Podcasts about Elsevier

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Dutch publishing and analytics company

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  • Jan 14, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Elsevier

Latest podcast episodes about Elsevier

Materialism
Episode 51: Reverse Engineering Nature's Peel

Materialism

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022


We all have experienced the pain of buying produce only for it to spoil before we can finish eating all of it. Apeel Sciences seeks to remedy this by creating a coating to help increase the longevity of fruit. We sit down with Lou Perez to discuss some of the science behind the company. This episode is sponsored Matmatch. Check out how they can help you find the perfect material for your next engineering project! This episode is also sponsored by Materials Today, an Elsevier community dedicated to the creation and sharing of materials science knowledge and experience through their peer-reviewed journals, academic conferences, educational webinars, and more. Thanks to Kolobyte and Alphabot for letting us use their music in the show! If you have questions or feedback please send us emails at materialism.podcast@gmail.com or connect with us on social media: Instagram and Twitter. Materialism Team: Taylor Sparks (co-host, co-creator), Andrew Falkowski (co-host, co-creator), Jared Duffy (production, marketing, and editing), Ramsey Issa (editing assistance). Keywords: Apeel, food storage, food safety Support Materialism: A Materials Science Podcast by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/materialism

Raise the Line
Healthcare As an Information Service - Dr. Geoffrey Rutledge, Co-Founder and Chief Medical Officer of HealthTap

Raise the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 25:15


“It's astonishing how many health-related questions are asked on Google every day,” observes Dr. Geoffrey Rutledge. “What we set out to do at HealthTap was create a place where people could get trusted answers.” On this episode of Raise the Line, learn about Dr. Rutledge's longstanding interest in the potential of technology to assist in healthcare delivery. Hear how Dr. Rutledge and his team saw early on the opportunity to deliver healthcare through mobile and electronic devices, and followed through to create a pioneering firm in the virtual healthcare space. Tune in to discover HealthTap's unique question-and-answer interface that features physician crowdsourcing and a peer review process, and hear about their virtual primary care clinic, where patients can have a long-term relationship with a doctor of their choice. Plus, learn why Dr. Rutledge believes technology can enable the interactions that are fundamental to the doctor-patient relationship, and why he envisions a huge role for a consistent virtual care platform in the field.

Raise the Line
Empowering Others to Shine - Simmi Singh, Partner and Leader, Egon Zehnder

Raise the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 28:38


“It's interesting that it's called coaching,” says expert leadership coach Simmi Singh. “I think of it more as learning to be a better student of myself, and learning to be the mirror that others can use to learn about themselves.” Tune in to this episode of Raise the Line for a fascinating discussion with Singh and host Dr. Rishi Desai on how we can all become more effective leaders and humans, and raise more confident and secure children. Discover why Singh believes parenting should be about listening, and why she thinks curious people should pursue “nonlinear and disorderly” careers. Hear about the importance of banishing our inner naysayers, embracing experimentation and failure, and paying attention to our guts. Plus, find out why, in the socially-distanced era of COVID, Singh makes a point of taking her phone or laptop to the fridge during Zoom calls, and why she advises people to keep their kids and pets in, rather than out, of virtual meetings.

Bicara Supply Chain
165. Skills for the new era of SCM

Bicara Supply Chain

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 12:08


Guest Name: Johannes Kern, General Manager at Xiezhi Supply Chain Consulting, Language: English, Publication date: Dec, 21. 2021 Johannes Kern is an Affiliated Professor of Supply Chain Management at Tongji University and General Manager of Xiezhi Consulting, China. His research focuses on Supply Chain Management and International Management, particularly on Digital Transformation and on the impact of cultural influences on Buyer-Supplier relationships. He teaches MBA and Master's students from around the world in Digital Transformation, Supply Chain Management, and International Management. His practitioner-oriented research is published with the OECD, Harvard Business School Publishing, and in books from Springer, Elsevier, and Wiley. Johannes supports international companies in China to improve their decision-making and increase their performance along the whole supply chain. Prior to that, he worked in various purchasing and logistics functions at the Bosch Group in Asia-Pacific, where he led teams and managed strategic projects in China, Korea, Thailand, Malaysia, Japan, and India. Johannes holds a Ph.D. from Technical University Darmstadt in Germany. Some of the highlights of questions from the podcast include: Why are skills in SCM a vital topic now? What skills in SCM are most important now and how to build up these skills? For a young supply chain professional, what advice you can offer to them to keep staying agile in response to the recent challenges? Connect with Johannes on Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johanneskern/ About Xiezhi Supply Chain Consulting - is a boutique consulting firm that helps German companies in China to optimize the whole Supply Chain, including Sourcing, Transportation, Warehousing, and Production. As a spin-off from TU Darmstadt and Tongji University, a systematic and analytical approach, incorporating state-of-the-art research is used. Xiezhi blends German quality with an understanding of the Chinese market and intercultural competency. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/bicarasupplychain/message

Raise the Line
Practical Steps for Combatting COVID Misinformation: Adam Beckman & Kyla Fullenwider, Office of the U.S. Surgeon General

Raise the Line

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 29:00


According to a recent Kaiser Health News study, nearly 80% of Americans believe at least some of the COVID-19 misinformation that has flooded news and social media channels since the start of the pandemic.  For today's Raise the Line guests, this troubling report confirmed the urgency with which their boss, U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy, has tackled this challenge.  Adam Beckman and Kyla Fullenwider, both senior-level advisors to Dr. Murthy, join host Shiv Gaglani to detail the “whole society” approach the Office of Surgeon General is taking which involves calling on major stakeholders in social media, education and journalism to do their part, but also providing help to local communities and individual Americans who Dr. Murthy sees as key players in this struggle. “The evidence tells us one of the best ways for addressing health misinformation is through individual, smaller-scale, intimate connections,” says Beckman.  To that end, the Office of Surgeon General created a Community Toolkit to provide detailed guidance on how to have difficult conversations with friends or family about misinformation including listening without judgement, steering people to credible sources whenever possible, and avoiding shaming.  Don't miss this fascinating and vitally important conversation about what one of the most visible health figures in the nation is doing about one of the greatest challenges of our time. For More Information on the U.S. Surgeon General's Community Toolkit visit surgeongeneral.gov/healthmisinformation

Getting In the Loop: Circular Economy | Sustainability | Closing the Loop
Addressing Social Aspects in Circular Economy with Alexandre Lemille

Getting In the Loop: Circular Economy | Sustainability | Closing the Loop

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 53:31


In today's episode, Alexandre Lemille introduces us to his idea of a 'Circular Humansphere,' which focuses on addressing human needs thanks to system circularity. Get ready to learn more about Alexandre's model that aims to build regenerative societies in full alignment with life systems. ABOUT TODAY'S GUESTAlexandre Lemille was recognized by the World Economic Forum as “Highly Commended” in the Circular Economy Leadership category (2016). He co-authored the 2020 academic Elsevier paper "Making Circular Economy Work for Human Development", and his Circular Humansphere concept was recently recognized by CRESTING Circular Research (2021).Resources and links discussed in this episode are available at gettinginthelooppodcast.com. Don't forget to check out our free circular economy resources including:The Circular Sectors Navigator E-BookLinkedin Group: Getting in the Loop PodcastRead more about the Circular Humansphere here.

The Suno India Show
Delhi case against SciHub and LibGen will decide the price of knowledge

The Suno India Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 27:42


In December 2020, three academic publishing giants—Elsevier, American Chemical Society and Wiley—moved the Delhi High Court against Sci-Hub and LibGen. These pirate websites make academic papers free for all. Academic publishers do not pay authors and make more profits than tech giants. Developing countries like India cannot afford the bulk of this research and the prices keep rising. India has the second-largest number of Sci-Hub users in the world. On this episode of The Suno India Show, reporter Suryatapa Mukherjee speaks to SciHub founder Alexandra Elbakyan, her lawyer Nilesh Jain, science activist and Newsclick editor Prabir Purkayastha who is an intervenor in the case, and also Suno India editor Menaka Rao who is an avid user of SciHub and LibGen. Tune in as we explore what this case means for the future of Indian research. Show notes: Is the staggeringly profitable business of scientific publishing bad for science? The Guardian Should Knowledge Be Free? Medlife Crisis Lawrence Liang: “The Delhi University Photocopy Case” See sunoindia.in/privacy-policy for privacy information.

Investor Connect Podcast
Investor Connect - 646 - Adrian Mendoza of Mendoza Ventures

Investor Connect Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 23:06


On this episode of Investor Connect, Hall welcomes Adrian Mendoza, Founder and General Partner at Mendoza Ventures.Based in Boston, Massachusetts, and founded in 2016, Mendoza Ventures is women-owned and the first LatinX-owned venture fund on the East Coast. They are an early-stage and growth fintech, AI, and cybersecurity venture fund that provides an actively managed approach to venture capital. They focus on diversity as playing an important role in their investment decisions, as roughly 75% of their portfolio consists of start-ups led by immigrants, people of color, and women. After having two VC-funded startups in Boston, Adrian started Mendoza Ventures to address the funding gap in the pre-seed investment stage for underrepresented founders. Born in Los Angeles to parents who immigrated from Mexico, Adrian moved to Boston for graduate school at Harvard. He has spent the last 20 years leading technology teams and building products for financial services and fintechs. He is the author of "Mobile User Experience", a book on mobile user experience published by Elsevier in 2013, adapted industry-wide as the standard for mobile user experience education, and of the video series “CSS for designers” published by O'Reilly in 2015.  Adrian earned his Bachelors from the University of Southern California and his Masters from Harvard University. Adrian advises investors and startups in the fintech space, discusses the evolution of the industry, his criteria for investing, and more. You can visit Mendoza Ventures at , via LinkedIn at , and via Twitter at .     Adrian can be contacted via email at , via LinkedIn at , and via Twitter at . ______________________________________________________________ For more episodes from Investor Connect, please visit the site at:    Check out our other podcasts here:   For Investors check out:   For Startups check out:   For eGuides check out:   For upcoming Events, check out    For Feedback please contact info@tencapital.group    Please , share, and leave a review. Music courtesy of .

Materialism
Episode 49: μ: Securing Metals Supply

Materialism

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 32:11


A recent report in the Wall Street Journal pointed out that building one wind turbine requires 900 tons of steel, 2,500 tons of concrete and 45 tons of plastic and a single electric vehicle will require the digging up, moving, and processing of over 500,000 pounds of raw materials! As we transition to electric vehicles and renewable energy and storage we will need to drastically increase the production and availability of metals including lithium, rare-earth elements, nickel, tin, tungsten and more. Where will we find these metals? In this episode we discuss this with Brian Menell, CEO of TechMet Ltd. Articles Discussed: 2019, Mills, If You Want ‘Renewable Energy,' Get Ready to Dig, Wall Street Journal LINK 2021, Mining investor TechMet closes second funding round at $120 million, Reuters LINK 2021, RCE Q&A With TechMet CEO, Brian Menell, on the Metal Supply Chain, Real Clear Energy LINK This episode is sponsored TechMet a private company focused in the production, processing, and recycling of Co, Li, Ni, REE, Sn, W, and V. The episode is also sponsored by Matmatch. Check out how they can help you find the perfect material for your next engineering project! This episode is also sponsored by Materials Today, an Elsevier community dedicated to the creation and sharing of materials science knowledge and experience through their peer-reviewed journals, academic conferences, educational webinars, and more. Thanks to Kolobyte and Alphabot for letting us use their music in the show! If you have questions or feedback please send us emails at materialism.podcast@gmail.com or connect with us on social media: Instagram and Twitter. Materialism Team: Taylor Sparks (co-host, co-creator), Andrew Falkowski (co-host, co-creator), Jared Duffy production, marketing, and editing), Ramsey Issa (editing assistance). Keywords: metals mining extractive metallurgy batteries electric vehicles geopolitical Support Materialism: A Materials Science Podcast by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/materialism

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 601 (10-31-21): Halloween, Water, and the Human Body

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:53).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Image Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 10-29-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for Halloween 2021.  Besides focusing on autumn's festival of fun and fright, this episode is part of a series this fall about water connections to the human body and human biology. SOUND – ~9 sec That eerie sound of a tree creaking in October wind sets a seasonal stage for a Halloween challenge: exploring how Halloween, water, and human biology all connect.  Sound like quite a trick?  Well, have a listen to some Halloween music for about 50 seconds, and then we'll treat you to some examples. MUSIC - ~50 sec – instrumental You've been listening to “A Little Fright Music,” by Torrin Hallett, a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  And here are six matches of Halloween creatures or images with water in the human body. 1.  Skeleton images rattle around everywhere for Halloween, and in living skeletons water is a significant component of bones and cartilage.  2.  Pretend blood covers many-a Halloween costume, and over half of the volume of blood is plasma, which in turn is over 90 percent water, and water is also a major component of blood cells. 3.  A muscular costume is part of pretending to be a super-strong character like Wonder Woman or Superman; and water plays a significant role in muscle structure and function; in turn, muscle is an important water-storage area for the body. 4.  The monster in movie versions of “Frankenstein” was brought to life by electricity, and the cells of our nervous system transmit messages though electrochemical impulses, using sodium and potassium ions in a water-based solution. 5.  If fiery or icy creatures need some temperature regulation, water's the body fluid that does it. And 6.  Flashing and watching from many creatures on Halloween night are eyes, either scary, suspenseful, or super-powered; and eyes have chambers containing aqueous humor and vitreous humour, two fluids that consist mostly of water and that maintain the shape of the eyes. This Halloween, imagine being a creature that's about 60 percent composed of an amazing substance with unique powers to dissolve other substances, absorb and release heat, and withstand being compressed.  What would you be?  Why, the water-based human being that you are! Thanks to Torrin Hallett for composing this week's music for Virginia Water Radio, and we close with another listen to the last few seconds of “A Little Fright Music.” MUSIC - ~13 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The wind and creaking tree sounds were recorded by Virginia Water Radio in Blacksburg, Va., on October 5, 2014.  “A Little Fright Music” is copyright 2020 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio.  This music was previously used in Episode 548, 10-26-20. Following are other music pieces composed by Torrin Hallett for Virginia Water Radio, with episodes featuring the music. “Beetle Ballet” – used in Episode 525, 5-18-20, on aquatic beetles.“Chesapeake Bay Ballad” – used in Episode 537, 8-10-20, on conditions in the Chesapeake Bay.“Corona Cue” – used in Episode 517, 3-23-20, on the coronavirus pandemic.“Flow Stopper – used in Episode 599, 10-28-21, on the “Imagine a Day Without Water” campaign.“Geese Piece” – used most recently in Episode 440, 10-1-18, on E-bird. “Ice Dance” – used in Episode 556, 12-21-20, on how organisms survive freezing temperatures.“Lizard Lied” – used in Episode 514, 3-2-20, on lizards.“New Year's Water” – used in Episode 349, 1-2-17, on the New Year. “Rain Refrain” – used most recently Episode 559, 1-11-21, on record rainfall in 2020.“Runoff” – in Episode 585, 7-12-21 – on middle-school students calling out stormwater-related water words.“Spider Strike” – used in Episode 523, 5-4-20, on fishing spiders.“Tropical Tantrum” – used most recently in Episode 580, 6-7-21, on the 2021 Atlantic tropical storm season preview.“Tundra Swan Song – used in Episode 554, 12-7-20, on Tundra Swans.“Turkey Tune” – used in Episode 343, 11-21-16, on the Wild Turkey.  Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGE Water uses in the human body.  Illustration from the U.S. Geological Survey, “The Water in You: Water and the Human Body,”  https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/water-you-water-and-human-body?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. SOURCES Used for Audio Peter Abrahams, ed., How the Body Works: A Comprehensive, Illustrated Encyclopedia of Anatomy, Metro Books, New York, 2007. American Red Cross, “Blood Components,” online at https://www.redcrossblood.org/donate-blood/how-to-donate/types-of-blood-donations/blood-components.html. Erin Blakemore, “How Twitching Frog Legs Helped Inspire ‘Frankenstein,'” Smithsonian Magazine, December 4, 2015, online at https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/how-twitching-frog-legs-helped-inspire-frankenstein-180957457/. Fandom, “Monster Wiki/Frankenstein's Monster,” online at https://monster.fandom.com/wiki/Frankenstein%27s_Monster. Mayo Clinic Health System, “Water: Essential to your body,” online at https://www.mayoclinichealthsystem.org/hometown-health/speaking-of-health/water-essential-to-your-body. Science Direct:“Aqueous Humor,” online at https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/aqueous-humor;“Vitreous Humour,” online at https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/veterinary-science-and-veterinary-medicine/vitreous-humour. University of Michigan Health, “Eye Anatomy and Function,” as of August 31, 2020, online at https://www.uofmhealth.org/health-library/hw121946. U.S. Geological Survey, “The Water in You: Water and the Human Body,” https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/water-you-water-and-human-body?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. U.S. National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Modules:“Composition of the Blood,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/leukemia/anatomy/composition.html;“Skeletal System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/skeletal/. For More Information about Human Biology, Including Water Aspects American Society of Hematology, “Blood Basics,” online at https://www.hematology.org/education/patients/blood-basics.Cleveland [Ohio] Clinic:“Heart & Blood Vessels: How Does Blood Travel Through Your Body,” online at https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/heart-blood-vessels-blood-flow-body;“Lymphatic System,” online at https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/21199-lymphatic-system. Eric Cudler, “Neuroscience for Kids,” online at https://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/neurok.html. The Franklin Institute of Philadelphia, Penn., “Blood Vessels,” online at https://www.fi.edu/heart/blood-vessels. Isabel Lorenzo et al., “The Role of Water Homeostasis in Muscle Function and Frailty: A Review,” Nutrients, Vol. 11, No. 8 (August 2019, accessed online at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6723611/(subscription may be required for access). Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, “Facts About Blood and Blood Cells,” online at https://www.mskcc.org/cancer-care/patient-education/facts-about-blood-and-blood-cells. Science Direct, “Synovial Fluid: Structure and Function,” excerpted from Textbook of Pediatric Rheumatology, 5th Edition, Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2005; accessed online at https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/synovial-fluid(subscription may be required for access). University of Bristol (England), School of Medical Sciences, “Brain Basics: The Fundamentals of Neuroscience,” online at http://www.bris.ac.uk/synaptic/basics/basics-0.html. U.S. National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Modules:“Blood, Heart and Circulation,” online at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/bloodheartandcirculation.html;“Muscular System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/muscular/;“Nervous System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/nervous/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Science” subject category. Following are links to other episodes on connections of water to human biology (much of the information in this week's episode was taken from these previous episodes). Overview of water's roles in the body – Episode 592, 8-30-21.Disease: COVID-19 – Episode 517, 3-23-20 and Episode 519, 4-6-20.Disease: influenza – Episode 393, 11-6-17.Disease: viruses – Episode 600, 10-25-21.Circulatory system connections to water – Episode 593, 9-6-21.Muscular system connections to water – Episode 596, 9-27-21.Neurological system connections to water – Episode 594, 9-13-21.Skeleton system connections to water (with a Halloween theme) – Episode 595, 9-20-21.Water intake and exercise – Episode 466, 4-1-19.Water thermodynamics – Episode 195, 1-6-14. Following are links to other Halloween-themed episodes. Episode 238, 10-31-14 – focusing on the plant Witch-hazel.Episode 548, 10-26-20 – focusing on water-related readings that are supernatural, mysterious, or imaginative. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-3 plus 5: MatterK.4 – Water is important in our daily lives and has properties.3.3 – Materials interact with water. Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes4.2 – Plants and animals h

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Materialism
Episode 48: Thermal Barrier Coatings

Materialism

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 35:58


Did you know turbine blades operate in environments above their melting temperature? The secret is a barrier, no thicker than your fingernail, that insulates, protects, and prevents the nickel superalloy blade from melting. In this episode we discuss the materials science that makes low thermal conductivity, high compliance thermal barrier coatings possible. Towards the end we peer into what the future might hold as we push operating temperatures higher. Articles Discussed: 2019, Smil, Gas Turbines Have Become by Far the Best Choice for Add-on Generating Power They offer instant-on power that's compact, mobile, quiet, economical, durable, and matchlessly efficient, IEEE Spectrum [LINK] 2010, Gas Turbines breaking the 60% efficiency barrier, Power Engineering International [LINK] 2005, Clarke & Phillpot, Thermal barrier coating materials, Materials Today [LINK] 2003, Clarke & Levi, Materials Design for the Next Generation Thermal Barrier Coatings, Annual Reviews of Materials Research [LINK] This article will be made available for free for 6 months thanks to the support of Materials Today! This episode is sponsored Matmatch. Check out how they can help you find the perfect material for your next engineering project! This episode is also sponsored by Materials Today, an Elsevier community dedicated to the creation and sharing of materials science knowledge and experience through their peer-reviewed journals, academic conferences, educational webinars, and more. Thanks to Kolobyte and Alphabot for letting us use their music in the show! If you have questions or feedback please send us emails at materialism.podcast@gmail.com or connect with us on social media: Instagram and Twitter. Materialism Team: Taylor Sparks (co-host, co-creator), Andrew Falkowski (co-host, co-creator), Jared Duffy (production, marketing, and editing), Ramsey Issa (editing assistance). Keywords: thermal barrier coatings, turbines, superalloys, ceramics, aviation, jet engines Support Materialism: A Materials Science Podcast by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/materialism

Cracking Cyber Security Podcast from TEISS
teissTalk: Quantifying cyber risk at Board level

Cracking Cyber Security Podcast from TEISS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 46:32


This audio-only version of our twice weekly cyber security talk show, teissTalk.  Join us twice a week for free by visiting www.teiss.co.uk/talk  On this episode, we focus on the following news story; The continuity lessons of the Facebook outage https://www.scmagazine.com/analysis/risk-management/the-continuity-lessons-of-the-facebook-outage  The panel discussion is titled “Quantifying cyber risk at Board level” https://www.teiss.co.uk/teisstalk/quantifying-cyber-risk-at-board-level/  This episode is hosted by Geoff White  https://www.linkedin.com/in/geoffwhitetech/   Our Guests are Paul Lewis, Senior Director of Cloud Security, Elsevier https://www.linkedin.com/in/paulslewis/  Simon Mair, Head of Information Security and Data Privacy, Brewin Dolphin https://www.linkedin.com/in/simonmair/  Brooks Wallace, VP Sales EMEA, Deep Instinct https://www.linkedin.com/in/brookswallace 

Fertility Friday Radio | Fertility Awareness for Pregnancy and Hormone-free birth control
FFP 386 | Fertility Challenges & Recurrent Miscarriage | Gluten Intolerance, Celiac & Fertility | Justine Bold

Fertility Friday Radio | Fertility Awareness for Pregnancy and Hormone-free birth control

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 68:11


The first part of today's episode focuses on my guest Justine's fertility journey which culminated with her pregnancy at age 43 with twins. The second part focuses on Justine's professional work in the area of gluten sensitivity, Celiac, and fertility. Justine Bold has worked as an academic in the UK at the University of Worcester since 2008. She is now also Program Director for CPD in the Medical School at Cardiff University. She has written articles on infertility, appeared in the media and coedited a book entitled ‘Integrated approaches to Infertility, IVF and Recurrent Miscarriage' that was published in 2016. She has published widely in academic journals on gluten and celiac disease and also on the integrative management of female reproductive health conditions. She is working towards PhD by publication having also co-authored a book on Mental Health in 2019 and recently contributed chapters to an upcoming text book ‘Gluten related disorders' to be published by Elsevier. Justine had a long personal journey to motherhood starting with a pregnancy loss in her early thirties finally becoming a mum in her forties. She is passionate about raising awareness about the infertility experience and in helping healthcare professionals to understand patients and clients to improve patient care and she is currently working on research projects in this area. She also appeared in the UK at Fertility Fest in 2018 and at the Fertility Show in Manchester in 2019. To learn more: https://www.worcester.ac.uk/about/profiles/justine-bold https://www.cardiff.ac.uk/people/view/1700118-bold-justine Today's episode is sponsored by the Fertility Awareness Mastery Online Self Study Program! Today's episode is sponsored by the Fertility Awareness Mastery Online Self-Study Course. The most in-depth and comprehensive online fertility awareness self-study program available. Click here to join now! Today's episode is also sponsored by Saturee! Liver is one of the most nutrient dense foods available! Liver is rich in folate, choline, vitamin B12, iron, vitamin A, selenium, zinc, coenzyme Q10 and the list goes on, but unless you grew up eating it, you may have a hard time loving the taste. Saturee A+ liver capsules contain 100% Australian grass fed and finished beef liver with no fillers or preservatives. Click here to purchase today and enter coupon code FERTILITYFRIDAY for a 5% discount off your order! Topics discussed in today's episode: How gluten can impact fertility Justine's personal experience with fertility challenges and how it lead her into to become a nutritional practitioner How our culture addresses fertility Connection between endometriosis and fertility Justine's experience with endometriosis What is celiac disease and what is the difference between the disease and gluten sensitivity Connect with Justine: You can connect with Justine on her Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook. Resources mentioned: Her latest work (contribution to a book chapter): https://www.elsevier.com/books/gluten-related-disorders/rostami-nejad/978-0-12-821846-4 The paper referenced: Non-coeliac gluten sensitivity and reproductive disorders The Fifth Vital Sign: Master Your Cycles & Optimize Your Fertility (Book) | Lisa Hendrickson-Jack Fertility Awareness Mastery Charting Workbook Fertility Awareness Mastery Online Self-Study Program Related podcasts & blog posts: FFP 324 | Overcoming Fertility Challenges  |  Overcoming Miscarriage, Pregnancy Loss & Stillbirth | Christine McAlister FFP 177 | Wheat Belly | Gluten Sensitivity, IBS, and Inflammation | Dr. William Davis [On-Air Client Session] FFP 131 | Fertility Awareness Reality Series | Managing Hashimoto's Naturally | Going Gluten Free | Kelly & Lisa FFP 051 | The Impact of Sugar Consumption on Fertility and Health | Creating a Healthy Relationship with Food | Angelique Panagos FFP 049 | Improving Fertility Naturally by Optimizing Your Diet, Lifestyle, and Environment | Eleni Roumeliotou Join the community! Find us in the Fertility Friday Facebook Group. Subscribe to the Fertility Friday Podcast in Apple Podcasts! Music Credit: Intro/Outro music Produced by J-Gantic A Special Thank You to Our Show Sponsors: Fertility Friday | Fertility Awareness Programs This episode is sponsored by my Fertility Awareness Programs! Master Fertility Awareness and take a deep dive into your cycles and how they relate to your overall health! Click here to apply now! The Fertility Awareness Charting Workbook This episode is sponsored by my new book the Fertility Awareness Mastery Charting. Click here to buy now.

Research 2030
Research strategy: A conversation with Lesley Thompson & Holly Falk-Krzesinski

Research 2030

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 44:08


In this episode, Elsevier's Holly J. Falk-Krzesinski, PhD, and Lesley Thompson, PhD, talk all things research strategy. During a wide-ranging discussion, they look at what's changing for universities and the myriad factors driving those changes, including: Shifts in funding The growth of open science An increased focus on societal impact, including the UN SDGs The rise of international collaboration (and associated tensions around intellectual property) “A growing number of universities at all levels in the US are instituting research development units to help bring life to their research strategies and complement the work that the researchers and faculty members are doing….And the value add to the institution isn't just the immediate research dollars or support for the involved investigators, but it is really capacity building for the institution, and those capacity building opportunities then drive some of the changes to the institution's research strategy.” - Dr. Holly J. Falk-Krzesinski, PhD  

SBS Sinhala - SBS සිංහල වැඩසටහන
Sri Lankan professor in Australia appointed as an editor of a world-renowned encyclopedia - ඔස්ට්‍රේලියාවේ වෙසෙන ශ්‍රී ලාංකික මහාචාර්යවරයාට ලෝක ප්‍රකට

SBS Sinhala - SBS සිංහල වැඩසටහන

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 15:47


Professor Mr. Tissa Wijeratne has been appointed as the Section Editor role to cover Stroke and Headache disorders for a world-renowned Elsevier Encyclopedia. - ලෝක ප්‍රකට Elsevier විශ්වකෝෂයේ අංශභාගය හා හිසරදය පිළිබඳ කොටසේ සංස්කාරකවරයෙකු ලෙස කටයුතු කිරීමට ඔස්ට්‍රේලියාවේ වෙසෙන මහාචාර්ය තිස්ස විජේරත්න මහතාට ලැබුණු අවස්ථාව පිළිබඳ SBS සිංහල ගුවන් විදුලිය සිදුකළ සාකච්ඡාවට සවන් දෙන්න.

Materialism
Episode 47: μ: Better Styrofoam Recycling

Materialism

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021


Taylor and Andrew sit down with Cassie Bradley of INEOS Styrolution to talk about improving styrofoam and reducing its ecological footprint. This episode is sponsored by INEOS Styrolution. Check them out at https://www.ineos-styrolution.com/index.html and https://styrolution-eco.com/ This episode is also sponsored by Matmatch. Check out how they can help you find the perfect material for your next engineering project! This episode is also sponsored by Materials Today, an Elsevier community dedicated to the creation and sharing of materials science knowledge and experience through their peer-reviewed journals, academic conferences, educational webinars, and more. Thanks to Kolobyte and Alphabot for letting us use their music in the show! If you have questions or feedback please send us emails at materialism.podcast@gmail.com or connect with us on social media: Instagram, Twitter. Materialism Team: Taylor Sparks (co-host, co-creator), Andrew Falkowski (co-host, editing assistance, co-creator), Jared Duffy (production, marketing, and editing), Ramsey Issa (editing assistance). Keywords: Styrofoam, recycling, ecological Support Materialism: A Materials Science Podcast by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/materialism

Thyroid Warrior Podcast
Social Determinants of Health...an Example 145

Thyroid Warrior Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 17:42


Today's episode is giving you an actual example of how social determinants of health can impact someone's care.   For me, we have to have a more broad conversation about care. It's not solely on race. If we could focus more on how similar we are despite our experiences and differences.   Yes, health disparities exist.    Yes, minority populations are usually impacted by these structural issues.   However,   WE have all struggled with access to care.   WE come from different backgrounds and have had poor experiences in getting to appointments.   WE have all struggled with watching loved ones get sick because they can't afford their medications.   The question is how do WE work TOGETHER to help each other MORE?   Resources Marmot, Michael, and Ruth Bell. “Social Inequalities in Health: a Proper Concern of Epidemiology.” Annals of Epidemiology, Elsevier, 3 Mar. 2016, www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1047279716300400.  Healthy People. “Social Determinants of Health.” Social Determinants of Health | Healthy People 2020, www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topics-objectives/topic/social-determinants-of-health.  Eighty-Six Percent of Primary Care Patients Believe Racism Is Impacting Their Health.” Primary Care Collaborative, 22 July 2020, www.pcpcc.org/2020/06/10/eighty-six-percent-primary-care-patients-believe-racism-impacting-their-health.  Evans, Michele K., et al. “Diagnosing and Treating Systemic Racism: NEJM.” New England Journal of Medicine, 17 June 2020, www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMe2021693.  PatientEngagementHIT. “Patients, Providers Reflect on Racism as Public Health Crisis.” PatientEngagementHIT, 15 June 2020, patientengagementhit.com/news/patients-providers-reflect-on-racism-as-public-health-crisis.  Nolen, LaShyra, et al. “How Medical Education Is Missing the Bull's-Eye: NEJM.” New England Journal of Medicine, 25 June 2020, www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1915891?query=recirc_mostViewed_railB_article.  Wakefield, Emily O, et al. “Describing Perceived Racial Bias Among Youth With Sickle Cell Disease.” OUP Academic, Oxford University Press, 17 Mar. 2018, academic.oup.com/jpepsy/article/43/7/779/4942298.  Betancourt, Joseph R. “Cultural Competence And Health Care Disparities: Key Perspectives And Trends.” Health Affairs, 2005, www.healthaffairs.org/doi/full/10.1377/hlthaff.24.2.499.  Henderson, Saras, et al. “Cultural Competence in Healthcare in the Community: A Concept Analysis.” Wiley Online Library, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, 7 Mar. 2018, onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/hsc.12556.  Rukhsana Ahmed & Benjamin R. Bates (2017) Patients' fear of physicians and perceptions of physicians' cultural competence in healthcare, Journal of Communication in Healthcare, 10:1, 55-60, DOI: 10.1080/17538068.2017.1287389  Joseph R. Betancourt, Alexander R. Green. “Defining Cultural Competence: A Practical Framework for Addressing Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Health and Health Care - Joseph R. Betancourt, Alexander R. Green, J. Emilio Carrillo, Owusu Ananeh-Firempong, 2003.” SAGE Journals, 1 July 2003, journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1093/phr/118.4.293.  Crawford, Dana E., et al. “‘LET UP': A Systematic Approach to Responding to Cultural Bias in Health Care.” ZERO TO THREE, vol. 40, no. 2, Nov. 2019, pp. 10–17. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&AuthType=ip,shib&db=eric&AN=EJ1244159&site=ehost-live&scope=site.  Place, Not Race: Disparities Dissipate In Southwest Baltimore When Blacks And Whites Live Under Similar Conditions 

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 596 (9-27-21): Water and Muscles

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:09).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImageExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 9-24-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of September 27, 2021.  This episode is part of a series this fall on water connections to the human body and human biology.  This week, we start with some mystery sounds.  Have a listen for about 25 seconds, and see if you know the body system you can hear at work in all of these sounds.  And here's a hint: it'll be a show of strength if you guess this. SOUNDS  - ~23 sec If you guessed the muscular system, you're right!  Walking, dribbling a basketball, lifting weights, and jumping rope all involve some of the over 600 skeletal muscles in the human body.  Skeletal muscles, also called striated or voluntary muscles, are one of three muscle types in the body.  The other two are smooth, or involuntary muscles, found in internal organs; and cardiac muscle in the heart.  Whatever their location or function, muscles have several important connections to water, including the following six. First, water is a major component of muscles, making up over 70 percent of muscle mass. Second, cell volume, that is, the space within cells, is affected by the amount of water that cells contain, or the cells' hydration state.  This is believed to be related to muscle strength and contraction capacity by affecting the shape and function of muscle proteins. Third, water is the medium containing all the dissolved biochemicals that the body needs to function, including those involved in muscular contraction and in nourishing muscle cells. Fourth, water is involved in reactions that release energy from the molecule ATP, and water is associated with the important energy-storage molecule glycogen. Fifth, water helps regulate body temperature, including the heat generated by muscular activity. And sixth, water helps lubricate moveable joints, the structures upon which skeletal muscles act to move parts of the body. Overall, water plays a significant role in muscle strength and function, and muscle, in turn, is an important area of water storage for the body. We close with some music whose title speaks of one of the most common uses of our muscles.  Here's the closing 25 seconds of “Walk This Way For Awhile,” by the Harrisonburg and Rockingham County, Va.-based band, The Steel Wheels. MUSIC - ~25 sec – Lyrics: “…you walk this way for awhile; will you walk this way for awhile?  I think you will, I know you still, I hope you will.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The sounds heard in this episode were recorded by Virginia Water Radio in Blacksburg, Va., on September 23, 2021. “Walk This Way for Awhile,” by The Steel Wheels, is from the album “Live at Goose Creek,” recorded October 14, 2010, at Franklin Park Performing Arts Center, Purcellville, Va., and produced by Goose Creek Music; used with permission of The Steel Wheels.  The song is also on The Steel Wheel's 2010 album, “Red Wing.”  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at http://www.thesteelwheels.com/.  More information about Goose Creek Music is available online at http://www.goosecreekmusic.com/.  More information about the Franklin Park Arts Center is available online at http://www.franklinparkartscenter.org/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 286, 10-19-15. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGE Structure of a representative human skeletal muscle.  Illustration from National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Module, “Muscular System/Structure of Skeletal Muscle,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/muscular/structure.html. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT THE HUMAN MUSCULAR SYSTEM The following information is quoted from the National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Module, “Muscular System/Introduction” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/muscular/. “The muscular system is composed of specialized cells called muscle fibers.  Their predominant function is contractibility.  Muscles, attached to bones or internal organs and blood vessels, are responsible for movement.  Nearly all movement in the body is the result of muscle contraction.  Exceptions to this are the action of cilia, the flagellum on sperm cells, and amoeboid movement of some white blood cells. “The integrated action of joints, bones, and skeletal muscles produces obvious movements such as walking and running.  Skeletal muscles also produce more subtle movements that result in various facial expressions, eye movements, and respiration. “In addition to movement, muscle contraction also fulfills some other important functions in the body, such as posture, joint stability, and heat production.  Posture, such as sitting and standing, is maintained as a result of muscle contraction.  The skeletal muscles are continually making fine adjustments that hold the body in stationary positions.  The tendons of many muscles extend over joints and in this way contribute to joint stability.  This is particularly evident in the knee and shoulder joints, where muscle tendons are a major factor in stabilizing the joint.  Heat production, to maintain body temperature, is an important by-product of muscle metabolism.  Nearly 85 percent of the heat produced in the body is the result of muscle contraction.” SOURCES Used for Audio Ann Baggaley, ed., Human Body, Dorling Kindersley Publishing, New York, N.Y, 2001. Cedric Bryant and Daniel Green, eds., Essentials of Exercise Science, American Council on Exercise, San Diego, Calif., 2017. Michael Houston, Biochemistry Primer for Exercise Science, 3rd Edition, Human Kinetics, Champaign, Ill., 2006. Isabel Lorenzo et al., “The Role of Water Homeostasis in Muscle Function and Frailty: A Review,” Nutrients, Vol. 11, No. 8 (August 2019, accessed online at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6723611/(subscription may be required for access).  National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Modules, “Muscular System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/muscular/. Science Direct, “Synovial Fluid: Structure and Function,” excerpted from Textbook of Pediatric Rheumatology, 5th Edition, Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2005; accessed online at https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/synovial-fluid(subscription may be required for access). Scott Powers and Edward Howley, Exercise Physiology: Theory and Application to Fitness and Performance, 8th Edition, McGraw-Hill, New York, N.Y., 2012.U.S. Geological Survey, “The Water in You: Water and the Human Body, online at https://www.usgs.gov/special-topic/water-science-school/science/water-you-water-and-human-body?qt-science_center_objects=0#qt-science_center_objects. For More Information about Water and the Human Body American Society of Hematology, “Blood Basics,” online at https://www.hematology.org/education/patients/blood-basics. Cleveland [Ohio] Clinic, “Heart & Blood Vessels: How Does Blood Travel Through Your Body,” online at https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/heart-blood-vessels-blood-flow-body. Cleveland [Ohio] Clinic, “Lymphatic System,” online at https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/21199-lymphatic-system.Eric Cudler, “Neuroscience for Kids,” online at https://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/neurok.html. Franklin Institute of Philadelphia, Penn., “Blood Vessels,” online at https://www.fi.edu/heart/blood-vessels. Mayo Clinic Health System, “Water: Essential to your body,” online at https://www.mayoclinichealthsystem.org/hometown-health/speaking-of-health/water-essential-to-your-body. Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, “Facts About Blood and Blood Cells,” online at https://www.mskcc.org/cancer-care/patient-education/facts-about-blood-and-blood-cells. National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Modules, “Nervous System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/nervous/. National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, SEER Training Module, “Skeletal System,” online at https://training.seer.cancer.gov/anatomy/skeletal/.National Institutes of Health/National Library of Medicine, “Blood, Heart and Circulation,” online at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/bloodheartandcirculation.html. University of Bristol (England), School of Medical Sciences, “Brain Basics: The Fundamentals of Neuroscience,” online at http://www.bris.ac.uk/synaptic/basics/basics-0.html. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Science” subject category. Another episode related to human exercise is Episode 483, 7-29-19.  It focuses on buoyancy and drag in the water and is designed for middle school and high school students. Following are links to other episodes on connections of water to human biology.  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in fall 2021; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes.  Episode 195, 1-6-14 – Water thermodynamics.Episode 393, 11-6-17 – Disease: Influenza.Episode 466, 4-1-19 – Water intake and sports.Episode 517, 3-23-20 and Episode 519, 4-6-20 – Disease: Water connections to COVID-19.Episode 592, 8-30-21 – Overview of water's roles in the body.Episode 593, 9-6-21 – Circulatory system connections to water.Episode 594, 9-13-21 – Neurological system connections to water.Episode 595, 9-20-21 – Skeletal system connections to water. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-3 plus 5: Force, Motion, and Energy5.2 – Energy can take many forms.5.3 – There is a relationship between force and energy of moving objects. Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes4.2 – Plants and animals have structures that distinguish them from one another and play vital roles in their ability to survive. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment. Life ScienceLS.2 – All living things are composed of one or more cells that support life processes, as described by the cell theory.LS.4 – There are chemical processes of energy transfer which are important for life. BiologyBIO.2 – Chemical and biochemical processes are essential for life.BIO.3 – Cells have structure and function. Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rdgrade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade.Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16

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Love & Guts
Bonus Ep | Dawn Whitten | The Infant Microbiome

Love & Guts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 75:11


#224 Dawn Whitten is a Naturopath, Western Herbalist, International Board Certified Lactation Consultant, Researcher and Educator. Passionate about protecting and nurturing the microbiome of the next generation, Dawn has a broad base of clinical experience with a focus on women's health through pregnancy and beyond, as well as infant and toddler health. She has been in clinical practice for 16+ years.   Dawn has been published in the peer-reviewed literature and has contributed to clinical textbooks (Including the Breastfeeding chapter in the soon to be published Advanced Clinical Naturopathic Medicine, Elsevier). Dawn co-coordinates two units within the Evidence-based Complementary Medicine Program in the College of Health & Medicine at the University of Tasmania. She is part of the research team at Probitic.Advisor.com and a clinical director at Goulds Natural Medicine in Hobart.   In this episode we cover: Why the first 1000 days of a newborn's life is crucial for shaping long term health What sort of health issues are linked to early microbiome disturbance How much an infant's microbiome is disturbed when mothers take antibiotics The stages of early microbiome development How is the infant colonised? Seeding? Why breastmilk is the ultimate gardener How does the microbiome of formula fed infants differ How do we support and optimise seeding And so much more Show Notes Goulds Natural Medicine Infant Microbiome Online Course Probiotics supplements and the breastfeeding infant - Why Not? Abstracts from the 19th International Society for Research in Human Milk and Lactation Conference

Ta de Clinicagem
Episódio 106: 4 Clinicagens de Rastreio de Câncer Colorretal

Ta de Clinicagem

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 53:42


- Quem deve fazer? - Até quando? - Como fazer? - O que fazer quando o resultado vem alterado? Rapha, Joanne e Iago respondem essas e outras perguntas! E ainda dão um bônus sobre as síndromes familiares, Polipose Adenomatosa Familiar (PAF) e Síndrome de Lynch Referências: 1- Screening for colorectal cancer: Strategies in patients at average risk. Uptodate Agosto 2021. Author:Chyke Doubeni, MD, FRCS, MPHSection Editors:Joann G Elmore, MD, MPHJ Thomas Lamont, MDDeputy Editor:Jane Givens, MD 2- USPSTF Recommendation: Screening for Colorectal Cancer. Entrevista do Jama, disponível em https://edhub.ama-assn.org/jn-learning/audio-player/18612046 3- DAVIDSON, Karina W. et al. Screening for colorectal cancer: US Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. JAMA, v. 325, n. 19, p. 1965-1977, 2021. 4- NEE, Judy; CHIPPENDALE, Ryan Z.; FEUERSTEIN, Joseph D. Screening for colon cancer in older adults: risks, benefits, and when to stop. In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Elsevier, 2020. p. 184-196. 5- http://cancerscreening.eprognosis.org/ 6- Shaukat et al. ACG Clinical Guidelines: Colorectal Cancer Screening 2021, The American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 116, n. 3 - p. 458-479, March 2021. 7- SYNGAL, Sapna et al. ACG clinical guideline: genetic testing and management of hereditary gastrointestinal cancer syndromes. The American journal of gastroenterology, v. 110, n. 2, p. 223, 2015. 8- Daniel C Chung, Linda H Rodgers. Familial adenomatous polyposis: Screening andmanagement of patients and families; Acesso em uptodate.com em setembro/2021 9- Michael J Hall. Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectalcancer): Cancer screening and management. Acesso em uptodate.com em setembro/2021 10- Finlay A Macrae. Overview of colon polyps; Acesso em uptodate.com em setembro/2021

Materialism
Episode 46: Better Nuclear Fuel

Materialism

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021


Are materials the solution to better, safer nuclear fuels? The tri-structural isotropic (TRISO) fuel particle is the product of a variety of materials innovations and is the most promising fuel form to date. Find out all about it in this episode where we cover the challenges and intricacies of designing materials for nuclear reactors! Articles Discussed: 2015 CRUD: Another Acronym Bites the Dust Link 2010 Materials challenges for nuclear systems Link 2019 Historical perspectives and current progress Link 2015 Coated Particle Fuels for High-Temperature Reactors Link 2021 Current State and Prospect on the Development of Advanced Nuclear Fuel Link This episode is sponsored by Matmatch. Check out how they can help you find the perfect material for your next engineering project! This episode is also sponsored by Materials Today, an Elsevier community dedicated to the creation and sharing of materials science knowledge and experience through their peer-reviewed journals, academic conferences, educational webinars, and more. Thanks to Kolobyte and Alphabot for letting us use their music in the show! If you have questions or feedback please send us emails at materialism.podcast@gmail.com or connect with us on social media: Instagram, Twitter. Keywords: Nuclear Fuel TRISO Fusion Fission Reactor Support Materialism: A Materials Science Podcast by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/materialism

GET OFF YOUR ASK
Emotional Dysregulation

GET OFF YOUR ASK

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 21:48


Today's episode focuses on the topic of emotional dysregulation. Listen in and discover the causes and symptoms of ED and learn about some practical tips on how to get back on track!Sources:Neurosci. “Know Your Brain: Amygdala.” Neuroscientifically Challenged, Neuroscientifically Challenged, 24 June 2014, www.neuroscientificallychallenged.com/blog/know-your-brain-amygdala.Arnsten, Amy F T, et al. “The Effects of Stress Exposure on Prefrontal Cortex: Translating Basic Research into Successful Treatments for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.” Neurobiology of Stress, Elsevier, 1 Jan. 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25436222.Carpenter, Ryan W, and Timothy J Trull. “Components of Emotion Dysregulation in Borderline Personality Disorder: a Review.” Current Psychiatry Reports, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Jan. 2013, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3973423/.Ford, Julian D, and Christine A Courtois. “Complex PTSD, Affect Dysregulation, and Borderline Personality Disorder.” Borderline Personality Disorder and Emotion Dysregulation, BioMed Central, 9 July 2014, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4579513/.Resources:National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-8255)National Institute of Mental HealthMental Health AmericaTearapy RecoveryWebsite: www.tearapyrecovery.comInstagram: www.instagram.com/tearapyrecoveryYouTube: www.youtube.com/tearapyrecoveryDisclaimer: This page and any related platforms are strictly for educational purposes and awareness. Tearapy Recovery does not and cannot guarantee the effectiveness or success of any suggestions provided as they are either based on personal experience or referenced from other sources. If you have an immediate mental health emergency, please call your mental health provider, 911 or call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-8255). Additionally, the views expressed by guests do not necessarily reflect the views of Tearapy Recovery, LLC.Support the show (https://linktr.ee/exposuremagazine)

The Learning & Development Podcast
Cognitive Task Analysis With Dick Clark

The Learning & Development Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 44:00


Cognitive Task Analysis gets to the decision-making behind performance so that what is done by Subject Matter Experts can be accurately shared and then replicated. In this episode, Dick Clark shares insights and experience into what CTA is, why it is critical to successful L&D and how to get started.   KEY TAKEAWAYS CTA improves the interview strategies that designers use to discover from experts what trainees need to learn. A lot of what experts do (about 70%) is hidden because they have learned to do things automatically. CTA draws out the thought processes behind far more of the actions experts perform. CTA trained groups learn 43 to 45% more and do so in about 35% less time. CTA trainees also make only minor mistakes. The creation of CTA training takes more time. But, the positive results achieved quickly cover the time spent creating the training. There are 100 types of CTA. In the episode, Dick narrows that field down and explains the technique that has been proven to work best. Revising and critiquing the training using another expert greatly improves the overall result. The process of creating CTA training often identifies problems that organizations have learned to work around. Providing the opportunity to solve those problems and work more efficiently. CTA is flexible, it works for all types of work. Including, technical, management, leadership and many soft skills. Selecting the right experts is essential. Dick covers how to do this in significant detail including what they ask them. Often, the rigorous analysis stage of CTA uncovers opportunities to create simple job aids that greatly enhance performance. AI is set to replace many elements of the analysis and design processes. AI will greatly speed the entire training process up, which will generate a huge step change that will make TLDP an even more critical department. BEST MOMENTS 'As task analysis is now performed only about 70% of the decisions that experts make are being captured. ' 'In the surgical CTA study, we solved enormous problems that the surgeons didn´t know they had.' 'There are places where job aids are just as effective, and certainly more efficient, than training.' 'A lot of AI programmes are going to be developed that is going to replace analysis and design. '   VALUABLE RESOURCES The Learning And Development Podcast - https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/the-learning-development-podcast/id1466927523   EPISODE RESOURCES You can follow and connect with Dick via: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dick-clark-3b16571/ Email: clark@usc.edu  Blink by Malcolm Gladwell   ABOUT THE GUEST Dick Clark is Professor Emeritus of Educational Psychology and Technology, Clinical Professor of Surgery and has served as Co-Director of the Center for Cognitive Technology at the University of Southern California. Dick is the author of over 300 published articles and book chapters as well as three recent books - Learning from Media: Arguments, analysis and evidence, Second Edition (2012, Information Age Publishers); Handling Complexity in Learning Environments: Research and Theory (2006, Elsevier) and Turning Research into Results: A guide to selecting the right performance solutions (2008, Information Age Publishers) which received the International Society for Performance Improvement (ISPI) Award of Excellence.   ABOUT THE HOST David James David has been a People Development professional for more than 20 years, most notably as Director of Talent, Learning & OD for The Walt Disney Company across Europe, the Middle East & Africa. As well as being the Chief Learning Strategist at Looop, David is a prominent writer and speaker on topics around modern and digital L&D as well as an active member of the CIPD L&D Advisory Board.   CONTACT METHOD Twitter:  https://twitter.com/davidinlearning/  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/davidjameslinkedin/  Website: https://www.looop.co/  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Materialism
Episode 45: μ: Was the Challenger an engineering failure?

Materialism

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 20:49


The Space Shuttle Challengers Explosion rocked America to its core. Was this issue actually caused by engineering or was it a management mistake. Delve into the story of the Rogers Commission and their findings on Morton Thiokols Solid Rocket Boosters and O-Ring. Articles Discussed: 2006 Challenger: Reporting a Disaster's Cold, Hard Fact LINK 2019 Challenger: The shuttle disaster that changed NASALINK 2016 A famous physicist's simple experiment showed the inevitability of the Challenger disasterLINK 2016 THE CHALLENGER DISASTER: A CASE OF SUBJECTIVE ENGINEERING LINK 2008 NASA Remembers Three Space Tragedies LINK 1986 INVESTIGATION OF THE CHALLENGER ACCIDENT LINK This episode is sponsored by Matmatch. Check out how they can help you find the perfect material for your next engineering project! This episode is also sponsored by Materials Today, an Elsevier community dedicated to the creation and sharing of materials science knowledge and experience through their peer-reviewed journals, academic conferences, educational webinars, and more. Thanks to Kolobyte and Alphabot for letting us use their music in the show! If you have questions or feedback please send us emails at materialism.podcast@gmail.com or connect with us on social media: Instagram, Twitter. Materialism Team: Taylor Sparks (editing assistance, co-creator), Andrew Falkowski (editing assistance, co-creator), Jared Duffy (co-host, production, marketing, and editing), Ramsey Issa (co-host). Keywords: NASA O-ring Challenger Space Shuttle Discovery Disaster Support Materialism: A Materials Science Podcast by contributing to their Tip Jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/materialism

Research 2030
Collaboration and data as drivers of progress: A conversation with Professor Carlos Henrique de Brito Cruz

Research 2030

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 20:30


In this episode, Carlos Henrique de Brito Cruz, Elsevier's Senior Vice President of Research Networks, talks collaborations.  As a former researcher, university leader, funder, and now an enabler of collaborations, Carlos has a unique perspective on these partnerships. During the course of this interview, he discusses the range of partnership models available and reflects on some of their pros and consThe important role of the “triple helix” structure Why international collaboration is on the rise How data can help universities and industry identify partners and track the impact The dangers of misusing data Why long-term thinking is crucial when it comes to collaborations  

Within & Between
S3E2: What's up with Els*vier?

Within & Between

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 52:49


You may have noticed that the cycle of academic publishing is pretty broken. Scientists give their research papers to academic journals for free, then the journal puts that work behind a paywall. Sometimes institutions will pay for a package of subscriptions to these journals, often costing millions of dollars. Jess and Sara talk about this cycle, and how institutions, journals, and individuals have started to push back against it. On ArXiv: https://xkcd.com/2085/ About UC's exit from that Elsevier contract: https://www.vox.com/the-highlight/2019/6/3/18271538/open-access-elsevier-california-sci-hub-academic-paywalls More on FSU's exit from the Big Deal: https://sparcopen.org/news/2020/elsevier-exit-qa-with-florida-state-university-about-their-big-deal-cancellations/ On the cycle of academic publishing: https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/jun/27/profitable-business-scientific-publishing-bad-for-science https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/mar/04/the-guardian-view-on-academic-publishing-disastrous-capitalism EndNote Click Extension: https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/endnote-click-formerly-ko/fjgncogppolhfdpijihbpfmeohpaadpc?hl=en Connect with the podcast on twitter @within_between, or email us letters about developmental science at withinandbetweenpod@gmail.com. More episodes and podcast information at WithinandBetweenPod.com. Follow Dr. Hart on twitter @Saraannhart Follow Dr. Logan on twitter @Jarlogan. Our theme music was composed by Jason Flowers. Our logo was created by Nathan Archer. This episode was recorded July 3, 2021.

Research 2030
Collaboration between industry and academia: Malcolm Skingle GSK's Director of Academic

Research 2030

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 34:02


Collaboration between industry and academia – it's a topic that divides many scientists. For every researcher eager to embark on a new partnership with a corporate, there's another hesitant to commit. But with public funding tight, and the issues that face society growing in complexity and urgency, the importance of these collaborations is increasing.This episode features GlaxoSmithKline's Director of Academic Liaison, Malcolm Skingle, who has more than 20 years' experience working on these collaborations. With the help of old friend and Elsevier Vice President of Academic Relations, Lesley Thompson, he explores:The benefits these partnerships bring – to both industry and universities/researchers.Some of the “myths” surrounding collaborations, from industry being anti-open science to suppressing researcher publications.The key questions universities should ask before signing on the dotted line.Featured in this episode (Link to full show notes here) Professor Malcolm Skingle Director of Academic Liaison at GlaxoSmithKline and guest speakerMalcolm has a BSc in Pharmacology/Biochemistry and a PhD in Neuropharmacology. He has worked in the pharmaceutical industry for over 40 years and gained a wide breadth of experience in the management of research activities. He coordinates Academic Liaison at GSK, managing staff in the US and UK. He sits on many external bodies, including the REF2021 Main Panel A and the BBSRC Council, and chairs several groups. Malcolm was awarded a CBE in 2009 in recognition of his contribution to the pharmaceutical industry. He has also been awarded an Honorary Professorship from the University of Birmingham and an honorary DSc from the University of Hertfordshire. Malcolm was elected a Fellow of the Faculty of Medicine at Imperial College London in 2011 and an honorary fellow of the British Pharmacological Society in 2020 Lesley Thompson, PhDVice President Academic Relations at Elsevier and guest host Lesley joined Elsevier in 2016 as Director Academic & Government Strategic Alliance in the UK. Previously, she worked for 26 years at the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), the largest of the UK's seven research councils. At Elsevier, Lesley plays a leading role in advancing Elsevier's initiatives to help universities, funding bodies and governments achieve their strategic objectives. She is a member of the Royal Society Diversity group, and, in January 2016, was awarded an MBE for services to research. Lesley has a PhD in Biology from the University of Essex and is married with children.Giacomo Mancini, PhD Business Development Manager at Elsevier and lead host of the Research 2030 podcastGiacomo is a Business Development Manager at Elsevier and lead host of Elsevier's Research 2030 podcast series. He received his PhD in Developmental and Evolutionary Biology from New York University and has a vast amount of research experience, having held positions as a Scientist and Research Associate at Johnson & Johnson and Mount Sinai Innovative Partners. While he's passionate about analytics and bibliometrics, you may also find him reading the sports section of fivethirtyeight.com or tracking MLB player statistics on baseballreference.com. Go Mets!

New Books in Psychology
Warren Mansell, "The Interdisciplinary Handbook of Perceptual Control Theory" (Academic Press, 2020)

New Books in Psychology

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 64:25


Regular listeners to this podcast will be well aware of my strong conviction that the Perceptual Control Theory initially formulated by William T. Powers entails many significant contributions to the domains of systems and cybernetics despite the fact that, for the last several decades, its applications have been further developed in a largely “adjacent” academic community.  It is in the ongoing spirit of a much-needed rapprochement between these fields, that previous guest, Warren Mansell, returns to this podcast; this time, as editor of The Interdisciplinary Handbook of Perceptual Control Theory – Vol. 1, out from Elsevier in 2020. Astonishing in its sweeping, panoramic view of the contemporary sciences, both “natural” and “social,” this magnificent volume brings together the latest research, theory, and applications of Powers' powerful and parsimonious theory proposing that the behavior of a living organism lies in the control of perceived aspects of both itself and its environment. Illustrating both the fundamental theory and the application of PCT to a broad range of disciplines, various chapters illuminate why perceptual control is fundamental to understanding human nature, describe a new way to do research on brain processes and behavior, reveal how the role of natural selection in behavior can be demystified, explain how engineers can emulate human purposeful behavior in robots with significantly lower computational expense, and so much more. If ever there was a book that could consolidate some of the world's most rigorous applications of PCT in a manner rendering its remarkable explanatory power and paradigm exploding practical value in vivid detail and inspiring insight, this is it. Tom Scholte is a Professor of Directing and Acting in the Department of Theatre and Film at the University of British Columbia located on the unceded, ancestral, and traditional territory of the Musqueam people. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/psychology

New Books in Science
Warren Mansell, "The Interdisciplinary Handbook of Perceptual Control Theory" (Academic Press, 2020)

New Books in Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 64:25


Regular listeners to this podcast will be well aware of my strong conviction that the Perceptual Control Theory initially formulated by William T. Powers entails many significant contributions to the domains of systems and cybernetics despite the fact that, for the last several decades, its applications have been further developed in a largely “adjacent” academic community.  It is in the ongoing spirit of a much-needed rapprochement between these fields, that previous guest, Warren Mansell, returns to this podcast; this time, as editor of The Interdisciplinary Handbook of Perceptual Control Theory – Vol. 1, out from Elsevier in 2020. Astonishing in its sweeping, panoramic view of the contemporary sciences, both “natural” and “social,” this magnificent volume brings together the latest research, theory, and applications of Powers' powerful and parsimonious theory proposing that the behavior of a living organism lies in the control of perceived aspects of both itself and its environment. Illustrating both the fundamental theory and the application of PCT to a broad range of disciplines, various chapters illuminate why perceptual control is fundamental to understanding human nature, describe a new way to do research on brain processes and behavior, reveal how the role of natural selection in behavior can be demystified, explain how engineers can emulate human purposeful behavior in robots with significantly lower computational expense, and so much more. If ever there was a book that could consolidate some of the world's most rigorous applications of PCT in a manner rendering its remarkable explanatory power and paradigm exploding practical value in vivid detail and inspiring insight, this is it. Tom Scholte is a Professor of Directing and Acting in the Department of Theatre and Film at the University of British Columbia located on the unceded, ancestral, and traditional territory of the Musqueam people. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/science

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society
Warren Mansell, "The Interdisciplinary Handbook of Perceptual Control Theory" (Academic Press, 2020)

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 64:25


Regular listeners to this podcast will be well aware of my strong conviction that the Perceptual Control Theory initially formulated by William T. Powers entails many significant contributions to the domains of systems and cybernetics despite the fact that, for the last several decades, its applications have been further developed in a largely “adjacent” academic community.  It is in the ongoing spirit of a much-needed rapprochement between these fields, that previous guest, Warren Mansell, returns to this podcast; this time, as editor of The Interdisciplinary Handbook of Perceptual Control Theory – Vol. 1, out from Elsevier in 2020. Astonishing in its sweeping, panoramic view of the contemporary sciences, both “natural” and “social,” this magnificent volume brings together the latest research, theory, and applications of Powers' powerful and parsimonious theory proposing that the behavior of a living organism lies in the control of perceived aspects of both itself and its environment. Illustrating both the fundamental theory and the application of PCT to a broad range of disciplines, various chapters illuminate why perceptual control is fundamental to understanding human nature, describe a new way to do research on brain processes and behavior, reveal how the role of natural selection in behavior can be demystified, explain how engineers can emulate human purposeful behavior in robots with significantly lower computational expense, and so much more. If ever there was a book that could consolidate some of the world's most rigorous applications of PCT in a manner rendering its remarkable explanatory power and paradigm exploding practical value in vivid detail and inspiring insight, this is it. Tom Scholte is a Professor of Directing and Acting in the Department of Theatre and Film at the University of British Columbia located on the unceded, ancestral, and traditional territory of the Musqueam people. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/science-technology-and-society

New Books Network
Warren Mansell, "The Interdisciplinary Handbook of Perceptual Control Theory" (Academic Press, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 64:25


Regular listeners to this podcast will be well aware of my strong conviction that the Perceptual Control Theory initially formulated by William T. Powers entails many significant contributions to the domains of systems and cybernetics despite the fact that, for the last several decades, its applications have been further developed in a largely “adjacent” academic community.  It is in the ongoing spirit of a much-needed rapprochement between these fields, that previous guest, Warren Mansell, returns to this podcast; this time, as editor of The Interdisciplinary Handbook of Perceptual Control Theory – Vol. 1, out from Elsevier in 2020. Astonishing in its sweeping, panoramic view of the contemporary sciences, both “natural” and “social,” this magnificent volume brings together the latest research, theory, and applications of Powers' powerful and parsimonious theory proposing that the behavior of a living organism lies in the control of perceived aspects of both itself and its environment. Illustrating both the fundamental theory and the application of PCT to a broad range of disciplines, various chapters illuminate why perceptual control is fundamental to understanding human nature, describe a new way to do research on brain processes and behavior, reveal how the role of natural selection in behavior can be demystified, explain how engineers can emulate human purposeful behavior in robots with significantly lower computational expense, and so much more. If ever there was a book that could consolidate some of the world's most rigorous applications of PCT in a manner rendering its remarkable explanatory power and paradigm exploding practical value in vivid detail and inspiring insight, this is it. Tom Scholte is a Professor of Directing and Acting in the Department of Theatre and Film at the University of British Columbia located on the unceded, ancestral, and traditional territory of the Musqueam people. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Systems and Cybernetics
Warren Mansell, "The Interdisciplinary Handbook of Perceptual Control Theory" (Academic Press, 2020)

New Books in Systems and Cybernetics

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 64:25


Regular listeners to this podcast will be well aware of my strong conviction that the Perceptual Control Theory initially formulated by William T. Powers entails many significant contributions to the domains of systems and cybernetics despite the fact that, for the last several decades, its applications have been further developed in a largely “adjacent” academic community.  It is in the ongoing spirit of a much-needed rapprochement between these fields, that previous guest, Warren Mansell, returns to this podcast; this time, as editor of The Interdisciplinary Handbook of Perceptual Control Theory – Vol. 1, out from Elsevier in 2020. Astonishing in its sweeping, panoramic view of the contemporary sciences, both “natural” and “social,” this magnificent volume brings together the latest research, theory, and applications of Powers' powerful and parsimonious theory proposing that the behavior of a living organism lies in the control of perceived aspects of both itself and its environment. Illustrating both the fundamental theory and the application of PCT to a broad range of disciplines, various chapters illuminate why perceptual control is fundamental to understanding human nature, describe a new way to do research on brain processes and behavior, reveal how the role of natural selection in behavior can be demystified, explain how engineers can emulate human purposeful behavior in robots with significantly lower computational expense, and so much more. If ever there was a book that could consolidate some of the world's most rigorous applications of PCT in a manner rendering its remarkable explanatory power and paradigm exploding practical value in vivid detail and inspiring insight, this is it. Tom Scholte is a Professor of Directing and Acting in the Department of Theatre and Film at the University of British Columbia located on the unceded, ancestral, and traditional territory of the Musqueam people. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/systems-and-cybernetics

SuperFeast Podcast
#125 Kid's Immunity & Liver Flushing with Helen Padarin

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 83:51


Today on the podcast Mason chats with naturopath, nutritionist, medical herbalist, and best-selling author Helen Padarin about kid's immunity, nutrition, Liver and Gallbladder flushing, and the seriously empowering works she does with kids, families, and remote indigenous communities. A big running theme in all of Helen's work as a practitioner is empowerment. Whether it be through supporting indigenous communities to continue their traditional ways of eating or her courses that focus on remedies, and hands-on tools to keep parents and children healthy; Helen is giving people the right building blocks and bridging the gap between disempowered and empowered health. Her passion is teaching people to come back to themselves, trust their intuition, and get back to centre so they can thrive in health. With 20 years' experience as a practitioner, Helen brings so much wisdom and experience to this conversation. Helen and Mason hone in on kid's immunity, nutrition, gut health, and why not suppressing fever in children is an empowering act that builds resilience and teaches us to trust our immune system. Helen takes us through the courses she runs and the full function/protocol of Liver and Gallbladder flushing; Why we do it, the basic preparation, and how it improves thyroid function. Tune in for health sovereignty and empowerment. . "I'm passionate about getting kids thriving, and through tools and inspiration, I take the weight out of health and healing and replace it with joy. My work is always in a way that is going to elicit an experience that's felt, that will then provide inspiration and curiosity to continue".      Mason and Helen discuss: Seasonal eating. Vitamin D and Zinc deficiency. Liver and Gallbladder Flushing. The Thyroid Gallbladder connection. Kid's immunity and nutrition. Fever and neural development. Looking at fever as a valuable process. Fevers in children; How to handle them. Carnivore and Paleo eating; How they can support the body. How current reference ranges of blood test results are limited. Foraging, hunting and gathering in indigenous communities. Supporting indigenous communities and their traditional ways of eating.  How non-indigenous Australian's can learn so much about connection and belonging from the ancient wisdom of indigenous people.   Who is Helen Padarin? Naturopath, nutritionist, medical herbalist, and author Helen Padarin has been in clinical practice since 2001. She works from one of Sydney's most highly regarded integrated medical centres alongside GP's, a pediatrician, and other practitioners. Helen is passionate about conscious living, real food, vital health, and empowering individuals, families, and organisations to find the joy in being well. Helen gains constant inspiration from seeing clients make conscious changes to their physical health and finding that it benefits their emotional, mental, and spiritual wellbeing as well. She loves working with other health professionals, community groups, thought leaders, and game-changers to provide truly holistic approaches to health, and creating supportive communities. Through her work Helen aims to promote awareness, and provide education about the treatment options available for immune disorders, digestive disorders, and neurological disorders. Her mission is to educate and promote awareness about a truly nourishing diet and lifestyle for everyone.  Helen was called on to write a chapter on pediatrics and ASD for a peer-reviewed clinical textbook published by Elsevier in 2011, has co-authored the book 'BubbaYumYum' with Charlotte Carr and Pete Evans, co-authored the 'The Complete Gut Health Cookbook' with Chef Pete Evans and has written several articles for health magazines. Since 2011 Helen has been a regular presenter and ambassador for the Mindd Foundation and has presented for Health Masters Live and ACNEM, providing post-graduate education for GP's, naturopaths, nutritionists, and other health care professionals. While living in NZ for over 4 years, Helen also lectured anatomy and physiology for the NZ College of Massage at the NZ Institute of Sport. Helen holds a bachelor's degree in Health Sciences (Naturopathy), advanced diplomas in nutrition, herbal medicine, massage, and has completed extensive post-graduate training in treatment for metabolic, neurologic, digestive, and immune disorders.   CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON APPLE PODCAST    Resources: Poop chart  Together Retreat Helen's Facebook Helenpadarin.com Bubba Yum Yum book The Complete Gut Health Cook Book     Q: How Can I Support The SuperFeast Podcast? A: Tell all your friends and family and share online! We'd also love it if you could subscribe and review this podcast on iTunes. Or  check us out on Stitcher, CastBox, iHeart RADIO:)! Plus  we're on Spotify!   Check Out The Transcript Here:   Mason: (00:01) Hey, Helen. Thanks for joining me.   Helen Padarin: (00:03) Hey Mason. Great to be here at long last. Hey, we've made it.   Mason: (00:06) Well, I'm glad you made it. I don't know how many years of hearing your name around the traps, the health community from grassroots days to just around Instagram and seeing your trips that you... I don't know if you are still running the trips out to, was it Arnhem Land?   Helen Padarin: (00:24) In Arnhem Land. Not since COVID that's for sure. So I'm hoping to get up there in July, just personally, but not work-related at this point, but that's been a very rich experience.   Mason: (00:39) What were you doing up there exactly?   Helen Padarin: (00:42) So I was partnering up with an organisation up in Elcho Island, started by Kama Mico, was Kama Trudgen, now Kama Mico. And she started this organisation with a Yolngu woman. So Yolngu are the indigenous people of that part of Northeast Arnhem Land, Elcho Island. And basically looking at supporting them to bring in more of their traditional ways of eating again, which essentially in that part of the world is very much what we would call paleo. And because they've got a really low lifespan there. Forties is generally where a lot of them are passing away, unfortunately, and it's just really due to a lack of education and resources and understanding. And likewise, us [inaudible 00:01:40], us non-indigenous have a hell of a lot to learn from them as well. So it was about learning from each other in this world where we're so disconnected from each other and ourselves and nature and ancient wisdoms and things like that, that really give us a sense of belonging and anchoring and place in the world and actually really simplify a lot of things as well.   Helen Padarin: (02:02) And so, as a result, a lot of us in this Western culture are feeling separated and isolated and stressed and alone, and the sense of not belonging and it's creating all sorts of depression, anxiety, and chronic illness. So we have a lot to learn from each other. So we had set up a world first really bringing indigenous and non-indigenous together for a two week retreat to learn from each other. And it was amazing.   Mason: (02:36) Far out.   Helen Padarin: (02:36) So I would love to do more of that work when the time and space and opportunity allows, but really beautiful work   Mason: (02:47) I love talking about diet and lifestyle. I really love watching, I'm always tuning into your stories, especially because I'm fascinated by practitioners who know how to hold that space really tightly, but there's an invisible bridging from the clinic over into the culture that we've got within our families and within our lifestyle. And you really, you've got a strong flame in your own personal culture. You're cooking out, you're talking a lot about your sourcing and I really like it because it's like it's a real authentic path that you have. And I don't see that a lot in practitioners. I see a lot of practitioners are in a colonised clinical mindset, which is awesome. And we need that. Just not that bridging.   Mason: (03:40) So since you're in that space, creating a diet no longer is about rules and following any crap like one thing. So you, I'm interested. So the way I see diets forming is you hold we're pillars of what we value. And for you, there's this again, for lack of a better word, there's a paleo esque energy around the way that you go and that you're getting a lot of the macro nutrients so on and so forth taking advantage of these whether it's like, I think your pork ribs yesterday?   Helen Padarin: (04:12) Pork belly.   Mason: (04:14) Pork belly. What's that farm again, that you-   Helen Padarin: (04:17) Gregory Downs Organics. So they're a regenerative farm in Young, which is about four and a half hours south west of Sydney. Amazing meat.   Mason: (04:26) I'm going to have to get onto that. I think that deliver. I think they send it-   Helen Padarin: (04:29) They're trying to get further afield. They do make drops in Sydney and Wollongong, and I think as far north as Newcastle, but they're yet to get up to Northern-   Mason: (04:40) [crosstalk 00:04:40] I can't complain, but so it's like there's that element of sourcing local, emulating the basic philosophy of based on the evidence of how we've eaten for thousands of thousands of years, but it's very much as you can as you know it's like okay, cool. We've got animals and a lot of vegetables that aren't endemic. Is that the right word? Anyway, that aren't native to where we are, but it's necessary. We do the best we can. Not many people go and then hold like, all right, now what about all the... I'm just curious what wisdom about, what pearls of wisdom when you go on that retreat, whether it be the food, the foraging, the insights around how you do have a family culture, what is there in that pillar that's marrying up with all these other pillars and values that you have?   Helen Padarin: (05:36) Well, everything in that culture is about relationships first and foremost. And the perspective and vision and way of seeing the world is utterly different. It's like being in another world literally then what we see it. So it can take quite a bit of adjustment to get your head around and how you relate to other people is based on your relationship with them or the relationship with animals or plants or a location or an element. It is literally all about relationships. So there's so much richness and beauty in that. And I see it taking life from being relatively 2D and black and white to being this Technicolour bazaar of richness. There's just so much more nuance in there and detail in there, which is really beautiful. And then it was really interesting from a food front because yes, I use paleo. I don't even really like labelling anything because I certainly don't agree with saying I am paleo because I am not paleo. I am a human. I'm Helen. And there are ways in which I eat that support my physiology best from my own experience. And so when I came across paleo, I was essentially already eating that way by way of experimentation since my teens of what works for me. Because I grew up feeling crap basically. Lots of immune stuff going on, depression, polycystic ovaries, just recurrent infections, pneumonia, shingles, you name it, asthma, eczema been there.   Mason: (07:24) The whole shebang.   Helen Padarin: (07:30) Yes. So I don't know what it was that drew me on this journey really. I know there were a few turning points, but for whatever reason, there was something innate in me that made me look for things that made me feel less crap. I wasn't even really looking to feel well because I didn't actually know that I didn't feel well because that was my normal. So I was just trying to avoid the things that obviously made me feel worse. And as years went on and that was refined. And then I started studying nutrition and naturopathy and it kept further being refined. And then I started seeing patients. And then for a lot of the first decade of my practise, I was really focusing a lot on working with children on the autism spectrum. And they like me, typically have a lot of digestive issues.   Helen Padarin: (08:23) And so going on this journey to heal my own digestion and working towards healing theirs, and it was like this amalgamation of nourishing traditions and gut and psychology syndrome and the body ecology diet and bringing all these things together. And when you overlay those elements, a lot of essentially what it came down to was paleo without knowing it. And then when I found out about paleo, I was like, "Huh, that's like what I'm doing." So it wasn't like a thing to latch on. And I encourage this for everybody is working towards what works best for you. And we go through different seasons in our life. And at different times we might need to eat in different ways to support ourselves through that phase as well.   Helen Padarin: (09:10) But what I found really interesting. So even when I'm eating paleo, my perception or my approach was always really highly plant-based. So it was still like 80% of my plate was veggies. And then there hasn't been meat and plenty of good fats, love fats. And then I started hearing about carnivore diet and [crosstalk 00:09:38] this ties into what I'm about to talk about up north. So I am getting somewhere with this.   Mason: (09:43) I completely trust you. I sometimes don't. I try, I'll admit, trust my guests and I'm like, "I'm going to remember that we've got a stake in the ground over there," but for you, I'm like, "I know you know what you're doing."   Helen Padarin: (09:56) Awesome. So when I first heard about carnivore, gosh, it must've been, I don't know, five, six years ago, something like that. And I was like, "You've got to be kidding me, right? That's a bit of a stretch." It was so far from my perception and my understanding at that point in time that I really couldn't reconcile with it at first. But then the more I started reading about it and the more I started researching and the more I was looking at a bit of the anthropological side of things and our history with hunting and gathering and the more I was looking at research and the more I'm working with restoring gut microbiomes and all this stuff. And I started meeting some people who were on that path and it was a massive turning point in them really upleveling or really nurturing and nourishing their health to a point that they hadn't yet been able to achieve prior.   Helen Padarin: (10:58) So I was starting to think, "Okay there's something in this." And then I started working with a few patients myself and experimenting just myself, but only in short little stints that actually felt really good on it. And patients who were bringing it in as well were typically really benefiting from it as well. And I typically maybe there might be rare cases, but I don't necessarily think it's a forever thing, but it's certainly a very helpful tool at times. But then what I learned when I was going up north was going hunting and gathering. It's really bloody hard to find plant foods, really hard. It takes out a lot of energy and a lot of effort for very small yield and that yield doesn't cover the expenditure of energy that it took to get it either.   Helen Padarin: (11:57) There's some amazing phytonutrients in there that have other really valuable physiological effects. But in terms of energy balance, it didn't add up at all. And yet to go and get a turtle or a goanna or whatever was actually relatively easy. And then you had something really filling and nourishing to share with the community. So that really started to shift as well my understanding. Because I've known over the years it's really important to prepare plants properly because they don't have teeth or claws. So their defence mechanisms are compounds within them that put animals off eating them because it might make them sick or die. And so we need to prepare those foods properly.   Mason: (12:47) Can I just say, just watch your hand. I think it just hits every now and then that mic.   Helen Padarin: (12:51) The microphone.   Mason: (12:52) I think it was just your hand brushing over it, but yeah. Sorry, go for it.   Helen Padarin: (12:58) No worries. So where was I? We really need to be able to prepare those plant foods properly so that we can digest them and utilise the nutrients in them adequately, which in our society of busy-ness, convenience, get things done quickly, that just doesn't tend to happen. So to have a healthy plant-based diet really takes a lot of conscientious effort. So time up there really helped me to consolidate that and really helped with my broadening my perspective. And again, it depends on what climate you're in, what season of life you're in, what your demands are at the time. All of those things come into play as well, but there really is time and place for all sorts of different ways of eating, including being vegan.   Mason: (13:54) I love this conversation so much. And I feel, if you're happy because I like what you're talking about there, it's just, it's bursted a bubble of perception that you had. And then from the way that you're talking about it, I'm going to keep to myself really questioned based I'm really just curious. And I'm in a real gooey thinking about this. You talked about seasonality being a factor. And for me more and more, as soon as you brought that up, it took me straight out of the black and white way of things. I still, if people say carnivore and straightaway in my mind, I'm like, "If you start it, there's going to be an intention to do that as long as possible, see how long that's going to be beneficial for you." And it's a real 2D way of approaching diet, which is fine, especially if you're in a clinic and especially if you're using veganism or carnivore as a healing tool. And you're very aware of other variables that may be doing gut microbiome testing, whatever it is.   Mason: (14:59) As soon as you mentioned seasonality, you've put colour and more of a 5D 6D way of thinking about how diets are going to slot in. And I started just thinking of gorging. It's of course like the same three square, although there's say and sorry for rambling here and sorry for rambling everybody because you tuned in for Helen, everyone. [crosstalk 00:15:25] I'm going to ramble a little bit, but we'll make sure we go long so we get all the wisdom out of Helen as well, but I'm going to indulge and process. I love contradictions. And again, I keep on thinking about this Scott Fitzgerald quote of the sign of true intelligence is your capacity to hold two opposing ideas at the same time and still function and hold them and watch them play pong back and forth.   Mason: (15:52) And so the three square meals. I'm like if you look at Chinese culture and the longevity factor of having consistency, same food, same nice warming food prepared in very similar ways, changing slightly during the seasons in cooking method. But having that real consistency for the body, I'm like, "That makes sense." And then you look at the ancestral element and it's like, well, for an Eskimo, you're going to, at some point in winter, you're going to be gorging on meat. And then I got brought to my attention. I'm like, yeah, but in the springtime, they actually have access to a shitload of berries and plant matter and they're going to be going hard over in that way. And they needed to because that's the way the world presented itself. And so there was this fluidity and this dance, which we need to learn how to integrate that.   Mason: (16:43) Even though we do have the convenience of civilization that could give us say the people who are best at taking advantage of civilization from a health and in other ways perspective is say the Chinese. And so they do that really well. So I'm like, cool, take that, but then don't forget your roots. So on and so forth that creates this gooey potential. If you can, for me, you say burst that bubble of like, "I know what it is. I know where I attribute my health to." It's this diet, because you've got to discover, I guess at the moment it must be trippy for you having a clinic and taking people through healing diets and then attempting to convey the ongoing, never-ending nature of finding an optimal diet in this crazy privilege that we have in this world.   Helen Padarin: (17:31) We definitely are in an incredible place of privilege that we do have so much choice and I think it's because we do have so much convenience and comfort. And convenience and comfort can really be thorns in the side of progress as well. So we really need to, I mean, I personally get really sick of going to, even if it's the organic supermarket and it's the same vegetables all year round. There's five things you can choose from like, "Oh my God, give me something else." I need to go foraging to have some variety or something. So we would be... Simple I think is good because we can very much over-complicate things. And the seasonality thing is an environmental thing and also an internal thing because internally we've got seasons too. So we are going through our lives, different stages of growth, different hormonal stages, stages of disease, stages of recovery and recuperation.   Helen Padarin: (18:38) We've got the four seasons of the year that we are... You know a lot about this. You can speak more on that, but throughout both our lives and our environments, there's always these shifts. And I think that's where we run into trouble when we attach ourselves to any ideology, because then there's that risk of sticking to it, no matter what, even if it isn't actually serving you anymore. So I think always having some flexibility and yet being able to dance with the seasons and know that things aren't stagnant. It's like when things get stagnant, that's when we get ill. So we need that flow happening throughout all elements of our life and food is one of them.   Mason: (19:27) And you brought up the different seasons of your life and that really strikes me. I haven't heard it come up in a while, just in a distinction around this, but brings the... And I can feel in that it's like you're going to evolve and have different seasons and you've only got the... That maybe doesn't necessarily loop around like the seasons of the earth, perhaps [crosstalk 00:19:56] and that's the only time you're going to have that hormone ratio or deployment, or that con symphony of those secretions. I'm just interested, have you got any in your own life? On that, just how that helps you like...   Helen Padarin: (20:14) Affected me the most is always staying curious. It's also affected me in that I'm a terrible meal planner. I won't plan a meal because I don't know how I'm going to feel on any given day. So on the day I want to go, "What do I need today? Okay. I'm going to have..." And I'm very fortunate that I've got that choice. There's a lot of people around the world who wouldn't. So that is definitely coming from a place of privilege, but I guess in different seasons for me, let me have a little think and feel. Well, I've actually just got some adrenal results back and I know I really need to go into some adrenal restoration for myself at the moment because there's been quite a few years of really depleting them basically.   Helen Padarin: (21:03) And I guess because I have all the pieces in place in my diet and lifestyle otherwise, I'm able to carry on pretty well. So I was quite surprised when I saw those are low. So I was like, "Okay, that's a little bit of a reality check for me as well." Stress is a big one for me. And I know that I've got this global high activation of my nervous system running in the background. So there can be, particularly during times of overwhelm for me, then I really need to make sure that I am, I don't know. There are times where I might have a bit more carbohydrate than normal and other times, for example, carbs just really don't suit me and make me feel tired. But other times it's something that's actually going to nourish me and nurture me and give me more energy and make me sleep better. And all of those kinds of things. So there's little tweaks like that in my diets.   Helen Padarin: (22:05) And then lifestyle wise, I'll be making sure that there's time to actually switch off and have quiet time. And over the years I've said one of my biggest goals in life is to get bored because I think there's not enough opportunity for that these days. And that's the place where creativity and imagination really comes to play. So that for me has been one of my big life lessons, because it's a little trap when you love what you do as well, because it doesn't necessarily feel like work, but you still got to really have that quiet time and rest, or I should say, I really still need to have that quiet time and rest. So they're the seasonal things for me that I'm feeling most at the moment anyway.   Mason: (22:57) Boredom. I really, I use that word in a very... I have used it. That's when I was like, when I was-   Mason: (23:02) I use that word in a very.... I have used it, like... I was like, when I stopped being vegan, it was because I got bored shitless with myself. And it's a very different kind of way of approaching that, like slipping into those states of boredom. I feel it's like an almost kind of, I can feel when you're saying that the context, there's a harmony and a sereneness in the cruising, which I think is yeah, definitely... If you look at the way, old Taoists, look at the heart, and being like, you know, full yang's all active, yang, celebration, love, but the yin is serene. And so you look at... This is someone, we just don't associate with that in the west, like that person's full power, fire, heart element, and they're just cruising.   Helen Padarin: (23:44) Yeah. And we definitely... Yeah. We really celebrate that yang in this culture. Right? And yeah, there's, I don't know who first said it, but you know, he who fails to go within goes without. We really need that time to nourish. And for me, boredom is just like an open space of nothingness, which is really, really beautiful. And more, I find, more and more challenging. Or not more and more challenging, I have just found it challenging, to spend time in that space. And I think I really feel that for kids these days as well, especially because they're growing up with so much stimulation and, you know, even we had as kids growing up. And I think that's a whole nother challenge that they're going to have to work their way through throughout life. Yeah.   Mason: (24:42) Mm-hmm (affirmative). I'd love to talk about kids a little bit. I'm like, I was so stoked when I saw you were doing a kid's immunity course. I feel because there's a lot with... There's obviously so much on adults' immunity because adults are so screwed. And kids have got...   Helen Padarin: (25:05) And that's the point, you know? Like often adults are so screwed because of what happened when we were kids. And so it's like, let's just stop that train now. Yeah? And turn it around so that when they're adults, I don't have to deal with all this hardship that we're dealing with because we didn't have that information or those tools or those resources when we were young. So yeah, it really breaks my heart to see kids in the clinic. And I know, because as I said before, I can relate to it, when I was young I didn't know that I didn't feel well until I felt better. And then it was like, holy shit, I can't believe I felt that bad for so long. You know? And so when I see kids now who are, you know, maybe not even five years old and already chronically ill, or even teenagers who have just had chronic ill health throughout their life.   Helen Padarin: (25:55) And a lot of it is gut and immune mediated. And they don't even know that they don't feel well. And I can see that, but they don't know that. And someone telling them isn't going to change that for them. Really, it's one of those things, I think most of the time, you don't really know until you experience it. And when you're feeling like that, gosh, it really... You know? It can tend to put a lens over how you see life and what your prospects are in the world and your hopefulness or hopelessness and all of this kind of thing. And so one of the things that I really wanted to be able to do with the kids immunity course is like, get kids thriving, you know? And it empowers whole families because when kids are ill, it puts stress on everybody as well. It puts a stress on other siblings who might not be getting the same amount of attention, it puts stress on parents.   Helen Padarin: (26:58) You know, if you look at, in the ASD community, for example, around, you know, there's about a 80% divorce rate because it's just so stressful when you're with kids with high needs all the time. But there's also, on the lesser end of the spectrum, asthma, allergies, eczema, but it disrupts sleep. And there's all these doctor's visits and there's this constant application of creams and antibiotics and steroids and all these kinds of stuff that, you know, you don't realise how much of an impact it's having on you sometimes until you're not having to do that anymore. And sometimes the idea of changing, like humans in general aren't great at change. And we'll tend to see it like Mount Everest and then we'll do it. And we're like, oh, that was actually an anthill, that wasn't so bad.   Helen Padarin: (27:51) So it's just a matter, I don't know. It's a matter of providing inspiration. Tools and inspiration. I'm really not a fan of motivation. Motivation takes a lot of energy. It takes discipline, but it takes a lot of energy. And sometimes you need that to make a first step. To go, okay, I'm going to do this. However, the way that I like to go on that adventure, to see what else there is. Yeah. So, and to bring some joy to it because of health and healing as well, it can get really weighted too. And you're always focusing on, you know, what's wrong or what else you've got to fix, or, you know, how can you do it better or how can you be better and all that kind of stuff. It's like, actually, let's just get curious and go on a bit of an adventure here and then feel bloody great as a result.   Mason: (28:53) I mean, I'm really excited about it for, you know, myself. Because I, you know, although I feel like we've got kind of like a real good foundation for understanding, you know, what the little ones need, obviously, you know, I've been in the industry and use your eyes like really, really healthy, but I feel like there's a lot of nuance perhaps that I have... Like I could probably upgrade with. So I'm really, I'm looking forward to it for myself for that reason.   Mason: (29:17) I'm pretty excited for the community based on what you just, like, everything you were just alluding to. That it's not just going to be like, stop doing this, you know, it's really harmful to do that and you should feel bad about that. You know, like I just remember the last time I heard someone really tuning into kids health and immunity, years ago, and they were like, basically, you know, giving gluten to a child is essentially, I'm sorry to say it and I'm trying to be gentle, but it's basically child abuse. And I was like, that's such a... You may think that, but that's such a... Like, you're perfectly within your rights, so hardcore to say that to someone, and you've alluded to all the realities of having a family and the fact making it, you know, for me, it's like, creating inspiration, a kinetic connection, an emotional connection to why we're going to do this. If the dad or the mom isn't onboard, you know, perhaps some space to allow everyone to find their own way to engage with this.   Mason: (30:12) So it's not them, and your awareness of the stress that this process can put through. I like, I can feel you really being like a... I mean, a shepherd implies that you've got sheep, but like, you know, a real custodian of like, that can really walk with people along that path and, you know, knowing that it's going to be really unique. I'm really excited for everyone on that. Would you mind jumping into some of the principles, the little tidbits around kids' immunity. Simple, complex that, you know, may be obvious, you know, may be not. And in that, like I was going to bring up maybe like fever as well, because I saw you doing a live on fever the other day. So maybe, I wouldn't mind just like a tiny little download on how you relate to fevers in childhood.   Helen Padarin: (31:07) Yeah. Well maybe we can start there. Yeah. Fever's really important, first of all. Right? So it is an essential part of an immune response. And if we are experiencing a fever, it's showing that our immune system is acting appropriately in the face of an infection or in the face of having to get rid of something in the body from an immune perspective. Okay? And so these days, one of the problems that I find we run into most frequently is where in a culture that is really adverse to discomfort, and fever's not comfortable. Yeah? And so whether it is a headache or whether it is a fever, we're very quick to pop a pill for that and to suppress that. But what we're then doing, if we're suppressing fever, is not actually allowing the immune system to carry out the functions that it needs to.   Helen Padarin: (32:04) And so then as a result, often the illness is either prolonged or it can even be more severe or recurrent. Yeah? Because the infection was never really properly addressed. And a lot of this just comes down to, you know, poor availability of information as well. We all are doing the best that we know what to do with the information that we have at the time. And generally speaking, the advice from most doctors and paediatricians is, if you've got a fever, have some paracetamol or something like that. Yeah? [inaudible 00:32:39] So it's not a... Yeah, it isn't about pointing fingers, going, you know, that's a bad thing to do, don't do it. And there are times and places for those things as well. But to be used really judiciously.   Helen Padarin: (32:54) And so there's a few fascinating things about fever too. And one of the ones that I find really interesting, and Rudolph Steiner talks about this quite a bit too, is how fever is actually really an important part of child development as well, neural development. And you will often notice that if a child has a fever and they're allowed to go through it, they're supported through it, then when they come out of it, it's like, whoa, when did you suddenly grow up? You know, have you noticed that yourself at all? Yeah.   Mason: (33:28) Hundred percent.   Helen Padarin: (33:29) Yeah, yeah. There's this big shift, but that doesn't tend to happen if we suppress the fever. Yeah? Why exactly that happens, I don't know the mechanism. But it is just something that you see happen all the time. Time after time. So that's really important. And there's also a resilience piece in there as well because when a child is supported to go through a fever, they know that they're capable of doing so. And they're also learning that it's okay to be uncomfortable, and discomfort passes too. So that's going to help them as they age because there's always going to be things in life that are painful and uncomfortable. We can't avoid it. And unfortunately we try to, but often in doing so create more. So it's that whole thing in a way of what we resist persists.   Helen Padarin: (34:27) And it's really empowering when you know that you can support your child. Because there's a lot of fear around fever too, yeah, it's like there's fear of febrile convulsions, for example. But the research shows, and clinical practise shows, that generally speaking, febrile convulsions aren't dangerous. There's a point to which, you know, fevers might need to be treated. And it's generally around the 40, 41 degree mark. Or if the child has symptoms like going really floppy or listless or something like that. But generally speaking, even for quite high fevers, there are a lot of safe practises that you can employ to support your child through it.   Helen Padarin: (35:10) And so in the course, we talk about what they are and we also do demos in the kitchen of home remedies and things that you can make to bring into play as well. And you know, what herbs can be useful for helping to moderate or break a fever and things like that if need be. So, yeah, I think fever is something... You know, it's important to monitor and manage, but I think generally speaking we tend to be way more fearful of it than what we need to be. And it's a really valuable process to go through.   Helen Padarin: (35:47) And we've had families in the course going through it. And since starting their course, their kids had an infection and like just the feedback we get after their child has an infection is so cool because you can hear it in their voice and feel it in their tone. They're just like so stoked and feeling so empowered that they actually knew what to do, and were capable of doing it at home. It wasn't this having to outsource all the time. And that I'm really passionate about as well, because I think we have in this society been kind of conditioned to hand over so much of our own power and responsibility. And if we can learn, actually, we've got this, we can do this. We'd be in a lot better place in so many ways.   Mason: (36:38) I love it so much. I love that, like, you've just articulated in a way that is incredible and perceivable. And I don't think people realise the impact. It's like when people don't know that they're not feeling that great, people don't realise just how disenfranchised they are, how disconnected they are from their own sovereignty and something as simple. And I'm excited because, you know, at times I float off into, you know, my very busy periods in the business and, you know, like... And I just, I kind of forget about just tending to the home fire and upkeeping those skills, and trusting in myself and believing myself. Lucky to have a wife that's like very, very good at that. But it's like preparing your own meals and then just having those remedies and watching... Knowing the protocols, you know, and not going to a clinician, oh my god, that's why you need to be teaching this mindset to practitioners, I think.   Mason: (37:41) It just makes me smile so much. And I just, I love practitioners that have that awareness because I think it takes a lot to embody that world of healing, clinical healing, facilitating people who would be out of their depth, which happens regularly. And thank god, you know, we have clinicians for when we are out of our depth. Entering that world, it's such a shedding of the skin and taking on a whole nother path to then venture out of that safe cocoon of I'm a know-it-all, and I'm the one that delivers the healing. To delivering what you are. I really value it. I don't have a word coined for what that type of practitioner is, but I'm going to say a good one. And so..   Helen Padarin: (38:32) [inaudible 00:38:32].   Mason: (38:33) But I love it, yeah.   Helen Padarin: (38:36) No, I get it. It's a big theme in my practise as well. I guess it is more about, you know, the whole teaching a man to fish thing, rather than giving out the fish. Because there's no point, otherwise we're just building other co-dependent relationships rather than being able to really trust and rely on ourselves. And yeah, again, one of my biggest passions, come back to yourself, free a connection with self, trusting that intuition, trusting your inner voice, knowing how much wisdom you do have, knowing how capable you are, and knowing how much resilience you have. Because so many things throughout our life can just like chip all that stuff away from our belief in ourselves that we have these totally warped views of what we are actually capable of. So yeah. Getting back to centre, getting back to self.   Mason: (39:30) So good. What are some of the other principles that you cover for kids' immunity?   Helen Padarin: (39:36) Yeah. So we start off with nutrition and immune function, which is actually really important when we're dealing with kids, because nutritionally speaking, kids aren't just mini adults, right? They're going through the most rapid rates of growth and development in their lives. So their requirements for nutrients are very different per kilo, for example, than it is for adults. Yeah? So we look at the key nutrients that are required for immune development and for gut function in particular, because as you know, most of the immune system is in the lining of the gut wall. And so while we start off with talking about nutrition, because of course every cell and hormone and neurotransmitter and immune molecule in your body is made up of the nutrients that you eat. So if you don't have those nutrients coming in, you don't have the building blocks to be able to build those things.   Helen Padarin: (40:31) And therefore your function is going to be impaired. So, we start off there with the building blocks. There's also the fact that during times of greater need, we need to make sure we have more of those nutrients. So if there are asthma or chronic allergies, or if there is an acute infection, the requirements for those nutrients also increases from baseline. So in those times, what do we want to focus on? Making sure there's plenty coming into the diet. Yeah? And we focus mostly on foods, but of course at times, you know, supplements can be helpful, but in the big scheme of things, we want foods to be medicine as much as possible. Yeah? You can't supplement away a shitty diet. You can't get all those building blocks because food is so much more than nutrients as well. Yeah. It's information and we can't get that information from supplements. So from there we go on and look at gut health and a little bit of a, not a big, deep dive, but a bit of a dive into the microbiome. Because as I just mentioned before, most of your immune system is in the lining of your gut wall and how your immune system responds to different triggers is very much dependent on what kind of microbes are growing in your gut. So we look at the integrity of the gut wall. We look at microbiome diversity. We look at what the gut needs to actually function well, what nutrients are required for gut health as well. So looking at that side of things. We have a whole module on fever. There's seven modules in the course. So yeah, there's a whole module on fever. And we've got an interview with Dr. Marsha Trait, who's a paediatric neurologist in the States and she's shared some beautiful information on fever and microbial diversity and all of that kind of thing in there. So that's got a lot of gold in it.   Mason: (42:38) Amazing. I think all of our people are going to be really stoked to know that you're, you know... I knew you would be, but just know that you're having like that micro, that diversity conversation. I think it's like everyone's starting to click on to that being such a good way to...   Helen Padarin: (42:54) [inaudible 00:42:54].   Mason: (42:54) Yeah. Awesome.   Helen Padarin: (42:54) For sure. Yeah. Then we have sessions in the kitchen. So each module's got PDFs and videos. And so yeah, you come into the kitchen with us as well and we do recipe demos of some really core foods to include for immune function. We have another module on home remedies as well. So again, come into the kitchen with us so that you know how to make them. They're super simple, but you know, like me, I'm a visual and kinesthetic person. So it's easier to learn that way.   Helen Padarin: (43:29) We do include in there overarching support for the whole family as well. Because just like the gut microbiome, the family unit is a bit of a microbiome itself as well. And so the impact of each member of the family affects the other. So we're looking at that kind of organism as a whole. And what else we've got. I feel like I'm missing one. We've got a whole bunch of additional resources in there too. And we include PDFs to research papers and stuff like that. So if you want to geek out more, you can go down that line. And then if you want to keep it really practical and just go, I need to know what to do now, then you can look at it from that point as well.   Mason: (44:18) Can you give me a sneak peak of some type of like nutrients, whether it be one that we like, you know, if you want to be finding it in food or supplementation, that you see as like a key one that's deficient in most diets, maybe don't, leave the hook thing and in the course we'll show you how to get it into your diets.   Helen Padarin: (44:34) I'm okay to share some. So yeah, I guess two of the big ones in Australia, well, not just Australia actually, Australia, America, Europe, and New Zealand, vitamin D and zinc, for sure. And one thing that's really important, I think, for people to understand as well is how limited reference ranges of blood test results are. Or rather how they are determined. Because a lot of people go, yeah, I had my vitamin D tested or I had my zinc tested or my whatever tested and it's all good. It's all fine, it's all in the normal range. But what's important to understand is that reference ranges through pathology labs are based on 95% of the results that go through that lab.   Helen Padarin: (45:29) So that means that generally speaking, it's sick people who are going to get tested. So it's 95% of the results of sick people, generally, not 95% of the results of healthy people. And so it can vary from lab to lab as well, depending on the demographic of the area that the lab is in. And I, as of this year, have been in practise now for 20 years.   Mason: (45:54) Whoa.   Helen Padarin: (45:54) I know, it doesn't seem possible, but apparently it is. And so I have seen over the years as our populations metabolic health.   Helen Padarin: (46:03) I've seen over the years, as our population's metabolic health has gone downhill, our reference ranges have changed along with that. So now where we're seeing, oh, it's in the normal range, 10 years ago, that would not have been in the normal range. So normal range doesn't actually really mean anything, okay? We want to actually look at the ideal range.   Mason: (46:21) What a way to decimate the genome and take us on a completely different dependent evolutionary path.   Helen Padarin: (46:29) A hundred percent. There's a Krishnamurti quote I love, now I need to remember it.   Mason: (46:38) I love it and that's all.   Helen Padarin: (46:40) And that's it so look him up. Here it is, basically, he's saying there's nothing healthy about being well adapted to a profoundly sick society, which is what we have been really doing quite well.   Mason: (46:59) Very well.   Helen Padarin: (47:00) So if we look at vitamin D, for example, in Australia and New Zealand, to be determined to be vitamin D deficient, you would have a rating of 49 nanomoles per litre or lower. But we know that even at 75 nanomoles per litre, you have a 50% increased risk of viral infections. That's at 75, but most people could have their blood test results come back at 51 and the doctor's like, "You're fine." And they're like, "Oh my God," going through the floor. So typically for vitamin D, we want to see... And it also increases risk of things like autoimmunity and allergies and eczema and gut issues as well because of course our nutrients are used for multiple functions throughout the body. So low or suboptimal levels. So there's deficiency and there's sub-optimal level and the sub-optimal level will have many impacts around the body.   Helen Padarin: (48:06) So really you're looking for levels of more than a hundred at least, but ideally between 130 and 200 nanomoles, the numbers are different in the States because they have different measurements so you have to do the conversion, but yet in Australia and New Zealand, that's what you're aiming for. So that is really not often achieved because while we're in this sunny country, we've also learned over the years to slip, slop, slap a bit too much and be too fearful of the sun. And so it's very rare for me to see good blood test results for vitamin D.   Helen Padarin: (48:42) And if we don't get our blood levels up by the end of summer, it's really hard to maintain them throughout the rest of the year, because particularly the further down the latitude or further up the latitude you go, the less months of the year, you're actually going to get rays from the sun that you get vitamin D from. So then you really need to make sure that you're getting it from your food. So, yes, vitamin D from food is really important.   Helen Padarin: (49:10) And so zinc, our soils in Australia and New Zealand and quite a few other countries are very low in zinc so it comes down to you're not just what you eat, but you're what you are, what you eat. So whether you are eating plants, you need to make sure that they've been in good soil. If you're eating animals, you need to make sure they're in good soil and eating good plants, and that's going to affect the nutrient density of the food, which is why I'm passionate about sourcing food as best as possible as he can, which isn't always possible, you just do the best with what you can and that's it. There's nothing else, no more to it, that's the best you can do. So yeah, there are a couple of the nutrients that are most commonly deficient. Yeah, and has a huge impact.   Mason: (49:59) Huge impact, yeah. Maybe it's good thing that I have a four year old always asked for a chunk of butter for herself to how down on in the morning,   Helen Padarin: (50:10) Yeah, that's it. So pasture-raised animal fats, so really the best source of vitamin D, which is one reason why I love my Gregory Downs Organics pork and their pork belly. So those fatty cuts of pork because pork fat is one of the highest sources of vitamin D. Or you could even get some pasture-raised lard and cook with that, pasteurised egg yolks, liver, cod liver oil, they are all good sources of vitamin D.   Mason: (50:37) Cod liver oil, an easy one to get into the kids.   Helen Padarin: (50:40) Most of the time, it actually is, it's only us adults that have psychological issues with them.   Mason: (50:47) Yeah. I'm damaged, I'm damaged from taking it. But we dosed Aiya up when she was a little one before she was tarnished.   Helen Padarin: (51:03) And that's one thing, if you are introducing foods to kids, it's monkey see monkey do, right? So if you are wanting them to have a particular food and you're giving it to them going, "Ah, that was gross," then they're going to go, "Ah, that's gross," because they're mirroring you because that's how they're learning. So this just goes across the board. Again, embrace that attitude of curiosity and adventure when you're trying new foods, whether it's yourself or your kids, and remember to give your kids the gift of finding out for themselves rather than basing their opinion of yours, yeah. So yeah, give them the opportunity to choose for themselves. And remember that humans are creatures of repetition, especially kids, and usually the magic number for trying new foods is 10 before you make an actual opinion about something. So just having things on offer that you can try a variety of different things.   Mason: (52:12) That's a good one. Yeah. Gosh, I'm looking forward to doing this course and I'm looking forward to everyone... I think we've got a lot of parents listening to this podcast, I think they're going to be stoked as well. Do you have any particular times when you open it up?   Helen Padarin: (52:27) Well, it's open all year, but now that we're going into the Southern hemisphere winter, we're doing more live chats and spending more time. There's a private Facebook group so you get to connect with other like-minded families as well, which is really great. And so yeah, times of year like this, we're spending more time in there to engage and make sure everybody's really resourced up as we go into the cooler months of the year. So yes, now is a good time.   Mason: (52:57) Oh, that's such a huge resource having a practitioner led course that's revolving around remedies and keeping yourself healthy is very different a lot of the time to where I've kind of come from, which is that super counter-culture grassroots health community, which it's like there's an experimental remedy for everything and a lot of the time they were impervious to structure. Some of them nail it and do it really well, most of the time not. So it's nice to know, especially when it comes to kids, they just have such a grounded resource, grounded admins helping.   Helen Padarin: (53:37) Yeah. And with the Q&As as well, the live chats, it's such a good opportunity to engage personally as well and ask specific questions about what's going on for your child or your family or yourself. Yeah, so there's the foundational work with all the course material and a lot of specifics in there for different kinds of conditions or symptoms, but then, yeah, the live chats are a great way to go deeper, basically.   Mason: (54:12) Amazing. I mean, what an investment. I mean, when it all gets a bit hard for me and I'm like, "I'm too busy," I kind of really start re-evaluating, especially... I mean, if I look at I'm investing in a house and working my ass off and I can feel how that kind of setup is going to be so beneficial. It's just as easily I feel the microbiome of my child, I'm like, "No," all of a sudden I'm not too busy. I just feel like getting that world into my world and I go, "Oh my gosh, what an investment," just how much easier life is going to be for that child, for me.   Helen Padarin: (54:50) Yeah, for the rest of their life and your life as well, because we know that the health in our childhood and how many courses of antibiotics we've had and that kind of thing has lifelong impact as well. So again, that's why I'm so passionate about it and why I wanted to focus on kids because it's a real opportunity to change the future. Or rather than change, have it empowered, strong, resilient future generations. And I can't think of a better gift to our kids in that sense than that really, because then they've got more freedom to do and choose what they wish to.   Mason: (55:33) It's huge. You do just see some people are just naturally born with a shitload of Jing, like Keith Richards, but there's other there's kids, there's families and they were just on the broths and organ meats, just real good source veggies. And you just look at that like the good stock, really good stock, strong knees.   Helen Padarin: (55:59) Absolutely. And I see that with my friend's kids. And so often they just get stopped all the time, going, "Wow, your kid's just so alert and so engaged and so vibrant," and yeah, it does make a huge difference how they start out, yeah, on all levels, physically, mentally, and emotionally, spiritually. Yeah.   Mason: (56:22) What an incredible opportunity to learn these things and to share them out as you said going up, getting on country and sharing that with mob. You can see something really amazing getting created here. It's not just run of the mill. All right. Everyone just jump onto that course, by the way, if you're in the Northern hemisphere get on, get onto it.   Helen Padarin: (56:46) Yeah. Even if you get onto it now you're prepared for your winter, but yes, you can sign up any time, but again, we're on there now.   Mason: (56:56) Prepare for flu season, although we don't have the flu anymore, it's gone. It's all gone. There's no flu season this year.   Helen Padarin: (57:03) Prepare for viruses, can't even say it. Actually, if anybody wants to help this cause for stronger future generations, just with all the censorship going on at the moment, anything that even smells of immunity just is really hard to get much reach. So if you do feel that this is important, then yeah, we would be super appreciative of just sharing it with friends and family and anyone you think might be interested out there.   Mason: (57:38) Yeah. So I'm really happy to share this out there. We've had that as well with all the COVID censorship, even just wanting to do an ad, right? You look at the crazy ads that people put out there from the pharmaceutical company and the crazy... We've talked about vaccines once on this podcast, especially the COVID-19 podcasts so it was with a doctor who, she's rad and she's worked on vaccines and she was explaining her process about all of why she wanted to do it. And I was like, "Great," it was a great conversation. And I really am seeing the opportunity to have some real open table chats on this podcast. And it's the same way with diets, start popping the bubble as much as possible and start looking at each other and feeling each other's process to approaching this whole thing and acknowledging our own ignorance at the same time.   Mason: (58:34) So in saying that, maybe we talk about it, maybe we don't, let's see how far we go down, but just talking to the immunity thing, look at how that's been advertised, celebrity endorsements, all that kind of stuff. There's no kind of real accountability there. I've got a product that's now a TGA listed medicine so it's on the same kind of level of scrutiny as a drug basically and we've got clinical-backed data, we're allowed to say, "This is to build your immune system, this is to support your immune system." And if I try and advertise that it gets denied by the big wigs, because I'm not allowed to advertise my thing that I paid a lot of money to have as a listed medicine here in Australia and is clinically-backed and acknowledged it is traditionally backed to support the immune system. So it's a lot of bullshit.   Helen Padarin: (59:32) Yeah. I feel It. Yeah, that's a whole other thing, isn't it? It's crazy, yeah, how much is being censored at the moment. And I kind of wanted to emphasise as well one thing that you said earlier and then kind of it came up then is that ability to hold contradictions. I mean, all of life is a contradiction, right? Contradiction is everywhere, nothing makes sense really, if you want a black and white yes or no kind of thing. And I just think it is really important that we do kind of let down our guards and defences a bit so that we can get curious and have conversations and not need to pretend that we know it all and be open to learning new information and hearing other people's points of views without becoming supercharged about it. I mean, I know it can be challenging at times, but rarely is the truth at either end of the spectrum, it's usually there's somewhere in between I think. But either way being open to more than one point of view I think is important for health as well.   Mason: (01:00:45) That contradiction you just brought up a real nuanced skill that does show intelligence there because I feel like it's a very slippery one and I do see a lot of people who are speaking out about having the vaccine forced on them going, "Hey everyone, please, you need to listen and learn," and I see the distinction and skill there is going, "I've done a lot of research on this. I have a view that is going against the common narrative and I want to share that and I'm going to ask you guys to be open to sharing," that's the skill. To be like that and have real conviction in that what you're talking about and still then holding this opening and this desire to learn and really dead set letting go of your "I'm a know-it-all, I'm right and I've got all my talking points that make it so that even though they're convincing," I've been there and been like, "No one will ever sway me on this. Look at that, I'm too good at gathering..." Whether you're on the pro or anti or whatever you want to call yourself side, having that ability to lay it down as you know it and staying completely open and curious at the same time, huge sign of intelligence.   Helen Padarin: (01:01:59) Imagine if we could all do that, imagine the state of affairs and society and the world if we even just had a little bit more of that going around. I think that's one of the medicines we need, yeah.   Mason: (01:02:15) I'm going to say something very non-woke now, but going through a fever, going through an experience that is not comfortable and being supported, but being allowed the right to be uncomfortable and work your way through that kind of helps you not become such a snowflake is how I'd put it. But I think what you're talking about, having an open affair, having conversation with someone and really trying to go down a rabbit hole with creating tension around, "I'm sharing what I kind of know, and I'm going to let in and acknowledge you know some," provided the person does, and they're not just a bloody, you know what I'm about to say, rambling idiot. It's very uncomfortable to hold that space and be in that space, that vulnerability of having conviction and really desiring to grow and evolve beyond where you are. And I think it all goes down to fevers, we didn't allow these people to have fevers now they're bloody snowflakes and they won't be uncomfortable in that tension space.   Helen Padarin: (01:03:28) That is so true. That's it. And that tension, there's negative or bad, not good enough words for it that I have anyway, but there's bad tension and good tension, right? To simplify things. And I think that is a good kind of tension. That's like creative tension, that's a space that allows new things to grow from because there is this discomfort. And if we're comfortable, we don't tend to grow because it's just too comfortable, right? But if we can be in that space where we've come from a particular perspective or belief but we can be open to others and again, be curious with someone else who can also meet you there and be curious because it's very hard to do that... Still possible actually, but it's nice if you can do it with someone who can meet you there, then that's where innovation comes from and creativity comes from and how to make things better. So, yeah.   Mason: (01:04:37) Oh, amen. A-bloody-men. I'm aware time is getting around us a little bit, before we bring it home. I just want to quickly get your download on liver flushing because it's your other offering. It's been a little bit since I've done my own liver flush, I do like the idea when Southern hemisphere springtime comes around, jumping on and I guess just being a part of a community and then doing it with you guys in that way. But do you want to just quickly give the down-low? There are a lot of people here who might not have actually heard of liver flushing, where it comes from in terms of the old school herbal tradition and folk remedy, what the point is, what the benefits are, why it's a good idea to in the beginning maybe be professionally advised and led?   Helen Padarin: (01:05:35) Absolutely, yeah. So this is a programme we run a couple of times a year and I guess one of my simplified philosophies of life and health is that disease comes down to two things, too much of something and not enough of something. So what we're wanting to do is nourish and cleanse basically to create and maintain our health. And we're in this environment these days where we are inundated with exposures that as a human race, we've never been exposed to before since World War Two, there's just been an explosion of chemicals in our environment, in our food. And so our livers and our thyroid for that matter get very heavily affected. So our thyroid is really sensitive to a lot of environmental toxins and our liver and gallbladder function are heavily affected by our thyroid, I'd love to know the TCM connection here actually.   Mason: (01:06:39) I was literally just thinking, I wish I had like a Jamie, like a Joe Rogan Jamie and I'd be like-   Helen Padarin: (01:06:45) "Look that up for me."   Mason: (01:06:47) Yeah, just bring that up. I'm going to wobble the video a little bit guys. I'm like, I think I've got a book here, I'm not going to go into it. It's not here, but I have a book that basically is that, a TCM practitioner booklet. Yeah.   Helen Padarin: (01:07:03) Yeah. So there's thyroid receptors throughout your body, right? And your gallbladder needs thyroid hormone to be able to empty bile from the gallbladder. And you also need a good functioning liver to... The word's escaping me at the moment. To transfer your T3, sorry, your T4, your inactive thyroid hormone to active thyroid hormone, T3. That conversion mainly happens in the liver. So you need good liver function for your thyroid hormone to work properly. You need that thyroid hormone for your gallbladder to empty properly and for a gazillion and other things as well.   Helen Padarin: (01:07:49) So we do this liver and gallbladder flush to help out the liver, the gallbladder, the gut, the thyroid kind of everything, basically. So the liver is where we produce our bile, it gets stored in the gallbladder and then when we're eating fatty food, you get a squirt of bile out of the gallbladder to emulsify. It's kind of like a detergent and emulsifies the fats so that your lipase and your enzymes that break down fat can break that down and you can get your essential fatty acids and you

All Things Strength & Wellness
Episode 243: Matt Wallden - Osteopathy, the Chek Institute, working in pro sport, and Vibram Five-fingers

All Things Strength & Wellness

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 89:03


This episodes guest is Matt Wallden. Matt trained as an Osteopath & Naturopath in the 1990's completing a BSc (Hons) and, later a Masters in Osteopathic Medicine, then going on to train in the CHEK System between 2001-2005.  His ambition was to work in professional sports; a goal he achieved by 2003.  Since then he has contributed several chapters to various medical texts and has been the Editor of the Rehabilitation Section  for Elsevier's Journal of Bodywork & Movement Therapies since 2009.   In 2006, Matt bought an early version of the Vibram Fivefingers and was the person who explained to Vibram that their “sailing shoe” had applications in rehabilitation and conditioning.  Matt presents here and abroad to post-graduate, undergraduate and various medical groups and has been part of the CHEK Faculty since 2006.  Matt lives in Surrey with his wife and 2 children. On this episode Matt and I discuss: Matt's background Why Matt became an osteopath? Matt shares his story of how he became involved with Vibram Fivefingers I ask Matt about research surrounding the efficacy of barefoot running I ask Matt how did he deals with a very stressful periods in his life  I ask Matt for his current and top reading recommendations I ask Matt if he could invite 5 people to dinner, dead or alive, who would he invite and why?  This was a great discussion with Matt and I hope you guys really enjoy it. Stay Strong, RB   Show Notes: Website mattwallden.com Facebook - Matthew Wallden Twitter - @MattWallden   Books Mentioned: Born to Run Win or Learn The Invisible Rainbow Living your Dying Myth and the Body   People and Resources Mentioned: Paul Chek Phillip Beach Joseph Chilton Pearce Vibram five fingers Michael Owen Chek Institute  Moshe Feldenkrais Charles Poliquin William Kraemer  Tudor Bompa Richard Schmidt Chelsea Football Club Surrey Cricket Club Leon Chaitow Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies Chris Murphy  Diane Lee Lynn McTaggart Joe Warne Conor McGregor John Kavanagh  Carol Dweck Joseph Campbell Albert Einstein  George Michael Mark Manson David Beckham Gary Neville Phil Neville Nicky Butt Paul Scholes  Ryan Giggs Bono Cleopatra Catherine the Great Gautama Buddha Jesus Christ

Research 2030
Global North-South Collaboration: A perspective from South Africa with Dr. Jennifer Thomson

Research 2030

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 18:42


“Increased collaborations can save considerable time and money, and most often, breakthrough research comes through collaborative research rather than by adhering to tried and true methods” (Bensal, et al., 2019) In this episode, we explore collaboration with between the Global South and the Global North with our hosts, Ylann Schemm and Ian Evans from Elsevier, as they talk to our guest, Dr. Jennifer Thomson, Emeritus Professor in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of Cape Town, and President of the Organization for Women in Science for the Developing World (OWSD).Episode VoicesJennifer ThomsonEmeritus Professor in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of Cape Town President of the Organization for Women in Science for the Developing World (OWSD) Prof. Jennifer Thomson is currently Emeritus Professor in the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of Cape Town (UCT). Previously, she was Associate Professor at the University of the Witwatersrand and Director of the Laboratory for Molecular and Cell Biology for the South African Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, before becoming Head of the Department of Microbiology at UCT. Thomson has won numerous prestigious awards and fellowships, including the L'Oreal/UNESCO prize for Women in Science for Africa in 2004 and an Honorary Doctorate from the Sorbonne University. Her research field is the development of genetically modified maize resistant to the African endemic maize streak virus and tolerant to drought and she has published three books on Genetically Modified Organisms: Genes for Africa, Seeds for the Future, and Food for Africa. She is a member of the board of the African Agricultural Technology Foundation (AATF), based in Nairobi and vice-chair of ISAAA (International Service for the Acquisition of AgriBiotech Applications). Prof. Jennifer Thomson also serves on the National Advisory Council on Innovation of the South African Minister of Science and Technology.Guest Hosts:Ylann SchemmAs Director of the Elsevier Foundation, Ylann Schemm drives technology-enabled partnerships to advance diversity in science, build research capacity and support global health around the world. She has been an integral part of the Foundation's growth since joining as a Program Officer in 2008. In addition, Ylann currently serves as Elsevier's Director of External Partnerships, building on 15 years in corporate relations and responsibility roles and focusing on key technology, gender and sustainability collaborations. Ian EvansIan Evans is Content Director for Global Communications at Elsevier. Previously, he was Editor-in-Chief of Elsevier's Global Communications Newsroom. Based in Oxford, he joined Elsevier six years ago from a small trade publisher specializing in popular science and literary fiction.Prior to this he worked for several years on a leading trade magazine for the electrical retail industry, reporting on new technologies and market trends in consumer electronics. He holds a degree in English literature from the University of Wales, Cardiff, and spends his spare time reading, writing, and playing drums.

Full Scope
Yellow Fever, Part 2

Full Scope

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2021 27:44


SummaryYellow Fever is a viral tropical disease. It is most prevalent in equatorial Africa (90%) and South America (10%). No specific treatments exist but it can be prevented with a highly affective vaccine. The disease is spread via mosquito vectors (arbovirus). Yellow refers to the jaundice that occurs in severe infection from liver damage. Bleeding (hemorrhagic fever) and kidney damage are other severe manifestations. Morbidity and MortalityAbout 5% of people infected with the Yellow Fever virus will die. Foreign visitors to endemic countries are at the higher risk of severe infection if exposed. Hemorrhagic fever, liver failure, and other organ failures can lead to shock and death. It is very difficult to know how many infections occur annually but the WHO estimates about 200,000 (likely many more). Epidemics periodically occur and usually have worse than normal case fatality rates. StoryYellow fever outbreaks plagued the America's in the 18th and 19th centuries, having been introduced from Africa just few hundred years prior. The Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1793 killed 9% of the residents in Philadelphia. Many, including George Washington, fled the city. Yellow Fever has plagued the US military for years before the 17D vaccine was discovered in 1937 by Max Theiler (Noble Prize).  Key Points1.  Yellow fever is endemic to equatorial Africa and South America, but strangely not Asia.2.  People living and traveling to these areas should be vaccinated with the 17D live attenuated yellow fever vaccine.3.  Fever, chills, headache, and myalgias are common. A minority of cases progress to liver failure and hemorrhage.  About half of cases that progress will be fatal4. Treatment is supportive. As such, prevention with vaccine, vector control, and avoiding mosquito bites is very important. Avoid blood thinners and anti-platelets. References-       Keystone et al. Travel Medicine, 4th Ed. Elsevier 2019. Ch. 12. Torresi and Kollaritsch. Recommended/Required Travel Vaccines.-       Farrar et al. Manson's Tropical Diseases, 23rd Ed. Elsevier 2014. Ch. 14. Young et al. Arbovirus Infection.-       Wikipedia. Yellow Fever, Yellow Fever Vaccine-       WHO, Yellow Fever. https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/yellow-fever-       Vaccine Information Statement. CDC. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/yf.pdf.-       Thomas R. E. (2016). Yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease: current perspectives. Drug design, development and therapy, 10, 3345–335

Active Towns
Livable Streets 2.0 w/ Bruce Appleyard

Active Towns

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2021 99:03


Show Notes:A livable street is like a good friend that gives you energy. In contrast, an unlivable street drains you.Bruce Appleyard is an Associate Professor of City Planning & Public Administration, at San Diego State University and serves as both the Associate Director Active Transportation Research Center (ATR) and the Associate Director Center for Human Dynamics in our Mobile Age (HDMA).He is the author of Livable Streets 2.0 published by Elsevier which is actually an expanded update of his father, Donald Appleyard's classic 1981 urbanism text Livable Streets. When the original edition first came out it was the first to put forth the theory that streets are for people.In this episode, John and Bruce discuss in detail many aspects of the book and his recent contribution on Designing for Active Travel he made to the International Encyclopedia of Transportation (TRNS).Livable Streets 2.0 is a complete manual on walking, bicycling, and traffic calming. So if you want to learn more about these things, we highly encourage you to get the book.Additional Helpful Links:Landing Page for this Episode on Active Towns websiteMike Lydon and Tactical UrbanismShared Streets and Woonerfs - Hans Monderman and Ben Hamilton-BaillieCharter for Humane and Equitable StreetsTransit and Bikes - Roland Kager's Active Towns Podcast EpisodeThe MUTCD - NACTO's positionRight of Way book and Angie Schmitt's Active Towns Podcast EpisodeContinuous, Raised Sidewalks and Sidepaths and a Not Just Bikes video on the subjectAdvisory Bike Lane Streets Fietsstraat Active Towns Podcast Episode PeopleForBikes Jan Gehl - Building at Human Scale books Cities for People and Life Between Buildings Interested but Concerned - Geller and 2011 follow up by Dr. Jennifer Dill  Berkeley Barriers Traffic Calming History Chuck Marohn - Strong TownsSTROAD:- Definition- Not Just Bikes STROAD video Show Credits:Audio Production by Active TownsA not-for-profit organization dedicated to helping communities create a Culture of Activity.Creative Commons License: Attributions Non-Commercial No Derivatives 2021Please consider supporting the Active Towns Podcast by making a donation or becoming PatronTo sign up for our monthly newsletter, scroll down to the form at bottom of our home pageBe sure to check out our video podcasts on our YouTube ChannelYou can reach John Simmerman by email at john@activetowns.org Music: Various Logic Pro X mixes by John Simmerman★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

The Ask. More. Get. More. Podcast | with Bare Slate
Ep.117 Michelle Diamond - How to Get More Out of Leadership During Hard Times

The Ask. More. Get. More. Podcast | with Bare Slate

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2021 25:06


Michelle Diamond joins us to discuss How to Get More Out of Hard Times on The Ask More Get More Show.Some points we cover:great leaders are a part of the team, AND achieve their personal goalsauthentic feedback is critical to move the team forwardattitude is so important to understand so that you can make good decisionsin both good times and harder times, the attitude of your team and the way in which it works together will determine how you get throughalways continue to develop your teams and recognize when someone is not happy and needs to move onthe importance of asking questions, and LISTENING it is encouraged that you admit when you don't know something and to ask your team for their insights and expertise in order to help make decisionsMichelle is a growth expert, operational executive, and entrepreneur, who has worked on investor, Board, CEO/C-Suite, and SME issues for 65 organizations ranging from start-up, early/growth stage, small/middle market, private equity/venture capital, to Fortune 50 companies in 31 industries including CIGNA, Colgate-Palmolive, Elsevier, MetLife, Daimler, Dekra, NRG, Constellation Energy, and Club Med – just to name a few.Michelle holds an MBA from Duke University, a BS from Morgan State University (Summa Cum Laude), and attended Wharton Executive Education. She is also a non-practicing Certified Public Accountant (CPA).Michelle lives in Beverly Hills and enjoys sports, dance, entertaining, and travel.You can learn more about Michelle and grab a copy of her book here.Want to Get More? Start here:~~~~~~~~JOIN THE MEMBERSHIP TODAY: https://www.bareslate.ca ~~~~~~~~Discover the books and tools we recommend here: https://www.amazon.ca/shop/bareslate~~~~~~~~Watch the Ask More. Get More. Show on YouTube: https://askmoregetmoreshowfuelledbybareslate.buzzsprout.com~~~~~~~~Be a guest on the show!: https://bit.ly/3bDr81A~~~~~~~~Listen to the Bare Slate Get More. podcast: https://getmorepodcastfuelledbybareslate.buzzsprout.com~~~~~~~~Website: https://www.bareslate.ca/~~~~~~~~LinkedIn: https://bit.ly/2zbafwD~~~~~~~PR/Media Requests: hello@bareslate.ca*please note that some links may be affiliate links and we may receive a small commission. It does not affect you as the buyer at all. Thank you for supporting the show!

Expert Insights on COVID-19 with Elsevier

This episode is part one of a two-part discussion about grief. Divorce, career change, loss of a child or parent, or loss of a colleague are all experiences that can lead to grief. People experience grief differently, and it can be particularly challenging for people working in healthcare.   Lizzie Pickering is a grief investigator. Lizzie's work is based on being alongside grieving parents at the children's hospice ward, setting up peer-to-peer support and navigating her own grief following the death of her son, Harry 20 years ago.  In this first part of our conversation, Lizzie explains the stages of grief and shares some practical tips on how to talk about grief with patients, families and colleagues.  Be sure to follow this podcast on your favorite podcast player to receive updates when part 2 of this conversation goes live. Elsevier Clinical Insights is a podcast highlighting clinical tools, resources, and the latest expert insights to support you in providing patient care. Hosted by: Dr. MJ Erickson-Hogue, Director, Point of Care, Digital Content, Elsevier Clinical Solutions  Learn more on Elsevier's Website | Health Podcast Network Follow on Twitter | Facebook | LinkedIn | YouTube

Python Bytes
#237 Separate your SQL and Python, asynchronously with aiosql

Python Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2021 39:41


Watch the live stream: Watch on YouTube About the show Sponsored by Sentry: Sign up at pythonbytes.fm/sentry And please, when signing up, click Got a promo code? Redeem and enter PYTHONBYTES Special guest: Mike Groves Michael #1: Textual Textual (Rich.tui) is a TUI (Text User Interface) framework for Python using Rich as a renderer. Rich TUI will integrate tightly with its parent project, Rich. This project is currently a work in progress and may not be usable for a while. Brian #2: Pinning application dependencies with pip-tools compile via John Hagen pip-tools has more functionality than this, but compile alone is quite useful Start with a loose list of dependencies in requirements.in: rich Can have things like >= and such if you have fixed dependencies. Now pip install pip-tools, and pip-compile requirements.in or python -m piptools compile requirements.in both have same effect. Now you'll have a requirements.txt file with pinned dependencies: # autogenerated by: pip-compile requirements.in click==7.1.2 # via typer colorama==0.4.4 # via rich commonmark==0.9.1 # via rich pygments==2.9.0 # via rich rich==10.2.2 # via -r requirements.in typer==0.3.2 # via -r requirements.in Now, do the same with a dev-requirements.ini to create dev-requirements.txt. Then, of course: - `pip install -r requirements.txt` - `pip install -r dev-requirements.txt` - And test your application. - All good? Push changes. To force pip-compile to update all packages in an existing requirements.txt, run pip-compile --upgrade. John provided an example project that uses this workflow: python-blueprint Mike #3: Pynguin Automated test generation Pynguin is a framework that allows automated unit test generation for Python. It is an extensible tool that allows the implementation of various test-generation approaches. Michael #4: Python Advisory DB via Brian Skinn A community owned repository of advisories for packages published on pypi.org. Much of the existing set of vulnerabilities are collected from the National Vulnerability Database CVE feed. Vulnerabilities are integrated into the Open Source Vulnerabilities project, which provides an API to query for vulnerabilities. Longer term, we are working with the PyPI team to build a pipeline to automatically get these vulnerabilities [listed] into PyPI. Tracks known security issues with the packages, for example: PYSEC-2020-28.yaml id: PYSEC-2020-28 package: name: bleach ecosystem: PyPI details: In Mozilla Bleach before 3.12, a mutation XSS in bleach.clean when RCDATA and either svg or math tags are whitelisted and the keyword argument strip=False. affects: ranges: - type: ECOSYSTEM fixed: 3.1.2 versions: - '0.1' - 0.1.1 - 0.1.2 - '0.2' ... Brian #5: Function Overloading with singledispatch and multipledispatch by Martin Heinz I kinda avoid using the phrase “The Correct Way to …”, but you do you, Martin. In C/C++, we can overload functions, which means multiple functions with the same name but different parameter types just work. In Python, you can't do that automatically, but you can do it. It's in the stdlib with functools and singledispatch: from functools import singledispatch from datetime import date, time @singledispatch def format(arg): return arg @format.register def _(arg: date): return f"{arg.day}-{arg.month}-{arg.year}" @format.register(time) def _(arg): return f"{arg.hour}:{arg.minute}:{arg.second}" Now format works like two functions: print(format(date(2021, 5, 26))) # 26-5-2021 print(format(time(19, 22, 15))) # 19:22:15 What if you want to switch on the type of multiple parameters? multipledispatch, a third party package, does the trick: from multipledispatch import dispatch @dispatch(list, str) def concatenate(a, b): a.append(b) return a @dispatch(str, str) def concatenate(a, b): return a + b print(concatenate(["a", "b"], "c")) # ['a', 'b', 'c'] print(concatenate("Hello", "World")) # HelloWorld Mike #6: Aiosql Fast Async SQL Template Engine Lightweight replacement for ORM libraries such as SQLAlchemy. Extras Michael SoftwareX Journal, Elsevier has had an open-access software journal, via Daniel Mulkey. There's even a special issue collection on software contributing to gravitational wave discovery. Python 3.10.0b2 is available Django security releases issued: 3.2.4, 3.1.12, and 2.2.24 Talks on YouTube for PyCon 2021. aicsimageio 4.0 released, lots of goodness for bio-image analysis and microscopy, thanks Madison Swain-Bowden. Mike Postponement of PEP 563 in 3.10 Joke Bank robbers A book about Rich

UIDP Conversations
Carlos de Brito Cruz, Elsevier, on using research and data to better humanity

UIDP Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2021 17:53


Carlos Henrique de Brito Cruz, Senior Vice President of Research Networks at Elsevier, on the role of triple helix collaboration to advance science and technology and drive economic gains. He also considers how data can help research organizations identify strengths, weaknesses, and common ground for better partnerships.

Full Scope
Yellow Fever, Part 1

Full Scope

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2021 25:08


SummaryYellow Fever is a viral tropical disease. It is most prevalent in equatorial Africa (90%) and South America (10%). No specific treatments exist but it can be prevented with a highly affective vaccine. The disease is spread via mosquito vectors (arbovirus). Yellow refers to the jaundice that occurs in severe infection from liver damage. Bleeding (hemorrhagic fever) and kidney damage are other severe manifestations. Morbidity and MortalityAbout 5% of people infected with the Yellow Fever virus will die. Foreign visitors to endemic countries are at the higher risk of severe infection if exposed. Hemorrhagic fever, liver failure, and other organ failures can lead to shock and death. It is very difficult to know how many infections occur annually but the WHO estimates about 200,000 (likely many more). Epidemics periodically occur and usually have worse than normal case fatality rates. StoryYellow fever outbreaks plagued the America’s in the 18th and 19th centuries, having been introduced from Africa just few hundred years prior. The Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1793 killed 9% of the residents in Philadelphia. Many, including George Washington, fled the city. Yellow Fever has plagued the US military for years before the 17D vaccine was discovered in 1937 by Max Theiler (Noble Prize).  Key Points1.  Yellow fever is endemic to equatorial Africa and South America, but strangely not Asia.2.  People living and traveling to these areas should be vaccinated with the 17D live attenuated yellow fever vaccine.3.  Fever, chills, headache, and myalgias are common. A minority of cases progress to liver failure and hemorrhage.  About half of cases that progress will be fatal4. Treatment is supportive. As such, prevention with vaccine, vector control, and avoiding mosquito bites is very important. Avoid blood thinners and anti-platelets. References-       Keystone et al. Travel Medicine, 4th Ed. Elsevier 2019. Ch. 12. Torresi and Kollaritsch. Recommended/Required Travel Vaccines.-       Farrar et al. Manson’s Tropical Diseases, 23rd Ed. Elsevier 2014. Ch. 14. Young et al. Arbovirus Infection.-       Wikipedia. Yellow Fever, Yellow Fever Vaccine-       WHO, Yellow Fever. https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/yellow-fever-       Vaccine Information Statement. CDC. https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/yf.pdf.-       Thomas R. E. (2016). Yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease: current perspectives. Drug design, development and therapy, 10, 3345–335

Unique Contributions
Series 2, episode 3: Reflections of a reluctant leader - with John Pham

Unique Contributions

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2021 45:44


In this episode, YS Chi speaks with John Pham, the editor in chief of Cell, just the fourth in the journal’s 47-year history.  Cell is one of the world’s leading scientific journals. Anthony Fauci, the chief medical advisor to the White House held up a copy of Cell during a Congressional hearing. Cell and the papers it publishes matter.Here is the remarkable story of the fourth son of Vietnamese immigrants who never imagined himself editor in chief of one of the world's leading scientific journal. In this episode, John discusses many of the big issues in scientific publishing, from diversity and trust in science to research integrity, transparency in data and open access. He also shares his thoughts on where he hopes to take Cell in the future. These are the reflections of a reluctant leader who had a calling for science and for doing "good things to help people".This podcast is brought to you by RELX.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 05.12.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2021 58:41


3. The Ivermectin Story    4. Who Suppressed Ivermectin     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Vj3xGT6izE   Exchange between Sen. Rand Paul and Dr. Anthony Fauci     Vegetarians have healthier levels of disease markers than meat-eaters University of Glasgow (Scotland), May 10. 2021 Vegetarians appear to have a healthier biomarker profile than meat-eaters, and this applies to adults of any age and weight, and is also unaffected by smoking and alcohol consumption, according to a new study in over 166,000 UK adults, being presented at this week's European Congress on Obesity (ECO), held online this year.  Biomarkers can have bad and good health effects, promoting or preventing cancer, cardiovascular and age-related diseases, and other chronic conditions, and have been widely used to assess the effect of diets on health. However, evidence of the metabolic benefits associated with being vegetarian is unclear.  To understand whether dietary choice can make a difference to the levels of disease markers in blood and urine, researchers from the University of Glasgow did a cross-sectional study analysing data from 177,723 healthy participants (aged 37-73 years) in the UK Biobank study, who reported no major changes in diet over the last five years.  Participants were categorised as either vegetarian (do not eat red meat, poultry or fish; 4,111 participants) or meat-eaters (166,516 participants) according to their self-reported diet. The researchers examined the association with 19 blood and urine biomarkers related to diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, liver, bone and joint health, and kidney function.  Even after accounting for potentially influential factors including age, sex, education, ethnicity, obesity, smoking, and alcohol intake, the analysis found that compared to meat-eaters, vegetarians had significantly lower levels of 13 biomarkers, including: total cholesterol; low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol--the so-called 'bad cholesterol; apolipoprotein A (linked to cardiovascular disease), apolipoprotein B (linked to cardiovascular disease); gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) and alanine aminotransferase (AST)--liver function markers indicating inflammation or damage to cells; insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1; a hormone that encourages the growth and proliferation of cancer cells); urate; total protein; and creatinine (marker of worsening kidney function). However, vegetarians also had lower levels of beneficial biomarkers including high-density lipoprotein 'good' (HDL) cholesterol, and vitamin D and calcium (linked to bone and joint health). In addition, they had significantly higher level of fats (triglycerides) in the blood and cystatin-C (suggesting a poorer kidney condition).  No link was found for blood sugar levels (HbA1c), systolic blood pressure, aspartate aminotransferase (AST; a marker of damage to liver cells) or C-reactive protein (CRP; inflammatory marker).  "Our findings offer real food for thought", says Dr Carlos Celis-Morales from the University of Glasgow, UK, who led the research. "As well as not eating red and processed meat which have been linked to heart diseases and some cancers, people who follow a vegetarian diet tend to consume more vegetables, fruits, and nuts which contain more nutrients, fibre, and other potentially beneficial compounds. These nutritional differences may help explain why vegetarians appear to have lower levels of disease biomarkers that can lead to cell damage and chronic disease." The authors point out that although their study was large, it was observational, so no conclusions can be drawn about direct cause and effect. They also note several limitations including that they only tested biomarker samples once for each participant, and it is possible that biomarkers might fluctuate depending on factors unrelated to diet, such as existing diseases and unmeasured lifestyle factors. They also note that were reliant on participants to report their dietary intake using food frequency questionnaires, which is not always reliable.     Alzheimer's study: A Mediterranean diet might protect against memory loss and dementia German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, May 6, 2021 In Alzheimer's disease, neurons in the brain die. Largely responsible for the death of neurons are certain protein deposits in the brains of affected individuals: So-called beta-amyloid proteins, which form clumps (plaques) between neurons, and tau proteins, which stick together the inside of neurons. The causes of these deposits are as yet unclear. In addition, a rapidly progressive atrophy, i.e. a shrinking of the brain volume, can be observed in affected persons. Alzheimer's symptoms such as memory loss, disorientation, agitation and challenging behavior are the consequences. Scientists at the DZNE led by Prof. Michael Wagner, head of a research group at the DZNE and senior psychologist at the memory clinic of the University Hospital Bonn, have now found in a study that a regular Mediterranean-like dietary pattern with relatively more intake of vegetables, legumes, fruit, cereals, fish and monounsaturated fatty acids, such as from olive oil, may protect against protein deposits in the brain and brain atrophy. This diet has a low intake of dairy products, red meat and saturated fatty acids. A nationwide study A total of 512 subjects with an average age of around seventy years took part in the study. 169 of them were cognitively healthy, while 343 were identified as having a higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease - due to subjective memory impairment, mild cognitive impairment that is the precursor to dementia, or first-degree relationship with patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. The nutrition study was funded by the Diet-Body-Brain competence cluster of the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and took place as part of the so-called DELCODE study of the DZNE, which does nationwide research on the early phase of Alzheimer's disease - that period before pronounced symptoms appear. "People in the second half of life have constant eating habits. We analyzed whether the study participants regularly eat a Mediterranean diet - and whether this might have an impact on brain health ", said Prof. Michael Wagner. The participants first filled out a questionnaire in which they indicated which portions of 148 different foods they had eaten in the past months. Those who frequently ate healthy foods typical of the Mediterranean diet, such as fish, vegetables and fruit, and only occasionally consumed foods such as red meat, scored highly on a scale. An extensive test series The scientists then investigated brain atrophy: they performed brain scans with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners to determine brain volume. In addition, all subjects underwent various neuropsychological tests in which cognitive abilities such as memory functions were examined. The research team also looked at biomarker levels (measured values) for amyloid beta proteins and tau proteins in the so-called cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 226 subjects. The researchers, led by Michael Wagner, found that those who ate an unhealthy diet had more pathological levels of these biomarkers in the cerebrospinal fluid than those who regularly ate a Mediterranean-like diet. In the memory tests, the participants who did not adhere to the Mediterranean diet also performed worse than those who regularly ate fish and vegetables. "There was also a significant positive correlation between a closer adherence to a Mediterranean-like diet and a higher volume of the hippocampus. The hippocampus is an area of the brain that is considered the control center of memory. It shrinks early and severely in Alzheimer's disease," explained Tommaso Ballarini, PhD, postdoctoral fellow in Michael Wagner's research group and lead author of the study. Continuation of nutrition study is planned "It is possible that the Mediterranean diet protects the brain from protein deposits and brain atrophy that can cause memory loss and dementia. Our study hints at this," Ballarini said. "But the biological mechanism underlying this will have to be clarified in future studies." As a next step, Ballarini and Wagner now plan to re-examine the same study participants in four to five years to explore how their nutrition - Mediterranean-like or unhealthy - affects brain aging over time.       Social isolation has a profound and increasingly negative impact on physical functioning in older adults         University of Southern Denmark, May 11, 2021 Social isolation among older adults is associated with poor health and premature mortality, but the connection between social isolation and physical functioning is poorly understood. New research generates more robust evidence about the associations between social isolation and physical functioning and how this accelerates over time, reports the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier. It also highlights the importance of incorporating strategies to reduce social isolation and promote successful aging. "Physical functioning is understood to influence the health of individuals. And social isolation is prevalent among older adults," explained lead investigator Borja del Pozo Cruz, PhD, Centre for Active and Healthy Ageing, Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. "However, the true extent of the relationship between social isolation and physical functioning was not fully understood. We needed to shed some more light on this relationship, as it plays an important role in individual aging." As individuals age, physical functioning declines, which can result in a loss of functional independence, onset of disability, and increased mortality, with significant personal, community, and economic costs. Older adults who are socially integrated may be more likely to engage in physical activity, which would in turn elicit improvements in their physical functioning. Social isolation is a significant problem facing the health and well-being of individuals across the life course. Individuals who are socially isolated are more likely to experience mental health problems, develop dementia, and have increased risk of premature mortality. Social isolation is particularly worrisome among older adults, with data from the United States indicating that one in four older adults is isolated or severely isolated. Given the worldwide trends in population aging, social isolation among older adults is likely to become an increasing burden in years to come. To examine the longitudinal associations between social isolation and physical functioning, investigators used nine waves of panel data from 2011 to 2019 from the National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS), a large US-representative sample of adults 65 or older. This means that the results can be generalized to the US population of older adults. The study analyzed observations from 12,427 NHATS participants to measure how individual changes in social isolation were associated with individual changes in objectively assessed physical functioning. Social isolation was captured through the Social Isolation Index (SII). Physical functioning was assessed using the NHATS version of the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB). The analytic sample encompassed 54,860 observations, meaning that respondents were observed 4.41 times on average. These findings add to a growing evidence base demonstrating the negative consequences of social isolation, specifically the acceleration of aging decline trajectories in physical functioning. Investigators were able to identify with a high degree of granularity how the association between social isolation and physical functioning shifts over old age and exacerbates the decline in physical functioning associated with aging. The results showed that the older individuals are, the greater the extent to which social isolation impacts their health. A small but growing number of observational studies in the UK, Japan, and China have identified negative associations between social isolation and physical functioning in samples of older adults. The current study resonates with and complements those results. However, the robust data generated by this national rather than community-based study enable findings to be generalized to a national population. "Physical functioning is a well-established marker of general health and it has been previously correlated with morbidity and mortality," noted Dr. del Pozo Cruz. "We demonstrate in this study that social isolation has a profound impact on the physical functioning in older adults. Mandated social contact restrictions and lockdowns due to COVID-19, coupled with more severe consequences of contagion among older adults, have likely exacerbated this trend. Study findings suggest that public health interventions should turn their attention to the social environments in which older people are embedded, in particular for those at risk of isolation. "Social isolation is one of the biggest challenges that societies face in the 21st century. We have to start thinking about this issue now to avoid more serious consequences down the track," added Dr. del Pozo Cruz.       How bullying and obesity can affect girls' and boys' mental health Uppsala University (Sweden), May 7, 2021 Depressive symptoms are more common in teenage girls than in their male peers. However, boys' mental health appears to be affected more if they suffer from obesity. Irrespective of gender, bullying is a considerably greater risk factor than being overweight for developing depressive symptoms. These conclusions are drawn by researchers at Uppsala University who monitored adolescents for six years in a questionnaire study, now published in the Journal of Public Health. "The purpose of our study was to investigate the connection between body mass index (BMI) and depressive symptoms, and to take a close look at whether being subjected to bullying affects this relationship over time. We also wanted to investigate whether any gender differences existed," says Sofia Kanders, a Ph.D. student at Uppsala University's Department of Neuroscience. In the study, young people born in Västmanland County, replied to questions about their height, weight and depressive symptoms on three separate occasions (2012, 2015 and 2018). The respondents' mean age was 14.4 years on the first occasion and 19.9 years on the last. Based on BMI, the adolescents were divided into three groups: Those with normal weight, those who were overweight and those with obesity respectively. They were also grouped according to the extent of their depressive symptoms. Overall, regardless of their weight, the girls stated more frequently that they had depressive symptoms. In 2012, 17 percent of the girls and 6 percent of the boys did so. By 2015, the proportions of adolescents with these symptoms had risen to 32 percent for the girls and 13 percent for the boys. The corresponding figures for 2018 were 34 and 19 percent respectively. A higher BMI did not, as far as the researchers could see, affect the girls' mental well-being to any great extent. Among the boys, however, the pattern observed was entirely different. "When we analyzed girls and boys separately, we saw that for boys with obesity in 2012, the risk for having depressive symptoms in 2015 was, statistically, five times higher than for normal-weight boys. In the girls we found no such connection," Kanders says. The study has been unable to answer the question of what causes this gender difference, and the researchers think more research is needed in this area. The young respondents were also asked about bullying—for example, to state whether, in the past year, they had been physically exposed to blows and kicks, teased or excluded, subjected to cyberbullying (abusive texting or other electronic or web bullying), or bullied by an adult at school. In every analysis, exposure to bullying was associated with a higher risk of depressive symptoms. This connection was also evident six years later, especially in overweight boys. The researchers believe that these results seem to indicate a gender difference in how BMI and bullying together drive development of future depressive symptoms. "One key conclusion and take-home message from our study is that bullying can affect mental illness for a long time to come, which therefore makes preventive measures against bullying in schools extremely important," Kanders says.     Efficacy of magnesium oxide and sodium valproate in prevention of migraine headache: a randomized, controlled, double-blind, crossover study Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences (Iran), May 4, 2021 According to news originating from Sari, Iran, by NewsRx correspondents, research stated, “Migraine is a disabling disorder that affects the quality of life of patients. Different medications have been used in prevention of migraine headache.” Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, “In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of magnesium oxide in comparison with valproate sodium in preventing migraine headache attacks. This is a single-center, randomized, controlled, crossover trial which is double-blind, 24-week, 2-sequence, 2-period, 2-treatment. After patient randomization into two sequences, the intervention group received magnesium oxide 500 mg and the control group received valproate sodium 400 mg two tablets each day (every 12 h) for 8 weeks. The primary efficacy variable was reduction in the number of migraine attacks and number of days with moderate or severe headache and hours with headache (duration) per month in the final of 8 weeks in comparison with baseline. Seventy patients were randomized and seven dropped out, leaving 63 for analysis. In an intention-to-treat analysis, 31 patients were in group 1 (magnesium oxide-valproate) and 32 patients were in group 2 (valproate-magnesium oxide). The mean number of migraine attacks and days per month was 1.72 +/- 1.18 and 2.09 +/- 1.70, with a mean duration of 15.50 +/- 21.80 h in magnesium group and 1.27 +/- 1.27 and 2.22 +/- 1.96, with a mean duration 13.38 +/- 14.10 in valproate group.” According to the news editors, the research concluded: “This study has shown that 500 mg magnesium oxide appears to be effective in migraine prophylaxis similar to valproate sodium without significant adverse effect.” This research has been peer-reviewed       Vitamin D and calcium from food is associated with lower risk of early menopause University of Massachusetts, May 10, 2021 A new study led by epidemiologists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst's School of Public Health and Health Sciences suggests that high intake of dietary vitamin D and calcium may be modestly associated with lower risk of early menopause, the cessation of ovarian function before age 45. Early menopause affects about 10 percent of women and is associated with higher risk of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and early cognitive decline. Epidemiology doctoral candidate Alexandra Purdue-Smithe and her advisor Elizabeth Bertone-Johnson, with colleagues at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, and Harvard Medical School, evaluated how vitamin D and calcium intake is associated with incidence of early menopause in the prospective Nurses' Health Study II. The study population includes 116,430 female U.S. registered nurses who were 25-42 years old when they responded to a baseline questionnaire. Diet was assessed five times over the 20-year study, allowing the researchers to capture changes in food and nutrient intake over time, Purdue-Smithe notes. Participants in the study contributed more than 1 million person-years of follow-up, during which 2,041 women experienced early menopause. The authors report the hazard ratio for early menopause comparing the highest vs. lowest dietary vitamin D intake groups was 0.83 (95% confidence interval = 0.72-0.95) and for dietary calcium 0.87 (95% CI=0.76-1.00). Details of the study, supported by the National Institutes of Health, appear in the current early online edition of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Purdue-Smithe says, "Laboratory evidence relating vitamin D to some of the hormonal mechanisms involved in ovarian aging provided the foundation for our hypothesis. However, to our knowledge, no prior epidemiologic studies have explicitly evaluated how vitamin D and calcium intake may be related to risk of early menopause. We found that after adjusting for a variety of different factors, vitamin D from food sources, such as fortified dairy and fatty fish, was associated with a 17 percent lower risk of early menopause when comparing the highest intake group to the lowest intake group." Because higher intake of vitamin D and calcium from foods may simply act as a marker for better nutrition and overall health, Purdue-Smithe says, the researchers took into account other factors such as intake of vegetable protein and alcohol, as well as body mass index and smoking. She adds, "The large size of this study allowed us to consider a variety of potential correlates of a healthy lifestyle that might explain our findings; however, adjusting for these factors made almost no difference in our estimates." The nutritional and reproductive epidemiologist notes that "in addition to placing women at higher risk of adverse future health outcomes, early menopause is also problematic as women are increasingly delaying childbearing into their later reproductive years. Fertility declines drastically during the 10 years leading up to menopause, so early menopause can have profound psychological and financial implications for couples who are unable to conceive as they wish. As such, it is important to identify modifiable risk factors for early menopause, such as diet." Because associations were stronger for vitamin D and calcium from dairy sources than from non-dairy food sources in the study, and Purdue-Smithe plans further analyses investigating individual dairy foods and other components of dairy and how they may be associated with early menopause.     High levels of exercise linked to 9 years of less aging at the cellular level Brigham Young University, May 10, 2021 Despite their best efforts, no scientist has ever come close to stopping humans from aging. Even anti-aging creams can't stop Old Father Time. But new research from Brigham Young University reveals you may be able to slow one type of aging--the kind that happens inside your cells. As long as you're willing to sweat. "Just because you're 40, doesn't mean you're 40 years old biologically," Tucker said. "We all know people that seem younger than their actual age. The more physically active we are, the less biological aging takes place in our bodies." The study, published in the medical journal Preventive Medicine, finds that people who have consistently high levels of physical activity have significantly longer telomeres than those who have sedentary lifestyles, as well as those who are moderately active. Telomeres are the protein endcaps of our chromosomes. They're like our biological clock and they're extremely correlated with age; each time a cell replicates, we lose a tiny bit of the endcaps. Therefore, the older we get, the shorter our telomeres. Exercise science professor Larry Tucker found adults with high physical activity levels have telomeres with a biological aging advantage of nine years over those who are sedentary, and a seven-year advantage compared to those who are moderately active. To be highly active, women had to engage in 30 minutes of jogging per day (40 minutes for men), five days a week. "If you want to see a real difference in slowing your biological aging, it appears that a little exercise won't cut it," Tucker said. "You have to work out regularly at high levels." Tucker analyzed data from 5,823 adults who participated in the CDC's National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, one of the few indexes that includes telomere length values for study subjects. The index also includes data for 62 activities participants might have engaged in over a 30-day window, which Tucker analyzed to calculate levels of physical activity. His study found the shortest telomeres came from sedentary people--they had 140 base pairs of DNA less at the end of their telomeres than highly active folks. Surprisingly, he also found there was no significant difference in telomere length between those with low or moderate physical activity and the sedentary people. Although the exact mechanism for how exercise preserves telomeres is unknown, Tucker said it may be tied to inflammation and oxidative stress. Previous studies have shown telomere length is closely related to those two factors and it is known that exercise can suppress inflammation and oxidative stress over time. "We know that regular physical activity helps to reduce mortality and prolong life, and now we know part of that advantage may be due to the preservation of telomeres," Tucker said.

Free Associations
Episode 97 - More walkies for health? Pets and diabetes

Free Associations

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2021 47:05


Matt, Chris, and Don discuss a study that asks whether pets and humans get diabetes in pairs, they debate who got the best of the new deal between Elsevier and University of California, and Chris and Matt share a love of a specific food. Journal club article: Pets and diabetes study

Unique Contributions
Series 2, episode 2: Inclusion & Diversity - with Kumsal Bayazit

Unique Contributions

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2021 33:36


How do you build trust? How do you meaningfully advance inclusion and diversity? In this episode, YS Chi speaks with Kumsal Bayazit, the first female CEO in Elsevier’s 140-year history, about her learnings and insights into building trust and creating an inclusive mindset. Kumsal tells us how her upbringing in Istanbul shaped her commitment to inclusion and diversity and what Elsevier is doing to support researchers and health professionals who play such a critical role in ensuring societal progress. This podcast is brought to you by RELX.

Epigenetics Podcast
Chromatin Analysis using Mass Spectrometry (Axel Imhof)

Epigenetics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2021 43:28


In this episode of the Epigenetics Podcast, we caught up with Axel Imhof from the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich in Germany to talk about his work on the identification of chromatin associated proteins using mass spectrometry. As the head of the Proteomics Core Facility Axel Imhof collaborates with research groups around the world. In addition, in his own lab, he focuses on the assembly and composition of chromatin, how environmental metabolites influence epigenetic marks, and how chromatin factors can be used as markers for pathological states. In this episode we discuss what has changed in the field of mass spectrometry over the years, how Axel Imhof takes advantage of collaborations, how metabolites influence chromatin, and how he is helping to bring epigenetic profiling via mass spectrometry to the clinic.   References Bonaldi, T., Regula, J. T., & Imhof, A. (2003). The Use of Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Histone Modifications. In Methods in Enzymology (Vol. 377, pp. 111–130). Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0076-6879(03)77006-2 Völker-Albert, M. C., Pusch, M. C., Fedisch, A., Schilcher, P., Schmidt, A., & Imhof, A. (2016). A Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of In Vitro Assembled Chromatin. Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, 15(3), 945–959. https://doi.org/10.1074/mcp.M115.053553 Scharf, A. N. D., Meier, K., Seitz, V., Kremmer, E., Brehm, A., & Imhof, A. (2009). Monomethylation of Lysine 20 on Histone H4 Facilitates Chromatin Maturation. Molecular and Cellular Biology, 29(1), 57–67. https://doi.org/10.1128/MCB.00989-08 Van den Ackerveken, P., Lobbens, A., Turatsinze, J.-V., Solis-Mezarino, V., Völker-Albert, M., Imhof, A., & Herzog, M. (2021). A novel proteomics approach to epigenetic profiling of circulating nucleosomes. Scientific Reports, 11(1), 7256. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-86630-3   Related Episodes Regulation of Chromatin Organization by Histone Chaperones (Geneviève Almouzni) Transcription and Polycomb in Inheritance and Disease (Danny Reinberg)   Contact Active Motif on Twitter Epigenetics Podcast on Twitter Active Motif on LinkedIn Active Motif on Facebook Email: podcast@activemotif.com

BrainWaves: A Neurology Podcast
#179 RBD and synucleinopathies

BrainWaves: A Neurology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2021 24:58


Who doesn’t enjoy their sleep? For most of us, it can be the most relaxing escape. And for others, a disturbance of sleep may be the first clue to a neurodenerative condition. Produced by James E. Siegler. Dr. Avidan reports that he receives royalties from Elsevier, is a consultant for Merck, and is a speaker for Eisai and Harmony. Music for our program today was by Andy Cohen, Purple Planet Music, Steve Combs, Yan Terrien, and Shane Ivers, whose music can be found at silvermansound.com. Our theme song was composed by Jimothy Dalton. Voiceover was courtesy of Taryn Hester. The opening theme was composed by Jimothy Dalton. Sound effects by Mike Koenig and Daniel Simion. Unless otherwise mentioned in the podcast, no competing financial interests exist in the content of this episode. BrainWaves' podcasts and online content are intended for medical education only and should not be used for clinical decision making. Be sure to follow us on Twitter @brainwavesaudio for the latest updates to the podcast. REFERENCES Boeve BF, Silber MH, Ferman TJ, Lucas JA and Parisi JE. Association of REM sleep behavior disorder and neurodegenerative disease may reflect an underlying synucleinopathy. Mov Disord. 2001;16:622-30. Gilat M, Coeytaux Jackson A, Marshall NS, Hammond D, Mullins AE, Hall JM, Fang BAM, Yee BJ, Wong KKH, Grunstein RR and Lewis SJG. Melatonin for rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in Parkinson's disease: A randomised controlled trial. Mov Disord. 2020;35:344-349. Lloyd R, Tippmann-Peikert M, Slocumb N and Kotagal S. Characteristics of REM sleep behavior disorder in childhood. J Clin Sleep Med. 2012;8:127-31. Malhotra R and Avidan AY. Neurodegenerative Disease and REM Behavior Disorder. Current treatment options in neurology. 2012;14:474-92. McGrane IR, Leung JG, St Louis EK and Boeve BF. Melatonin therapy for REM sleep behavior disorder: a critical review of evidence. Sleep Med. 2015;16:19-26. Porter VR and Avidan AY. Clinical Overview of REM Sleep Behavior Disorder. Semin Neurol. 2017;37:461-470. Shin C, Park H, Lee WW, Kim HJ, Kim HJ and Jeon B. Clonazepam for probable REM sleep behavior disorder in Parkinson's disease: A randomized placebo-controlled trial. Journal of the neurological sciences. 2019;401:81-86. St Louis EK, Boeve AR and Boeve BF. REM Sleep Behavior Disorder in Parkinson's Disease and Other Synucleinopathies. Mov Disord. 2017;32:645-658. St Louis EK and Boeve BF. REM Sleep Behavior Disorder: Diagnosis, Clinical Implications, and Future Directions. Mayo Clinic proceedings. 2017;92:1723-1736. Teigen LN, Sharp RR, Hirsch JR, Campbell E, Timm PC, Sandness DJ, Feemster JC, Gossard TR, Faber SM, Steele TA, Rivera S, Junna MR, Lipford MC, Tippmann-Peikert M, Kotagal S, Ju YE, Howell M, Schenck CH, Videnovic A, Jennum P, Hogl B, Stefani A, Arnulf I, Heidbreder A, Lewis S, McCarter SJ, Boeve BF, Silber MH and St Louis EK. Specialist approaches to prognostic counseling in isolated REM sleep behavior disorder. Sleep Med. 2021;79:107-112.