick has on multiple occasions said that the idea for the music came from listening to Miles Davis' album "Sketches of Spain", and in particular to Davis' version of -- and I apologise for almost certainly mangling the Spanish pronunciation badly here -- "Concierto de Aranjuez", though I see little musical resemblance to it myself. [Excerpt: Miles Davis, "Concierto de Aranjuez"] She has also, though, talked about how the song was influenced by Ravel's "Bolero", and in particular the way the piece keeps building in intensity, starting softly and slowly building up, rather than having the dynamic peaks and troughs of most music. And that is definitely a connection I can hear in the music: [Excerpt: Ravel, "Bolero"] Jefferson Airplane's version of "White Rabbit", like their version of "Somebody to Love", was far more professional, far -- and apologies for the pun -- slicker than The Great Society's version. It's also much shorter. The version by The Great Society has a four and a half minute instrumental intro before Slick's vocal enters. By contrast, the version on Surrealistic Pillow comes in at under two and a half minutes in total, and is a tight pop song: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "White Rabbit"] Jack Casady has more recently said that the group originally recorded the song more or less as a lark, because they assumed that all the drug references would mean that RCA would make them remove the song from the album -- after all, they'd cut a song from the earlier album because it had a reference to a trip, so how could they possibly allow a song like "White Rabbit" with its lyrics about pills and mushrooms? But it was left on the album, and ended up making the top ten on the pop charts, peaking at number eight: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "White Rabbit"] In an interview last year, Slick said she still largely lives off the royalties from writing that one song. It would be the last hit single Jefferson Airplane would ever have. Marty Balin later said "Fame changes your life. It's a bit like prison. It ruined the band. Everybody became rich and selfish and self-centred and couldn't care about the band. That was pretty much the end of it all. After that it was just working and living the high life and watching the band destroy itself, living on its laurels." They started work on their third album, After Bathing at Baxter's, in May 1967, while "Somebody to Love" was still climbing the charts. This time, the album was produced by Al Schmitt. Unlike the two previous producers, Schmitt was a fan of the band, and decided the best thing to do was to just let them do their own thing without interfering. The album took months to record, rather than the weeks that Surrealistic Pillow had taken, and cost almost ten times as much money to record. In part the time it took was because of the promotional work the band had to do. Bill Graham was sending them all over the country to perform, which they didn't appreciate. The group complained to Graham in business meetings, saying they wanted to only play in big cities where there were lots of hippies. Graham pointed out in turn that if they wanted to keep having any kind of success, they needed to play places other than San Francisco, LA, New York, and Chicago, because in fact most of the population of the US didn't live in those four cities. They grudgingly took his point. But there were other arguments all the time as well. They argued about whether Graham should be taking his cut from the net or the gross. They argued about Graham trying to push for the next single to be another Grace Slick lead vocal -- they felt like he was trying to make them into just Grace Slick's backing band, while he thought it made sense to follow up two big hits with more singles with the same vocalist. There was also a lawsuit from Balin's former partners in the Matrix, who remembered that bit in the contract about having a share in the group's income and sued for six hundred thousand dollars -- that was settled out of court three years later. And there were interpersonal squabbles too. Some of these were about the music -- Dryden didn't like the fact that Kaukonen's guitar solos were getting longer and longer, and Balin only contributed one song to the new album because all the other band members made fun of him for writing short, poppy, love songs rather than extended psychedelic jams -- but also the group had become basically two rival factions. On one side were Kaukonen and Casady, the old friends and virtuoso instrumentalists, who wanted to extend the instrumental sections of the songs more to show off their playing. On the other side were Grace Slick and Spencer Dryden, the two oldest members of the group by age, but the most recent people to join. They were also unusual in the San Francisco scene for having alcohol as their drug of choice -- drinking was thought of by most of the hippies as being a bit classless, but they were both alcoholics. They were also sleeping together, and generally on the side of shorter, less exploratory, songs. Kantner, who was attracted to Slick, usually ended up siding with her and Dryden, and this left Balin the odd man out in the middle. He later said "I got disgusted with all the ego trips, and the band was so stoned that I couldn't even talk to them. Everybody was in their little shell". While they were still working on the album, they released the first single from it, Kantner's "The Ballad of You and Me and Pooneil". The "Pooneil" in the song was a figure that combined two of Kantner's influences: the Greenwich Village singer-songwriter Fred Neil, the writer of "Everybody's Talkin'" and "Dolphins"; and Winnie the Pooh. The song contained several lines taken from A.A. Milne's children's stories: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "The Ballad of You and Me and Pooneil"] That only made number forty-two on the charts. It was the last Jefferson Airplane single to make the top fifty. At a gig in Bakersfield they got arrested for inciting a riot, because they encouraged the crowd to dance, even though local by-laws said that nobody under sixteen was allowed to dance, and then they nearly got arrested again after Kantner's behaviour on the private plane they'd chartered to get them back to San Francisco that night. Kantner had been chain-smoking, and this annoyed the pilot, who asked Kantner to put his cigarette out, so Kantner opened the door of the plane mid-flight and threw the lit cigarette out. They'd chartered that plane because they wanted to make sure they got to see a new group, Cream, who were playing the Fillmore: [Excerpt: Cream, "Strange Brew"] After seeing that, the divisions in the band were even wider -- Kaukonen and Casady now *knew* that what the band needed was to do long, extended, instrumental jams. Cream were the future, two-minute pop songs were the past. Though they weren't completely averse to two-minute pop songs. The group were recording at RCA studios at the same time as the Monkees, and members of the two groups would often jam together. The idea of selling out might have been anathema to their *audience*, but the band members themselves didn't care about things like that. Indeed, at one point the group returned from a gig to the mansion they were renting and found squatters had moved in and were using their private pool -- so they shot at the water. The squatters quickly moved on. As Dryden put it "We all -- Paul, Jorma, Grace, and myself -- had guns. We weren't hippies. Hippies were the people that lived on the streets down in Haight-Ashbury. We were basically musicians and art school kids. We were into guns and machinery" After Bathing at Baxter's only went to number seventeen on the charts, not a bad position but a flop compared to their previous album, and Bill Graham in particular took this as more proof that he had been right when for the last few months he'd been attacking the group as self-indulgent. Eventually, Slick and Dryden decided that either Bill Graham was going as their manager, or they were going. Slick even went so far as to try to negotiate a solo deal with Elektra Records -- as the voice on the hits, everyone was telling her she was the only one who mattered anyway. David Anderle, who was working for the label, agreed a deal with her, but Jac Holzman refused to authorise the deal, saying "Judy Collins doesn't get that much money, why should Grace Slick?" The group did fire Graham, and went one further and tried to become his competitors. They teamed up with the Grateful Dead to open a new venue, the Carousel Ballroom, to compete with the Fillmore, but after a few months they realised they were no good at running a venue and sold it to Graham. Graham, who was apparently unhappy with the fact that the people living around the Fillmore were largely Black given that the bands he booked appealed to mostly white audiences, closed the original Fillmore, renamed the Carousel the Fillmore West, and opened up a second venue in New York, the Fillmore East. The divisions in the band were getting worse -- Kaukonen and Casady were taking more and more speed, which was making them play longer and faster instrumental solos whether or not the rest of the band wanted them to, and Dryden, whose hands often bled from trying to play along with them, definitely did not want them to. But the group soldiered on and recorded their fourth album, Crown of Creation. This album contained several songs that were influenced by science fiction novels. The most famous of these was inspired by the right-libertarian author Robert Heinlein, who was hugely influential on the counterculture. Jefferson Airplane's friends the Monkees had already recorded a song based on Heinlein's The Door Into Summer, an unintentionally disturbing novel about a thirty-year-old man who falls in love with a twelve-year-old girl, and who uses a combination of time travel and cryogenic freezing to make their ages closer together so he can marry her: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "The Door Into Summer"] Now Jefferson Airplane were recording a song based on Heinlein's most famous novel, Stranger in a Strange Land. Stranger in a Strange Land has dated badly, thanks to its casual homophobia and rape-apologia, but at the time it was hugely popular in hippie circles for its advocacy of free love and group marriages -- so popular that a religion, the Church of All Worlds, based itself on the book. David Crosby had taken inspiration from it and written "Triad", a song asking two women if they'll enter into a polygamous relationship with him, and recorded it with the Byrds: [Excerpt: The Byrds, "Triad"] But the other members of the Byrds disliked the song, and it was left unreleased for decades. As Crosby was friendly with Jefferson Airplane, and as members of the band were themselves advocates of open relationships, they recorded their own version with Slick singing lead: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Triad"] The other song on the album influenced by science fiction was the title track, Paul Kantner's "Crown of Creation". This song was inspired by The Chrysalids, a novel by the British writer John Wyndham. The Chrysalids is one of Wyndham's most influential novels, a post-apocalyptic story about young children who are born with mutant superpowers and have to hide them from their parents as they will be killed if they're discovered. The novel is often thought to have inspired Marvel Comics' X-Men, and while there's an unpleasant eugenic taste to its ending, with the idea that two species can't survive in the same ecological niche and the younger, "superior", species must outcompete the old, that idea also had a lot of influence in the counterculture, as well as being a popular one in science fiction. Kantner's song took whole lines from The Chrysalids, much as he had earlier done with A.A. Milne: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Crown of Creation"] The Crown of Creation album was in some ways a return to the more focused songwriting of Surrealistic Pillow, although the sessions weren't without their experiments. Slick and Dryden collaborated with Frank Zappa and members of the Mothers of Invention on an avant-garde track called "Would You Like a Snack?" (not the same song as the later Zappa song of the same name) which was intended for the album, though went unreleased until a CD box set decades later: [Excerpt: Grace Slick and Frank Zappa, "Would You Like a Snack?"] But the finished album was generally considered less self-indulgent than After Bathing at Baxter's, and did better on the charts as a result. It reached number six, becoming their second and last top ten album, helped by the group's appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show in September 1968, a month after it came out. That appearance was actually organised by Colonel Tom Parker, who suggested them to Sullivan as a favour to RCA Records. But another TV appearance at the time was less successful. They appeared on the Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour, one of the most popular TV shows among the young, hip, audience that the group needed to appeal to, but Slick appeared in blackface. She's later said that there was no political intent behind this, and that she was just trying the different makeup she found in the dressing room as a purely aesthetic thing, but that doesn't really explain the Black power salute she gives at one point. Slick was increasingly obnoxious on stage, as her drinking was getting worse and her relationship with Dryden was starting to break down. Just before the Smothers Brothers appearance she was accused at a benefit for the Whitney Museum of having called the audience "filthy Jews", though she has always said that what she actually said was "filthy jewels", and she was talking about the ostentatious jewellery some of the audience were wearing. The group struggled through a performance at Altamont -- an event we will talk about in a future episode, so I won't go into it here, except to say that it was a horrifying experience for everyone involved -- and performed at Woodstock, before releasing their fifth studio album, Volunteers, in 1969: [Excerpt: Jefferson Airplane, "Volunteers"] That album made the top twenty, but was the last album by the classic lineup of the band. By this point Spencer Dryden and Grace Slick had broken up, with Slick starting to date Kantner, and Dryden was also disappointed at the group's musical direction, and left. Balin also left, feeling sidelined in the group. They released several more albums with varying lineups, including at various points their old friend David Frieberg of Quicksilver Messenger Service, the violinist Papa John Creach, and the former drummer of the Turtles, Johnny Barbata. But as of 1970 the group's members had already started working on two side projects -- an acoustic band called Hot Tuna, led by Kaukonen and Casady, which sometimes also featured Balin, and a project called Paul Kantner's Jefferson Starship, which also featured Slick and had recorded an album, Blows Against the Empire, the second side of which was based on the Robert Heinlein novel Back to Methuselah, and which became one of the first albums ever nominated for science fiction's Hugo Awards: [Excerpt: Jefferson Starship, "Have You Seen The Stars Tonite"] That album featured contributions from David Crosby and members of the Grateful Dead, as well as Casady on two tracks, but  in 1974 when Kaukonen and Casady quit Jefferson Airplane to make Hot Tuna their full-time band, Kantner, Slick, and Frieberg turned Jefferson Starship into a full band. Over the next decade, Jefferson Starship had a lot of moderate-sized hits, with a varying lineup that at one time or another saw several members, including Slick, go and return, and saw Marty Balin back with them for a while. In 1984, Kantner left the group, and sued them to stop them using the Jefferson Starship name. A settlement was reached in which none of Kantner, Slick, Kaukonen, or Casady could use the words "Jefferson" or "Airplane" in their band-names without the permission of all the others, and the remaining members of Jefferson Starship renamed their band just Starship -- and had three number one singles in the late eighties with Slick on lead, becoming far more commercially successful than their precursor bands had ever been: [Excerpt: Starship, "We Built This City on Rock & Roll"] Slick left Starship in 1989, and there was a brief Jefferson Airplane reunion tour, with all the classic members but Dryden, but then Slick decided that she was getting too old to perform rock and roll music, and decided to retire from music and become a painter, something she's stuck to for more than thirty years. Kantner and Balin formed a new Jefferson Starship, called Jefferson Starship: The Next Generation, but Kantner died in January 2016, coincidentally on the same day as Signe Anderson, who had occasionally guested with her old bandmates in the new version of the band. Balin, who had quit the reunited Jefferson Starship due to health reasons, died two years later. Dryden had died in 2005. Currently, there are three bands touring that descend directly from Jefferson Airplane. Hot Tuna still continue to perform, there's a version of Starship that tours featuring one original member, Mickey Thomas, and the reunited Jefferson Starship still tour, led by David Frieberg. Grace Slick has given the latter group her blessing, and even co-wrote one song on their most recent album, released in 2020, though she still doesn't perform any more. Jefferson Airplane's period in the commercial spotlight was brief -- they had charting singles for only a matter of months, and while they had top twenty albums for a few years after their peak, they really only mattered to the wider world during that brief period of the Summer of Love. But precisely because their period of success was so short, their music is indelibly associated with that time. To this day there's nothing as evocative of summer 1967 as "White Rabbit", even for those of us who weren't born then. And while Grace Slick had her problems, as I've made very clear in this episode, she inspired a whole generation of women who went on to be singers themselves, as one of the first prominent women to sing lead with an electric rock band. And when she got tired of doing that, she stopped, and got on with her other artistic pursuits, without feeling the need to go back and revisit the past for ever diminishing returns. One might only wish that some of her male peers had followed her example.

america tv love music american new york history black church children chicago hollywood disney master apple uk rock washington mexico british san francisco west holiday washington dc arizona ohio spanish arts alabama spain tennessee detroit revolution strange north record fame island heroes jews nazis empire rev stone vietnam matrix ocean tribute southern california catholic beatles mothers cd crown cia philippines rolling stones west coast thompson oz elvis wizard finland rock and roll xmen pakistan bay area volunteers parks villains snacks garcia dolphins reports ashes turtles nest lives bob dylan purple big brother bands medicare san jose airplanes northern americana invention woodstock omaha lsd cream satisfaction ballad elvis presley pink floyd belgians newsweek republican party dino added californians marvel comics peter pan medicaid other side state department katz antioch grateful dead chronicle baxter alice in wonderland rock and roll hall of fame miles davis peace corps spence lovin family tree triumphs buchanan carousel mixcloud charlie chaplin tilt san francisco chronicle sly would you like frank zappa santa clara kt national endowment starship janis joplin headquarters ayn rand schmitt chaplin hippies slick monkees steely dan concierto bakersfield triad old west garfunkel rock music rca elektra runnin sketches buddy holly milne greenwich village white rabbit phil spector village voice get together haskell zappa byrds ravel spoonful levis jerry garcia heartbeats doris day jefferson airplane stranger in a strange land fillmore brian jones glen campbell george bernard shaw steve ditko bolero david crosby my best friend wyndham levi strauss all you need lonely hearts club band whitney museum superior court harry nilsson methuselah jacques brel judy collins sgt pepper heinlein ed sullivan show dryden tom wolfe buffalo springfield weavers bessie smith great society rca records robert heinlein objectivism altamont jefferson starship ken kesey run around bob weir this life john phillips acid tests holding company golden gate park sly stone aranjuez ricky nelson bill graham haight ashbury elektra records grace slick san franciscan ditko bluesman carter family john sebastian tennessee georgia family dog colonel tom parker abbie hoffman bill thompson mercury records town criers roger mcguinn balin tommy oliver charles lloyd jorma fillmore east smothers brothers rickenbacker merry pranksters van dyke parks mystic arts one flew over the cuckoo gary davis hot tuna john wyndham monterey pop festival milt jackson jorma kaukonen antioch college jackie deshannon dave van ronk we built this city mothers of invention echoplex cass elliot monterey jazz festival yippies fillmore west mickey thomas moby grape roy buchanan slicks ian buchanan wellingtons jimmy brown jack nitzsche quicksilver messenger service paul kantner kesey al schmitt marty balin fred neil kantner casady surrealistic pillow all worlds jack casady blues project bob harvey bobby gentry skip spence john hammond jr billy roberts jac holzman papa john creach tilt araiza
Radio Duna - Sintonía Crónica
John Phillips: ¿Quién le teme al Rey Lobo?

Radio Duna - Sintonía Crónica

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022


Su vida personal siempre fue tormentosa y, de manera póstuma, terminó en un escándalo tras las graves acusaciones de una de sus hijas.

Kym McNicholas On Innovation
Innovative Healthier Holiday Food Hacks

Kym McNicholas On Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 46:03


Get ready for the unhealthiest time of year -- the holidays! Research shows half of Americans will break their diet to give into the temptation of holiday food. A little cheat here or there -- well - we are all human. But you don't want to make a holiday habit of eating foods that will light your arteries on fire. The more logs on the fire --- the more retardant you will need to put out the flames. In body speak, the more fats and cholesterol being called in to patch up the artery damage. Don't worry, we are not here to be scrooge and tell you not to enjoy your holiday favorites. We are going to be your Holiday Angels, offering some healthier ways to enjoy them! The Way To My Heart has released its first publication called, "Food For Thought," and one of the largest sections is all about healthier substitutes. So during the next hour, hosted by Kym McNicholas and Dr. John Phillips, co-hosted by Nurse Practitioner Kay Smith, we are going to show you how to healthify your holidays. Patients with Peripheral Artery Disease, restricted blood flow in mainly the leg arteries caused by plaque build-up, share their favorite holiday hacks. Dietitian Melissa Hooper rounds out the broadcast with some of her non-negotiables for anyone trying to stick to their medical diets

Personal Injury Marketing Mastermind
148. John Phillips, Phillips and Hunt — Fight for What Matters: Reverence in Practice and Earned Media

Personal Injury Marketing Mastermind

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 25:11


A steward of justice, John Phillips has changed the way that companies and governments operate. He is verified on three social media channels, secured a $495 Million Dollar verdict, won countless awards, and even beaten the president in trial. But john measures success not in accolades, but in the reverence he earns from those he loves. Once "best lawyer in America" John and his firm Phillips and Hunt have represented celebrities and athletes - but spend most of their time helping the injured get justice. Today, we discuss jury selection and how to tell a winning story. Why representing high-profile clients should not come with the requisite of kevlar vests. How earned media and traditional media have bolstered his nationwide presence. And how an empath can change the world for the better. What's In This Episode Who is John Phillips? How to identify and eliminate prejudice during jury selection. His perspective on physical safety and why he shouldn't have to wear a kevlar suit. How he came to help rewrite legislation after the Amahad Abury case. What role has earned media played in securing such high-profile cases? Why is networking so important? How does he leverage traditional marketing in a way that is true to his personality?

Kym McNicholas On Innovation
When Treatment Algorithms Are Ripe For Innovation

Kym McNicholas On Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 46:36


If you have symptoms A, B, and C, it is likely your physician will follow a decision-tree that leads them to choose X as treatment. Treatment algorithms exist across healthcare. They're detailed, step-by-step flow charts that outline the recommended treatment for patients with a specific disorder. These algorithms are a critical foundation for any physician. They're also critical for standardizing treatment around the world so as to provide equitable care. In this week's show hosts, Kym McNicholas and Dr. John Phillips are joined by The Way To My Heart's Nurse Practitioner Kay Smith and Rush Hospital's Dr. Kumar Madassery about the value of treatment algorithms as well as where they fall short for patients, costing life and limb. They also discuss critical questions patients can ask their doctor to determine their treatment algorithm so they can weigh it against another physician who may use a different flow chart for treatment. During the Save My Piggies segment in the second half of the show, a patient, John, and his wife, Amy, who discovered almost too late that different doctors have different treatment algorithms, share their plight to save his life and limb and the importance of getting a second opinion. 

The John Phillips Show
The John Phillips Election Special

The John Phillips Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 29:01


John lets you know how hes voting in the upcoming electionSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Real Church Clearwater
1 Corinthians 1:1-9 - David John Phillips

Real Church Clearwater

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 55:29


Join in as we continue our series on 1 Corinthians...

Kym McNicholas On Innovation
Strategies to Reduce Covid Vascular Complications

Kym McNicholas On Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 45:43


COVID-19 in its early days was classified as only a respiratory illness with varying degrees of severity. But as healthcare professionals learned more over time, they started also considering it a vascular disease because of blood clots that led to serious complications, including death, in patients suffering from COVID-19. In today's show hosts, Dr. John Phillips and Kym McNicholas are joined by guest co-host Nurse Practitioner Kay Smith and Cardiothoracic Surgeon Dr. David Allie, and a patient who almost lost his legs following vascular complications due to COVID-19, to talk about those vascular complications and strategies to minimize arterial/venous thromboembolism (blood clots), myocardial infarction (damage to the heart muscle caused by lack of blood supply, which could be the result of a blood clot) complications. Some of those strategies discussed include earlier bloodwork to check cardiovascular biomarkers such as D-dimer and troponin as well as ultrasound imaging of the lungs, heart, and legs upon the early presentation of symptoms, which could signal an earlier need for aggressive intervention and treatment.

I'm Right w/Jesse Kelly
TV: Durham, Disaster, & Dome

I'm Right w/Jesse Kelly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 44:08


The John Durham investigation has been nothing but a dud so far. Is there anything you can take away from it? Jesse Kelly discusses with Julie Kelly. As for the disaster, just wait until you hear the latest move from the CDC. Joe Kent has reaction to that. Plus, how could we forget, it's Kamala Harris' birthday! Jesse and John Phillips celebrate.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Jesse Kelly Show
TV: Durham, Disaster, & Dome

The Jesse Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 44:08


The John Durham investigation has been nothing but a dud so far. Is there anything you can take away from it? Jesse Kelly discusses with Julie Kelly. As for the disaster, just wait until you hear the latest move from the CDC. Joe Kent has reaction to that. Plus, how could we forget, it's Kamala Harris' birthday! Jesse and John Phillips celebrate.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Phillips Show
The John Phillips Show 10/19/22 1pm

The John Phillips Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 42:09


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Phillips Show
The John Phillips Show 10/19/22 12pm

The John Phillips Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 38:47


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Phillips Show
The John Phillips Show 10/19/22 2pm

The John Phillips Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 35:09


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Pastor Mike Impact Ministries
Psalm 8 - A Psalm of Rejoicing

Pastor Mike Impact Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 5:00


“O LORD, our Lord, How excellent is Your name in all the earth, Who have set Your glory above the heavens! Out of the mouth of babes and nursing infants You have ordained strength, Because of Your enemies, That You may silence the enemy and the avenger." I have been reading through the Book of Psalms daily now for over 50 years and estimate that I have read them completely through well over 600 times. I have preached many messages from the Psalms but honestly, I never had taken the time to study the history or background behind the writing of each individual Psalm. I am thoroughly enjoying preparing for these chats each day as I research each Psalm and I feel like I am learning so much more about them, especially as I look at the writer and the occasion for the writing of each Psalm. I trust that you will be as blessed as I am as we go through the Book of Psalms over the next several months. From the title that is over Psalm 8, we know that David wrote it. Different commentators have various opinions as to the occasion of the writing of the Psalm and especially the meaning of “Gath”. In many translations the word “Gittith” is used instead of “Gath”. C.H. Spurgeon in his commentary, “The Treasury of David”, makes this observation about the title: “We are not clear upon the meaning of the word Gittith. Some think it refers to Gath and may refer to a tune that was commonly sung there, or possibly it was an instrument of music that was invented there. It might have been a song of Obed-edom the Gittite. This is the owner of the house where the ark was kept when it was brought back from the Philistines. Better still, this could have been a song that David wrote and sung over Goliath of Gath. Others, tracing the Hebrew to its root, conceive it to mean a song for the winepress, a joyful hymn for the treaders of grapes.” Spurgeon went on to note: The term Gittith is applied to two other Psalms, (81:1-16, 84:1-12) both of which are of a joyous character. From this it may be concluded, that where we find that word in the title, we may look for a hymn of delight. (I have paraphrased Spurgeon's comments for the sake of clarity.) John Phillips believes Psalm 8 was definitely written by David on the occasion of his victory over Goliath of Gath. Phillips called this Psalm “The Death of a Champion” and noted: “It was later, when David was king and was arranging music for the royal choir he included this psalm with the note: "Muthlabben," a Hebrew expression which means, "the death of the champion." The tradition that refers it to Goliath is as old as the Targum. There it is paraphrased: "Concerning the death of the man who went forth between the camps." Scholars tell us that this is a direct reference to the story of David and Goliath for in 1 Samuel 17:4 the Hebrew word for champion is "the man of the space between the camps"—that dread no-man's land between Israel and the Philistines dominated by Goliath of Gath.” Remember Psalms 1 and 2 gave us the introduction to the Book of Psalms assuring us that God blesses the righteous person and will judge and punish the evil deeds and iniquity of the unrighteous. Then Psalms 3 through 7 are the cries and prayers of David in times of trouble and distress as he faces the insurrection of his son Absalom and the slander and falsehoods of his enemies. Psalm 8 is a refreshing and uplifting Psalm and song as we sit on a hillside on a beautiful clear night and view the creation of the heavens and reflect on how awesome our Lord is! Amen! God bless!

Real Punk Radio Podcast Network
The Big Takeover Show – Number 403 – October 10, 2022 [Half Usual/Half a Special Lookback Show!]

Real Punk Radio Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022


This week's show, after a brief 1979 Dickies revisit: brand new Weyes Blood, Ron Sexsmith, Damned, Black Watch, Daniel Wylie, I Was a King, and Reds, Pinks and Purples; plus The Beatles, Easybeats, John Phillips, “Little” Jimmy Dickens, Merseys, Derric...

Kym McNicholas On Innovation
The Genius Behind ALS Innovation

Kym McNicholas On Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 46:05


Hosts Interventional Cardiologist Dr. John Phillips and Emmy Award-winning journalist Kym McNicholas are talking about innovation around ALS. Most are familiar with ALS now more than ever because o the famous internet ice bucket challenge involving the pouring of a bucket of ice water over a person's head, either by another person or self-administered, to promote awareness of Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis , or ALS. ALS is a progressive nervous system disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord, causing loss of muscle. Most people with this disease begin with muscle stiffness or weakness. But they eventually lose the ability to walk, dress, write, speak, swallow, and ultimately breathe on their own when the muscle paralysis spreads to vital organs such as the lungs. We are talking about it here on the Heart of Innovation for three reasons: First, although it's not considered a vascular disease, some researchers believe that an ALS-linked gene mutation could cause disruptions in the blood-spinal cord barrier, causing the neurovascular inflammatory response, which is ALS; Second, due to the lack of mobility as ALS progresses, many people with ALS end up with circulation issues in the legs (Circulation issues in the legs is known as peripheral vascular disease. We've talked about that at length on this show where arteries start hardening and the flaps that help usher blood flow back to the heart start malfunctioning.); Third, innovation around treatment and disease management has led to a longer, better quality of life for people with ALS due to organizations such as the Gleason Foundation, founded by former New Orleans Saints NFL great Steve Gleason. Kearney Gray, Director of development for the Gleason Foundation talks about how patient-driven innovation with communication and mobility are helping patients to live a longer, better quality of life. The Gleason foundation has played an integral role in raising the patient voice to create change in care, empowering companies to create new, novel approaches to improving communication for people with ALS, and not only educating lawmakers on ALS, but inspiring them to take action to help elevate care. Dietitian Melissa Hooper also joins the discussion to talk about the importance of nutrition in slowing the progression of disease and improving the quality of life of people with ALS. Since people with ALS maintain their cognitive ability throughout disease progression, knowing what's to come and what's happening can impact mental well-being. So, Kathryn Walker, CEO, MSN-Anesthesia, MSN-Psychiatry, at mental wellness treatment centers, Rivatalist, adds to the conversation with available options to improve mental health.

The Mentors Radio Show
Prioritizing Health is Good for Business, The Mentors Radio talks with Suniel Jain, NMD

The Mentors Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 52:50


We can't always have perfect health but we CAN create habits that ensure we are living in ways that foster good health, good attitude, good mindset... all that is Good For Business! In this episode The Mentors Radio host John Phillips talks with guest mentor Suniel Jain, NMD about the amazing benefits of maintaining good health and how to take simple steps to ensure we stay healthy and vibrant regardless of the demands of business and other obligation. As a naturopathic doctor and the founder/owner of Arizona-based Rejuvena Health & Aesthetics, Dr. Jain specializes in wellness and healthy aging. Not only does he live by his own principles, he also has been a remarkable influence in John's life, and in the lives of many other professionals.  In this episode, you'll learn a lot about keeping your business's most important asset running at its full potential, and that asset is you! Sign up for free podcasts of the radio show to listen Anytime, Anywhere... on iTunes, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, TuneIN, Google Play and everywhere else... click here . SHOW NOTES: Dr. Suniel Jain BioRejuvena Health and Aesethics

Kym McNicholas On Innovation
How To Ease Anxiety Before and After Surgery

Kym McNicholas On Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 46:32


Description: Having a chronic illness and/or a surgical procedure can be scary. In this episode of the Heart of Innovation, we are talking about pre and post surgery stress and anxiety, especially tomophobia, 'the fear of surgery'. In the hospital, people are given medicine to help them sleep or sedatives to put them at ease. At home, it's not always as easy. Either way, many times the hurry up and wait game for any procedure is sure to put you on edge. The Way To My Heart Nurse Practitioner Kay Smith along with CRNA Kathryn Walker, CEO of Rivitalist , a group of mental wellness centers and her colleague Beth Ward, a Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW) talk to hosts Kym McNicholas and Interventional Cardiologist Dr. John Phillips about how to discuss doubt, fears, and anxiety with your healthcare team. They also offer tangible, actionable ways in which you can put yourself at ease pre and post surgery. Grady, a family member of a patient who is now recovering from open heart surgery kicked off the discussion with a candid description of his experience leading up to his brother's procedure. He discussed the fear driven by the procedure itself but also the revolving door of physicians, the numerous pre-operative tests, the gaps in communication at times, and worries about what happens if treatment doesn't work. He also drove home the importance of a patient's healthcare team to recognize the stress and anxiety of a patient's family and to keep them in the loop to ensure all are on the same page so they can more effectively support the patient and help accelerate versus hinder the healing process. Marcia, a patient with peripheral artery disease (P.A.D.), asked the therapists and Dr. Phillips about how to deal with post-surgery symptoms and the emotional stress that comes with so many questions that may arise between appointments with her healthcare team. Most patients don't have a physician or clinician on speed dial every single time a question pops up. So, what might be a small, normal post-surgery side effect, can be magnified the longer a patient waits for an answer. A big takeaway from CRNA Kathryn and LCSW Beth is to recognize that stress, anxiety, and fear step from worrying about the future and things you can't control. They say the key is to focus on what you can control. Draw a circle on a piece of paper and place inside the circle all of the things you are worried about that YOU can actually do something about. That includes planning for options to accelerate recovery, such as starting to contemplate rehab possibilities, setting up a meeting with a dietitian, obtaining items for improved comfort and mobility at home, etc. Focus on those. For the others, sit down and come up with questions that may arise around them which can be discussed with your healthcare team or that of your family member. In summary, it's most important to not burden yourself with regrets of the past and the 'what if's' of the future. Catch them coming into your mind, and remind yourself to look for things that are within your power tand control to change and do right now. For more, listen to this powerful conversation:

The Rabbit Hole Show
Episode 44 - John Phillips

The Rabbit Hole Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 73:28


This week we are joined by John Phillips. He shares his incredible journey through faith and trusting Jesus and the Holy Spirit to guide his (and his family's) destiny.

Kym McNicholas On Innovation
How to Walk Effectively To Improve Circulation

Kym McNicholas On Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 46:01


Description: You don't want to miss this compelling episode of The Heart of Innovation, not only because it has the potential to save life and limb through a deep dive into how walking can help create a ‘natural bypass,' but because a patient shares his story of how a second opinion changed his life. In segment three, Duke and his vascular specialist Dr.Yazan Khatib at First Coast Cardiovascular Institute in Jacksonville, Florida talk about how a leg amputation was thwarted. Duke has Peripheral Artery Disease (P.A.D.), which is a chronic circulation issue in mainly the legs. Duke had multiple interventions and bypasses to restore blood flow to his legs before finding Dr. Khatib. The catalyst for Duke seeking help from Dr. Khatib was the point where his previous doctor told him that it wasn't worth his time and energy financially to delay what he believed was the inevitable, which was amputation. It was Duke's Primary Care Physician who told him to get a second opinion before amputation. Four years later, Duke is still walking on two feet thanks to regular maintenance by Dr.Khatib and lifestyle modifications, especially walking. Walking is the best medicine for P.A.D. That's why duringthis episode, hosts Kym McNicholas and Dr. John Phillips spend the majority of time leading up to the Save My Piggies segment and afterwards talking to Interventional Radiologist Dr. Lorenzo Patrone, 2022 European Patient Champion and 2020 Global Vascular Doctor of the Year, about why walking is the best medicine for P.A.D. and other circulation issues. Mass General Hospital Vascular Surgeon Dr. Anahita Dua also shares how to walk effectively to wake up and grow your collateral network to help improve circulation without intervention. P.A.D. is defined by a narrowing of the arteries, mainly in the legs, due to plaque build-up. When flow is restricted, muscles, organs, and tissue are starved of critical nutrients, including oxygen. This may cause symptoms, such as leg pain and cramping when walking (claudication). Even worse, it could prevent healing of sores on your feet, leading to ischemia, meaning tissue loss. Wounds need oxygen to heal. Your body does have a back-up system. It's the collateral network, known as your body's "natural bypass." The collateral network consists of smaller vessels available to handle extra demand. What makes them so special is they have the ability to expand and even grow if necessary to keep up with demand.   Walking helps to accelerate this process. When you walk or exercise, your heart starts to pump harder and faster to circulate blood to deliver oxygen to your muscles, organs, and tissues. If arteries can't handle the additional rush of blood flow, the collateral vessels re-structure to meet the increased demand. Think about it like our freeway system. If there's an obstacle such as an accident on the freeway blocking the flow of traffic, more cars veer off on to side roads to continue moving forward towards their destination. Collateral vessels, like side roads, can vary in capacity, but unlike side roads collateral vessels can expand and grow with increased demand. The extent to which your collateral network can keep up with demand, depends on the individual and stage of disease.   The collateral network's effectiveness may be limited in individuals with advanced age PAD and those with smaller vessel disease below-the-knee. That's why it's important to get a full vascular assessment. During this assessment, discuss with your physician: What is the extent to which you believe mybody will be able to re-route flow and slow the progression of disease naturally? Based on my situation, what should be mydaily and weekly walking goals? If walking is my initial treatment protocol,what symptoms are a warning for me to return prior to my scheduled follow-up for immediate re-assessment? What are next steps if my Ankle-BrachialIndex (ABI) test improves by my next appointment? What are next steps if my ABI test does notimprove by my next appointment? For those without Critical Limb Threatening Ischemia(CLTI), standard protocols for treating P.A.D. suggest a three-month program that consists of medical and exercise therapy. During that time, physicians assess whether an antiplatelet drug and/or a vasodilator, coupled with brisk walking will help your body to increase flow not only through narrowed arteries, but also through the collateral network. If you are post-procedure, following an intervention orbypass, your physician will prescribe a walking regimen to help maintain the recently treated vessels open, as well as to continue to maintain and build your collateral network. If a covered stent is used or bypass is performed collateral vessels will be impacted in those areas, but walking will remain critical to increase demand for blood flow to maintain those vessels open. Some facilities offer a formal Supervised Exercise Therapy (SET) program to support walking as medicine for P.A.D. patients. If your physician doesn't have a formal walking program, go to TheWayToMyHeart.org to sign up for My Steps, which is a text-based program designed to meet each individual patient's needs and goals to increase long-term accountability. Read more about how to walk effectively togrow your natural bypass in the 20-page step-by-step PADdy's Post"Walking Special" handbook. To find other P.A.D. Warriors walking to better health, join our community at community. TheWayToMyHeart.org or search “Peripheral Artery Disease” to download our app from the App Store or Google Play. Listen to the full episode of The Heart of Innovation to hear straight from Dr. Patrone, Dr. Phillips, and Dr. Dua on how to walk effectively to grow your collateral network.

Kym McNicholas On Innovation
Innovative Approaches to Mental Health for Patients with Chronic Physical Illness

Kym McNicholas On Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 47:05


Description: Chronic physical illness can lead to depression and anxiety, resulting in a mental health crisis which can further jeopardize a patient's health. The Heart of Innovation hosts Kym McNicholas and Dr. John Phillips are joined by The Way To My Heart's Nurse Practitioner Kay Smith, legendary business and financial reporter Bambi Francisco (Founder and CEO of Vator.TV), and Revitalist (Mental wellness treatment center chain in six states including Tennessee and Kentucky) CEO Kathryn Walker to talk about the problem and innovative solutions to improve mental health in patients with chronic physical ailments. Today's show kicked off with a couple inspirational quotes by Queen Elizabeth II to celebrate the impact she's had on the world during her reign: “Everyone is our neighbour, no matter what race, creed, or colour.” “When peace comes, remember it will be for us, the children of today, to make the world of tomorrow a better and happier place.” Queen passed away this past week of what may have been a massive stroke, although upon publish of this article, cause of death had not been released to the public. Dr. Phillips commented on the prevalence of strokes in the elderly, and the importance of getting checked annually for one common cause, which is atrial fibrillation, an irregular and often rapid heart rate that can lead to blood clots. Now that the COVID-19 lockdown has lifted and hospital facilities are starting to operate again at a normal rate, it's important for everyone to C.H.A.T. with their doctor about vascular health, which means to ask their physician to check their Carotids, Heart, Abdomen (Aneurysm), and Toes (arteries and veins). The discussion on vascular health backed into the topic of the day, which is mental health and chronic physical illness. Bambi Francisco runs a content distribution network, Vator.TV, which includes regular salons on mental health. Her next event, “Future of Behavioral and Mental Health is October 26th where topics will include “Reinventing the doctor's role”, “Future of Clinics”, “Lifestyle” and more. The premise for the event as well as how she began her discussion on mental health, is that for at least a decade, about one out of five Americans suffered from some sort of mental disorder. In the case of depression, it's become almost an epidemic rom being a rare condition 50 years ago. Critics have argued the rise has a lot to do with pathologizing normal psychic and somatic behavior, meaning society's idea of normal often means never feeling sad or hopeless. Covid and policies around the lockdown that kept kids out of schools has contributed to the elevated levels of mental stress. But it's also weighed heavily on those with chronic illnesses. Kathryn Walker, CEO of Revitalist, who's also an ICU Nurse explains why chronic physical illnesses can impact mental well-being and how psychedelics such as ketamine are becoming more accepted as mainstream treatment. Nurse Practitioner Kay also discusses the importance o Virtual Reality in the treatment of mental health issues and Bambi Francisco highlights the rise in faith-based technologies to improve mental well-being. Diane, a patient with Peripheral Artery Disease (P.A.D.), which is a chronic circulation issue, talks about the impact of P.A.D. on her mental state and how finding the right vascular specialist who uses advanced minimally invasive tools and techniques can make all the difference in the world in not only providing pain relief, but also restoring hope, her mental state, as well as her love life.

The Jesse Kelly Show
TV: Groom & Doom

The Jesse Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 48:16


Poll numbers are out about how many Democrats think men can get pregnant. Spoiler alert: It's a lot. How did we get to this point and how deep does the woke rot go? Jesse Kelly examines. What's driving this? Part of it is Hollywood. David Ng joins Jesse Kelly with the latest happenings in culture. Plus, Karol Markowicz and John Phillips weigh in on the devastating impacts of COVID policies on children.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Cold Case Crew
BONUS EPISODE: John Phillips (a Cold Case from RI)

Cold Case Crew

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 12:55


On the night of October 26, 1986, avid baseball fan John Phillips of North Kingston, RI, attended a World Series party at the residence of a friend to watch the Boston Red Sox take on the NY Mets. He left around 10:30pm, opting to walk the 2.9 miles back to his apartment in East Greenwich. However, John would never make it home. In the early morning hours of October 27th, John's body was discovered in the parking lot of Golf World, less than a mile from where he left the party. He had been shot once in the head, and his death was ruled a suicide. For fifteen (15) years, there would be no investigation into the suspicious circumstances that surrounded John's death. In 2001, authorities with the NK Police Department officially changed his cause of death to homicide. Who killed John Phillips? Join the Cold Case Crew as we tell the little known story of The Mysterious Death of John Phillips, a Cold Case local to North Kingston, Rhode Island. Join our Patreon: www.Patreon.com/ColdCaseCrew#JohnPhillips #ColdCase #1986 #ColdCasesOfRhodeIsland #ColdCasesOfNorthKingston #UnsolvedHomicide #UnsolvedMurder #SuspiciousMurder #ColdCaseCrew #UnsolvedRhodeIsland #JusticeForJohnPhillips #BlindReaction______________________________________________________________________________________________________References: Websites:https://www.wpri.com/news/man-to-his-brothers-killer-own-up-to-what-youve-done-2/https://www.independentri.com/independents/north_east/article_16f06086-f4b3-5573-9cea-041099315696.htmlhttps://patch.com/rhode-island/northkingstown/nk-police-seeking-info-on-1986-cold-case-murderhttps://www.facebook.com/johnphillipsnk______________________________________________________________________________________________________Special Thank You'sThank You to Our FamiliesCompute OneAh-Hale CreationsBrand RPMCandor Creative CompanyKevin BeattyHale Family DentistryMusic:abyss by Rexlambo https://soundcloud.com/rexlambo Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported — CC BY 3.0 Free Download / Stream: https://bit.ly/3ksUw0D Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/t_VIgXsAp9I Editing:Whitney Cappellari and Audacity Website:www.coldcasecrewwv.comSupport the show

Pastor Mike Impact Ministries
Revelation 22:3-7 - Present Performance Determines Future Position

Pastor Mike Impact Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 5:14


“And there shall be no more curse, but the throne of God and of the Lamb shall be in it, and His servants shall serve Him. They shall see His face, and His name shall be on their foreheads. There shall be no night there: They need no lamp nor light of the sun, for the Lord God gives them light. And they shall reign forever and ever." Years ago, at a pastor's conference at First Baptist Church in Jacksonville Florida, I heard Dr. John Phillips preach a great message on Genesis 49, that he entitled, “The Judgment Seat of Jacob”. This chapter in Genesis is about Jacob blessing his twelve sons from his death bed. In his message, Dr. Phillips made the statement, “Present performance determines future position in the kingdom.” His point was that how we serve the Lord now, in our time on earth, will determine what position of service we will have in the future Kingdom of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. Over the years as I have studied the Bible and have taught about what it means, that we as believers, will rule and reign with Jesus, I only thought it only meant this was during the Millennium, the thousand-year reign of Christ, we read about in Revelation 20. But now as we look at Revelation 22, which is speaking of our eternal home after the Millennium, I believe that our position of service and reigning with Christ will extend throughout all eternity. Who knows, we might be given the opportunity to rule over other universes for Christ! If this is the case, and I think it is, then it becomes a tremendous motivation to faithfully serve the Lord Jesus Christ now! There are so many passages in the New Testament that speak of how we as believers will one day give an account of our present service at the Judgment Seat of Christ (Romans 14:10-12; 1 Corinthians 3:10-15; 2 Corinthians 5:6-10). The Apostle Paul was definitely motivated on serving the Lord faithfully by keeping focused by the reality of eternity. He refused to “faint”, to give up, despite the hardships and persecutions he faced. In 2 Corinthians 4:16-18, he put it this way: “Therefore we do not lose heart. Even though our outward man is perishing, yet the inward man is being renewed day by day. For our light affliction, which is but for a moment, is working for us a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory, while we do not look at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen. For the things which are seen are temporary, but the things which are not seen are eternal.” Moses desired to see the face of God in Exodus 33-34. But was only able to see His back parts or he would have died from the Glory! But even then, Moses' face shone with a heavenly glow at just the sight of God's shoulders! Here in Revelation 22, we are told that we will be able to see the face of God for all eternity and have His name written in our foreheads. We will not only dwell with God, not only will we serve God, but we will belong to God for all eternity! As we rule over the universe, we willingly serve Christ in recognition of His majesty, His power, and His love! A.T. Pierson, the great Bible teacher and expositor wrote this about the above verses: “And there shall be no more curse” – perfect restoration. “But the throne of God and of the Lamb shall be in it” – perfect administration. “His servants shall serve Him” – perfect subordination. “And they shall see His face” – perfect transformation. “And His name shall be in their foreheads” – perfect identification. “And there shall be no night there; and they need no candle, neither light of the sun; for the Lord giveth them light” – perfect illumination. “And they shall reign forever and ever” – perfect exultation. It is my prayer that today we will be motivated and encouraged to faithfully serve the Lord in this present life as we prepare for our future position in eternity! God bless!

Kym McNicholas On Innovation
Type 2 Diabetes and How Can Diet Rreduce Amputation Risk

Kym McNicholas On Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 46:18


Description: Type 2 diabetes and obesity are epidemics that can lead to amputation due to a common complication known as peripheral artery disease (P.A.D.), which is plaque build-up in mainly the leg arteries that restricts blood flow. But the right diet can help mitigate risk for limb loss. Hosts Kym McNicholas and Interventional Cardiologist Dr. John Phillips are joined by Nurse Practitioner Kay Smith to chat with special guest Dr. Michael Dansinger, Wellness Director for Boston Heart Diagnostics, about diabetes reversal, eating strategies to for P.A.D. prevention, and the secret to weight loss based on USA Network's The Biggest Loser reality show. Dr. Michael Dansinger is Founding Director of the Diabetes Reversal Program at Tufts Medical Center in Boston . He also serves on the CDC's Expert Panel for Worksite Wellness Programs and on the Council of Directors for the True Health Initiative, a leading international voice for health and wellness. Dr. Dansinger previously served as the Nutrition and Obesity Editor for Medscape Journal of Medicine and was the principal investigator of the Tufts Popular Diet Trial comparing the Atkins, Zone, Weight Watchers and Ornish eating plans for weight loss and heart disease risk-factor reduction (published in JAMA). Dansinger was the nutrition doctor for NBC's The Biggest Loser for 10 years and designer of the Biggest Loser Diet, which won top awards from U.S. News & World Report (including No. 1 Best Diet for Diabetes). Before Dr. Dansinger got into the heart of this episode's feature topic on how diet can reduce a diabetic's risk for vascular complications, the show kicked off with a discussion about obstacles patients face in healthcare. Nurse Practitioner Kay Smith shared her experience in Scotland, spending four hours in pre-operative protocols for a surgery planned for next week, only to have her physician cancel her surgery appointment due to a condition called, atrial fibrillation, that she was never informed of but was written in her medical chart. Kym and Dr. Dansinger weighed in on lessons others can learn from this experience which includes two critical questions all patients should ask following any medical appointment: What are you writing in my chart that I should be aware of so I don't miss any assessment or diagnosis? Can I get a copy of my cases notes for this appointment? This may be available through your facility's medical app or platform. You can also request it through a facility's medical records department. Kym also shared her nightmare experience with her dad falling a second time in two weeks. The first fall was out of their area and resulted in emergency surgery to replace a previous hip replacement and stabalize an elbow fracture with pins and wires. This second fall resulted in an additional hairline fracture in his femur, re-opening of the hip replacement incision, and a displacement of the pins in his elbow. An ambulance trip to the emergency room left Kym and her dad with more questions than answers. The emergency physician and clinicians refused to call the on-call orthopedic surgeon to review his xrays. If they did, they would've learned of his additional hairline fracture in the femur and would've sent him home in a wheelchair. Instead, he was told to get up and walk despite debilitating pain and a continued run of the fracture. Even more, they didn't remove that half pulled off wound dressing, didn't apply temporary steri strips to reseal the wound that opened, and sent him home with only half the wound covered. So, when he arrived home, within 10 minutes the paramedics had to be called as the wound dehiesced further and he had to be taken to a larger hospital facility in Marin County, California with a more experienced trauma team. There, he was scheduled for time in the operating room to properly clean, re-sutre, and dress the incision site. He was also admitted until an orthopedic surgeon could get a physical therapist and occupational therapist to work with him on his new orders for limited weight-bearing. Dr. Dansinger and Dr. Phillips both were horrified by Kym's experience with her dad. They agree that under no circumstances should Kym's dad have been released from the first emergency room without an orthopedic surgeon reviewing the images and without proper wound care. They each expressed the importance of physicians and clinicians taking the time necessary to listen to the patients and fully assess the entire situation and for patients and their advocates to have patience with medical staff. But they were also not surprised due to an overwhelmed healthcare system, especially since the COVID epidemic. Dr. Dansinger says as our population continues to age this will become an even bigger problem of overcrowded hospital facilities and not enough staff to manage them. It's why he shifted from an urgent care doctor to focusing on prevention of chronic illness. That includes diabetes. That's where the hosts transitioned the conversation into focusing more intently on what patients can do to reverse it and mitigate their risk for serious vascular complications such as amputation.

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 151: “San Francisco” by Scott McKenzie

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022


We start season four of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs with an extra-long look at "San Francisco" by Scott McKenzie, and at the Monterey Pop Festival, and the careers of the Mamas and the Papas and P.F. Sloan. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on "Up, Up, and Away" by the 5th Dimension. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources As usual, all the songs excerpted in the podcast can be heard in full at Mixcloud. Scott McKenzie's first album is available here. There are many compilations of the Mamas and the Papas' music, but sadly none that are in print in the UK have the original mono mixes. This set is about as good as you're going to find, though, for the stereo versions. Information on the Mamas and the Papas came from Go Where You Wanna Go: The Oral History of The Mamas and the Papas by Matthew Greenwald, California Dreamin': The True Story Of The Mamas and Papas by Michelle Phillips, and Papa John by John Phillips and Jim Jerome. Information on P.F. Sloan came from PF - TRAVELLING BAREFOOT ON A ROCKY ROAD by Stephen McParland and What's Exactly the Matter With Me? by P.F. Sloan and S.E. Feinberg. The film of the Monterey Pop Festival is available on this Criterion Blu-Ray set. Sadly the CD of the performances seems to be deleted. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript Welcome to season four of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs. It's good to be back. Before we start this episode, I just want to say one thing. I get a lot of credit at times for the way I don't shy away from dealing with the more unsavoury elements of the people being covered in my podcast -- particularly the more awful men. But as I said very early on, I only cover those aspects of their life when they're relevant to the music, because this is a music podcast and not a true crime podcast. But also I worry that in some cases this might mean I'm giving a false impression of some people. In the case of this episode, one of the central figures is John Phillips of the Mamas and the Papas. Now, Phillips has posthumously been accused of some truly monstrous acts, the kind of thing that is truly unforgivable, and I believe those accusations. But those acts didn't take place during the time period covered by most of this episode, so I won't be covering them here -- but they're easily googlable if you want to know. I thought it best to get that out of the way at the start, so no-one's either anxiously waiting for the penny to drop or upset that I didn't acknowledge the elephant in the room. Separately, this episode will have some discussion of fatphobia and diet culture, and of a death that is at least in part attributable to those things. Those of you affected by that may want to skip this one or read the transcript. There are also some mentions of drug addiction and alcoholism. Anyway, on with the show. One of the things that causes problems with rock history is the tendency of people to have selective memories, and that's never more true than when it comes to the Summer of Love, summer of 1967. In the mythology that's built up around it, that was a golden time, the greatest time ever, a period of peace and love where everything was possible, and the world looked like it was going to just keep on getting better. But what that means, of course, is that the people remembering it that way do so because it was the best time of their lives. And what happens when the best time of your life is over in one summer? When you have one hit and never have a second, or when your band splits up after only eighteen months, and you have to cope with the reality that your best years are not only behind you, but they weren't even best years, but just best months? What stories would you tell about that time? Would you remember it as the eve of destruction, the last great moment before everything went to hell, or would you remember it as a golden summer, full of people with flowers in their hair? And would either really be true? [Excerpt: Scott McKenzie, "San Francisco"] Other than the city in which they worked, there are a few things that seem to characterise almost all the important figures on the LA music scene in the middle part of the 1960s. They almost all seem to be incredibly ambitious, as one might imagine. There seem to be a huge number of fantasists among them -- people who will not only choose the legend over reality when it suits them, but who will choose the legend over reality even when it doesn't suit them. And they almost all seem to have a story about being turned down in a rude and arrogant manner by Lou Adler, usually more or less the same story. To give an example, I'm going to read out a bit of Ray Manzarek's autobiography here. Now, Manzarek uses a few words that I can't use on this podcast and keep a clean rating, so I'm just going to do slight pauses when I get to them, but I'll leave the words in the transcript for those who aren't offended by them: "Sometimes Jim and Dorothy and I went alone. The three of us tried Dunhill Records. Lou Adler was the head man. He was shrewd and he was hip. He had the Mamas and the Papas and a big single with Barry McGuire's 'Eve of Destruction.' He was flush. We were ushered into his office. He looked cool. He was California casually disheveled and had the look of a stoner, but his eyes were as cold as a shark's. He took the twelve-inch acetate demo from me and we all sat down. He put the disc on his turntable and played each cut…for ten seconds. Ten seconds! You can't tell jack [shit] from ten seconds. At least listen to one of the songs all the way through. I wanted to rage at him. 'How dare you! We're the Doors! This is [fucking] Jim Morrison! He's going to be a [fucking] star! Can't you see that? Can't you see how [fucking] handsome he is? Can't you hear how groovy the music is? Don't you [fucking] get it? Listen to the words, man!' My brain was a boiling, lava-filled Jell-O mold of rage. I wanted to eviscerate that shark. The songs he so casually dismissed were 'Moonlight Drive,' 'Hello, I Love You,' 'Summer's Almost Gone,' 'End of the Night,' 'I Looked at You,' 'Go Insane.' He rejected the whole demo. Ten seconds on each song—maybe twenty seconds on 'Hello, I Love You' (I took that as an omen of potential airplay)—and we were dismissed out of hand. Just like that. He took the demo off the turntable and handed it back to me with an obsequious smile and said, 'Nothing here I can use.' We were shocked. We stood up, the three of us, and Jim, with a wry and knowing smile on his lips, cuttingly and coolly shot back at him, 'That's okay, man. We don't want to be *used*, anyway.'" Now, as you may have gathered from the episode on the Doors, Ray Manzarek was one of those print-the-legend types, and that's true of everyone who tells similar stories about Lou Alder. But... there are a *lot* of people who tell similar stories about Lou Adler. One of those was Phil Sloan. You can get an idea of Sloan's attitude to storytelling from a story he always used to tell. Shortly after he and his family moved to LA from New York, he got a job selling newspapers on a street corner on Hollywood Boulevard, just across from Schwab's Drug Store. One day James Dean drove up in his Porsche and made an unusual request. He wanted to buy every copy of the newspaper that Sloan had -- around a hundred and fifty copies in total. But he only wanted one article, something in the entertainment section. Sloan didn't remember what the article was, but he did remember that one of the headlines was on the final illness of Oliver Hardy, who died shortly afterwards, and thought it might have been something to do with that. Dean was going to just clip that article from every copy he bought, and then he was going to give all the newspapers back to Sloan to sell again, so Sloan ended up making a lot of extra money that day. There is one rather big problem with that story. Oliver Hardy died in August 1957, just after the Sloan family moved to LA. But James Dean died in September 1955, two years earlier. Sloan admitted that, and said he couldn't explain it, but he was insistent. He sold a hundred and fifty newspapers to James Dean two years after Dean's death. When not selling newspapers to dead celebrities, Sloan went to Fairfax High School, and developed an interest in music which was mostly oriented around the kind of white pop vocal groups that were popular at the time, groups like the Kingston Trio, the Four Lads, and the Four Aces. But the record that made Sloan decide he wanted to make music himself was "Just Goofed" by the Teen Queens: [Excerpt: The Teen Queens, "Just Goofed"] In 1959, when he was fourteen, he saw an advert for an open audition with Aladdin Records, a label he liked because of Thurston Harris. He went along to the audition, and was successful. His first single, released as by Flip Sloan -- Flip was a nickname, a corruption of "Philip" -- was produced by Bumps Blackwell and featured several of the musicians who played with Sam Cooke, plus Larry Knechtel on piano and Mike Deasey on guitar, but Aladdin shut down shortly after releasing it, and it may not even have had a general release, just promo copies. I've not been able to find a copy online anywhere. After that, he tried Arwin Records, the label that Jan and Arnie recorded for, which was owned by Marty Melcher (Doris Day's husband and Terry Melcher's stepfather). Melcher signed him, and put out a single, "She's My Girl", on Mart Records, a subsidiary of Arwin, on which Sloan was backed by a group of session players including Sandy Nelson and Bruce Johnston: [Excerpt: Philip Sloan, "She's My Girl"] That record didn't have any success, and Sloan was soon dropped by Mart Records. He went on to sign with Blue Bird Records, which was as far as can be ascertained essentially a scam organisation that would record demos for songwriters, but tell the performers that they were making a real record, so that they would record it for the royalties they would never get, rather than for a decent fee as a professional demo singer would get. But Steve Venet -- the brother of Nik Venet, and occasional songwriting collaborator with Tommy Boyce -- happened to come to Blue Bird one day, and hear one of Sloan's original songs. He thought Sloan would make a good songwriter, and took him to see Lou Adler at Columbia-Screen Gems music publishing. This was shortly after the merger between Columbia-Screen Gems and Aldon Music, and Adler was at this point the West Coast head of operations, subservient to Don Kirshner and Al Nevins, but largely left to do what he wanted. The way Sloan always told the story, Venet tried to get Adler to sign Sloan, but Adler said his songs stunk and had no commercial potential. But Sloan persisted in trying to get a contract there, and eventually Al Nevins happened to be in the office and overruled Adler, much to Adler's disgust. Sloan was signed to Columbia-Screen Gems as a songwriter, though he wasn't put on a salary like the Brill Building songwriters, just told that he could bring in songs and they would publish them. Shortly after this, Adler suggested to Sloan that he might want to form a writing team with another songwriter, Steve Barri, who had had a similar non-career non-trajectory, but was very slightly further ahead in his career, having done some work with Carol Connors, the former lead singer of the Teddy Bears. Barri had co-written a couple of flop singles for Connors, before the two of them had formed a vocal group, the Storytellers, with Connors' sister. The Storytellers had released a single, "When Two People (Are in Love)" , which was put out on a local independent label and which Adler had licensed to be released on Dimension Records, the label associated with Aldon Music: [Excerpt: The Storytellers "When Two People (Are in Love)"] That record didn't sell, but it was enough to get Barri into the Columbia-Screen Gems circle, and Adler set him and Sloan up as a songwriting team -- although the way Sloan told it, it wasn't so much a songwriting team as Sloan writing songs while Barri was also there. Sloan would later claim "it was mostly a collaboration of spirit, and it seemed that I was writing most of the music and the lyric, but it couldn't possibly have ever happened unless both of us were present at the same time". One suspects that Barri might have a different recollection of how it went... Sloan and Barri's first collaboration was a song that Sloan had half-written before they met, called "Kick That Little Foot Sally Ann", which was recorded by a West Coast Chubby Checker knockoff who went under the name Round Robin, and who had his own dance craze, the Slauson, which was much less successful than the Twist: [Excerpt: Round Robin, "Kick that Little Foot Sally Ann"] That track was produced and arranged by Jack Nitzsche, and Nitzsche asked Sloan to be one of the rhythm guitarists on the track, apparently liking Sloan's feel. Sloan would end up playing rhythm guitar or singing backing vocals on many of the records made of songs he and Barri wrote together. "Kick That Little Foot Sally Ann" only made number sixty-one nationally, but it was a regional hit, and it meant that Sloan and Barri soon became what Sloan later described as "the Goffin and King of the West Coast follow-ups." According to Sloan "We'd be given a list on Monday morning by Lou Adler with thirty names on it of the groups who needed follow-ups to their hit." They'd then write the songs to order, and they started to specialise in dance craze songs. For example, when the Swim looked like it might be the next big dance, they wrote "Swim Swim Swim", "She Only Wants to Swim", "Let's Swim Baby", "Big Boss Swimmer", "Swim Party" and "My Swimmin' Girl" (the last a collaboration with Jan Berry and Roger Christian). These songs were exactly as good as they needed to be, in order to provide album filler for mid-tier artists, and while Sloan and Barri weren't writing any massive hits, they were doing very well as mid-tier writers. According to Sloan's biographer Stephen McParland, there was a three-year period in the mid-sixties where at least one song written or co-written by Sloan was on the national charts at any given time. Most of these songs weren't for Columbia-Screen Gems though. In early 1964 Lou Adler had a falling out with Don Kirshner, and decided to start up his own company, Dunhill, which was equal parts production company, music publishers, and management -- doing for West Coast pop singers what Motown was doing for Detroit soul singers, and putting everything into one basket. Dunhill's early clients included Jan and Dean and the rockabilly singer Johnny Rivers, and Dunhill also signed Sloan and Barri as songwriters. Because of this connection, Sloan and Barri soon became an important part of Jan and Dean's hit-making process. The Matadors, the vocal group that had provided most of the backing vocals on the duo's hits, had started asking for more money than Jan Berry was willing to pay, and Jan and Dean couldn't do the vocals themselves -- as Bones Howe put it "As a singer, Dean is a wonderful graphic artist" -- and so Sloan and Barri stepped in, doing session vocals without payment in the hope that Jan and Dean would record a few of their songs. For example, on the big hit "The Little Old Lady From Pasadena", Dean Torrence is not present at all on the record -- Jan Berry sings the lead vocal, with Sloan doubling him for much of it, Sloan sings "Dean"'s falsetto, with the engineer Bones Howe helping out, and the rest of the backing vocals are sung by Sloan, Barri, and Howe: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "The Little Old Lady From Pasadena"] For these recordings, Sloan and Barri were known as The Fantastic Baggys, a name which came from the Rolling Stones' manager Andrew Oldham and Mick Jagger, when the two were visiting California. Oldham had been commenting on baggys, the kind of shorts worn by surfers, and had asked Jagger what he thought of The Baggys as a group name. Jagger had replied "Fantastic!" and so the Fantastic Baggys had been born. As part of this, Sloan and Barri moved hard into surf and hot-rod music from the dance songs they had been writing previously. The Fantastic Baggys recorded their own album, Tell 'Em I'm Surfin', as a quickie album suggested by Adler: [Excerpt: The Fantastic Baggys, "Tell 'Em I'm Surfin'"] And under the name The Rally Packs they recorded a version of Jan and Dean's "Move Out Little Mustang" which featured Berry's girlfriend Jill Gibson doing a spoken section: [Excerpt: The Rally Packs, "Move Out Little Mustang"] They also wrote several album tracks for Jan and Dean, and wrote "Summer Means Fun" for Bruce and Terry -- Bruce Johnston, later of the Beach Boys, and Terry Melcher: [Excerpt: Bruce and Terry, "Summer Means Fun"] And they wrote the very surf-flavoured "Secret Agent Man" for fellow Dunhill artist Johnny Rivers: [Excerpt: Johnny Rivers, "Secret Agent Man"] But of course, when you're chasing trends, you're chasing trends, and soon the craze for twangy guitars and falsetto harmonies had ended, replaced by a craze for jangly twelve-string guitars and closer harmonies. According to Sloan, he was in at the very beginning of the folk-rock trend -- the way he told the story, he was involved in the mastering of the Byrds' version of "Mr. Tambourine Man". He later talked about Terry Melcher getting him to help out, saying "He had produced a record called 'Mr. Tambourine Man', and had sent it into the head office, and it had been rejected. He called me up and said 'I've got three more hours in the studio before I'm being kicked out of Columbia. Can you come over and help me with this new record?' I did. I went over there. It was under lock and key. There were two guards outside the door. Terry asked me something about 'Summer Means Fun'. "He said 'Do you remember the guitar that we worked on with that? How we put in that double reverb?' "And I said 'yes' "And he said 'What do you think if we did something like that with the Byrds?' "And I said 'That sounds good. Let's see what it sounds like.' So we patched into all the reverb centres in Columbia Music, and mastered the record in three hours." Whether Sloan really was there at the birth of folk rock, he and Barri jumped on the folk-rock craze just as they had the surf and hot-rod craze, and wrote a string of jangly hits including "You Baby" for the Turtles: [Excerpt: The Turtles, "You Baby"] and "I Found a Girl" for Jan and Dean: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "I Found a Girl"] That song was later included on Jan and Dean's Folk 'n' Roll album, which also included... a song I'm not even going to name, but long-time listeners will know the one I mean. It was also notable in that "I Found a Girl" was the first song on which Sloan was credited not as Phil Sloan, but as P.F. Sloan -- he didn't have a middle name beginning with F, but rather the F stood for his nickname "Flip". Sloan would later talk of Phil Sloan and P.F. Sloan as almost being two different people, with P.F. being a far more serious, intense, songwriter. Folk 'n' Roll also contained another Sloan song, this one credited solely to Sloan. And that song is the one for which he became best known. There are two very different stories about how "Eve of Destruction" came to be written. To tell Sloan's version, I'm going to read a few paragraphs from his autobiography: "By late 1964, I had already written ‘Eve Of Destruction,' ‘The Sins Of A Family,' ‘This Mornin',' ‘Ain't No Way I'm Gonna Change My Mind,' and ‘What's Exactly The Matter With Me?' They all arrived on one cataclysmic evening, and nearly at the same time, as I worked on the lyrics almost simultaneously. ‘Eve Of Destruction' came about from hearing a voice, perhaps an angel's. The voice instructed me to place five pieces of paper and spread them out on my bed. I obeyed the voice. The voice told me that the first song would be called ‘Eve Of Destruction,' so I wrote the title at the top of the page. For the next few hours, the voice came and went as I was writing the lyric, as if this spirit—or whatever it was—stood over me like a teacher: ‘No, no … not think of all the hate there is in Red Russia … Red China!' I didn't understand. I thought the Soviet Union was the mortal threat to America, but the voice went on to reveal to me the future of the world until 2024. I was told the Soviet Union would fall, and that Red China would continue to be communist far into the future, but that communism was not going to be allowed to take over this Divine Planet—therefore, think of all the hate there is in Red China. I argued and wrestled with the voice for hours, until I was exhausted but satisfied inside with my plea to God to either take me out of the world, as I could not live in such a hypocritical society, or to show me a way to make things better. When I was writing ‘Eve,' I was on my hands and knees, pleading for an answer." Lou Adler's story is that he gave Phil Sloan a copy of Bob Dylan's Bringing it All Back Home album and told him to write a bunch of songs that sounded like that, and Sloan came back a week later as instructed with ten Dylan knock-offs. Adler said "It was a natural feel for him. He's a great mimic." As one other data point, both Steve Barri and Bones Howe, the engineer who worked on most of the sessions we're looking at today, have often talked in interviews about "Eve of Destruction" as being a Sloan/Barri collaboration, as if to them it's common knowledge that it wasn't written alone, although Sloan's is the only name on the credits. The song was given to a new signing to Dunhill Records, Barry McGuire. McGuire was someone who had been part of the folk scene for years, He'd been playing folk clubs in LA while also acting in a TV show from 1961. When the TV show had finished, he'd formed a duo, Barry and Barry, with Barry Kane, and they performed much the same repertoire as all the other early-sixties folkies: [Excerpt: Barry and Barry, "If I Had a Hammer"] After recording their one album, both Barrys joined the New Christy Minstrels. We've talked about the Christys before, but they were -- and are to this day -- an ultra-commercial folk group, led by Randy Sparks, with a revolving membership of usually eight or nine singers which included several other people who've come up in this podcast, like Gene Clark and Jerry Yester. McGuire became one of the principal lead singers of the Christys, singing lead on their version of the novelty cowboy song "Three Wheels on My Wagon", which was later released as a single in the UK and became a perennial children's favourite (though it has a problematic attitude towards Native Americans): [Excerpt: The New Christy Minstrels, "Three Wheels on My Wagon"] And he also sang lead on their big hit "Green Green", which he co-wrote with Randy Sparks: [Excerpt: The New Christy Minstrels, "Green Green"] But by 1965 McGuire had left the New Christy Minstrels. As he said later "I'd sung 'Green Green' a thousand times and I didn't want to sing it again. This is January of 1965. I went back to LA to meet some producers, and I was broke. Nobody had the time of day for me. I was walking down street one time to see Dr. Strangelove and I walked by the music store, and I heard "Green Green" comin' out of the store, ya know, on Hollywood Boulevard. And I heard my voice, and I thought, 'I got four dollars in my pocket!' I couldn't believe it, my voice is comin' out on Hollywood Boulevard, and I'm broke. And right at that moment, a car pulls up, and the radio is playing 'Chim Chim Cherie" also by the Minstrels. So I got my voice comin' at me in stereo, standin' on the sidewalk there, and I'm broke, and I can't get anyone to sign me!" But McGuire had a lot of friends who he'd met on the folk scene, some of whom were now in the new folk-rock scene that was just starting to spring up. One of them was Roger McGuinn, who told him that his band, the Byrds, were just about to put out a new single, "Mr. Tambourine Man", and that they were about to start a residency at Ciro's on Sunset Strip. McGuinn invited McGuire to the opening night of that residency, where a lot of other people from the scene were there to see the new group. Bob Dylan was there, as was Phil Sloan, and the actor Jack Nicholson, who was still at the time a minor bit-part player in low-budget films made by people like American International Pictures (the cinematographer on many of Nicholson's early films was Floyd Crosby, David Crosby's father, which may be why he was there). Someone else who was there was Lou Adler, who according to McGuire recognised him instantly. According to Adler, he actually asked Terry Melcher who the long-haired dancer wearing furs was, because "he looked like the leader of a movement", and Melcher told him that he was the former lead singer of the New Christy Minstrels. Either way, Adler approached McGuire and asked if he was currently signed -- Dunhill Records was just starting up, and getting someone like McGuire, who had a proven ability to sing lead on hit records, would be a good start for the label. As McGuire didn't have a contract, he was signed to Dunhill, and he was given some of Sloan's new songs to pick from, and chose "What's Exactly the Matter With Me?" as his single: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "What's Exactly the Matter With Me?"] McGuire described what happened next: "It was like, a three-hour session. We did two songs, and then the third one wasn't turning out. We only had about a half hour left in the session, so I said 'Let's do this tune', and I pulled 'Eve of Destruction' out of my pocket, and it just had Phil's words scrawled on a piece of paper, all wrinkled up. Phil worked the chords out with the musicians, who were Hal Blaine on drums and Larry Knechtel on bass." There were actually more musicians than that at the session -- apparently both Knechtel and Joe Osborn were there, so I'm not entirely sure who's playing bass -- Knechtel was a keyboard player as well as a bass player, but I don't hear any keyboards on the track. And Tommy Tedesco was playing lead guitar, and Steve Barri added percussion, along with Sloan on rhythm guitar and harmonica. The chords were apparently scribbled down for the musicians on bits of greasy paper that had been used to wrap some takeaway chicken, and they got through the track in a single take. According to McGuire "I'm reading the words off this piece of wrinkled paper, and I'm singing 'My blood's so mad, feels like coagulatin'", that part that goes 'Ahhh you can't twist the truth', and the reason I'm going 'Ahhh' is because I lost my place on the page. People said 'Man, you really sounded frustrated when you were singing.' I was. I couldn't see the words!" [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "Eve of Destruction"] With a few overdubs -- the female backing singers in the chorus, and possibly the kettledrums, which I've seen differing claims about, with some saying that Hal Blaine played them during the basic track and others saying that Lou Adler suggested them as an overdub, the track was complete. McGuire wasn't happy with his vocal, and a session was scheduled for him to redo it, but then a record promoter working with Adler was DJing a birthday party for the head of programming at KFWB, the big top forty radio station in LA at the time, and he played a few acetates he'd picked up from Adler. Most went down OK with the crowd, but when he played "Eve of Destruction", the crowd went wild and insisted he play it three times in a row. The head of programming called Adler up and told him that "Eve of Destruction" was going to be put into rotation on the station from Monday, so he'd better get the record out. As McGuire was away for the weekend, Adler just released the track as it was, and what had been intended to be a B-side became Barry McGuire's first and only number one record: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "Eve of Destruction"] Sloan would later claim that that song was a major reason why the twenty-sixth amendment to the US Constitution was passed six years later, because the line "you're old enough to kill but not for votin'" shamed Congress into changing the constitution to allow eighteen-year-olds to vote. If so, that would make "Eve of Destruction" arguably the single most impactful rock record in history, though Sloan is the only person I've ever seen saying that As well as going to number one in McGuire's version, the song was also covered by the other artists who regularly performed Sloan and Barri songs, like the Turtles: [Excerpt: The Turtles, "Eve of Destruction"] And Jan and Dean, whose version on Folk & Roll used the same backing track as McGuire, but had a few lyrical changes to make it fit with Jan Berry's right-wing politics, most notably changing "Selma, Alabama" to "Watts, California", thus changing a reference to peaceful civil rights protestors being brutally attacked and murdered by white supremacist state troopers to a reference to what was seen, in the popular imaginary, as Black people rioting for no reason: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "Eve of Destruction"] According to Sloan, he worked on the Folk & Roll album as a favour to Berry, even though he thought Berry was being cynical and exploitative in making the record, but those changes caused a rift in their friendship. Sloan said in his autobiography "Where I was completely wrong was in helping him capitalize on something in which he didn't believe. Jan wanted the public to perceive him as a person who was deeply concerned and who embraced the values of the progressive politics of the day. But he wasn't that person. That's how I was being pulled. It was when he recorded my actual song ‘Eve Of Destruction' and changed a number of lines to reflect his own ideals that my principles demanded that I leave Folk City and never return." It's true that Sloan gave no more songs to Jan and Dean after that point -- but it's also true that the duo would record only one more album, the comedy concept album Jan and Dean Meet Batman, before Jan's accident. Incidentally, the reference to Selma, Alabama in the lyric might help people decide on which story about the writing of "Eve of Destruction" they think is more plausible. Remember that Lou Adler said that it was written after Adler gave Sloan a copy of Bringing it All Back Home and told him to write a bunch of knock-offs, while Sloan said it was written after a supernatural force gave him access to all the events that would happen in the world for the next sixty years. Sloan claimed the song was written in late 1964. Selma, Alabama, became national news in late February and early March 1965. Bringing it All Back Home was released in late March 1965. So either Adler was telling the truth, or Sloan really *was* given a supernatural insight into the events of the future. Now, as it turned out, while "Eve of Destruction" went to number one, that would be McGuire's only hit as a solo artist. His next couple of singles would reach the very low end of the Hot One Hundred, and that would be it -- he'd release several more albums, before appearing in the Broadway musical Hair, most famous for its nude scenes, and getting a small part in the cinematic masterpiece Werewolves on Wheels: [Excerpt: Werewolves on Wheels trailer] P.F. Sloan would later tell various stories about why McGuire never had another hit. Sometimes he would say that Dunhill Records had received death threats because of "Eve of Destruction" and so deliberately tried to bury McGuire's career, other times he would say that Lou Adler had told him that Billboard had said they were never going to put McGuire's records on the charts no matter how well they sold, because "Eve of Destruction" had just been too powerful and upset the advertisers. But of course at this time Dunhill were still trying for a follow-up to "Eve of Destruction", and they thought they might have one when Barry McGuire brought in a few friends of his to sing backing vocals on his second album. Now, we've covered some of the history of the Mamas and the Papas already, because they were intimately tied up with other groups like the Byrds and the Lovin' Spoonful, and with the folk scene that led to songs like "Hey Joe", so some of this will be more like a recap than a totally new story, but I'm going to recap those parts of the story anyway, so it's fresh in everyone's heads. John Phillips, Scott McKenzie, and Cass Elliot all grew up in Alexandria, Virginia, just a few miles south of Washington DC. Elliot was a few years younger than Phillips and McKenzie, and so as is the way with young men they never really noticed her, and as McKenzie later said "She lived like a quarter of a mile from me and I never met her until New York". While they didn't know who Elliot was, though, she was aware who they were, as Phillips and McKenzie sang together in a vocal group called The Smoothies. The Smoothies were a modern jazz harmony group, influenced by groups like the Modernaires, the Hi-Los, and the Four Freshmen. John Phillips later said "We were drawn to jazz, because we were sort of beatniks, really, rather than hippies, or whatever, flower children. So we used to sing modern harmonies, like Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross. Dave Lambert did a lot of our arrangements for us as a matter of fact." Now, I've not seen any evidence other than Phillips' claim that Dave Lambert ever arranged for the Smoothies, but that does tell you a lot about the kind of music that they were doing. Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross were a vocalese trio whose main star was Annie Ross, who had a career worthy of an episode in itself -- she sang with Paul Whiteman, appeared in a Little Rascals film when she was seven, had an affair with Lenny Bruce, dubbed Britt Ekland's voice in The Wicker Man, played the villain's sister in Superman III, and much more. Vocalese, you'll remember, was a style of jazz vocal where a singer would take a jazz instrumental, often an improvised one, and add lyrics which they would sing, like Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross' version of "Cloudburst": [Excerpt: Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross, "Cloudburst"] Whether Dave Lambert ever really did arrange for the Smoothies or not, it's very clear that the trio had a huge influence on John Phillips' ideas about vocal arrangement, as you can hear on Mamas and Papas records like "Once Was a Time I Thought": [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "Once Was a Time I Thought"] While the Smoothies thought of themselves as a jazz group, when they signed to Decca they started out making the standard teen pop of the era, with songs like "Softly": [Excerpt, The Smoothies, "Softly"] When the folk boom started, Phillips realised that this was music that he could do easily, because the level of musicianship among the pop-folk musicians was so much lower than in the jazz world. The Smoothies made some recordings in the style of the Kingston Trio, like "Ride Ride Ride": [Excerpt: The Smoothies, "Ride Ride Ride"] Then when the Smoothies split, Phillips and McKenzie formed a trio with a banjo player, Dick Weissman, who they met through Izzy Young's Folklore Centre in Greenwich Village after Phillips asked Young to name some musicians who could make a folk record with him. Weissman was often considered the best banjo player on the scene, and was a friend of Pete Seeger's, to whom Seeger sometimes turned for banjo tips. The trio, who called themselves the Journeymen, quickly established themselves on the folk scene. Weissman later said "we had this interesting balance. John had all of this charisma -- they didn't know about the writing thing yet -- John had the personality, Scott had the voice, and I could play. If you think about it, all of those bands like the Kingston Trio, the Brothers Four, nobody could really *sing* and nobody could really *play*, relatively speaking." This is the take that most people seemed to have about John Phillips, in any band he was ever in. Nobody thought he was a particularly good singer or instrumentalist -- he could sing on key and play adequate rhythm guitar, but nobody would actually pay money to listen to him do those things. Mark Volman of the Turtles, for example, said of him "John wasn't the kind of guy who was going to be able to go up on stage and sing his songs as a singer-songwriter. He had to put himself in the context of a group." But he was charismatic, he had presence, and he also had a great musical mind. He would surround himself with the best players and best singers he could, and then he would organise and arrange them in ways that made the most of their talents. He would work out the arrangements, in a manner that was far more professional than the quick head arrangements that other folk groups used, and he instigated a level of professionalism in his groups that was not at all common on the scene. Phillips' friend Jim Mason talked about the first time he saw the Journeymen -- "They were warming up backstage, and John had all of them doing vocal exercises; one thing in particular that's pretty famous called 'Seiber Syllables' -- it's a series of vocal exercises where you enunciate different vowel and consonant sounds. It had the effect of clearing your head, and it's something that really good operetta singers do." The group were soon signed by Frank Werber, the manager of the Kingston Trio, who signed them as an insurance policy. Dave Guard, the Kingston Trio's banjo player, was increasingly having trouble with the other members, and Werber knew it was only a matter of time before he left the group. Werber wanted the Journeymen as a sort of farm team -- he had the idea that when Guard left, Phillips would join the Kingston Trio in his place as the third singer. Weissman would become the Trio's accompanist on banjo, and Scott McKenzie, who everyone agreed had a remarkable voice, would be spun off as a solo artist. But until that happened, they might as well make records by themselves. The Journeymen signed to MGM records, but were dropped before they recorded anything. They instead signed to Capitol, for whom they recorded their first album: [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "500 Miles"] After recording that album, the Journeymen moved out to California, with Phillips' wife and children. But soon Phillips' marriage was to collapse, as he met and fell in love with Michelle Gilliam. Gilliam was nine years younger than him -- he was twenty-six and she was seventeen -- and she had the kind of appearance which meant that in every interview with an older heterosexual man who knew her, that man will spend half the interview talking about how attractive he found her. Phillips soon left his wife and children, but before he did, the group had a turntable hit with "River Come Down", the B-side to "500 Miles": [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "River Come Down"] Around the same time, Dave Guard *did* leave the Kingston Trio, but the plan to split the Journeymen never happened. Instead Phillips' friend John Stewart replaced Guard -- and this soon became a new source of income for Phillips. Both Phillips and Stewart were aspiring songwriters, and they collaborated together on several songs for the Trio, including "Chilly Winds": [Excerpt: The Kingston Trio, "Chilly Winds"] Phillips became particularly good at writing songs that sounded like they could be old traditional folk songs, sometimes taking odd lines from older songs to jump-start new ones, as in "Oh Miss Mary", which he and Stewart wrote after hearing someone sing the first line of a song she couldn't remember the rest of: [Excerpt: The Kingston Trio, "Oh Miss Mary"] Phillips and Stewart became so close that Phillips actually suggested to Stewart that he quit the Kingston Trio and replace Dick Weissman in the Journeymen. Stewart did quit the Trio -- but then the next day Phillips suggested that maybe it was a bad idea and he should stay where he was. Stewart went back to the Trio, claimed he had only pretended to quit because he wanted a pay-rise, and got his raise, so everyone ended up happy. The Journeymen moved back to New York with Michelle in place of Phillips' first wife (and Michelle's sister Russell also coming along, as she was dating Scott McKenzie) and on New Year's Eve 1962 John and Michelle married -- so from this point on I will refer to them by their first names, because they both had the surname Phillips. The group continued having success through 1963, including making appearances on "Hootenanny": [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "Stack O'Lee (live on Hootenanny)"] By the time of the Journeymen's third album, though, John and Scott McKenzie were on bad terms. Weissman said "They had been the closest of friends and now they were the worst of enemies. They talked through me like I was a medium. It got to the point where we'd be standing in the dressing room and John would say to me 'Tell Scott that his right sock doesn't match his left sock...' Things like that, when they were standing five feet away from each other." Eventually, the group split up. Weissman was always going to be able to find employment given his banjo ability, and he was about to get married and didn't need the hassle of dealing with the other two. McKenzie was planning on a solo career -- everyone was agreed that he had the vocal ability. But John was another matter. He needed to be in a group. And not only that, the Journeymen had bookings they needed to complete. He quickly pulled together a group he called the New Journeymen. The core of the lineup was himself, Michelle on vocals, and banjo player Marshall Brickman. Brickman had previously been a member of a folk group called the Tarriers, who had had a revolving lineup, and had played on most of their early-sixties recordings: [Excerpt: The Tarriers, "Quinto (My Little Pony)"] We've met the Tarriers before in the podcast -- they had been formed by Erik Darling, who later replaced Pete Seeger in the Weavers after Seeger's socialist principles wouldn't let him do advertising, and Alan Arkin, later to go on to be a film star, and had had hits with "Cindy, O Cindy", with lead vocals from Vince Martin, who would later go on to be a major performer in the Greenwich Village scene, and with "The Banana Boat Song". By the time Brickman had joined, though, Darling, Arkin, and Martin had all left the group to go on to bigger things, and while he played with them for several years, it was after their commercial peak. Brickman would, though, also go on to a surprising amount of success, but as a writer rather than a musician -- he had a successful collaboration with Woody Allen in the 1970s, co-writing four of Allen's most highly regarded films -- Sleeper, Annie Hall, Manhattan, and Manhattan Murder Mystery -- and with another collaborator he later co-wrote the books for the stage musicals Jersey Boys and The Addams Family. Both John and Michelle were decent singers, and both have their admirers as vocalists -- P.F. Sloan always said that Michelle was the best singer in the group they eventually formed, and that it was her voice that gave the group its sound -- but for the most part they were not considered as particularly astonishing lead vocalists. Certainly, neither had a voice that stood out the way that Scott McKenzie's had. They needed a strong lead singer, and they found one in Denny Doherty. Now, we covered Denny Doherty's early career in the episode on the Lovin' Spoonful, because he was intimately involved in the formation of that group, so I won't go into too much detail here, but I'll give a very abbreviated version of what I said there. Doherty was a Canadian performer who had been a member of the Halifax Three with Zal Yanovsky: [Excerpt: The Halifax Three, "When I First Came to This Land"] After the Halifax Three had split up, Doherty and Yanovsky had performed as a duo for a while, before joining up with Cass Elliot and her husband Jim Hendricks, who both had previously been in the Big Three with Tim Rose: [Excerpt: Cass Elliot and the Big 3, "The Banjo Song"] Elliot, Hendricks, Yanovsky, and Doherty had formed The Mugwumps, sometimes joined by John Sebastian, and had tried to go in more of a rock direction after seeing the Beatles on Ed Sullivan. They recorded one album together before splitting up: [Excerpt: The Mugwumps, "Searchin'"] Part of the reason they split up was that interpersonal relationships within the group were put under some strain -- Elliot and Hendricks split up, though they would remain friends and remain married for several years even though they were living apart, and Elliot had an unrequited crush on Doherty. But since they'd split up, and Yanovsky and Sebastian had gone off to form the Lovin' Spoonful, that meant that Doherty was free, and he was regarded as possibly the best male lead vocalist on the circuit, so the group snapped him up. The only problem was that the Journeymen still had gigs booked that needed to be played, one of them was in just three days, and Doherty didn't know the repertoire. This was a problem with an easy solution for people in their twenties though -- they took a huge amount of amphetamines, and stayed awake for three days straight rehearsing. They made the gig, and Doherty was now the lead singer of the New Journeymen: [Excerpt: The New Journeymen, "The Last Thing on My Mind"] But the New Journeymen didn't last in that form for very long, because even before joining the group, Denny Doherty had been going in a more folk-rock direction with the Mugwumps. At the time, John Phillips thought rock and roll was kids' music, and he was far more interested in folk and jazz, but he was also very interested in making money, and he soon decided it was an idea to start listening to the Beatles. There's some dispute as to who first played the Beatles for John in early 1965 -- some claim it was Doherty, others claim it was Cass Elliot, but everyone agrees it was after Denny Doherty had introduced Phillips to something else -- he brought round some LSD for John and Michelle, and Michelle's sister Rusty, to try. And then he told them he'd invited round a friend. Michelle Phillips later remembered, "I remember saying to the guys "I don't know about you guys, but this drug does nothing for me." At that point there was a knock on the door, and as I opened the door and saw Cass, the acid hit me *over the head*. I saw her standing there in a pleated skirt, a pink Angora sweater with great big eyelashes on and her hair in a flip. And all of a sudden I thought 'This is really *quite* a drug!' It was an image I will have securely fixed in my brain for the rest of my life. I said 'Hi, I'm Michelle. We just took some LSD-25, do you wanna join us?' And she said 'Sure...'" Rusty Gilliam's description matches this -- "It was mind-boggling. She had on a white pleated skirt, false eyelashes. These were the kind of eyelashes that when you put them on you were supposed to trim them to an appropriate length, which she didn't, and when she blinked she looked like a cow, or those dolls you get when you're little and the eyes open and close. And we're on acid. Oh my God! It was a sight! And everything she was wearing were things that you weren't supposed to be wearing if you were heavy -- white pleated skirt, mohair sweater. You know, until she became famous, she suffered so much, and was poked fun at." This gets to an important point about Elliot, and one which sadly affected everything about her life. Elliot was *very* fat -- I've seen her weight listed at about three hundred pounds, and she was only five foot five tall -- and she also didn't have the kind of face that gets thought of as conventionally attractive. Her appearance would be cruelly mocked by pretty much everyone for the rest of her life, in ways that it's genuinely hurtful to read about, and which I will avoid discussing in detail in order to avoid hurting fat listeners. But the two *other* things that defined Elliot in the minds of those who knew her were her voice -- every single person who knew her talks about what a wonderful singer she was -- and her personality. I've read a lot of things about Cass Elliot, and I have never read a single negative word about her as a person, but have read many people going into raptures about what a charming, loving, friendly, understanding person she was. Michelle later said of her "From the time I left Los Angeles, I hadn't had a friend, a buddy. I was married, and John and I did not hang out with women, we just hung out with men, and especially not with women my age. John was nine years older than I was. And here was a fun-loving, intelligent woman. She captivated me. I was as close to in love with Cass as I could be to any woman in my life at that point. She also represented something to me: freedom. Everything she did was because she wanted to do it. She was completely independent and I admired her and was in awe of her. And later on, Cass would be the one to tell me not to let John run my life. And John hated her for that." Either Elliot had brought round Meet The Beatles, the Beatles' first Capitol album, for everyone to listen to, or Denny Doherty already had it, but either way Elliot and Doherty were by this time already Beatles fans. Michelle, being younger than the rest and not part of the folk scene until she met John, was much more interested in rock and roll than any of them, but because she'd been married to John for a couple of years and been part of his musical world she hadn't really encountered the Beatles music, though she had a vague memory that she might have heard a track or two on the radio. John was hesitant -- he didn't want to listen to any rock and roll, but eventually he was persuaded, and the record was put on while he was on his first acid trip: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I Want to Hold Your Hand"] Within a month, John Phillips had written thirty songs that he thought of as inspired by the Beatles. The New Journeymen were going to go rock and roll. By this time Marshall Brickman was out of the band, and instead John, Michelle, and Denny recruited a new lead guitarist, Eric Hord. Denny started playing bass, with John on rhythm guitar, and a violinist friend of theirs, Peter Pilafian, knew a bit of drums and took on that role. The new lineup of the group used the Journeymen's credit card, which hadn't been stopped even though the Journeymen were no more, to go down to St. Thomas in the Caribbean, along with Michelle's sister, John's daughter Mackenzie (from whose name Scott McKenzie had taken his stage name, as he was born Philip Blondheim), a pet dog, and sundry band members' girlfriends. They stayed there for several months, living in tents on the beach, taking acid, and rehearsing. While they were there, Michelle and Denny started an affair which would have important ramifications for the group later. They got a gig playing at a club called Duffy's, whose address was on Creeque Alley, and soon after they started playing there Cass Elliot travelled down as well -- she was in love with Denny, and wanted to be around him. She wasn't in the group, but she got a job working at Duffy's as a waitress, and she would often sing harmony with the group while waiting at tables. Depending on who was telling the story, either she didn't want to be in the group because she didn't want her appearance to be compared to Michelle's, or John wouldn't *let* her be in the group because she was so fat. Later a story would be made up to cover for this, saying that she hadn't been in the group at first because she couldn't sing the highest notes that were needed, until she got hit on the head with a metal pipe and discovered that it had increased her range by three notes, but that seems to be a lie. One of the songs the New Journeymen were performing at this time was "Mr. Tambourine Man". They'd heard that their old friend Roger McGuinn had recorded it with his new band, but they hadn't yet heard his version, and they'd come up with their own arrangement: [Excerpt: The New Journeymen, "Mr. Tambourine Man"] Denny later said "We were doing three-part harmony on 'Mr Tambourine Man', but a lot slower... like a polka or something! And I tell John, 'No John, we gotta slow it down and give it a backbeat.' Finally we get the Byrds 45 down here, and we put it on and turn it up to ten, and John says 'Oh, like that?' Well, as you can tell, it had already been done. So John goes 'Oh, ah... that's it...' a light went on. So we started doing Beatles stuff. We dropped 'Mr Tambourine Man' after hearing the Byrds version, because there was no point." Eventually they had to leave the island -- they had completely run out of money, and were down to fifty dollars. The credit card had been cut up, and the governor of the island had a personal vendetta against them because they gave his son acid, and they were likely to get arrested if they didn't leave the island. Elliot and her then-partner had round-trip tickets, so they just left, but the rest of them were in trouble. By this point they were unwashed, they were homeless, and they'd spent their last money on stage costumes. They got to the airport, and John Phillips tried to write a cheque for eight air fares back to the mainland, which the person at the check-in desk just laughed at. So they took their last fifty dollars and went to a casino. There Michelle played craps, and she rolled seventeen straight passes, something which should be statistically impossible. She turned their fifty dollars into six thousand dollars, which they scooped up, took to the airport, and paid for their flights out in cash. The New Journeymen arrived back in New York, but quickly decided that they were going to try their luck in California. They rented a car, using Scott McKenzie's credit card, and drove out to LA. There they met up with Hoyt Axton, who you may remember as the son of Mae Axton, the writer of "Heartbreak Hotel", and as the performer who had inspired Michael Nesmith to go into folk music: [Excerpt: Hoyt Axton, "Greenback Dollar"] Axton knew the group, and fed them and put them up for a night, but they needed somewhere else to stay. They went to stay with one of Michelle's friends, but after one night their rented car was stolen, with all their possessions in it. They needed somewhere else to stay, so they went to ask Jim Hendricks if they could crash at his place -- and they were surprised to find that Cass Elliot was there already. Hendricks had another partner -- though he and Elliot wouldn't have their marriage annulled until 1968 and were still technically married -- but he'd happily invited her to stay with them. And now all her friends had turned up, he invited them to stay as well, taking apart the beds in his one-bedroom apartment so he could put down a load of mattresses in the space for everyone to sleep on. The next part becomes difficult, because pretty much everyone in the LA music scene of the sixties was a liar who liked to embellish their own roles in things, so it's quite difficult to unpick what actually happened. What seems to have happened though is that first this new rock-oriented version of the New Journeymen went to see Frank Werber, on the recommendation of John Stewart. Werber was the manager of the Kingston Trio, and had also managed the Journeymen. He, however, was not interested -- not because he didn't think they had talent, but because he had experience of working with John Phillips previously. When Phillips came into his office Werber picked up a tape that he'd been given of the group, and said "I have not had a chance to listen to this tape. I believe that you are a most talented individual, and that's why we took you on in the first place. But I also believe that you're also a drag to work with. A pain in the ass. So I'll tell you what, before whatever you have on here sways me, I'm gonna give it back to you and say that we're not interested." Meanwhile -- and this part of the story comes from Kim Fowley, who was never one to let the truth get in the way of him taking claim for everything, but parts of it at least are corroborated by other people -- Cass Elliot had called Fowley, and told him that her friends' new group sounded pretty good and he should sign them. Fowley was at that time working as a talent scout for a label, but according to him the label wouldn't give the group the money they wanted. So instead, Fowley got in touch with Nik Venet, who had just produced the Leaves' hit version of "Hey Joe" on Mira Records: [Excerpt: The Leaves, "Hey Joe"] Fowley suggested to Venet that Venet should sign the group to Mira Records, and Fowley would sign them to a publishing contract, and they could both get rich. The trio went to audition for Venet, and Elliot drove them over -- and Venet thought the group had a great look as a quartet. He wanted to sign them to a record contract, but only if Elliot was in the group as well. They agreed, he gave them a one hundred and fifty dollar advance, and told them to come back the next day to see his boss at Mira. But Barry McGuire was also hanging round with Elliot and Hendricks, and decided that he wanted to have Lou Adler hear the four of them. He thought they might be useful both as backing vocalists on his second album and as a source of new songs. He got them to go and see Lou Adler, and according to McGuire Phillips didn't want Elliot to go with them, but as Elliot was the one who was friends with McGuire, Phillips worried that they'd lose the chance with Adler if she didn't. Adler was amazed, and decided to sign the group right then and there -- both Bones Howe and P.F. Sloan claimed to have been there when the group auditioned for him and have said "if you won't sign them, I will", though exactly what Sloan would have signed them to I'm not sure. Adler paid them three thousand dollars in cash and told them not to bother with Nik Venet, so they just didn't turn up for the Mira Records audition the next day. Instead, they went into the studio with McGuire and cut backing vocals on about half of his new album: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire with the Mamas and the Papas, "Hide Your Love Away"] While the group were excellent vocalists, there were two main reasons that Adler wanted to sign them. The first was that he found Michelle Phillips extremely attractive, and the second is a song that John and Michelle had written which he thought might be very suitable for McGuire's album. Most people who knew John Phillips think of "California Dreamin'" as a solo composition, and he would later claim that he gave Michelle fifty percent just for transcribing his lyric, saying he got inspired in the middle of the night, woke her up, and got her to write the song down as he came up with it. But Michelle, who is a credited co-writer on the song, has been very insistent that she wrote the lyrics to the second verse, and that it's about her own real experiences, saying that she would often go into churches and light candles even though she was "at best an agnostic, and possibly an atheist" in her words, and this would annoy John, who had also been raised Catholic, but who had become aggressively opposed to expressions of religion, rather than still having nostalgia for the aesthetics of the church as Michelle did. They were out walking on a particularly cold winter's day in 1963, and Michelle wanted to go into St Patrick's Cathedral and John very much did not want to. A couple of nights later, John woke her up, having written the first verse of the song, starting "All the leaves are brown and the sky is grey/I went for a walk on a winter's day", and insisting she collaborate with him. She liked the song, and came up with the lines "Stopped into a church, I passed along the way/I got down on my knees and I pretend to pray/The preacher likes the cold, he knows I'm going to stay", which John would later apparently dislike, but which stayed in the song. Most sources I've seen for the recording of "California Dreamin'" say that the lineup of musicians was the standard set of players who had played on McGuire's other records, with the addition of John Phillips on twelve-string guitar -- P.F. Sloan on guitar and harmonica, Joe Osborn on bass, Larry Knechtel on keyboards, and Hal Blaine on drums, but for some reason Stephen McParland's book on Sloan has Bones Howe down as playing drums on the track while engineering -- a detail so weird, and from such a respectable researcher, that I have to wonder if it might be true. In his autobiography, Sloan claims to have rewritten the chord sequence to "California Dreamin'". He says "Barry Mann had unintentionally showed me a suspended chord back at Screen Gems. I was so impressed by this beautiful, simple chord that I called Brian Wilson and played it for him over the phone. The next thing I knew, Brian had written ‘Don't Worry Baby,' which had within it a number suspended chords. And then the chord heard 'round the world, two months later, was the opening suspended chord of ‘A Hard Day's Night.' I used these chords throughout ‘California Dreamin',' and more specifically as a bridge to get back and forth from the verse to the chorus." Now, nobody else corroborates this story, and both Brian Wilson and John Phillips had the kind of background in modern harmony that means they would have been very aware of suspended chords before either ever encountered Sloan, but I thought I should mention it. Rather more plausible is Sloan's other claim, that he came up with the intro to the song. According to Sloan, he was inspired by "Walk Don't Run" by the Ventures: [Excerpt: The Ventures, "Walk Don't Run"] And you can easily see how this: [plays "Walk Don't Run"] Can lead to this: [plays "California Dreamin'"] And I'm fairly certain that if that was the inspiration, it was Sloan who was the one who thought it up. John Phillips had been paying no attention to the world of surf music when "Walk Don't Run" had been a hit -- that had been at the point when he was very firmly in the folk world, while Sloan of course had been recording "Tell 'Em I'm Surfin'", and it had been his job to know surf music intimately. So Sloan's intro became the start of what was intended to be Barry McGuire's next single: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "California Dreamin'"] Sloan also provided the harmonica solo on the track: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "California Dreamin'"] The Mamas and the Papas -- the new name that was now given to the former New Journeymen, now they were a quartet -- were also signed to Dunhill as an act on their own, and recorded their own first single, "Go Where You Wanna Go", a song apparently written by John about Michelle, in late 1963, after she had briefly left him to have an affair with Russ Titelman, the record producer and songwriter, before coming back to him: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "Go Where You Wanna Go"] But while that was put out, they quickly decided to scrap it and go with another song. The "Go Where You Wanna Go" single was pulled after only selling a handful of copies, though its commercial potential was later proved when in 1967 a new vocal group, the 5th Dimension, released a soundalike version as their second single. The track was produced by Lou Adler's client Johnny Rivers, and used the exact same musicians as the Mamas and the Papas version, with the exception of Phillips. It became their first hit, reaching number sixteen on the charts: [Excerpt: The 5th Dimension, "Go Where You Wanna Go"] The reason the Mamas and the Papas version of "Go Where You Wanna Go" was pulled was because everyone became convinced that their first single should instead be their own version of "California Dreamin'". This is the exact same track as McGuire's track, with just two changes. The first is that McGuire's lead vocal was replaced with Denny Doherty: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "California Dreamin'"] Though if you listen to the stereo mix of the song and isolate the left channel, you can hear McGuire singing the lead on the first line, and occasional leakage from him elsewhere on the backing vocal track: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "California Dreamin'"] The other change made was to replace Sloan's harmonica solo with an alto flute solo by Bud Shank, a jazz musician who we heard about in the episode on "Light My Fire", when he collaborated with Ravi Shankar on "Improvisations on the Theme From Pather Panchali": [Excerpt: Ravi Shankar, "Improvisation on the Theme From Pather Panchali"] Shank was working on another session in Western Studios, where they were recording the Mamas and Papas track, and Bones Howe approached him while he was packing his instrument and asked if he'd be interested in doing another session. Shank agreed, though the track caused problems for him. According to Shank "What had happened was that whe

god united states america tv love american new york california new year history black hollywood uk rock los angeles las vegas work action mexico fall british san francisco young french canadian girl washington dc moon alabama night detroit congress trip grammy epic fish broadway run captain hair southern california catholic beatles mothers manhattan cd caribbean boy columbia mtv glass kick rolling stones raiders west coast capitol elvis doors rock and roll tom cruise guard destruction fantastic stones hart shortly south africans cocktails flip folk phillips rebel turtles depending storytellers bob dylan dedicated billboard big brother aladdin bands stopped soviet union rodgers trio northern weil wheels invention lsd paul mccartney ludwig van beethoven swim webb porsche watts vocal darling dimension santa barbara herman medieval californians neil young djing rusty jimi hendrix motown cathedrals woody allen mamas ludwig lambert beach boys mgm st patrick millennium duo werewolves grateful dead i love you sleeper jack nicholson improvisation adler ode mick jagger duffy getting better nicholson lovin papa johns addams family mixcloud tilt paul simon big three mccartney monterey mcguire arnie unsurprisingly schwab papas stumble janis joplin us constitution jello jim morrison monkees dickson hendricks sam cooke james dean doherty wicker man virgin islands teddy bears strangelove booker t garfunkel stills rock music brian wilson smoothies supremes connors greenwich village bluebird ciro move on otis redding sunset strip separately hard days incidentally good vibrations oldham radio shack gilliam byrds shangri la paul revere spoonful jersey boys