Podcasts about natural sciences

Branch of science about the natural world

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Latest podcast episodes about natural sciences

This Academic Life
Ep.9 – Rerun: Academic Salary

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022


In this episode, we discuss the taboo topic of a professor's salary and the importance of academic salary transparency. We also discuss how administrators can work with junior faculty and help them ease the salary negotiation process. Reference list: https://www.ccdaily.com/2021/04/a-look-at-faculty-presidents-salaries/ https://www.lifeofaprofessor.com/post/are-professors-rich The Annual Report on the Economic Status of the Profession, 2018-19 https://www.npr.org/sections/money/2014/07/02/327289264/episode-550-when-salaries-arent-secret Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) Contact list: If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org. You can also find us on webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on facebook group “This Academic Life”. Cast list: Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newel (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah. Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Support This Academic Life by contributing to their tip jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life

State of Inclusion
Eco-Justice - Justice for Whom?

State of Inclusion

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 32:42


Eco-Justice and Environmental Justice...What do those terms mean and how they inform our thinking about the question: Justice for Whom? Join us today as we learn more about these terms and talk with conservationist, Rebecca Bolich-Wade, about how communities can use eco-justice, environmental justice, and the community commons to build more inclusive and equitable communities.Full TranscriptRebecca Bolich-Wade Bio:With experience ranging from wildlife research to environmental education, Rebecca is presently utilizing her knowledge to expand Clean Water conservation at Upstate Forever, a conservation organization representing the Upstate of South Carolina. Rebecca holds a Bachelor of Science in Biology from Furman University where she studied conservation biology and philosophy. During her undergraduate studies and following her graduation, Rebecca had opportunities to work in research pertaining to mountain lions, bobcats, Mexican grey wolves, Bolson tortoises, and bats in states ranging from New York to New Mexico. Since the summer of 2020, Rebecca has been in pursuit of her Masters of Natural Science and Environmental Education from Hamline University. During this graduate program, Rebecca has had a keen focus on inclusion and diversity within environmental education and ecojustice.  Additional References:Athens Land TrustWelcome to Living Cully : Living CullyHome - Urban Waters Learning Network We mentioned these books in our discussion. You can purchase them from the State of Inclusion Bookstore at bookshop.orgBraiding Sweetgrass, by Robin Wall KimmererThe Practice of Adaptive Leadership: Tools and Tactics for Changing Your Organization and the World, by Heifetz, Grashow, and Linsky   

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers
666: Developing Nanomaterials to Help Solve Global Energy, Fuel, and Fresh Water Issues - Dr. Mita Dasog

People Behind the Science Podcast - Stories from Scientists about Science, Life, Research, and Science Careers

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 38:44


Dr. Mita Dasog is an Associate Professor and the Izaak Walton Killam Memorial Research Chair in the Department of Chemistry at Dalhousie University in Canada. Mita's lab conducts basic research to examine how different nanomaterials form, what dictates their size and shape, and how these features influence their properties. They also do applied research developing nanomaterials to address major global challenges such as energy production, fuel production, and desalination to help with the water crisis. When she's not doing science, you can often find Mita listening to CoComelon with her kid, reading a great mystery novel, painting, or cooking delicious Indian, Thai, Chinese, or Mexican cuisine. Mita received her BSc in chemistry from the University of Saskatchewan and her PhD in chemistry from the University of Alberta. Next, she worked at the Technical University of Munich in Germany for about half a year as a Green Talents Visiting Scholar. Afterwards, Mita was awarded a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada postdoctoral fellowship to conduct research at California Institute of Technology. Mita has been recognized with numerous awards and honors including the Nova Scotia Discovery Centre Emerging Professional Award and the President's Emerging Investigator Research Excellence Award. She is also an elected Member of the College of the Royal Society of Canada and a Member of the Global Young Academy. In our interview, Mita shares more about her life and science.

K-12 Greatest Hits:The Best Ideas in Education
Four-Day School Weeks Are Coming Faster Than We Thought: What Do You Need to Know in Advance?

K-12 Greatest Hits:The Best Ideas in Education

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 19:29 Very Popular


The four-day school week is not new, but the speed at which schools are adopting the model is breathtaking. Largely driven by the difficulty in attracting and retaining teachers, school districts are making the leap at increasingly rapid rates. In this episode we ask, what do teachers and school leaders need to consider ahead of time to be prepared? Follow on Twitter: @sgthomas1973 @bamradionetwork @jonharper70bd @DocSig @askpang Dr. Robert Sigrist currently serves as the Assistant Superintendent of Business and Operations for the St. Joseph School District in St. Joseph, MO. He is beginning his 29th year as an educator. He received his Ed.D. in Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis from the University of Missouri-Columbia. He earned his M.S. in Secondary Administration from Northwest Missouri State University and his B.S. in Natural Science from Missouri Western State University. Alex Soojung-Kim Pang, PhD., is the author of “REST: WHY YOU GET MORE DONE WHEN YOU WORK LESS.” Rest has been translated into a dozen languages, and recently appeared in a new paperback edition with a foreword by Arianna Huffington. Shawn Thomas is in her 20th year of teaching in the largest county in Georgia. She has taught Kindergarten, Second and Third Grade, and ESOL K-5.

The Smart 7
The Sunday 7 - Why it's hot in the city, Britain meets the Bison, putting Grey Squirrels on the pill and the FA rules out headers…

The Smart 7

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 19:09


The Smart 7 is a daily podcast that gives you everything you need to know in 7 minutes, at 7 am, 7 days a week... With over 10 million downloads and consistently charting, including as No. 1 News Podcast on Spotify, we're a trusted source for people every day. If you're enjoying it, please follow, share, or even post a review, it all helps... Today's episode includes the following guests: Kathy Baughman McLeod - Director of the Adrienne Arsht–Rockefeller Foundation Resilience Center at the Atlantic CouncilTom Gibbs - Bison Ranger, Wildwood TrustPaul Whitfield - Director General for the Wildwood TrustMichael Byers - Professor of Global Politics and International Law at the University of British ColumbiaDr Willie Stewart - Consultant Neuropathologist at University of GlasgowDr Michael Grey - Neuroscientist at the University of East AngliaRichard Mundy - Nature recovery manager at Gwent Wildlife TrustDr Giovanna Massei - Director of the Botstiber Institute for Wildlife Fertility Control Europe, University of YorkDaniele Michilli - Postdoctoral researcher at MIT's Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space ResearchEloise Hunt - PhD student in Natural Sciences at Imperial College London In Ireland? Why not try our Ireland Edition? Contact us over at Twitter or visit www.thesmart7.com Presented by Jamie East, written by Olivia Davies and produced by Daft Doris. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Teachers Aid
Four-Day School Weeks Are Coming Faster Than We Thought: What Do You Need to Know In Advance?

Teachers Aid

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 19:28


The four-day school week is not new, but the speed at which schools are adopting the model is breathtaking. Largely driven by the difficulty in attracting and retaining teachers, school districts are making the leap at increasingly rapid rates. In this episode we ask, what do teachers and school leaders need to consider ahead of time to be prepared? Follow on Twitter: @sgthomas1973 @bamradionetwork @jonharper70bd @DocSig @askpang Dr. Robert Sigrist currently serves as the Assistant Superintendent of Business and Operations for the St. Joseph School District in St. Joseph, MO. He is beginning his 29th year as an educator. He received his Ed.D. in Educational Leadership & Policy Analysis from the University of Missouri-Columbia. He earned his M.S. in Secondary Administration from Northwest Missouri State University and his B.S. in Natural Science from Missouri Western State University. Alex Soojung-Kim Pang, PhD., is the author of “REST: WHY YOU GET MORE DONE WHEN YOU WORK LESS.” Rest has been translated into a dozen languages, and recently appeared in a new paperback edition with a foreword by Arianna Huffington. Shawn Thomas is in her 20th year of teaching in the largest county in Georgia. She has taught Kindergarten, Second and Third Grade, and ESOL K-5.

The Smart 7 Ireland Edition
The Sunday 7 - Why it's hot in the city, Britain meets the Bison, putting Grey Squirrels on the pill and the FA rules out headers…

The Smart 7 Ireland Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 18:57


The Smart 7 Ireland Edition is the daily news podcast that gives you everything you need to know in 7 minutes, at 7am, 7 days a week… Consistently appearing in Ireland's Daily News charts, we're a trusted source for people every day. If you're enjoying it, please follow, share or even post a review, it all helps… Today's episode includes references to the following guests:Kathy Baughman McLeod - Director of the Adrienne Arsht–Rockefeller Foundation Resilience Center at the Atlantic CouncilTom Gibbs - Bison Ranger, Wildwood TrustPaul Whitfield - Director General for the Wildwood TrustMichael Byers - Professor of Global Politics and International Law at the University of British ColumbiaDr Willie Stewart - Consultant Neuropathologist at University of GlasgowDr Michael Grey - Neuroscientist at the University of East AngliaRichard Mundy - Nature recovery manager at Gwent Wildlife TrustDr Giovanna Massei - Director of the Botstiber Institute for Wildlife Fertility Control Europe, University of YorkDaniele Michilli - Postdoctoral researcher at MIT's Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space ResearchEloise Hunt - PhD student in Natural Sciences at Imperial College London Contact us over at Twitter or visit www.thesmart7.com Presented by Ciara Revins, written by Liam Thompson and produced by Daft Doris. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Political Animals
Religious Liberty: A History, with Dr Sarah Irving-Stonebraker

The Political Animals

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 83:04


Intellectual historian Sarah Irving-Stonebraker joins the show for a conversation about the history of religious liberty, exploring the emergence and development of the concept from its first explicit usage by the third century church father Tertullian to its more recent secular evolution towards the present. Key moments in the history of religious liberty are covered, including the medieval period, the Reformation, colonisation, the American constitution and the French Revolution, conscientious objection and the Australian context. Dr Sarah Irving-Stonebraker is Senior Lecturer in History at Western Sydney University and co-editor of the Journal of Religious History. She was awarded her PhD in History from Cambridge University (2007) and has been an Assistant Professor at Florida State University and a Junior Research Fellow at Wolfson College, Oxford University. Her first book, Natural Science and the Origins of the British Empire (Cambridge), was awarded The Royal Society of Literature and Jerwood Foundation Award for Non-fiction. She has two current book projects: Forgotten Histories of Religious Liberty in Australia, 1788- Present and The Death of History and the Hope of Christianity. The Political Animals is hosted by Dr Jonathan Cole, an academic, writer, speaker and translator specialising in political theology: the intersection of religion and politics. Jonathan was a senior terrorism analyst at Australian intelligence agency the Office of National Assessments where he worked on Islamist terrorism and the global jihadist movement. He is the author of Christian Political Theology in an Age of Discontent: Mediating Scripture, Doctrine, and Political Reality. You can follow Jonathan and the show on Twitter and Facebook.

This Academic Life
Ep.37 – Academic Conferences

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022


In this episode, we talk about academic conferences. Why you should go, what you need to do to prepare, and what are the do's and dont's when you get there.      Reference list:   Sponsor: De Gruyter: This episode is sponsored by De Gruyter and its portfolio in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. For “Students and Researchers in Mathematics” De Gruyter's 2022 catalog is now available on This Academic Life website. Contact list: If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org. You can also find us on the webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on Facebook group “This Academic Life”.    https://www.apa.org/ed/precollege/psn/2016/09/academic-conferences     Cast list:   Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newell (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah. Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Editing team:   Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) Edited by Angella Chen Edited by Jared Duffy Artwork is created using Canva (canva.com) Support This Academic Life by contributing to their tip jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life

Oxidative Potential Podcast
#23 - Dr. Mike T. Nelson - Building a Resilient Athlete, Physiological Flexibility, Homeostatic Regulators,

Oxidative Potential Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 99:43


Today on the show is Dr Mike T. Nelson. Mike has a Ph.D. in Exercise Physiology, a BA in Natural Science, and an MS in Biomechanics. He is also an adjunct professor and a member of the American College of Sports Medicine. Dr. Mike T. Nelson has spent 18 years of his life learning how the human body works, specifically focusing on how to properly condition it to burn fat and become stronger, more flexible, and healthier. He's been called in to share his techniques with top government agencies, universities and colleges, fitness organizations and fanatics. The techniques he's developed, and the results Mike gets for his clients have been featured in international magazines, in scientific publications, and on websites across the globe. Links to Dr. MikeInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/drmiketnelson/?hl=en Twitter: https://twitter.com/miketnelson Physiological Flexibility Course: https://miketnelsons.samcart.com/products/physflex/Metabolic Flexibility Course: https://flexdiet.com/Oxidative Potential Podcast LinksMoxy Monitor Discount:For a 5% discount on a Moxy Monitor purchase use promocode: OXPOhttps://www.moxymonitor.com/Instagram Links:https://www.instagram.com/criticalo2/?hl=enhttps://www.instagram.com/resiliencehpc/?hl=enYoutube Links:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfkBVklDMTPMbaPw0ikG2tgWebsite Links:https://www.resiliencehpc.ca/

This Academic Life
Ep.36 – Lecturers in Academia

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 30:51


In this episode, we discuss with Dr. Aleeta M. Powe,  an associate professor of instruction in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Louisville, on the challenges and needs that lecturers face in academia.      Reference list:   Sponsor: De Gruyter: This episode is sponsored by De Gruyter and its portfolio in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. For “Students and Researchers in Mathematics” De Gruyter's 2022 catalog is now available on This Academic Life website. Contact list: If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org. You can also find us on the webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on Facebook group “This Academic Life”.    Cast list:   Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newell (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah. Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Editing team:   Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) Edited by Angella Chen Edited by Jared Duffy Artwork is created using Canva (canva.com) Support This Academic Life by contributing to their tip jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life

Futureproof with Jonathan McCrea
A Brief History of Weaponised Insects

Futureproof with Jonathan McCrea

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 45:34


If you've seen classic B Movies like 1954's 'Them' or the criminally underappreciated classic, 'Starship Troopers', the words “Insect Warfare” probably conjure up some specific, likely silly imagery. But insects have featured in human conflicts in very real and often terrifying ways since the beginning of the historical record and likely, long before it. Jeffrey Lockwood is Professor of Natural Sciences and Humanities at the University of Wyoming and the author of 'Six-Legged Soldiers: Using Insects as Weapons of War'. He joins Jonathan to discuss, Catherine McGuinness, Zoologist and Educational Assistant at the National Museum of Ireland & Dr. Lara Dungan also joined Jonathan for Newsround.

Research Bites Podcast
#5 - Marina (Nina) von Keyserlingk - Animal welfare and ethics

Research Bites Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 31:50


Your host: Kristina Spaulding, PhD, CAAB with Science Matters Academy of Animal Behavior, LLCEvery once in a while I like to bring in voices from other disciplines to round out our knowledge of behavior. For this episode, I am speaking with a well-respected farm animal welfare researcher. Dr. Marina (Nina) von Keyserlingk is a Professor and Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada Industrial Research Chair holder in Animal Welfare at The University of British Columbia (UBC) where she has co-directed the Animal Welfare Program since 2002. Together with her colleagues and students their research focuses on assessing animal welfare and developing practical methods of improving the welfare of animals. She has published in excess of 300 peer reviewed scientific papers, contributed to the training of over 100 highly qualified individuals and is a frequent and enthusiastic speaker for academic and professional audiences. She was the 2018 recipient of the prestigious Hans Sigrist Research Prize (Bern, Switzerland) for her outstanding contributions to the sustainability of food animal systems. She is considered one of the world leading experts in farm animal welfare. Please enjoy my conversation with Dr. von Keyserlingk as we discuss issues related to the welfare and ethics of farm and companion animals.This is a shortened version of the podcast. The full version of the podcast is available to Research Bites members. You can get more information on Research Bites and other educational opportunities at www.sciencemattersllc.com

USMARADIO
Roger Malina | NaturArchy 2022

USMARADIO

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 1:19


A brief statement from Roger Malina who has attended to Resonances IV SciArt Summer School at Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy. > For years, UT Dallas has sought to fuse its long-held strengths in technology with the creativity of the arts and humanities. That philosophical blend is embodied by a new professor who is a champion for interdisciplinary academics. Dr. Roger F. Malina is a physicist, astronomer and executive editor of Leonardo publications at MIT Press. He serves in two of the University's schools, as a distinguished professor of arts and technology in the School of Arts and Humanities, and as a professor of physics in the School of Natural Sciences and Mathematics. Malina is a former director of the Observatoire Astronomique de Marseille Provence (OAMP) in Marseille, and a member of its observational cosmology group, which performs investigations on the nature of dark matter and dark energy. He is also a member of the Mediterranean Institute for Advanced Study. Malina was also a member of the jury for the Buckminster Fuller Challenge 2011, which awards a prize to those who create strategies with potential to “solve humanity's most pressing problems."

Once Upon a Tech
Episode 10: Confronting racism in CS through community, criticality, and citizenship with Aman Yadav

Once Upon a Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 23:55


In this episode, I take a deep dive into the paper, Breaking the Code: Confronting Racism in Computer Science through Community, Criticality, and Citizenship with Aman Yadav. He is a Professor in the College of Education and the College of Natural Science at Michigan State University. Aman's teaching and research focuses on computational thinking, computer science education, and problem-based learning. Find resources here.

Machine Learning Podcast - Jay Shah
Explainability, Human Aware AI & sentience in large language models | Dr. Subbarao Kambhampati

Machine Learning Podcast - Jay Shah

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 144:42


Are large language models really sentient or conscious? What is explainability (XAI) and how can we create human-aware AI systems for collaborative tasks? Dr. Subbarao Kambhampati sheds some light on these topics, generating explanations for human-in-loop AI systems and understanding 'intelligence' in context to AI systems. He is a Prof of Computer Science at Arizona State University and director of the Yochan lab at ASU where his research focuses on decision-making and planning specifically in the context of human-aware AI systems. He has received multiple awards for his research contributions. He has also been named a fellow of AAAI, AAAS, and ACM and also a distinguished alumnus from the University of Maryland and also recently IIT Madras.Time stamps of conversations:00:00:40 Introduction00:01:32 What got you interested in AI?00:07:40 Definition of intelligence that is not related to human intelligence00:13:40 Sentience vs intelligence in modern AI systems00:24:06 Human aware AI systems for better collaboration00:31:25 Modern AI becoming natural science instead of an engineering task00:37:35 Understanding symbolic concepts to generate accurate explanations00:56:45 Need for explainability and where01:13:00 What motivates you for research, the application associated or theoretical pursuit?01:18:47 Research in academia vs industry01:24:38 DALL-E performance and critiques01:45:40 What makes for a good research thesis? 01:59:06 Different trajectories of a good CS PhD student02:03:42 Focusing on measures vs metrics 02:15:23 Advice to students on getting started with AIArticles referred in the conversationAI as Natural Science?: https://cacm.acm.org/blogs/blog-cacm/261732-ai-as-an-ersatz-natural-science/fulltextPolanyi's Revenge and AI's New Romance with Tacit Knowledge: https://cacm.acm.org/magazines/2021/2/250077-polanyis-revenge-and-ais-new-romance-with-tacit-knowledge/fulltextMore about Prof. RaoHomepage: https://rakaposhi.eas.asu.edu/Twitter: https://twitter.com/rao2zAbout the Host:Jay is a PhD student at Arizona State University.Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/shahjay22/Twitter: https://twitter.com/jaygshah22Homepage: https://www.public.asu.edu/~jgshah1/ for any queries.Stay tuned for upcoming webinars!***Disclaimer: The information contained in this video represents the views and opinions of the speaker and does not necessarily represent the views or opinions of any institution. It does not constitute an endorsement by any Institution or its affiliates of such video content.***

This Academic Life
Ep.35 – Let's Turn in Those Grades

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 25:24


Episode Notes In this episode, we talk about instructors' stresses when turning in those final grades. As we wind down the semester, it is time to see if all of your lecture preparation, classroom demonstrations, careful selection of homework questions, creation of in-class quizzes, and your best science jokes have paid off - it is time to “Turn in Those Grades.”     Reference list:   Sponsor: De Gruyter: This episode is sponsored by De Gruyter and its portfolio in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. For “Students and Researchers in Mathematics” De Gruyter's 2022 catalog is now available on This Academic Life website. Contact list: If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org. You can also find us on the webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on Facebook group “This Academic Life”.    Cast list:  Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newell (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah. Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Editing team:   Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) Edited by Angella Chen Edited by Jared Duffy Artwork is created using Canva (canva.com) Support This Academic Life by contributing to their tip jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life

NUI Galway
Experience the Most Biodiverse Campus in Ireland by Sound

NUI Galway

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 27:53


Home to a mixture of important habitats, the NUI Galway campus has been recognised as the most biodiverse university campus in Ireland. Nuala Ní Chonghaile joins Caitriona Carlin from NUI Galway's Ryan Institute and School of Natural Sciences, on a walk through the NUI Galway Biodiversity Trail in this edition of the Cois Coiribe Podcast – a series that explores major societal issues and the role that NUI Galway, and our global alumni network play in creating new knowledge, in research and in policy making.

Seal le Seán ar Raidió Rí-Rá
Martha Fitzgerald

Seal le Seán ar Raidió Rí-Rá

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 13:29


Labhraíonn Martha Fitzgerald ón gcompántas drámaíochta Fizz and Chips Productions faoi na tograí ar fad atá ar siúl acu faoi láthair. Insíonn sí dúinn faoin scannán Faitíos a rinne siad anuraidh, a gcéad dráma Dragon agus seó nua – A Natural Science – atá ar siúl i Ros Comáin ar an 23 Meitheamh.

Love Nature
Around the World With 50,000 Bees

Love Nature

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 32:42


In 2008, a honeybee flew through the window of artist Matt Willey's New York City apartment and a lasting connection was made. “The Good of the Hive” is a global art project based on Willey's personal commitment to hand paint 50,000 individual honeybees (the average number for a healthy, thriving honeybee hive). In North Carolina, Willey's murals can be found in Asheville, Durham, and here in Raleigh at the NC Museum of Natural Sciences. Find out why Willey believes “what we love, we save,” and get an update on his worldwide mural project. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/lovenature/message

Creativity in Captivity
CHRISTOPHER MARLEY: Creatures Comfort

Creativity in Captivity

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 43:14


A visual artist and designer that plants his flag at the center of art, nature & science.  Christopher works with reclaimed organisms and natural elements to create breathtaking museum exhibits by transforming exotic insects and tropical sea creatures into astounding works of art.  Marley's artwork has been exhibited in hundreds of galleries worldwide. His solo exhibitions have been featured at The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, The Beaty Biodiversity Museum in Vancouver B.C., The Houston Museum of Natural Science, The Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, the Stamford Art Museum, Los Angeles Museum of Art, WMODA and the Queens Museum. Many of the world's most exclusive retailers such as Bergdorf Goodman, Saks 5th Avenue (NYC), Gumps (San Francisco), Barney's (NYC) and La Galerie du Bon Marche (Paris) have also hosted solo exhibitions. His first book Pheromone, The Insect Art of Christopher Marley (Pomegranate, 2008) was named one of the Best Books of 2008 by The Times (UK) and his second book, Biophilia (Abrams, 2015) is a New York Times Bestseller.  He maintains design studios in Willamette Valley, Oregon and in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. On this episode Christopher shares what it was like to grow up with his dad's dead birds in the freezer next to the popsicles, what he now keeps in his many freezers around the world and how important lighting is to displaying elements of nature. 

This Academic Life
Ep.34 – A Middle Schooler's View on STEM

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 25:02


In this episode, Lise Tantin talks about the broad view of STEM from a middle schooler's point of view. She shares her thought on how the STEM programs are evolving and what the new topics attract youth these days.   Guest bio: List Tantin is a student at West High School's magnet ELP program in Salt Lake City-Utah. She will be graduating from eighth grade this year. She is interested in neuroscience.   https://www.txstate.edu/chemistry/About-the-Department/Faculty-Profiles/schilter.html     Reference list:   Sponsor: De Gruyter: This episode is sponsored by De Gruyter and its portfolio in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. For “Students and Researchers in Mathematics” De Gruyter's 2022 catalog is now available on This Academic Life website. Contact list: If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org. You can also find us on the webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on Facebook group “This Academic Life”.    Cast list:   Lise Tantin (Guest) is an 8th grader in Salt Lake City, Utah. Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newell (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah. Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Editing team:   Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) Edited by Angella Chen Edited by Jared Duffy Artwork is created using Canva (canva.com) Support This Academic Life by contributing to their tip jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life

On Wildlife
Cicadas with Gene Kritsky

On Wildlife

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 25:40


The animal that we're talking about this week is one that you've probably heard before. They also have one of the most interesting life cycles on the planet and can emerge in huge swarms. This week, Alex is joined by expert Gene Kritsky, Professor of Biology and Dean of the School of Behavioral and Natural Sciences at Mount St. Joseph University, to tell you all there is to know about these amazing creatures. So, you may want to invest in some earplugs because we're going to learn all about cicadas.For sources and more information, please visit our website.Sign up for our email list on our website for the chance to win a free On Wildlife t-shirt!Support the show

EcoJustice Radio
Climate Change in the Desert with Ecologist James Cornett

EcoJustice Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 58:31


The Joshua tree is an icon and ecological keystone of the California deserts. However, climate disruption with hotter, drier summers and more frequent brush fires, threatens that some day soon Joshua Tree National Park will no longer have any of their namesake trees. In fact, many other important desert plants and animals face an uncertain future. There exist so many unique symbiotic relationships, from the ocotillo blossoms and migrating hummingbirds to the spiny teddy bear cholla and the innovative woodrat. We discuss these systems and investigate what solutions are needed. Are solar farms in the desert an appropriate renewable energy solution, or do they cause more harm than good? What about the consequences of lithium mining in Death Valley for electric vehicles? Did you know it is not a wise idea to grow your own Joshua Tree from imported seeds? Our guest, James Cornett [https://www.amazon.com/kindle-dbs/entity/author/B001K84BWE], is an ecologist and principal biologist at JWC Ecological Consultants. He is one of the West's most prolific writers with more than forty-four books published as of 2021. As former Director of Natural Sciences at the Palm Springs Desert Museum, he continues to share his love of natural history through writing, teaching, and lecturing. He is the first professional naturalist to have visited all nine of the world's great deserts and is writing a book on his travels and research in each. This is an encore presentation of our interview from 2021. For bonus content and other benefits, become an EcoJustice Radio patron at https://www.patreon.com/ecojusticeradio Podcast Website: http://ecojusticeradio.org/ Podcast Blog: https://www.wilderutopia.com/category/ecojustice-radio/ Support the Podcast: https://socal350.org/contribute-to-socal-350-climate-action/ Executive Producer: Jack Eidt Host/Producer: Jessica Aldridge Engineer: Blake Lampkin Show Created by Mark and JP Morris Music: Javier Kadry Episode 111 Image: Stephanie Lemus

Playlist Wars
The Battle of Rush (w/ Something For Nothing: A Rush Fancast)

Playlist Wars

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 72:04 Very Popular


In this episode, we're joined by Steve & Gerry from the Something For Nothing: A Rush Fancast, to battle over who created the best playlist for the mighty Rush. Vote now for YOUR favorite playlists, hear the results of past episodes & listen to ALL of the playlists at: http://www.playlistwarspodcast.com If you'd like to support Playlist Wars, then consider becoming a Patreon subscriber: http://www.patreon.com/playlistwars. Tiers include: Patreon exclusive content; early access to ad-free episodes; & join the show as a guest for a "Playlist An Album" mini episode or a full-length episode! SONGS DISCUSSED INCLUDE 2112, The Analog Kid, Animate, Anthem, Available Light, Distant Early Warning, Far Cry, Free Will, The Garden, Headlong Flight, La Villa Strangiato, Limelight, Manhattan Project, Natural Science, One Little Victory, Red Barchetta, The Spirit Of Radio, Subdivisions, Tom Sawyer, Working Man, Xanadu & YYZ AS HEARD IN THE EPISODE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fULwDbZ4iSU CONNECT WITH PLAYLIST WARS Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/playlistwars Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/playlistwars Twitter: http://twitter.com/playlistwars Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/playlistwarspodcast TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@playlistwars CONNECT WITH SOMETHING FOR NOTHING: A RUSH FANCAST Website: https://somethingfornothing.podbean.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RushFancast Twitter: https://twitter.com/RushFanCast Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/therushcast/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/playlistwars/support

Admissions Straight Talk
How to Write Essays That Will Get You Into Medical School: An Expert's Take | Accepted

Admissions Straight Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 23:11


All you need to know about med school admissions [Show Summary] Madison Searle, a published writer, graduate application advisor, and former director of an undergraduate Honors Center at a leading Public Ivy, shares his tips and strategies for medical school applications that lead to acceptance.  Madison Searle, Accepted medical school consultant, talks about how to get accepted [Show Notes] Welcome to the 472nd episode of Admissions Straight Talk. Thanks for tuning in.  Are you ready to apply to your dream medical schools? Are you competitive at your target programs? Accepted's Med School Admissions Quiz can give you a quick reality check. Just go to accepted.com/medquiz, complete the quiz, and you will not only get an assessment but also tips on how to improve your chances of acceptance. Plus it's all free. hbspt.cta.load(58291, '6f21f36c-c988-4e9c-b947-0b9d4af1557f', {"region":"na1"}); Our guest today, Madison Searle, is a published writer, graduate application advisor, and former director of an undergraduate Honors Center at a leading Public Ivy. He earned his Master's in English Lit from UVA and taught writing seminars for students in two honors programs at the College of Natural Sciences at UT Austin in addition to being the director of those programs. Almost all of the students in his seminars were applying to medical school or other healthcare professions. UT conservatively estimated acceptance rates for those programs at around 95%. Today, Madison is an Accepted consultant working with med school and healthcare applicants.  You were an English major and got your Master's in Literature. How did you get involved in med school and science admissions? [2:13] Good question. For the past decade, I've taught two writing seminars to two honors programs that were about 80% premed students. One of the first things I did in that first semester a decade ago was teach autobiographical writing because I knew that's what they were going to be doing for medical school applications. I continued doing that through January of this year and I also worked with countless students on their own medical school application letter. You worked with students individually through the program as well as providing the seminar? [2:47] Correct. Yes. How do you suggest applicants approach the writing portion of the primary application? [2:54] My first bit of advice to any premed student, and I got them early enough in their trajectory that I could give this advice to them, was to keep a daily journal about their premed journey. It would be useful to them in three ways. First, it would help them to simply remember the experiences and thoughts they could draw on for their medical school applications. It would give them practice at writing about their own thoughts and experiences, and it would also help them gain clarity in figuring out and really being able to articulate their motivation for going to medical school.  READ: AMCAS Work and Activities Section: What to Include (With Examples) >> As far as the personal statement itself goes, there are few absolutes in writing and teaching students how to prepare for an essay. But I think that's one of them. You should not just dive into the personal statement. I was working with someone last week who was frustrated with herself because her draft was not to her satisfaction. And she said, “It's such a simple question. This ought to be easy.” Of course, it's not a simple question. It's a very complex question, but I think a lot of students have the idea that the question, "Why do you want to go to medical school?" is obvious. It shouldn't be obvious and it takes most students a good bit of time to get the complex reasons down in a way that feels authentic and honors the significance of that decision they've made to apply to medical school. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lAoOVHmeo1w How many times did you have a student say they want to go to medical sc...

This Academic Life
Ep.33 – Non-Traditional Path to A Tenure-Track Position

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 31:17


Non-traditional path to a tenure-track positionIn this episode, Prof. Schilter talks about his unusual path to a tenure-track position and how his position as a senior editor of Nature Reviews Chemistry is helping his career today as a researcher and educator.   Guest bio: David Schilter attended The University of Sydney, where he received a BS with First Class Honours and the University Medal (2001−2004). He continued at Sydney to pursue graduate work in bio-inorganic and supramolecular chemistry, for which he was awarded a PhD (2005−2009). Combined postdoctoral/lecturing stints at The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (2009−2014) and the Institute for Basic Science (2014−2016) saw him extend his repertoire into bio-organometallics and carbon materials, respectively. This experience was further complemented by his editorial roles at Springer Nature, where he helped launch Nature Reviews Chemistry while also serving at Nature Catalysis and Nature Communications (2016−2021). A passion to return to academia and exploit this diverse knowledge saw him join the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Texas State University as Assistant Professor (2021−). His interests lie in the synthesis and characterization of molecular inorganic complexes relevant to biology and catalysis.   https://www.txstate.edu/chemistry/About-the-Department/Faculty-Profiles/schilter.html     Reference list:   Sponsor: De Gruyter: This episode is sponsored by De Gruyter and its portfolio in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. For “Students and Researchers in Mathematics” De Gruyter's 2022 catalog is now available on This Academic Life website. Contact list: If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org. You can also find us on the webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on Facebook group “This Academic Life”.    Cast list:   Prof. David Schilter (Guest) is a Professor of Chemistry and BioChemistry at Texas State University. Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newell (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah. Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Editing team:   Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) Edited by Angella Chen Edited by Jared Duffy Artwork is created using Canva (canva.com) Support This Academic Life by contributing to their tip jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life

The Inquiry
How do pandemics end?

The Inquiry

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 24:13


After two really difficult years living in the grip of Covid-19, restrictions are winding down and international borders are opening up in countries around the world. Striking the right balance between the needs of a population fed up with lockdowns and scientists warning we've only reached the end of the beginning is complicated to get right. While it may feel like the worst of Covid-19 has passed, the disease still poses a real threat to us. We ignore this fact at our peril. So, in this week's Inquiry Sandra Kanthal will be asking how pandemics really end. Produced and presented by Sandra Kanthal Editor: Richard Vadon Guests: Dr Margaret Harris, Spokesperson, World Health Organisation Nicholas Christakis, Professor of Social and Natural Science, Yale University Aris Katzourakis, Professor of Evolution and Genomics, University of Oxford Dora Vargha, Professor of History and Medical Humanities, University of Exeter (Covid face mask lying on the ground. Getty images)

Citation Needed
The Bone Wars

Citation Needed

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 34:03


The Bone Wars, also known as the Great Dinosaur Rush,[1] was a period of intense and ruthlessly competitive fossil hunting and discovery during the Gilded Age of American history, marked by a heated rivalry between Edward Drinker Cope (of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia) and Othniel Charles Marsh (of the Peabody Museum of Natural History at Yale). Each of the two paleontologists used underhanded methods to try to outdo the other in the field, resorting to bribery, theft, and the destruction of bones. Each scientist also sought to ruin his rival's reputation and cut off his funding, using attacks in scientific publications. Our theme song was written and performed by Anna Bosnick. If you'd like to support the show on a per episode basis, you can find our Patreon page here.  Be sure to check our website for more details.

Love Nature
Bringing Dinosaurs to Life

Love Nature

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 32:04


Julius Csotonyi, Ph.D., is an award-winning natural history artist with a background in ecology and microbiology. Csotonyi illustrates the results of scientific research, providing compelling and accurate visual depictions of dinosaurs and other prehistoric life as well as a variety of living creatures. Csotonyi has collaborated with NC Museum of Natural Sciences researchers on the upcoming Dueling Dinosaurs project, providing beautiful renditions of the Triceratops and Tyrannosaurus specimens. See Csotonyi's vivid murals featured prominently in the Museum's new limited-time special exhibition, “Life Before Dinosaurs: The Permian Monsters,” now open through September 4, 2022. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/lovenature/message

Citation Needed
The Bone Wars

Citation Needed

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 34:03


The Bone Wars, also known as the Great Dinosaur Rush,[1] was a period of intense and ruthlessly competitive fossil hunting and discovery during the Gilded Age of American history, marked by a heated rivalry between Edward Drinker Cope (of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia) and Othniel Charles Marsh (of the Peabody Museum of Natural History at Yale). Each of the two paleontologists used underhanded methods to try to outdo the other in the field, resorting to bribery, theft, and the destruction of bones. Each scientist also sought to ruin his rival's reputation and cut off his funding, using attacks in scientific publications. Our theme song was written and performed by Anna Bosnick. If you'd like to support the show on a per episode basis, you can find our Patreon page here.  Be sure to check our website for more details.

Walkin' on the Wild Side
America's Marvelous but Misunderstood Marsupial with Special Guest Jerry Reynolds

Walkin' on the Wild Side

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 48:36


The "possum-bilities" are endless when we get together with Jerry Reynolds, a wonderful and fun-loving naturalist and "possum-ologist" with the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences.  Join us as we chat, laugh, and marvel at the fascinating facts and biology of North America's only marsupial, the often maligned, but misunderstood Virginia Opossum!  Here's a few websites and resources to learn more:https://www.nwf.org/Magazines/National-Wildlife/2015/AprilMay/Animals/Opossumshttps://mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/field-guide/virginia-opossumhttps://www.ncwildlife.org/Portals/0/Learning/documents/Profiles/opossumvirginia.pdfhttps://www.dnr.sc.gov/wildlife/species/opossum.htmlIf you'd like to follow Jerry Reynolds on Facebook and his awesome posts, videos, and photos:Facebook - Jerry ReynoldsNorth Carolina Museum of Natural SciencesInjured or orphaned wildlife, contact a licensed rehabilitator in your area!  Contact your local state department of natural resources for a licensed rehabilitator list in your area.  Here's some information from the two national opossum societies:https://opossumsocietyus.org/https://www.opossum.org/*At "Walkin' on the Wild Side", we recommend that you contact a licensed rehabilitator immediately when it comes to approaching any injured, abandoned, or orphaned wildlifeInterested in having Marvin and Gabrielle speak at your event?  Email us below for more information!Email us at www.walkingonthewildside21@gmail.comFollow us on our two webpages at:Nature Nook PhotographyWalkin' on the Wild SideYou can listen directly from our website at https://walkinonthewildside.buzzsprout.com, or from any of the major podcast platforms, such as Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Audible, Spotify, iHeart Radio, TuneIn, Stitcher, and more! Subscribe to our podcasts on any of these platforms and leave us a review!We hope you enjoy listening to our podcast and welcome your emails, comments, and feedback.  Hopefully, we will inspire you to get out there and start "Walkin' on the Wild Side"!

Hot Drinks - Stories From The Field
Andrew Cusack (with David Perry): NOLS - $30,000 Blister in the Yukon

Hot Drinks - Stories From The Field

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 88:47


Andrew Cusack was born and raised in Sudbury, ON, and studied Outdoor Recreation and Natural Science at Lakehead University in Thunder Bay, ON. He spent more than ten years working in outdoor education for organizations across Asia and North America, including NOLS Project DEAR, Asia Pacific Adventure, Hong Kong International School, Hong Kong University and Kingfisher Outdoor Education Centre. Upon leaving outdoor education, he worked the following ten years with the United Nations Refugee Agency, responding to humanitarian crises in multiple countries. In 2020 he left the agency and relocated to Victoria, BC, where he now works as a city planner for housing policy. In this episode, David Perry joins us, a former student on the course Andrew and I worked together in the Yukon's Ogilvie Mountains. As you will hear, David was a part of a significant medical evacuation on this course, and I thought it would be nice to bring him on and hear the story from a student's perspective. Currently, David has a unique business making 3D-printed violins, which we touched on in the conversation.  OPENFAB PDWhttps://openfabpdx.com/fiddle/ Full Circle Everst  https://www.fullcircleeverest.com/

This Academic Life
Ep.32 – Social Media in Academia

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 24:46


In this episode we discuss how social media sites and academics go hand in hand. Whether it's promoting your work, making connections, or helping get your students names out there every platform has its benefits and drawbacks. Reference list: Wired Academia: Why Social Science Scholars Are Using Social Media LINK Social Media in Academia LINK Social media for professional development and networking opportunities in academia LINK Academia goes social media, MOOC, SPOC, SMOC and SSOC LINK The social media in academia and education LINK Social media for scientists LINK Sponsor: De Gruyter: This episode is sponsored by De Gruyter and its portfolio in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. For “Students and Researchers in Mathematics” De Gruyter's 2022 catalog is now available on This Academic Life website. Contact list: If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org. You can also find us on the webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on Facebook group “This Academic Life”. Cast list: Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newell (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah. Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Editing team: Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) Edited by Angella Chen Edited by Jared Duffy Artwork is created using Canva (canva.com) Support This Academic Life by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life

This Academic Life
Ep.31 – Managing Your Grants

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 26:47


In this episode, we discuss some frequently asked questions regarding grants management once the funding has arrived at the awarded institution, including: course buyout, summer salary, overspending, and indirect cost recovery (or overhead returns).  Reference list:  OMB Uniform Guidance for Grants and Contract Agreements OMB Uniform Guidance (2014) | GRANTS.GOV Sponsor: De Gruyter: This episode is sponsored by De Gruyter and its portfolio in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. For “Students and Researchers in Mathematics” De Gruyter's 2022 catalog is now available on This Academic Life website.  Contact list:  If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org. You can also find us on the webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on Facebook group “This Academic Life”.  Cast list: Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newell (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah.  Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Editing team:  Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) Edited by Angella Chen  Edited by Jared Duffy Artwork is created using Canva (canva.com) Support This Academic Life by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life

CrossPolitic Studios
Daily News Brief for Tuesday, April 26th, 2022 [Daily News Brief]

CrossPolitic Studios

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 22:14


… and more on today’s CrossPolitic Daily News Brief. This is Toby Sumpter. Today is Tuesday, April 26, 2022. French President Emmanuel Macron won re-election to a second term on Sunday, beating far-right challenger Marine Le Pen. https://twitter.com/SBSNews/status/1518436382946914304?s=20&t=JmyST1xPkVhXKkXGViCwCA Play: 0:00-0:26 The election runoff was a rematch of their 2017 race, when the center-right Macron ran as a fresh face and trounced Le Pen 66.1 percent to 33.9 percent. Sunday's vote was closer but still decisive, with Macron, now running with a clear record, winning 58.5 percent to 41.5 percent. Biden said he felt good about the election, and was looking forward to talking to Macron Monday. https://twitter.com/therecount/status/1518611872139857921?s=20&t=9oZvYhXWZjIpSuf9IksCvw Play Audio Macron said his re-election was a win for "a more independent France and a stronger Europe," although he called it his duty to "respond effectively" to "the anger that has been expressed" in the campaign. Le Pen conceded defeat but said French voters showed they wanted a "strong counter power" to Macron. Is DeSantis Really Fighting or Just Shadow Boxing? Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis signed a bill last Friday that revokes a special tax district which essentially gave Disney governing powers on its theme park land at Orlando. The new law was apparently an act of retribution for Disney's belated opposition to the controversial "Don't Say Gay" law approved just a few weeks earlier by the state's GOP-led legislature. "You're a corporation based in Burbank, California, and you're gonna marshal your economic might to attack the parents of my state," DeSantis said before signing the anti-Disney law. "We view that as a provocation, and we're going to fight back against that." The question is whether this commitment to "fighting back" probably means hurting Florida taxpayers. It's a complicated story, but the gist appears to be that revoking Disney's tax district essentially puts area residents on the hook for more than $1 billion in bonds the company used to pay for things like water service and new roads on its land. Local homeowners could see their taxes jump by 20 percent as a result – to the tune of 163 million per year. Orange County Tax Collector Scott Randolph, a Democrat and the former ranking member of the Florida House finance and tax committee, claims that if Reedy Creek ceases to exist, the residents of his county and neighboring Osceola will have to take on its tens of millions in bond payments and operational expenses currently paid by Disney, but will be left without the ability to collect revenue because the taxing authority will no longer exist. Randolph told FOX Business that could mean an increase in property taxes of 25% if Orange County has to absorb all of it. Florida state Rep. Randy Fine, the Republican who sponsored the legislation, told FOX Business that that argument is "just a scare tactic used by woke politicians." Fine acknowledges that the local entities where Reedy Creek lies will pick up the Reedy Creek's debt once the district is dissolved, but says those local governments can create Municipal Service Taxing Units (MSTU) that would also "pick up the revenue that would be going to pay for the debt." He insists that "There's no impact to taxpayers." Randolph argues that according to Florida statute, the local governments cannot impose MSTUs on Reedy Creek because it is an independent tax district. Therefore, he says, when that incorporated municipality dissolves, Disneywould have no obligation to pay the $163 million each year. Fine says that's why the service taxing units are municipal, and therefore not something handled by the state. "Scott Randolph's job is to open envelopes and to take out checks," the lawmaker told FOX Business. "He probably should stick to that. He doesn't set tax policy." In reply, Randolph said, "Randy Fine doesn't understand basic math." Raldolph says the bill against Disney was rushed through in 48 hours without legislators working out the details, but acknowledges that there is over a year for local municipalities to work out how they will manage the transition. After signing the legislation into law, DeSantis' office issued a statement clarifying that "it is not the understanding or expectation for SB 4-C, abolishing independent special districts, to cause any tax increases for the residents of any area of Florida." The new law undoing Disney's tax district doesn't actually take effect until June 2023, and observers think the company and the state might work out some kind of accommodation by then. The whole incident might end up as little more than a showy, performative in-kind contribution from the Florida Legislature to DeSantis' incipient 2024 presidential campaign. So the question is what is actually going on here? If DeSantis revoking some privileges from Disney, that seems reasonable, since Disney has publicly signaled that they are planning to do more grooming of Florida’s kids. At the same time, dropping a huge tax bill on that region could be detrimental, although maybe not as detrimental as Disney continuing to brainwash the children and families of Florida. At the same time, some transparency on taxes and funding would be nice. And the people of Florida who care about real freedom and virtue should want to see those numbers include indications of putting money and therefore freedom back in the pockets of the people of Florida, not government programs or temporary dispensations from the government. Not so long ago, the American dream was alive and well. Employees who worked hard were rewarded, and employers looked for people who could do the job, not for people who had the right political views. RedBalloon.work is a job site designed to get us back to what made American businesses successful: free speech, hard work, and having fun. If you are a free speech employer who wants to hire employees who focus on their work and not identity politics, then post a job on RedBalloon. If you are an employee who is being censored at work or is being forced to comply with the current zeitgeist, post your resume on RedBalloon and look for a new job. www.redballoon.work, the job site where free speech is still alive! www.redballoon.work Toronto Zoo is Administering COVID-19 Shots to Animals https://globalnews.ca/news/8776124/toronto-zoo-covid-19-vaccines-zoetis/amp/?fbclid=IwAR3DJMOiEPtAlKgmRfGnawJioi1YOANHRKt_BSJi8vF5FYm8RQjs_ly6D0A The Toronto Zoo says it has begun administering COVID-19 vaccines to its most susceptible animals. In a press release issued Thursday, the zoo said it has received COVID-19 vaccines for animals developed and donated by Zoetis. According to the zoo, it has received 320 doses of the vaccine. Each animal will need two doses, administered two-to-three weeks apart. The zoo said it has 120 animals that have already or will soon receive a vaccine, “based on the COVID-19 sensitivity list that has been developed through on-going research and reports of positive cases in other zoos.” The release said zoos in the U.S. have been vaccinating their animals since 2021, adding that “to date there have been no significant adverse effects reported.” According to Dolf DeJong, CEO, Toronto Zoo, the zoo has not seen any positive cases of the virus within it’s animals during the pandemic. “Being able to add this extra layer of protection allows us to continue doing everything we can to provide them with the highest level of protection and medical care,” DeJong said. According to the zoo, animals are given the choice if they want a vaccine or not. Wait. What?! The zoo said animals undergo “positive reinforcement training” adding that many animals “willingly present an area of the body (such as an arm or tail) as part of their training exercises with their trusted keepers, with desirable treats often used as a reward for their participation.” The zoo said the training sessions are voluntary. The zoo said the training allows the animals to participate in other things like X-rays, blood draws, hoof trimming, which “allow the keepers and veterinary team to monitor their health regularly” without “causing the animals any undue stress.” You know this is hilarious. But it’s also full of propaganda. To call what these folks are doing to zoo animals “voluntary” and a “choice” is wicked. Now I don’t think animals need to be given any choices. They need to be cared for as creatures made by God, but man is responsible to take dominion over the creatures, to rule over them in wisdom. But in an evolutionary worldview, human beings are just animals, and so we can be locked in our homes, or in cages, and what is forced upon us can be called voluntary and our free choices, with just enough positive reinforcement training. Lies, Propaganda, Story Telling, and the Serrated Edge DNB: This year our national conference is in Knoxville, TN October 6th-8th. The theme of this year’s conference is Lies, Propaganda, Storytelling and the Serrated Edge. Satan is the father of lies, and the mother of those lies is a government who has rejected God. We have especially been lied to these last two years, and the COVIDpanic has been one of the central mechanisms that our government has used to lie to us and to grab more power. Because Christians have not been reading their bibles, we are susceptible to lies and weak in our ability to fight these lies. God has given us His word to fight Satan and his lies, and we need to recover all of God’s word, its serrated edge and all. Mark your calendars for October 6th-8th, as we fight, laugh and feast with fellowship, beer and Psalms, our amazing lineup of speakers, hanging with our awesome vendors, meeting new friends, and more. Early bird tickets are available to the end of May. Remember: FightLaughFeast Club members get $100 dollars off. https://www.dailywire.com/news/university-offers-tenure-track-only-for-women-non-binary-or-two-spirit-persons University of Waterloo is Trying to Keep Up with the Toronto ZooTheDailyWire Reports: The University of Waterloo is advertising a researcher position exclusively for “qualified individuals who self-identify as women, transgender, non-binary, or two-spirit.” The position at the Canadian university is for a researcher in the Natural Science and Engineering Research Council. While “exceptional” candidates may be considered for an assistant professor position, the advertisement makes it clear that you cannot be one of these candidates if you are a male. “This call is open only to qualified individuals who self-identify as women, transgender, non-binary, or two-spirit.” The term “two-spirit” referring to an Indigenous person who identifies as more than one gender. The university did not immediately respond to requests for comment from The Daily Wire. Applicants are required to “self identify” through a university survey, which first asks applicants to select whether they identify as a woman, a man, transgender, “gender-fluid and/or non-binary,” two-spirit, or “prefer not to answer.” The applicant is then asked to select the option they identify with: asexual, bisexual, gay, lesbian, pansexual, straight or heterosexual, other, or “prefer not to answer.” “Select all that apply,” the survey notes. The University of Waterloo emphasizes that it seeks to attract “outstanding and diverse faculty members with the goal of being recognized as one of the top innovative universities in the world,” noting that “embedding equity, diversity and inclusivity across the research enterprise enhances research excellence.” “As such, we encourage applications from candidates who have been historically disadvantaged and marginalized, including applicants who identify as Indigenous peoples (e.g., First Nations, Métis, Inuit/Inuk), Black, racialized, people with disabilities, women and/or 2SLGBTQ+,” the advertisement says. In the university’s advertisement it notes that the candidate “will propose an innovative program of high-quality research that will attract external funding and excellent, well qualified and diverse graduate students.” “Evidence of an active research program with emphasis on climate and/or climate change science, water science and sustainability, or future cities and a successful record of Tri-Agency research funding, or equivalent, is required,” the advertisement says. “Ability and desire to partner with faculty in closely related fields is required.” Psalm of the Day: Psalm 148 https://www.christkirk.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/18-Psalm-148-From-Heavn-O-Praise.mp3 Play: 0:00-0:41 Amen. This is Toby Sumpter with CrossPolitic News. Remember you can always find the links to our news stories and these psalms at crosspolitic dot com – just click on the daily news brief and follow the links. Or find them on our App: just search “Fight Laugh Feast” in your favorite app store and never miss a show. If this content is helpful to you, would you please consider becoming a Fight Laugh Feast Club Member? We are building a cancel-proof Christian media platform, and we can’t do it without your help. Join today and get a $100 discount at the Fight Laugh Feast conference in Knoxville, TN Oct. 6-8, and have a great day.

Daily News Brief
Daily News Brief for Tuesday, April 26th, 2022

Daily News Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 22:14


… and more on today’s CrossPolitic Daily News Brief. This is Toby Sumpter. Today is Tuesday, April 26, 2022. French President Emmanuel Macron won re-election to a second term on Sunday, beating far-right challenger Marine Le Pen. https://twitter.com/SBSNews/status/1518436382946914304?s=20&t=JmyST1xPkVhXKkXGViCwCA Play: 0:00-0:26 The election runoff was a rematch of their 2017 race, when the center-right Macron ran as a fresh face and trounced Le Pen 66.1 percent to 33.9 percent. Sunday's vote was closer but still decisive, with Macron, now running with a clear record, winning 58.5 percent to 41.5 percent. Biden said he felt good about the election, and was looking forward to talking to Macron Monday. https://twitter.com/therecount/status/1518611872139857921?s=20&t=9oZvYhXWZjIpSuf9IksCvw Play Audio Macron said his re-election was a win for "a more independent France and a stronger Europe," although he called it his duty to "respond effectively" to "the anger that has been expressed" in the campaign. Le Pen conceded defeat but said French voters showed they wanted a "strong counter power" to Macron. Is DeSantis Really Fighting or Just Shadow Boxing? Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis signed a bill last Friday that revokes a special tax district which essentially gave Disney governing powers on its theme park land at Orlando. The new law was apparently an act of retribution for Disney's belated opposition to the controversial "Don't Say Gay" law approved just a few weeks earlier by the state's GOP-led legislature. "You're a corporation based in Burbank, California, and you're gonna marshal your economic might to attack the parents of my state," DeSantis said before signing the anti-Disney law. "We view that as a provocation, and we're going to fight back against that." The question is whether this commitment to "fighting back" probably means hurting Florida taxpayers. It's a complicated story, but the gist appears to be that revoking Disney's tax district essentially puts area residents on the hook for more than $1 billion in bonds the company used to pay for things like water service and new roads on its land. Local homeowners could see their taxes jump by 20 percent as a result – to the tune of 163 million per year. Orange County Tax Collector Scott Randolph, a Democrat and the former ranking member of the Florida House finance and tax committee, claims that if Reedy Creek ceases to exist, the residents of his county and neighboring Osceola will have to take on its tens of millions in bond payments and operational expenses currently paid by Disney, but will be left without the ability to collect revenue because the taxing authority will no longer exist. Randolph told FOX Business that could mean an increase in property taxes of 25% if Orange County has to absorb all of it. Florida state Rep. Randy Fine, the Republican who sponsored the legislation, told FOX Business that that argument is "just a scare tactic used by woke politicians." Fine acknowledges that the local entities where Reedy Creek lies will pick up the Reedy Creek's debt once the district is dissolved, but says those local governments can create Municipal Service Taxing Units (MSTU) that would also "pick up the revenue that would be going to pay for the debt." He insists that "There's no impact to taxpayers." Randolph argues that according to Florida statute, the local governments cannot impose MSTUs on Reedy Creek because it is an independent tax district. Therefore, he says, when that incorporated municipality dissolves, Disneywould have no obligation to pay the $163 million each year. Fine says that's why the service taxing units are municipal, and therefore not something handled by the state. "Scott Randolph's job is to open envelopes and to take out checks," the lawmaker told FOX Business. "He probably should stick to that. He doesn't set tax policy." In reply, Randolph said, "Randy Fine doesn't understand basic math." Raldolph says the bill against Disney was rushed through in 48 hours without legislators working out the details, but acknowledges that there is over a year for local municipalities to work out how they will manage the transition. After signing the legislation into law, DeSantis' office issued a statement clarifying that "it is not the understanding or expectation for SB 4-C, abolishing independent special districts, to cause any tax increases for the residents of any area of Florida." The new law undoing Disney's tax district doesn't actually take effect until June 2023, and observers think the company and the state might work out some kind of accommodation by then. The whole incident might end up as little more than a showy, performative in-kind contribution from the Florida Legislature to DeSantis' incipient 2024 presidential campaign. So the question is what is actually going on here? If DeSantis revoking some privileges from Disney, that seems reasonable, since Disney has publicly signaled that they are planning to do more grooming of Florida’s kids. At the same time, dropping a huge tax bill on that region could be detrimental, although maybe not as detrimental as Disney continuing to brainwash the children and families of Florida. At the same time, some transparency on taxes and funding would be nice. And the people of Florida who care about real freedom and virtue should want to see those numbers include indications of putting money and therefore freedom back in the pockets of the people of Florida, not government programs or temporary dispensations from the government. Not so long ago, the American dream was alive and well. Employees who worked hard were rewarded, and employers looked for people who could do the job, not for people who had the right political views. RedBalloon.work is a job site designed to get us back to what made American businesses successful: free speech, hard work, and having fun. If you are a free speech employer who wants to hire employees who focus on their work and not identity politics, then post a job on RedBalloon. If you are an employee who is being censored at work or is being forced to comply with the current zeitgeist, post your resume on RedBalloon and look for a new job. www.redballoon.work, the job site where free speech is still alive! www.redballoon.work Toronto Zoo is Administering COVID-19 Shots to Animals https://globalnews.ca/news/8776124/toronto-zoo-covid-19-vaccines-zoetis/amp/?fbclid=IwAR3DJMOiEPtAlKgmRfGnawJioi1YOANHRKt_BSJi8vF5FYm8RQjs_ly6D0A The Toronto Zoo says it has begun administering COVID-19 vaccines to its most susceptible animals. In a press release issued Thursday, the zoo said it has received COVID-19 vaccines for animals developed and donated by Zoetis. According to the zoo, it has received 320 doses of the vaccine. Each animal will need two doses, administered two-to-three weeks apart. The zoo said it has 120 animals that have already or will soon receive a vaccine, “based on the COVID-19 sensitivity list that has been developed through on-going research and reports of positive cases in other zoos.” The release said zoos in the U.S. have been vaccinating their animals since 2021, adding that “to date there have been no significant adverse effects reported.” According to Dolf DeJong, CEO, Toronto Zoo, the zoo has not seen any positive cases of the virus within it’s animals during the pandemic. “Being able to add this extra layer of protection allows us to continue doing everything we can to provide them with the highest level of protection and medical care,” DeJong said. According to the zoo, animals are given the choice if they want a vaccine or not. Wait. What?! The zoo said animals undergo “positive reinforcement training” adding that many animals “willingly present an area of the body (such as an arm or tail) as part of their training exercises with their trusted keepers, with desirable treats often used as a reward for their participation.” The zoo said the training sessions are voluntary. The zoo said the training allows the animals to participate in other things like X-rays, blood draws, hoof trimming, which “allow the keepers and veterinary team to monitor their health regularly” without “causing the animals any undue stress.” You know this is hilarious. But it’s also full of propaganda. To call what these folks are doing to zoo animals “voluntary” and a “choice” is wicked. Now I don’t think animals need to be given any choices. They need to be cared for as creatures made by God, but man is responsible to take dominion over the creatures, to rule over them in wisdom. But in an evolutionary worldview, human beings are just animals, and so we can be locked in our homes, or in cages, and what is forced upon us can be called voluntary and our free choices, with just enough positive reinforcement training. Lies, Propaganda, Story Telling, and the Serrated Edge DNB: This year our national conference is in Knoxville, TN October 6th-8th. The theme of this year’s conference is Lies, Propaganda, Storytelling and the Serrated Edge. Satan is the father of lies, and the mother of those lies is a government who has rejected God. We have especially been lied to these last two years, and the COVIDpanic has been one of the central mechanisms that our government has used to lie to us and to grab more power. Because Christians have not been reading their bibles, we are susceptible to lies and weak in our ability to fight these lies. God has given us His word to fight Satan and his lies, and we need to recover all of God’s word, its serrated edge and all. Mark your calendars for October 6th-8th, as we fight, laugh and feast with fellowship, beer and Psalms, our amazing lineup of speakers, hanging with our awesome vendors, meeting new friends, and more. Early bird tickets are available to the end of May. Remember: FightLaughFeast Club members get $100 dollars off. https://www.dailywire.com/news/university-offers-tenure-track-only-for-women-non-binary-or-two-spirit-persons University of Waterloo is Trying to Keep Up with the Toronto ZooTheDailyWire Reports: The University of Waterloo is advertising a researcher position exclusively for “qualified individuals who self-identify as women, transgender, non-binary, or two-spirit.” The position at the Canadian university is for a researcher in the Natural Science and Engineering Research Council. While “exceptional” candidates may be considered for an assistant professor position, the advertisement makes it clear that you cannot be one of these candidates if you are a male. “This call is open only to qualified individuals who self-identify as women, transgender, non-binary, or two-spirit.” The term “two-spirit” referring to an Indigenous person who identifies as more than one gender. The university did not immediately respond to requests for comment from The Daily Wire. Applicants are required to “self identify” through a university survey, which first asks applicants to select whether they identify as a woman, a man, transgender, “gender-fluid and/or non-binary,” two-spirit, or “prefer not to answer.” The applicant is then asked to select the option they identify with: asexual, bisexual, gay, lesbian, pansexual, straight or heterosexual, other, or “prefer not to answer.” “Select all that apply,” the survey notes. The University of Waterloo emphasizes that it seeks to attract “outstanding and diverse faculty members with the goal of being recognized as one of the top innovative universities in the world,” noting that “embedding equity, diversity and inclusivity across the research enterprise enhances research excellence.” “As such, we encourage applications from candidates who have been historically disadvantaged and marginalized, including applicants who identify as Indigenous peoples (e.g., First Nations, Métis, Inuit/Inuk), Black, racialized, people with disabilities, women and/or 2SLGBTQ+,” the advertisement says. In the university’s advertisement it notes that the candidate “will propose an innovative program of high-quality research that will attract external funding and excellent, well qualified and diverse graduate students.” “Evidence of an active research program with emphasis on climate and/or climate change science, water science and sustainability, or future cities and a successful record of Tri-Agency research funding, or equivalent, is required,” the advertisement says. “Ability and desire to partner with faculty in closely related fields is required.” Psalm of the Day: Psalm 148 https://www.christkirk.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/18-Psalm-148-From-Heavn-O-Praise.mp3 Play: 0:00-0:41 Amen. This is Toby Sumpter with CrossPolitic News. Remember you can always find the links to our news stories and these psalms at crosspolitic dot com – just click on the daily news brief and follow the links. Or find them on our App: just search “Fight Laugh Feast” in your favorite app store and never miss a show. If this content is helpful to you, would you please consider becoming a Fight Laugh Feast Club Member? We are building a cancel-proof Christian media platform, and we can’t do it without your help. Join today and get a $100 discount at the Fight Laugh Feast conference in Knoxville, TN Oct. 6-8, and have a great day.

Love Nature
The Art of Science Communication

Love Nature

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 37:14


Welcome to the third season of the Love Nature Podcast. The NC Museum of Natural Sciences is a proud participant of the North Carolina Science Festival, a month-long celebration of science every April. We are kicking off our season with award-winning science communicator, host and producer, Emily Graslie. Emily is a regular host for PBS programs, including the 6-part digital series, “In Our Nature.” As a classically trained violinist and former museum curator, Emily knows science and art are about communication and connection. Hear Emily's perspective and discover how she uses her talents and experiences to advocate for Museums and natural spaces. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/lovenature/message

Big Picture Medicine
#085 I Have More Impact as a VC Than MD — Dr Stephen Reeders (Founder MVM Partners)

Big Picture Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 17, 2022 44:55


Dr Stephen Reeders founded MVM Partners in 1997. They invest in high growth businesses with bases in London and Boston. He's had three different lives— Firstly he obtained a BA in Natural Sciences from Cambridge, before getting his Medical Degree from Oxford and then training as a Doctor in some of the UK's premier institutes such as John Radcliffe, Guys and Queen Square. In part II, he became a Clinical Researcher across both Oxford and some of the US's greatest research houses. For example, just in the infancy of his career, he discovered PKD1 — a gene linked to Polycystic Kidney Disease. The seminal paper was published in Nature in 1985. Finally — in the third act, he moved into the world of business and investment — in which he tackled how to translate some of these discoveries into great businesses that could benefit people at scale. He was also the first investor and acting CEO of UpToDate. In this interview, I try and unpack what made him able to excel in all three acts — and also, why a flourishing Doctor and Clinical Academic would move into the world of investment. I hope you enjoy. You can find me on Twitter @MustafaSultan and subscribe to my newsletter on www.musty.io

This Academic Life
Ep.30 – Overcome Overwork

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 21:03


In this episode, we discuss the culture of overwork and how we can strategize to overcome it. Good reads are listed in the Reference list in this show notes. Reference list: https://voicesofacademia.com/2020/09/04/confronting-the-culture-of-overwork-less-is-more-by-brittany-uhlorn/ https://www.insidehighered.com/advice/2019/12/11/what-interests-do-busyness-and-overwork-academe-serve-opinion https://archeothoughts.wordpress.com/2018/09/21/the-cult-of-overwork-in-academia-a-confessional-post/ https://thevarsity.ca/2021/03/14/opinion-combatting-toxic-academic-culture-work-to-learn-not-work-to-work/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8282063/ Sponsor: De Gruyter: This episode is sponsored by De Gruyter and its portfolio in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. For “Students and Researchers in Mathematics” De Gruyter's 2022 catalog is now available on This Academic Life website. Contact list: If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org. You can also find us on the webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on Facebook group “This Academic Life”. Cast list: Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newell (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah. Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Editing team: Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) Edited by Angella Chen Edited by Jared Duffy Artwork is created using Canva (canva.com) Support This Academic Life by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life

Audio Podcast
CDC New Opioid Guideline – What This Means for the Mito Community

Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 62:06


Learn about the new draft CDC Opioid Guideline, how it impacts the mito community and how you can raise your voice to address important topics still to be decided by the CDC. We will hear from: Charles Mitter, Ph.D. Emeritus Professor, College of Computer, Mathematical and Natural Sciences, University of Maryland; Former Chair, Department of Entomology Caroline Sanders Senior Policy Director, California Pan-Ethnic Health Network George Lippman Social Justice Advocate, Chair of the City of Berkeley Peace and Justice Commission