Podcast appearances and mentions of Ryan Smith

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Best podcasts about Ryan Smith

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Latest podcast episodes about Ryan Smith

Kappa Kappa Psi Presents
W. Francis McBeth Award Winners: Dylan Shadoan & Andrew Weliver

Kappa Kappa Psi Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 24:11


Welcome back to Season 4! Join editor & host, Ryan Smith, as he interviews Dylan Shadoan, Alumni from Alpha, and Andrew Weliver, Alumni from Nu Beta, about the W. Francis McBeth Student Musicianship Award.   Transcription coming soon. Questions, Comments, Suggestions: smity@kkpsi.org

Hockey Central @ Noon
Marek & Friedman: Trade Chatter Picking up Around the NHL?

Hockey Central @ Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 23:56


Jeff and Elliotte look back on the anniversary of Rangers defenceman Marek Malík's huge goal to end a 15-round shootout between New York and Washington in 2005, and chat about superstar players that have struggled with penalty shots and in the shootout (0:17). The guys then preview Canucks-Blue Jackets, and talk about whether there's anything new to report from Vancouver, trade chatter picking up around the league, and the biggest surprises and disappointments at the quarter mark of the season (5:22). Next, they weigh in on how concerning the Islanders' struggles are (14:30). To wrap, they talk about why hockey fans should know Utah Jazz owner Ryan Smith, and the future of MLSE in light of reports that Fenway Sports Group approached the company  (18:20).The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the hosts and guests and do not necessarily reflect the position of Rogers Sports & Media or any affiliate.

Get Up!
Hour 1: OT Diaster in Dallas

Get Up!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 46:59


Ryan Smith, Sam Acho, Rob Ninkovich, and Dan Granziano discuss the Cowboys OT loss. Can the Cowboys get out of their slump? Can the Cowboys make a deep playoff push? Is there a formula to beat the Cowboys? Are the Bills locked to win thre AFC East? What do they need to do to make the playoffs? How will Rodgers injured toe effect him on the field? Are the Cowboys run game in trouble? Can the PAckers beat the Rams? Do the Browns need to bench Baker to succeed? 

Get Up!
Hour 1: Thanksgiving Football

Get Up!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 47:00


Ryan Smith, Jeff Saturday, Adam Schefter, Bart Scott, and Diana Russini discuss today's line up of games. Will Cowboys be healthy enough to beat the Raiders? Do the Cowboys need to play more physical? What do the Cowboys need to do to win? Do the Browns need to bench Baker to save their season? Is Baker's injuries too severe? Who is the most important person on the Browns for the rest of the season? Can Packers beat the Rams with Rodgers having a hurt toe? Are the Patriots the team to beat in the AFC? Will Jalen Hurts lead the Eagles to the playoffs?  DAk Prescott, Baker Mayfield, Aaron Rodgers

Kappa Kappa Psi Presents
Native American Heritage Month: Bree Colwell

Kappa Kappa Psi Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 30:29


Welcome back to Season 4! Join editor & host, Ryan Smith, as he interviews Bree Colwell, Alumni from Lambda Tau, about Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe culture for Native American Heritage Month.   Transcription coming soon. Questions, Comments, Suggestions: smity@kkpsi.org

The Bates Bobcast
Bates Bobcast Episode 246: Cross country's trip to nationals, early winter sports standouts

The Bates Bobcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 54:16


On the latest Bobcast, we're recapping strong performances at the NCAA Championships for our cross country teams! Plus, we talk with some early season standouts on the hardwood and in the pool. Interviews this episode: 1:08 -- Jillian Richardson '23 (Female Bobcat of the Week) and Tara Ellard '22, Women's cross country All-Americans. 7:31 -- Ryan Smith '23, Men's Cross Country (Male Bobcat of the Week). 18:56 -- Brianna Gadaleta '23, Women's Basketball. 27:38 -- Stephon Baxter '23, Men's Basketball. 35:46 -- Grace Wenger '24, Women's Swimming and Diving. 42:56 -- Edmond Giang '23, Men's Swimming and Diving. 47:53 -- Dani Kogut, Head Coach, Field Hockey.

Brigham Young Money
#73 – The Pioneers Were Disrupters Feat. Liam Anderson

Brigham Young Money

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 92:38


Episode Notes The boys are joined by Liam Anderson (@notliamanders0n), from Well There's Your Problem, Lions Led by Donkeys, and Ten Thousand Losses Podcast, to discuss several topics, including Alex Jones big L in court, Kyle Kuzma, Chris Christie, and then we finish with a discussion about a profile from the Deseret News about totally normal billionaire and Utah Jazz owner, Ryan Smith. Link to the article here: https://www.deseret.com/utah/2021/11/15/22772490/ryan-smith-has-a-pitch-utah-jazz-dwyane-wade-qualtrics

Chris Kamrani on tribute videos, Ryan Smith's hopes for Utah, Whittingham/Sitake long-term + more

"The Drive" with Spence Checketts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 23:00


The Athletic's Chris Kamrani joins The Drive to discuss tribute videos(!!!), Ryan Smith's vision for Utah, Kyle Whittingham's long-term coaching future, Oregon @ Utah + more

Get Up!
Hour 1: Mac and Ease

Get Up!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 44:30


Louis Riddick, Dianna Russini, Bart Scott and Damien Woody join Ryan Smith as they discuss just how far Mac Jones can take the Patriots. Why does one of our analysts think they can go all the way to the Super Bowl this season? With Aaron Rodgers not practicing much at all the last two weeks, are the Packers headed towards a potential trap game against the Vikings? Plus, Baker Mayfield has said this is probably the most beat up he has been in his career but his injuries aren't an excuse. What are our analysts reading between the lines? Should Mayfield be a part of the Browns' future?

Kappa Kappa Psi Presents
NIB: Alex Shapiro & Dr. Cynthia Johnston Turner - Pt. 2

Kappa Kappa Psi Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 33:31


Welcome back to Season 4! Join editor & host, Ryan Smith, as we listen to the second part of a recording of a session at Nat Con 2021 in Grand Rapids. This session was a conversation between Alex Shapiro and Dr. Cynthia Johnston Turner, composer of "Suspended" and NIB conductor, respectively.   Transcription available soon. Questions, Comments, Suggestions: smity@kkpsi.org

Life's A Party
65- How To Flirt Online | UFC 268, Fancy Wedding, Childhood Memories Early 2000s

Life's A Party

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 70:38


The boys recap their eventful weekends where Ryan went to the world's most famous arena, Madison Square Garden, while Paul attended a very high class wedding that was a little out of his league. Ryan breaks down his trip from being scammed by a hotel, smoking in MSG and the thrill of watching people get knocked out in person. Paul then breaks down the biggest upscale wedding he believes he will ever attend in his life. From a Martini ice luge, to a cocktail hour filled with expensive seafood choices, to fireworks being shot off the dance floor, this wedding was far from normal. Next the fellas go down a list of "Things you would remember if you were a kid in the early 2000s." Club Penguin was the launching point for socializing online, and was a place to show off your clout. Memory lane then continues from flirting on Facebook via a poking war to having multiple Facebook wives in a week. Lastly it was survival of the fittest when the math times table quizzes came out. You do not want to miss this show, so grab a beer and let's travel back in time. #UFC268 #ChildhoodMemories #Facebook Get 10% OFF ScubaBeer with Promo Code "LIFESAPARTY" at Scubabeer.com Follow us on our Socials Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/lifesapartypod/ Tik Tok - https://www.tiktok.com/@lifesapartypod?lang=en Twitter - https://twitter.com/LifesAPartyPod Interested in supporting the show? Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/lifesapartypod?fan_landing=true Welcome to Life's A Party Podcast

Health Hacks With Mark L White
How To Control Your Biological Age ft. Ryan Smith of True Diagnostic

Health Hacks With Mark L White

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 1:26


https://marklwhite.com Your Biological Age can be slowed, and even reversed, by applying lifestyle changes. While scientists believe about 40% of your Methylation is out of your hands, due to what you inherited from your parents or experienced in childhood – that still leaves over half of your gene expression in your own hands. How low should you get your Biological Age? To find out, stream this episode with guest Ryan Smith! About Our. Guest: Ryan Smith attended Transylvania University and graduated with a degree in Biochemistry. After finishing all the educational curriculum and passing USMLE Step 1 he decided to leave and open up a pharmacy in the United States that focused on peptide synthesis and formulations for pharmaceutical preparations. That pharmacy, Tailor Made Compounding, became the 4th fastest growing company in healthcare in the US. Ryan exited Tailor Made in late 2020. Since then, Ryan has opened many businesses including TruDiagnostic, a company focusing on methylation array-based diagnostics for life extension and preventive healthcare. TruDiagnostic is a CLIA certified lab and health data company focused on serving integrative and functional medicine providers in the United States. TruDiagnostic has a commitment to research with over 21 approved clinical research studies investigating the epigenetic methylation changes of a variety of longevity and health interventions. Since Tru Diagnostics inception, they have created one of the largest private epigenetic health databases in the world with over 13,000 patients tested. Ryan also continues to consult for pharmacies and healthcare clinics in the US and Internationally. Connect With Our Guest: - Website: https://trudiagnostic.com

The Pressbox
Ryan Smith, Springfield Thunderbird - Segment 4 - 11/15/21

The Pressbox

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 13:21


Provision Church - Sermons
From Slaves to Sons - Galatians

Provision Church - Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 39:12


Message from Ryan Smith on November 14, 2021

Daily Path
Building Creative Spaces with Ryan Smith | #249

Daily Path

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 34:33


Being able to replicate the breakthroughs and positive impacts you have had personally in the lives of others is how we make the world a better place. In "Building Creative Spaces" Coach and Program Coordinator, Ryan Smith shares how leaders can create creative spaces for productivity and breakthroughs. Book Free Discovery Call: www.JoeWintersJr.com Music by Bingx.

Get Up!
Hour 1: Odell's Options

Get Up!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 48:43


Louis Riddick, Adam Schefter, Bart Scott and Damien Woody join Ryan Smith as they discuss where Odell Beckham Jr will land now that he's narrowed down his list of teams. Which of those would be the best fit for him? Aaron Rodgers is nearing his return along with his star offensive lineman, David Bakhtiari. Are the Packers primed to go on a big run with them back in their lineup? Plus, Jay Williams joins the show to discuss the impact of LeBron's return now that Russell Westbrook is figuring it out as well as the dominance of Steph Curry. Odell Beckham Jr, Aaron Rodgers, David Bakhtiari, Russell Westbrook, Steph Curry

Kappa Kappa Psi Presents
NIB: Alex Shapiro & Dr. Cynthia Johnston Turner - Pt. 1

Kappa Kappa Psi Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 34:08


Welcome back to Season 4! Join editor & host, Ryan Smith, as we listen to the first part of a recording of a session at Nat Con 2021 in Grand Rapids. This session was a conversation between Alex Shapiro and Dr. Cynthia Johnston Turner, composer of "Suspended" and NIB conductor, respectively.   Transcription available soon. Questions, Comments, Suggestions: smity@kkpsi.org

Life's A Party
64- CRAZY Bar Fights!!!! | Drunk Mistakes, Fact or Fiction, Nickelodeon Facts

Life's A Party

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 64:09


The fellas are back and what better way to start the show then to talk about some of their biggest drinking mistakes that you most likely have done as well. From drunk cooking stories, to drunk bar fights, to revealing inappropriate secrets, you definitely do not want to miss a second of this show. Paul abruptly storms off the set, but immediately revisits the show in Ryan's desk??? You'll have to tune in to see what could have possibly caused that to happen!!! And to round things up, the boys turn back the clocks and give some of the BEST Nickelodeon facts out there that will have you all revisiting some childhood memories. Thank you for watching and as always, let's party it up!!!! #BarFights #DrunkThoughts #Nickelodeon Get 10% OFF ScubaBeer with Promo Code "LIFESAPARTY" at Scubabeer.com Follow us on our Socials Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/lifesapartypod/Tik Tok - https://www.tiktok.com/@lifesapartypod?lang=en Twitter - https://twitter.com/LifesAPartyPod Interested in supporting the show? Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/lifesapartypod?fan_landing=true Welcome to Life's A Party Podcast

Locked On Chargers - Daily Podcast On The Los Angeles Chargers
CB Ryan Smith Out For The Year | What Went Right And Wrong Against The Eagles

Locked On Chargers - Daily Podcast On The Los Angeles Chargers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 40:50


Tuesday's on the Locked On Chargers Podcast are always better after a win! Today Daniel Wade and David Droegemeier break down Ryan Smith's season ending injury and the best and worst from Sunday's game against the Eagles. The hosts give their thoughts on losing special teams ace and cornerback Ryan Smith, Asante Samuel Jr. still in the concussion protocol, and Kenneth Murray being expected to practice fully this week. The guys get into what went wrong with Chris Harris Jr struggling, the run defense is still a major issue, and more. A lot went right in this win against the Eagles. Justin Herbert had one of the best games of his career. Offensive coordinator Joe Lombardi called a phenomenal game, the Tight Ends excelled, the offensive line blocked extremely well all day. A lot of great takeaways in this game that the Chargers can build on going forward in this season. Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Getupside Just download the FREE GetUpside App and use promo code TOUCHDOWN to get up to 50¢/gallon cash back on your first tank.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

This Week in Health IT
Putting the Patient First, Citizen Development, Digital, Automation, and Leadership

This Week in Health IT

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 49:13


November 5, 2021: As you start talking about automation, you have to be open, transparent and purposeful with your employees. Some of them will think you're bringing in a fleet of robots to take over their jobs. What is Intermountain doing with this incredible innovation that promises to offload the mundane and repetitive daily tasks? How does Intermountain develop solutions that stem from the voice of patients? How do they set up citizens for success when it comes to data and access to systems that will help them accomplish what they need? And how do you approach a new leadership role in the middle of a pandemic? Ryan Smith, CIO joins us for all of this and more.Key Points:00:00:00 - Intro 00:11:10 - When it comes to human centered design, don't let IT people design consumer solutions. That's principle number one. 00:13:10 - Intermountain Digital Platform00:15:50 - Intermountain has been really purposeful talking about robotic process automation and intelligent automation. How can we let people find more joy in their work and be able to focus their time and effort on the things that really matter and bring value?Intermountain Healthcare

Pushing The Limits
Handling Pressured Situations and Making Career Transitions with Conrad Smith

Pushing The Limits

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 63:55


In our fast-paced world, everyone feels pressured to be the best and to do their best. It's easy to succumb to worry and anxiety during this time. This week, a superstar athlete encourages us to reframe pressure as an opportunity. You may not be involved in the sports world, but you can still learn from it. For our guest, overcoming high-pressure situations boils down to two things: trusting in the preparation you've done and taking things one step at a time.  Retired All Blacks player Conrad Smith joins us in this episode to talk about his experiences in the sporting world. He gives us a glimpse into his childhood and how he transitioned in and out of professional rugby. It's easy to make sports your whole identity if you're not careful, and Conrad details how athletes can avoid this trap. He also shares how we can equip ourselves to handle high-pressure situations. If you want to hear about Conrad's tales with the All Blacks and know how to be better at dealing with being pressured, this episode is for you.    Here are three reasons why you should listen to the full episode: Gain insights on the dangers of being too immersed in a sports bubble.  Learn how you can deal with feeling pressured. Understand the importance of adaptability in our fast-changing world. Resources Gain exclusive access and bonuses to Pushing the Limits Podcast by becoming a patron!  A new program, BOOSTCAMP, is coming this September at Peak Wellness! All Blacks  International Rugby Players    Get Customised Guidance for Your Genetic Make-Up For our epigenetics health programme, all about optimising your fitness, lifestyle, nutrition and mind performance to your particular genes, go to  https://www.lisatamati.com/page/epigenetics-and-health-coaching/.   Customised Online Coaching for Runners CUSTOMISED RUN COACHING PLANS — How to Run Faster, Be Stronger, Run Longer  Without Burnout & Injuries Have you struggled to fit in training in your busy life? Maybe you don't know where to start, or perhaps you have done a few races but keep having motivation or injury troubles? Do you want to beat last year's time or finish at the front of the pack? Want to run your first 5-km or run a 100-miler? ​​Do you want a holistic programme that is personalised & customised to your ability, goals, and lifestyle?  Go to www.runninghotcoaching.com for our online run training coaching.   Health Optimisation and Life Coaching If you are struggling with a health issue and need people who look outside the square and are connected to some of the greatest science and health minds in the world, then reach out to us at support@lisatamati.com, we can jump on a call to see if we are a good fit for you. If you have a big challenge ahead, are dealing with adversity or want to take your performance to the next level and want to learn how to increase your mental toughness, emotional resilience, foundational health, and more, contact us at support@lisatamati.com.   Order My Books My latest book Relentless chronicles the inspiring journey about how my mother and I defied the odds after an aneurysm left my mum Isobel with massive brain damage at age 74. The medical professionals told me there was absolutely no hope of any quality of life again. Still, I used every mindset tool, years of research and incredible tenacity to prove them wrong and bring my mother back to full health within three years. Get your copy here: https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/books/products/relentless. For my other two best-selling books Running Hot and Running to Extremes, chronicling my ultrarunning adventures and expeditions all around the world, go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/books.   Lisa's Anti-Ageing and Longevity Supplements  NMN: Nicotinamide Mononucleotide, an NAD+ precursor Feel Healthier and Younger* Researchers have found that Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide or NAD+, a master regulator of metabolism and a molecule essential for the functionality of all human cells, is being dramatically decreased over time. What is NMN? NMN Bio offers a cutting edge Vitamin B3 derivative named NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) that can boost the levels of NAD+ in muscle tissue and liver. Take charge of your energy levels, focus, metabolism and overall health so you can live a happy, fulfilling life. Founded by scientists, NMN Bio offers supplements of the highest purity and rigorously tested by an independent, third party lab. Start your cellular rejuvenation journey today. Support Your Healthy Ageing We offer powerful third party tested, NAD+ boosting supplements so you can start your healthy ageing journey today. Shop now: https://nmnbio.nz/collections/all NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 250mg | 30 capsules NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 500mg | 30 capsules 6 Bottles | NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 250mg | 30 Capsules 6 Bottles | NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 500mg | 30 Capsules Quality You Can Trust — NMN Our premium range of anti-ageing nutraceuticals (supplements that combine Mother Nature with cutting edge science) combats the effects of aging while designed to boost NAD+ levels. Manufactured in an ISO9001 certified facility Boost Your NAD+ Levels — Healthy Ageing: Redefined Cellular Health Energy & Focus Bone Density Skin Elasticity DNA Repair Cardiovascular Health Brain Health  Metabolic Health   My  ‘Fierce' Sports Jewellery Collection For my gorgeous and inspiring sports jewellery collection, 'Fierce', go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/lisa-tamati-bespoke-jewellery-collection.   Episode Highlights [02:59] Conrad's Childhood Conrad's family used to move around until they settled at New Plymouth when he was six. His family was very close, as his parents always made time for him and his siblings.  They were also supportive of both his academics and sports. Conrad spent most of his childhood playing sports and helping out on their family farm.  [09:03] Conrad as a Young Sportsman  Conrad wasn't initially an overachiever when it comes to sports.  During his time at school, rugby didn't take up a huge portion of his life. Conrad didn't feel pressured to play, unlike most kids involved in sports today.  He's very grateful that he was able to finish his law degree before he started playing professionally.  [11:44] The Dangers of the Sports System Nowadays, there's an obsession with finding talent and training them hard from a young age.  The rationale behind this is to give these kids the best chances of success. However, Conrad is sceptical about this approach. He believes that balancing life and sports is crucial, especially because sports is a short-term career. Many athletes end up going bankrupt or developing depression because they don't have a life outside of playing sports. [16:26] Staying Grounded When you're in a sports bubble, it's easy to lose touch with reality. If you're handling a high-paying sports career, you can forget how real people live. Athletes need to stay grounded and not tie their identity with their sports. This way, they can land on their feet after the bubble bursts.  The challenge is to find other things that you enjoy and avoid the trap of coaching after your playing career ends.  [29:39] On Career Transitions With the rapid changes in the world, we need to adapt to stay relevant.  It takes courage to change your career.  However, you can always find support when you open up to the people around you.   [33:06] Mental Health in Sports  All athletes feel pressured with their sports—what's important is how they deal with it.  When you look at being pressured differently, you can see it as an opportunity.   There's no quick fix for handling high-pressure situations. It's essential to find what works for you. [36:38] How to Deal with Feeling Pressured  Preparation is critical to help overcome feeling pressured.  If you have done the prep work, all that's left for you to do is execute.  Don't get overwhelmed by the bigger picture. Instead, focus on the minute details. You need to be at the top of your game if you're playing in the Rugby World Cup. Listen to the full episode to hear how Conrad overcomes being pressured! [45:21] Conrad's Experiences with the All Blacks Conrad was playing for the Wellingtons when he was picked to play for the All Blacks. His fellow players and coaches told him not to feel pressured and encouraged him to have fun.  For Conrad, being an All Black never lost its glow. He acknowledges what the team means for the country.  He believes that the All Blacks continues to perform well because the players uphold the team's legacy. In particular, their jersey means so much to Conrad. Find out why when you tune in to the full episode!  [52:51] The Future of Rugby Now working as a lawyer in the player association, Conrad speculates that women's rugby will see tremendous growth in the coming years.  The women's rugby players are more motivated by the sport. They want to reach more women and girls through it.  Since this women's rugby is still a relatively small industry, there's not much effort to commercialise yet.  This can be an advantage. It's similar to how small but nimble companies can overtake big industries. [59:56] Conrad's Advice to Parents and Children It is much more harmful to shelter your children from sports. As you get serious about sports, remember to stay grounded and balanced. Connect with the real world as much as you can.  Lastly, be open to opportunities and changes.    7 Powerful Quotes ‘I think it's fine to keep a balance, and to play other sports, and to experience, just live a normal life. I think you can still excel.' ‘You have a crazy number of bankruptcy, crazy number of rates of depression because they haven't learned to live outside of their sport.' ‘You have a lot of retired players that feel like they have to coach because they think it's all they know. The challenge, I suppose is, then of being careful not to fall into that trap.' ‘Whatever you decide that you want to be, you can become.' ‘The bigger the moments and the bigger the pressure, it's the funny thing, it's the more important that you focus on the smaller, minute detail.' ‘If you break it down into one more step, just one more, and then you just keep going and keep going. Then, invariably, that mindset or that thing that's in your head passes and then you're back in the game.' ‘If it's a conversation you're just having in your own mind, you will never get anywhere. You just need to open up about it.'   About Conrad Conrad Smith was a long-time player of New Zealand's All Blacks and helped lead the team to the 2011 and 2015 Rugby World Cups. He is widely known as “The Snake” for his ability to slip through tackles. At 38, he captained the Wellington-based Hurricanes in the Southern Hemisphere's Rugby league, then retired after the 2015 World Cup.  He now serves as legal counsel and project manager for International Rugby Players, the global representative body for the sport. He is also the high-performance manager for Pau, a French club that competes in the Top 14, the highest in the country's domestic league.  Find out more about Conrad and his work at International Rugby Players.    Enjoyed This Podcast? If you did, be sure to subscribe and share it with your friends! Post a review and share it! If you enjoyed tuning in, then leave us a review. You can also share this with your family and friends, so they can learn what to do when they feel pressured.  Have any questions? You can contact me through email (support@lisatamati.com) or find me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. For more episode updates, visit my website. You may also tune in on Apple Podcasts. To pushing the limits, Lisa     Transcript Of The Podcast Welcome to Pushing the Limits, the show that helps you reach your full potential, with your host Lisa Tamati, brought to you by lisatamati.com.  Lisa Tamati: Lisa Tamati speaking. Welcome back to Pushing the Limits. This week, I have Conrad Smith, the famous, famous All Black, who many of you Kiwis at least will know, a superstar athlete. And we share information about his career, and what it's like to be in the World Cup, and lots of exciting stuff. Also, what it's like to be post-career now, retiring, some of the issues that he sees around young athletes. Really lovely and interesting conversation with the amazing Conrad Smith who's also a lawyer as well as an All Black. Talk about an overachiever.  Before we get on to the show, just want to remind you, we have our epigenetics flagship program that we're running constantly. So if anybody wants to find out what the genes are all about, and how to optimise your food, your exercise, your lifestyle, your chronobiology, your mood and behaviour, all these things to your specific genes, and get the blueprint and the user manual for your body, then please come and check out what we do. Head on over to lisatamati.com, hit the ‘Work with Us' button, and then you'll see our Peak Epigenetics program. That will take you over to our site where you can find out all about that. Or you can always reach out to me, and I can send you a little bit of a video, and maybe jump on a call to explain how it all works. It's a really powerful and awesome program. We've taken hundreds and hundreds of people through this program, and it's really been life-changing for so many, including myself and my family. So if you're wanting to find out about that, just head on over to lisatamati.com and hit the work with us button.  Also, just wanted to let you know that I do a lot of motivational speaking, corporate speaking. I would love if anyone knows, or organising a conference, or team workshop, or anything like that, please reach out to me: lisa@lisatamati.com if you're interested in finding out about my speaking programs. Also, we do corporate wellness programs on that front as well. How can you upgrade your life and be the best version of you can be at work and at home? That's what we're all about. So thanks for that letting me do that little plug.  Now, we're going to be going over to Conrad Smith who's just been moved back to New Plymouth. I've had the privilege of meeting him a number of times and working on a couple of things. So I hope you enjoy this conversation. Now, over to Conrad.  Well, hi everyone and welcome back to Pushing the Limits this week with Lisa Tamati. I am really excited for today's conversation. I've teamed up with another amazing superstar, a top athlete for you guys to enjoy learning from today. I have Conrad Smith. Conrad, welcome to the show.  Conrad Smith: Thank you, Lisa. Thank you for the introduction.  Lisa: You hardly need an introduction especially to people living in New Zealand. A legendary All Black. You played for how many years? I think it's 2004? Conrad: 15 years. Lisa: 15 as an All Black, as a winger. You've been a captain of the Hurricanes. You've been, I don't know, Player of the Year and Sportsman of the Year in Wellington. Your accolades are such a huge list, Conrad. You're blushing already, I can see. But really, an incredible athletic career and you were also talented as a cricketer, I understand. Conrad: When I was a little fella, when I was little fella. I was too little for rugby so I played more cricket, but yeah.  Lisa: And then you grew. Conrad: I was a New Zealander. New Zealand kid back then. Yeah, then I grew up. That's right.  Lisa: Yeah. Then you grew up and you were big enough to take on the big boys. Say, Conrad, give us a little bit of a feel like where you grew up. And how much of an influence did your childhood have on what you ended up doing with your rugby career? Conrad: Yeah. So I was actually born down Hawera. My father was a policeman so we moved around with him a little bit in the early years, and then moved to New Plymouth when I was about six. We're a very, very close family. He gave a lot of time. My mom and dad would always make time for the kids: a couple older brothers, younger sister. Yeah, it was a great childhood. A lot of sport was played but we all did pretty well academically, which my parents laughed at because both of them never made it. They did poorly in school. Really, really supportive parents in terms of... It's funny, I probably took it for granted then, but I don't ever remember my parents either not being there or having to work.  Everything we did, we always were supported. And they were there, whether it was just drive us there, or coach our teams, or try and help us with our homework. I think that was what I've, like I said, took for granted but now, being older, I realise how important that was and why we're still such a close family, and my brothers are my best mates, and my sister is. We still meet. Yeah we still, obviously. We're all sort of have moved around the world but we're sort of pretty close together again. I suppose I try to be now with my own family like my dad was to me. Yeah, so those were the luckiest break in my head, I suppose. I always say people talk about luck, especially in sport but for me, it was just the family I was born into and the sport I had as a young fella.  Lisa: Yeah. Now, that's brilliant. And you had a couple of kids yourself?  Conrad: Yeah, yeah. Now, we've got two of them, just about to go off to school. Luca is my seven, and we had him in New Zealand, and then our daughter was actually born over in France while I was over there for four or five years. She's come back with us. Lisa: Growing up in the... You grew up in the 80s, I grew up in the 70s. Showing my age, yeah. But I think in the 80s, it was still very much like an outdoorsy lifestyle, like that good Kiwi kid upbringing, especially in Taranaki because we both come from here. Having that being outdoors in nature all day, as kids, we never came home before dark, sort of thing. Was it the same in your household?  Conrad: Yeah, for sure and like I say to all the brothers, they were pretty influential in what I did. I just sort of hung around, tail off them but very much, we were always out. I just think of my childhood, it was all about playing sport, finding areas to play sport. You'd sort of get pushed out, and as we try and play inside, then we'd get pushed out to the garden and we'd ruin the garden or ruin the lawn. We're just constantly finding places to do what guys do with a ball and you can do anything. Then, the wider family were farming so my dad was on the farm. He sort of got kicked off by his older brother, but that was a family farm.  So we would eat out that way and that's that Douglas from Stratford on the way there with my mom in there. That's been in the family for three or four generations and that would be where we're kids. We'd help with haymaking, we'd help with carving, we'd help all sorts. That was pretty much my favourite holiday, and the same as all of us kids would be to go spend some time there and help on the farm. That was just a childhood, yeah. You just know what friends to do and always outside, didn't matter if it was raining and cold as it often is at most parts. We just put a coat on and carry on.  Lisa: Oh, man that just takes me back to my childhood, and I often think, 'Man, I want to go back.' What happened to that simple life that we had when we were kids? You're very lucky to have such wonderful parents, obviously. It's such a cool family. You also went off into university and became a lawyer, as you do, as an All Black. A slight overachiever there, Conrad. Did you always want to be a lawyer apart from wanting to be an All Black?  Conrad: As I sort of said before, I wasn't a huge overachiever on the sport front. Well, I went to Francis Douglas; it's not a huge sporting school. We had sporting teams, but that wasn't very much. Part of it, you were there to study, you were there to get an education, and I enjoyed it. I enjoyed school. I think it is a great school, and a lot of my mates now are still from the mates I made in my school years, and yeah. So I didn't mind class and I never had a... I suppose leaving high school as it was when I was going to go to university, my brothers had both done that. That was sort of a thing to do.  Law was, yeah. It was something. I enjoyed English history. Those sort of subjects at school in Wellington wasn't too far. I sort of wanted to go down to meet my brothers down there and that was the scarfie life was. But he sort of talked me out of it just because he... I think he'd done about four years by that stage, and flying down, and getting himself back and forth was pretty tough. They sort of said, 'Well, if you have to, go closer to home.' and that was when I ended up in Wellington and I really enjoyed law and rugby.  Yeah like I say, sport was great, but it was two nights a week. It wasn't taking over my life as I know it does to a lot of kids nowadays. They make academies, and whatnot, and maybe talk about whether that's a good thing or a bad thing. But yeah, I was able to finish a full law degree and luckily, that sort of perfectly dovetailed into when I started playing professionally. Yeah, it was just sort of fortunate for me in terms of the way it all worked out and the timing. That's something I was very grateful for, obviously. Lisa: Yeah, yeah. Because right now, like your career, your playing career at least is over, you've got something to do. You've got a qualification. If we dive into that subject a little bit, so a lot of the young guys now are coming through and they're sort of getting picked out early along the way. What sort of dangers do you see with that system?  Conrad: Yeah, I do worry about it,  and I've spoken about it before. Because it's not just in rugby. It's in all sports. There's sort of a real obsession towards identifying talent young. Then the excuses, are you giving them the best chance of success? So we're gonna do all the work with them, and specialise them, and make them concentrate on the sport. But firstly, I don't know if that actually helps them with their sport a whole lot. I think it's fine to keep a balance, and to play other sports, and to experience, just live a normal life. I think you can still excel. But the other thing is that if it doesn't work out or even if it works out, sports are short term industry. You know, I know that that's not forever, and when you get to the back end of that, if you're purely invested in one sport when the time runs out, you got to rebuild a lot of the... Yeah and that's a real problem.  And you don't need to look far to find a lot of evidence about that. We've been afoot and looking at American sports because they've been professional a lot longer than we have. Some of the statistics is just shocking. And people would think that they paid so much money, the athletes in those sports in America that they should be able to live literally after... They could do whatever they want. Theoretically, they have enough money just to retire but the statistics are not that at all. You have a crazy number of bankruptcy, crazy number of rates of depression because they haven't learned to live outside of their sport. That's sort of been taken away from them because they're placed into their sport so young, and then just cut, and there's no real assistance around that.  So yeah, that's an extreme example and we're nowhere near at that stage here with the way the academies and that are set up. I know most of the people involved are very mindful of the things I've just talked about. Lisa: That's pretty...just open that conversation now. Conrad: Yeah. I just think there's a lot to be said around leading young people. I look at myself and from that period of development where maybe nowadays, I'd been in an academy, I was lead to play multiple... I played cricket, I played basketball, I ran, I did, God knows, all these things, and who's to say what lessons I learned from those other sports that I actually used in rugby? Because there's so much that you can pick up and also being able to study.  For me to have a degree, the benefits that gave me to deal with injuries, to deal with all the downsides of sport because I had a background and the education. It's really helpful. You relax a lot more. You get a perspective on the sorts of things that if you're just wrapped up in a sport and you get an injury, man that's tough. You can't do what you would like to do. Where do you turn? But I think if you've had a bit of an education, and it doesn't have to be a law degree, but if you've got some other life or other opportunities and options that you can turn to in those times, and it gives you perspective and a sense of reality, and you don't get so caught up in that, so yeah. I know it is appreciated. I just think it may be still underrated by a lot of the people that are setting up these academies and things for the young sportsmen.  Lisa: Yeah, and that's a good conversation to have and just be open about. Because you're one injury away from ending your career at any time. And then, to build... that's like building a sort of a house on a foundation of saying if you haven't got something else and you haven't got the life skills, if I just look at the opposite extreme with my sport where you have... When I started, just a bunch of weirdos doing crazy stuff, right? There's no structure, and there was no support. There was no knowledge, but it taught me that I had to go and market myself. I had to go and push everything that... Even when I represented New Zealand, I had to buy my own singlet to wear at the thing. Get a little... I'm getting here and do all of the things. So you had to market yourself, present yourself, become a speaker, do all of this sort of stuff in order to... So through that, you learn a lot of life skills anyway and then it was never a professional sport, in a sense. I managed to live off my sport for a number of years, but that was an exceptionally... That just because I found ways to do that but it wasn't a pathway that anybody could follow. But it taught me to fight. I remember having this conversation with my brother, Dawson, who I know was one of your heroes when you were a little feller. My brother, Dawson, was a Hurricanes player and Super Rugby in Taranaki and international as well. When I came back from Australia, and I came back to New Zealand, and I was raising money to go to Death Valley, which was a big race for me, he was like, 'Why are you in the media? Where you want to be? I used to hide from the damn media.' And I'm like, 'Yeah, but you got everything given to you, mate. You got all your clothes, all your gear, you got stuff gifted to you left, right, and centre. You've actually got no idea what another sport is.' That structure, that framework is not there. And that's good and it's bad.  When you have everything laid on for you, but you haven't had to fight in society for your things... Because I've talked to a lot of rugby clubs actually around the country to all the younger guys. Everything is laid out for them. They have to fight. They've got a lot of pressure as far as performance and all that sort of stuff goes, but the rest of life is sort of taken care of. So it's something to be wary of. I think you got young ones and going up through this system is to just think about, 'What is the fallback option here? What else are they going to do when their career is over?' Because it can be very short, and not everybody reaches the stardom that you did. Not everyone gets to play for the All Blacks' 94 games or... Conrad: We talked about the bubble. They use that term a lot within sports. So you come into this bubble. When you stay in that bubble, you lose touch with reality. You're actually... I know because I've seen it, and I'd use that same terminology and say, 'Come on and talk to the guys. I've got to get out of the bubble.' It was always a thing of because people would... And you'd see it with people that get drawn into a sporting career and if they're doing really well. And you're right. It's only in New Zealand that it's probably only really rugby. There are other sports now that get paid really well, but they have to head overseas so... You're thrown into a lifestyle where everything is laid on and you don't actually... You forget how the real people live and the real life is, and that the bubble bursts, and it all comes about, and this is what I'm saying: The more time you spend in that bubble, when it bursts, the harder it is. The fall can really take a lot of getting used to it and some people don't.  Unfortunately, even the guys I have played with, I've got as many stories of guys who are struggling, still struggling as the guys who fell on their feet. I don't think anyone does straight away, even myself. People will say ‘You handled it well.' I've been retired just over three years and I knew. Everyone seemed to me it's at least two years before you even... There's still things you struggle with it. And that was spot on. It just takes a lot of time to understand that you're never going to get up in the morning and have that same drive. You're very lucky that when you're as a sportsman or woman to have that drive. Just do the same thing. But you got to find something else, and it will never replace that and it's not meant to, but it's a challenge for everyone. Those life experiences during that sporting career are so important so that when the bubble bursts, when you come out of it, it's just a little bit easier to find your feet. Because otherwise, that is tough, and it's a bit of a worry.  Lisa: Yeah yeah exactly. Just on even from that identity of being this athlete and you had a singular purpose. Pretty much every day when you got up, it was to train and it was to be the best for the next game or the next whatever. And that gets taken away and then the complexity of life comes in. Yeah? I retired from doing ultramarathons at 48. It's a sport where you can go a lot longer, and I've got mates that are still in their 60s and 70s doing it. But what I do see often in the ultra running community is they don't know anything else so, 'I'm going to stick with what I know and I'm just going to beat the crap out of my body until it falls into the ground.' Rather than going, 'Hang on a minute. This is no longer conducive to what I really want for me.' And reassessing. With rugby, you're forced to because physically, at 48, you wouldn't be able to keep up with a 20-year-old.  There's that whole, have you struggled? I know I've struggled with that whole identity. Like, 'Who the hell am I if I'm not that hardass athlete and I'm not able to do what I used to do?' Because I still get it in the running scene, 'Oh, a marathon must be... you must do that before breakfast.' I'm like, 'Yeah, no. That's not...' Now, a 5K's quite long. You know what I mean? So your horizon comes back in. So I've spent decades pushing my horizon out to be able to go longer, longer, longer, bigger. Then, life happens. In my case it was mum and that was the end of the career. It was high time; it was overdue. But that whole, you just had the rug pulled out from under you, and your identity is tied up in that performance. Have you found that a struggle?  Conrad: Yeah. Yeah, I think. Like I say, everyone does. You're lying if you say people do it easy. Again, I think a lot of the work, hopefully, athletes that handle it better have thought about that work during their career and they don't... We were given some great support while I was playing, particularly, within the All Blacks, guys like Gilbert Enoka with the background. And the whole mental side of not just the game, but of life, in terms of keeping...being grounded, keeping perspective. Part of that was your identity and not letting rugby define you. We used to say that you're a person that plays rugby, you're not a rugby player. It has this other life. You're actually... I play rugby because I like playing. Maybe that's not who I am. That's what the public sees, and I think if you get a handle on that while you're playing, then you understand that when rugby is taken away but that's not part of... ‘That's what I used to do. Now, I'm not doing it anymore but I'm still the person I've been this whole way. Now, my journey carries on.'  Like I say, that's easier said than done. There's people that become the rugby player. That's all they are, and so that's the real challenge. For me, it was about just finding other challenges. And I think anyone in terms of rugby or any sport yourself, you find other challenges, it gives you... You realise your own identity and you find other things to do that give you fulfilment. I think aligned with that is the whole... When I think of rugby players, a lot of them who find the identity in rugby, they then just go on to coaching, and this is a real problem, and it might... I don't think that's just with the sport of rugby, but you have a lot of retired players that feel like they have to coach because they think it's all they know.  The challenge, I suppose is, then of being careful not to fall into that trap. It was easier for me. I studied. I used to be a lawyer. I'm sure I could go back and do that. Maybe not as a lawyer, but there are other skills that I have. That's a really hard message, but it's a really important message to give all sportsmen. To rugby players, I'm always telling them, 'You don't have to stay in rugby, you know. You played, you finished, you don't have to coach.' There's going to be hundreds and thousands of players finishing career and they think they have to coach. But their skills are transferable to hundreds of different professions and things that will pay them well. You can keep being yourself.  Even for me, I've stayed within rugby but it's not coaching. I'm working with the Players Association, International Players Association and that suits me. That's my skill set: a bit of the law, the analytical side of me that I've always had. And I think that was important. It's sort of my process of moving away from that identity as just 'Conrad Smith, the rugby player.' It's important to find other things that challenge me and that I enjoy. Lisa: Just interrupting the program briefly to let you know that we have a new patron program for the podcast. Now, if you enjoy Pushing the Limits, if you get great value out of it, we would love you to come and join our patron membership program. We've been doing this now for five and a half years and we need your help to keep it on air. It's been a public service free for everybody and we want to keep it that way. But to do that we need like-minded souls who are on this mission with us to help us out. So if you're interested in becoming a patron for Pushing the Limits podcast, then check out everything on patron.lisatamati.com. That's patron.lisatamati.com. We have two patron levels to choose from. You can do it for as little as 7 dollars a month, New Zealand, or 15 dollars a month if you really want to support us. We are grateful if you do.There are so many membership benefits you're going to get if you join us: everything from workbooks for all the podcasts, the strength guide for runners, the power to vote on future episodes, webinars that we're going to be holding, all of my documentaries, and much, much more. So check out all the details: patron.lisatamati.com. And thanks very much for joining us.  Lisa: That's awesome and thanks for sharing that because I think that's... Being able to openly have these conversations because there are a lot of athletes in lots of different sports struggling with this whole process of... Your career is so short, and you're not a has-been. I asked myself these conversations, and most especially in the beginning is, 'You're nothing now. You're a has-been now. You can't do it.' And being embarrassed about that, instead of going, 'Hang on a minute. I'm still pretty fricking epic and I do other stuff.' Now, that's freed up a huge piece of my brain and my daily power and energy to then go and attack other massive projects.  There's so many things in the world that you can take on. It's all up to you to develop a certain passion. And I think it's not even just in the sports realm. I see people who are in careers that got friends and careers, they don't want to be there anymore but they studied it, they became it, they did it. whatever it was. Now, they're like, 'Is that it?' It doesn't have to be it, no. We live in a day and age where we can actually go and retrain. In fact, we have to be adaptable and flexible in this day and age if we want to keep up because the world is changing so fast. So many jobs are going to be gone and whole industries.  As a jeweller in a previous life, that industry got destroyed, really. If you weren't in the big game with big brands and Chinese mass production and stuff like that and you're an artisan, a person who made one-off pieces, you're struggling now unless you really got the top massive diamonds and God knows what. Everyone else is struggling, so you have to go, 'Okay, that industry's change. I'm going to have to adapt, change, go with it, overcome it, improvise, and keep developing.' I think that's the message that we're getting here is you don't box yourself in. don't just be that one-trick pony. That's not, and Conrad is now an advocate, he's a father, he's a speaker.  Whatever you decide that you want to be, you can become. And you're not just Conrad, the All Black. I think that's a really important transition for everybody to go through. Even if you're a policeman or a teacher and you don't want to do that anymore or whatever the case is. Conrad: Yeah, and it takes a bit of courage. Like I said before, it's easier said than done a lot of the time. And that's what people just need that encouragement. Especially with finances and people suddenly are, 'I've got a mortgage on a house. I don't want to change career because there might be a layer where I'm not earning money.' But yeah, I just think that's... You come back to some questions about who you are, who you want to be, and you've got to be... You'll be happy doing what you're doing. So I just think all the help you can get from people around you, that's where you'll draw the energy, I think. If it's a conversation you're just having in your own mind, you will never get anywhere. You just need to open up about it, speak to people close to you, and I think that's generally where the answers come from.  Lisa: Yeah. I think that's gold. On that point, how big is mental health in your work? Do you do a lot around supporting mental health, and that sort of thing, and helping people transition, and all that sort of jazz?  Conrad: Yeah, absolutely. More and more, it's a complex field. When you talk about players in the game, in the sport of rugby, it's really difficult. We were starting to appreciate the pressures I think that sportsmen and women are under in these fields. It's a lot of… it draws that back on what we were talking about before. You're in a bubble and you do lose perspective and so not as the... The challenge is to help these young, these kids that are in these bubbles to speak different, and keep living, and look at sport as this amazing opportunity, and not feel the pressure. Well, maybe saying not feeling the pressure is the wrong way to put it because it's natural, but to feel the pressure and find a way to deal with that, a healthy way to deal with it. Again, I look back on my career and you're playing for the All Blacks, you're playing World Cups, it's easy to talk about pressure. There was never times that I didn't know how to deal with it, and that was from the sport I had, and maybe the background, and my upbringing. But it was easily... You just channel that and see and look at it differently and decide. Look at the opportunity that every time you feel pressure, you get it, it's as simple as just changing the perspective of things rather than the pressure of, ‘You have to win'. ‘I'm an All Black, I want to win because…' Whatever. ‘I've got a country behind me,' and suddenly, it's a burden that's lifted and yeah, you flipped it and you're puffing out your chest, and you want to do it. If it doesn't come off, it's a game. There's more important things, absolutely, around. But yeah, like I keep saying, it's not easy for everyone and there's people that understand that better. The challenge is getting through to people of different backgrounds, and different cultures, and different ages.  Lisa: Yeah with different problems.  Conrad: Yeah. I'm saying that because I know what works for me, but I know a 17-year-old young Samoan boy who's playing rugby, I don't know for the Highlanders, I might not be able to connect with him. The things that worked for me won't work for him. That's what I'm trying to say. Or the female swimmer who's doing, training for an Olympics. We're all different, and the challenge is finding a way for everyone to deal with that pressure and to be mentally healthy through a sports career. Lisa: I love that approach and just coming off the back of the Olympics. It was just wonderful to watch our amazing athletes doing amazing things. Lisa Carrington just blows me away. She's mentally just insane. But I love that thing of the challenge versus threat. I think this is a really important thing to do. When you're feeling overwhelmed and overburdened and like the whole world of pressure is on me, you going out and something the World Cup, were you able, even in those extreme pressure moments, to turn that into an opportunity and not a threat? Because that does change the physiology. Like when you're running on the paddock on those days, those couple of times in your life where it's just been horrifically big pressure, how did you physically and mentally cope there?  Conrad: Yeah, I think we've spent a lot of time, and everyone did, preparing for that World Cup. Again, as All Blacks, you have to spend a lot of time because you know the pressure that comes with and the expectation that comes with being an All Black in New Zealand. But even more so a World Cup, a home World Cup, when we hadn't won, I think 2011. A lot of our preparation time wasn't just being on the field with how we're going to play but was how to deal with that pressure. For me, it was just constantly turning it around so that it was never a moment I even... I can look back and think of times in the game where the team was under pressure and it would be perceived as... Even in that final hour, the team struggled a bit with the pressure, but if I'm being honest, our preparation never let us feel that way. We were dealing with that all the time.  We just were focused on doing our job. We talked so much about whatever comes our way, we were going to adapt and deal with it and that's what you just had to keep doing. You never sort of stop, and you'll notice yourself, you just don't let yourself stop and think about that. I think if you've got to that stage, it's too late. If you're having to go through a process of. 'How do I deal with this?' It's probably too late. You've already, hopefully, got a process in place where you're just, it's just instinctively, you're just channelling that, focusing on little details. Because you know whatever the pressure, that's not going to influence you unless you need it. You just focus on the small tasks and you get through 80 minutes of rugby like that, keep a smile on your face. Lisa: Pull your focus into the job at hand instead of the: 'Oh my god. Everyone's watching me. Everyone's pressuring. Hang on a minute I've just got to pass this ball right now.' You're breaking it down into little tiny... Conrad: We all have little trigger words and I know we've talked about this: ‘Be in the now.' Be in the now, which is like just what you're talking about. It's not thinking about the mistake you might have just made, the ball you drop, the tackle you missed, and it's not worrying, and you're not thinking about the World Cup, you're going to win at the end of this game. Because you can't do anything. Right now. ‘Right now. Right now, I'm going to catch this next ball.' Look up, keep looking, keep calling, whatever it is. It's as simple as a little thing like that that just keeps you in tune with the moment and not letting you get overwhelmed by the bigger picture. Yeah, massively important, obviously. The bigger the moments and the bigger the pressure, it's the funny thing, it's the more important that you focus on the smaller, minute detail.  Lisa: I love it. I said try to forget the consequences of what you're doing. You've done the preparation. You've done the work. You've done everything that you possibly can. You're standing on the start line, in my case, a race, then letting go of the outcome because you've done what you can do. And now, it's up to the whatever happens in the next few hours or days, in my case. So this was no longer just in your hands then. Because the gods have a thing to say about it as well. Sometimes, if you try and control the uncontrollable, then you'll drive yourself to madness, whereas if you can go, 'I've done the stuff that I was responsible for. I've put the work and I've done the preparation. I know my strategies. I know my pacing. I know whatever it is I'm doing. I got that right. Okay. I'm going to keep my eye on the ball here. But I'm going to let go of the outcome now.' Because when you let go of the outcome, then that pressure goes and you're in that...  Being in that now is a really powerful message to people. Because when you're in the past or the future, you're either worrying about the future, or you're regretting what's happened in the past, or it's a load for you to carry. In the moment, when you're under pressure, all you can cope with is that second right now. The next minute. That's it. When I was running long distances, I would break it down into: 'What's the next power pole? I just got to get to the next power pole. If I can't even get that far, I'm just gonna take one more step.' You can always take one more step, right? If you break it down into one more step, just one more, and then you just keep going and keep going. Then, invariably, that mindset or that thing that's in your head passes, and then you're back in the game.  Conrad: That's funny, you sound... because someone I remember that came and spoke to the team when we were outside joined the team in 2004, and we had Amish Carter came and spoke with the team. It was before the 2007 World Cup and obviously, that World Cup didn't end well, but some of what he said, I still remember it. He was talking about his Olympic performances, and he said, and I think one of the questions from the players was about we're talking: the nerves and the pressure. And I remember him saying that he wasn't nervous. He wasn't nervous when he got to the start line just for the reasons you said. He said: ‘Because then, I'd backed on my prep, I'd done everything I needed to do. Now, it was just a matter of going out and doing that. You can't do anymore.' It's funny that when I looked, especially towards into my career, the only times I would feel nervous normally, on the start of a week. So if we play the game on a Saturday, and that was because I'm nervous thinking of all the things I've got to do on the Monday, Tuesday. But by the Friday, I would have this real sense of calm. I'd have a smile and I'll be like, 'Right now, it's time to do it.' It's funny because people, it's the opposite. They're not thinking about a game on Monday, Tuesday, but they were getting nervous on before a game starts thinking, 'You must be even worse.' But yeah, that was the way I could explain it is that we're really... I was nervous thinking about the game but now, I've done all that. This is the path I've taken. This is the training I've done for this game. Now, I'm ready to... I'm going to go and do it and see if it works. Lisa: Yeah, this is the reward phase. This is actually what you've been preparing for all along, so this is the time when you actually should be enjoying it. It wasn't always that easy especially when you're doing a couple hundred K's somewhere because sometimes it's not that pleasant. But you've done the work to get to the start line and the times where I am being nervous is when I hadn't done the work.  Conrad: Exactly. I think of some... I don't like admitting it but normally, with All Blacks, you always have checked every box but there were games, I'd go back even the Hurricanes or Club Games and that's the ones where I'd be nervous because I'd be thinking... ‘I haven't really... now this week. I probably haven't done…' Then, you get nervous but actually the bigger the occasion, the preparation is normally good.  Lisa: You took it seriously and yeah, yeah. I've come stuck on some short races where I've had my ass handed to me because I went in with the... That's just the short race, and oh my god. Had my ass handed to me. So yeah, always respect every distance or every game. I think it's key. What's it actually like, Conrad, to be... The first time that you put on that All Blacks jersey? Because it's every little boy and now, little girl's dream too. What's it actually like to put on that sort of thing for the first time? Can you remember?  Conrad: Yeah for sure. It's pretty special. I do think I was really lucky the way it panned out for me in terms of... It happened really quickly. I'd play. I hadn't even played the Super Rugby game. I hadn't played for the Hurricanes. When it started, I had a really... I was playing for the Wellington Lions. We made the final, and then I was picked, fortunately. So the coaching staff that had come in wanted to pick some new younger players and I was one of those. That was very much sort of out of the blue. Then, I was starting the following week. So I played a final. The team was picked. We assembled the end of that following week. We flew to Italy, and then I was playing.  But that was great in hindsight because it didn't let me overthink that. It was sort of okay, and I just was like, 'Right.' Little bit like what I said before, 'I'm just going to enjoy it.' Admittedly there were people around me. Graham Henry, Ryan Smith, Steve Hansen, great coaches, and Gilbert Enoka that were giving me those messages. Just telling me, 'We're picking you in the first game. Just go and enjoy it. Just keep doing what you're doing. We love what you're doing.' So those messages for a young guy were perfect. I didn't actually question that. Yeah, I just took the jersey. I was still sort of pinching myself how quickly it happened. But yeah, then there I was playing and yeah, it was an amazing experience.  I'm glad to say it never really diminished. I was lucky to play for over a decade, and it was always special putting on the jersey. The team does a great job, I think, of respecting the jersey, acknowledging how important it is to their country, what we mean to everyone, and staying grounded, and all that good stuff about acknowledging the connection that you have with the young men and women who are dreaming to being All Black, wishing they were there, would give anything to be in your place. So you're always aware of that, and so it never loses its glow. Then I put my jersey on.  Brian Hoyer who was a big part of the team when I joined the team, he said ‘When you put the jersey on, you shouldn't be able to fit outside the doorway.' You grow that big. I'm not using the words and I always... For me, I was normally marking someone bigger than me or normally not the biggest in the room but I always felt that. That I have to turn sideways to get out the door but that was the sort of feeling and you hear that even today: The way you sort of, you grow in the jersey. Lisa: You're carrying the manner and the tradition of that, and the reputation of that, and the hopes of a nation, basically, on your shoulders, which can be either a load or it can be like, 'Wow, how lucky am I that I get to stand on the shoulders of those who have gone before?' Basically and like you said, 'Yeah, I can't fit through the door because I'm just filled with all that.'  Okay, just a very quick anecdote. I was running through in the Gobi Desert at one point and we were running through these slot canyons. These really crazy. It was hot. One guy died out there that day which was really terrible. I was running through there and I was chasing down this American woman who was in front of me and I was second. I'm like, 'I've got to plan something here if I want to beat this person in front of me that I was chasing down through these canyons.'  So I started singing the Maori Battalion song to myself and I started to... like my ancestors, and my tradition there, my heritage like, 'I'm going to bloody beat you, American. Yeah. I'm gonna chase you down, and I'm singing away to myself running along through this canyon.' I beat her, right. It was awesome. I just went dashing past her, and I beat her. But it was just like, 'Wow.' It's just like you're pulling out stuff that you... It's not just you. You're like your ancestors and your heritage, and they're powering you. So I imagine it's a bit the same with the All Blacks jersey.  Conrad: Yeah. It's powerful stuff. Like, and it's all about creating something bigger than you. There's no doubt the history of things or like you say, in individual sports. As soon as you can create that connection to a greater cause. Actually, in the All Blacks, it's actually easy. I say this when I talk to other sports teams around how they create the identity. But the All Blacks had it handed to them because they have 130 years of whatever it is of this amazing performance, of this history, this black jersey that this country that's mad obsessed with them, great air of success and also, this idea that we do unite. We're the flagship of New Zealand. Rightly or wrongly, that's the way we're saying and you got to embrace that.  The fact that every time an All Black teams practice, it's a culture we have in New Zealand. This great collection of men who are representing the country. You capture that in the right way, and it counts as something. The field is 00 but I always felt... Yeah, when we got it right, we're straight away. That's worth some points at least on the board. It's something special that the All Blacks do have, and to the credit of the team, the whole time, I was involved. I know that it's carrying on that the way they connect and acknowledge that, it's really well done. It's the reason that the team continues to perform well. Lisa: And it does it empower whole generations. Like I said to my brother Dawson, my dad wanted him to be an All Black, and he wanted him to meet all those milestones along the way. I remember like... We lost my dad last year, as people know, if they listened to my podcast. I said to my brother the other day, 'Dawson,' because he went to the game up at the park, at Pukekura Park and they had the 25-year anniversary for the Ranfurly Shield because he was on the Ranfurly Shield team. He was excited to go to the Ranfurly Shield thing, and I remember that being the proudest moment of my dad's life. Of all the things that my dad got to do and see, all of their kids, I said to Dawson, 'You gave him the highest point in his life was when you came home with that Ranfurly Shield, and you're a part of that Taranaki Team. That was, for him, the pinnacle.'  That's beautiful because that is just like... Especially when you've lost somebody... And Dawson's like, to be able to go and celebrate that Ranfurly Shield with his old mates and reminisce on those times. That stays with you to the end: those special moments that you get, and that camaraderie that comes with it, and all of that sort of stuff. He gave my dad a precious gift really by being a part of that team. Dad was just so proud.  Dawson said to me once, 'Lisa, you could run across every fricking desert in the world and it would still not mean as much as that Ranfurly Shield.' And I said, 'You're damn right, and that's okay.' Because he was right in that. It's okay because he loved rugby, and he loved rugby teams, and the rugby world. My dad played, what do you call that? Fifth-grade rugby until he was 45 and he only quit because people were telling him he was too old, and then he played touch for another 10 years. He was a legend. A legend.  You're carrying all that on your shoulders. There are five and six-year-old kids looking at you on screen like you did with Daws back then. Like, 'Oh, these big Taranaki players and stuff.' That's just beautiful. I had that just wanting to represent New Zealand in something because I couldn't be in All Blacks because back then, we didn't have women playing rugby, much to my dad's disappointment. Actually watching the girls at the sevens in the Olympics, oh, I just fell in love with that team. They were just epic. Ruby Tui is my new bloody hero. She's just amazing. I think she's just epic. But just to watch the camaraderie of those girls and the performance that they put on, I'm glad that women now have the chance to do that tough stuff too. Because that's pretty special as well: seeing girls going there and giving it everything, just going hard.  Conrad: You speak to the Black Ferns, the women's rugby, it's growing so much not just in New Zealand, but around the world and that's pretty exciting, especially for Fifteens and the opportunity it's giving so many young women. Yeah and so for myself, that's really refreshing now with international rugby and the Player Association and we deal with both men and women's. The joy I hear working in women's rugby, seriously, compared to men's, especially men's Fifteens, it's a lot of established... Careful with my words, but it's just so hard. To put it simply, it's so hard to get things done even if you agree there's so much.  Whereas in the women's game, it's so refreshing. There's just an openness and the enthusiasm. They just, 'Yep. Let's get that done and this.' You will see, women's rugby going to go great in the next few years, and it's because of... In the men's game, I don't like to say it, but it might not have anywhere near the same growth or evolution just because it's... Lisa: Stayed in the old ways. It obviously breaks everything, isn't it?  Conrad: The money, the money at that level is so big that there's so much at stake. That's just what grinds along, whereas the women's game, they're not... Obviously, they're trying to commercialise on the game, but it's crumbs compared to the men's for things at the moment. But they'll catch up at a huge rate because they're just open about... Like at the moment, they're motivated by having fun, being patient, at getting the product out, getting more and more women and girls playing the game.  Lisa: That's amazing and isn't that though that's a really good analogy for everything in the world? Like that the big old institutions or big bureaucracies are going to be struggling in the future, I think. Completely off-topic but from the governments, to the big corporations, to the big institutions are going to be struggling against these young, nimble, small, exponentially powered technology-based companies and the rate of change that's coming that these big state, old bureaucratic, not just talking about rugby here, but governments and things are actually going to be on the backfoot shortly.  I always think of that Kodak, the company Kodak that used to be the biggest player in the world and photography, right? They didn't go with digital evolution, then they went under. Because they were too busy trying to protect what they already had, they actually discovered digital photography. They started it, but they didn't pursue it because they thought, 'Oh, that's going to be a threat to our current existing business.' That mindset is when you get overtaken by the young upstarts that come along with enthusiasm and they can, on a company-wide level, they're smaller. They're nimble. They can make decisions quicker. They can move faster. I see this in all areas happening. Hopefully, in the right way it'll brush off as well, but the girls certainly are next level.  Conrad: They're great. And I've got to know a few of them, a few of the Black Ferns. Lisa: Can you help me out with Ruby? I want to get in with Ruby. Conrad: That is such great Kiwi so yeah, more than happy. She'd love to chat. Lisa: Woohoo. Okay. I know she's pretty busy right now. Everybody in the world wants to see her right now. And the other girls, they're just amazing. Conrad, as we wrap it up now in a minute because I know you got to go, but what is it that you want to get across? So if we highlighted a couple of points now, if you were talking to your children, you've got two kids, what do you want them to do in the future? Or what would you, if you were talking to some young kids out there that want to have a life in the sporting world? What's some last parting wisdom or for the parents of those kids?  Conrad: Yeah, I think if you're speaking to parents, the first thing is the value of sport, I think. I just worry a little bit. I know I'm working in rugby, and there's some crazy things being said about the potential harms of playing a contact sport. But honestly, I've had the benefit of seeing, digging a lot deeper into that and that is not at all as clear as it's conveyed because of the sensationalism of journalism. Kids are kids. They love playing. If I leave my boy and his next-door neighbour, they're gonna wrestle; they're gonna fight. There's no harm in playing.  But on the flip side, the harm of not playing sport, of sheltering them, of thinking, of sitting in a lounge with a Coke and a bag of lolly is better for a kid than going and playing rugby because he might knock his head. That's so far from the truth. That would be my wish for parents' young kids. Just play sport but... And then, I suppose, if it's to reflect on what we've talked about, when the kid means getting serious about a sport, it would be to keep you balanced, to not lose sight. If you're put in a bubble because it's a performance bubble, then that's all well and good but now, it's a bubble and you need to step out of that every chance you get and connect with the real world as much as you can.  Unfortunately, there are dangers and there are risks when you are totally invested into a sport. The crazy thing is sport is a great thing. It should be enjoyed and if you're even not enjoying it, it's not hard just to talk to someone and step outside your sport to reconnect with the people in the real world. Then, that should give you back your love of the game, and then you'll go well and be like Lisa and I and have a life where you've had a sport that you've loved, and it's given you amazing opportunities, and literally meet great people, and you still come out of it, and you're still happy, and still meet people but doing different things. Lisa: This is gold. Conrad, thank you so much for your time today. I really appreciate it. I'm looking forward to doing our speaking gig together shortly and that's going to be exciting. I'm just really glad to have made your acquaintance and I think that you have such a level approach, level-headed approach to this whole thing and gave us some great insights today on what it is to be an All Black, but also what it is to come out the other side and gave us some really good perspective. So thanks for your time today, Conrad. Conrad: Pleasure, Lisa.  That's it this week for Pushing the Limits. Be sure to rate, review, and share with your friends, and head over and visit Lisa and her team at lisatamati.com.   

Kappa Kappa Psi Presents
Native American Heritage Month: Hunter Harris

Kappa Kappa Psi Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 22:55


Welcome back to Season 4! Join editor & host, Ryan Smith, as he interviews Hunter Harris, Active from Epsilon, about Mississippi Choctaw culture for Native American Heritage Month.   Transcription can be found here: Link Questions, Comments, Suggestions: smity@kkpsi.org

Life's A Party
63- Naughty Halloween Costumes?!?! | OnlyFans, Good/Bad Costumes, Candy Thoughts

Life's A Party

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 53:12


HAPPY HALLOWEEN!!! Ryan shows up as a stripper and suggests for an LAP only fans?!?! Meanwhile Paul now works for NASA and wants to live up in space. To start the show Ryan breaks down his apple/pumpkin picking shenanigans over the weekend, while Paul goes a second time?!?! Next the boys break down some of the best and worst Halloween costume ideas for parties. Is it too over the top to make a normal costume sexy??? The fellas give their thoughts. Following that up are some deep conversations about the best and worst candy out there. To round the show up, the boys read some tweets that used the hashtag #WeirdestHalloweenEver and react to the stories. The 2nd annual Halloween show is a fun one and you do not want to miss it. So as always, grab a beer, grab some candy and let's have some fun!!!!! #Halloween #ApplePicking #Partying Get 10% OFF ScubaBeer with Promo Code "LIFESAPARTY" at Scubabeer.com Follow us on our Socials Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/lifesapartypod/Tik Tok - https://www.tiktok.com/@lifesapartypod?lang=en Twitter - https://twitter.com/LifesAPartyPod Interested in supporting the show? Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/lifesapartypod?fan_landing=true Welcome to Life's A Party Podcast

Locked On Angels - Daily Podcast On The Los Angeles Angels
Talking 66ers (Low-A) baseball with Steve Wendt!

Locked On Angels - Daily Podcast On The Los Angeles Angels

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 37:13


Steve Granado is kicking off Minor League Week on Locked On Angels with a chat with Inland Empire 66ers broadcaster Steve Wendt. They cover everything from COVID, to new pitch clocks and equipment and of course prospects like Jose Guzman, Bryce Teodosio, Jack Dashwood and Ryan Smith. We're talking about the Los Angeles Angels farm system from pitching to outfielders on today's episode, and all week! Follow Steve Wendt! Give us a call: ‪(714) 409-6396‬ Follow Steve: @SteveGranado Follow LOA: @LockedOnAngels Watch on YouTube Buy two seven merch/Follow two seven merch Listen to Movies I Should've Watched Listen to Our Game Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Buccaneers Observer
[250] Game film review: Chicago Bears. THESE FOOLS JUST GAVE UP!

Buccaneers Observer

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 58:57


If you like what we do and want to support the show, please consider a monthly donation: https://anchor.fm/buccaneers-observer/support After the game, we determined Leonard Fournette deserved the game ball. But after review of the game film, Ralph determined the offensive line, in fact, won us that game and thus deserved that game ball. Donovan Smith boasted afterward that he made #99 his son. The game film determined that was the truth. The Buccaneers receivers had a few dropped passes, but the Bears had even more than that. Bucs special teams played phenomenally, particularly #28 Darwin Thompson. He may be the new Ryan Smith, special teams stud. Overall, it appeared the Bears coaches quit after halftime, electing the run the ball the remainder of the game. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/buccaneers-observer/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/buccaneers-observer/support

Kappa Kappa Psi Presents
New VPSA: TarShae Odom

Kappa Kappa Psi Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 18:36


Welcome back to Season 4! Join editor & host, Ryan Smith, as he interviews TarShae Odom, newly appointed Vice President for Student Affairs (VPSA), about being Active, his platform, and overcoming nerves.    Transcription can be found here: Link Questions, Comments, Suggestions: smity@kkpsi.org

Life's A Party
62- Best Drunk Pranks!!! | Fall Seltzers, Rated R Movies, Skydiving

Life's A Party

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 64:17


With a brand new intro, the boys are coming in hot this week!!! First things first the fellas try the NEW Bud Light Seltzer Fall Flannel pack and give their ratings. Then Ryan reveals one of his biggest fears in life, while an Oreo debate breaks out mid show. Paul tries to convince the LAP crew to try skydiving and the boys revisit some of their BEST drunk pranks that they have performed or have been a part of in the past!!! You do not want to miss this week's show, so grab a beer and let's have ourselves a show!!! #Pranks #Skydiving #Shots Get 10% OFF ScubaBeer with Promo Code "LIFESAPARTY" at Scubabeer.com Follow us on our Socials Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/lifesapartypod/Tik Tok - https://www.tiktok.com/@lifesapartypod?lang=en Twitter - https://twitter.com/LifesAPartyPod Interested in supporting the show? Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/lifesapartypod?fan_landing=true Welcome to Life's A Party Podcast

Roundball Roundup
Episode 121: Commissioner Adam Silver talks Ryan Smith, Donovan Mitchell, Rudy Gobert, and NBA 75

Roundball Roundup

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 17:06


JP caught up with the Commish and gave a quick thought on the Jazz's opening night win.

Image Podcast
Anwar Hossain

Image Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 50:25


Special guests Anwar Hossain and Ross Patton join pastor Josh Perry and host Ryan Smith as we talk about Muslim evangelism and church planting in Bangladesh. You can reach out to Anwar if you're interested in finding out more about what God is doing in Bangladesh or ways to help further the mission. anwarrr2000@yahoo.com or P.O. Box 5052 New Market, Dhaka 1205. We would also love your feedback, questions, and topic suggestions at redemptionwv.com/image so please drop us a line!

Autonomy Bytes
013 – Andrew Shepherd and Ryan Smith: Autonomy Bytes First Anniversary Celebration

Autonomy Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 14:05


It's the first anniversary of Autonomy Bytes! This episode looks back at the engaging guests and interesting topics from the first 12 episodes, while previewing the future of the show and coming advances in the autonomy industry.

Kappa Kappa Psi Presents
National Convention: Kirk Randazzo

Kappa Kappa Psi Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 14:16


Welcome back to Season 4! Join editor & host, Ryan Smith, as he interviews Kirk Randazzo, Past National President, about joining a community band, what conventions may look like in the future, and performances at Nat Con.    Transcription can be found here: Link Questions, Comments, Suggestions: smity@kkpsi.org

Life's A Party
61- S*x Toy Bingo?! | Explain Yourself, Drunk Stories, Buying Condoms

Life's A Party

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 50:03


The boys look forward to Halloween parties ahead, but first they got some explaining to do!!! To start the show, the fellas have to explain pictures that they have previously posted across their social media accounts. It's safe to say, their moms will not be very proud. Next, Ryan and Paul talk about the awkwardness of buying condoms for the first time and later in the show Paul then introduces "Sex Toy Bingo" to Ryan...which he is weirdly intrigued about. You do not want to miss this show, it is filled with laughs and mistakes and what better way to watch the show then with a beer, so enjoy!!!! #DrunkStories #Gritty Get 10% OFF ScubaBeer with Promo Code "LIFESAPARTY" at Scubabeer.com Follow us on our Socials Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/lifesapartypod/Tik Tok - https://www.tiktok.com/@lifesapartypod?lang=en/Twitter - https://twitter.com/LifesAPartyPod Interested in supporting the show? Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/lifesapartypod?fan_landing=true Welcome to Life's A Party Podcast

Collective Church Podcast
6th Birthday Vision

Collective Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 92:08


We mark our 6th birthday with Pastors Lorenzo Smith, Ryan Smith, and Isaac Brickner reflecting on where we're at six years in and using our current series in Proverbs to call our church family to live out the four core identities of a disciple as responsible followers of Jesus, responsible family members, responsible stewards, and responsible disciple-makers.

Locked On Jazz - Daily Podcast On The Utah Jazz
Rudy gives back, new color branding, Pick and Roll deep dive

Locked On Jazz - Daily Podcast On The Utah Jazz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 31:30


David Locke, radio voice of the Utah Jazz and Jazz NBA Insider, brings you the daily podcast on the Utah Jazz, Locked On Jazz. Now live on You Tube for every episode. In today's episode Locke delves into the much talk about color branding change by owner Ryan Smith. Plus, Rudy Gobert and Rudy's kids continues his amazing community work. Locke got a tutorial on pick and roll over the week and shares what he learned about the most common play in the NBA and the different ways it can be run. Something is going on with three point shooting in the NBA and it is not what you think. The expectations of the season and what is really happening are two totally different things and what does it mean. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Sarah Todd on Jazz preseason, rebranding, tip-off expectations + more

"The Drive" with Spence Checketts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 13:17


Sarah Todd joins The Drive to discuss the Jazz preseason, Ryan Smith rebranding, expectations for 2021 tip-off + more

Latter-day Saint MBA Podcast
Ryan Smith - 2021 Conference Replay

Latter-day Saint MBA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 30:11


Mike Maughan (Northwestern's Kellogg MBA student) interviews Ryan Smith about scaling your whole life .

Kappa Kappa Psi Presents
Hispanic Heritage Month: Maria Lopez

Kappa Kappa Psi Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 17:49


Welcome back to Season 4! Join editor & host, Ryan Smith, as he interviews Maria Lopez, Active from Zeta Zeta, about Mexican culture for Hispanic Heritage Month.   Transcription can be found here: Link Questions, Comments, Suggestions: smity@kkpsi.org

Zero to a Million
Scaling Your e-Commerce Store with SMS

Zero to a Million

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 26:59


HIGHLIGHTS 00:37 Ryan's career journey and entry with Emotive02:36 Target customers at Privy and partnerships at Emotive05:28 Noticing SMS for a more personalized customer experience10:58 Merchant strategies to capture email and phone numbers15:36 The rising priority of owned channels and engaging in human interactions21:32 Relying on one channel alone is not advisable25:52 Connect with RyanQUOTES05:50 "How can I learn more about your interests? I want your birthday, your phone number... And what that is all essentially leading to is how can we create a more personalized and humanized experience for the customers at the end of the day?06:38 "E-commerce is finally starting to be empowered... and any way that we can engage with them in a more human to human interaction is going to result in, well, obviously more sales, but more loyal customers."08:13 "When you talk about like getting someone to give your phone number, there needs to be like a unique value proposition for that. Make sure that, hey, by opting-in to receive text messages from this specific brand, you're going to be on a VIP list."11:05 "If you're coming into Emotive or another SMS provider and you're looking to get that list grown really quickly. Again, use that email list that you already have to send out an opt-in for SMS and say, hey, you know, we just rolled out SMS."16:18 "Where the industry is definitely moving away from is just those typical one-way blast. We get a piece of mail, it started when you get a piece of mail in the mailbox that says, hey, here's a coupon code to go to Bed Bath & Beyond or whatever."You can connect with Ryan in the links below:Website - https://emotive.io/LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/ryan-rsmith/

Get Up!
Hour 1: Tom Terrific

Get Up!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 47:26


Jeff Darlington, Dominique Foxworth and Rob Ninkovich join Ryan Smith to give their takes on whether Tom Brady can keep up the season he is having. Brian Windhorst reports on the latest regarding the decisions surrounding Kyrie Irving and Ben Simmons. Is there a quarterback controversy brewing for the Sooners? Plus, can we actually see a college football playoff without Alabama? Heather Dinich and Paul Finebaum join the show to discuss it all. 

Get Up!
Hour 2: Action Jackson

Get Up!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 48:16


After leaked emails forced the stunning resignation of Jon Gruden Monday night, Adam Schefter reports on how it all went down. Dominique Foxworth, Dan Graziano, Jeff Saturday and Marcus Spears join Ryan Smith to give their takes on how the fallout will impact the Raiders' front office and locker room. In a thrilling overtime victory against the Colts, Lamar Jackson put on an MVP-caliber performance. Is he the MVP through five weeks though? Plus, Jessica Mendoza breaks down how the Red Sox advanced to the ALCS and what is needed for them to win it all.

Get Up!
Hour 1: Gruden Resigns

Get Up!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 44:00


After leaked emails forced the stunning resignation of Jon Gruden Monday night, Adam Schefter reports on how it all went down. Dominique Foxworth, Dan Graziano, Jeff Saturday and Marcus Spears join Ryan Smith to give their takes on how the fallout will impact the Raiders' front office and locker room. In a thrilling overtime victory against the Colts, Lamar Jackson put on an MVP-caliber performance. Is he the MVP through five weeks though? Plus, Jessica Mendoza breaks down how the Red Sox advanced to the ALCS and what is needed for them to win it all. Jon Gruden, Lamar Jackson, Chris Sale

Life's A Party
60- Smashing Pumpkins DRUNK?! | Disney Fireworks, Fall Activities, Pop Culture Debates

Life's A Party

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 58:16


Ryan watches the new Disney firework show "Enchantment," while Paul touches on the previously beloved show "Happily Ever After" and explains how it will be missed by the Disney community. Next the boys go down some of the best fall activities such as haunted houses, pumpkin picking, hayrides and touring a winery to see if they are OVERRATED or UNDERRATED. To wrap up the show they debate some of the best pop culture debates that will last forever!!!! Is Pepsi better than Coke??? You do not want to miss this show!!! So grab a beer and let's share some laughs together! #October #Pumpkins #DisneyFireworks Get 10% OFF ScubaBeer with Promo Code "LIFESAPARTY" at Scubabeer.com Listen On Other Platforms Tik Tok - https://www.tiktok.com/@lifesapartypod?lang=en Twitter - https://twitter.com/LifesAPartyPod Interested in supporting the show? Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/lifesapartypod?fan_landing=true Welcome to Life's A Party Podcast

Wrong About Everything
Wrong About Amy's Birthday!

Wrong About Everything

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 63:03


We're back and talkin some tranche with special guest and MNCUN.org's Ryan Smith!  We're also celebrating Amy's birthday while talking politics and shrooms with New Hope Farmacy, Inc!  Enjoy the episode! Be sure to check out the TV broadcast on MCN6 saturday at 2:30pm.   Be sure to check out our facebook/twitter fridays at 3:15pm to see our livestream!  We'd also appreciate it if you'd consider giving to the show's patreon page....it helps pay our bills (not line our pockets) and as a bonus, you get some cool benefits and prizes, including your membership into our “not a dick” hall of fame:  patreon.com/wrongabouteverythingpodcast please support our sponsors!   if you need a place to store your money, join the thousands of Minnesotans who have saved money with less fees and lower loan rates by joining a MN Credit Union.  To learn more:  mncun.org -if you are injured in an accident or due to someone else's negligence, we strongly recommend looking up the great Michael Bryant at Bradshaw & Bryant:  mnpersonalinjury.com  If you need help with a podcast, video, or livestream, message them at info@mbcmulticast.com or visit their site at mbcmulticast.com

Kappa Kappa Psi Presents
Hispanic Heritage Month: Luis Manjarrez

Kappa Kappa Psi Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 14:24


Welcome back to Season 4! Join editor & host, Ryan Smith, as he interviews Luis Manjarrez, Alumni from Iota Pi, about Mexican culture for Hispanic Heritage Month.   Transcription can be found here: Link Questions, Comments, Suggestions: smity@kkpsi.org

Poptimist
Gatekeeping Domestic Partnerships with Ryan Smith

Poptimist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 75:14


It's James Spader week here on Poptimist! We're so excited to be joined by Ryan Smith to talk about why people find James Spader so grating. Also! We're talking about Midnight Mass, Lego Masters UK, Sex-Education, and how bad our Texas Sex Ed. was. We're talking Boston Legal, The Office, The Practice, Pretty in Pink, The Blacklist, True Colors, Jack's Back, Speaking of Sex, and more! Host: Billy and Dagny McCartney Guest: Ryan Smith Art: Nina Howard Music: Someone Your Own Size by RW Smith

Big Asp Cornhole Podcast
Episode 87 Tampa Bay Bag Review Ft. Ryan Smith and Eric Anderson

Big Asp Cornhole Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 80:04


Welcome Back! Join the boys as they talk about their cornhole journey, and then touch on the upcoming ACL events.  Then they discuss the Tampa Bay Cornhole Companies list of bags, Icky Sticky, X-Factor, Smoking J's, and Pineapple Express! Finish her off with a banger interview from BG Cornhole's studdly duo of Eric Anderson and Ryan Smith.  As always, we hope you throw 'em straight, and its nothing but four bagger from here on out. CORNHOLE IT!

Locked On Jazz - Daily Podcast On The Utah Jazz
Ryan Smith impact, NBA neuters instant replay, Can Jazz be good defensively when Rudy Gobert is off the floor

Locked On Jazz - Daily Podcast On The Utah Jazz

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 33:44


David Locke, radio voice of the Utah Jazz and Jazz NBA Insider, brings you the daily podcast on the Utah Jazz, Locked On Jazz. Now live on You Tube for every episode. In today's episode Locke shares about the Utah Jazz vision of bringing the game directly to the fans and all fans. The NBA just virtually eliminated the coaches challenge from the game with their latest rule and that may not be a good thing. The Utah Jazz were bad defensively last year with Rudy Gobert on the bench. Can they be good this year with Hasaan Whiteside. Locke takes a Locke at Whiteside's career to decide what is realistic to expect. Then are their enough possessions to go around for the Utah Jazz? It was an issue last year and it might be worse this year. This will be a delicate balance for the players and the coaches Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors!SweatBlock Get it today for 20% off at SweatBlock.com with promo code LockedOn, or at Amazon and CVS. Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Indeed Get started RIGHT NOW with a SEVENTY-FIVE DOLLAR SPONSORED JOB CREDIT to upgrade your job post at Indeed.com/locked Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Kappa Kappa Psi Presents
Hispanic Heritage Month: Hana Garcia

Kappa Kappa Psi Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 8:49


Welcome back to Season 4! Join editor & host, Ryan Smith, as he interviews Hana Garcia, Brother from Lambda Psi, about Mexican culture for Hispanic Heritage Month.   Transcription can be found here: Link Questions, Comments, Suggestions: smity@kkpsi.org

Basic Brewing Radio
09-30-21 - Natural State Beer Gold

Basic Brewing Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 57:45


We catch up with Mark and Ryan Smith at Natural State Beer following their taking GABF gold for their maibock.

MTV's Official Challenge Podcast
Good Vibes And Gladiator w/ Showrunner Ryan Smith

MTV's Official Challenge Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 72:36


Tori and Aneesa go even more behind the scenes than usual in this episode, as they are joined by Ryan Smith, the Executive Producer and Showrunner of The Challenge: Spies, Lies & Allies. They discuss how a season comes together, the most difficult challenges and eliminations to execute, and the biggest hurdles he faced while putting this season together. The Challenge vets also dive into a muddy challenge, a bold move by a rookie, and a devastating end to one challenger's season. Watch new episodes of The Challenge every Wednesday, and go behind the scenes with Tori and Aneesa the next morning, on MTV's Official Challenge Podcast. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com