Podcasts about Wizardry

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Latest podcast episodes about Wizardry

Chip Time
S2 Ep. 25: 2010 Payton Jordan 10K: Chris Solinsky's "Magical" American Record (Chip Time Classic)

Chip Time

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 49:10


Another Chip Time Classic! This time we break down the legendary 10K at Payton Jordan where Chris Solinsky shocked the world and was the first non-African to ever break 27 minutes in the 10K... on a record attempt set up for Galen Rupp. We then cover the similarities between Nike's division and the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. Contact the show: chiptimepod@gmail.com. Leave a 5-star rating on Apple or Spotify if you enjoyed. Check out Scotty's latest article for The Stride Report: https://www.thestridereport.com/post/tsr-s-2022-d1-xc-top-50-individual-rankings-women-update-2 Shop my Favorite 100% Science-Backed Amino Acid Supplements Enter Code "CHIPTIME " To Save 30% ► aminoco.com/CHIPTIME

Wandering DMs
Matt Finch | And the Tome of Adventure Design | Wandering DMs S04 E40

Wandering DMs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 60:14


Dan & Paul chat with Matt Finch, creator of Swords & Wizardry, about his Revised Tome of Adventure Design! Tome of Adventure Design is a comprehensive, start-to-finish resource for designing fantasy adventures for your favorite tabletop role-playing game. It is system neutral, and can be used with virtually any fantasy game. This book includes random generation tables for almost every step of the design process: locations, villainous plots, designing new monsters, and bizarre environments in strange, unknown planes of existence. Thousands of micro-prompts in the margins add additional brainstorming power to the process, and the book is filled with design advice from award-winning author Matt Finch. "It's over 300 pages of randomly selected jolts to the brain. In the introduction, Finch states that the point of incorporating randomness into your adventure writing is “to deliver cryptic results designed to shock the reader's creativity into filling in the gaps” … Let me emphasize his use of the word “shock” in that passage. It's perfect. The moment when two, three, or more nonsensical, fragmentary, contradictory notions gel into a coherent and fresh idea is shocking. It's revelatory. It's magical. And it's inspiring…" Steve Winter, Designer & Contributor, Dungeons & Dragons for TSR and Wizards of the Coast Get the Revised Tome of Adventure Design hereAnd see the completed Kickstarter page here Wandering DMs Paul Siegel and Dan “Delta” Collins host thoughtful discussions on D&D and other TTRPGs every week. Comparing the pros and cons of every edition from the 1974 Original D&D little brown books to cutting-edge releases for 5E D&D today, we broadcast live on YouTube and Twitch so we can take viewer questions and comments on the topic of the day. Live every Sunday at 1 PM Eastern time.

Nerd’s RPG Variety Cast
Redux Sabres & Witchery without music for System Sunday

Nerd’s RPG Variety Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 24:42


This is a slightly shorter version without the loud background music. If you listened to the the 9 October version, episode 410, you can skip this one. I look at Simon Washbourne's wonderful Sabres & Witchery based on Swords & Wizardry. It adds some clever twists to the Matt Finch's game and if you want to go monster hunting in the 16th to 18th centuries you could do far worse than grab a copy of this gem. Free PDF https://beyondbeliefgames.webs.com/freestuff.htm Print https://www.lulu.com/shop/simon-washbourne/sabres-witchery-rpg/paperback/product-20994192.html?page=1&pageSize=4 Crush, the Con in San Antonio, TX 21-23 Oct 2022 www.crushthecon.com The Crush Foundation https://www.thecrushfoundation.com/ Remember October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month Come to DaveCon in Bloomington, MN on 13-16 April, 2023 https://www.davecon.net/ Proud member of the Grog-talk Empire having been bestowed the title of The Governor Most Radiant Grandeur Baron The Belligerent Hero of The Valley. https://www.grogcon.com/podcast/ You can contact me through my Google Voice Number for US callers: (540) 445-1145, using Speakpipe for international callers: https://www.speakpipe.com/NerdsRPGVarietyCast through the podcast's email at nerdsrpgvarietycast 'at' gmail 'dot' com or find me on a variety of discords including the Audio Dungeon Discord. Home page for this show https://nerdsrpgvarietycast.carrd.co/ Home page for Cerebrevore, the TTRPG panel discussion podcast https://cerebrevore.carrd.co/ Ray Otus did the coffee cup art for this show, you can find his blog at https://rayotus.carrd.co/ TJ Drennon provides music for my show. Colin Green at Spikepit https://anchor.fm/spikepit provided the "Have no fear" sound clip. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jason376/message

Harry Potter Theory
Did Remus Lupin Ever Question Sirius Black's INNOCENCE? - Harry Potter Theory

Harry Potter Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 5:02 Transcription Available


Welcome to Harry Potter Theory. Today, we're discussing Remus Lupin and Sirius Black. More specifically, we're going to be addressing why it is that Remus Lupin never even seemed to bat an eyelid at Sirius's conviction.  Yes, he was upset about everything that happened, but as far as Sirius's innocence is concerned, you would have thought that Remus- one of his best friends, would have tried harder to uncover the truth. Remus Lupin and Sirius Black met at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry in the 1970s- 1971 to be exact, and it was here that they also formed friendships with James Potter and Peter Pettigrew.  Before the sorting ceremony even happened, the 4 boys hit it off, and when they were eventually sorted in to the same house, Gryffindor, they knew that they were destined to be friends. Though the boys got on with many of their other classmates, this particular group of 4 boys had a truly special bond, and they eventually came up with a name for their group - they were ‘The Marauders'. They were all huge troublemakers- hellbent on breaking rules and causing mischief, and it was their common interests that helped to foster the deep friendships that these 4 boys would form.  Their group existed for the duration of the time that they spent at Hogwarts, and after graduating they even all went on to join The Order of the Phoenix - a secret society founded by Dumbledore that opposed Lord Voldemort.  The friendship that the 4 boys shared ran deep, really deep, so who would have thought that it would all fall to pieces 3 years after their graduation. In 1981 Peter Pettigrew defected from the Order of the Phoenix and joined the Death Eaters. Shortly thereafter, he revealed the location of the Potter Cottage to Voldemort- effectively signing the Potter family's death warrants. Sirius Black, after discovering what Peter had done, went out to find Pettigrew and seek justice- but it was here that Sirius would condemn himself to Azkaban. Knowing that Sirius might come for him, Peter was able to effectively frame Sirius for the murder of 12 muggles, as well as himself.  From this day onward, Sirius's name and reputation was tarnished. Not only did people think he was a crazed wizard who had murdered 12 muggles, but they also thought he exposed the Potter's. And that should be expected, because most of these people didn't know Sirius personally. But in a world where everyone is against you, you should always be able to turn to your lifelong friends for support. But for Sirius, the only remaining Marauder kicking around, Remus Lupin, wanted nothing to do with him. Why?

Bandit’s Keep
Swords & Wizardry; Monstrosities

Bandit’s Keep

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 11:49


Pick it up in PDF: https://www.drivethrurpg.com/product/112618/Monstrosities-Swords-and-Wizardry?affiliate_id=464523 Pick it up in Print: https://amzn.to/3TduDRC Matt Finch's other works: https://www.mythmeregames.com/ Join my Discord Server: https://discord.gg/pDyA2jYvSx Support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/banditskeep Check out these other great Podcasts that are contributing Down in a Heap: https://anchor.fm/rob-c The Nerd's RPG Variety Cast: https://anchor.fm/jason376 The Redcaps Podcast: https://anchor.fm/theredcaps Cleric's Wear Ringmail: https://anchor.fm/clerics-wear-ringmail Phantom Thoughts: https://anchor.fm/the-pink-phantom Minions and Musings: https://anchor.fm/eviljeff

Lost Minds Podcast
EP238. It's Witchcraft And Wizardry?

Lost Minds Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 73:36


Arichamondaz... there you go... You are welcome... If you are reading this and listening to that then you are going to be rich, pretty cool huh. We just hit you with a spell to make you richer, thats the kind of guys you get here on the LMP. If it wasn't the why would we say it? We try not to scare you with hard facts but the truth is in here and it's not so bad. The topics vary this week but and the end of the day it only matters where you are in relation to them. What do you think about what we thinking about? Let us know on any one of the socials. We love hearing from ya and we love all of ya. Be good and enjoy it.

Nerd’s RPG Variety Cast
410 Sabres & Witchery on System Sunday

Nerd’s RPG Variety Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 27:19


Sorry about the background music being a little loud in this episode. On this System Sunday during OSR October we are looking at Simon Washbourne's wonderful Sabres & Witchery based on Swords & Wizardry. It adds some clever twists to the Matt Finch's game and if you want to go monster hunting in the 16th to 18th centuries you could do far worse than grab a copy of this gem. Free PDF https://beyondbeliefgames.webs.com/freestuff.htm Print https://www.lulu.com/shop/simon-washbourne/sabres-witchery-rpg/paperback/product-20994192.html?page=1&pageSize=4 Soundtrack mentioned is for the movie Blood on Satan's Claws. Come to DaveCon in Bloomington, MN on 13-16 April, 2023 https://www.davecon.net/ Proud member of the Grog-talk Empire having been bestowed the title of The Governor Most Radiant Grandeur Baron The Belligerent Hero of The Valley. https://www.grogcon.com/podcast/ You can contact me through my Google Voice Number for US callers: (540) 445-1145, using Speakpipe for international callers: https://www.speakpipe.com/NerdsRPGVarietyCast through the podcast's email at nerdsrpgvarietycast 'at' gmail 'dot' com or find me on a variety of discords including the Audio Dungeon Discord. Home page for this show https://nerdsrpgvarietycast.carrd.co/ Home page for Cerebrevore, the TTRPG panel discussion podcast https://cerebrevore.carrd.co/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jason376/message

DAD IS NOT A NOUN
Chapter 9: The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend Grand Wizardry

DAD IS NOT A NOUN

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 19:10


On this episode the two things I love is hip-hop & fantasy fiction. Creator D.D. Turner & Chaz Stats merge the two to gives us The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend, Paths of Grand Wizardry back in 2010 .  A novel about an extraordinary teen with an extraordinary destiny. I hope you enjoyed  Chapter 1-8!!!  Here is Chapter 9: The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend details the story of a young Cris Alexander Ellison, whom with great pride, overtly claims and supports the culture of Hip Hop. Unbeknownst to Cris, he has a direct genealogical link to an ancient, African, prophetic tribe said to have sown the seeds for the Hip Hop ideal some several thousand years ago. As a result of this unique link to the past, Cris finds himself the sole holder of the freeing key that will release a current Hip Hop from its dwindling existence and place it back on the golden path of resurgence. But up against Roger "Feedback" Cromwell and his Hip Hop for Destruction clan, this will prove to be no easy task.

DAD IS NOT A NOUN
Chapter 10: The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend Grand Wizardry

DAD IS NOT A NOUN

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 16:39


On this episode the two things I love is hip-hop & fantasy fiction. Creator D.D. Turner & Chaz Stats merge the two to gives us The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend, Paths of Grand Wizardry back in 2010 .  A novel about an extraordinary teen with an extraordinary destiny. I hope you enjoyed  Chapter 1-9!!!  Here is Chapter 10: The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend details the story of a young Cris Alexander Ellison, whom with great pride, overtly claims and supports the culture of Hip Hop. Unbeknownst to Cris, he has a direct genealogical link to an ancient, African, prophetic tribe said to have sown the seeds for the Hip Hop ideal some several thousand years ago. As a result of this unique link to the past, Cris finds himself the sole holder of the freeing key that will release a current Hip Hop from its dwindling existence and place it back on the golden path of resurgence. But up against Roger "Feedback" Cromwell and his Hip Hop for Destruction clan, this will prove to be no easy task.

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - EMILY CARLIN - Protecting Yourself from Predatory Spirits, Energy Vampires, and Malevolent Magick

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 41:28


Emily Carlin has been a magickal practitioner for more than a decade. She is the Grey School of Wizardry's Dean of Dark Arts, specializing in defensive magick and creatures of the night, teaching magickal protection to people of all ages and skill levels. Emily also holds a BA in philosophy from Wellesley College and a JD from Seattle University School of Law, and is a member of the Washington State Bar. Carlin is a lifelong resident of Seattle, Washington. - http://www.e-carlin.com/******************************************************************To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com ******************************************************************

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - ELLEN EVERT HOPMAN - Secret Medicines from Your Garden – Plants for Healing, Spirituality and Magic

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 60:01


Ellen Evert Hopman is a professional member of the American Herbalists Guild (AHG) and the author of a number of books; Secret Medicines from Your Garden – Plants for Healing, Spirituality, and Magic, The Sacred Herbs of Spring, The Sacred Herbs of Samhain, The Real Witches of New England, A Legacy of Druids – Conversations with Druid leaders from Britain, the USA and Canada, The Priestess of the Forest trilogy of novels, and other volumes. She is the current Archdruid of Tribe of the Oak (Tuatha na Dara) www.tribeoftheoak.com, an international Druid Order based in New England. See all her books and blog at www.elleneverthopman.com Ellen Evert Hopman has been a teacher of herbalism since 1983 and is a professional member of the American Herbalists Guild. She has been a teacher of Druidism since 1990. She is the author of a number of books; The Sacred Herbs of Spring, The Sacred Herbs of Samhain, The Real Witches of New England, Tree Medicine Tree Magic, Scottish Herbs and Fairy Lore, the Priestess of the Forest Druid trilogy of novels, A Druid's Herbal of Sacred Tree Medicine, and other volumes. She has presented at schools and workshops across the United States and Europe. A Druidic initiate since 1984, she is the Arch Druid of Tribe of the Oak www.tribeoftheoak.com, a founding member and former co-Chief of The Order of the White Oak (Ord Na Darach Gile), a Bard of the Gorsedd of Caer Abiri, an ArchDruidess of the Druid Clan of Dana, and was Vice President of the Henge of Keltria for nine years. She is a member of the Grey Council of Mages and Sages and taught at the Grey School of Wizardry for several years. Find her books and blog at www.elleneverthopman.com now at https://guidetoremoteviewing.comTo listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewpaper.com

The B******t Detective
A Dose of Dave #316 - Cleansing Mushy Wizardry

The B******t Detective

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 7:41


A Dose of Dave is a series of bite sized podcasts featuring me on my own. I'm just trying it out to see where it takes me. They're only about 5-10 mins long. If you wish to contribute to the podcast you can here: - https://www.patreon.com/bullshitdetective

The Lunar Society
Charles C. Mann - Americas Before Columbus & Scientific Wizardry

The Lunar Society

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 92:03


Charles C. Mann is the author of three of my favorite history books: 1491. 1493, and The Wizard and the Prophet. We discuss:why Native American civilizations collapsed and why they failed to make more technological progresswhy he disagrees with Will MacAskill about longtermismwhy there aren't any successful slave revoltshow geoengineering can help us solve climate changewhy Bitcoin is like the Chinese Silver Tradeand much much more!Watch on YouTube. Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or any other podcast platform. Read the full transcript here. Some really cool guests coming up, subscribe to find out about future episodes!Follow me on Twitter for updates on future episodes.If you enjoyed this episode, you may also enjoy my interviews of Will MacAskill (about longtermism), Steve Hsu (about intelligence and embryo selection), and David Deutsch (about AI and the problems with America's constitution).If you end up enjoying this episode, I would be super grateful if you shared it. Post it on Twitter, send it to your friends & group-chats, and throw it up on any relevant subreddits & forums you follow. Can't exaggerate how much it helps a small podcast like mine.Timestamps(0:00:00) -Epidemically Alternate Realities(0:00:25) -Weak Points in Empires(0:03:28) -Slave Revolts(0:08:43) -Slavery Ban(0:12:46) - Contingency & The Pyramids(0:18:13) - Teotihuacan(0:20:02) - New Book Thesis(0:25:20) - Gender Ratios and Silicon Valley(0:31:15) - Technological Stupidity in the New World(0:41:24) - Religious Demoralization(0:44:00) - Critiques of Civilization Collapse Theories(0:49:05) - Virginia Company + Hubris(0:53:30) - China's Silver Trade(1:03:03) - Wizards vs. Prophets(1:07:55) - In Defense of Regulatory Delays(0:12:26) -Geoengineering(0:16:51) -Finding New Wizards(0:18:46) -Agroforestry is Underrated(1:18:46) -Longtermism & Free MarketsTranscriptDwarkesh Patel   Okay! Today I have the pleasure of speaking with Charles Mann, who is the author of three of my favorite books, including 1491: New Revelations of America before Columbus. 1493: Uncovering the New World Columbus Created, and The Wizard and the Prophet: Two Remarkable Scientists and Their Dueling Visions to Shape Tomorrow's World. Charles, welcome to the Lunar Society.Charles C. Mann   It's a pleasure to be here.Epidemically Alternate RealitiesDwarkesh Patel   My first question is: How much of the New World was basically baked into the cake? So at some point, people from Eurasia were going to travel to the New World, bringing their diseases. Considering disparities and where they would survive, if the Acemoglu theory that you cited is correct, then some of these places were bound to have good institutions and some of them were bound to have bad institutions. Plus, because of malaria, there were going to be shortages in labor that people would try to fix with African slaves. So how much of all this was just bound to happen? If Columbus hadn't done it, then maybe 50 years down the line, would someone from Italy have done it? What is the contingency here?Charles C. Mann   Well, I think that some of it was baked into the cake. It was pretty clear that at some point, people from Eurasia and the Western Hemisphere were going to come into contact with each other. I mean, how could that not happen, right? There was a huge epidemiological disparity between the two hemispheres––largely because by a quirk of evolutionary history, there were many more domesticable animals in Eurasia and the Eastern hemisphere. This leads almost inevitably to the creation of zoonotic diseases: diseases that start off in animals and jump the species barrier and become human diseases. Most of the great killers in human history are zoonotic diseases. When people from Eurasia and the Western Hemisphere meet, there are going to be those kinds of diseases. But if you wanted to, it's possible to imagine alternative histories. There's a wonderful book by Laurent Binet called Civilizations that, in fact, does just that. It's a great alternative history book. He imagines that some of the Vikings came and extended further into North America, bringing all these diseases, and by the time of Columbus and so forth, the epidemiological balance was different. So when Columbus and those guys came, these societies killed him, grabbed his boats, and went and conquered Europe. It's far-fetched, but it does say that this encounter would've happened and that the diseases would've happened, but it didn't have to happen in exactly the way that it did. It's also perfectly possible to imagine that Europeans didn't engage in wholesale slavery. There was a huge debate when this began about whether or not slavery was a good idea. There were a lot of reservations, particularly among the Catholic monarchy asking the Pope “Is it okay that we do this?” You could imagine the penny dropping in a slightly different way. So, I think some of it was bound to happen, but how exactly it happened was really up to chance, contingency, and human agency,Weak Points in EmpiresDwarkesh Patel   When the Spanish first arrived in the 15th and 16th centuries, were the Incas and the Aztecs at a particularly weak point or particularly decadent? Or was this just how well you should have expected this civilization to be functioning at any given time period?Charles C. Mann   Well, typically, empires are much more jumbly and fragile entities than we imagine. There's always fighting at the top. What Hernán Cortés was able to do, for instance, with the Aztecs––who are better called The Triple Alliance (the term “Aztec” is an invention from the 19th century). The Triple Alliance was comprised of three groups of people in central Mexico, the largest of which were the Mexica, who had the great city of Tenochtitlan. The other two guys really resented them and so what Cortes was able to do was foment a civil war within the Aztec empire: taking some enemies of the Aztec, some members of the Aztec empire, and creating an entirely new order. There's a fascinating set of history that hasn't really emerged into the popular consciousness. I didn't include it in 1491 or 1493 because it was so new that I didn't know anything about it; everything was largely from Spanish and Mexican scholars about the conquest within the conquest. The allies of the Spaniards actually sent armies out and conquered big swaths of northern and southern Mexico and Central America. So there's a far more complex picture than we realized even 15 or 20 years ago when I first published 1491. However, the conquest wasn't as complete as we think. I talk a bit about this in 1493 but what happens is Cortes moves in and he marries his lieutenants to these indigenous people, creating this hybrid nobility that then extended on to the Incas. The Incas were a very powerful but unstable empire and Pizarro had the luck to walk in right after a civil war. When he did that right after a civil war and massive epidemic, he got them at a very vulnerable point. Without that, it all would have been impossible. Pizarro cleverly allied with the losing side (or the apparently losing side in this in the Civil War), and was able to create a new rallying point and then attack the winning side. So yes, they came in at weak points, but empires typically have these weak points because of fratricidal stuff going on in the leadership.Dwarkesh Patel   It does also remind me of the East India Trading Company.Charles C. Mann   And the Mughal empire, yeah. Some of those guys in Bengal invited Clive and his people in. In fact, I was struck by this. I had just been reading this book, maybe you've heard of it: The Anarchy by William Dalrymple.Dwarkesh Patel   I've started reading it, yeah but I haven't made much progress.Charles C. Mann   It's an amazing book! It's so oddly similar to what happened. There was this fratricidal stuff going on in the Mughal empire, and one side thought, “Oh, we'll get these foreigners to come in, and we'll use them.” That turned out to be a big mistake.Dwarkesh Patel   Yes. What's also interestingly similar is the efficiency of the bureaucracy. Niall Ferguson has a good book on the British Empire and one thing he points out is that in India, the ratio between an actual English civil servant and the Indian population was about 1: 3,000,000 at the peak of the ratio. Which obviously is only possible if you have the cooperation of at least the elites, right? So it sounds similar to what you were saying about Cortes marrying his underlings to the nobility. Charles C. Mann   Something that isn't stressed enough in history is how often the elites recognize each other. They join up in arrangements that increase both of their power and exploit the poor schmucks down below. It's exactly what happened with the East India Company, and it's exactly what happened with Spain. It's not so much that there was this amazing efficiency, but rather, it was a mutually beneficial arrangement for Xcalack, which is now a Mexican state. It had its rights, and the people kept their integrity, but they weren't really a part of the Spanish Empire. They also weren't really wasn't part of Mexico until around 1857. It was a good deal for them. The same thing was true for the Bengalis, especially the elites who made out like bandits from the British Empire.Slave Revolts Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah, that's super interesting. Why was there only one successful slave revolt in the new world in Haiti? In many of these cases, the ratios between slaves and the owners are just huge. So why weren't more of them successful?Charles C. Mann   Well, you would first have to define ‘successful'. Haiti wasn't successful if you meant ‘creating a prosperous state that would last for a long time.' Haiti was and is (to no small extent because of the incredible blockade that was put on it by all the other nations) in terrible shape. Whereas in the case of Paul Maurice, you had people who were self-governing for more than 100 years.. Eventually, they were incorporated into the larger project of Brazil. There's a great Brazilian classic that's equivalent to what Moby Dick or Huck Finn is to us called Os Sertões by a guy named Cunha. And it's good! It's been translated into this amazing translation in English called ​​Rebellion in the Backlands. It's set in the 1880s, and it's about the creation of a hybrid state of runaway slaves, and so forth, and how they had essentially kept their independence and lack of supervision informally, from the time of colonialism. Now the new Brazilian state is trying to take control, and they fight them to the last person. So you have these effectively independent areas in de facto, if not de jure, that existed in the Americas for a very long time. There are some in the US, too, in the great dismal swamp, and you hear about those marooned communities in North Carolina, in Mexico, where everybody just agreed “these places aren't actually under our control, but we're not going to say anything.”  If they don't mess with us too much, we won't mess with them too much. Is that successful or not? I don't know.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah, but it seems like these are temporary successes..Charles C. Mann   I mean, how long did nations last? Like Genghis Khan! How long did the Khan age last? But basically, they had overwhelming odds against them. There's an entire colonial system that was threatened by their existence. Similar to the reasons that rebellions in South Asia were suppressed with incredible brutality–– these were seen as so profoundly threatening to this entire colonial order that people exerted a lot more force against them than you would think would be worthwhile.Dwarkesh Patel   Right. It reminds me of James Scott's Against the Grain. He pointed out that if you look at the history of agriculture, there're many examples where people choose to run away as foragers in the forest, and then the state tries to bring them back into the fold.Charles C. Mann   Right. And so this is exactly part of that dynamic. I mean, who wants to be a slave, right? So as many people as possible ended up leaving. It's easier in some places than others.. it's very easy in Brazil. There are 20 million people in the Brazilian Amazon and the great bulk of them are the descendants of people who left slavery. They're still Brazilians and so forth, but, you know, they ended up not being slaves.Slavery BanDwarkesh Patel   Yeah, that's super fascinating. What is the explanation for why slavery went from being historically ever-present to ending at a particular time when it was at its peak in terms of value and usefulness? What's the explanation for why, when Britain banned the slave trade, within 100 or 200 years, there ended up being basically no legal sanction for slavery anywhere in the world?Charles C. Mann   This is a really good question and the real answer is that historians have been arguing about this forever. I mean, not forever, but you know, for decades, and there's a bunch of different explanations. I think the reason it's so hard to pin down is… kind of amazing. I mean, if you think about it, in 1800, if you were to have a black and white map of the world and put red in countries in which slavery was illegal and socially accepted, there would be no red anywhere on the planet. It's the most ancient human institution that there is. The Code of Hammurabi is still the oldest complete legal code that we have, and about a third of it is about rules for when you can buy slaves, when you can sell slaves, how you can mistreat them, and how you can't–– all that stuff. About a third of it is about buying, selling, and working other human beings. So this has been going on for a very, very long time. And then in a century and a half, it suddenly changes. So there's some explanation, and it's that machinery gets better. But the reason to have people is that you have these intelligent autonomous workers, who are like the world's best robots. From the point of view of the owner, they're fantastically good, except they're incredibly obstreperous and when they're caught, you're constantly afraid they're going to kill you. So if you have a chance to replace them with machinery, or to create a wage where you can run wage people, pay wage workers who are kept in bad conditions but somewhat have more legal rights, then maybe that's a better deal for you. Another one is that industrialization produced different kinds of commodities that became more and more valuable, and slavery was typically associated with the agricultural laborer. So as agriculture diminished as a part of the economy, slavery become less and less important and it became easier to get rid of them. Another one has to do with the beginning of the collapse of the colonial order. Part of it has to do with.. (at least in the West, I don't know enough about the East) the rise of a serious abolition movement with people like Wilberforce and various Darwins and so forth. And they're incredibly influential, so to some extent, I think people started saying, “Wow, this is really bad.”  I suspect that if you looked at South Asia and Africa, you might see similar things having to do with a social moment, but I just don't know enough about that. I know there's an anti-slavery movement and anti-caste movement in which we're all tangled up in South Asia, but I just don't know enough about it to say anything intelligent.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah, the social aspect of it is really interesting. The things you mentioned about automation, industrialization, and ending slavery… Obviously, with time, that might have actually been why it expanded, but its original inception in Britain happened before the Industrial Revolution took off. So that was purely them just taking a huge loss because this movement took hold. Charles C. Mann   And the same thing is true for Bartolome de Las Casas. I mean, Las Casas, you know, in the 1540s just comes out of nowhere and starts saying, “Hey! This is bad.” He is the predecessor of the modern human rights movement. He's an absolutely extraordinary figure, and he has huge amounts of influence. He causes Spain's king in the 1540s to pass what they call The New Laws which says no more slavery, which is a devastating blow enacted to the colonial economy in Spain because they depended on having slaves to work in the silver mines in the northern half of Mexico and in Bolivia, which was the most important part of not only the Spanish colonial economy but the entire Spanish empire. It was all slave labor. And they actually tried to ban it. Now, you can say they came to their senses and found a workaround in which it wasn't banned. But it's still… this actually happened in the 1540s. Largely because people like Las Casas said, “This is bad! you're going to hell doing this.”Contingency & The Pyramids Dwarkesh Patel   Right. I'm super interested in getting into The Wizard and the Prophet section with you. Discussing how movements like environmentalism, for example, have been hugely effective. Again, even though it probably goes against the naked self-interest of many countries. So I'm very interested in discussing that point about why these movements have been so influential!But let me continue asking you about globalization in the world. I'm really interested in how you think about contingency in history, especially given that you have these two groups of people that have been independently evolving and separated for tens of thousands of years. What things turn out to be contingent? What I find really interesting from the book was how both of them developed pyramids––  who would have thought that structure would be within our extended phenotype or something?Charles C. Mann    It's also geometry! I mean, there's only a certain limited number of ways you can pile up stone blocks in a stable way. And pyramids are certainly one of them. It's harder to have a very long-lasting monument that's a cylinder. Pyramids are also easier to build: if you get a cylinder, you have to have scaffolding around it and it gets harder and harder.With pyramids, you can use each lower step to put the next one, on and on, and so forth. So pyramids seem kind of natural to me. Now the material you make them up of is going to be partly determined by what there is. In Cahokia and in the Mississippi Valley, there isn't a lot of stone. So people are going to make these earthen pyramids and if you want them to stay on for a long time, there's going to be certain things you have to do for the structure which people figured out. For some pyramids, you had all this marble around them so you could make these giant slabs of marble, which seems, from today's perspective, incredibly wasteful. So you're going to have some things that are universal like that, along with the apparently universal, or near-universal idea that people who are really powerful like to identify themselves as supernatural and therefore want to be commemorated. Dwarkesh Patel   Yes, I visited Mexico City recently.Charles C. Mann Beautiful city!TeotihuacanDwarkesh Patel Yeah, the pyramids there… I think I was reading your book at the time or already had read your book. What struck me was that if I remember correctly, they didn't have the wheel and they didn't have domesticated animals. So if you really think about it, that's a really huge amount of human misery and toil it must have taken to put this thing together as basically a vanity project. It's like a huge negative connotation if you think about what it took to construct it.Charles C. Mann   Sure, but there are lots of really interesting things about Teotihuacan. This is just one of those things where you can only say so much in one book. If I was writing the two-thousand-page version of 1491, I would have included this. So Tehuácan pretty much starts out as a standard Imperial project, and they build all these huge castles and temples and so forth. There's no reason to suppose it was anything other than an awful experience (like building the pyramids), but then something happened to Teotihuacan that we don't understand. All these new buildings started springing up during the next couple of 100 years, and they're all very very similar. They're like apartment blocks and there doesn't seem to be a great separation between rich and poor. It's really quite striking how egalitarian the architecture is because that's usually thought to be a reflection of social status. So based on the way it looks, could there have been a political revolution of some sort? Where they created something much more egalitarian, probably with a bunch of good guy kings who weren't interested in elevating themselves so much? There's a whole chapter in the book by David Wingrove and David Graeber, The Dawn of Everything about this, and they make this argument that Tehuácan is an example that we can look at as an ancient society that was much more socially egalitarian than we think. Now, in my view, they go a little overboard–– it was also an aggressive imperial power and it was conquering much of the Maya world at the same time. But it is absolutely true that something that started out one way can start looking very differently quite quickly. You see this lots of times in the Americas in the Southwest–– I don't know if you've ever been to Chaco Canyon or any of those places, but you should absolutely go! Unfortunately, it's hard to get there because of the roads terrible but overall, it's totally worth it. It's an amazing place. Mesa Verde right north of it is incredible, it's just really a fantastic thing to see. There are these enormous structures in Chaco Canyon, that we would call castles if they were anywhere else because they're huge. The biggest one, Pueblo Bonito, is like 800 rooms or some insane number like that. And it's clearly an imperial venture, we know that because it's in this canyon and one side is getting all the good light and good sun–– a whole line of these huge castles. And then on the other side is where the peons lived. We also know that starting around 1100, everybody just left! And then their descendants start the Puebla, who are these sort of intensely socially egalitarian type of people. It looks like a political revolution took place. In fact, in the book I'm now writing, I'm arguing (in a sort of tongue-in-cheek manner but also seriously) that this is the first American Revolution! They got rid of these “kings” and created these very different and much more egalitarian societies in which ordinary people had a much larger voice about what went on.Dwarkesh Patel   Interesting. I think I got a chance to see the Teotihuacan apartments when I was there, but I wonder if we're just looking at the buildings that survived. Maybe the buildings that survived were better constructed because they were for the elites? The way everybody else lived might have just washed away over the years.Charles C. Mann   So what's happened in the last 20 years is basically much more sophisticated surveys of what is there. I mean, what you're saying is absolutely the right question to ask. Are the rich guys the only people with things that survived while the ordinary people didn't? You can never be absolutely sure, but what they did is they had these ground penetrating radar surveys, and it looks like this egalitarian construction extends for a huge distance. So it's possible that there are more really, really poor people. But at least you'd see an aggressively large “middle class” getting there, which is very, very different from the picture you have of the ancient world where there's the sun priest and then all the peasants around them.New Book ThesisDwarkesh Patel   Yeah. By the way, is the thesis of the new book something you're willing to disclose at this point? It's okay if you're not––Charles C. Mann   Sure sure, it's okay! This is a sort of weird thing, it's like a sequel or offshoot of 1491. That book, I'm embarrassed to say, was supposed to end with another chapter. The chapter was going to be about the American West, which is where I grew up, and I'm very fond of it. And apparently, I had a lot to say because when I outlined the chapter; the outline was way longer than the actual completed chapters of the rest of the book. So I sort of tried to chop it up and so forth, and it just was awful. So I just cut it. If you carefully look at 1491, it doesn't really have an ending. At the end, the author sort of goes, “Hey! I'm ending, look at how great this is!” So this has been bothering me for 15 years. During the pandemic, when I was stuck at home like so many other people, I held out what I had since I've been saving string and tossing articles that I came across into a folder, and I thought, “Okay, I'm gonna write this out more seriously now.” 15 or 20 years later. And then it was pretty long so I thought “Maybe this could be an e-book.” then I showed it to my editor. And he said, “That is not an e-book. That's an actual book.” So I take a chapter and hope I haven't just padded it, and it's about the North American West. My kids like the West, and at various times, they've questioned what it would be like to move out there because I'm in Massachusetts, where they grew up. So I started thinking “What is the West going to be like, tomorrow? When I'm not around 30 or 50 years from now?”It seems to be that you won't know who's president or who's governor or anything, but there are some things we can know. It'd be hotter and drier than it is now or has been in the recent past, like that wouldn't really be a surprise. So I think we can say that it's very likely to be like that. All the projections are that something like 40% of the people in the area between the Mississippi and the Pacific will be of Latino descent–– from the south, so to speak. And there's a whole lot of people from Asia along the Pacific coast, so it's going to be a real ethnic mixing ground. There's going to be an epicenter of energy, sort of no matter what happens. Whether it's solar, whether it's wind, whether it's petroleum, or hydroelectric, the West is going to be economically extremely powerful, because energy is a fundamental industry.And the last thing is (and this is the iffiest of the whole thing), but I'm going to go out on a limb and say that the ongoing recuperation of sovereignty by the 294 federally recognized Native nations in the West is going to continue. That's been going in this very jagged way, but definitely for the last 50 or 60 years, as long as I've been around, the overall trend is in a very clear direction. So then you think, okay, this West is going to be wildly ethnically diverse, full of competing sovereignties and overlapping sovereignties. Nature is also going to really be in kind of a terminal. Well, that actually sounds like the 1200s! And the conventional history starts with Lewis and Clark and so forth. There's this breakpoint in history when people who looked like me came in and sort of rolled in from the East and kind of took over everything. And the West disappears! That separate entity, the native people disappear, and nature is tamed. That's pretty much what was in the textbooks when I was a kid. Do you know who Frederick Jackson Turner is? Dwarkesh Patel  No.Charles C. Mann So he's like one of these guys where nobody knows who he is. But he was incredibly influential in setting intellectual ideas. He wrote this article in 1893, called The Significance of the Frontier. It was what established this idea that there's this frontier moving from East to West and on this side was savagery and barbarism, and on this other side of civilization was team nature and wilderness and all that. Then it goes to the Pacific, and that's the end of the West. That's still in the textbooks but in a different form: we don't call native people “lurking savages” as he did. But it's in my kids' textbooks. If you have kids, it'll very likely be in their textbook because it's such a bedrock. What I'm saying is that's actually not a useful way to look at it, given what's coming up. A wonderful Texas writer, Bruce Sterling, says, “To know the past, you first have to understand the future.”It's funny, right? But what he means is that all of us have an idea of where the trajectory of history is going. A whole lot of history is about asking, “How did we get here? How do we get there?” To get that, you have to have an idea of what the “there” is. So I'm saying, I'm writing a history of the West with that West that I talked about in mind. Which gives you a very different picture: a lot more about indigenous fire management, the way the Hohokam survived the drought of the 1200s, and a little bit less about Billy the Kid. Gender Ratios and Silicon Valley Dwarkesh Patel   I love that quote hahaha. Speaking of the frontier, maybe it's a mistaken concept, but I remember that in a chapter of 1493, you talk about these rowdy adventurer men who outnumber the women in the silver mines and the kind of trouble that they cause. I wonder if there's some sort of distant analogy to the technology world or Silicon Valley, where you have the same kind of gender ratio and you have the same kind of frontier spirit? Maybe not the same physical violence––– more sociologically. Is there any similarity there?Charles C. Mann   I think it's funny, I hadn't thought about it. But it's certainly funny to think about. So let me do this off the top of my head. I like the idea that at the end of it, I can say, “wait, wait, that's ridiculous.“ Both of them would attract people who either didn't have much to lose, or were oblivious about what they had to lose, and had a resilience towards failure. I mean, it's amazing, the number of people in Silicon Valley who have completely failed at numbers of things! They just get up and keep‌ trying and have a kind of real obliviousness to social norms. It's pretty clear they are very much interested in making a mark and making their fortunes themselves. So there's at least a sort of shallow comparison, there are some certain similarities. I don't think this is entirely flattering to either group. It's absolutely true that those silver miners in Bolivia, and in northern‌ Mexico, created to a large extent, the modern world. But it's also true that they created these cesspools of violence and exploitation that had consequences we're still living with today. So you have to kind of take the bitter with the sweet. And I think that's true of Silicon Valley and its products *chuckles* I use them every day, and I curse them every day.Dwarkesh Patel   Right.Charles C. Mann   I want to give you an example. The internet has made it possible for me to do something like write a Twitter thread, get millions of people to read it, and have a discussion that's really amazing at the same time. Yet today, The Washington Post has an article about how every book in Texas (it's one of the states) a child checks out of the school library goes into a central state databank. They can see and look for patterns of people taking out “bad books” and this sort of stuff. And I think “whoa, that's really bad! That's not so good.” It's really the same technology that brings this dissemination and collection of vast amounts of information with relative ease. So with all these things, you take the bitter with the sweet. Technological Stupidity in the New WorldDwarkesh Patel   I want to ask you again about contingency because there are so many other examples where things you thought would be universal actually don't turn out to be. I think you talked about how the natives had different forms of metallurgy, with gold and copper, but then they didn't do iron or steel. You would think that given their “warring nature”, iron would be such a huge help. There's a clear incentive to build it. Millions of people living there could have built or developed this technology. Same with the steel, same with the wheel. What's the explanation for why these things you think anybody would have come up with didn't happen?Charles C. Mann   I know. It's just amazing to me! I don't know. This is one of those things I think about all the time. A few weeks ago, it rained, and I went out to walk the dog. I'm always amazed that there are literal glistening drops of water on the crabgrass and when you pick it up, sometimes there are little holes eaten by insects in the crabgrass. Every now and then, if you look carefully, you'll see a drop of water in one of those holes and it forms a lens. And you can look through it! You can see that it's not a very powerful lens by any means, but you can see that things are magnified. So you think “How long has there been crabgrass? Or leaves? And water?”  Just forever! We've had glass forever! So how is it that we had to wait for whoever it was to create lenses? I just don't get it. In book 1491, I mentioned the moldboard plow, which is the one with a curving blade that allows you to go through the soil much more easily. It was invented in China thousands of years ago, but not around in Europe until the 1400s. Like, come on, guys! What was it? And so, you know, there's this mysterious sort of mass stupidity. One of the wonderful things about globalization and trade and contact is that maybe not everybody is as blind as you and you can learn from them. I mean, that's the most wonderful thing about trade. So in the case of the wheel, the more amazing thing is that in Mesoamerica, they had the wheel on child's toys. Why didn't they develop it? The best explanation I can get is they didn't have domestic animals. A cart then would have to be pulled by people. That would imply that to make the cart work, you'd have to cut a really good road. Whereas they had these travois, which are these things that you hold and they have these skids that are shaped kind of like an upside-down V. You can drag them across rough ground, you don't need a road for them. That's what people used in the Great Plains and so forth. So you look at this, and you think “maybe this was the ultimate way to save labor. I mean, this was good enough. And you didn't have to build and maintain these roads to make this work”  so maybe it was rational or just maybe they're just blinkered. I don't know. As for assembly with steel, I think there's some values involved in that. I don't know if you've ever seen one of those things they had in Mesoamerica called Macuahuitl. They're wooden clubs with obsidian blades on them and they are sharp as hell. You don't run your finger along the edge because they just slice it open. An obsidian blade is pretty much sharper than any iron or steel blade and it doesn't rust. Nice. But it's much more brittle. So okay, they're there, and the Spaniards were really afraid of them. Because a single blow from these heavy sharp blades could kill a horse. They saw people whack off the head of a horse carrying a big strong guy with a single blow! So they're really dangerous, but they're not long-lasting. Part of the deal was that the values around conflict were different in the sense that conflict in Mesoamerica wasn't a matter of sending out foot soldiers in grunts, it was a chance for soldiers to get individual glory and prestige. This was associated with having these very elaborately beautiful weapons that you killed people with. So maybe not having steel worked better for their values and what they were trying to do at war. That would've lasted for years and I mean, that's just a guess. But you can imagine a scenario where they're not just blinkered but instead expressive on the basis of their different values. This is hugely speculative. There's a wonderful book by Ross Hassig about old Aztec warfare. It's an amazing book which is about the military history of The Aztecs and it's really quite interesting. He talks about this a little bit but he finally just says we don't know why they didn't develop all these technologies, but this worked for them.Dwarkesh Patel   Interesting. Yeah, it's kind of similar to China not developing gunpowder into an actual ballistic material––Charles C. Mann   Or Japan giving up the gun! They actually banned guns during the Edo period. The Portuguese introduced guns and the Japanese used them, and they said “Ahhh nope! Don't want them.” and they banned them. This turned out to be a terrible idea when Perry came in the 1860s. But for a long time, supposedly under the Edo period, Japan had the longest period of any nation ever without a foreign war. Dwarkesh Patel   Hmm. Interesting. Yeah, it's concerning when you think the lack of war might make you vulnerable in certain ways. Charles C. Mann   Yeah, that's a depressing thought.Religious DemoralizationDwarkesh Patel   Right. In Fukuyama's The End of History, he's obviously arguing that liberal democracy will be the final form of government everywhere. But there's this point he makes at the end where he's like, “Yeah, but maybe we need a small war every 50 years or so just to make sure people remember how bad it can get and how to deal with it.” Anyway, when the epidemic started in the New World, surely the Indians must have had some story or superstitious explanation–– some way of explaining what was happening. What was it?Charles C. Mann   You have to remember, the germ theory of disease didn't exist at the time. So neither the Spaniards, or the English, or the native people, had a clear idea of what was going on. In fact, both of them thought of it as essentially a spiritual event, a religious event. You went into areas that were bad, and the air was bad. That was malaria, right? That was an example. To them, it was God that was in control of the whole business. There's a line from my distant ancestor––the Governor Bradford of Plymouth Colony, who's my umpteenth, umpteenth grandfather, that's how waspy I am, he's actually my ancestor––about how God saw fit to clear the natives for us. So they see all of this in really religious terms, and more or less native people did too! So they thought over and over again that “we must have done something bad for this to have happened.” And that's a very powerful demoralizing thing. Your God either punished you or failed you. And this was it. This is one of the reasons that Christianity was able to make inroads. People thought “Their god is coming in and they seem to be less harmed by these diseases than people with our God.” Now, both of them are completely misinterpreting what's going on! But if you have that kind of spiritual explanation, it makes sense for you to say, “Well, maybe I should hit up their God.”Critiques of Civilization Collapse TheoriesDwarkesh Patel   Yeah, super fascinating. There's been a lot of books written in the last few decades about why civilizations collapse. There's Joseph Tainter's book, there's Jared Diamond's book. Do you feel like any of them actually do a good job of explaining how these different Indian societies collapsed over time?Charles C. Mann   No. Well not the ones that I've read. And there are two reasons for that. One is that it's not really a mystery. If you have a society that's epidemiologically naive, and smallpox sweeps in and kills 30% of you, measles kills 10% of you, and this all happens in a short period of time, that's really tough! I mean COVID killed one million people in the United States. That's 1/330th of the population. And it wasn't even particularly the most economically vital part of the population. It wasn't kids, it was elderly people like my aunt–– I hope I'm not sounding callous when I'm describing it like a demographer. Because I don't mean it that way. But it caused enormous economic damage and social conflict and so forth. Now, imagine something that's 30 or 40 times worse than that, and you have no explanation for it at all. It's kind of not a surprise to me that this is a super challenge. What's actually amazing is the number of nations that survived and came up with ways to deal with this incredible loss.That relates to the second issue, which is that it's sort of weird to talk about collapse in the ways that they sometimes do. Like both of them talk about the Mayan collapse. But there are 30 million Mayan people still there. They were never really conquered by the Spaniards. The Spaniards were still waging giant wars in Yucatan in the 1590s. In the early 21st century, I went with my son to Chiapas, which is the southernmost exit province. And that is where the Commandante Cero and the rebellions were going on. We were looking at some Mayan ruins, and they were too beautiful, and I stayed too long, and we were driving back through the night on these terrible roads. And we got stopped by some of these guys with guns. I was like, “Oh God, not only have I got myself into this, I got my son into this.” And the guy comes and looks at us and says, “Who are you?” And I say that we're American tourists. And he just gets this disgusted look, and he says, “Go on.” And you know, the journalist in me takes over and I ask, “What do you mean, just go on?” And he says, “We're hunting for Mexicans.” And as I'm driving I'm like “Wait a minute, I'm in Mexico.” And that those were Mayans. All those guys were Maya people still fighting against the Spaniards. So it's kind of funny to say that their society collapsed when there are Mayan radio stations, there are Maya schools, and they're speaking Mayan in their home. It's true, they don't have giant castles anymore. But, it's odd to think of that as collapse. They seem like highly successful people who have dealt pretty well with a lot of foreign incursions. So there's this whole aspect of “What do you mean collapse?” And you see that in Against the Grain, the James Scott book, where you think, “What do you mean barbarians?” If you're an average Maya person, working as a farmer under the purview of these elites in the big cities probably wasn't all that great. So after the collapse, you're probably better off. So all of that I feel is important in this discussion of collapse. I think it's hard to point to collapses that either have very clear exterior causes or are really collapses of the environment. Particularly the environmental sort that are pictured in books like Diamond has, where he talks about Easter Island. The striking thing about that is we know pretty much what happened to all those trees. Easter Island is this little speck of land, in the middle of the ocean, and Dutch guys come there and it's the only wood around for forever, so they cut down all the trees to use it for boat repair, ship repair, and they enslave most of the people who are living there. And we know pretty much what happened. There's no mystery about it.Virginia Company + HubrisDwarkesh Patel   Why did the British government and the king keep subsidizing and giving sanctions to the Virginia Company, even after it was clear that this is not especially profitable and half the people that go die? Why didn't they just stop?Charles C. Mann   That's a really good question. It's a super good question. I don't really know if we have a satisfactory answer, because it was so stupid for them to keep doing that. It was such a loss for so long. So you have to say, they were thinking, not purely economically. Part of it is that the backers of the Virginia Company, in sort of classic VC style, when things were going bad, they lied about it. They're burning through their cash, they did these rosy presentations, and they said, “It's gonna be great! We just need this extra money.” Kind of the way that Uber did. There's this tremendous burn rate and now the company says you're in tremendous trouble because it turns out that it's really expensive to provide all these calves and do all this stuff. The cheaper prices that made people like me really happy about it are vanishing. So, you know, I think future business studies will look at those rosy presentations and see that they have a kind of analogy to the ones that were done with the Virginia Company. A second thing is that there was this dog-headed belief kind of based on the inability to understand longitude and so forth, that the Americas were far narrower than they actually are. I reproduced this in 1493. There were all kinds of maps in Britain at the time showing these little skinny Philippines-like islands. So there's the thought that you just go up the Chesapeake, go a couple 100 miles, and you're gonna get to the Pacific into China. So there's this constant searching for a passage to China through this thought to be very narrow path. Sir Francis Drake and some other people had shown that there was a West Coast so they thought the whole thing was this narrow, Panama-like landform. So there's this geographical confusion. Finally, there's the fact that the Spaniards had found all this gold and silver, which is an ideal commodity, because it's not perishable: it's small, you can put it on your ship and bring it back, and it's just great in every way. It's money, essentially. Basically, you dig up money in the hills and there's this long-standing belief that there's got to be more of that in the Americas, we just need to find out where. So there's always that hope. Lastly, there's the Imperial bragging rights. You know, we can't be the only guys with a colony. You see that later in the 19th century when Germany became a nation and one of the first things the Dutch said was “Let's look for pieces of Africa that the rest of Europe hasn't claimed,” and they set up their own mini colonial empire. So there's this kind of “Keeping Up with the Joneses” aspect, it just seems to be sort of deep in the European ruling class. So then you got to have an empire that in this weird way, seems very culturally part of it. I guess it's the same for many other places. As soon as you feel like you have a state together, you want to index other things. You see that over and over again, all over the world. So that's part of it. All those things, I think, contributed to this. Outright lying, this delusion, other various delusions, plus hubris.Dwarkesh Patel   It seems that colonial envy has today probably spread to China. I don't know too much about it, but I hear that the Silk Road stuff they're doing is not especially economically wise. Is this kind of like when you have the impulse where if you're a nation trying to rise, you have that “I gotta go here, I gotta go over there––Charles C. Mann   Yeah and “Show what a big guy I am. Yeah,––China's Silver TradeDwarkesh Patel   Exactly. So speaking of China, I want to ask you about the silver trade. Excuse another tortured analogy, but when I was reading that chapter where you're describing how the Spanish silver was ending up with China and how the Ming Dynasty caused too much inflation. They needed more reliable mediums of exchange, so they had to give up real goods from China, just in order to get silver, which is just a medium of exchange––but it's not creating more apples, right? I was thinking about how this sounds a bit like Bitcoin today, (obviously to a much smaller magnitude) but in the sense that you're using up goods. It's a small amount of electricity, all things considered, but you're having to use up real energy in order to construct this medium of exchange. Maybe somebody can claim that this is necessary because of inflation or some other policy mistake and you can compare it to the Ming Dynasty. But what do you think about this analogy? Is there a similar situation where real goods are being exchanged for just a medium of exchange?Charles C. Mann   That's really interesting. I mean, on some level, that's the way money works, right? I go into a store, like a Starbucks and I buy a coffee, then I hand them a piece of paper with some drawings on it, and they hand me an actual coffee in return for a piece of paper. So the mysteriousness of money is kind of amazing. History is of course replete with examples of things that people took very seriously as money. Things that to us seem very silly like the cowry shell or in the island of Yap where they had giant stones! Those were money and nobody ever carried them around. You transferred the ownership of the stone from one person to another person to buy something. I would get some coconuts or gourds or whatever, and now you own that stone on the hill. So there's a tremendous sort of mysteriousness about the human willingness to assign value to arbitrary things such as (in Bitcoin's case) strings of zeros and ones. That part of it makes sense to me. What's extraordinary is when the effort to create a medium of exchange ends up costing you significantly–– which is what you're talking about in China where people had a medium of exchange, but they had to work hugely to get that money. I don't have to work hugely to get a $1 bill, right? It's not like I'm cutting down a tree and smashing the papers to pulp and printing. But you're right, that's what they're kind of doing in China. And that's, to a lesser extent, what you're doing in Bitcoin. So I hadn't thought about this, but Bitcoin in this case is using computer cycles and energy. To me, it's absolutely extraordinary the degree to which people who are Bitcoin miners are willing to upend their lives to get cheap energy. A guy I know is talking about setting up small nuclear plants as part of his idea for climate change and he wants to set them up in really weird remote areas. And I was asking “Well who would be your customers?” and he says Bitcoin people would move to these nowhere places so they could have these pocket nukes to privately supply their Bitcoin habits. And that's really crazy! To completely upend your life to create something that you hope is a medium of exchange that will allow you to buy the things that you're giving up. So there's a kind of funny aspect to this. That was partly what was happening in China. Unfortunately, China's very large, so they were able to send off all this stuff to Mexico so that they could get the silver to pay their taxes, but it definitely weakened the country.Wizards vs. ProphetsDwarkesh Patel   Yeah, and that story you were talking about, El Salvador actually tried it. They were trying to set up a Bitcoin city next to this volcano and use the geothermal energy from the volcano to incentivize people to come there and mine cheap Bitcoin. Staying on the theme of China, do you think the prophets were more correct, or the wizards were more correct for that given time period? Because we have the introduction of potato, corn, maize, sweet potatoes, and this drastically increases the population until it reaches a carrying capacity. Obviously, what follows is the other kinds of ecological problems this causes and you describe these in the book. Is this evidence of the wizard worldview that potatoes appear and populations balloon? Or are the prophets like “No, no, carrying capacity will catch up to us eventually.”Charles C. Mann   Okay, so let me interject here. For those members of your audience who don't know what we're talking about. I wrote this book, The Wizard and the Prophet. And it's about these two camps that have been around for a long time who have differing views regarding how we think about energy resources, the environment, and all those issues. The wizards, that's my name for them––Stuart Brand called them druids and, in fact, originally, the title was going to involve the word druid but my editor said, “Nobody knows what a Druid is” so I changed it into wizards–– and anyway the wizards would say that science and technology properly applied can allow you to produce your way out of these environmental dilemmas. You turn on the science machine, essentially, and then we can escape these kinds of dilemmas. The prophets say “No. Natural systems are governed by laws and there's an inherent carrying capacity or limit or planetary boundary.” there are a bunch of different names for them that say you can't do more than so much.So what happened in China is that European crops came over. One of China's basic geographical conditions is that it's 20% of the Earth's habitable surface area, or it has 20% of the world's population, but only has seven or 8% of the world's above-ground freshwater. There are no big giant lakes like we have in the Great Lakes. And there are only a couple of big rivers, the Yangtze and the Yellow River. The main staple crop in China has to be grown in swimming pools, and that's you know, rice. So there's this paradox, which is “How do you keep people fed with rice in a country that has very little water?” If you want a shorthand history of China, that's it. So prophets believe that there are these planetary boundaries. In history, these are typically called Malthusian Limits after Malthus and the question is: With the available technology at a certain time, how many people can you feed before there's misery?The great thing about history is it provides evidence for both sides. Because in the short run, what happened when American crops came in is that the potato, sweet potato, and maize corn were the first staple crops that were dryland crops that could be grown in the western half of China, which is very, very dry and hot and mountainous with very little water. Population soars immediately afterward, but so does social unrest, misery, and so forth. In the long run, that becomes adaptable when China becomes a wealthy and powerful nation. In the short run, which is not so short (it's a couple of centuries), it really causes tremendous chaos and suffering. So, this provides evidence for both sides. One increases human capacity, and the second unquestionably increases human numbers and that leads to tremendous erosion, land degradation, and human suffering.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah, that's a thick coin with two sides. By the way, I realized I haven't gotten to all the Wizard and Prophet questions, and there are a lot of them. So I––Charles C. Mann   I certainly have time! I'm enjoying the conversation. One of the weird things about podcasts is that, as far as I can tell, the average podcast interviewer is far more knowledgeable and thoughtful than the average sort of mainstream journalist interviewer and I just find that amazing. I don't understand it. So I think you guys should be hired. You know, they should make you switch roles or something.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah, maybe. Charles C. Mann   It's a pleasure to be asked these interesting questions about subjects I find fascinating.Dwarkesh Patel   Oh, it's my pleasure to get to talk to you and to get to ask these questions. So let me ask about the Wizard and the Prophet. I just interviewed WIll McCaskill, and we were talking about what ends up mattering most in history. I asked him about Norman Borlaug and said that he's saved a billion lives. But then McCaskill pointed out, “Well, that's an exceptional result” and he doesn't think the technology is that contingent. So if Borlaug hadn't existed, somebody else would have discovered what he discovered about short wheat stalks anyways. So counterfactually, in a world where Ebola doesn't exist, it's not like a billion people die, maybe a couple million more die until the next guy comes around. That was his view. Do you agree? What is your response?Charles C. Mann   To some extent, I agree. It's very likely that in the absence of one scientist, some other scientist would have discovered this, and I mentioned in the book, in fact, that there's a guy named Swaminathan, a remarkable Indian scientist, who's a step behind him and did much of the same work. At the same time, the individual qualities of Borlaug are really quite remarkable. The insane amount of work and dedication that he did.. it's really hard to imagine. The fact is that he was going against many of the breeding plant breeding dogmas of his day, that all matters! His insistence on feeding the poor… he did remarkable things. Yes, I think some of those same things would have been discovered but it would have been a huge deal if it had taken 20 years later. I mean, that would have been a lot of people who would have been hurt in the interim! Because at the same time, things like the end of colonialism, the discovery of antibiotics, and so forth, were leading to a real population rise, and the amount of human misery that would have occurred, it's really frightening to think about. So, in some sense, I think he's (Will McCaskill) right. But I wouldn't be so glib about those couple of million people.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah. And another thing you might be concerned about is that given the hostile attitude that people had towards the green revolution right after, if the actual implementation of these different strains of biochar sent in India, if that hadn't been delayed, it's not that weird to imagine a scenario where the governments there are just totally won over by the prophets and they decide to not implant this technology at all. If you think about what happened to nuclear power in the 70s, in many different countries, maybe something similar could have happened to the Green Revolution. So it's important to beat the Prophet. Maybe that's not the correct way to say it. But one way you could put it is: It's important to beat the prophets before the policies are passed. You have to get a good bit of technology in there.Charles C. Mann   This is just my personal opinion, but you want to listen to the prophets about what the problems are. They're incredible at diagnosing problems, and very frequently, they're right about those things. The social issues about the Green Revolution… they were dead right, they were completely right. I don't know if you then adopt their solutions. It's a little bit like how I feel about my editors–– my editors will often point out problems and I almost never agree with their solutions. The fact is that Borlaug did develop this wheat that came into India, but it probably wouldn't have been nearly as successful if Swaminathan hadn't changed that wheat to make it more acceptable to the culture of India. That was one of the most important parts for me in this book. When I went to Tamil Nadu, I listened to this and I thought, “Oh! I never heard about this part where they took Mexican wheat, and they made it into Indian wheat.” You know, I don't even know if Borlaug ever knew or really grasped that they really had done that! By the way, a person for you to interview is Marci Baranski–– she's got a forthcoming book about the history of the Green Revolution and she sounds great. I'm really looking forward to reading it. So here's a plug for her.In Defense of Regulatory DelaysDwarkesh Patel   So if we applied that particular story to today, let's say that we had regulatory agencies like the FDA back then that were as powerful back then as they are now. Do you think it's possible that these new advances would have just dithered in some approval process that took years or decades to complete? If you just backtest our current process for implementing technological solutions, are you concerned that something like the green revolution could not have happened or that it would have taken way too long or something?Charles C. Mann   It's possible. Bureaucracies can always go rogue, and the government is faced with this kind of impossible problem. There's a current big political argument about whether former President Trump should have taken these top-secret documents to his house in Florida and done whatever he wanted to? Just for the moment, let's accept the argument that these were like super secret toxic documents and should not have been in a basement. Let's just say that's true. Whatever the President says is declassified is declassified. Let us say that's true.  Obviously, that would be bad. You would not want to have that kind of informal process because you can imagine all kinds of things–– you wouldn't want to have that kind of informal process in place. But nobody has ever imagined that you would do that because it's sort of nutty in that scenario.Now say you write a law and you create a bureaucracy for declassification and immediately add more delay, you make things harder, you add in the problems of the bureaucrats getting too much power, you know–– all the things that you do. So you have this problem with the government, which is that people occasionally do things that you would never imagine. It's completely screwy. So you put in regulatory mechanisms to stop them from doing that and that impedes everybody else. In the case of the FDA, it was founded in the 30 when some person produced this thing called elixir sulfonamides. They killed hundreds of people! It was a flat-out poison! And, you know, hundreds of people died. You think like who would do that? But somebody did that. So they created this entire review mechanism to make sure it never happened again, which introduced delay, and then something was solidified. Which they did start here because the people who invented that didn't even do the most cursory kind of check. So you have this constant problem. I'm sympathetic to the dilemma faced by the government here in which you either let through really bad things done by occasional people, or you screw up everything for everybody else. I was tracing it crudely, but I think you see the trade-off. So the question is, how well can you manage this trade-off? I would argue that sometimes it's well managed. It's kind of remarkable that we got vaccines produced by an entirely new mechanism, in record time, and they passed pretty rigorous safety reviews and were given to millions and millions and millions of people with very, very few negative effects. I mean, that's a real regulatory triumph there, right?So that would be the counter-example: you have this new thing that you can feed people and so forth. They let it through very quickly. On the other hand, you have things like genetically modified salmon and trees, which as far as I can tell, especially for the chestnuts, they've made extraordinary efforts to test. I'm sure that those are going to be in regulatory hell for years to come. *chuckles* You know, I just feel that there's this great problem. These flaws that you identified, I would like to back off and say that this is a problem sort of inherent to government. They're always protecting us against the edge case. The edge case sets the rules, and that ends up, unless you're very careful, making it very difficult for everybody else.Dwarkesh Patel   Yeah. And the vaccines are an interesting example here. Because one of the things you talked about in the book–– one of the possible solutions to climate change is that you can have some kind of geoengineering. Right? I think you mentioned in the book that as long as even one country tries this, then they can effectively (for relatively modest amounts of money), change the atmosphere. But then I look at the failure of every government to approve human challenge trials. This is something that seems like an obvious thing to do and we would have potentially saved hundreds of thousands of lives during COVID by speeding up the vaccine approval. So I wonder, maybe the international collaboration is strong enough that something like geoengineering actually couldn't happen because something like human challenge trials didn't happen.Geoengineering Charles C. Mann   So let me give a plug here for a fun novel by my friend, Neal Stephenson, called Termination Shock. Which is about some rich person just doing it. Just doing geoengineering. The fact is that it's actually not actually against the law to fire off rockets into the stratosphere. In his case, it's a giant gun that shoots shells full of sulfur into the upper atmosphere. So I guess the question is, what timescale do you think is appropriate for all this? I feel quite confident that there will be geoengineering trials within the next 10 years. Is that fast enough? That's a real judgment call. I think people like David Keith and the other advocates for geoengineering would have said it should have happened already and that it's way, way too slow. People who are super anxious about moral hazard and precautionary principles say that that's way, way too fast. So you have these different constituencies. It's hard for me to think off the top of my head of an example where these regulatory agencies have actually totally throttled something in a long-lasting way as opposed to delaying it for 10 years. I don't mean to imply that 10 years is nothing. But it's really killing off something. Is there an example you can think of?Dwarkesh Patel   Well, it's very dependent on where you think it would have been otherwise, like people say maybe it was just bound to be the state. Charles C. Mann   I think that was a very successful case of regulatory capture, in which the proponents of the technology successfully created this crazy…. One of the weird things I really wanted to explain about nuclear stuff is not actually in the book.

covid-19 god united states america american spotify texas history world president donald trump english europe china earth japan water mexico british speaking west germany food africa ai christianity nature european italy japanese spanish north carolina ireland north america spain staying brazil african irish uber east indian bitcoin mexican massachusetts natural code silicon valley britain catholic washington post helps starbucks mississippi civil war millions dutch philippines native americans columbus prophet west coast pleasure wizard pacific vikings haiti fda diamond brazilian americas rebellions latino native prophets edinburgh new world excuse significance nuclear vc wizards similar khan indians portuguese scientific panama underrated el salvador mexico city population bolivia uncovering anarchy central america west africa grain ebola frontier imperial keeping up american revolution empires great lakes mayan south asia cort british empire clive pyramids cortes industrial revolution american west moby dick silk road puebla adam smith aztec joneses oh god cunha bengal druid critiques bureaucracy aztecs largely eurasia edo chiapas c4 undo in defense civilizations mayans chesapeake western hemisphere brazilians wizardry great plains tamil nadu yap geoengineering pizarro new laws easter island incas yucatan spaniards david graeber your god neal stephenson jared diamond niall ferguson outright green revolution new revelations las casas mesoamerica mughal east india company teotihuacan agriculture organization hammurabi tenochtitlan huck finn paul maurice james scott mccaskill mexica wilberforce malthus william powell brazilian amazon agroforestry yangtze sir francis drake ming dynasty spanish empire darwins david keith mesa verde david deutsch william dalrymple northern mexico yellow river plymouth colony bartolome norman borlaug chaco canyon bruce sterling charles c mann laurent binet mississippi valley charles mann bengalis acemoglu borlaug triple alliance americas before columbus will macaskill virginia company frederick jackson turner joseph tainter east india trading company murray gell mann north american west hohokam shape tomorrow prophet two remarkable scientists
A Trip Down Memory Card Lane
Ep.106 – Let's Party

A Trip Down Memory Card Lane

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022


Today, we're telling the story of the entire role-playing genre as part of our conversation on Wizardry (1981). We'll look back at wargames, and follow their evolution through miniature wargaming and into role-playing itself. As part of this talk, we look at the history of Dungeons and Dragons, and look at what role-playing games have borrowed from it. Finally, we'll look at why Wizardry is a relevant title in annals of gaming history.

Imagine a Place
Design Thinking for Games | Brenda Romero, CEO and Game Designer

Imagine a Place

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 36:44


Brenda Romero is an award-winning game director, entrepreneur, and Fulbright award recipient who entered the video game industry in 1981 and is presently CEO and co-founder of Romero Games. As a game developer, she has worked on 50 games and contributed to many seminal titles, including Wizardry, Ghost Recon, and Dungeons & Dragons.Brenda has been designing and inventing games her whole life and she's become one of the world's best at it. So, what's the connection between designing a game and designing for physical space? In today's episode, Brenda helps us discover it just might be the challenge of designing for the interactive, complex, and  emotional experience of being human.Click here to get your FREE copy of the Imagine a Place journalFollow Imagine a Place on Instagram: @imagineaplaceFollow Imagine a Place on LinkedInLeave Doug a question or comment on SpeakPipe

The Sacred Hallow Podcast
Christianity is unravelling part 2

The Sacred Hallow Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 24:30


Abijah is joined by Destiny and Orenda in studio for a discussion on the current demise and downfall of Christianity. Christianity is unravelling for all the world to see.

Get My Book Out There Podcast
80 The Magic of Connection: How to Tap Into the Marketing Wizardry of Your Reader Avatar

Get My Book Out There Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 8:16


As children, we're taught to believe in the magic of connection. Whether it's the Tooth Fairy, Santa Claus, or the Easter Bunny, we're taught that when we believe in something strongly enough, it feels real. The same is true when it comes to marketing. If you can tap into the magic of connection with your reader avatar, you can create a powerful marketing force that will work wonders for your book sales.

The Sacred Hallow Podcast
Christianity is unravelling part 1

The Sacred Hallow Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 24:36


Abijah is joined by Destiny and Orenda in studio for a discussion on the current demise and downfall of Christianity. Christianity is unravelling for all the world to see.

WELLPOWER
EP. 35: TEST DON'T GUESS & MINERAL BALANCING WIZARDRY with BARTON SCOTT

WELLPOWER

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 56:47


Description This week holds an important story of a man and his minerals. Kristin sits with friend and health entrepreneur, Barton Scott, Founder of Upgraded Formulas. Barton is an athlete and chemical engineer who had been lucky to enjoy a constantly sharp mind up to a certain point in his life - when this began to shift rapidly in the other direction, without him having any idea why. He began suffering more and more, experiencing extreme levels of brain fog, memory loss and mental fatigue. How could this be, especially at an early age? He was only in his mid twenties then, and to make matters so much worse, a massive hole opened in his life at the same time, when without warning, he lost someone very close to him to an aneurysm. It was preventable, he knew. Watching one of the people he loved the most die because no one could help her was THE motivating force for his work today. Listen in and hear how important minerals are to the human body, your longevity and disease prevention - all things that led him to develop the best Hair Test Mineral Analysis (HTMA) and advisement team in the world alongside nanotechnology that supports mineral absorption at its finest.   Highlights: (04:38) How Barton's journey started (10:26) Understanding what your body is losing (17:54) Hair Mineral Analysis Test: What It Can Reveal About You (22:51) The difference in getting particles in small sizes (23:59) Short Term Memory Loss: What Everyone Needs to Know (28:33) How to Live Optimally (36:27) What causes nutrient deficiencies? (40:25) What should you know about vitamin and mineral supplements  (46:16) What happens when you take too much Vitamin C and Zinc? (51:11) Barton's Biohack (52:53) Barton's advice to his younger self Links: Website: https://www.upgradedformulas.com/pages/our-story  LinkedIn: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/askbarton/?hl=en 

The Mane Land: for Orlando City SC fans
PawedCast Episode 307: Red Bulls Rewind, Pride-Wave, OCB, Charlotte Preview, and More

The Mane Land: for Orlando City SC fans

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 80:07


Orlando City SC had a rare nine-point weekend across the three teams and, for the first time in history, the Lions, Pride, and OCB all won without conceding a goal on the same weekend. The Young Lions got things started with a 2-0 win at New York City FC II, followed by Orlando City's 1-0 win at the New York Red Bulls, and capped by the Pride's 1-0 win at San Diego Wave FC. That doesn't mean it was a perfect weekend of soccer (said the Manchester United fan), but the results from the club — three wins out of three —- were as good as you can get. Dave Rohe and I break down Orlando City's 1-0 win at New York, which included a heartbreaking injury to Alexandre Pato. While the severity isn't known at the time of this writing, things don't sound promising. We selected our Man of the Match (this time we weren't unanimous) and talked about Facundo Torres' weekly honor. The Orlando Pride not only extended their unbeaten streak, they even got a win instead of another draw. Meggie Dougherty Howard's penalty kick goal was enough to lift the Pride to a win over a lot of their former teammates who now ply their trade in San Diego. Alex Morgan looked particularly dangerous all night but generously rocked the woodwork instead of scoring. Seb Hines' bunch are fun to watch and if they can find just a little bit more quality, they could even flirt with a potential playoff spot as the season winds down. To that end, the Pride added speedy forward Ally Watt from OL Reign this week, and Haley Brugeja finally made the match day squad, so Hines might have some attacking reinforcements arriving to help the squad try to get to that next level. OCB bounced back from last week's loss by beating NYCFC II behind Jack Lynn's brace. And while Dave and I don't share some folks' enthusiasm for letting Lynn play for the first team just quite yet, we do enjoy seeing the rookie put the ball in the net for the Young Lions. This week's mailbag asked us whether Hines is the Pride's version of Ted Lasso and how we would sort Orlando City players into the various houses at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. If there's anything — and we do mean anything — you want us to address on the next show, just ask by tweeting it to us at @TheManeLand with the hashtag #AskTMLPC. Finally, we gave our key match-ups and predictions for Orlando City's upcoming match this Sunday night on the road in North Carolina against Charlotte FC. Stay safe and enjoy the show! Here's how No. 307 went down: 0:15 - The Lions attempted only two shots, but one of them went in and that was enough. 26:16 - The Pride just keep finding ways to get results and they're about to add another forward. Plus, OCB got a win away from home. 53:21 - We answer our mail and make our predictions for the Lions against Charlotte. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Harry Potter Theory
How Did First Years Get Wands During Voldemort's Reign? Why Were They Sent to Hogwarts?

Harry Potter Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 8:45 Transcription Available


Welcome to Harry Potter Theory. Today, we're discussing Voldemort's reign in the second wizarding war, Hogwarts, Hogwarts FIRST YEAR STUDENTS, and wands.  Let's dive in to it. Voldemort's regime during the second wizarding war really flipped the wizarding world on its axis. Where once there was peace, now there was heartbreak, separation and destruction. He had successfully taken over the ministry of magic, torn apart Diagon Alley, and EVEN managed to breach the walls of Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry- the world's foremost magic school. The school, which had previously been overseen by powerful wizard (and good guy, maybe?) Albus Dumbledore, was no longer under his protection after his untimely death. Dumbledore's vacancy left a big hole in Hogwarts, and without his protection, it didn't take long for Voldemort and the Death Eaters to waltz right in. But the Death Eaters taking over Hogwarts certainly didn't mean that classes would stop. Oh no. Class was still very much in session, just with a very…different set of rules and approach.  With a double-agent Snape taking the Headmaster helm, most of the school staff remained in their usual postings. However, a Death Eater takeover did of course mean that a few new faces were introduced to the faculty, like Alecto and Amycus Carrow- a pure blood brother/sister combo that took over Muggle Studies and Defence Against the Dark Arts (respectively). Ok Silas, we get it, class was still in session. What's your point? Well, school in session meant that new faces were still popping up at Hogwarts. That's right, just like Harry Potter in his first year- new, bright young witches and wizards were walking through the doors of Hogwarts for the very first time.  But, can you even begin to imagine how much different this experience would have been for these NEW first years? Harry was met with wonder, magic and excitement. These new first years must have been met with darkness, terror and uncertainty- entirely unsure of where the school stood admist Voldemort's wizarding world takeover. Why were students even sent?

The Sacred Hallow Podcast
Christian Nationalism is Real Christianity

The Sacred Hallow Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 24:30


Abijah and Orenda discuss the growing factions within the christian church over whether or not christian nationalism is indeed Christianity.

IGN.com - Daily Fix (Video)
Hogwarts Legacy: New Character Customization Options Revealed - IGN Daily Fix

IGN.com - Daily Fix (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022


On today's IGN The Fix: Games, Presented by GameStop, we're taking a look at new Hogwarts Legacy screenshots and a never-before-seen cinematic. The cinematic shows a group of dark wizards trying to steal a Hippogriff, while the screenshots showcase some of the character customization options coming to the game. If you really wanted to live out your Harry Potter dreams and attend the School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, this game's your best option. The hit platform fighter MultiVersus has been hit with another delay, this time the start of Season 1 is being pushed back, along with the debut of Morty from Rick & Morty. Sorry, no new date for Season 1 has been revealed. And today we're taking a look at the pre-built gaming PC options offered by GameStop.

W2M Network
Long Road to Ruin: Harry Potter Film Series (Part 2 of 4)

W2M Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 122:55


Original Airdate 11/10/2016 Alexis Hejna join Sean Comer and Mark Radulich in looking at the Parts 3 and 4 of the Harry Potter film series. On this episode we're discussing "Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban" and "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire." Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban: Harry Potter's (Daniel Radcliffe) third year at Hogwarts starts off badly when he learns deranged killer Sirius Black (Gary Oldman) has escaped from Azkaban prison and is bent on murdering the teenage wizard. While Hermione's (Emma Watson) cat torments Ron's (Rupert Grint) sickly rat, causing a rift among the trio, a swarm of nasty Dementors is sent to protect the school from Black. A mysterious new teacher helps Harry learn to defend himself, but what is his secret tie to Sirius Black? Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire: The fourth movie in the Harry Potter franchise sees Harry (Daniel Radcliffe) returning for his fourth year at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, along with his friends, Ron (Rupert Grint) and Hermione (Emma Watson). There is an upcoming tournament between the three major schools of magic, with one participant selected from each school by the Goblet of Fire. When Harry's name is drawn, even though he is not eligible and is a fourth player, he must compete in the dangerous contest.

Dev Game Club
DGC Ep 312: MegaMan 2/MegaMan X (part two)

Dev Game Club

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 75:15


Welcome to Dev Game Club, where this week we continue our series on Capcom's MegaMan series, looking at the latter half of the game, exploring its difficulty and how it presents a final exam, among other topics. Dev Game Club looks at classic video games and plays through them over several episodes, providing commentary. Sections played: Finished the Game! (Hmm...) Issues covered: multiple forms of mastery, leaning on rewind, playing "au naturale," analogues in the podcast hosts, being confused about item 1, how the powers match up against various bosses, Brett's tornado, choosing the right weapon for the job, wondering whether you learn from earlier enemies for the final exam, plotting out your path, the final areas of the castle and challenge, divergent paths in game design, multiple ways of using the same ingredients, being frustrated by the type of game, having the gratifying sense of overcoming a boss, gaining knowledge, being surprised by a mid-game cutscene and map, puzzle rooms and weird rooms, the final exam, the bomb maze room, having to fight all the mans again, an amazing ending cutscene, wanting to know about the lore, identifying how to make games fit better to players, matchmaking very quickly, mixing different things together, the consequences of not reading mechanics and how that impacts a game, not knowing who Sen is, the Painted World, shipping your vertical slice, the terror of the Tower of Latria, showing the flaws of the mechanics. Games, people, and influences mentioned or discussed: Metroidvanias, Wonderful 101, Platinum Games, Clover Games, Okami, Hideki Kamiya, Viewtiful Joe, GameCube, Wizardry, Ultima IV, Conan the Barbarian, Sabotage, Lode Runner, Robotron, Joust, Mario (series), Metroid, Nintendo, Contra, Assassin's Creed, Raymond, Celeste, Todd Howard, Halo (series), Josh Mankey, Dark Souls, Stardew Valley, Warren Linam-Church, Ico, Sasha, Shadow of the Colossus, Hidetaka Miyazaki, Fumito Ueda, Kirk Hamilton, Aaron Evers, Mark Garcia, Dog Game Club. Next time: 3 Mens of MegaMan X! Twitch: brettdouville or timlongojr, instagram:timlongojr, Twitter: @timlongojr and @devgameclub DevGameClub@gmail.com

Reknr hosts: The MMT Podcast
#136 Asad Zaman: The High Wizardry And Hidden Assumptions Of Econometrics

Reknr hosts: The MMT Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 53:10


Patricia and Christian talk to economist, social scientist, and former Vice-Chancellor of the Pakistan Institute of Development Economics Professor Asad Zaman about econometrics.   Please help sustain this podcast! Patrons get early access to all episodes and patron-only episodes: https://www.patreon.com/MMTpodcast   For an intro to MMT: Listen to our first three episodes: https://www.patreon.com/posts/41742417 And Episode 126 - Dirk Ehnts: How Banks Create Money: https://www.patreon.com/posts/62603318   All our episodes in chronological order: https://www.patreon.com/posts/43111643   Asad Zaman's Writing: https://asaduzaman.medium.com/ Asad Zaman's World Economics Association Pedagogy Blog: https://weapedagogy.wordpress.com/author/asaduzaman/ Asad Zaman's YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/AsadZaman7   Asad Zaman - “The secrets of happiness”: https://asaduzaman.medium.com/the-secrets-of-happiness-1d83621f6b14 Asad Zaman - “Spirituality and development” [lecture, with notes]: https://weapedagogy.wordpress.com/2017/01/29/spirituality-development/   More on monetary operations: Episode 20 - Warren Mosler: The MMT Money Story (part 1): https://www.patreon.com/posts/28004824   Episode 126 - Dirk Ehnts: How Banks Create Money: https://www.patreon.com/posts/62603318   Episode 13 - Steven Hail: Everything You Always Wanted To Know About Banking, But Were Afraid To Ask: https://www.patreon.com/posts/41790887   Episode 43 - Sam Levey: Understanding Endogenous Money: https://www.patreon.com/posts/35073683 “An Accounting Model of the UK Exchequer – 2nd edition” by Andrew Berkeley, Richard Tye & Neil Wilson: https://gimms.org.uk/2021/02/21/an-accounting-model-of-the-uk-exchequer/ Our episodes about “An Accounting Model of the UK Exchequer”: Part 1: https://www.patreon.com/posts/46352183 Part 2: https://www.patreon.com/posts/46865929    More on inflation: Episode 7: Steven Hail: Inflation, Price Shocks and Other Misunderstandings: https://www.patreon.com/posts/41780508 Episode 65 - Phil Armstrong: Understanding Inflation: https://www.patreon.com/posts/40672678 Episode 104 - John T Harvey: Inflation, Stagflation & Healing The Nation: https://www.patreon.com/posts/52207835 Episode 123 - Warren Mosler: Understanding The Price Level And Inflation: https://www.patreon.com/posts/59856379 Episode 128 - L. Randall Wray & Yeva Nersisyan: What's Causing Accelerating Inflation? Pandemic Or Policy Response?: https://www.patreon.com/posts/63776558   More details on Dirk Ehnts' "Modern Monetary Theory and European Macroeconomics” course at Maastricht University: https://maastricht.dreamapply.com/courses/course/134-modern-monetary-theory-and-european-macroeconomics?search=34057   Sign up for alerts from The Gower Initiative For Modern Money Studies about their forthcoming MMT book: https://gimms.org.uk/   A list of MMT-informed campaigns and organisations worldwide: https://www.patreon.com/posts/47900757   We are working towards full transcripts, but in the meantime, closed captions for all episodes are available on our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEp_nGVTuMfBun2wiG-c0Ew/videos   Transcript for opening monologue: https://www.patreon.com/posts/69293554   Show notes: https://www.patreon.com/posts/69293532

The Sacred Hallow Podcast
Christians are tired Part 2

The Sacred Hallow Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 28:25


Abijah and Orenda discuss an article published in The New York Post titled " American Christians are sick of being punished for their views. In a part 2 episode.

First Cup of Coffee with Jeffe Kennedy
First Cup of Coffee - July 15, 2022

First Cup of Coffee with Jeffe Kennedy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 20:12 Transcription Available


A bit more on the internet/cell data saga (fair warning), and then further ruminations on RPGs, Wizardry, my own experiences along with other female/enby/etc. folks in the community, and Frosé. The rant on the game Wizardry that I mention is here (https://www.twitch.tv/videos/45216905).Buy ROGUE'S PAWN here! (https://jeffekennedy.com/rogue-s-pawn)Buy THE STORM PRINCESS AND THE RAVEN KING here!! (https://jeffekennedy.com/the-storm-princess-and-the-raven-king). The Heirs of Magic series is here (https://jeffekennedy.com/series/heirs-of-magic).The audiobook of GREY MAGIC is here (https://www.audible.com/pd/Grey-Magic-Audiobook/B09Z77GHDL?source_code=AUDFPWS0223189MWT-BK-ACX0-307001&ref=acx_bty_BK_ACX0_307001_rh_us), BRIGHT FAMILIAR is here (https://www.audible.com/pd/Bright-Familiar-Audiobook/B09WSGFLXW?source_code=AUDFPWS0223189MWT-BK-ACX0-303113&ref=acx_bty_BK_ACX0_303113_rh_us) and DARK WIZARD is here (https://www.audible.com/pd/Dark-Wizard-Audiobook/B09QQRHTYZ?source_code=AUDFPWS0223189MWT-BK-ACX0-294201&ref=acx_bty_BK_ACX0_294201_rh_us).The Sorcerous Moons series - now in KU! - is available here (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09YVVB82N).If you want to support me and the podcast, click on the little heart or follow this link (https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/jeffekennedy).You can watch this podcast on YouTube here https://youtu.be/esiQx2SldT0Sign up for my newsletter here! (https://landing.mailerlite.com/webforms/landing/r2y4b9)Support the show

Harry Potter Theory
What If Dudley Dursley Went to Hogwarts (A WIZARD?!) - Harry Potter Theory

Harry Potter Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 9:05 Transcription Available


Welcome to Harry Potter Theory. Today we're discussing WHAT IF Dudley Dursley, Harry Potter's volatile cousin, had turned out to be a wizard too? Now, although the mere idea of this what if scenario might have you immediately spewing profanities my way, you must admit that the chance that Dudley might have possessed some magical talent is not all that far-fetched of an idea. Why is that you may ask? Well, to start with, it's common knowledge that plenty of witches and wizards are born into Muggle families in which no other known relatives possess the ability to perform magic. Which, of course, brings us to my second point: this is the exact situation Lily Evans, Harry's mum, found herself in. As you likely well know, Lily's family was comprised entirely of Muggles, including her sister, Petunia, Dudley's mum. And although in adulthood, Petunia showed nothing but disdain for her sister's magical talents, even going so far as to call her a freak, we know from flashbacks of the girls' childhood that Petunia actually rather envied Lily's abilities and had wished to attend Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry herself. In fact, as a child, she even sent a letter requesting admission to Professor Dumbledore. Sadly – yet very understandably – Petunia was gently let down by Dumbledore who could not allow admission of a Muggle to the school. Unfortunately, this only seemed to spurn her jealousy of Lily into blatant hatred and resentment. But alas…I digress…

The Overlook Hour Podcast
#355 - The Parallax View, Cruel Jaws, Naked Killer

The Overlook Hour Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 104:00


The boys celebrate July 4th in their own respective ways. Randy watched "The Parallax View" while Clark and Russ watched "Cruel Jaws". Clark also covers the British family comedy, "Brian and Charles" and Russ watched one of the luminaries of the Cat III movement in "Naked Killer". Films: This Much I Know to Be True (2022), Brian and Charles (2022), The Parallax View (1974), Cruel Jaws (1995), Final Flesh (2009), Uncle Sam (1996), Naked Killer (1992), Wizardry (1991), The Bear (TV) Hey, we're on YouTube!  Listening on an iPhone? Don't forget to rate us on iTunes!   Fill our fe-mailbag by emailing us at OverlookHour@gmail.com    Reach us on Instagram (@theoverlooktheatre) Facebook (@theoverlookhour) Twitter (@OverlookHour) 

Crowdfunding Nerds: Kickstarter Marketing For Board Games & Beyond!

Brandon The Game Dev joins the Crowdfunding Nerds to chop manufacturing, freight and fulfilment. 00:00:50 – How TTRPG Fanatics Find New TTRPG Games 00:14:12 – The Board Game Design Lab Podcast Comes To An End 00:17:26 – Hiring Out Logistics Project Management 00:22:45 – Types Of Freight 00:25:15 – Does Freightos Have Competitive Pricing Compared To OTX 00:31:40 – Have Many Manufacturing Options 00:35:46 – Custom Charges 00:37:08 - Customs De Minimis Shownotes RPG.net Poll - https://forum.rpg.net/index.php?threads/how-do-you-learn-about-new-rpg-games-books.898242/ Social Media Vs Email - https://youtu.be/jZ5H6DeaKKs?t=587 Last BGDL Podcast - https://boardgamedesignlab.com/see-you-space-cowboy-with-gabe-barrett-and-jamey-stegmaier/ Freightos - https://www.freightos.com/ OTX - https://www.otxlogistics.com/ Brandon The Game Dev - https://brandonthegamedev.com/ Pangea Marketing Agency - https://www.pangeamarketingagency.com/ Weird Marketing Tales - https://weirdmarketingtales.com/

The Sacred Hallow Podcast
Christians are tired part 1

The Sacred Hallow Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 23:53


Abijah and Orenda discuss an article published in The New York Post titled " American Christians are sick of being punished for their views."

Action and Ambition
The Wizardry Behind Starting and Thriving in Business

Action and Ambition

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 32:20


Welcome to another episode of The Action and Ambition Podcast! Joining us today are Dr. Travis Fox and Michelle Fox, the Co-Founders of Ultimate Business Quest. This platform ignites transformative change in businesses by delivering business basics and practical coaching presented in a world of immersing fantasy gameplay. The quest has the power to level up your business and life. Michelle believes that each company and person needs to understand their ‘why' to implement internal awareness and put drive, passion, and knowledge into action. Tune in to learn more on this!

Harry Potter Theory
10 OVERLOOKED Careers in Harry Potter's Wizarding World - Harry Potter Explained

Harry Potter Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 9:55 Transcription Available


Welcome to Harry Potter Theory. Tell me, if you lived in the wizarding world, what type of job would you want? Some of you might have thought about this question a time or two already.  Perhaps you want to be an auror at the Ministry of Magic?  Or a professor, at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. You might think those are great choices, but they're actually a bit limited.   There are hundreds of jobs to choose from in the wizarding world, and today, we're going to take a look at a handful of some of the most interesting ones: from Troll Trainer to Magical Creature Breeder, and more. Let's get in to it.

Fonecallz
What Is This Wizardry? | Ep 23

Fonecallz

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 53:29


Vinny and Aaron discuss all things technology, including cybernetic attachments, AR / VR, AI chat bots, Dall-E 2, and more!AI Chat Bot Music:Forsaken by Mikael HellmanLink: https://filmmusic.io/song/5221-forsakenLicense: https://filmmusic.io/standard-licenseSUPPORT THE SHOW!Patreon | https://www.patreon.com/fonecallzFOLLOW USInstagram | https://www.instagram.com/fonecallzTwitter| https://twitter.com/fonecallzDiscord | https://discord.gg/7mPHpcyEvwWebsite | https://fonecallz.buzzsprout.comSupport the show

No Agenda
1452: "Toxic Stew"

No Agenda

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 212:54 Very Popular


No Agenda Episode 1452 - "Toxic Stew" "Toxic Stew Executive Producers: Sir Boiled Peanut Black Knight Sir Big Loaf Lee Rhodes Gunter Weber Anonymous Matthew Schock Chris "Sully" Sullivan Sir Jake Knight of the Deep Blue Sea The Feral Housewife casey hamre Douwe Andela Joe Spry Anonymous Sir Paul of the Command Line Ecuador Eric Tim Osborn Evan Downs Ryan Kilgo kristen gottula Evan & Sarah Ellen Lacke Sir Rogue of the Taverns, Baron of the Cowichan valley Associate Executive Producers: Anonymous Rancher Joshua Gribben Sean Fincham Alan Dix Anonymous Jonathan Keegan, Baronet Sir Cycle Path David Medus & Leila Jessie Hrynkiw Andrew Baker Sir William Lee Justin Spry Become a member of the 1453 Club, support the show here Boost us with with Podcasting 2.0 Certified apps: Podfriend - Breez - Sphinx - Podstation - Curiocaster - Fountain Title Changes Baronet Sir Rogue of the Taverns -> Sir Rogue of the Taverns, Baron of the Cowichan valley Knights & Dames Michael Zavala -> Sir Lavish, Knight of Divided and Concord California and the Dirty Sac Delta and Surrounding Territories et al Victor Munoz -> Sir Vic, Knight of the Threat Hunters Art By: Capitalist Agenda End of Show Mixes: Prof JJ - Lee O LaPuke - GWFFTheKok Engineering, Stream Management & Wizardry Mark van Dijk - Systems Master Ryan Bemrose - Program Director Back Office Aric Mackey Chapters: Dreb Scott Clip Custodian: Neal Jones NEW: and soon on Netflix: Animated No Agenda No Agenda Social Registration Sign Up for the newsletter No Agenda Peerage ShowNotes Archive of links and Assets (clips etc) 1452.noagendanotes.com New: Directory Archive of Shownotes (includes all audio and video assets used) archive.noagendanotes.com RSS Podcast Feed Full Summaries in PDF No Agenda Lite in opus format NoAgendaTorrents.com has an RSS feed or show torrents Last Modified 05/19/2022 17:22:23This page created with the FreedomController Last Modified 05/19/2022 17:22:23 by Freedom Controller