Podcasts about Newberg

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Latest podcast episodes about Newberg

Red Hills Church Podcast
Philippians: Grace 7 Peace - Phil. 1:12-30.

Red Hills Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023


Pastor Kate Swanson continues our series with a message from Philippians 1:12-30. ++++ LINKS +++++ Online Gathering Details: http://redhills.church/online Give Online: http://redhills.church/give Connect Card: http://redhills.church/connectcard +++++ JOIN US +++++ In-Person & Online GatheringsSundays at 8:30, 10:00 (Livestream), & 11:30AMhttp://redhills.church/online +++++ CONNECT +++++ Website: http://redhills.church Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/redhillschurchnewberg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/redhillschurchnewberg YouTube: http://bit.ly/rhcyoutube +++++ CONTACT +++++ Email: info@redhills.church Phone: 971.225.3737 Church Office: 901 Brutscher Street, Ste. 216, Newberg, OR 97132

Red Hills Church Podcast
Philippians: Grace & Peace - Phil. 1:1-11

Red Hills Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023


Pastor Lane Greenleaf-Perez opens up our new sermon series in the book of Philippians.++++ LINKS +++++ Online Gathering Details: http://redhills.church/online Give Online: http://redhills.church/give Connect Card: http://redhills.church/connectcard +++++ JOIN US +++++ In-Person & Online GatheringsSundays at 8:30, 10:00 (Livestream), & 11:30AMhttp://redhills.church/online +++++ CONNECT +++++ Website: http://redhills.church Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/redhillschurchnewberg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/redhillschurchnewberg YouTube: http://bit.ly/rhcyoutube +++++ CONTACT +++++ Email: info@redhills.church Phone: 971.225.3737 Church Office: 901 Brutscher Street, Ste. 216, Newberg, OR 97132

OutKick 360
Hour 1 - Josh Newberg - On3 National Host, OK360 Headlines, Hutton's Favorite Moneyline Upsets.

OutKick 360

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 44:00


OK360 Headlines: The boys dig into the top storylines from the first weekend of the NFL Playoffs. And Josh Newberg joins the show to get into the Jaden Rashada saga at UF and potentially being the first holdout due to an NIL deal gone bad. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast
Jeff Meader: Oral History Interview

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 52:12


This interview is with Jeff Meader of Eminent Domaine. In this interview, Jeff talks about growing up near Ribbon Ridge on a farm and falling in love with that lifestyle. He speaks about attending college for business, yet taking agricultural courses and goes on to describe his time working in commercial real estate. Later, Jeff discusses his discovery of the Oregon wine world and the formation of Eminent Domaine. He also shares the story behind its name. The phrase Eminent Domaine is a legal term meaning “the right of a government to claim private property for public use with financial compensation.” As Jeff describes, this is what happened to one of his old properties and is what funded the creation of the winery by the same name. He also speaks about the community he is a part of and what makes this an industry worth working in. At the end, Jeff talks about the recent challenges Oregon wine has faced as well as the future he is working towards for his brand. This interview was conducted by Rich Schmidt at Eminent Domaine in Newberg on June 14, 2022.

Real Life With Pamela Lau
What is Christian Leadership? A Conversation with Lindsay Knox, Vice President, Enrollment and Marketing

Real Life With Pamela Lau

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 54:07


I am honored to connect with Lindsay Knox on my show today! She is currently serving as the Vice President for Enrollment at Marketing at George Fox University. In what has become a unique professional story, Lindsay has spent all of her 17 year career in higher education at George Fox. She started in an entry level position and worked her way up to joining the President's Executive Leadership Team in the summer of 2020. Her expertise is primarily in student recruitment tactics & financial aid leveraging. Her enrollment teams are industry leaders known for their innovative strategies and high achieving results. By focusing on leadership through developing individuals to achieve their full potential, Lindsay has been able to put her Master's of Organizational Leadership from Gonzaga University to good use.  Over the years, her strengths in strategic planning and goal execution has gained recognition from the National Association for Christian College Admissions Professionals (NACCAP). Lindsay may spend her days at George Fox University in Newberg, OR, but it's her daughters who ultimately motivate her. Teaching Violet (7) and Lydia (5) to work hard, care about others, love Jesus, and believe in themselves is the best work she gets to do. Lindsay has been married to Kelly for 9 years and they spend as much time as they can outdoors either in their garden or lakeside at their family cabin on the Swift Reservoir in Washington.  In this episode we dive into topics such knowing you are called to lead and what it looks like to say Yes to God's call to leadership.  We discuss prioritizing motherhood as an executive leader, crafting life in a dual-leadership marriage and family, how our early experiences in life point to future leadership opportunities, what does culture say leadership is or should be?  What do executive leader dreams and goals look like as followers of Jesus?  Can leaders communicate too much?  When do we know it's time to engage our heart more when leading?  What is the Christian spirit of leadership?  How do we define leadership?  We cover the tough topic of why all leaders need support and how people above, and people below can show support of a good leader, encouragement and writing notes to people we appreciate. The role of peer support is vital for leadership growth. And finally, we end our time discussing what it takes to stay in leadership for the long haul. In this episode you will learn: Ambition doesn't always look the same when God is calling you to lead A definition of leadership that takes responsibility for removing boulders on the path How an executive level woman says yes to influence What culture projects as an image of leadership compared to what it's really like when you're a follower of Jesus Questions to ask yourself as a Christian leader when helping others accomplish goals The similarities between the people we oversee and toddlers: Over communication There are goals we want to achieve but the way we treat people matters We cannot assume people we lead know our intent; we need to learn to communicate our "whys" Examples of how to practically support a person in leadership--for real Why it's so important to find out your leader's "whys" so you can encourage them The difference between showing support and expressing encouragement How to ask your team members, "How can I help you for real?" What it takes to stay in leadership for the long haul. Leadership coaches, therapy, being honest with peers are key --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/pamela-havey-lau/message

Red Hills Church Podcast

Guest Pastor Steve Mitchell follows our season of Advent with a message about Epiphany. ++++ LINKS +++++ Online Gathering Details: http://redhills.church/online Give Online: http://redhills.church/give Connect Card: http://redhills.church/connectcard +++++ JOIN US +++++ In-Person & Online GatheringsSundays at 8:30, 10:00 (Livestream), & 11:30AMhttp://redhills.church/online +++++ CONNECT +++++ Website: http://redhills.church Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/redhillschurchnewberg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/redhillschurchnewberg YouTube: http://bit.ly/rhcyoutube +++++ CONTACT +++++ Email: info@redhills.church Phone: 971.225.3737 Church Office: 901 Brutscher Street, Ste. 216, Newberg, OR 97132

Red Hills Church Podcast
All-Church Gathering 2023

Red Hills Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023


Pastor James Busch leads us into a new year with a message about the sacrificial love of God.++++ LINKS +++++ Online Gathering Details: http://redhills.church/online Give Online: http://redhills.church/give Connect Card: http://redhills.church/connectcard +++++ JOIN US +++++ In-Person & Online GatheringsSundays at 8:30, 10:00 (Livestream), & 11:30AMhttp://redhills.church/online +++++ CONNECT +++++ Website: http://redhills.church Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/redhillschurchnewberg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/redhillschurchnewberg YouTube: http://bit.ly/rhcyoutube +++++ CONTACT +++++ Email: info@redhills.church Phone: 971.225.3737 Church Office: 901 Brutscher Street, Ste. 216, Newberg, OR 97132

The Giving Town
The Leverage of Rotary - with Auggie Gonzales

The Giving Town

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 48:50


Auggie Gonzales is a well known and beloved member of our community who has been serving this town in various capacities for over 25 years. In this episode, Auggie shares what brought him to Newberg, how he got involved in Rotary, various projects he has been involved with, and his work with Newberg Urgent Care.As mentioned in the episode, you can check out The Joyful Roberts Group YouTube channel here.The Joyful Roberts Group The Joyful Roberts Group is a real estate team led by Daniel Roberts, host of The Giving Town.Support the show

Red Hills Church Podcast
Christmas Eve 2022

Red Hills Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022


Pastor Lane Greenleaf-Perez leads us in a time of hope, joy, peace, and love as we celebrate the birth of King Jesus.++++ LINKS +++++ Online Gathering Details: http://redhills.church/online Give Online: http://redhills.church/give Connect Card: http://redhills.church/connectcard +++++ JOIN US +++++ In-Person & Online GatheringsSundays at 8:30, 10:00 (Livestream), & 11:30AMhttp://redhills.church/online +++++ CONNECT +++++ Website: http://redhills.church Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/redhillschurchnewberg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/redhillschurchnewberg YouTube: http://bit.ly/rhcyoutube +++++ CONTACT +++++ Email: info@redhills.church Phone: 971.225.3737 Church Office: 901 Brutscher Street, Ste. 216, Newberg, OR 97132

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast
Kate Ayres: Oral History Interview

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 84:15


This interview is with Kate Ayres of Penner-Ash Wine Cellars. In this interview, Kate speaks about her education and training in the industry and goes over various jobs she's worked. She describes her first harvest and what it was like creating memories with her crew. She goes over what it's like working in different places and how winemaker's style can vary. She also tells some fun stories, including one about a not so conventional interview. Later, Kate speaks about her work at Penner-Ash and how her role has evolved. She also talks about what it's like working with Pinot noir, what the Oregon environment and community is like, and what she predicts in her future. This interview was conducted by Rich Schmidt at Penner-Ash Wine Cellars in Newberg on April 21, 2021.

GEORGE FOX TALKS
What NOT to do While Traveling Abroad... | WORLD

GEORGE FOX TALKS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 34:27


Discomfort, awkward interactions, life-threatening danger—All possibilities when venturing out of your bubble and into an unfamiliar culture. David & Nick are here to address all of these topics and more while sharing their first-hand experiences of things NOT going according to plan. Dr. Martínez directs George Fox University's Study Abroad program and teaches Spanish.Nick Forrest is a pastor at Northside Community Church in Newberg, OR. He previously worked with YWAM in Arusha, TanzaniaIf you enjoy listening to the George Fox Talks podcast and would like to watch, too, check out our channel on YouTube! We also have a web page that features all of our podcasts, a sign-up for our weekly email update, and publications from the George Fox University community.

Red Hills Church Podcast
The Unexpected King: Love

Red Hills Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2022


Pastor Kate Swanson shares the message of love on this fourth Advent week.++++ LINKS +++++ Online Gathering Details: http://redhills.church/online Give Online: http://redhills.church/give Connect Card: http://redhills.church/connectcard +++++ JOIN US +++++ In-Person & Online GatheringsSundays at 8:30, 10:00 (Livestream), & 11:30AMhttp://redhills.church/online +++++ CONNECT +++++ Website: http://redhills.church Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/redhillschurchnewberg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/redhillschurchnewberg YouTube: http://bit.ly/rhcyoutube +++++ CONTACT +++++ Email: info@redhills.church Phone: 971.225.3737 Church Office: 901 Brutscher Street, Ste. 216, Newberg, OR 97132

Sermons – Grace Baptist Church
Advent Sermon Series – Joy

Sermons – Grace Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2022


Bulletin: Click the “SAVE” button above for a copy of this week's full bulletin.

The Blue Planet Show
Wing Foil interview: Mike's Lab- Mike Zajicek and Stefano Moris on the Blue Planet Show

The Blue Planet Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 109:40


Mike Zajicek and Stefano Moris make some of the world's fastest foils. When I researched their foils to use for wing foiling, I could not find much information online. After many months of waiting, they were finally able to make time for an interview. The timing was great since I just received the 600 Mike's lab Foil from them that I ordered months ago. We talk about their background, how they started designing and making foils and go into detail on their foil design theories and construction. For more information on their foils, please visit: http://www.mikeslab.com Aloha friends. It's Robert Stehlik. Welcome to another episode of the Blue Planet Show, where I interview foil athletes, designers, and thought leaders and get lots of good information for all those foil crazy people out there, like you and me. This year I didn't post a lot of interviews, but I'm ending this year, 2022 with a bang, with two really good interviews. Today's interview is with Mike's lab founder Mike and partner Stefano. They make some of the best foils in the world, the fastest foils in the world, hand-built in San Francisco and in Italy. The story, background story is really cool as well. know, Mike grew up in Czechoslovakia, communist Czechoslovakia, where he started building windsurf equipment and making it for his friends. And then escaping over the border, risking his life to escape Communist Czechoslovakia, and ended up in the West and eventually in San Francisco, started making windsurf boards again for some of the top athletes in the world, and then getting. Foils at the time of the interview. I only had one quick session on my 600 mike slab foil. Since then, I've been able to try it more and also use it on a really long downwind run in epic conditions from Hawaii Kai to White Plains where we winged like about 40 miles downwind. Super fun. And that's why I could really tell how fast this foil is. I went out with some really fast guys and was able to of smoke them in some of the runs just because the foil was really quick and easy to control and I was just able to make these big drops on these big bumps. And so I had a great time with it. I might include some of that footage in this during this interview. And then also I have some really nice footage of Alan Kez using his five, I think it's a five 40 Mike's lab foil in Kailua. And got some cool drone footage of him going super fast on that foil as well. I hope you enjoy the, this interview and next week's interview is gonna be with Ken Winter. He's the designer at Duotone and making some of the best wings on the market and also was really the first one to make inflatable wings for foiling. He's definitely a pioneer and a really good story. Started. Windsurf professional, and then got into the design side of things. And he really shared a lot about the, his wing designs and philosophy and et cetera. So that's a really good show as well. And I'm gonna post that the following Saturday, which is December 24th, and wishing everyone happy holidays. And without further ado, here is Mike and Stefano with Mike's lab. So welcome, Stefano and Mike to the Blue Planet Show. Today's show is about Mike's Lab foils. Thanks so much for joining me. I've been waiting for quite a while to get you on the show. And I finally got my own Mike's lab foil. I've only tried it one time, unfortunately, but really really excited about it. So welcome to the show. Thank you. Yeah, no problem. Yeah. And actually, let's start with where you are joining from, so we're spread out all over the world here. All right. I'm in Sienna, Italy, and I'm close to San Francisco. Yeah. And then I'm in Honolulu where it's morning time. And I think for you it's Mike is midday and for Stephano, it's late in the evening. So thanks for making the time to, to join the Blue Planet Show. , my, my video is, Doing funky stuff, but, so anyway let's talk a little bit about your background. I just heard Mike saying that you you basically had to escape from, or Yeah. Tell us about, a little bit about your background how you got to where you're now. Maybe start with Mike. Yeah, so obviously I have went grade school, then apprentice training for cabinet making, but high end cabinet making, the European stuff, which you make, eat for generations rather than the, whatever I learned here. Kitchen cabinets with a staple gun, , very different. And then I went to like high school with kinda orientation for architecture, interior design and furniture design. And after that I worked for about a year in interior design in the office and also in the what is it? Shop shop. And we were catering to diplomats in Prague, taking care of the residences, preparing all that and. About 1978 actually. Exactly. I started making windsurfing boards because that was one thing we were allowed to do because my brother took on hang gliding and that was a no-no, especially close to the border. So that quickly became somewhat outlawed except one little hill in center of Czech Republic. So that's why me and my friends, we picked up wind surfing and, so 78 I made the first one, and that's how I actually introduced myself into epoxy and all that. And I kept making boards until 2012, actually more, that was the end of windsurfing boards, and then the kit boards went on for another, I would say three to four years. But during the end of that time the foil came on and I was able to jump on probably the first sword foil, which was imported into America by Brian Lake. And he left for a week somewhere and he said, yeah, Mike, hey, he have at it  and I, it was a very interesting time. He couldn't quite do it yet. It was a skim board. I put footsteps on it so I can even try because I hate boards without footsteps. And yeah, it was difficult. He thought he wasted his money  soon, very soon after he came back, he learned enough that he was doing the, I think it was Friday night races on kite boards. And very quickly he started winning the weather mark. And so we knew this is the way to go. And so sorry to interrupt you, but this was all still in the Czech Republic, right? No. I escape in 1983. And what are we are talking about now? Maybe 2014. So there's 30 years between. Okay. But okay. So you were saying back, so back in the Czech Republic, you're doing an apprenticeship for building furniture and so on. And then you started playing with hang lighters and building wind surfers, correct? Correct. That was all. So in the Czech Republic? Yes. And I'm sure that at that time you weren't really able to buy any goods from the West, so you had to basically build your whole rig and everything, or like, how, yeah. How was, how did that work? So back then, yeah, we basically bought, it was actually a pre molded piece of styrofoam, but we didn't like the shape, so we reshaped it a little bit and then laid it up with fiberglass and epox.  and for, let's say universal. We had friends like machine fittings where the high pressure hose would fit into get screwed from the, from both sides with like heavy duty bolt, expand the high pressure hose into this little delivering housing. That was our universal. And then we fitted aluminum MAs, which is just a piece of pipe, and same thing for the boom, which I found two trees and started bending my aluminum pipe to make a boom. And then I SCO end together. And I'm sure everybody started like that. Everybody in eastern Europe, right? Yeah, because I grew up in, in west Berlin, but we had friends in East Germany and they had to basically build their own equipment unless we brought them something over from the west, . Yeah. But I recall the beginnings in Maui, like early seventies, and nobody was making anything and they were pioneering their own way. Oh, so that, was that early you got into windsurfing, like back Yeah, I was 78 maybe just few years later and  certainly couldn't buy except those pre molded styrofoam blanks. Somebody was able to put together probably on the side in some factory. And yeah, that's what we bought and we could buy a park and fiberglass that was doable. Okay. And then talk a little bit about how you escaped from the Czech Republic and made it to the us. So me and my wealth, our dad was always on a dissident side, but he never got too much in trouble except getting fired from pilot school. But his friends they were persecuted a little bit more to the point that some of them ended up in u New Mines, and actually two sons of one of this, these friends helped us later on. But first we took a vacation in Yugoslavia and we contacted these couples sons over on my dad's friend, who in the meantime died as probably the result of the minds. So they researched an area how we can, or where it's safe to jump the fence between Yugoslavia and Italy. First we tried to sail from Yugoslavia to Italy across, like this Northern bay. We were quickly stopped by boat and we were in the wetsuit, so they just sent us. . Then later on, I remember being in some kind of a police station. I think that's when we came up to the border crossing and they basically took us out and did little interview. And the third time, there was few days later, these friends from Switzerland came and we started talking, strategizing, and they had this city in US Lavia where some other check people were able to just jump the fence in the middle of the city. And so that's what we ended up doing. And we abandoned our car on the US lobby inside and they basically loaded us into their car. And from dark midnight Italy, we drove all the way to Vienna refugee camp, which is Austria, where the waiting line was locked shorter. And we just had to lie to authorities there, that was the first country we stepped our foot on. So we will be able to stay in a refugee camp and apply for asylum. Wow. So this was like, I guess this was before the Berlin Wall came down and things like that. Oh yeah. What year? What year was that? I, this was 83 and Berlin Wall came down in 89. Oh, okay. So that's when the borders were really still really strict and hard to Oh Cross, right? Yeah. Yeah. Wow. So that, you're basically risking your life doing that, right? Yeah, if you don't do it in the right spot. So my cousin was actually in the army and he was patrolling the bo border, and there was like 50 kilometer dead zone, and they had machine guns, him and his body and dogs basically patrolling the, this dead zone with electrical fences and all that. And my cousin decided to escape, this was like two years before I did it. So he knew that it was a bad area and he was so soft that his parents were actually just, his dad was allowed to go to the refugee camp, talk to him, and he managed to bring him back. And so he got little fill in how it goes, because he worked on the border and he escaped. And I'm sure his body wasn't deep due to after, wow. His whatever colleague escapes. But anyway, so then you applied for asylum, I guess in, in Europe and then, but how did you make it to San Francisco? . So yeah, you apply, you wait few months we had a interview with Ambassador, US Ambassador in vie. And once he okayed us, we in the meantime joined this American Fund for Czechoslovak refugees, which was financing the flights, to come to us. And we were asked where they were gonna send us to Boston, and we thought further away from Europe would be better idea. And luckily we got San Francisco, so we ended up directly to here. They paid us first month's rent and after that we were on our own. Luckily we got welfare the first few months and yeah, after I, I literally started working in a company shop two weeks after arrival with zero English, , some French, enough Russian. And luckily a Russian guy hired me for his shop. So I was able to speak Russian to him at first, but he had three other young guys like me, and I picked up English from them within few months. Pretty okay. Especially, and it's just about work, it's not, it wasn't too bad. Wow. Yeah, now, and now your English is very good, so that's impressive. How old were you when you got to the United States? 23. Oh, okay. Wow. Yeah. Okay. That's a amazing story. And then, yeah, so then you got a job, and then how did you get into making your own foils? First it was the boards. I jumped from that 78 back in check. I made at least six wind boards. And then here I am in San Fran, driving by Berkeley, where I see dozens of wind surfers having fun. And I go, I gotta, get back to it. Me and two other friends, we bought this production like horrible quality boards and started going out there and later on I realized, yeah, I probably have to make me my own board again. And it was 1985 when I made my first board, maybe 86, 1 of those. And I managed to cut my finger pretty badly in that process, . And I finished the board injured, and three of my friends tried it, and they immediately said, yeah, we need something like that. We want same board. . So I had three customers before I could ever try my first board out here, And I slowly shifted from cabinet making and little bit later construction because my Russian boss managed to fire me for asking him a question . So I went into short period of construction and from that I was able to meander into making boards. And so that's how you started basically you started your own business building boards? Yeah. In 86 full-time. Okay. Definitely 87. And then, yeah. And then talk about, yeah. How that evolved into Mike's lab, I called it, believe it or not, Mike's lab. Then for the first board, just as a joke that I'm some big operation . It was, nothing. And yeah, I was making in inroads into the local scene, racing myself, pushing it. And then local racers like Bar Chrisman and Steve Silvester, they noticed sooner than later they got their own boards made by me, even though Bar Chrisman was making his own. But it was too much work for him, , and now he's using my force. That's crazy. Literally, what is it, 37 years later or 40 maybe Yeah. So I'm making boards and in 1996, Matt Pritchard asks me to make him aboard and he picks it up on the way to Hood River Nationals. And he wins by a long shot, like all bullets, by long distance. So immediately Kevin stepped in, then Kevin won his first World Cup, p w a beating beyond Dereck, interrupting his 13 year winning streak on my board, which was a big deal. Wow. And I think it was 1999. And film again calls me and he goes, Mike, you gotta come over. Kevin's gonna do it. And sure enough, I just made awards and that was a lot of fun. . Oh, that's excellent. Okay. So Matt and Pritchard put you on the map a little bit with the Win Winston Awards and Yeah. Later on it was all kinds of other people like Phil Scott Fent, and Michael many others. They all use Finian Min. Newberg who was, there was plenty of others. And the whole time, like basically you're not really sponsoring these guys, they're just buying boards from you because you make the fastest boards or were you making boards for free for some of those guys? No, they had to pay me. I was still very poor, barely making it. To the top guys, I was trying to keep the price down so they can keep selling it. And they did, they sold the board for at least the same, if not more. But I didn't have to do the paperwork or all that, so I just Yeah. Collected money and they let them deal with it. So early on, pretty much everybody had to pay me, but I was very reasonable about the prices, hopefully . Wow. Yeah, it's a little bit like I, I was talking to Mark Rappa horse who started S I c and all the best guys were buying his boards cuz they were the fastest boards available and he didn't really have to sponsor anybody because that's a nice position to be. Yeah, that's where I . But it seems like to the, to this day, it's like you have more, like you, it seems like you have a long waiting list to, for these foils. Like I had to wait, I don't know, three or four months to get a foil. What's your wait time? And I don't know is that kind of how you try to keep it where you basically, you can't make as many as people want? Or what's, yeah, what's your philosophy? Stef, I should men jump in here in let's say the waiting times and the list, but I would say boards, you can almost go in and, let's say have a mate in Cobra, which we did with the kite boards and they were pretty dang good. But I don't really see how our design could be successful and made somewhere in China without us looking it over. And we did try to teach an outfit here in Michigan, I believe, and we slept through about, I don't know, six months, maybe a year. And it still wasn't, the quality wasn't there, so it's not so easy. So I step, Steph should jump in here. Yeah, actually okay. So actually Stefana maybe start talking a little bit about your background, like how you got into this business. Sure. Okay. Mike is one of my best friends. I've known him since I was 18 years old. I'm 48 now. And I, yeah, time flies. And so I met Mike at the Berkeley Marina windsurfing because I caught the windsurfing bug when I was 17. And I met him when I was 18 and I was at the Berkeley Marina and I would see him and all these other guys just go up, up and down and upwind up to Treasure Island training every day. And as a senior in high school at that time, I got off at around noon, just afternoon. So I was going to Berkeley every day. And I just saw that as a goal I wanted to achieve, to be able to, be as fast as those guys and be able to go up wind as fast as those guys. And I was on this super heavy polypropylene, tega windsurf board, and I was just, slug up there. And I finally remember finally making it all the way up to Treasure Island and seeing Mike and the others dancing around playing, doing big jumps. And I chased them back down wind. And I tracked Mike down in the parking lot and we started talking. And then I, and for me, Mike's lab.  as a board maker and as a person was already a legend at that point in the windsurfing scene. So I remember going up to him and oh my gosh, you got a new Mike's lab? Oh, when did you get that? And Mike was like, oh, I made it . And so that just started the whole conversation there. And Mike, gave me an awesome deal. My very first Mike's lab board was a one that had broken and taken up water and he was able to cut the whole thing in half and let it dry out and repair it. So he sold it to me for cheap and I paid off by digging under his house an addition, an additional room under his house. Cuz as a high school student I didn't have that kind of money . And yeah, so that's how our friendship started is out there on the race course, so to speak. And I'm a product designer, so I went to San Jose State and studied product design. So I'm right in the middle between mechanical engineering and fine art. And during my university days and on weekends I'd be working in a windsurfing shop. On the summers I'd be doing all the local race circuit and everything like that. And often would fly myself at Mike's for dinners and jacuzzi time and just philosophizing on life. And that's how our friendship started. . And then in 2006 I met my Italian wife and I have Italian relatives too over here. And so I decided to move over here. And in 2014 is when we started the whole Hydrofoil project. And since as a product designer, I have, I've been doing CAD and 3D and tool design and things like that since 1994. And I proposed to Mike Hey, let's, let's I knew the scene in San Francisco was already blowing up and Mike was already sending me messages about it and I wanted to get into it too. And I'm just one of the people I, I love to just build everything. And I'm always more satisfied to be out on the water if it's something that I've made. So I was just saying, Hey, let's, start a project together just almost like a hobby, we'll design it together and Mike will do all the first layups. I'll do all the tool design. I'll make the first mold. I should jump in quickly in here. Yeah, so I got it sort then soon enough I got spots, foil as well, l shortly after that, F four started making their own foil.  and I was hacking together literally hundreds of pieces with thousands of combinations for maybe a couple of years and never really figured out what it needs and where is the problem. And I know I couldn't control the sort in pitch and spots in left. And I knew it could be combined. And I'm telling Stefano and he goes let's make our own. And there it was. . , yeah. Wow. So it started, so before you met, and I guess that was in the early nineties when you guys met when you were 18. So before that, did you grow up in California or Yeah. Yeah. I was born in San Francisco and I grew up in the Bay Area. Yes. Oh, okay. And then, so basically you married an Italian wife, your Italian wife, and then moved to, basically moved to Italy. Yeah. And then, so now you make, basically you make foils as well in, in Italy. Yeah so the whole development process with Mike is that, from TA 2014 when things started just almost as a hobby, but then quickly started getting requests and things like that I was always doing the design work, the tooling and we would always sort of hash out over at that particular time, Voxer, now we use what's up, but just chats to refine and go over the designs. And I would then come over once or twice a year to work with him in his garage and help boost production because we quickly gotta to the point where we just could not meet demand. And we had to get some more man, hands in there so to speak. So I would come over. A couple times a year to do these production sessions. And and at that particular time I was also teaching at a a university here in Italy, different design courses and curriculum. And then in 2019, the demand got so much where it justified me opening up my own shop over here. So from 2019, I've had my own lab, so to speak where I produce a lot of the foils that are then sold on over here in Europe. Wow. Okay. Great story. So I'm gonna, I'm gonna share this these cool sketches that you emailed me. I'm gonna screen share it and sure. And can you see them? Yeah. Okay. So I guess at that time you guys were one of you was in the Bay Area and one is in and Europe and Italy. And then you were making these for Kite, kite foiling. . Yeah. These first sketches are one of our very first designs. And we, Mike and I both have the philosophy where we just gotta try stuff and learn by doing, we are definitely of the trial and error philosophy. And so this, these are sketches of our very first design, which had, the mass mounted directly over the wing. And I would often 3D print stuff and send it over to Mike so we could have it in his hands. And what you're seeing, all those little pieces, seven through two, and A, B, C, D, those were all the first sort of positive mold like that I sent to Mike because our very first design made negative molds by 3D printing them and backfilling them with resin and M D F, but it ended up getting lost in the shipping. So then a few months later I had to send him the positives, which then he made molds of so just for a good laugh. That was our very first design. Okay, so these little pieces, you made 3D printed molds and then built the basically made the parts and then put 'em all together into to make one foil. Yeah, those, I sent them all the pieces and he could put them all together and then make a mold himself out of fiberglass or whatever he did at the time. Yeah. Amazing. Yeah. , and this is where you were a little bit younger still . Yeah. . But yeah, talk, here's sketches, where we're thinking about, how to keep the tips from popping outta the water. Just what seems so obvious now. But at that time, these were all considerations that we were making. Yeah. And here's a little cross section of how I was gonna make the 3D printed mold to send them. And I, this, this was a, it was such a tragedy because I, for months, I printed all these pieces, made this huge mold, and it just literally got lost in shipping and just damaged. It's probably some buried in some warehouse in America somewhere. ? Oh, no. Yeah. Okay. Yeah. So talk a little bit about this. Is this like your secret sauce or can you share a little bit about like, how you built your molds and if, are you still do using that same process? No, the not at all. So this was in the beginning we used the 3D printing to make the first mold, but we quickly realized that it's just not accurate enough. When you're dealing with making and designing and making hydrofoils, you have to have much higher tolerances. And We quickly moved on to aluminum molds. However, having said that, often in our design process between Mike and I, Mike is somebody that really likes to have something, between his hands, that he can of feel the profile and help visualize the connection. And so often I would print out little pieces and send them to him just so he could like, touch and hold them and give feedback on what he thought. And that was these little pieces here kind of thing? Yeah. Or I don't know if, I don't remember if I sent a picture or not, but, our connections or sometimes profile sections and things like that. Yeah, wing section, wingtip, just to, for me to touch it and Yeah. But, oh, sorry. I just picked up basically the dimensions from what seemed to be working from my thousands of experiments over couple of years. And I gave the rough dimensions and then Stefano would add it, make it into a final product. And then we had somebody, I believe, in Kansas making our first aluminum molds, which were, reasonably pricey, but for, as he said lot better tolerances and also option. Cooking it in the oven to get the proper mask strength. We had to go the aluminum route and pressures, I we clamp our molds together. Everybody knows we do a wet layer process and we use really high pressures, which obviously 3D printing doesn't, can't hold up to it. . But these original molds, I guess the, this part here was the three pin 3D printed part, and then you put exactly resin underneath it and MDF boards, and then just Yeah. Made your own molds out of yeah, out of 3D printed materials for prototyping, basically. Yeah. Yeah. And I since those early days, I have done this a couple more times when I want to do something that's just so ridiculous that it's not worth spending, a few thousand on an aluminum mold and then find out that it doesn't work, so I, I did a flying wing concept many years ago with this same process. Okay. And then I guess this picture here is like the, where the mass is right on top of the foil, but the foil is angled forward. Yep. Yeah. Looks like a good way to catch seaweed, right? Yeah, . Exactly. . But how did it work? We I think we ended up not doing such a forward rake when we, I think this was like maybe one of the very first sketches. Yeah, just a sketch. I bet you it would turn really good. And I know brand did this forward. Oh yeah. Yeah. Anyway. Okay and then this looks like what year was this? This kind of an older article. Huh? The world's fastest kite boards. Kite boards by day. Wow. So if it's a kiteboard, I bet you it's about 2014, maybe 13. And yeah, I went straight from winding making boards from, for Johnny Heineken, Adam Cook, and all these really fast guys. And again, they took it straight to the world championship winning. Johnny was at least two or three times world champion on the three Fin Kitire boards. Yeah, right there, . And then this, I guess this was before foiling, right? This, these were just Exactly with a regular fin on the back and so on. Yeah. Yeah. Three fins. Yes. Oh, three fins. Okay. Wow. Which ironically turned into be perfect for learning Wing foiling. Yeah. And then the, and then there's these asymmetrical speed boards. Huh. That's cool too. That's Rob Douglas, who was always, and he still is now pursuing speed on wings with my foils, and he's buying all kinds of wings, trying to go fast. But this was at the time when kites were actually holding the world speed record for sale powered craft. And he was asking me to make his boards with his ideas, his dimensions for different conditions. I believe at the end I probably made about 27 of these for him. . Wow. So at the at that time, yeah, the kites held the world speed record for sail power. Who's holding it now? What is it? Is it foils or still regular boards well be, so he got his world record, 55.5 knots, which held for I think a couple of years. And then the little boat, Ste. May know the name. I think it was some kind of attraction foil with a sail. Yeah. Vest. Sail rocket. Yeah. And sale Rocket disintegrated at the end of the run by, by obliterating that 55 55 Or maybe over 60, but it could never be repeated because the book was in, in pieces, . Oh, wow. And then that's still the world record, that's the current world record? Or did they get the world record with that run, or, yes. No, they did. They did. And then at the end of the run, the Bo boat, just self des or self-destructed. Hon, honestly, I don't, I, I know the, when the Sail Rocket had their big crash, I don't think that was the record run. I think they went and re rebuilt and did the record run after that, but I believe they still have the record. And this, yeah, this image here is just, I have a portfolio site just showing a, the depth of my work. I've done everything from consumer electronics to toys, to, to clothing. A lot of people think since I'm involved, in the design side of Mike's lab, they think I'm, an aero engineer or, a naval architect. But I'm not I'm really just as much an artist as I am a tinkerer. , if you would say, So even like first class airline seats and things like that you worked on . Yep. Yep. And what is this? A it's a little mp3, boom box from back in the day. And there's some other Bluetooth concepts there. I was working for a design firm for a while where we did shoe concepts for Nike. I've done everything from, multimedia commercials to some c compositing work to web design and coding and things like that. So a little bit of everything under the creative umbrella. The slipper looks a little bit like a kite surfing foot strap. Yeah. Maybe there's some subconscious influence there. What's this one? The Air Force water plane. Oh, I so I, all my life I've been into, radio control, everything and this kind of ties into the hydrofoil design. And I, it's the same with Mike in the sense that we've, all the things we've been into in our lives, we've always thought about just the way fluid flows. So neither Mike nor I. Like I said, aeronautical engineers but we definitely lie awake at night thinking about flow. And so I've done, yeah, that was a scratch built radio control airplane I built and I've done discus launch and RC helicopters and I there was a period of my life where I was skydiving for about 14 years, and I also designed and built a parachute. So I've even designed and built foil kites as well. So just flow, fluid flow. Interesting. And then this looks like a covid safe cafeteria design. Is that what it is? ? No, it's old fur. It's a old library furniture from a much old, just for privacy or yeah, exactly. Yeah. Yeah. So not not the covid flowing across the table. Yeah. No. And since 2019, that's all I've been doing is the hydrofoil. So before 2019, I was mixing in consulting and, working on the hydrofoils with Mike. But since two, 2019 it's been just full-time hydrofoils, which Okay. Even then, even with Mike producing in California and me producing in Europe, yeah. The wait list is still Optum 3, 4, 5 months. It depends on what model and where the person is located. Yeah. And then so the pictures in that portfolio shows Nico Par. And for about three years we were dominating the racing circuit on our kite foil and our waiting line just absolutely exploded. It was pushing past two years, waiting time for everybody else, learn how to make proper foils. We were definitely there having very successful race design. And I think Nico Parley were at least two times world champion. Daniel Lamoro at least three on our foil, and maybe Johnny I think was as well, one once or twice. Yeah. And I think it's really important to point out that, when people think of Mike's lab, they first think of Mike, and then sometimes they think about me. But the re the reality is it's really like a big team project. I If it wasn't for the valuable input and feedback of Nico and Johnny and Ricky Leche and Connor and all, just the whole slew of racers giving their input, then of course our hydrofoils wouldn't be where they are today. So I just got this foil that bullet six and it's yeah, it's beautiful. I only tried it one time for a short time to test it out. It definitely felt fast and very efficient. But I'm wondering like, how many people do you have working on these and do you, did you actually do some of the work on this foil or like who who actually builds these foils at them? Yeah, I believe I build this one and shift it to you, and the only thing I have done by somebody is to cut my pieces to be late inside the mold. So if you imagine a roll of carbon and I need to have the pieces precut, I have somebody doing that. But everything else I do myself. So the pre-reg carbon basically cut into into the pieces that fit into the mold. It's not even pre-reg, it's dry carbon. It's dry carbon and then it's saturated by liquid resin. So the resin, do you like vacuum it into the mold or do you lay it out wet it out before the mold closes? How does that work? Yeah, exactly. Just wet it out piece by piece into each half of the mold and then the two halves come together and hopefully next morning it pops open with what you have. It obviously needs a lot of cleaning after it comes out of the mold, but. . Yeah, so I guess this one looks like the whole, the fuselage and the whole front foil is all one piece and then it looks like the tail is molded separately and then connected here. Is that correct? No, it's all molded in the same time. What you probably are looking at is our own mold connection. It looks like it's been connected, but no, it was all laid up in, in one time, one piece. And that's because we have to screw the wings to the fuselage from each end of the fuselage, right? So you can see the seam of the mold on the final product. But other than that, it's all one piece. And our philosophy was back then trying to make a race foil. The less connections and the more in center the wings are in relation to the fuselage, the less, as Stephano called it, peak acceleration we gonna encounter. So if you have to screw the wing from one side or the other, you have bulk of the fage and meat necessary to, for the screw to go in on one side, and that's your unnecessary drag through the water. So we decided to go this route and learn how to build it and it's reason. Efficient, making it this way that we don't have to spend time, making pieces there, machining them together, screwing them together. , this way we can find unit for the customer who may not have the ability, conditions or time to do it themselves, so they get something what's already fine tuned and you, the only way to really mess it up is to run the reef or something. Oh, I know. And this foil looks so nice. I'm really scared of getting it scratched up. So the spot i g foiler is really shallow and then the mass I got is like 102 centimeters I'm probably only gonna use it in deep water spots. Yeah, I think you changed it from 96 to 1 0 2. . . Yeah. No, for racing. It's definitely nice to, especially Darwin racing. I wanted to ask these has these little blue fibers in it. What is that and what, why are those early on? It was for me to I used to go to the border with up to six different boards and foils on shore and I would go in and out with a kite back then. And I figured out how to mark them visually for me, because if you go in and out, you forget which one felt what and why.  and I had this color coding type. Visuals. And I remember, oh, the orange one felt this way and felt good. Let me look how I build it. What is the pitch when I came home or to the shop the next day? And I think it also gives it a little bit of a character. When people have the same foil, at least they can recognize which one is theirs. Especially running into the wrestling line. Sometimes people would grab somebody else's board In the past, if you can't believe it, like wind surfing boards, I made so  this way. It was a little bit, recognizable in the first glance. Okay. So that this is basically the color, just so you can each foils a little bit different and you can recognize which, which ones which. Yeah. And then, yeah, I noticed there is on the, and it's fun for us too, just it changes things up. I like to use pigments and tins too when I'm doing mine. And it's fun cause you can see the difference between my ies and mine and just changes. Yikes. Your connection is really slow now, I think. Yeah. We're breaking up a little bit, but, and then, yeah, on the mass too, it has these little colors and stuff like that. So it's just yeah, make it little bit unique. Each one. Each piece. Yeah. And the colors could be almost any color. I get a fiber in different colors and the pigments in different colors. So yeah, it just can be limitless. And then the other thing that I found really interesting is the connection between the mask and the fu fuselage. And basically rather than having it like a lot of foils have almost a box, a little bit like a tule box where the mask goes into the foil. But it looks like you try to it's more like you're maximizing the surface area where they're connected and and getting, that's not only the surface area, it's also not weakening the fuselage. The fuselage has to be super strong. And others using the mini total, if you can really pay attention, for example, lift, right lift foils, they do the mini total. And if you look at the fuselage size on their foil, it's massive. So I don't know if they ever will be able to go top speed, even though they do pretty well. But the disadvantage of the mini turtle is that your fuselage is too. Yeah, it definitely introduces a weak spot. Like on my access fuselages there's like several that had got a little cracks right here, like right at the end of the mast where it inserts into the board because that's just like a, the sides are relatively thin, right. Next to the box. So I guess, so basically part of it is just to have more strength right here in that connection. Yeah. Makes sense. Yeah. It transfers a little bit too much stress. That's the, and then explain how this little screw works. Cause I guess the whole, with this screw, you can change the angle of the tail a little bit. Is that correct? Can you explain how that works? Because I haven't really tried that yet to put a washer or something in here. Yeah, you could, but it's not necessarily Yeah, go ahead. But I think we gotta take two steps back here because a lot of people that are probably listening to this, that are coming from the wing foiling or the prone or surf foiling, and maybe I've never heard of Mike's lab before. This connection system that we develop has been copied by many other brands, which is a testament to how well it works and. The design the crux of the, of designing a hydrofoil is you have to marry what would be the hydrodynamic ideal with what is mechanically required in order to just support the stresses involved. And so that's why we very quickly are very first foils. Yeah. We had a detachable, front wing and detachable rear wing. And then we quickly realized, as Mike was saying, that there's just way too much drag there in order to be able to house all the extra hardware, so on and so forth. So that connection system is to be as efficient and small as possible, but still be mechanically sound enough. And another misconception that a lot of people have is that little screw is used for the incidents, but it's actually not when you would, like with our kit oils, when we were, we had smaller diameter fuselages we would use shims and we still do with the kite foils. And you can literally you're bending the fuselage in order to get an angular change in incidents. So it's not so much that you have to have a little screw, but you just have to have material in there that then you're actually flexing the whole fuselage. Okay. Ba basically basically the foil is being held by these B three big screws in the. , but, and then this one is to hold a washer if you wanted to. No. The little stabilizes the fuselage going towards the back wing. We are using the mask and strength to keep the fuselage attached as long as possible before it has to go on its own to hold onto the back wing. And early on when I was testing a kite forests, the little screw wasn't there. And I could not quite, I didn't like it. It was all over the place as far as stability. As soon as I added the little screw manually into one of the foils, it improved drastically. So the legal screw is there for stability mainly, and Okay, got it. It became an advantage that the pitch of the incidents on the back wing was adjustable by putting reasonable tension without damaging something, we could lower the incidence of the back wing right there on the beach and, go back out. Okay. So if let's say I, if I wanted to, if I put a small washer in here in between, that would lower the incidence of the tail flow. So basically, if you want, if you wanna go faster and have, basically have less lift at high speeds, that's what it would achieve, basically. Or is it the other way? ? No. You are correct, but I don't think you need to do that. Yeah. It's already pitched to go really fast. You may wanna experiment. I don't think it's gonna help you with speed or anything like that. In fact, it's gonna force you to move your footstep maybe an inch back. But it, I don't think it's gonna buy you anything. It's probably gonna lower the stability if you go lower than the pitch you have. I don't think you're gonna see any good results. Okay. That's good to know. It's good. Measure it and it's around two degrees up to 2.4. I wouldn't ship it at all. And if you go below two degrees, at least in Kite Falls, we found that the four stars golfing, if you go really fast downwind, it loses the stability. The back wing is not helping to stabilize the fronting downwind at high speed. So you're saying the the built-in angle of incidents of the tail wing is about two degrees, is that correct? Ye between two to 2.4. And then what about the front wing? Oh, that's neutral. That's always neutral. Neutral zero. Okay. Yeah and it depends also what back wing it is as well. Cause we have different back wings. . Yeah. Because it's that's a little bit of a misconception is sometimes yeah. Really what matters is the difference between the front angle of the front and the back wing. So yeah. Correct. So basically your front wing is at zero angle of incidents. The back wing is like two degrees two to two and a half. Yeah. And and just to be clear, zero angles for a front wing does not mean neutral lift. It's still giving a lot of lift even at zero degrees, right? Because of the shape of the profile, right? Yeah. Yes. And I found it was relatively easy to get it up. I was worried that it would take really high speed to get up on foil, but it wasn't too, it worked fine and it just came up just fine, it wasn't like a big thing. We I mean I tried to erase it last Sunday and none of us were able to get going because the wind was too light and we ended up having to get a bo to take us back in But but yeah but it had nothing to do with the foil. Was this not windy enough? I should mention that my friend, my buddy has the same exact foil you have and that's his favorite. And he just arrived to Los Baja and he was gonna go out. And he did. And he said, oh my God, this s water is really wild and it's a little bit less stable. And then he comes in and he sends me a message, I'm so stupid, I put on a kite foil . So he went out on his standard kite foil on a wing board and thought, everything is good. And then he comes in and he's totally shocked that he was able to do it. . . Yeah. So talk a little bit about the tips here. Had, it's like a little bit, what do I call it? It's like downward, but then has a little bit up, up curved at the end. So what's the theory behind that Is say down and then back up again? Yeah. Right here in the tip. To make sure that the ventilation doesn't, if you breach a tip so that the ventilation doesn't propagate back down the wing. I see. So when the wing tips comes out of the water, this tip doesn't create ventilation at the tip. Yeah it doesn't allow the low pressure or the detached flow from the top of the wing tip to then propagate down towards the root. It helps shed that sort of bubble and shed that ventilation. Okay. And then I noticed on the tail wing you have these little winglets. What's the purpose of those? Yeah, all those curves on the front wing, which go straight button, then down, and same thing on the back wing. They bring stability and directionality. So for example, our most accessibility kite trace wing, front wing had a lot of these curves and it was very stable. So yeah, you could make a straight wing straight across, but it's gonna be pretty, it's gonna feel like a banana peel stepping on. So that the first purpose is to get it away from the surface, right? If you curve it down, then you don't bridge the first surfaces often, and then the directionality and stability comes from that as well. And then the tip is relief that as step said, it shut the. . Okay. And then, yeah, it was three . So the other question I had like the tule bo tu mount I guess all your masks have tu mounts and it seems like in, in surf foiling and wing foiling, most like the new standard is the plate mounts, right? Yeah. The plate mounts with the two, two US boxes. Why are you sticking with the tu mount and yeah, what's the theory behind that? Yeah the, Mike will give his opinion, but my opinion is that the total box is in incredibly rigid, in any well-built board where you have tracks, you have to tie it to the top of the deck anyway, and the total box does that by itself anyway. So from my standpoint, a 240 gram box is a lot lighter than tracks. And that's not even talking about hydrodynamic issues of the plate underwater versus the total box as well. Okay. Okay. So it's more efficient and you have the connection to the deck of the board and like the whole box is basically different, stronger, yeah. A lot less draggy and it's lighter. Yeah. Yeah, I in, luckily in our floorboards we have the foil strong box, we call 'em, it has both ATU and a plate mount. But some of my newer boards, like the, this one behind me only has the plate mount. So I guess I'm gonna have to either use a plate mount adapter or just use just for this prototype. But I'm gonna have to start putting total boxes in all my boards. Again,  or bo, have both, but we also sell adapters and I also make custom carbon plates for clients that really want to have the plate. I'll do it. It's not like we're we don't do it, but Right. We just prefer the box. Makes sense. Yeah, it's, it, I think it would be pretty difficult, at least for me to build in the plate because you can imagine the resonant fiber running out of the end of the mold now on a vertical situation. So the tunnel is a lot more simple and a lot stronger, and I think it's the correct way to go. The plate has a huge advantage by adjustability back and forth. In fact, I think even Nickleson from Lift gave me the credit that I was the first one to put two tracks side by side because he used to use four balls drilled through the board.  and attached, from the deck, that's how he was attaching this plate mount system. . And I just, I looked at it and I go, oh, I've been using the windsurfing pin boxes long enough that this could be a lot more elegant and adjustable and it wouldn't leak. And sure enough it worked and then everybody adopted it . Interesting. Yeah, what you said makes sense. Basically, when you're laying up the carbon inside the mold with the total, you can keep all the layers going straight and basically the strongest direction versus having to curve them out in a plate mount. So is that And resin dripping out , sorry? And resin would be dripping out. Oh yeah. Yeah. So you would have a big mess when you're try to lay it up. Yeah. Okay. That makes sense. And then I guess why there, why are there so many holes? Is it just cause so that it's adaptable to different types? OFTU boxes, . Okay. That came from kite race foils. The foot strap had to be incidentally right over thet box. So that was a disadvantage. So people who had tracks for kite race foil, which was very bad sock, unstable, flexible, but they could put a footstep anyway on it. On the deck. So once we had to deal with the th with the tunnel, I figured, hey, we can go to one, at least one of the inserts or mounts for the footsteps straight into the tunnel. And that's why this is adjustability for footstep mounting. I see. You can, so basically you can put the foot strap, the one that goes through the footstep into the mass in different positions. That makes, now do kite racers, you just use two screws or do you sometimes use multiple screws to hold it in the total box. I was gonna say that. So for winging, I do two screws up front and one in the back. Not only, it makes it a little bit stronger if you hit big fish, like people hit whales out here, , or I hit a dolphin and some other people actually broke off a wing not mine. I think it was spots back then hitting a dolphin. Anyway, so the two screws put it in with lot more strength, right? Because even wind first, you imagine the big wind board with a rig and rider on it if they hit a sea or rock or anything. Now the foil is at the bottom of whatever. So if they can use more than one screw, it helps. But they are still using at these locally little string for the center screw. , if you really hit something and the foil falls out, it, it hangs on the little piece of rope of the center screw. And also, I like the system because if people damage the barrel, not, or if it breaks the barrel not breaks, they can just pop one out and put it in the appropriate place, the damaged one. So it's like a spare  built in spares. , yeah, exactly. Yeah. The other thing I wanted to ask you, like with the total boxes, one of my pet peeves, and I'm not sure if I'm just not doing it right, but it seems like no matter how tight I put it in, like sometimes, like when you're on the water, you're pumping or whatever, all of a sudden you get that little, and it loosens up a little bit because I think it just slides a little bit deeper into the box. Like how can prevent that from happening? It doesn't loosen up, it actually tightens up so the connection gets more secure between the foil and the board. But your front screw may be a little bit loose, but nobody cares until you hit something like a big fish, right? Because there is always pressure going up from the front way. So you don't care if the screw is a little bit loose at this point. And that's why two screws, because I can crank them against each other, one and the back one and you can hear it cracking and going in and maybe. If you would use two screws, it may not happen. The little cracking what happens to you. And oh, sorry. Ahead sfa. I was just gonna say, a little bit of candle wax rubbed on the side of the head. Also gets it into the box with very little friction and allows you to tighten it from the get-go really easily as well. That's a good tip. I'll try that. And Johnny also developed this technique for the race fos. He really wanted the total sitting Absolutely. Exactly how he wanted it. So his board height at the deck for the front foot would've to be in literally millimeters. He hated it if it was even colder in chalk. So he would put it in, put screws in, then he would grab the foil, put a board upside down and hit the nose of the board, the deck side against the ground, like grass. And you could hear this crack, what you describe happens to you on the water. So he would prepack it on the beach and retighten the screws so nothing could move afterwards. Ah, okay. Yeah, that's another technique, . Basically attach the foil, put the put, put it with the foil down on, and then have the board on top and push it upside down. Okay. And just hit the gently and just. The front of the wing holding the foil like this and just top the nose of the board. Oh, okay. Like you are stepping on it type thing. Okay. You will hear this crack and then you can reit the upcr. Interesting. Check with your board maker too. Yeah. That . Yeah. Yeah, I mean I'm, we make most of my own board but I guess another misconception too is like that I guess if you hit something, most of the pressure obviously is on the front connection, on the front screw. But when you're riding the Yeah, the lift of the front wing, actually the most pressures on that back screw. The back screw. Because this lifts up and the back screw gets pulled down basically. Pulled out. Yes. When you're writing. But the huddle box is designed so that the radiuses, the vertical radiuses are taking the load. So it's not really, it shouldn't be the screws that are bearing that load. They cinch it in there, but once it's in there, it's not depending on the screws. Okay. So just to be clear, like you're saying the kind of these, the, this sites takes the vertical load. Yeah, because it gets wedged into the board basically. Yeah. Yep. And then, yeah, another thing too, people sometimes say oh, my board thet box doesn't go all the way in, but basically there's supposed to be a little gap in the bottom of it, right? Like the, basically it sits tight on these ends and then the sides are just parallel, right? Yep. Yeah. That was the design with this by Larry to have those radis at the ends, jamming in at 10 degrees each side, and that's where the load was basically taken up. And yeah, there must be a gap between the top of the tunnel and your board deck of it, because if there was not, imagine your full body weight would be pushing out a little nomination detail out through the deck, and you would just cause leakage. But in the meantime, starboard brand for foiling windsurfing, they had so many problems with the total box, probably not built properly, that they ended up using the roof, basically the top of the box and issuing the shims. So you would install your box just the right way. So as Johnny was sensitive to the height of the deck up front for the front foot, now the top athletes for windsurfer are doing the same thing with shimming, the top, like you said, on top of the tunnel, and they can adjust the rake of the foil itself against the board. Ah, okay. So by, by basically shimming this top, you can change the angle of the mask slightly kind of thing. But in my opinion, it totally defeats the purpose of the radiuss getting jammed into the box. But their box kept stretching so bad that they had to do this. So now you don't have the ends cinched, or only the sides are holding the foil and it's sitting on the top. It cannot go any deeper, which I think it's crazy, but they are doing it . Okay. Interesting. Interesting. All right, thanks for thanks for that. Something, I'm gonna try that like you were saying, Johnny Heineken just like cracking the foil on the beach before getting on the water and retightening it. That's a good idea. They should, you use two screws up front, the two front ones, and if you smack it and you crank both of them, no way you're gonna do it by sailing it anymore. It's gonna be okay in there. And for the, to put in the second screw. My box only has two screws in, it's, two holes in it. So I just, I guess have to just mark the exact spot and drill a hole through the tu box basically. Correct. I don't know. We use quarter into G 10 on top of the tunnel, so we can actually put the screws in anywhere we want and counter seeing them. So in case you are not using the pad, you can still comfortably step on it. So in case you do have some solid support for your second screw, yeah. You can just drill it one and one eight back from the front hole, and you're gonna be exactly in the right spot. Actually I was just thinking like on my, on most of our boards, the deck is thicker than the tunnel, so there's a hole for the screw to go into the board. Into the board. But anyways, yeah something to play around with, oh wait, are you using like Alexis boxes? It's similar to the Gulf Foil boxes. Yeah. We make our own with a full strong box, but oh, and does it have the screws vertical, like 90 degrees or are they Originally it's taken from total design. It's it's like like the straight, like the Gulf foil. Yeah, so be careful when you are first putting in your foil, you need to rotate the barrel notes by those few degrees because original total design is about 10 degrees right back. So yeah, that could be a little issue. But yeah, I'm trying to give enough space for the front and back to be countered back by 10 degrees. It was originally designed for windsurfing and windsurfing decks for slalom boards. They were sloping down. They were getting thin as you go towards the tail. So that's why that 10 degree slope. Yeah. I'm just sharing like this is what our, we have a box that combines like the tunnel and the interesting the plate mount together and then the top has this only the two holes though. Yeah. Then just use the two holes. Don't bother with there's screw. Good enough. Yeah. No, I mean it seems to work fine. I think just like getting it super tight before you get on the water is the key, I think. Or even maybe breaking it, bringing in a screwdriver. Yeah, tighten it on the water if it's necessary. But as I said, you never need to tighten it on the border as far. Having a secure connection. The only reason to do it is if it feels uncomfortable stepping on it, if but it's never bad. It shouldn't even matter. I think like when you're pumping, when you're pumping and there's a lull and there's no wind and you have to pump through the lull, sometimes that pumping will it's right. But yeah, then you don't want that rocking thing of your mass rocking. Oh, so you are saying it actually goes back out until it hits the screw? think yeah, like you said, it goes a little bit deeper, but then the screws loose. So when you're pumping there to be a little bit of wiggle back and forth on so you can feel the foil doing this. Yeah, I've never seen that. Never. Yeah. I dunno. Yeah. Maybe didn't put it tight enough, yeah. Title box should be tighter than that. It should go in there with a friction, and that friction should stop this. If the back through is tight. I don't think it'll pull out the front, but I never heard of it yet, okay. Okay. All right. And then I also noticed that the whole thing is pretty light. I know I also have access to access foils and it just it just a little bit more weight. And the this whole foil feels pretty light. So how do you achieve that, I guess you just minimize the amount of materials needed by just making that smaller or like how Yeah. How do you keep it light? . For starters, our sections are much thinner than what people are usually used to out there. When I see the profile thicknesses of some of the other brands that like 15, 16, 17 millimeters we're at 12.3 13 millimeters, so already there's less volume there. And then we also have core materials in order to get, good compaction. So it's not solid carbon all the way through. So that's, do you use wood inside, wood or foam or what do you use inside the foam? Is it secret? That's proprietary.  proprietary. Ok. We got some, we have secret sauce. Secret sauce, yeah. Yeah. No, that's good. I respect that. . Okay so the, and then what, like on this mass, it has a little strip of unidirectional part of the way I think it stops at some point. Oh, that's just for fun. That's another one of those pictures. . Ok. That's another thing along with these co funky colors and stuff like that. Yeah. . Okay. Cool. All right, so yeah, what else about the foils that's, that you wanna mention that's unique about your foils? I'd say what's unique is you don't have to do anything. They're plug and play. In, into as Mike was saying before, the incidents, you don't really have to adjust it, especially not with wing surfing relative to kite surfing. The speeds and the balance is a little bit different. So the, our foils are definitely just go have fun. And in my opinion, the less you do something to it, the better. A lot of people ask like, how should I sand it? How should I, eh just don't do anything. The less is, the less you do, the better. . And then I would say one unique characteristic that a lot of people tend to say or be surprised by is just how easy they are to use. I think a lot of people since they know we come from a racing heritage, are maybe afraid that, oh, maybe the foils are like, difficult to use, or something like that. But the reality is a good race foil is easy to control cause that gives you the confidence to then push it and go fast. And it's no different with all our wing foils as well. They're just easy to use. . Another thing is I'm basically demoing the foils to anybody who's interested to hop on it and usually. , all it takes is once and some people have to order it right in and there because it's lot speedier, less drag, more stable, more fun just to use it than anything they tried before. I, we have people which claim they have tried everything there is on the planet made and they say, yeah, we just buy yours and  multiple models just because it feels unique. Yeah, Alan Ez actually on this interview he talked about the Mike's lab foils and winning a race with it last summer on Maui against all the young guys and stuff like that. So that kind of convinced me that, okay, I gotta try one of these foils. . And yeah, definitely what you said about the, being able to control it. Basically every foil has that kind of a max, it seems like a maximum speed that's built in almost. And you want to try to get as get and stay as close as you can to that maximum speed and then Yeah, the how easy it's to control it at that speed is really important because yeah, I mean it's hard to push it to that limit if it's really hard to control it at high speeds. Makes sense. Yeah. . Okay. And what about the fuselage length? I guess that's just something you tested and came up with a good length there. That may have been the worst design feature because again, we have to have it made out of aluminum to be able to properly assemble the mold and build it and cook it. And coming from very short fuselages on kite oils, wind surface will try to use and they were not happy. So it kept growing from super short kite fuselages to super long over one meter for windsurfing, fos. And then winging came on the scene and now we started trying the windsurfing on a wing board wing foil, and that was way too long. So this whole harmonic, the fuselages was very frustrating because I had to have so many molds made and then you still have to test it and people get better. The wings sizes, like the foil wings get smaller, bigger, and they work differently with each other. And then the wings, handheld wings, they get better, faster, and different size. Push differently on a four. So that's definitely very frustrating or worse. But now it settled in for each wing. I like to use certain length and it seems to work. Yeah, that's not to say it's not gonna change still, but hopefully. And yeah, and I mean there's different geometry configurations based on what front and rear wing we have. And then one general comment I'll make a big difference between wing foiling and kite foiling is there's just so much more based on people's local conditions as well. In the sense that with kite foiling, when we were developing the stuff, the kind of mentality was if it can work well in San Francisco, it's gonna work well everywhere. But the reality is with wing foiling is you've got, one guy who wants, a shorter mass because the amplitude of his waves. And then you've got another one who wants open season high water, another guy who wants a longer fuse because that's what he likes and is used to, and another guy who wants a little bit of a shorter fuse. Yeah, on one hand things are settling, but it's never gonna settle like it was with kite foiling where you have a very sort of specific size that everybody can get into. I think personal preference plays a huge. Roll here. Interesting. Also, whether it's saltwater or freshwater, that, that makes a big difference in that amount of lift or like the, a little bit, but that doesn't affect our geometry shorts. That does, that's never affected, like what front wing we're gonna pair with what back wing and what fuselage length. But us generally speaking for freshwater, you probably need a slightly bigger foil a little bit with a little bit more lift. Is that right to or because it's hot water's denser, or is that not really that Sure, yeah. In, in, in theory. But then at the same time, it's all trade-offs. So you're talking about such a tiny little window to play in right there. That, that, okay. So it's gonna be a little bit faster in the freshwater

The Giving Town
The Exciting Future of Camp Tilikum - with Dennis Littlefield

The Giving Town

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 46:56


In this episode, Dennis Littlefield, Executive Director at Camp Tilikum, shares some of the recent challenges as well as the exciting future of Camp Tilikum. For over 50 years, Tilikum has held a special place in the hearts of Newberg's population. Every year, thousands of children experience the highlight of their summer at one of Tilikum's Summer Camps. However, Tilikum does much more than provide a summer camp for kids, as you'll learn in this episode. From family retreats, challenge course projects, and new opportunities coming soon, there are a lot of exciting things happening at Tilikum.Tilikum has also not been without its own set of challenges. Between Covid-19 and a failed valve at the bottom of the lake, it has been a tough couple of years. But with the pandemic mostly behind us and a brand new valve, the future is looking bright!If you are interested in learning more about Tilikum and its mission or would like to offer support, visit their website at https://camptilikum.org/The Joyful Roberts Group The Joyful Roberts Group is a real estate team led by Daniel Roberts, host of The Giving Town.Support the show

Red Hills Church Podcast
The Unexpected King: Joy

Red Hills Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022


Pastor Lane Greenleaf-Perez speaks of joy in this third week of Advent.++++ LINKS +++++ Online Gathering Details: http://redhills.church/online Give Online: http://redhills.church/give Connect Card: http://redhills.church/connectcard +++++ JOIN US +++++ In-Person & Online GatheringsSundays at 8:30, 10:00 (Livestream), & 11:30AMhttp://redhills.church/online +++++ CONNECT +++++ Website: http://redhills.church Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/redhillschurchnewberg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/redhillschurchnewberg YouTube: http://bit.ly/rhcyoutube +++++ CONTACT +++++ Email: info@redhills.church Phone: 971.225.3737 Church Office: 901 Brutscher Street, Ste. 216, Newberg, OR 97132

Sermons – Grace Baptist Church
Advent Sermon Series – Love

Sermons – Grace Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022


Bulletin: Click the “SAVE” button above for a copy of this week's full bulletin.

Sermons – Grace Baptist Church
Advent Sermon Series – Peace

Sermons – Grace Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022


Bulletin: Click the “SAVE” button above for a copy of this week's full bulletin.

Red Hills Church Podcast
The Unexpected King: Peace

Red Hills Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022


Pastor Brett Kindberg shares a message of peace for our second week of Advent.++++ LINKS +++++ Online Gathering Details: http://redhills.church/online Give Online: http://redhills.church/give Connect Card: http://redhills.church/connectcard +++++ JOIN US +++++ In-Person & Online GatheringsSundays at 8:30, 10:00 (Livestream), & 11:30AMhttp://redhills.church/online +++++ CONNECT +++++ Website: http://redhills.church Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/redhillschurchnewberg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/redhillschurchnewberg YouTube: http://bit.ly/rhcyoutube +++++ CONTACT +++++ Email: info@redhills.church Phone: 971.225.3737 Church Office: 901 Brutscher Street, Ste. 216, Newberg, OR 97132

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast
Cliff Robben: Oral History Interview

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 67:44


This interview is with Cliff Robben of J. Christopher Wines. In this interview, Cliff speaks about his life before wine, including his interest in the FBI and his jobs in accounting. He goes on to describe his introduction to the Oregon Wine Industry and how his role grew from there. He talks about his positions at IPNC and Loosen Bros. and what his experience was like working for those wine organizations. Later, Jake discusses his work at J. Christopher. He goes over his initial role and how it has adapted. He also speaks about his current position as General Manager and what he sees as he looks ahead for himself, J. Christopher, and Oregon Wine. This interview was conducted by Rich Schmidt at J. Christopher Wines in Newberg on June 10, 2021.

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast
Megan Markel: Oral History Interview

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 55:55


This interview is with Megan Markel of Well-Played Wines. Megan talks about her careers in politics, nonprofits and various parts of the wine industry, including time as a national sales manager and her new role at Willamette Valley Wineries Association. She also talks about launching her new label and what has gone into that. Megan's unique perspective on the industry is also explored, as she talks about the changes she's seen and the impact of 2020. This interview was conducted by Rich Schmidt at Chehalem Cultural Center in Newberg on April 5, 2022.

Red Hills Church Podcast
The Unexpected King: Hope

Red Hills Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022


Pastor Lane Greenleaf-Perez starts our Advent series with a message of hope.++++ LINKS +++++ Online Gathering Details: http://redhills.church/online Give Online: http://redhills.church/give Connect Card: http://redhills.church/connectcard +++++ JOIN US +++++ In-Person & Online GatheringsSundays at 8:30, 10:00 (Livestream), & 11:30AMhttp://redhills.church/online +++++ CONNECT +++++ Website: http://redhills.church Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/redhillschurchnewberg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/redhillschurchnewberg YouTube: http://bit.ly/rhcyoutube +++++ CONTACT +++++ Email: info@redhills.church Phone: 971.225.3737 Church Office: 901 Brutscher Street, Ste. 216, Newberg, OR 97132

Sermons – Grace Baptist Church

Bulletin: Click the “SAVE” button above for a copy of this week's full bulletin.

Red Hills Church Podcast
Waiting Well: What If We Had Waited?

Red Hills Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022


Pastor Mark Nicklas, Director of Mercy and Justice at B4Church, shares the conclusion of our Waiting Well series with the question, "What if we had waited?"++++ LINKS +++++ Online Gathering Details: http://redhills.church/online Give Online: http://redhills.church/give Connect Card: http://redhills.church/connectcard +++++ JOIN US +++++ In-Person & Online GatheringsSundays at 8:30, 10:00 (Livestream), & 11:30AMhttp://redhills.church/online +++++ CONNECT +++++ Website: http://redhills.church Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/redhillschurchnewberg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/redhillschurchnewberg YouTube: http://bit.ly/rhcyoutube +++++ CONTACT +++++ Email: info@redhills.church Phone: 971.225.3737 Church Office: 901 Brutscher Street, Ste. 216, Newberg, OR 97132

Red Hills Church Podcast
Waiting Well: What Happens When We Wait?

Red Hills Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022


++++ LINKS +++++ Online Gathering Details: http://redhills.church/online Give Online: http://redhills.church/give Connect Card: http://redhills.church/connectcard +++++ JOIN US +++++ In-Person & Online GatheringsSundays at 8:30, 10:00 (Livestream), & 11:30AMhttp://redhills.church/online +++++ CONNECT +++++ Website: http://redhills.church Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/redhillschurchnewberg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/redhillschurchnewberg YouTube: http://bit.ly/rhcyoutube +++++ CONTACT +++++ Email: info@redhills.church Phone: 971.225.3737 Church Office: 901 Brutscher Street, Ste. 216, Newberg, OR 97132

Sermons – Grace Baptist Church
Persisting Through Deliverance

Sermons – Grace Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022


Bulletin: Click the “SAVE” button above for a copy of this week's full bulletin.

Talking Business
Maxine Braune-Williams, D'Anu Wine Bar

Talking Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 15:52


Topics from this week's episode Keeping business going during the pandemic The meaning behind the name D'Anu Sourcing the grapes Scheduling for success Finding your niche and capitalizing on that Alaskan influenced So many events - check out their calendar    Connect with Maxine on their website and at their address 173 NE  3rd Ave, St. 107 and in Newberg at 300 1st St. Newberg, OR 97132.   Subscribe, Rate & Share Your Favorite Episodes! Thanks for tuning into today's episode of Talking Business with your host, Darcey Edwards with Edwards Realty Trust and Queen Bee Leadership Training. If you enjoyed this episode, please head over to Apple Podcasts to subscribe and leave a rating and review. To learn more about  Darcey please visit her website or Queen Bee Leadership Training. She is also available on Instagram or Facebook. Talking Business is sponsored by XposeHope a 501(c)3 organization dedicated to showing God's love to members of the adult entertainment industry regardless of where they are at. To learn more about XposeHope please visit our website, connect with us on Instagram, Facebook, and share your favorite episodes across social media. Special thanks to Lee Gochenour Photography for Video and Photography. This episode was produced by Christi Dodge of Dodge Media Productions. 

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast
Carrie Kalscheuer: Oral History Interview

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 81:13


This interview is with Carrie Kalscheuer of Rex Hill Wines and A to Z Wineworks. In this interview, Carrie speaks about her life before wine and the years before she moved to Oregon. She talks about her love for travel and how a few months spent in Florence Italy led to the discovery of a wine passion. She realized it was what she wanted to pursue, loving that it was a connector and educator that would allow her to travel places just through a glass. Carrie describes her arrival in Oregon, including how she landed her job at Rex Hill Wines. She also discusses the wine certifications she has earned, the committees she has served on, and the responsibilities she has as Director of Sales and Education at Rex Hill and A to Z Wineworks. Later, Carrie even shares her motto and advice to others: “Always say yes and take every opportunity.” This interview was conducted by Rich Schmidt at Rex Hill Wines in Newberg on July 11, 2022.

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast
Piper Underbrink: Oral History Interview

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 85:33


This Oral History Interview is with Piper Underbrink of Privé Vineyard. A native of Florida, Piper started her winemaking journey in California and Utah, before discovering her love of Oregon wine and purchasing Privé right before the COVID-19 lockdown. In this interview she talks about her journey through the industry, her introduction to the Oregon Wine industry during the pandemic, and the exciting future of the vineyard and winery. This interview was conducted by Rich Schmidt on January 27, 2022 at Privé Vineyard in Newberg.

Red Hills Church Podcast
Waiting Well: How Do We Persevere?

Red Hills Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022


This week, Pastor Lane is teaching from Isaiah 40 and drawing from the prophets in their perseverance.++++ LINKS +++++ Online Gathering Details: http://redhills.church/online Give Online: http://redhills.church/give Connect Card: http://redhills.church/connectcard +++++ JOIN US +++++ In-Person & Online GatheringsSundays at 8:30, 10:00 (Livestream), & 11:30AMhttp://redhills.church/online +++++ CONNECT +++++ Website: http://redhills.church Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/redhillschurchnewberg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/redhillschurchnewberg YouTube: http://bit.ly/rhcyoutube +++++ CONTACT +++++ Email: info@redhills.church Phone: 971.225.3737 Church Office: 901 Brutscher Street, Ste. 216, Newberg, OR 97132

Sermons – Grace Baptist Church

Bulletin: Click the “SAVE” button above for a copy of this week's full bulletin.

Just Eat Normally: Eating Disorder Recovery
Ep 47: Cultivating confidence to share your story with author Carly Newberg

Just Eat Normally: Eating Disorder Recovery

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2022 54:36


Carly is an Author, Substitute Teacher, and Freelancer specializing in writing, editing, and marketing. As an adolescent, Carly struggled with an eating disorder (Anorexia, Bulimia, and Exercise Addiction) which has contributed to her passion for mental health and overall wellbeing. Carly has been recovered five years and recently worked in a residential treatment facility with those aiming to recover. She gives talks and leads events and workshops throughout Oregon. In this episode we discuss: Impact of growing up with food scarcity and being forced to finish your plate as a child How school sports can spiral into an eating disorder Purging with exercise and laxatives Dealing with people's comments about body changes What a self-recovery journey looks like Cultivating confidence to share your story and experience of an eating disorder How sharing your story can create a new narrative Using social media to find a likeminded community in recovery Carly's new book, Good Enough Connect with Rachel. Dr. Rachel Evans is a psychologist, hypnotherapist and eating disorder survivor. She brings together academic knowledge and theories, therapeutic skills and personal experience for a unique perspective on eating disorder recovery. Rachel helps ambitious women to stop restricting, bingeing and purging. and to feel comfortable in their body. https://eatingdisordertherapist.co.uk/ https://www.instagram.com/rachel.evans.phd/ https://www.facebook.com/rachel.evans.phd Connect with Carly. Carly is an Author, Substitute Teacher, and Freelancer specializing in writing, editing, and marketing. As an adolescent, Carly struggled with an eating disorder (Anorexia, Bulimia, and Exercise Addiction). She has been recovered five years and recently worked in a residential treatment facility with those aiming to recover. She gives talks and leads events and workshops throughout Oregon. To hear her full story, read or listen to Carly's memoir, Good Enough: Believing beautiful through Trauma, through Life, through Disorder. https://www.sincerelycarly.com/ https://www.instagram.com/_sincerelycarly/ https://www.facebook.com/sincerelycarly/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/rachel-evans8/support

Red Hills Church Podcast
Waiting Well: How Do We Wait?

Red Hills Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022


How do we listen for the Lord as we wait? This week, Pastor Lane is teaching from Nehemiah 8 as we contemplate what it means to wait well.++++ LINKS +++++ Online Gathering Details: http://redhills.church/online Give Online: http://redhills.church/give Connect Card: http://redhills.church/connectcard +++++ JOIN US +++++ In-Person & Online GatheringsSundays at 8:30, 10:00 (Livestream), & 11:30AMhttp://redhills.church/online +++++ CONNECT +++++ Website: http://redhills.church Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/redhillschurchnewberg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/redhillschurchnewberg YouTube: http://bit.ly/rhcyoutube +++++ CONTACT +++++ Email: info@redhills.church Phone: 971.225.3737 Church Office: 901 Brutscher Street, Ste. 216, Newberg, OR 97132

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast
Tai-Ran Niew: Oral History Interview

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 92:55


This interview is with Tai-Ran Niew of Niew Vineyards. In the interview, Tai-Ran takes us through his journey so far, which includes his time before wine. Prior to entering the Wine Industry, Tai-Ran studied aeronautical engineering at Cambridge and worked as an investment banker. During trips abroad he discovered more about wine and his interest continued to grow. Tai-Ran specifically describes his time and work in Tasmania and why that experience inspired him to start making wine in Oregon. From there, Tai-Ran discusses Niew Vineyard and what that project has been like. He goes over selecting and designing his label and what the process was of building his brand. He also talks about finding the land, choosing to make Chardonnay, and defining his vineyard and winemaking philosophy. He discusses Masanobu Fukuoka, who inspired his vineyard philosophy and what impact that has had on the land and vines. At the end, he shares his thoughts on the wine industry and what future he'd like to see for himself and Niew Vineyards. This interview was conducted by Rich Schmidt at Niew Vineyards in Newberg on July 23, 2021.

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast
Bill & Sandy Sanchez: Oral History Interview

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 77:44


This interview is with Bill and Sandy Sanchez of Potter's Vineyard. In this interview, the couple speak about how they were inspired to make their own wine and create their own tasting room. They describe finding and purchasing Laura Volkman's estate vineyard in 2012 and go over the process of making it their own. They also discuss why they wanted to combine wine and art, specifically clay art and pottery. They go over building their brand, finding local artists, and refining their winemaking style. The couple also talks about the experiences they wanna customers to have, focusing on a relaxing and comfortable environment. Near the end, they discuss the most recent vintage, 2020 and what that year had in store for them. This interview was conducted by Rich Schmidt at Potter's Vineyard in Newberg on July 27, 2021.

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast
Todd Hansen: Oral History Interview

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 86:02


This Oral History Interview is with Todd Hansen of Longplay Wine. Todd describes his growing interest in wine leading to his purchasing a vineyard, and learning viticulture (and later winemaking) along the way. He adds insights about the Oregon wine industry and the people who helped him along the way. Todd also speaks about the intersection of wine and music and about the future of his brand and his new space in Newberg. This interview was conducted by Rich Schmidt on February 2, 2022 at Longplay Wines in Newberg.

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast
Tom Schaad: Oral History Interview

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 88:40


This interview is with Tom Schaad of August Cellars. In this interview, Tom tells the story of August Cellars. He goes over starting the business, choosing the land, and building their clientele. He talks about his mission for the brand, describing it as a “Tuesday night wine” and notes the steps they have taken to reach their goals. Later, Tom speaks about his role as Facility Manager at August Cellars. He also talks about the nature if the Oregon Wine communities and why Oregon's industry is unique. At the end, he describes what the future looks like for him, August Cellars, and the industry as a whole. This interview was conducted by Rich Schmidt at August Cellars in Newberg on June 21, 2021.

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast
Travis Bonilla: Oral History Interview

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 69:04


This interview is with Travis Bonilla of Bergström Wines. In this interview, Travis speaks about his career in winemaking and why he began working in the Oregon Wine Industry. He describes his wine education process, which included working harvest, developing his palate, and learning from mentors. He also talks about his winemaking style. He goes over how he became Assistant Winemaker at Bergström Wines and what it is like working there. Later, he discusses the challenges brought by COVID-19 and the 2020 fires. At the end, Travis goes over what trends and changes he sees in the industry, as well as, what advice he'd give to those interested in working with wine. This interview was conducted by Rich Schmidt at Bergström Winery in Newberg on July 16, 2021.

GEORGE FOX TALKS
WORLD | Are Short-Term Mission Trips Helpful?

GEORGE FOX TALKS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 34:25


David Martínez & Nick Forrest chat about the harm that can be done through careless short-term mission work--as well as the deeply beneficial & life-changing effect it can have on participants. Tune in to learn the Swahilian phrase for a chronic complainer, hear David's story about traveling to the US after being a missionary kid in Spain, get Nick's & David's book recommendations on the subject, and much more.Dr. Martínez directs George Fox University's Study Abroad program and teaches SpanishNick Forrest is a pastor at Northside Community Church in Newberg, OR. He previously worked with YWAM in Arusha, TanzaniaIf you enjoy listening to the George Fox Talks podcast and would like to watch, too, check out our channel on YouTube! We also have a web page that features all of our podcasts, a sign-up for our weekly email update, and publications from the George Fox University community.

Red Hills Church Podcast
Waiting Well: Faithfulness In The In Between

Red Hills Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022


Pastor Lane introduces a new series, Waiting Well, as we pursue faithfulness in the in-between.++++ LINKS +++++ Online Gathering Details: http://redhills.church/online Give Online: http://redhills.church/give Connect Card: http://redhills.church/connectcard +++++ JOIN US +++++ In-Person & Online GatheringsSundays at 8:30, 10:00 (Livestream), & 11:30AMhttp://redhills.church/online +++++ CONNECT +++++ Website: http://redhills.church Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/redhillschurchnewberg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/redhillschurchnewberg YouTube: http://bit.ly/rhcyoutube +++++ CONTACT +++++ Email: info@redhills.church Phone: 971.225.3737 Church Office: 901 Brutscher Street, Ste. 216, Newberg, OR 97132

Oregon Music News
Carly Harvey Interview with Art Levine Part 1

Oregon Music News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 24:42


A middle of the night interview with Carley Harvey who will sing at Newberg 's Meraviglioso Winery at 4 p.m, Saturday October 22 show, followed by a 10:30 p.m Tuesday show at Garages Music in Lake Oswego and an appearance next Friday in Camano, Washington. “I

Red Hills Church Podcast
James: Wisdom Lived Out / James 5:13-20

Red Hills Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022


Pastor Lane Greenleaf-Perez closes our James series in James 5:13-20.++++ LINKS +++++ Online Gathering Details: http://redhills.church/online Give Online: http://redhills.church/give Connect Card: http://redhills.church/connectcard +++++ JOIN US +++++ In-Person & Online GatheringsSundays at 8:30, 10:00 (Livestream), & 11:30AMhttp://redhills.church/online +++++ CONNECT +++++ Website: http://redhills.church Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/redhillschurchnewberg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/redhillschurchnewberg YouTube: http://bit.ly/rhcyoutube +++++ CONTACT +++++ Email: info@redhills.church Phone: 971.225.3737 Church Office: 901 Brutscher Street, Ste. 216, Newberg, OR 97132

The Giving Town
Let's Talk About Mental Health - with Community Wellness Collective

The Giving Town

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 43:02


During the 2016-2017 school year, Newberg lost multiple high school students to suicide. During this time, several community members came together to see how they could support and improve the mental health of students and the town as a whole.In this episode, President and co-founder Elise Yarnell Hollamon shares the story of Community Wellness Collective and how they continue to promote mental health access, remove stigmas surrounding mental health and addiction services, and support the overall well-being of the community. To learn more and access additional community resources, visit https://www.communitywellnesscollective.org/As mentioned in the episode, you can check out The Joyful Roberts Group YouTube channel here.The Joyful Roberts Group The Joyful Roberts Group is a real estate team led by Daniel Roberts, host of The Giving Town.Support the show

Red Hills Church Podcast
James: Wisdom Lived Out / James 5:7-12

Red Hills Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022


Pastor Kate Swanson leads our church family through James 5:7-12.++++ LINKS +++++ Online Gathering Details: http://redhills.church/online Give Online: http://redhills.church/give Connect Card: http://redhills.church/connectcard +++++ JOIN US +++++ In-Person & Online GatheringsSundays at 8:30, 10:00 (Livestream), & 11:30AMhttp://redhills.church/online +++++ CONNECT +++++ Website: http://redhills.church Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/redhillschurchnewberg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/redhillschurchnewberg YouTube: http://bit.ly/rhcyoutube +++++ CONTACT +++++ Email: info@redhills.church Phone: 971.225.3737 Church Office: 901 Brutscher Street, Ste. 216, Newberg, OR 97132

The History of Sex
Two-Spirit: The Lakota Winkte - Sex on the Great Plains

The History of Sex

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 53:35


What does it mean to be Two-Spirit? The film The Miseducation of Cameron Post likens it to being a "Native American David Bowie," but that's a far cry. What does it really mean? And what is the Two-Spirit tradition of the Lakota, the winkte? Episode theme music courtesy of the The Eagle and the Raven Band, featuring Ki' Earth Spirit. Don't forget to subscribe, rate, and review. Support the show on Patreon at www.patreon.com/btnewberg. Research, writing, editing, and production by B. T. Newberg. Logo Design by Rachel Westhoff. Additional credits, references, and more at www.historyofsexpod.com.

Red Hills Church Podcast
James: Wisdom Lived Out / James 5:1-6

Red Hills Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022


This week continues our series on biblical wisdom in the book of James. Pastor Lane leads us through James 5:1-6.++++ LINKS +++++ Online Gathering Details: http://redhills.church/online Give Online: http://redhills.church/give Connect Card: http://redhills.church/connectcard +++++ JOIN US +++++ In-Person & Online GatheringsSundays at 8:30, 10:00 (Livestream), & 11:30AMhttp://redhills.church/online +++++ CONNECT +++++ Website: http://redhills.church Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/redhillschurchnewberg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/redhillschurchnewberg YouTube: http://bit.ly/rhcyoutube +++++ CONTACT +++++ Email: info@redhills.church Phone: 971.225.3737 Church Office: 901 Brutscher Street, Ste. 216, Newberg, OR 97132

Red Hills Church Podcast
James: Wisdom Lived Out / James 4:13-17

Red Hills Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022


Pastor Lane leads us through James 4:13-17 as we continue to seek out biblical wisdom.++++ LINKS +++++ Online Gathering Details: http://redhills.church/online Give Online: http://redhills.church/give Connect Card: http://redhills.church/connectcard +++++ JOIN US +++++ In-Person & Online GatheringsSundays at 8:30, 10:00 (Livestream), & 11:30AMhttp://redhills.church/online +++++ CONNECT +++++ Website: http://redhills.church Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/redhillschurchnewberg Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/redhillschurchnewberg YouTube: http://bit.ly/rhcyoutube +++++ CONTACT +++++ Email: info@redhills.church Phone: 971.225.3737 Church Office: 901 Brutscher Street, Ste. 216, Newberg, OR 97132

Meaningful Marketplace Podcast
#127 "You Gotta Make a Buck" - Hannah Jodoin, Miss Hannah's Gourmet Popcorn

Meaningful Marketplace Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 46:55


“You gotta make a buck” is the driver for entrepreneurs in Hannah Jodoin's view. Her parents were always involved in restaurants and loved food, and always took the family to popcorn and kettle corn booths for snacks so popcorn became a family staple. Then, a friend suggested that popcorn wasn't that hard of a way to make a buck as a side hustle, and that spurred her on to set up a kiosk in a local mall. With an small, electric movie-style popper, it took two batches to fill a bag, so it was a terrific lesson on how important production was to a business and its revenue. They then moved up to festival sized equipment with propane heat and started serving their popular treats on a large scale, making more revenue and profit in a shorter time frame. This led to their first breakthrough, the Portland Farmer's Market. There they developed a loyal clientele and also a big buy in from the community who gave them great suggestions on new flavors, which the family, in turn, produced. Miss Hannah's Gourmet Popcorn took off. As we have mentioned many times before, our host Sarah Masoni had a hand in helping the company get off the ground with her advice and wisdom. Early on, Hannah's parents took some of the popcorn to Oregon State University's Food Innovation Center of which Sarah is the Director to get her opinion on the commercial appeal of their product. Sarah's positive review and encouragement was pivotal in the company having the confidence to dream bigger. Hannah's involvement has been from the beginning, obviously, but there was a detour in her life. Her college degree was going to lead to a profession in the Christian ministry, but she came back to work in the business for a summer and that led to a unique job title for her. She was in charge of figuring out how the business could operate without a family member always being present to produce and sell the popcorn. At the time, their storefront was a kiosk and Hannah put together all the procedures and training so that employees could operate the kiosk successfully and free up the family members to work on marketing and sales. They now are focused on opening up distribution on more grocery stores to keep spreading the brand name. Along the way, Hannah has dug into how popcorn is grown and become somewhat of an expert as to the pollination of the crop and how large popcorn is developed. You can buy Miss Hannah's Popcorn at their storefront in the high-end Bridgeport Village in Lake Grove, Oregon, or their manufacturing facility in Newberg, Oregon, also the heart of Oregon's wine country. There also are various retailers across the Pacific Northwest, including our sponsor Market of Choice. For those not in the area, order online. And their gift boxes really are a work of art so think about Miss Hannah's for a special surprise present. Website: https://www.misshannahspopcorn.com/contact, Twitter - @Hannahspopcorn, Instagram - @misshannahspopcorn, Facebook - @misshannahspopcorncorn, Our hosts: Twitter - @sarahmasoni and @spicymarshall, Instagram - @masoniandmarshall

Intelligent Design the Future
Into the Mystic with a Neurosurgeon and a Neurotheologian

Intelligent Design the Future

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 36:11


Today's ID the Future continues the conversation between neurosurgeon Michael Egnor and neurotheologian Andrew Newberg. In this second and concluding part of their discussion, they further explore what experiments using brain scans reveal about how the brain is affected by meditation and mystical experiences, including near-death experiences. Also, what parts of the brain light up, and what parts go dormant, when someone is “speaking in tongues,” and how does someone who has this experience describe it, and does that description mesh with or clash with what turns up on the brain scans? Tune in to hear Newberg's answer to this and other issues related to the mind-brain problem and the mystical. This interview is posted here by permission of Mind Read More › Source

Intelligent Design the Future
The Mind/Brain Problem and the Power of Meditative Prayer

Intelligent Design the Future

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 32:44


It's hard to know where the brain ends and the mind begins. How can studying our brains give us insight into our minds? On this ID the Future, neuroscientist Andrew Newberg and neurosurgeon Michael Egnor sit down for a chat about all things brain related including neurotheology, methods of studying the brain, and research on how various forms of religious and non-religious meditation actually change the wiring of the brain, including in particular a study Newberg did on Franciscan nuns and what they refer to as “centering prayer.” This interview is borrowed, with permission, from Mind Matters, a podcast of the Walter Bradley Center for Natural and Artificial Intelligence. Source