Podcasts about natural sciences

Branch of science about the natural world

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Latest podcast episodes about natural sciences

The Radio Free Hillsdale Hour
Adam Carrington, Michelle Easton, & Matthew Young

The Radio Free Hillsdale Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 51:11


TOPICS: Past, present, & future Supreme Court cases, HOW TO RAISE A CONSERVATIVE DAUGHTER, & chemistry as part of a liberal arts education. Host Scot Bertram talks with Adam Carrington, Associate Professor of Politics & William and Patricia LaMothe Chair in the U.S. Constitution at Hillsdale College, about recent opinions from the previous U.S. Supreme Court term as well as previewing cases to be argued in the upcoming term. Michelle Easton discusses her recent book HOW TO RAISE A CONSERVATIVE DAUGHTER. And Matthew Young, Dean of Natural Sciences & Associate Professor of Chemistry at Hillsdale, discusses chemistry as part of a liberal arts education.

This Academic Life
Ep.17 – A Rollercoaster Ride: The Life of a Graduate Student

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 24:13


Graduate school can be exciting and yet stressful for a graduate student. In this episode, we talk with a couple of Ph.D. students who are a married couple, Keawepono (Pono) and  Priscilla Delgado Wong. Both Pono and Priscilla are currently biomedical engineering students at Georgia Tech. They share their journeys as graduate students.  Reference list:  Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) Artwork is created using Canva (canva.com)  Contact list:  If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org. You can also find us on webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on facebook group “This Academic Life”.  Cast list: Pono and Priscilla Delgado Wong are currently Ph.D. students in the biomedical engineering department at Georgia Tech.  Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newel (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah.  Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI).Notes here Support This Academic Life by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life

Futility Closet
358-The Radium Girls

Futility Closet

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 30:34


In 1917, a New Jersey company began hiring young women to paint luminous marks on the faces of watches and clocks. As time went on, they began to exhibit alarming symptoms, and a struggle ensued to establish the cause. In this week's episode of the Futility Closet podcast we'll tell the story of the Radium Girls, a landmark case in labor safety. We'll also consider some resurrected yeast and puzzle over a posthumous journey. Intro: Joseph Underwood was posting phony appeals for money in 1833. The earliest known written reference to baseball appeared in England. Sources for our feature on the Radium Girls: Claudia Clark, Radium Girls : Women and Industrial Health Reform, 1910-1935, 1997. Ross M. Mullner, Deadly Glow: The Radium Dial Worker Tragedy, 1999. Robert R. Johnson, Romancing the Atom: Nuclear Infatuation From the Radium Girls to Fukushima, 2012. Dolly Setton, "The Radium Girls: The Scary but True Story of the Poison that Made People Glow in the Dark," Natural History 129:1 (December 2020/January 2021), 47-47. Robert D. LaMarsh, "The Radium Girls: The Dark Story of America's Shining Women," Professional Safety 64:2 (February 2019), 47. Angela N.H. Creager, "Radiation, Cancer, and Mutation in the Atomic Age," Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences 45:1 (February 2015), 14-48. Robert Souhami, "Claudia Clark, Radium Girls," Medical History 42:4 (1998), 529-530. Ainissa Ramirez, "A Visit With One of the Last 'Radium Girls,'" MRS Bulletin 44:11 (2019), 903-904. "Medicine: Radium Women," Time, Aug. 11, 1930. "Poison Paintbrush," Time, June 4, 1928. "Workers From Factory May Get Federal Honors," Asbury Park Press, June 27, 2021. John Williams, "Tell Us 5 Things About Your Book: Kate Moore's 'The Radium Girls,'" New York Times, April 30, 2017. Jack Brubaker, "Those 'Radium Girls' of Lancaster," [Lancaster, Pa.] Intelligencer Journal / Lancaster New Era, May 9, 2014. William Yardley, "Mae Keane, Whose Job Brought Radium to Her Lips, Dies at 107," New York Times, March 13, 2014. Fred Musante, "Residue From Industrial Past Haunts State," New York Times, June 24, 2001. Denise Grady, "A Glow in the Dark, and a Lesson in Scientific Peril," New York Times, Oct. 6, 1998. Martha Irvine, "Dark Secrets Come to Light in New History of 'Radium Girls,'" Los Angeles Times, Oct. 4, 1998. Marc Mappen, "Jerseyana," New York Times, March 10, 1991. "Radium Poisoning Finally Claims Inventor of Luminous Paint After Fight to Harness Terrific Force of Atom," Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Nov. 25, 1928. "Two of Women Radium Victims Offer Selves for Test While Alive," [Danville, Va.] Bee, May 29, 1928. "Death Agony From Radium," [Brisbane, Qld.] Daily Standard, May 15, 1928. "To Begin Two Suits Against Radium Co.," New York Times, June 24, 1925. "U.S. Starts Probe of Radium Poison Deaths in Jersey," Brooklyn Daily Eagle, June 19, 1925. Listener mail: Carolyn Wilke, "How Do We Know What Ancient People Ate? Their Dirty Dishes," Atlantic, July 24, 2021. Chris Baraniuk, "The Treasure Inside Beer Lost in a Shipwreck 120 Years Ago," BBC, June 22, 2021. Fiona Stocker, "A Beer Brewed From an Old Tasmanian Shipwreck," BBC, Dec. 7, 2018. Mary Esch, "Taste of History: Yeast From 1886 Shipwreck Makes New Brew," AP News, March 15, 2019. National Collection of Yeast Cultures. "National Collection of Yeast Cultures," Wikipedia (accessed Aug. 29, 2021). "History of Missing Linck," Missing Linck Festival (accessed Sep. 3, 2021). "Missing Linck Festival Arrives … Finally!" The Gnarly Gnome, June 4, 2021. This week's lateral thinking puzzle was contributed by listener Tim Ellis, who sent this corroborating link (warning -- this spoils the puzzle). You can listen using the player above, download this episode directly, or subscribe on Google Podcasts, on Apple Podcasts, or via the RSS feed at https://futilitycloset.libsyn.com/rss. Please consider becoming a patron of Futility Closet -- you can choose the amount you want to pledge, and we've set up some rewards to help thank you for your support. You can also make a one-time donation on the Support Us page of the Futility Closet website. Many thanks to Doug Ross for the music in this episode. If you have any questions or comments you can reach us at podcast@futilitycloset.com. Thanks for listening!

American Indian Airwaves
Mauna Kea & the NSF, State Violence, Targeting Elders, Militarization, & Tourism Escalates COVID-19

American Indian Airwaves

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 58:57


Liko Martin and Laulani Teale (Hawaiian Nation). Liko Martin, Haku Mele, is one of Hawai'i's renowned songwriters and activist; founder and co-founder of many Indigenous organizations; a farmer, fisherman, cultural practitioner, peacemaker and veteran; a Kupuna Advisor for Ho'opae Pono Peace Project, plus more. Laulani Teale is a musician, artist, cultural practitioner, public health practitioner, web/social media developer, and coordinator for the Ho'opae Pono Peace Project, plus more. Liko Martin and Laulani Teale join us for this exclusive one-hour interview regarding protecting Mauna Kea, an Indigenous Hawaiian sacred site, from the $1.4 billion Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) Project – twenty stories high (below and above ground). Our guests provide an update on the United States National Science Foundation's new and committed involvement in supporting the TMT project, its implications for the Indigenous peoples of Hawaii. In addition, our guests articulate how the TMT project if developed will result in the destruction and further desecration of Mauna Kea, a sacred site, the disastrous adversities suffered by all the flora and fauna relations as well as the profound amount of water pollution resulting from TMT project. Our guests provide an update on some of the Kupuna's court cases resulting from being arrested when defending Mauna Kea, how the Hawaiian state tourist industry is contributing to escalating COVID-19 rates, and the further usurpation, dispossession, theft, and pollution by the U.S. military in militarization Indigenous peoples' traditional homelands. The University of California along with the California Institute of Technology (Cal-Tech), the National Institutes of Natural Sciences of Japan, the National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the Department of Science and Technology of India, and the National Research Council (Canada); the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy are members of The TMT International Observatory LLC (TIO), the non-profit organization responsible for the TMT Project threatening Mauna Kea. American Indian Airwaves regularly broadcast Thursdays from 7pm to 8pm (PCT) on KPFK FM 90.7 in Los Angeles, CA; FM 98.7 in Santa Barbara, CA; FM 99.5 in China Lake, CA; FM 93.7 in North San Diego, CA; FM 99.1 KLBP in Long Beach, CA (Tuesdays, 11am-12pm); and WCRS FM 98.3/102.1 in Columbus, OH. Click here for archived American Indian Airwaves programs on the KPFK website within the past 60-days only or click on (below) after 8pm for today's scheduled program. Soundcloud Apple Podcast Google Podcast iHeartRadio Spotify Podcast Stitcher Podcast Tunein Podcast

This Academic Life
Ep.16 – Exploring Undergraduate Research

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 30:37


Have you ever wondered about doing undergraduate research? In this show, we learn about the benefit of doing undergraduate research from Prof. Cynthia Furse, a professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of Utah. She has mentored more than 175 students throughout her career and in this show, she shares her thoughts about all aspects of undergraduate research.  Reference list:  Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) Artwork is created using Canva (canva.com)  References for listeners:  https://www.ece.utah.edu/undergraduate-research/ Contact list:  You can find more information about Prof. Cynthia Furse on https://utah.instructure.com/courses/558911 https://faculty.utah.edu/u0029376-CYNTHIA_M_FURSE/hm/index.hml If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org. You can also find us on webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on facebook group “This Academic Life”.  Cast list: Prof. Cynthia Furse (guest) is a professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of Utah.  Dr. Furse is a Fellow of the IEEE and the National Academy of Inventors. Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newel (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah.  Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) Support This Academic Life by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life

Progress, Potential, and Possibilities
Dr. Harold Katcher, PhD - Chief Scientific Officer - Yuvan Research - Rejuvenative Plasma Fractions

Progress, Potential, and Possibilities

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 40:23


 Dr. Harold Katcher is the Chief Scientific Officer at Yuvan Research Inc., a biotech company exploring the development of novel, young plasma fraction rejuvenation treatments in mammals. Most recently Dr. Katcher was the Academic Director for Natural Sciences for the Asian Division of the University of Maryland Global Campus and throughout his career, Dr. Katcher has been a pioneer in the field of cancer research, and in the development of modern aspects of gene hunting and sequencing (including as one of the discoverers of the breast cancer gene BRCA1) as part of Myriad Genetics, and carries expertise in bioinformatics, chronobiology, and biotechnology. Dr. Katcher has thousands of citations in the scientific literature, with publications ranging from protein structure to bacteriology, biotechnology, bioinformatics and biochemistry. Dr. Katcher is launching his new book “The Illusion of Knowledge” on September 4th, 2021. 

EcoJustice Radio
No More Joshua Trees? Climate Change in the Desert

EcoJustice Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 71:46


The Joshua tree is an icon and ecological keystone of the California deserts. However, climate disruption with hotter, drier summers and more frequent brush fires, threatens that some day soon Joshua Tree National Park will no longer have any Joshua trees. In fact, many other important desert plants and animals face an uncertain future. There exist so many unique symbiotic relationships, from the ocotillo blossoms and migrating hummingbirds to the spiny teddy bear cholla and the innovative woodrat. We discuss these systems and investigate what solutions are needed. Are solar farms in the desert an appropriate renewable energy solution, or do they cause more harm than good? What about the consequences of lithium mining in Death Valley for electric vehicles? Did you know it is not a wise idea to grow your own Joshua Tree from imported seeds? Our guest today, James Cornett [https://www.amazon.com/kindle-dbs/entity/author/B001K84BWE], is an ecologist and principal biologist at JWC Ecological Consultants. He is one of the West's most prolific writers with more than forty-four books published as of 2021. As former Director of Natural Sciences at the Palm Springs Desert Museum, he continues to share his love of natural history through writing, teaching, and lecturing. He is the first professional naturalist to have visited all nine of the world's great deserts and is writing a book on his travels and research in each. Podcast Website: http://ecojusticeradio.org/ Podcast Blog: https://www.wilderutopia.com/category/ecojustice-radio/ Support the Podcast: https://socal350.org/contribute-to-socal-350-climate-action/ Executive Producer: Jack Eidt Host/Producer: Jessica Aldridge Engineer: Blake Lampkin Show Created by Mark and JP Morris Music: Javier Kadry Episode 111 Image: Stephanie Lemus

Beyond the Bench: STEMulating Career Conversations
SC113: Vernon R. Morris, PhD-- Atmospheric Scientist and Founder of The Color of Weather (Part 1)

Beyond the Bench: STEMulating Career Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 45:13


His scientific curiosity can be traced back to being a two year old military kid playing in his desert backyard catching snakes and gila monsters.  His major in chemistry was the result of a chance meeting in the hallway of a building at his undergraduate college.  These two events eventually led Dr. Vernon Morris to pursue, not only an undergraduate degree in chemistry and mathematics, but also PhD in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences.  A well-respected and highly accomplished researcher in his field, Dr. Morris is now Director and Professor in the School of Mathematical and Natural Sciences at Arizona State University. You can find out more about Dr. Morris via https://newcollege.asu.edu/vernon-morris Be sure to join in for Part Two, when we discuss more of The Color of Weather.

This Academic Life
Ep.15 – Quantum Education

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 23:25


Have you heard of quantum education? In this show, we learn about it from Dr. Tina Brower-Thomas, a research professor in the graduate school at Howard University. She also holds a visiting faculty appointment at Harvard University. At the forefront of national quantum education, she shares with us how she got into this field and some initiatives she is currently leading.  Reference list:  Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) Artwork is created using Canva (canva.com)  References for listeners:  http://ciqm.harvard.edu/staff.html https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8G1T7UGNo58 https://www.google.com/search?q=number+of+black+female+scientists+in+the+united+states&rlz=1C1GGRV_enUS791US791&oq=number+of+black+female+scientists+in+the+united+states&aqs=chrome..69i57.47910j1j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8  https://ncses.nsf.gov/pubs/nsf21321  https://ncses.nsf.gov/pubs/nsf21321/data-tables  https://ncses.nsf.gov/pubs/nsf19304/digest/field-of-degree-minorities#blacks-or-african-americans https://www.quantum.gov/  Contact list:  You can find more information about Dr. Tina Brower-Thomas on https://profiles.howard.edu/profile/39526/tina-louise-brower-thomas  If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org. You can also find us on webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on facebook group “This Academic Life”.  Cast list: Dr. Tina Brower-Thomas (guest) is a research professor in the graduate school at Howard University. She's the Executive Director of CIQM (Center of Integrated Quantum Materials) at Howard and Education Director.   Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newel (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah.  Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Support This Academic Life by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life

Higher Density Living Podcast
Plejaren Revelations Part 2 - Plejaren Spirit Teaching Series

Higher Density Living Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 27:57


Natural Sciences are the main focus of this episode. From Quantum Mechanics to Chemistry, Astronomy, and Biology, Alex-Jason takes us unto every wonder of the natural world in conjunction with Plejaren insights and teachings. The time has come for history to open the world up with Alien contact and extraterrestrial life. Higher Density Living is upon us. Let's join Alex-Jason together as we discuss and tackle back for another series of Billy Meier and Extraterrestrial Wisdom. Learn to know the social reality of Mankind. www.higherdensityliving.com

This Academic Life
Ep.14 – Midcareer Burnout

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 24:05


Mid-career development can be a daunting and challenging in an academic career. With much emphasis on junior faculty, and also senior faculty who take leadership roles, mid-career development is often overlooked. A mid-career burnout resulting in a career slump can occur to many of us. As hard as we try to avoid admitting or even talking about struggles and challenges we face as mid-career, the reality is - it is real and if you experience it - you are not alone. In this show, we interview Prof. Michelle Portman, Associate Professor of Technion Israel Institute of Technology, leading the MarCoast Ecosystems Integration Laboratory. She shares her academic journey particularly during her mid-career and provides some advice on how to face and overcome mid-career burnout. Reference list: Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) Artwork is created using Canva (canva.com) References for reviewers: https://science.sciencemag.org/content/348/6240/1282/tab-pdf https://hbr.org/2019/03/facing-your-mid-career-crisis Contact list: You can find more information about Prof. Michelle Portman on https://portman.net.technion.ac.il If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org. You can also find us on webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on facebook group “This Academic Life”. Cast list: Prof. Michelle Portman (guest) is an Associate Professor at Technion Israel Institute of Technology. https://portman.net.technion.ac.il Her column “You'll be OK” appeared in Science Working Life can be found here https://science.sciencemag.org/content/348/6240/1282/tab-pdf Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newel (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah. Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Support This Academic Life by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life

Ngobrol Dilit CfDS
Difussion #56 - With EngageMedia : Does AI Violate Human Rights?

Ngobrol Dilit CfDS

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 69:27


Pembicara 1. Jun E-Tan (Researcher EngageMedia) 2. Yunita Sari (Researcher and Lecturer at The Faculty Of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, UGM) Moderator Treviliana Eka Putri (Research Manager CfDS)

Decoding Superhuman
Predicting The Future: What Can You Learn from Testing Glycans? with Gordan Lauc

Decoding Superhuman

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 48:10


Dr. Gordon Lauc is the world's leading glycan researcher. In this podcast, Boomer sits down with Dr. Lauc to understand the function of glycans, how glycan testing is currently being used, why glycans are not mainstream and how they may serve as an indicator of future incidences. Are glycans the future of predictive testing? Check it out in this episode. Who is Gordan Lauc? Dr Gordan Lauc is Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Zagreb Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry and founder and CEO of Genos Ltd. He graduated molecular biology at the University of Zagreb Faculty of Science in 1992, and obtained PhD in Biochemistry and the University of Zagreb in 1995. He got his postdoctoral training at the Institute for Medical Physics and Biophysics in Münster and Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. Since 1993 he is employed at the Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry in Zagreb. Between 1998 and 2010 he was also part-time employed at the University of Osijek School of Medicine where he founded DNA laboratory for the identification of war victims and also served as Vice-Dean for Science between 2001 and 2005. Dr Lauc is author of over 100 research papers published in international journals and six international patents. He was invited to lecture at numerous international conferences, elected for visiting professor at the Johns Hopkins University and in 2011 also inducted in the prestigious Johns Hopkins Society of Scholars. If 2012 he was appointed Honorary Professor at the University of Edinburgh and Adjunct Professor at the Edith Cowan University in Perth.He chaired a number of conferences, including the “European Science Foundation Exploratory Workshop on Glycoscience” which resulted in the creation of the “European Glycoscience Forum”. Professor Lauc was a chairman of the committee that prepared Croatian National Action plan for the increased investment in research in development (2007), and was a member of the National Science Council between 2009 and 2013 and also and President of the National Council for Natural Sciences. He is a President-elect of the International Glycoscience Organization and member of the Steering Committee of the European Glycoscience Forum.Highlights[4:11] What are glycans?[8:01] Glycans in proteomics and genomics[10:40] What do glycans do in our bodies?[17:30] Genomes, epigenomes and metabolism[20:00] How fast do glycans shift?[23:02] Can glycans predict your health future? [30:12] Predicting risk of cardiovascular disease[36:00] Using glycans to halt or reverse health conditions[38:30] Lifestyle modifications to improve your glycansResourcesLongevity Episode with Dr. Aubrey De Gray https://www.decodingsuperhuman.com/episode/aubreyGlycanAge - https://glycanage.com/SponsorsTroscriptionsOne of my favorite tools for cognitive enhancement, especially after long plan rides, is Blue Cannatine. The delivery mechanism is unique (buccle troche). It is especially effective for me on improving short-term memory, focus, and verbal fluency.It's the closest thing that I found to NZT and I think you guys should try it out. Get yours at https://troscriptions.com/ and use code BOOMER for 10% off.Full disclosure: I am involved with the company (I like the product that much).GlycanAgeI'm fascinated with Biological Age. Our guest today dives deep into glycans and their potential role in biological age. GlycanAge uses glycans as a predictive measure to determine your biological age.If you want to try out GlycanAge for yourself, or perhaps for your clients, you can go to https://glycanage.com/ and just order a test.Self-knowledge inspires change - it's time you take control of your health.Continue Your High Performance JourneyWebsite https://glycanage.com/Twitter https://twitter.com/gordanlaucLinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/gordanlauc/?originalSubdomain=hrDisclaimer This information is being provided to you for educational and informational purposes only. This is being provided as a self-help tool to help you understand your genetics, biodata and other information to enhance your performance. It is not medical or psychological advice. Virtuosity LLC, or Decoding Superhuman, is not a doctor. Virtuosity LLC is not treating, preventing, healing, or diagnosing disease. This information is to be used at your own risk based on your own judgment. For the full Disclaimer, please go to (Decodingsuperhuman.com/disclaimer). See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Good Faith Weekly
Good Faith Weekly, 07/23/2021 - Dr. Amber Schmidtke on Covid and Skye Perryman on Democracy Forward

Good Faith Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 55:24


A weekly podcast exploring stories at the intersection of faith and culture through an inclusive Christian lens. This week Mitch and Autumn talk about the Delta Variant.Dr. Amber Schmidtke joins the show to discuss recent Covid-19 developments. Dr. Schmidtke did her post-doctoral fellowship at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and is the new Division Chair of Natural Sciences and Mathematics at the University of Saint Mary.Later, Skye Perryman, a lawyer, advocate, and leader with a track record of taking on and winning critical fights that advance democratic values educates us all on the current state of our nation. Skye was recently named President and CEO of Democracy Forward Foundation in June 2021.

This Academic Life
Ep.13 – Which Q comes first: Quality or Quantity?

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021


Episode Notes We all have heard the phrase “Publish or Perish”, but what does it really mean in our today's academic life? In this show, we interview Prof. Stephane Bordas, Professor of Computational Mechanics at University of Luxemburg, to talk about Quality vs Quantity related to scientific publishing. He has published more than 200 journal articles and has served as the editor of a few journals. He will share some insights on which Q comes first when it comes to publishing scientific documents. Reference list:  Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) Artwork is created using Canva (canva.com)  References for listeners:  https://www.scribendi.com/academy/articles/publish_or_perish.en.html https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0166149 http://homes.sice.indiana.edu/filiradi/Mypapers/1-s2.0-S1751157715200120-main.pdf Contact list:  If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org. You can also find us on webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on facebook group “This Academic Life”.  Cast list: Prof. Stephane Bordas (guest) is a Professor of Computational Mechanics at University of Luxemburg. https://wwwfr.uni.lu/recherche/fstm/doe/members/stephane_bordas. Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newel (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah.  Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Support This Academic Life by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life

Increments
#28 (C&R Series, Ch. 9) - Why is Logic Applicable to Reality?

Increments

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 61:25


Why do logic and mathematics work so well in the world? Why do they seem to describe reality? Why do they they enable us to design circuit boards, build airplanes, and listen remotely to handsome and charming podcast hosts who rarely go off topic? To answer these questions, we dive into Chapter 9 of Conjectures and Refutations: Why are the Calculi of Logic and Arithmetic Applicable to Reality?. But before we get to that, we touch on some of the good stuff: evolutionary psychology, cunnilingus, and why Robin is better than Batman. References: Ben on Do Explain with Christofer Lovgren (https://www.doexplain.org/episodes/311-nonuniversal-explainers-with-ben-chugg) Debate (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Hb3oe7-PJ8&ab_channel=HarvardUniversity) between Spelke and Pinker Very Bad Wizards discussing the paper "Oral Sex as Infidelity detection" (episode (https://www.verybadwizards.com/216), paper (https://www.toddkshackelford.com/downloads/Pham-Shackelford-PAID-2013.pdf)). [Sturgeon's Law](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sturgeon%27s_law#:~:text=Sturgeon's%20law%20(or%20Sturgeon's%20revelation,science%20fiction%20author%20and%20critic.) Eugene Wigner's paper (https://www.maths.ed.ac.uk/~v1ranick/papers/wigner.pdf) The Unreasonable Effective of Mathematics in the Natural Sciences. Stoic versus Aristotilian logic. Here (https://www.uvm.edu/~jbailly/courses/196Stoicism/notes/StoicLogic.html) is a nice discussion of the differences between the two. Rob Wiblin's tweet (https://twitter.com/robertwiblin/status/1345800502093766657) that all probabilities are subjective probabilities (in an otherwise very good thread). Buhler's three functions of language: (i) Expressive, (ii) Signaling, and (iii) Descriptive. See the "Organon Model" (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organon_model#:~:text=B%C3%BChler's%20work%20influenced%20Roman%20Jakobson,the%20representation%20function%20(Darstellungsfunktion)). Piece (https://www.skeptic.org.uk/2021/06/youre-probably-not-galileo-scientific-advance-rarely-comes-from-lone-contrarian-outsiders/) on Brett Weinstein and Ivermectin. Quotes: _“The indescribable world I have in mind is, of course, the world I have ‘in my mind'—the world which most psychologists (except the behaviourists) attempt to describe, somewhat unsuccessfully, with the help of what is nothing but a host of metaphors taken from the languages of physics, of biology, and of social life.” _ _“In so far as a calculus is applied to reality, it loses the character of a logical calculus and becomes a descriptive theory which may be empirically refutable; and in so far as it is treated as irrefutable, i.e. as a system of logically true formulae, rather than a descriptive scientific theory, it is not applied to reality.” _ Send us the most bizarre use of evolutionary psychology you've seen at incrementspodcast@gmail.com.

Will’s World
Will & Jessica Tour the NC Museum of Natural Sciences, Episode 25

Will’s World

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 11:43


#MuseumofNaturalSciences #Tour Ever wonder what's inside the NC Museum of Natural Sciences? We got you! Let Will and Jessica tour you to this amazing place and meet amazing creatures-- from wasps to sloths to dinosaurs! Don't forget to like and subscribe! You may also visit our website at www.willsworldchannel.com

This Academic Life
Ep.12 – Myths and Realities of Academic Administration

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021 31:02


In this episode, we talk to Prof. Linda Schadler, the Dean of College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences at the University of Vermont, on the myths and realities of academic administration. She shares with us her path of becoming an administrator and then a dean of an engineering college. She spells out some myths about academic administration and the realities and surprises she faces at this position.  Reference list:  Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) Artwork is created using Canva (canva.com)  Contact list:  If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org.  You can also find us on webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on facebook group “This Academic Life”.  Cast list: Prof. Linda Schadler (guest) is a Dean of the College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences at the University of Vermont. https://www.uvm.edu/cems/profiles/linda-s-schadler  Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newel (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah.  Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI).  Support This Academic Life by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life

Swag Bender with Dr. Dariel
Swag Bender Episode 034 “A conversation about Anthropology and Activism with an Asian and African American perspective” with Dr. Linda Ziegenbein

Swag Bender with Dr. Dariel "DT" Henry

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2021 50:41


Dr. Linda Ziegenbein is an experienced higher education professional dedicated to making our institutions deserving of our students. She is skilled in project development and implementation, budget management, teaching, and public speaking. An anthropologist working in STEM, she brings a social science perspective to re-thinking STEM education. She is currently the Interim Director for the Office of Student Success & Diversity in the College of Natural Sciences at UMass Amherst. Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/linda.ziegenbein Twitter: @LindaZiegenbein IG: @lindamz LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lindaziegenbein/

This Academic Life
Ep.11 – School kids ask

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2021 26:39


In this episode, we interview two school kids, Kingston (a 7th grader) and Phenix (a 4th grader), from Durham, NC. They ask us some great questions about how college works and what a professors' life looks like, and the process to pursue a STEM career. Reference list: Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) Contact list: If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org. You can also find us on webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on facebook group “This Academic Life”. Cast list: Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newel (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah. Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Support This Academic Life by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life

Crucial Listening
#79: Dalibor Cruz

Crucial Listening

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2021 80:20


Slipping into the bloodstream, navigating hell, addictive polyrhythms. The Honduran-American producer discusses three important albums.Pablo's picks:Muslimgauze – Hussein Mahmood Jeeb Tehar GassPaul Schütze – New Maps Of HellLos Roland's – Solo Exitos Vol. 2The new Dalibor Cruz album, Riddled With Absence, is out now via Natural Sciences – check it out here. Follow Dalibor Cruz on Instagram.

Drunk on Porpoise
A "Bright Green Future" With Trevor Cohen

Drunk on Porpoise

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2021 49:12


"As climate change shifts our planet towards an uncertain future, a movement of unlikely heroes are building a blueprint for a better world. It's a world where clean power grows wealth for local communities, resources regenerate themselves, city planning is driven by the people, and healthy soil is our greatest asset" - Bright Green FutureThis week we sat down with author Trevor Cohen, co-author of Bright Green Future. He shares his stories of meeting the unlikely heroes that are working towards creating a better future for our planet, and at the same time inspiring its readers to do the same. 

Thoughts on Record: Podcast of the Ottawa Institute of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy
Dr. Andrea Ashbaugh, C.Psych: Working With Beliefs Around Emotions

Thoughts on Record: Podcast of the Ottawa Institute of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 72:31


The beliefs held around emotions can lead individuals to resist and deny their internal experience.  This can have many potential downstream implications for being able to cope effectively, being properly attuned to one's needs, and remaining effective in the face of difficult interpersonal situations.  Former president of the Canadian Association for Cognitive Behavioural Therapies,  Dr. Andrea Ashbaugh, C.Psych joins us for a discussion around assessing, conceptualizing and working with client's beliefs around emotions.  In this discussion we cover:     the kinds of clinical experiences or observations which have led Dr. Ashbaugh to become  interested in addressing the beliefs clients hold about emotions  the factors (e.g., early life experiences, temperament) that can shape one's stance towards emotionsprototypically "western" vs "eastern"  views about psychological & physical paincues for the clinician that it is time to start to work on beliefs about emotionscommon types of beliefs about emotions that can cause challengesclinical presentations where clients may be more likely to experience challenging beliefs around emotionshow perceptions around certainty influences the capacity to tolerate emotionsthe impact of our emotional state on perceptionsthe cognitive & behavioural strategies that can be used for beliefs about the dangers of expressing negative emotions to others the cognitive & behavioural strategies that can be used for beliefs about feeling negative emotions caveats around the role of medication in the context of psychotherapy focused on helping clients negotiate their relationship with emotionsthe potential utility of a transdiagnostic approach to working with emotions the role of values & curiosity in helping clients to explore unpleasant emotions Dr. Andrea Ashbaugh, C.Psych is an associate professor in the School of Psychology at the University of Ottawa and is a licensed clinical psychologist in the province of Ontario, Canada. She obtained her master's and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada and completed a post-doctoral fellowship in the Department of Psychiatry at McGill University and the Douglas Mental Health University Institute, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.She is director of the Cognition and Anxiety Studies Laboratory (CASL) and the Sex and Anxiety Research Group (SAX-RG). Her research interests as part of CASL centre around understanding the causes and developing treatments for anxiety and fear-related problems. She has recently started a program of research to understand the causes and psychological effects of experiencing traumatic and non-traumatic events that transgress one's moral beliefs in military personnel and veterans. Her research in the context of the SAX-RG centres around the impact of beliefs about arousal sensations and context on the interpretation of arousal, and its impact on sexual interest and functioning. She has received funding for her research broadly including from Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.Dr. Ashbaugh regularly supervises CBT training and teaches courses on psychopathology and clinical psychology at both the graduate and undergraduate level. She has served on the Editorial Boards of Psychological Assessment. She is currently an Associate Editor for the Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry and editorial board member for Behaviour Research and Therapy. She is a former president of the Canadian Association for Cognitive and Behavioural Therapies (CACBT) and was seminal in the development of national CBT training guidelines that were released by CACBT in May 2019.

The Smart 7
Ep 363. The Sunday 7 - Brood X Cicadas, Encrypted Criminals, Sick Bats and the Man a Whale ate...

The Smart 7

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2021 15:34


Today's episode includes the following guests:Professor Oliver Jones, RMIT University in Melbourne AustraliaHaroon Malik, Cyber Security Director at 6ClicksDr Kelsey Moreno, Tel Aviv UniversityGene Kritsky, Dean of Behavioural and Natural Sciences at Mount St Joseph UniversityDr Chris Van Tulleken, BBC Documentary presenterDr Katie Andrews from the World Mosquito ProgrammeMichael Packard, Modern Day Jonah, Provincetown, Massachusetts The Smart 7 is a daily podcast that puts your brain into gear by telling you everything you need to know for the day in less than 7 minutes. It's a snapshot of the world, covering everything from politics to entertainment, via sport and current affairs.Please follow and spread the word!In Ireland? Why not try our Ireland Edition?You need the Smarts? We've got the Smarts.Contact us over at Twitter or visit www.thesmart7.comPresented by Jamie East, written by Liam Thompson and produced by Daft Doris. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

HouseSmarts Radio with Lou Manfredini
HouseSmarts Radio with Lou Manfredini – Summer cicadas

HouseSmarts Radio with Lou Manfredini

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2021


Dr. Gene Kritsky, Dean, School of Behavioral and Natural Sciences at Mount St. Joseph – Everything you need to know about these noisy summer insects. For more information visit http://genekritsky.com/

Pivots
Ernest Dollar: City of Raleigh Museum

Pivots

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2021 29:35


It's been said repeatedly that we are living in historic times but how can historic times help us navigate this one. For that, we turned to Ernest Dollar, Executive Director of the City of Raleigh and Pope House Museum so we can learn more about what history can tell us now and how it can help us move forward. In this episode, we cover…Ernest's definition of a pivot (3:42)The role of history museums post-pandemic (8:00)“History doesn't repeat itself but it often rhymes” (13:06)Can the end of the 1918 pandemic inform us on how this one will end? (22:06)“History has taught me that ‘it too shall pass.” (24:27)About Ernest: Ernest Dollar is a triangle native and has spent most of his work in the history museum field since his first director job in 2001 at the Orange County Historical Museum in Hillsborough. He serves as the Executive Director of the City of Raleigh and Pope House MuseumLinksLearn More about the City of Raleigh Museum Learn more about the Pope House Museum Article on Ernest Dollar from Walter MagazineFollow the City of Raleigh Museum on Facebook (City of Raleigh Museum), Twitter (@CORMuseumFriend), and Instagram (@cormuseumfriends)Related Podcast Episode: Our conversation with Eric Dorfman, Director/CEO of NC Museum of Natural Sciences included a bit about where he sees the future of Natural History Museums. He even edited a book about it. 

This Academic Life
Ep.10 – Jennifer Granholm's Visit to Howard University: Research Infrastructure at HBCUs

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2021 19:56


In this episode, we discuss Jennifer Granholm's visit to Howard University and the panel she had with Kim on it. Discussing topics ranging from promises to increase funding to Kim being quoted in a Washington Post article.  Reference list:    https://www.vuu.edu/Content/Uploads/vuu.edu/images/Pledge%20of%20Allegiance%20FINAL.pdf The Panel(Kim's Section is around 17 minutes) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=33iP7BzZoC4&t=1040 https://www.washingtonpost.com/education/2021/05/03/howard-university-stem-research/ Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) Contact list:    If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org. You can also find us on webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on facebook group “This Academic Life”.    Cast list: Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newel (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah.  Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI).  Support This Academic Life by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

Thoughts on Record: Podcast of the Ottawa Institute of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

While "body and mind" have at times been regarded as separate entities, it is now abundantly clear that the brain & body are continuous elements of a massively interconnected system.  Preeminent professor, researcher & lecturer in the field of behavioural neuroscience, Dr. Hymie Anisman, joins Dr. Pete Kelly, C.Psych for a wide-ranging and discussion of:   how stress can impact upon almost any aspect of healththe mechanisms by which adverse early life events can sensitize emotional, behavioural, cognitive & physiological coping to later stressors, creating vulnerability to mental and physiological illnessa brief overview of epigenetics and how trauma can be transmitted across generations the relationship between the brain and the immune system including discussion of the microbiomethe hunt for biomarkers of mental illness perspectives on current diagnostic systems for mental illness vs. plausible alternatives (e.g., Research Domain Criteria - RDoC)consideration of the necessity of the appreciation of genetic diversity and genetic polymorphisms to the study of biological determinants of human behaviour, precision medicine etc.factors influencing reactivity to stressors at the individual levelcaveats around examining the biological basis of the efficacy of psychotherapya brief consideration of the process of allostasis in the face of chronic stress (and why the "crash" might come after the major stressor has passed)the role of social support seeking & providing as well as prosocial behaviour with respect to coping with stressorsa brief meditation on the utility of tolerating uncertainty in life, research (and other domains)Hymie's perspective on the biggest questions left unanswered in behavioural neuroscience right nowHymie Anisman received his PhD in 1972 (University of Waterloo), where he was also on faculty for two years, and has been a Professor at Carleton University, Ottawa, since 1994. He has also held an adjunct appointment with the Institute of Mental Health Research (Royal Ottawa Hospital) since 1993. Professor Anisman was a Senior Ontario Mental Health Research Fellow , is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, and held a Canada Research Chair in Neuroscience from 2001-2015, and has since held the position of Canada Research Professor. The principle theme of his research has concerned the influence of stressors on neurochemical, neuroendocrine and immune systems, and how these influence psychological (anxiety, depression) and physical illnesses including neurodegenerative, heart disease, and cancer progression. His work has spanned studies using animal models to assess stress-related pathology as well as studies in humans to assess stress, coping and appraisal processes.  In addition to sitting on the editorial boards of several journals and on numerous grant panels,  Professor Anisman has published more than 400 peer reviewed journal papers, 40 book chapters, and several review papers within neuroscience, immunity, and psychology journals, as well as publishing 3 textbooks, 1 lay book, and 2 edited books. His research has been funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), The Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), the Ontario Mental Health Foundation (OMHF), the Canadian Foundation for Innovation (CFI) and the Canada Research chairs program (CRC). https://twitter.com/Hymie_Anisman

Podcast Raleigh
Kristen Hess, HH Architecture

Podcast Raleigh

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2021 60:02


Kristen Hess didn't always knew she wanted to work in architecture, but she always knew she should be in charge. Once she discovered an architect is akin to being the conductor of a symphony--bringing out the best of all the various players to create a piece--she knew it was for her. And once she came to Raleigh to study design at N.C. State, she never left.Now she leads a firm that is helping shape what our city and state (and beyond) will look like for generations. The firm she founded and leads, HH Architecture, has worked on numerous projects involving museums, parks, schools, community colleges, government buildings and more, including the upcoming Dueling Dinosaurs exhibit at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences (which you can hear more about in our interview with Dr. Lindsay Zanno!). We specifically discuss three projects she has worked on--the North Carolina Zoo, the State Farmers Market and the N.C. State Fairground--that are quintessential to life in this state.Hess has been a Marshall and Eisenhower Fellow, allowing her to broaden her contacts and knowledge, and she uses those experiences not only in her work, but in giving back to her community. She serves on the Greater Raleigh Chamber Executive Committee, the Governor's Council on Historically Underutilized Businesses, as well as the Board of Directors for the Girl Scouts of North Carolina Coastal Pines.Please support the businesses who support us: Papa Murphy's Take N Bake Pizza of Raleigh and Steele Residential.Subscribe to Podcast Raleigh on your favorite podcast sites so you never miss an episode, and if you enjoy it we'd love for you to rate or read a comment:Apple: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/podcast-raleigh/id1458907220Google: https://play.google.com/music/listen?u=0#/ps/Inzk5woxrsjwf3zhd5vv3av4yeiStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/podcast-raleighSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/6b3dVvLJfO0EqvDGQaFTAP

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast
Mike Lynch Shares His Story, and the Idea Behind Darktrace

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2021 37:57


Mike Lynch shares his startup story, the idea behind Darktrace, and how we still need to get better at turning ideas in university seminar rooms into saleable products. As an investor and technologist, Mike also shares what sort of ideas and pitches he would like most want to see and how AI will change the legal industry. Dr. Mike Lynch OBE FREng FRS is a celebrated technologist, entrepreneur, and investor. Having founded and lead some of the UK's most successful tech companies, including Autonomy, Blinkx, and Cambridge Neurodynamics, Mike then created Invoke Capital in 2012 to create and support world-leading fundamental tech businesses such as Darktrace and Luminance. Referred to as the UK's answer to Bill Gates, Mike read Natural Sciences at Cambridge University, where he also gained a Ph.D. and held a research fellowship in adaptive pattern recognition. He was awarded an OBE for Services to Enterprise in 2006, is a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the Royal Society, and was elected to the Prime Minister's Council for Science and Technology in 2011.

Dot to Dot Behind the Person
Overloaded - how every aspect of your life is influenced by your brain chemicals with Ginny Smith

Dot to Dot Behind the Person

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2021 44:52


Ginny is a neuroscience expert and science communicator. She read Natural Sciences at Cambridge, but her main passion and expertise is in psychology and neuroscience, so she focuses on helping kids and adults understand our complex minds. Ginny says that “Science is fun and fascinating and ever changing, and I want to help everyone share in the joy of curiosity and exploration.”   ​Some of the things that Ginny said in this week's chat that stood out for me:“I find it amazing how much we still don't understand about this thing that controls everything we do”“Science can come across as something that's finished – it's this body of facts that we know about the world and I think telling kids and adults that there's so much more to be discovered can be really inspiring.”“It's actually behavioural change that can have a bigger impact on our lives at the moment than neuro science but it feels like neuroscience is the sexier option so anyone who is selling something tends always badge it as neuroscience.  And balance your hormones, take this supplement, we're going to retrain your brain. Just take anything that makes big claims on neuroscience needs to have big evidence and a lot of the time if they're trying to sell you something there's not.” The second edition to my award winning book Defining You – Build Your Unique Personal Profile and Unlock Your True Potential is now out: https://bit.ly/DefiningYou2ndEdIf you are curious about who you are, your brain and the influences in your life then please dip into my more recent book Mirror Thinking – How Role Models Make Us Human. https://bit.ly/MirrThinkhttps://bit.ly/MirrorUSACanhttps://bit.ly/2ylrc7HFollow on:Instagram: www.instagram.com/fiona_murdenTwitter: https://twitter.com/fionamurden Facebook: https://facebook.com/fionamurdenAnd for Ginny: ginnysmithscience.comSocials: @GinnySmithScibraintasticscience.comSocials: @BraintasticSciAmazon Book link: Overloaded: How Every Aspect of Your Life is Influenced by Your Brain Chemicals: Amazon.co.uk: Smith, Ginny: Books Links to non-amazon shops here: www.ginnysmithscience.com/overloaded      

This Academic Life
Ep.9 – Academic Salary

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2021 25:54


In this episode, we discuss the taboo topic of a professor’s salary and the importance of academic salary transparency. We also discuss how administrators can work with junior faculty and help them ease the salary negotiation process.  Reference list:    https://www.ccdaily.com/2021/04/a-look-at-faculty-presidents-salaries/ https://www.lifeofaprofessor.com/post/are-professors-rich The Annual Report on the Economic Status of the Profession, 2018-19 Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) Contact list:    If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org. You can also find us on webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on facebook group “This Academic Life”.    Cast list: Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newel (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah.  Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI).  Support This Academic Life by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

Increments
#25 - Mathematical Explanation with Mark Colyvan

Increments

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2021 127:37


We often talk of explanation in the context of empirical sciences, but what about explanation in logic and mathematics? Is there such a thing? If so, what does it look like and what are the consequences? In this episode we sit down with professor of philosophy Mark Colyvan and explore How mathematical explanation differs from explanation in the natural sciences Counterfactual reasoning in mathematics Intra versus extra mathematical explanation Alternate logics Mathematical thought experiments The use of probability in the courtroom References: - The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in the Natural Sciences (https://www.maths.ed.ac.uk/~v1ranick/papers/wigner.pdf) by Eugene Wigner. - Proofs and Refutations (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proofs_and_Refutations#:~:text=Proofs%20and%20Refutations%3A%20The%20Logic,characteristic%20defined%20for%20the%20polyhedron.) by Imre Lakatos. Mark Colyvan (http://www.colyvan.com/) is a professor of philosophy at the University of Sydney, and a visiting professor (and, previously, Humboldt fellow) at Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich. He has a wide array of research interests, including the philosophy of mathematics, philosophy of logic, decision theory, environmental philosophy, and ecology. He has authored three books: The Indispensability of Mathematics (Oxford University Press, 2001), Ecological Orbits: How Planets Move and Populations Grow (Oxford University Press, 2004, co-authored with Lev Ginzburg), and An Introduction to the Philosophy of Mathematics (Cambridge University Press, 2012). Special Guest: Mark Colyvan.

Into the Fold: Issues in Mental Health
Episode 114: The Case Against Spanking

Into the Fold: Issues in Mental Health

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2021 41:29


It’s well established that children with histories of abuse demonstrate higher levels of depression, conduct disorder, PTSD, impaired social functioning and other problems. This is deeply entangled with how we discipline them. On this special episode of Into the Fold, we are teaming up with fellow member of the Texas Podcast Network, Marc Airhart, host of the Point of Discovery podcast from the University of Texas at Austin College of Natural Sciences. Together we talk with child discipline expert Dr. Elizabeth Gershoff, professor in the Department of Human Development and Family Sciences at UT Austin and the director of the Population Research Center, who has been studying the effects of physical discipline on children for two decades and is advocating for an end to the practice.

Backyard Bounty
The Surprisingly Fascinating Life Of Periodical Cicadas ft. Dr. Gene Kritsky

Backyard Bounty

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2021 39:03


Periodical Cicadas are this week’s Backyard Bounty podcast topic as we join Nicole as she talks with Gene KritskyWhat You’ll LearnWhat are the different types of Cicada?What is the life cycle of a periodical cicada?What role cicadas play in the environmentWhere and when do cicadas emerge.How you can help map the 2021 emergence of the periodical cicada Brood X. Our GuestGene Kritsky, PhD is Professor of Biology and Dean of Behavioral and Natural Sciences at Mount St. Joseph University in Cincinnati. He is a Fellow of the Entomological Society of America and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He received his BA in Biology from Indiana University in 1974, and his MS and PhD in Entomology from the University of Illinois in 1976 and 1977 respectively.Gene lives with his wife, the artist Jessee Smith, in Cincinnati, Ohio.Resources & Links MentionedCicada Safari – download the free app from the Apple app store or Google playCicada safari websiteGene’s website*Periodical Cicadas: The Brood X Edition bookCicada jewelry made by Genes wife,*Denotes affiliate linksYou May Also LikeFascinating Facts about Bats & How To Attract Them ft Dr. Merlin TuttleSupport The ShowYour support helps us continue to provide the best possible episodes!Find video episodes on YouTubeSubscribe to the podcast email newsletterSubmit a question or suggestion for the show by calling our listener line at (719) 647-7754Shop Backyard Bounty merchandiseJoin our text community (719) 292- 3207Get behind the scenes with PatreonFind us online @HeritageAcresMarket: Website / Facebook Page / Facebook Group / Instagram / TikTok / Twitter / Gab / PinterestSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/heritageacres)

The Not Old - Better Show
#540 17 Year Cicada Safari - Dr. Gene Kritsky

The Not Old - Better Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2021 29:00


17 Year Cicada Safari - Dr. Gene Kritsky The Not Old Better Show, Science & Technology Interview Series Welcome to The Not Old Better Show.  I'm Paul Vogelzang and this episode is brought to you by Feals and is part of our Science Makes Us Safer series.   Our guest today is Dr. Gene Kritsky, and we're talking about the 17-year periodical cicadas.  Dr. Gene Kritsky is the dean of Behavioral and Natural Sciences and is a professor in the Department of Biology at Mount St. Joseph University. Additionally, Dr. Gene Kritsky is an entomologist who has authored or edited 10 books and over 250 papers on subjects as diverse as entomology, egyptology, evolution, history of science, dinosaur biology, insect poetry, and insect mythology. Dr. Kritsky's most recent book, The Periodical Cicadas: The Brood X Edition was published in 2021.  And, now, Dr. Kritsky and his Mount St. Joseph IT team have introduced a fantastic new app to track the cicada for citizen science research, called ‘Cicada Safari.' At this very instant, in backyards and forests across the eastern U.S., one of nature's greatest spectacles is underway. Every seventeen years, millions of cicadas rise from the soil of the eastern United States to fly, mate, and fill the air with their noisy song. Although it may lack the epic majesty of the wildebeest migration in the Serengeti or the serene beauty of cherry blossom season in Japan, this event is no less awe-inspiring. I'm talking about the emergence of the Brood X cicadas.  Be aware as you're mowing your lawn, outside on a hike, listening to the trees rustle, and please use the Cicada Safari app to help with the tracking and mapping of these amazing insects! We'll talk about the Brood X cicada, the new ‘Cicada Safari' app, cicada sounds, which you can hear now in the background, and all things cicada with Dr. Gene Kritsky. Please join me in welcoming to The Not Old Better Show via internet phone, Dr. Gene Kritsky. My thanks to Dr. Gene Kritsky for his generous time, work, and energy today.  My thanks to Feals for sponsoring today's show.  Please support our sponsors.  My thanks, as well, to you, my wonderful Not Old Better Show audience.  Please join me next time, be safe, be healthy…I hope you're listening today as you're waiting in line for your vaccine, and remember, let's talk about Better.  The Not Old Better Show.  Thanks, everybody.

The Brian Lehrer Show
Cicadas Are Having Their Own 'Hot Vax Summer'

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2021 15:01


Gene Kritsky, Dean of the School of Behavioral and Natural Sciences at Mount St. Joseph University in Cincinnati and author of Periodical Cicadas: The Brood X Edition (Ohio Biological Survey 2021), talks about the coming of trillions of cicadas from underground into parts of the Northeast and Midwest and the science behind why they only emerge every 17 years. 

This Academic Life
Ep.8 – Study Abroad: US vs Europe

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2021


In this episode, we discuss some major differences between European and American educational systems with Dr. Christos Athanasiou, a postdoctoral research associate in the School of Engineering at Brown university. As someone who has personally experienced studying in both European and American institutes, he will share some insights into these two different educational systems. Reference list: Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) https://educationdata.org/international-student-enrollment-statistics https://crsreports.congress.gov/product/pdf/IF/IF11347 https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2019/11/18/open-doors-data-show-continued-increase-numbers-americans-studying-abroad Contact list: If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org. You can also find us on webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on facebook group “This Academic Life”. Cast list: Dr. Christos Athanasiou (guest) is a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the School of Engineering at Brown University. He is the founder of M&M science mentorship program. Please check out his website if you are interested in having a mentor or you know someone who is looking for a dedicated mentor: https://www.ceathanasiou.com Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newel (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah. Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Support This Academic Life by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

MooreStories
An intimate Conversation with Ms.Ronice Moore

MooreStories

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2021 47:21


In the first episode of MooreStories I have an extremely special guest for you. I will be interviewing Ms. Ronice Moore, a young millennial entrepreneur who has recently started a sip and paint business. Ronice is also a mom, a healthcare worker. She holds several degrees in Natural Sciences and the best part is she happens to be my daughter. We will be discussing her inspirations, how the unexpected murder of her older brother transformed the direction of her young life, and what it was like being a teenage mother.I hope you enjoy episode one. It’s Moorestories ya’ll!Social Media:IG @MooreStoriess02Website Mooresuccess.net

Point of Discovery
The Case Against Spanking

Point of Discovery

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2021 39:34


Physical punishment, or spanking, is widely practiced in the U.S. and around the world, although it appears to be decreasing. Parents, caregivers and school administrators who use it say the goal is to prevent unwanted behaviors and teach children to make better choices. But does it actually work? And what long term effects does it have on the physical and mental health of people who are punished this way? In today’s special episode, we’re teaming up with Ike Evans, producer of the Into the Fold podcast, to jointly interview one of the world’s experts on physical punishment, Liz Gershoff. She’s a professor in the University of Texas at Austin’s Department of Human Development and Family Sciences and the director of the Population Research Center. She’s been studying the effects of physical discipline on children for two decades and advocating for an end to the practice. If you’re interested in digging deeper, check out Into the Fold Episode 22: Restorative Discipline in Schools: https://hogg.utexas.edu/into-the-fold-episode-22-restorative-discipline-in-schools Listen to other great episodes of Into the Fold here: https://soundcloud.com/hoggfoundation Music for today’s show was produced by: Podington Bear - https://www.podingtonbear.com/ About Point of Discovery Point of Discovery is a production of the University of Texas at Austin's College of Natural Sciences and is a part of the Texas Podcast Network. The opinions expressed in this podcast represent the views of the hosts, and not of The University of Texas at Austin. You can listen to all our episodes at @point-of-discovery . Questions or comments about this episode, or our series in general? Email Marc Airhart at mairhart[AT]austin.utexas.edu

This Academic Life
Ep.7 – Don't Ignore Those Awards

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2021 28:20


In this episode, we discuss the importance of getting awards in academia and ways to get them with Dr. Debbie Kaminski, a professor emeritus in Mechanical Engineering. She will share with us the different types of awards faculty members can go after and why it is critical for the community as a whole to work together to promote each other’s work through nomination. References: Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) https://advance.washington.edu/resources/docs/Mabrouk-EverythingYouWantedToKnow.pdf https://jcsw.hms.harvard.edu/files/joint-committee-status- women/files/presentation_for_jcsw_01112018.pdf https://ask.metafilter.com/341303/Ethics-re-asking-to-be-nominated-for-an-award Contact list: If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org. You can also find us on webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on facebook group “This Academic Life”. Cast list: Prof. Debbie Kaminski (guest) is a Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). She is also a sci-fi fiction writer. Please also check out her most recent books: https://www.amazon.com/Island-Too-Lovely-Deborah-Kaminski-ebook/dp/B0867Q5NTX/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=an+island+too+lovely&qid=1617154057&s=digital-text&sr=1-1 https://www.amazon.com/Damians-Workshop-Deborah-Kaminski-ebook/dp/B00SSJXBEW/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=damian%27s+workshop&qid=1617154196&s=digital-text&sr=1-1 Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newel (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah. Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Support This Academic Life by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

The Daily Gardener
April 28, 2021 Plants for Hummingbirds, William Darlington, Frances Bickelhaupt, Wanting Spring, Letters from Yellowstone by Diane Smith, and the State Flower of Alaska

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2021 23:00


Today we celebrate a Quaker son of Pennsylvania who accomplished so much during his lifetime and left a legacy of botanical information for future generations. We'll also learn about a woman who, together with her husband, created an impressive arboretum in the middle of Iowa. We’ll hear some thoughts about spring from a Contemporary Turkish playwright, novelist, and thinker. We Grow That Garden Library™ with a fun fiction book about an adventurous young woman who joins an expedition in Yellowstone National Park at the end of the nineteenth century. And then we’ll wrap things up with the fascinating story of the Alaska State Flower - the Forget-me-not (Myosotis alpestris).   Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart To listen to the show while you're at home, just ask Alexa or Google to “Play the latest episode of The Daily Gardener Podcast.” And she will. It's just that easy.   The Daily Gardener Friday Newsletter Sign up for the FREE Friday Newsletter featuring: A personal update from me Garden-related items for your calendar The Grow That Garden Library™ featured books for the week Gardener gift ideas Garden-inspired recipes Exclusive updates regarding the show Plus, each week, one lucky subscriber wins a book from the Grow That Garden Library™ bookshelf.   Gardener Greetings Send your garden pics, stories, birthday wishes, and so forth to Jennifer@theDailyGardener.org   Curated News 12 Gorgeous Plants That Will Attract Hummingbirds to Your Garden | Bob Vila | Michelle Ullman   Facebook Group If you'd like to check out my curated news articles and original blog posts for yourself, you're in luck. I share all of it with the Listener Community in the Free Facebook Group - The Daily Gardener Community. So, there’s no need to take notes or search for links. The next time you're on Facebook, search for Daily Gardener Community, where you’d search for a friend... and request to join. I'd love to meet you in the group.   Important Events April 28, 1782 Today is the birthday of the botanist, physician, and member of the U.S. House of Representatives, William Darlington. Like his fellow eminent botanists John Bartram, Humphry Marshall, and William Baldwin, William was born into a Quaker family in Pennsylvania. A native of West Chester, William received his medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. When William was a student, Benjamin Barton, the botanist and author of the first American botany textbook was an early mentor. After signing on as a surgeon for an East India merchant, William traveled to Calcutta. A year later, William returned to England and married Catharine Lacey, the daughter of a distinguished Revolutionary War General. Lacey supported William’s work. The Darlingtons were married for forty years and had four sons and four daughters. Two of their sons were named in honor of fellow botanists: their oldest son was Benjamin Smith Barton Darlington and their youngest son William Baldwin Darlington. The year 1826 was a big year for William Darlington. He organized and presided over the Chester County Cabinet of Natural Sciences, and he published his first edition of "Florula Cestrica," his summary of plants in West Chester, Pennsylvania. William was a saver and an archivist. Today, William’s work to preserve his letters with Humphry Marshall and John Bartram are much appreciated. In terms of legacy, one of William’s most valuable contributions to botanical history is his masterpiece called Memorials of Bartram and Marshall.  In 1853, the botanist John Torrey named a new variety of California pitcher-plant for Darlington. He called it Darlingtonia Californica. As for William, his large herbarium and works were bequeathed to his beloved Chester County Cabinet of Natural Science. William was buried in Oaklands Cemetery, near West Chester. Twenty years earlier, William wrote his own epitaph in Latin - it is inscribed on his monument: "Plantae Cestrienses, quas dilexit atque illustravit, super tumulum ejus semper floreant" or May the plants of Chester, which he loved and documented, forever blossom over his grave. William's tombstone is crowned with a relief of Darlingtonia californica.   April 28, 1916 Today is the birthday of the arboretum-maker Frances Bickelhaupt. Frances is remembered for the arboretum that she and her husband Robert created around their family home in Clinton, Iowa. During the 1960s and 1970s, Robert and Frances watched in dismay as Dutch Elm disease claimed the beautiful Elm-lined streets of their hometown. In response, Frances and Robert began planting a diverse range of trees on their 10-acre property. Now, Frances and Robert were exceptionally disciplined when it came to planting trees - they committed to grouping all the trees by species. Today, the Bickelhaupt Arboretum has a lovely collection of trees - including ash, beech, birch, crabapple, elm, hickory, honeylocust, linden, magnolia, and oak. Bickelhaupt also has a gorgeous conifer collection, regarded as the Arboretum’s crown jewel, and features many rare and dwarf conifers. In total, the Bickelhaupt Arboretum boasts over 2,000 different species of plants. In 2020, the Bickelhaupt Arboretum was damaged by the derecho ("duh-RAY-cho") - a widespread and severe windstorm that blew through the midwest on August 10, 2020. As a result of the derecho, Bickelhaupt lost 28 trees, and many more were damaged in the hurricane-force winds. The first course of action is clean up following by tree removal - for the trees were so damaged they could not be saved. Today, if you happen to visit the Bickelhaupt Arboretum, there is a poignant sculpture of Frances and Robert near the entrance. They are standing side by side, and Frances has one foot resting on the top of a shovel she holds against the earth.   Unearthed Words In the winter, you may want the summer; in the summer, you may want the autumn; in the autumn, you may want the winter; but only in the spring you dream and want no other season but the spring! ― Mehmet Murat ildan (“MAY-met Moor-rat ILL-don,” Contemporary Turkish playwright, novelist, and thinker   Grow That Garden Library Letters from Yellowstone by Diane Smith This fiction book came out in 2000, and it won the Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association Book Award for Fiction. In this book, Diane Smith tells the story of a young woman named  A. E. (Alexandria) Bartram. A lively young woman and amateur botanist, Alexandria is invited on an expedition of Yellowstone in the spring of 1898. The leader of the expedition is a Montana professor who initially thought AE Bartram was a man.  He was shocked to learn the truth when Alexandra joins the team. Still, it's full steam ahead 4 the group of scientists, and they embark on a summer of fascinating Adventures and a web of entangled relationships. The backdrop is, of course, the beauty of Yellowstone and 19th-century concerns about science, economics, and nature. This book offers a little bit of everything - botany, humor, adventure - and even romance. This book is 226 pages of fiction based on true American history, nature, science, and culture. You can get a copy of Letters from Yellowstone by Diane Smith and support the show using the Amazon Link in today's Show Notes for around $1   Today’s Botanic Spark Reviving the little botanic spark in your heart April 28, 1917 On this day, the State Flower of Alaska was adopted: the Wild Native Forget-me-not (Myosotis alpestris "my-oh-SO-tiss al-pes-tris”). The Forget-me-not was part of the Alaskan culture long before it became the official state flower. During the Alaskan gold rush, the men formed lodges. A lodge called the Grand Igloo selected the Forget-me-not as the lodge emblem. Later on, women got involved with the lodge through auxiliaries. One pioneering Alaskan woman was Esther Birdsall Darling. Esther lived in Alaska from 1907 to 1918. She created a dog kennel in Nome and later started the first sled dog race. Esther became known worldwide when she began writing about her life in the north and her Alaskan sled dogs. Inspired by the “Forget-me-not” legislation, Esther wrote a poem dedicated to the State’s pioneers called “Forget-me-not.” It was included in the bill put before the legislature: So in thinking for an emblem For this Empire of the North We will choose this azure flower That the golden days bring forth, For we want men to remember That Alaska came to stay Though she slept unknown for ages And awakened in a day. So although they say we’re living In the land that God forgot, We’ll recall Alaska to them With our blue Forget-me-not. In the bill's margins, there were two handwritten verses (likely written by Esther) and often used as the first two verses to her original poem. A little flower blossoms forth On every hill and dale, The emblem of the Pioneers Upon the rugged trail; The Pioneers have asked it And we could deny them not; So the emblem of Alaska Is the blue Forget-me-not. The Forget-me-not is a member of the Borage family (Boraginaceae). In Floriography ("FLOOR-EE-ah-grah-FEE") or the language of flowers, the Forget-me-not flower represents true faithful love, fond memories, hope, and remembrance. In the middle ages, Forget-me-not was believed to be an effective treatment for scorpion bites. The buds of the flower curl like a scorpion's tail, which was believed to be a sign from nature. This is how Forget-me-not earned the common name Scorpion Grass. Celebrated in folklore, there are many stories about Forget-me-nots. The popular tale of how the Forget-me-not was named tells of a German knight walking by a river with his lady. When he stooped to pick a tiny flower, he lost his balance as he straightened to give the blossom to his beloved. He fell into the river and said, " Vergiss mein nicht." before being swept away. After the battle of Waterloo, the battlefield was covered with Forget-me-nots. The dainty flowers sprung up to mark the spots of fallen soldiers. When King Richard III banished Henry of Lancaster, he chose the Forget-me-not as a rallying symbol. The flower became an emblem for his followers. During the 20th-century, Germans planted Forget-me-nots to honor the fallen and were a special remembrance after WWI. In modern gardens, Forget-me-nots are especially beautiful in rock gardens and along water features like streams. On April 26, 1951, the Vermont Standard shared an adorable story about the Forget-me-not. “Professor Leon Dean of the English Department of UVM (The University of Vermont) spoke on the subject of "Vermont Folklore." He began by explaining that history is all about us… and that the learned historian no longer looks down upon the contributions of the local historian.  Folklore, he said, can be adapted to [the] classroom… and the student can go from folklore to local, and national history.  ...Even more important are people whose memories reach back in a chain - from generation to generation.  Professor Dean gave the illustration of a country doctor who in the spring, would carry Forget-me-not seeds which he sprinkled on the waters of the streams he passed. In time these streams were lined with Forget-me-nots, a memorial when he was gone.”   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener. And remember: "For a happy, healthy life, garden every day."

Jeff & Jenn Podcasts
Dr. Gene Krisky

Jeff & Jenn Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2021 14:19


Dr. Kritsky is the dean of Behavioral and Natural Sciences and is a professor in the Department of Biology at Mount St. Joe University. He is also the cicada authority! He joined us to tells us all things cicada and when they will join us.

FUTURES Podcast
How Your Brain Chemicals Influence Your Life w/ Ginny Smith

FUTURES Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2021 77:34


Science writer Ginny Smith shares her insights into the latest ways to scientifically understand the human brain, the role of hormones and neurotransmitters in memory, sleep, depression and addiction, and the methods we can use to improve our cognition. Ginny Smith studied Natural Sciences at the University of Cambridge, specialising in Psychology and Neuroscience, and now spreads her love of her subject as a science writer and presenter.  Ginny performs a range of science shows about the brain at science festivals and teaches at the University of Cambridge’s Institute of Continuing Education. She is a presenter and producer for the British Psychological Society’s Psych Crunch podcast, and a regular on the Cosmic Shambles Network. For several years she worked with the Naked Scientists, and produced and presented a weekly science show for Cambridge TV. She loves to write science articles for a general audience, and has written several books for DK, targeted at a younger audience. Overloaded is her first title for a popular science readership.  Find out more: futurespodcast.net CREDITS Produced by FUTURES Podcast Recorded, Mixed & Edited by Luke Robert Mason FOLLOW FUTURES PODCAST Twitter: @FUTURESPodcast Instagram: @futurespodcast Facebook: @FUTURESPodcast

Citizens' Climate Lobby
CCR Ep 59 Black Birders Week with Tykee James

Citizens' Climate Lobby

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2021 30:00


As the government affairs coordinator at the National Audubon Society in Washington, DC. Tykee James has a special role—organizing bird walks with members of Congress and congressional staff! Birding has been important to him ever since he started as a teen in Philadelphia.  Last year, after a racist incident against a Black birder in New York’s Central Park, Tykee James and fellow birders decided to create #BlackBirdersWeek. They had only hours to organize the event which included using social media to reveal a whole world of birding by people of color. During that week, the #BlackBirderWeek campaign had more than 600 million impressions on social media sites. It also generated national press coverages. Tykee joins us to talk about the incredibly successful campaign and the need to tell stories about Black experiences that go beyond narratives of trauma. He also shares his plans for this year’s Black Birders Week.  Tykee James is the government affairs coordinator at the National Audubon Society and sits on the board of directors of the DC Audubon Society, Wyncote Audubon Society, Audubon Maryland-DC, the Birding Co-op, and the Academy of Natural Sciences at Drexel University.  In his personal time he is the audio producer for Wildlife Observer Network, a wildlife media project he started with some wildlife-friendly friends in Philly. Tykee hosts two podcasts: Brothers in Birding and On Word for Wildlife. The Art House Citizens Climate Radio host, Peterson Toscano, shares some of his own climate story. In doing so, he evokes the spirit of American poet, Walt Whitman. He reveals there was a lot more to the bard than just his famous book, Leaves of Grass. Whitman evolved from an aimless young man to a dynamic new poetic prophet to a tender and faithful caregiver to young men devastated by the American Civil War.  Like the need to increase our empathy during this time of the Coronavirus Pandemic, Peterson stresses how climate change requires an opening of the heart. Whitman models this beautifully in the ways he cared for wounded and dying soldiers.  Influenced by Gary Schmidgall’s book, Walt Whitman: A Gay Life, Peterson recreates the moment of Whitman’s first breakthrough. It happened at an evening in the Opera when he heard the Italian diva Madame Marietta Alboni. Her voice pierced Whitman and opened up his artistic soul. You will hear Fac ut Portem from Rossini’s Stabat Mater available on Archive.org as Peterson narrates the moment. You can hear standalone version of The Art House at Artists and Climate Change Good News Story Our Good News Story comes out of Portland, Oregon. Lane Shaffer is a 15 year old high school student. He is one of several students seeking to change public transportation policy in the Portland area.  In addition to working on this public transportation project, Lane is also one of the hosts of All in My Head podcast. It is produced by a group of teens that are making a podcast for youth, by youth. They counter stereotypes around mental health in the teen BIPOC (Black, and Indigenous, People of Color) and LGBTQ+ community.  If you have good news to share, contact Peterson radio @ citizensclimate.org Dig Deeper How to Be an Urban Birder, book by David Lindo Hear the full conversation between Tykee James and host, Peterson Toscano Black and Latinx Birders Scholarship Envisioning an Anti-Racist Sustainable Philly A panel discussion focused on understanding sustainability from the perspective of diverse and often marginalized communities (recording on YouTube) Walt Whitman and the Civil War, American Experience on PBS We always welcome your thoughts, questions, suggestions, and recommendations for the show. Leave a voice mail at 518.595.9414. (+1 if calling from outside the USA.) You can email your answers to radio @ citizensclimate.org   You can hear Citizens’ Climate Radio on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher Radio, SoundCloud, Podbean, Northern Spirit Radio, Google Play, PlayerFM, and TuneIn Radio. Also, feel free to connect with other listeners, suggest program ideas, and respond to programs in the Citizens’ Climate Radio Facebook group or on Twitter at @CitizensCRadio.

This Academic Life
Ep.6 – A High Schooler Asks

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2021 24:40


In this episode, we interview Angella, a high schooler, who wants to know more about what a professor does, how to find the passion in choosing his/her academic path, and what it takes to become one. Reference list: Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) Contact list: If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org. You can also find us on webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on facebook group “This Academic Life”. Cast list: Angella Chen, Niskayuna High School, NY Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newel (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah. Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Support This Academic Life by donating to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

Coaches Rising
85 - Dave Snowden: How the natural sciences can inform coaching

Coaches Rising

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2021 41:30


Coaching has some fairly established approaches, but they are generally not based on empirical data. Could the practice of coaching benefit from taking a more scientific approach to the development of its methodology? In this conversation with management consultant Dave Snowden we explore using the natural sciences to inform coaching theory and practice, the role of context and relating in behavioral change, and the value of the numinous. Dave Snowden is a management consultant and researcher in the field of knowledge management and the application of complexity science. Known for the development of the Cynefin framework, he is the founder and chief scientific officer of Cognitive Edge, a Singapore-based management consulting firm specializing in complexity and sensemaking. He has authored several articles and book chapters on the Cynefin framework and the role of complexity in sensemaking.

The Science Revolution with Thom Hartmann
Let's Call Them "Right to Life" or "Freedom" Passports!

The Science Revolution with Thom Hartmann

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2021 33:00


Will America hold Trump & his enablers accountable for 400,000 unnecessary deaths? Is this manslaughter, now that Trump brags that he actively ignored the scientific advice? Prof. Richard Wolff is here on rising food prices and the impact on global unrest. If prices continue to rise — on top of the pain of the pandemic — the world could be in for a bumpy future. Plus - Vaccine Passports? Let's just call them "right to life" or "freedom" passports! What red blooded, Nazi-arm-band-wearing, Confederate-flag-waving, Capitol-invading, gun-toting American patriot could possibly object?

This Academic Life
Ep.5 – STEM Women Moving Forward in Academia: Prof. Robin Selinger

This Academic Life

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2021


Although more women than men participate in higher education in the U.S., the same is not true when it comes to women pursuing careers in science and engineering. Despite the increased emphasis on gender equality, statistical evidence shows that the STEM gap keeps increasing. In this episode, Prof. Robin Selinger, a Professor of Physics from Kent State University and a Fellow of the American Physical Society, offers a wealth of her insights and experiences that are beneficial to all STEM women and men in academia. The discussions include the challenges she has faced, mentors who were critical to her career and success, how we can make an even playing field for women in STEM academics, how leaders in the professional communities and universities can advocate for women colleagues who tend to not self-promote, and how to successfully recruit people color into STEM academics, and how affirmative action can be used as a double sword against women in STEM and how our male colleagues should be part of this conversation as STEM women moving forward in academia. Reference list: Music by RuthAnn Schallert-Wygal (schallert.wygal@gmail.com) Contact list: You can find more information about Prof. Robin Selinger on https://www.kent.edu/physics/profile/robin-selinger. If you have any comments about our show or have suggestions for a future topic, please contact us at info@thisacademiclife.org. You can also find us on webpage https://thisacademiclife.org and on facebook group “This Academic Life”. Cast list: Prof. Robin Selinger (guest) is a Professor of Physics at Kent State University in Ohio. Prof. Kim Michelle Lewis (host) is a Professor of Physics and Associate Dean of Research, Graduate Programs, and Natural Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Howard University. Prof. Pania Newel (host) is currently an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at The University of Utah. Prof. Lucy Zhang (host) is a Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). Support This Academic Life by donating to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/this-academic-life This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

The Science Revolution with Thom Hartmann
Rand Paul May Be Infecting America With a Brand New COVID Epidemic

The Science Revolution with Thom Hartmann

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2021 27:53


Coming up on the Science Revolution this week, look out, as Rand Paul may be infecting America with a brand new COVID epidemic, and we may have no protection. Investigative Journalist, Greg Palast is here on the Exxon Valdez disaster 33 years ago. He's saying, "don't buy Exxon's fable of the drunken captain." We just passed World Water Day and Rianna Eckel, from Food and Water Watch, drops by about the growing threat of water privatization.