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Cinik Radio Podcast
Ep 166 - The Last Of Us EP 2 & 3

Cinik Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2023 42:52


Listen this week as the CRP crew discuss episode 2 and 3 of The Last of Us. Good video game adaptations have been few and far between and this one definitely makes cut.   Send us your questions at CINIKRADIO@GMAIL.COM.   Look at all our other shows at CINIKRADIO.COM.   Follow Cinik Radio at FACEBOOK.COM/CINIKRADIO.

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts
Cancer Topics - My Approach to Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 26:47


Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma or DLBCL is the most common type of lymphoma. Much progress has been made in treatment of the disease lately, particularly with emergence of CAR T-cell therapy, but not all patients are benefiting from it. This episode of Cancer Topics features Drs. Loretta Nastoupil and Chijioke Nze exploring treatment approaches for two cases of refractory DLBCL: a 60-year-old man with no comorbidities (1:30) and a 39-year-old woman with HIV (18:35). The guests also discuss improving patient access to CAR T-cell therapy and managing its toxicities (10:35), as well as emerging therapies for DLBCL (14:30). To learn more about management of refractory DLBCL, check out the ASCO course linked bellow. Guest Disclosures:Loretta Nastoupil, MD: Honoraria – Gilead Sciences, Novartis, Bayer, Janssen Oncology, TG Therapeutics, Bristol-Myers Squibb, ADC Therapeuitcs, Morphosys, Epizyme, Genmab, Takeda, Genentech/Roche; Research Funding – Janssen Biotech, Celgene, Genentech/Roche, Epizyme, Novartis, IgM Biosciences, Caribou Biosciences, Gilead Sciences, Allogene Therapeutics, Takeda Chijioke Nze, MD, MPH: No Relationships to Disclose Resources: ASCO Course: Second-line Therapy for Relapsed/Refractory Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (Free to Full and Allied ASCO Members) ASCO Podcast: Cancer Topics - New Therapies for Lymphoma (Part 1) ASCO Guideline: Management of Immune-Related Adverse Events in Patients Treated With Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T-Cell Therapy ASCO Article: Navigating the Evolving Treatment Landscape of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma If you liked this episode, please follow the show. To explore other educational content, including courses, visit education.asco.org. Contact us at education@asco.org.  TRANSCRIPT The disclosures for guests on this podcast can be found in the show notes. Dr. Loretta Nastoupil: So, I do have optimism that as we have more and more treatment options entering into the treatment landscape, we'll have fewer patients that are experiencing a refractory disease, and potentially succumbing to the lymphoma. Hello, my name is Dr. Loretta Nastoupil, I'm an Associate Professor and Deputy Chair of the Department of Lymphoma and Myeloma, at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Welcome to this ASCO Education podcast episode. It's my pleasure to welcome Dr. Chijioke Nze. Dr. Chijioke Nze: Hello, everyone. I'm Dr. Chijioke Nze, a Hematology/Oncology fellow at MD Anderson, I'll be co-hosting this episode with Dr. Nastoupil. Dr. Loretta Nastoupil: We've seen notable advances in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma research lately, with novel treatments including CAR T-cell therapy, offering the prospect of long-term remission for some patients, yet many patients are not even receiving second-line or later therapy, and even fewer are treated beyond the second line. How do you approach a patient with refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma? In today's episode, we'll explore strategies for management of refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma through two patient cases. So, Dr. Nze, walk us through our first case. Dr. Chijioke Nze: Our first case is Frank. Frank is 60 years old and has no comorbidities. He presented with severe back pain in September 2021, and was evaluated locally. He had a CT scan that showed retroperitoneal mass, prompting further evaluation. He had a biopsy of the left retroperitoneal mass in November 2021, which was consistent with diffuse large B-cell, germinal center B-cell of phenotype Ki-67 of 90%. He had a subsequent PET-CT scan, which showed a large conglomerate, and invasive left retroperitoneal hypermetabolic mass with satellite nodularity and contiguous bulky retroperitoneal adenopathy. He had bulky, FDG-avid metastatic retrocrural and intrathoracic adenopathy as well. He was treated with R-CHOP for six cycles, and at the end, achieved complete remission. He had a PET-CT a year later that showed new and worsening intensely FDG-avid abdominal adenopathy. This was new from a PET scan he'd had in January 2022 of the same year. He had a biopsy of this retroperitoneal adenopathy, which was consistent with relapsed diffuse large B-cell germinal center phenotype, also Ki-67 of 90%. Locally, he was treated with ICE, times five cycles, and had a follow-up CT scan at the end, which showed persistent bulky nodal disease with periaortic regional nodes with double 5, consistent with persistent disease. He also was found to have new and more conspicuous nodes in other areas as well. He presented for his first visit at MD Anderson in September 2022. Dr. Nastoupil, when you see a patient like this coming into your clinic, what's your typical approach? Dr. Loretta Nastoupil: For a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, we are always hoping for cure with frontline rituximab, containing anthracycline-based chemotherapy. And so, it's always a gross disappointment when patients experience relapse. The timing of that relapse right now informs our current approach. And the reason I mention that, is because there have been three large randomized studies conducted and reported out just in the last year demonstrating that CAR T-cell therapy is the preferred option for patients who experience either primary refractory disease, or relapse within 12 months. And that is because they resulted in better outcomes than standard salvage-based chemotherapy and high-dose therapy autotransplant in the setting of chemosensitive disease. I have to acknowledge, of the three studies that were done, two were positive trials, so that's why currently, we have axi-cel or Axicabtagene ciloleucel, or Lisocabtagene maraleucel, and not tisa-cel or Tisagenlecleucel, as CAR T-cell therapy options. And again, that's because two of the three studies were positive trials. Now, the challenge is why would we have two positive studies in one negative trial? There are a lot of caveats to how those studies were conducted, but I think one of the biggest important lessons to be gained is that if you're going to consider CAR T for these high-risk patients, you want to do it as soon as possible, because that delay from identifying CAR T as a preferred option to actually infusing cells in a disease-- in a case particularly like this, where patients may have bulky, aggressively-behaving disease - that prolonged time may actually have an impact on outcomes. Dr. Chijioke Nze: Excellent. Thank you. So, you've mentioned he had an early relapse. How would you define early relapse in this patient population? Dr. Loretta Nastoupil: Thinking back to how we've been approaching diffuse large B-cell lymphoma over the last two decades, the PARMA study, which was done prior to Rituximab, suggested that for patients who had chemosensitive disease to a platinum-based salvage chemotherapy, which generally, was at least a partial response on CT, if they went on to high-dose therapy autologous stem cell transplant, 50-60% of those patients could anticipate cure. Whereas for the folks who continued on salvage chemotherapy, 10-20% of those patients had favorable outcome. So, we generally do try salvage-based chemotherapy, and for patients with chemosensitive disease, go on to high-dose therapy autotransplant. However, in the modern era where we've approached patients who've had rituximab as part of their frontline therapy, at least two studies - the ORCHARD study, and the CORAL study suggested that only 20% of patients who relapse in the post-rituximab era, particularly within 12 months, were successfully salvaged with platinum-based chemotherapy and high-dose therapy autologous stem cell transplant. Now, fortunately for patients who fail salvage, we have had CAR T-cell therapy as an option based off of three pivotal phase II studies, demonstrating about 40% of patients could anticipate a cure with CAR T-cell therapy. So, it only made sense to try and move that therapy up into second line, and the preferred population was those that had progressed within 12 months of frontline rituximab and anthracycline-based chemo. Now, to qualify for those studies, patients had to be considered fit for the control arm, which was salvage and auto transplant. Nonetheless, I do think for a patient like this, who's 60, without any other significant comorbidities, whose biggest challenge to longevity of life is his aggressive lymphoma, CAR T-cell therapy should be considered as soon as possible for this patient. Dr. Chijioke Nze: Is there still a role for high-dose therapy and autologous transplant in the new era, given the efficacy shown with CAR T-cell therapy? Dr. Loretta Nastoupil: I think there is. And the reason why I say that is, the trials that were done really did focus on the highest-risk patients, which were those with primary refractory disease or those who progress within 12 months of frontline. Now, there are patients that will have later relapse. And so, I do think for those patients, particularly those who are young and otherwise fit, should be approached first with a platinum-based salvage chemotherapy, in the setting of chemosensitive disease, proceed onto high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplant. Now, what do we do for those patients who have a late relapse but are otherwise older, or who have comorbidities that would make them suboptimal candidates for the high-dose therapy preceding stem cell transplant? I have a couple other options for those patients - so, there was a trial done with liso-cel for patients who were otherwise older, or not fit for intensive therapy. It's a single-arm phase II without a randomized comparison, but also demonstrated that liso-cel in second-line, later relapsed patients who are not fit for intensive therapy, resulted in comparable outcomes to what we would anticipate on that third-line or later setting. We also have other non-CAR T-cell therapy options, such as tafasitamab, which is a naked CD19 antibody, which has been combined with lenalidomide in the L-MIND study, again, for patients without primary refractory disease and who would not be appropriate candidates for intensive therapy. So, I do think we have alternative options, it's just when we look at the totality of the data right now, my conclusion is that CAR T-cell therapy, particularly for high-risk patients, is the most likely chance to result in cure. Dr. Chijioke Nze: Excellent. In a patient who we are considering CAR T-cell therapy, what are some of the short-term and long-term consequences, or toxicities that we should worry about? Dr. Loretta Nastoupil: One of the challenges right now with CAR T, and why it's still only available in specialized centers, is the acute toxicity, which is really a derivative of its mechanism of action. We take patients' own T-cells, we use a viral vector to introduce extracellular receptor, but also a co-stimulatory molecule. So, once these cells engage their antigen, sort of prime to react to that, and that can lead to pretty rapid T-cell expansion, release of cytokines, recruitment of other inflammatory cells to that tumor bed, and as a result, a large portion of patients can anticipate to experience cytokine release syndrome, which again, is the result of the activation of these T-cells, the expansion and the recruitment of other inflammatory cells. Fortunately, for most patients, this results in fever alone that can be managed with supportive measures. Occasionally, they'll have concomitant hypoxia or hypotension, and unfortunately, few patients will have significant or severe toxicity. The other toxicity that's less easily manageable or less predictable is the neurotoxicity that can vary according to patient-specific characteristics, such as age, and the amount of tumor burden, their performance status going into CAR, but even more importantly, the construct that's utilized, with highest rates of neurotoxicity associated with axi-cel. Again, likely speaking to its construct and the CD28 costimulatory domain that is unique to axi-cel. As a result of these acute toxicities, patients are required to stay within two hours of their treating center for the first four weeks, and they're also discouraged from operating heavy machinery, such as driving, for the first eight weeks following CAR T. So, I do you think this creates some barriers to access to this therapy, particularly the patients that are treated in community settings that may reside long distances from these certified CAR centers. Dr. Chijioke Nze: So, you mentioned that obviously, given the specialized care needed for the CAR T therapy, that they're kind of localized in certain sites. What are some of these issues with access that you're noticing both in the logistics of giving CAR T, and also in patient access? Dr. Loretta Nastoupil: I'm hoping we're going to address one of those issues right now, which is, education and awareness, because we've had these three randomized studies, and two being positive readouts just in the last year. It's important to get the message out that CAR T-cell therapy for high-risk early relapsed refractory large cell lymphoma patients can result in a significant improvement in event-free survival and progression-free survival over the standard of care. And so, being aware that this therapy can result in more favorable outcomes is step one. Step two is, we have to ensure that there are minimal barriers to getting those patients into these treating centers as quickly as possible. So, recognizing who delivers the care - is it your traditional stem cell transplant physician? Is it a lymphoma doctor? What centers are certified? Some of these issues can be addressed with quick internet searches. So, for instance, in our center, we have a 1-800 number for anyone who's interested in CAR T-cell therapy that connects them directly to a CAR T coordinator who can help them understand do they meet the FDA-approved indication? Would they be interested in seeking consult? And we try and prioritize getting those patients in the door as soon as possible since time likely does have an impact on outcomes. And then, partnering with our community oncologist - you're going to be the primary oncologist for these patients leading up to CAR, and then after that four-week window, when we're keeping the patients in close proximity to our centers, we often send them back. And so, making sure that they're comfortable knowing what potential late toxicities to be on the lookout for, which include B-cell aplasia and risk for infection, or prolonged cytopenias, beyond just lymphopenia. And so again, there's a need for education and partnering with our community sites to make sure that there is successful handoff of these patients back after they've completed the monitoring for the acute toxicity. And then, really trying to explore opportunities to utilize some of the better tolerated CAR T, such as liso-cel, in your non-traditional academic centers. Those that are equipped to handle phase I studies or stem cell transplant, for instance, may not be affiliated with the university. So, I think those are all types of strategies that could be employed to try and improve access for patients. Dr. Chijioke Nze: And then, you mentioned the liso-cel, but in some of the toxicities, are there ways of predicting which patients will do better or worse? Are there ways to reduce toxicities? And is there any hope for things such as outpatient administration of CAR T? Dr. Loretta Nastoupil: So, my answer today may improve over time as we get larger numbers and more experience, but what we currently understand is that the patient performance status, their degree of tumor, how quickly that tumor is increasing, LDH and some inflammatory markers such as CRP or ferritin pretreatment can provide some insight into a higher risk of toxicity. And then obviously, the construct that's utilized. Again, axi-cel has higher rates of neurotoxicity. All will have some form of cytokine release syndrome, generally speaking, but rates of grade three or higher are quite infrequent, particularly with liso-cel and tisa-cel. So, it's multifactorial. That then raises the question, can we do anything to alter those modifiable risk factors? Can we reduce the disease burden? Can we improve the performance status? Can we do anything to reduce the inflammatory markers pre-treatment? And so, those are strategies that are being discussed, and I think in general, as we get more effective therapies that enter into the treatment landscape, it's probably some of the best ways to try and reduce some of those risk factors. Dr. Chijioke Nze: Rounding that up, are there any exciting developments or things to look out for, for exciting therapies in the relapse setting? Dr. Loretta Nastoupil: A couple of things beyond CAR T that I think we should all be aware of and anticipate to be in our toolkit relatively soon; probably, one of the most exciting, is the development of the bispecific antibodies. So, another challenge with CAR T is the requirement to collect these patients' own T-cells and send them off to a central manufacturing site, and the turnaround time can be anywhere from 3-4 weeks. And again, in a situation where you have an aggressive disease, that can be a long time to wait. And so, is there any treatments that are more readily available, that again, will be effective at reducing disease burden? And so, by specifics kind of fit those unmet needs to some extent - you have essentially two heads; one head is going to bind the endogenous T-cells that eliminates the need to leukapherese these patients and manufacture, and then the other head is going to generally engage CD20, which we know is an effective targeted antigen, particularly in B-cell lymphomas. And there are a number that are under development. We saw preliminary phase II data with glofitamab, epcoritamab, as well as combination strategies with mosunetuzumab. So, I do have optimism that the bispecific antibodies will potentially enter into the treatment landscape. I anticipate they'll probably be used first post-CAR T, but will likely move their way into earlier lines of therapy. I've already mentioned tafasitamab in combination with lenalidomide, which is an effective non-chemotherapy option. We have antibody-drug conjugates, such as Loncastuximab, which is a CD19 antibody-drug conjugate. It's essentially targeted delivery of chemotherapy, and it looks to have a pretty promising activity as a single agent in that third-line or later space, and then polatuzumab, which is a CD79b antibody drug conjugate, in the relapse setting has been combined with bendamustine and rituximab, but also demonstrated significant improvement in the frontline setting in the POLARIS study where vincristine was replaced with polatuzumab. So, I do have optimism that as we have more and more treatment options entering into the treatment landscape, we'll have fewer patients that are experiencing refractory disease, and potentially succumbing to the lymphoma. Dr. Chijioke Nze: And then, one additional question: How do you approach a patient who is not quite as fit, in thinking about what their options are for later-line therapies? You already mentioned some of these, but which of those would you prioritize in this setting? Dr. Loretta Nastoupil: Again, as we get more experience, we develop skills that help us sort of navigate all these different options. In my practice, if I'm even considering CAR T, I'm going to delay bendamustine until after I've collected those cells. I think that's one caveat that-- we do get nervous about the quality of those autologous CAR Ts if they're generated in someone who's had recent exposure to bendamustine. So, that may help me sequence that later on. We have questions right now about what's the optimal sequencing of CD19-directed therapy because we have several options beyond just CAR T-- As I mentioned, we have Lonca, we've got tafasitamab and lenalidomide. Currently, we don't have prospective data that really informs that question, and there's a number of research studies underway to try and help us understand if there is a preferred sequence, or even if it matters how we handle CD19 targeting. For my older, frailer patients where I'm really worried, they're not going to be able to tolerate something like liso-cel, or they're not going to be able to have that caregiver, and they're uncomfortable relocating to an area where CAR T might be available, my general approach right now is to consider tafasitamab and lenalidomide first in that relapse setting, followed by either Lonca or Pola-BR. Selinexor is another option. It's an oral agent, though again, in my opinion, if we look at the totality of the data, may be less effective than the other options. So, I might reserve that as a last option for someone, again, with relapsed/refractory large cell. Dr. Chijioke Nze: Excellent. Thank you. This has been very helpful. Dr. Loretta Nastoupil: All right. So, Dr. Nze, now I'm going to turn the table and ask you some questions. I'm going to change this up a little bit - she's now a 39-year-old female. She has significant comorbidities. She has HIV, and again, large cell lymphoma. So, let me walk you through her case, and then we'll discuss some of the challenges, again, in a very different scenario, albeit a similar disease. So, our female is, I mentioned 39, pre-existing HIV, she's treated frontline with six cycles of R-CHOP and intrathecal methotrexate for CNS prophylaxis. Because of her comorbidities, again, not well controlled HIV, she also has a poor functional status at the time of relapse. This was a couple years ago, and CAR T was not an option in second line, though she is someone who had a relapse that was beyond 12 months. So, for her second-line approach, because of her comorbidities, she actually receives rituximab in combination with high-dose cytarabine, dexamethasone, and oxaliplatin for three cycles, and actually achieves a chemosensitive disease and is referred to our stem cell transplant colleagues. Unfortunately, at that time, due to comorbidities, she was deemed not to be an appropriate candidate for high-dose therapy, and she's been monitored for signs of relapse. Despite being in the minority, she actually does not have a recurrence of her lymphoma but has a number of other, again, challenges in regards to her comorbidity, including multiple infections, resulting in recurrent hospitalizations. And so, it's always been a challenge for me in being intimately involved in her case, deciding when she's presenting, how alarmed to be about recurrent lymphoma versus infection, and how I might approach her in the setting of relapsed large cell lymphoma. So, what role does prior type and response to therapy play in treatment selection at your next line of treatment? Dr. Chijioke Nze: I think in this patient, it sounds like she got one adequate therapy on and the initial presentation with R-CHOP, and then with IT chemotherapy as well. She looked like she had a good response. I think the fact that she achieved a complete response and the duration of her response, lets me know that she likely has chemosensitive disease. This, in turn, helps me to pick what to do next. As you mentioned previously, we know how efficacious the CAR T therapy is, but in someone like her who had a long duration, trying salvage therapy and proceeding to autologous transplant might make sense. I'd be interested in your thoughts. Dr. Loretta Nastoupil: Yeah, I agree. And I think part of the challenge, particularly when we're facing patients with HIV, they're often excluded from prospective studies. And so, we're often in a scenario where we may not have the wealth of data to inform our treatment decision. But I do think in general, comorbidities play a major role-- we're navigating treatment options. Because again, traditionally, we've used intensive chemotherapy as our mainstay of treatment, and there are clear criteria that patients generally should meet that help us predict how likely they are to have significant or severe toxicity from high-dose therapy. And this is a prime example of even though she was young, her comorbidity made her a poor candidate for intensive therapy. I think the other sort of non-clinical factors that we sometimes take into consideration, because CAR T was approved off of single-arm phase II studies, again, none of which would've included someone like her, because of her HIV status, how do we extrapolate-- for instance, if she had relapsed in that third-line space, and suggesting that she did not have significant infection or other significant comorbidities, do we have experience to proceed with an autologous CAR in that setting? So, again, there've been a few cases where we have case reports where people have reported on their standard of care outcomes, particularly with CAR T in patients with active HIV disease, but one of the concerns I have in these scenarios is very selected. If you have active infection, that can make the acute toxicity with CAR significantly worse. And so again, we're trying to navigate a sort of limited data zone to try and help her and choose the right therapy. Again, you've met this patient with me, you helped care for her for some time, and you have a unique experience of also practicing in a county hospital where comorbidities, particularly, like HIV, can be much more common. What is your perception regarding barriers to accessing CAR T as it pertains to social factors, clinical factors, and again, this is a case that highlights some of those issues. Dr. Chijioke Nze: You mentioned at first that she had uncontrolled HIV. So, I think which, one, speaks to her treatment reference of her non-malignancy-related diseases, and trying to get that under control would be one of the first things I could think about. Thinking about how her care is managed and what kind of support she has are very important for us to think about as well. The other thing that's very important is, a lot of patients who we're seeing in the community may not have access to such specialized centers such as MD Anderson, where patients do have access to clinical trials and CAR T therapy. So, patients who are unlike her, who might qualify, may not actually be able to get these therapies as well. Part of the reason is, it can be insurance status, which is what we see in a lot of our patients. So, a barrier to get into the door. And then too barriers, lack of social support can be a big issue as well. And then there's also a big push in the community to improve the trust and awareness of these novel therapies, as you've mentioned. So, in a lot of the community practice, some of the community practitioners may not be comfortable with these, and a lot of the patients may not have heard of these new technologies, and also want to defer trying new therapies before having other people try new therapies before they consider them themselves. I think all these things present specific significant barriers to patients in the community. One, their ability to adhere to care, two, their insurance and their ability to get care and the financial toxicities associated with that. And then third, really understanding the options that are available. Dr. Loretta Nastoupil: And again, just to try and illustrate a couple other points. You know, we use a case here, which is a real case, with significant comorbidities such as HIV, which again, is something that is not frequently encountered, and will have a large impact on treatment selection. What if I just told you this patient has comorbidities, but she has moderate type-2 diabetes, and as a result, she has mild renal insufficiency, ejection fraction is actually adequate, would you have done anything different in this case? Dr. Chijioke Nze: No. I think in this particular case, I do think the fact that she did have a good response for a long duration of time, and did seem to have chemosensitive disease, I would probably still have tried a salvage therapy and autologous transplant in this patient. In the event that she was refractory, or had early relapse, and in that case, I would consider her to not be chemosensitive and would definitely have sought some more active therapies such as CAR T cell therapy through available products. Dr. Loretta Nastoupil: And then one last question for you: What if we just changed her age and we made her 79, but no other significant comorbidities, how would that have impacted your approach? Dr. Chijioke Nze: I'm going to turn that one over to you, I'm not exactly sure how I would treat with older patient with the same disease. Dr. Loretta Nastoupil: That's fair. So, if you have an older patient who has a late relapse, but not necessarily someone you would consider appropriate for salvage chemotherapy and high-dose therapy, then I think tafasitamab and lenalidomide would be probably my first choice in that setting, just based off of the L-MIND study. Dr. Chijioke Nze: Thank you, Dr. Nastoupil, for a great discussion of the management of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. And thank you to all our listeners. We appreciate you tuning in to this episode of the ASCO Educational podcast.   The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy, should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 01.18.23

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 63:09


Videos: Brought to you by… Pfizer! FORMER PFIZER VP, DR. MIKE YEADON – EVERYTHING WE HAVE BEEN TOLD ABOUT COVID-19 WAS A LIE Fauci didn't want autopsies done on Covid victims. I wonder why? Dr. Peter McCullough SLAMS Pfizer board member over censorship and propaganda | Redacted News Study explores effects of dietary choline deficiency on neurologic and system-wide health Arizona State University, January 16, 2023 Choline, an essential nutrient produced in small amounts in the liver and found in foods including eggs, broccoli, beans, meat and poultry, is a vital ingredient for human health. A new study explores how a deficiency of dietary choline adversely affects the body and may be a missing piece in the puzzle of Alzheimer's disease. It's estimated that more than 90% of Americans are not meeting the recommended daily intake of choline. The current research, conducted in mice, suggests that dietary choline deficiency can have profound negative effects on the heart, liver and other organs. Lack of adequate choline is also linked with profound changes in the brain associated with Alzheimer's disease. These include pathologies implicated in the development of two classic hallmarks of the illness: amyloid plaques, which aggregate in the intercellular spaces between neurons; and tau tangles, which condense within the bodies of neurons. The new research, led by scientists at Arizona State University and published in Aging Cell, describes pathologies in normal mice deprived of dietary choline and in choline-deficient transgenic mice, the latter of which already exhibit symptoms associated with the disease. In both cases, dietary choline deficiency results in liver damage, enlargement of the heart and neurologic alterations in the AD mice, typically accompanying Alzheimer's disease and including increased levels of plaque-forming amyloid-beta protein and disease-linked alterations in tau protein. Further, the study illustrates that choline deficiency in mice causes significant weight gain, alterations in glucose metabolism (which are tied to conditions such as diabetes), and deficits in motor skills. In the case of humans, “it's a twofold problem,” according to Ramon Velazquez, senior author of the study and assistant professor with the ASU-Banner Neurodegenerative Disease Research Center. “First, people don't reach the adequate daily intake of choline established by the Institute of Medicine in 1998. And secondly, there is vast literature showing that the recommended daily intake amounts are not optimal for brain-related functions.” The research highlights a constellation of physical and neurological changes linked to choline deficiency. Sufficient choline in the diet reduces levels of the amino acid homocysteine, which has been recognized as a neurotoxin contributing to neurodegeneration, and is important for mediating functions such as learning and memory through the production of acetylcholine. The growing awareness of choline's importance should encourage all adults to ensure proper choline intake. This is particularly true for those on plant-based diets, which may be low in naturally occurring choline, given that many foods high in choline are eggs, meats, and poultry. Plant-based, choline-rich foods, including soybeans, Brussels sprouts and certain nuts can help boost choline in these cases. Moreover, inexpensive, over-the-counter choline supplements are encouraged to promote overall health and guard the brain from the effects of neurodegeneration. The new study examines mice at 3-12 months, or early to late adulthood (roughly equivalent to 20-60 years of age for humans). In the case of both normal and transgenic mice displaying symptoms of Alzheimer's, those exposed to a choline-deficient diet exhibited weight gain and adverse effects to their metabolism. Damage to the liver was observed through tissue analysis, as was enlargement of the heart. Elevated soluble, oligomeric and insoluble amyloid-beta protein were detected, as well as modifications to tau protein characteristic of those leading to neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. Further, choline-deficient mice performed poorly in a test of motor skills, when compared with mice receiving adequate choline in their diet. These adverse effects were heightened in the transgenic mice. Translating these findings to humans, this implies that people who are predisposed to Alzheimer's disease or in the throes of the illness should ensure they are getting enough choline.”Our work provides further support that dietary choline should be consumed on a daily basis given the need throughout the body,” Velazquez says. (NEXT) Melanoma: Vitamin D supplements linked to reduced skin cancer risk University of Eastern Finland & Kuopio University, January 15, 2023 A new study finds that the regular use of vitamin D is associated with lower rates of melanoma skin cancer. The cross-sectional study was a collaboration between the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital. The research involved 498 Finnish adults determined by dermatologists to be at high risk of skin cancer, such as melanoma, as well as squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma. According to researchers, people who took vitamin D regularly were less likely to have had melanoma in the past or currently and were deemed by dermatologists to be less likely to develop melanoma in the future. Study participants ranged in age from 21 to 79 years old, including 253 males and 245 females. Participants were divided into three groups based on their intake of vitamin D supplements: non-use, occasional use, or regular use. The researchers were also interested in finding out whether regular use of vitamin D supplements corresponded to higher blood levels of vitamin D, known as serum calcidiol or 25-hydroxy-vitamin D3. This is the “storage form” of vitamin D in the body. Some research has linked low serum calcidiol with increased cancer risk, while other research has suggested otherwise. Nonetheless, it is a measure often used to determine a person's vitamin D levels. After testing serum calcidiol levels in 260 participants, researchers found that regular vitamin D supplementation corresponded with the highest levels of serum calcidiol and non-supplementation with the lowest levels. “Human skin itself expresses [the enzyme] CYP27A1 that produces calcidiol from vitamin D, and CYP27B1 that produces biologically very active calcitriol from calcidiol,” Dr. Harvima explained, noting that enzyme expression determines the level of vitamin D and its metabolites in the body. (NEXT) New research furthers case for exercise promoting youthfulness University of Arkansas, January 17, 2023 A recent paper published in the Journal of Physiology deepened the case for the youthfulness-promoting effects of exercise on aging organisms, building on previous work done with lab mice nearing the end of their natural lifespan that had access to a weighted exercise wheel. For this paper, the researchers compared aging mice that had access to a weighted exercise wheel with mice that had undergone epigenetic reprogramming via the expression of Yamanaka factors. The Yamanaka factors are four protein transcription factors (identified as Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc, often abbreviated to OKSM) that can revert highly specified cells (such as a skin cell) back to a stem cell, which is a younger and more adaptable state. The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to Dr. Shinya Yamanaka for this discovery in 2012. In the correct dosages, inducing the Yamanaka factors throughout the body in rodents can ameliorate the hallmarks of aging by mimicking the adaptability that is common to more youthful cells. Of the four factors, Myc is induced by exercising skeletal muscle. Myc may serve as a naturally induced reprogramming stimulus in muscle, making it a useful point of comparison between cells that have been reprogrammed via over expression of the Yamanaka factors and cells that have been reprogrammed through exercise—”reprogramming” in the latter case reflecting how an environmental stimulus can alter the accessibility and expression of genes. Ultimately, the team determined that exercise promotes a molecular profile consistent with epigenetic partial programming. That is to say, exercise can mimic aspects of the molecular profile of muscles that have been exposed to Yamanaka factors (thus displaying molecular characteristics of more youthful cells). This beneficial effect of exercise may in part be attributed to the specific actions of Myc in muscle. Murach sees their research as further validation of exercise as a polypill. “Exercise is the most powerful drug we have,” he says, and should be considered a health-enhancing—and potentially life-extending—treatment along with medications and a healthy diet. (NEXT) Exploiting the synergy of nutraceuticals for cancer prevention and treatment Research suggests that free radicals (ROS) generated upon mixing two nutraceuticals—resveratrol and copper—can help ameliorate various diseases by inactivating cell-free chromatin particles Tata Memorial Centre (India), January 16, 2023 Chromatin comprises a complex mixture of DNA and proteins that forms the structural basis of chromosomes in the cellular nuclei. When cells die, they release cell-free chromatin particles or “cfChPs” into the circulatory system. In 1996, evidence for tumour-derived DNA circulating in the blood of cancer patients was first reported. This evidence caught the interest Dr. Indraneel Mittra, who is now Professor Emeritus and the Dr. Ernest Borges Chair in Translational Research at Tata Memorial Centre in Mumbai, India. His tryst with research on genetic material in cancer metastases began, and after 15 years of research he has presented various papers, developing a body of evidence that indicates the critical role of cfChPs in orchestrating development of not only cancer, but various other diseases. Emerging evidence indicates that cfChPs play an essential role in ageing, sepsis, cancer development, and chemotherapy-related toxicity. With respect to the latter, Prof. Mittra explains, “Chemo-toxicity is not primarily caused by chemotherapeutic drugs, but rather by cfChPs that are released from the first cells that die after chemotherapy. The released cfChPs set in motion a cascading effect, increasingly damaging the DNA of healthy host cells, and triggering inflammatory processes in a vicious cycle that perpetuates and prolongs the toxicity of chemotherapy.” Recently, a team from Tata Memorial Centre have demonstrated the therapeutic benefits of a pro-oxidant mixture of resveratrol and copper, R-Cu, in patients undergoing chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer. Combining R with Cu (R-Cu) leads to the generation of free oxygen radicals which can inactivate the offending cfChPs. In this context, the research team launched a single-arm phase II clinical trial to study the synergistic effects of R-Cu administration on cfChPs inactivation in patients with advanced gastric cancer. The primary objective was to determine whether R-Cu, via cfChPs' inactivation, was successful in reducing the grade ≥ 3 toxicity seen with docetaxel-based chemotherapies. To this end, the researchers monitored the likely changes in the toxicities of chemotherapeutic treatments using a grading system that provides a framework for the assessment of unwanted physiological effects. The results were promising—although R-Cu did not reduce haematological toxicities, it significantly reduced the incidence of non-haematological toxicities comprising hand-foot syndrome, diarrhoea, and vomiting. Moreover, R-Cu reduced docetaxel exposure compared to the control arm without affecting efficacy in terms of overall survival. (NEXT) Deep meditation may alter gut microbes for better health Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (China), January 16, 2023 Regular deep meditation, practiced for several years, may help to regulate the gut microbiome and potentially lower the risks of physical and mental ill health, finds a small comparative study published in the open access journal General Psychiatry. The gut microbes found in a group of Tibetan Buddhist monks differed substantially from those of their secular neighbors, and have been linked to a lower risk of anxiety, depression, and cardiovascular disease. Research shows that the gut microbiome can affect mood and behavior through the gut–brain axis. This includes the body's immune response, hormonal signaling, stress response and the vagus nerve—the main component of the parasympathetic nervous system, which oversees an array of crucial bodily functions. The significance of the group and specimen design is that these deep-thinking Tibetan monks can serve as representatives of some deeper meditations. Although the number of samples is small, they are rare because of their geographical location. The researchers analyzed the stool and blood samples of 37 Tibetan Buddhist monks from three temples and 19 secular residents in the neighboring areas. None of the participants had used agents that can alter the volume and diversity of gut microbes: antibiotics; probiotics; prebiotics; or antifungal drugs in the preceding 3 months. Sample analysis revealed significant differences in the diversity and volume of microbes between the monks and their neighbors.”Collectively, several bacteria enriched in the meditation group [have been] associated with the alleviation of mental illness, suggesting that meditation can influence certain bacteria that may have a role in mental health,” write the researchers. These include Prevotella, Bacteroidetes, Megamonas and Faecalibacterium species, the previously published research suggests. Finally, blood sample analysis showed that levels of agents associated with a heightened risk of cardiovascular disease, including total cholesterol and apolipoprotein B, were significantly lower in the monks than in their secular neighbors by their functional analysis with the gut microbes. (NEXT) Curcumin/Boswellia shows promise in chronic kidney disease Baylor University, January 14, 2023. The Journal of Complementary and Integrative Medicine reports the finding of researchers at Baylor University of a reduction in a marker of inflammation among chronic kidney disease patients given a combination of Curcuma longa (curcumin) and Boswellia serrata. The study included sixteen individuals receiving standard care for chronic kidney disease who were not undergoing dialysis. Participants were randomized to receive capsules containing curcumin from turmeric extract plus Boswellia serrata, or a placebo for eight weeks. Blood samples collected before and after treatment were analyzed for plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (markers of inflammation), and the endogenous antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase, as well as serum C-reactive protein (CRP, another marker of inflammation.) Blood test results from the beginning of the study revealed increased inflammation and reduced glutathione peroxide levels. At the study's conclusion, participants who received curcumin and Boswellia serrata experienced a reduction in interleukin-6 in comparison with pretreatment values, indicating decreased inflammation, while IL-6 values rose among those who received a placebo. In their discussion of the findings, the authors remark that curcumin and Boswellia serrata have been separately shown to lower interleukin-6 via inhibition of the nuclear factor kappa beta and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways.

Cinik Radio Podcast
EP 165 - The Last Of Us EP 1

Cinik Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 38:59


Listen this week as the CRP crew discuss episode 1 of The Last of Us. Good video game adaptations have been few and far between and this one definitely makes cut. Send us your questions at CINIKRADIO@GMAIL.COM. Look at all our other shows at CINIKRADIO.COM. Follow Cinik Radio at FACEBOOK.COM/CINIKRADIO.

Mentor Moments
Season 2 Episode 8 - Casey Anderson

Mentor Moments

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 25:21


Mentor Moments Season Two Story Moments: Everyone has a story to tell. Our unique stories shape our lives and the individuals we become. This season Mentor Moments will feature individuals sharing their story moments. Each episode will illustrate how seemingly little life moments ultimately shaped our careers in ways that were unpredictable and personally fulfilling. This episode we feature Casey Anderson! Casey graduated from Maryville University's Rehabilitation Counseling program in 2017 and started my career as crisis intervention advocate at YWCA St. Louis, offering support to individuals who experienced emotional, physical and sexual abuse. I then was promoted to the Program Supervisor of Crisis Intervention where I continued developing professionally; planning and facilitating community trainings, supporting a team of staff and volunteers and developing partnerships. I left YWCA in March 2020, joining VR as a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor in the St. Charles office. I have found that my advocacy skills are valued here in my position. I have been on various committees and I am the designated VRC for the Work Based Learning program that coordinates and partners with Workforce Development, a CRP, and local school districts. I love making connections with others and watching folks discover confidence and independence by achieving their employment goals. I look forward to making a difference in people's lives through our mission and vision here with the MRAEC. Missouri Rehabilitation Association Eastern Chapter Maryville University Rehabilitation Counseling Maryville University Rehabilitation Counseling Youtube MRA Eastern Chapter Blog

The Cabral Concept
2536: Sauna & Breast Implants, Meningococcal Meningitis, Adenomyosis, Acne & Staphylococcus, Chronic Headaches (HouseCall)

The Cabral Concept

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 19:39


Thank you for joining us for our 2nd Cabral HouseCall of the weekend! I'm looking forward to sharing with you some of our community's questions that have come in over the past few weeks…   Jessica: Thank you for all you do! I have learned so much about healing myself though your podcast and running your tests as well as doing the functional medicine detox and the heavy metal detox! For my question… I know the benefits of infrared sauna. I have also heard that for women with breast implants it can cause those heavy metals to leak out of them. I was hoping that you could shed some light on this and advise if women with implants should in fact use an infrared sauna? Thank you so much!   Anonymous: Dr. Cabral, I am curious if you have any experience with long term effects of meningococcal meningitis. I had it when I was an infant and, from what I was told, it was very severe. I am now 28 and struggle with very poor gut motility and overall circulation, causing unbearable constipation/trapped gas and a multitude of of problems in cold weather with my hands and feet. I don't know if there is any connection between these problems and my illness as an infant, but it is really the only major trauma event that could have caused something. I exercise daily, get good sleep, and eat extremely clean. I've tried cutting out nearly every type of food to see if there was a culprit on my plate, but to no avail. I've seen every doctor, ran FM more labs than I can afford, and am still left confused.   Danica: Hi Dr. Cabral! I was recently diagnosed with adenomyosis. I can't find much in your past podcasts about it, so I was hoping you could talk a little about ideas for natural remedies. The main treatments are hysterectomy and uterine artery embolization, neither of which I want to do. I appreciate you!   Anonymous: Hi Dr Cabral, last 2 years I've had painful cystic acne on my upper back, many UTIs, & earlier this year I got impetigo around my mouth at the same time as I was battling hand food mouth. also get athletes foot in winter. Because of these issues, I've been thinking I maybe have a staphylococcus bacteria problem as this seems to be what many functional medicine drs believe can cause cystic acne. Candida metabolic vitamins test didn't seem to show elevated bacterial markers, but showed my vitamin C level at zero. Other labs showed CRP is at 16. I'm 34 & eat well, but stressed with small kids. In 2021, my cortisol was flatlined low all day. My TSH is borderline hyper. Question: 1) what are your thoughts? 2) what type of lab test can I run to specifically check for a staph infection?   Shannon: Hi Dr. Cabral, I appreciate your time and insight and have enjoyed learning so much from you on these podcasts. My twelve year old son has been having chronic headaches for at least 5 months now. In addition, he had alopecia post C in 2020 (his hair has mostly grown back now however his upper eyelashes are still missing), plus allergies to dust, mold, cats, dogs, grass, and some trees. He is congested with very poor sense of smell all the time. I am beginning to think his headaches are due to sinusitis and possibly that his eyelashes aren't growing back because of the constant inflammation in his eyes. I would appreciate any advice as to how to help him. I have him on Quercitin , Vit. C and nettle tea already. Thank you.   Thank you for tuning into this weekend's Cabral HouseCalls and be sure to check back tomorrow for our Mindset & Motivation Monday show to get your week started off right!   - - - Show Notes and Resources: StephenCabral.com/2536 - - - Get a FREE Copy of Dr. Cabral's Book: The Rain Barrel Effect - - - Join the Community & Get Your Questions Answered: CabralSupportGroup.com - - - Dr. Cabral's Most Popular At-Home Lab Tests: > Complete Minerals & Metals Test (Test for mineral imbalances & heavy metal toxicity) - - - > Complete Candida, Metabolic & Vitamins Test (Test for 75 biomarkers including yeast & bacterial gut overgrowth, as well as vitamin levels) - - - > Complete Stress, Mood & Metabolism Test (Discover your complete thyroid, adrenal, hormone, vitamin D & insulin levels) - - - > Complete Food Sensitivity Test (Find out your hidden food sensitivities) - - - > Complete Omega-3 & Inflammation Test (Discover your levels of inflammation related to your omega-6 to omega-3 levels) - - - Get Your Question Answered On An Upcoming HouseCall: StephenCabral.com/askcabral - - - Would You Take 30 Seconds To Rate & Review The Cabral Concept? The best way to help me spread our mission of true natural health is to pass on the good word, and I read and appreciate every review!

Candace Pollock _The Intentionality Gurus
Heart Mojo with Melinda Smith with guest Lee-Ann Spacek_Senior Relocation 1_9_23

Candace Pollock _The Intentionality Gurus

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 44:30


Please subscribe to our youtube page to get notices on all new podcasts as well helping us grow our audience. https://www.youtube.com/c/NewClevelandRadio Today's guest is Lee-Ann Spacek. Lee-Ann Spacek has been awarded the "Outstanding Services to Seniors" by the National Association of Realtors and the Senior Real Estate Specialist Council. Lee-Ann has unparalleled regional relocation experience and a national reputation as a leader in relocation and real estate. The last 11 years of her career have been devoted to advocating for seniors who are making a move. Lee-Ann Spacek has earned designations of CRP®, Certified Relocation Professional, GMS®, Global Mobility Specialist, CRB®, Certified Residential Broker and SRES®, Senior Real Estate Specialist, a combination of designations held by less than 1% of relocation professionals in the country. https://www.northcoastrelo.com/ info@northcoastrelo.com 216-513-6800 https://www.facebook.com/melindasmithhearmojo https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLSdL23sBfgglGttCH7JqxWTqAAOGjUxGq For additional info: newclevelandradio@gmail.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/podcastsnewclevelandradio/support

Podcast RADIOPROTECTION
93. Mini série « Marguerite

Podcast RADIOPROTECTION

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 8:11


« Nous sommes la moyenne des 5 personnes que nous côtoyons le plus » ! Chaque fois que j'ai besoin d'une petite dose d'encouragement, je me répète cette citation de Jim Rohn. Matthieu STEFANI du podcast GDIY en a fait son mantra. Et aujourd'hui j'ai envie de lui piquer. Je m'appelle Stéphanie, je suis ingénieure, formatrice en radioprotection et podcasteuse ... ou du moins ça c'est la version officielle. Aujourd'hui et pour tout le mois de janvier 2023 pour le challenge JANVOIX, je suis Marguerite, CRP à la clinique BRUNA SUR LOT, et j'ai tellement envie de côtoyer 5 personnes magnifiques pour augmenter ma moyenne, que j'ai décidé d'en faire un podcast. Dans cette (en)quête, je rencontre Stéphanie PINAULT. Elle me briefe sur ma procrastination et me donne 2 tips pour y faire face :

Podcast RADIOPROTECTION
92. Mini série « Marguerite

Podcast RADIOPROTECTION

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 8:29


SONDAGE : Comment bosses-tu ? Es-tu plutôt : A. Sans filet et improvisateur, B. Tout est cadré et ultra préparé , ou C. Un mix de tout ça ? Etudiante en école d'ingé. un de nos profs nous a dit « La meilleure improvisation est celle qui est préparée. » Meilleur tips ever

Take It Easy
Damar Hamlin II: Support and Change

Take It Easy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 50:31


On today's episode, we update the status of Buffalo Bills Safety Damar Hamlin and reiterate the importance of empathetic listening and support of people experiencing trauma and stress with limited information. We also discuss some macro-level changes we can direct our attention to while we are pausing and reflecting: Improving player safety and field conditions, as outlined by NFLPA President JC Tretter NFLPA renews call for safer fields - ProFootballTalk Expanding dimensions of the NFL field to reduce repeated impact collisions Expanding medical care for players post-retirement, and expanding the NFL's player pension program Mina Kimes and Domonique Foxworth on Damar Hamlin and what's next for the NFL & players Supporting people who are going through traumatic situations, and the culture around football as it relates to respecting feelings and emotions Announcement directly from Damar's family: Fundraiser by Damar Hamlin : The Chasing M's Foundation Community Toy Drive (gofundme.com) Learn about CRP and First Aid Training With Stop The Bleed CKSAML Productions Subscribe to our new Podcast series. The Fall of the Spurs Dynasty on Apple Podcasts Part 1: The Greatest Dynasty in North American Pro Sports – The Fall of the Spurs Dynasty Part 2: Gregg Popovich – The Fall of the Spurs Dynasty Part 3: Kawhi Leonard – The Fall of the Spurs Dynasty Part 4: What Happened in 2018?? – The Fall of the Spurs Dynasty | Podcast on Spotify Part 5: The Fall – The Fall of the Spurs Dynasty | Podcast on Spotify This show is presented by BetOnline Sportsbook. Use Code “BLEAV50” for a 50% bonus on your initial deposit

Take It Easy
Damar Hamlin

Take It Easy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 21:26


On today's episode, we provide credible information available about Buffalo Bills Safety Damar Hamlin, who collapsed on the field in Monday's Football game, leading to the players and coaches ending the game. With the absence of enough information, we discuss the importance of empathy and care for those experiencing a traumatic situation with the absence of information Learn about CRP and First Aid Training With Stop The Bleed Reporting on Damar Hamlin's Status: Joe Danneman of Fox19 Cincinnati on Twitter Tricia Macke @fox19 / Twitter Jordon Rooney on Twitter: "Update on Damar: His vitals are back to normal and they have put him to sleep to put a breathing tube down his throat. They are currently running tests. We will provide updates as we have them. CKSAML Productions Subscribe to our new Podcast series. The Fall of the Spurs Dynasty on Apple Podcasts Part 1: The Greatest Dynasty in North American Pro Sports – The Fall of the Spurs Dynasty Part 2: Gregg Popovich – The Fall of the Spurs Dynasty Part 3: Kawhi Leonard – The Fall of the Spurs Dynasty Part 4: What Happened in 2018?? – The Fall of the Spurs Dynasty | Podcast on Spotify Part 5: The Fall – The Fall of the Spurs Dynasty | Podcast on Spotify This show is presented by BetOnline Sportsbook. Use Code “BLEAV50” for a 50% bonus on your initial deposit

Podcast RADIOPROTECTION
91. Mini série « Marguerite

Podcast RADIOPROTECTION

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 6:26


Tout comme il y a des saisons tout au long de l'année, il y a aussi des saisons tout au long de notre vie. Nous changeons, nous évoluons, nous vieillissons .... nous prenons de l'expérience. J'aime voir les saisons passer, car c'est un rappel que rien ne dure éternellement. Les bonnes comme les mauvaises choses. Je m'appelle Stéphanie, je suis ingénieure, formatrice en radioprotection et podcasteuse ... ou du moins ça c'est la version officielle. Aujourd'hui et pour tout le mois de janvier 2023 pour le challenge JANVOIX je suis Marguerite, CRP à la clinique BRUNA SUR LOT, et j'ai vu passer tellement de saisons, tellement de changements opérer que j'ai décidé d'en faire un podcast. Carole, coach capillaire certifiée, vient nous suggérer la bonne résolution de nous jeter dans le grand bain. - - - - -

Podcast RADIOPROTECTION
90. Mini série « Marguerite

Podcast RADIOPROTECTION

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 2:30


Attrape un verre ... nous allons célébrer ! Je te propose même 2 raisons pour célébrer aujourd'hui :

Acilci.Net Podcast
Acilci Gözüyle Safra Kesesi

Acilci.Net Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 10:07


Merhaba  Bu yazımızda kalabalık acillerde hemen her gün karşımıza çıkan patolojiler olan safra taşlarına, akut kolesistit ve kolanjite değineceğiz. Bu tablolarla ilgili gastroenteroloji, dahiliye ve genel cerrahi kliniklerinin farklı yaklaşımları olabileceğini biliyoruz. Fakat başlıktan da anlaşılacağı üzere temel hedefimiz, acil servislerde çalışan pratisyen hekimlerin veya asistanlığın ilk yıllarındaki hekimlerin ilk yaklaşımını gözden geçirmek olacak. Başlamadan, karın ağrısı ile ilgili bu yazımızı ve ilişkili diğer konular olan hepatit ve pankreatit yazılarını da okuyabilirsiniz. Nedir? Öncelikle aslında bildiğimiz tanımlarla başlayalım.  Safra taşlarının safra kesesi içinde bulunup, herhangi bir tıkanıklığa ve semptoma sebep olmadığı duruma kolesistolithiazis denir. Bu taşların safra kanallarına doğru hareket etmeleri, geçici tıkanıklıklara sebep olmaları ve safra kesesindeki basıncın artmasıyla ağrının ortaya çıkması ise biliyer kolik olarak adlandırılır. Taşlar zaman zaman safra kesesi içine veya duodenuma düşerler ve tıkanıklık açılır, semptomlar geriler. Biliyer kolikte hastanın ağrısının yaklaşık 6 saat içinde sonlanması beklenir. Bu durumda tıkanıklık, uzun süreli total bir obstrüksiyon olmadığından, hastanın staz parametreleri (ALP, GGT, Bilirubin) ve enfektif bir süreç olmadığından WBC, CRP normal olarak tespit edilir. Şikayetleri de gerileyeceğinden hastanın semptomatik tedavi sonrası elektif poliklinik kontrolü önerilerek acil servisten taburcu edilmesi uygun olur. Yani her safra taşı olan hastanın acil yatışı gerekmeyebilir. Fakat tıkanıklık devam ederse safra kesesindeki distansiyon devam eder, inflamasyon başlar ve bazı durumlarda enfeksiyon da tabloya eklenir. Safra kesesinin bu inflamatuar sürecine akut kolesistit denir.​1​ Hastalar sağ üst kadran ağrısı, bulantı kusma, ateş yüksekliği şikayetleri ile başvurabilir. Tanımından da anlaşılacağı üzere bir enfeksiyondan bahsettiğimizden lökositoz tespit edilir. Bu intraabdominal enfeksiyon, istisnalar haricinde, hastane yatışı ve iv antibiyotik tedavisi gerektirir. Akut kolesistitin komplikasyonları, perforasyon, gangrenöz kolesistit, amfizematöz kolesistit, kolesistoenterik fistül ve safra taşı ileusu olarak sayılabilir ve bu komplikasyonların varlığında acil cerrahi müdahale gerekecektir. Çok daha nadir olarak akut kolesistit safra taşı olmaksızın da ortaya çıkabilir. Genellikle immunsupresif, geçirilmiş cerrahi öyküsü olan, başka bir sebeple hastanede yatmakta olan kritik hastalarda görülen akalküloz kolesistit​2​, temel olarak safra kesesinin dolaşımının bozulması ile ilişkili olarak değerlendirilmiştir. Kliniği, tetkikleri ve tedavi yaklaşımı taşlı kolesistit ile aynıdır. Altta yatan patolojilere göre prognozu, taşlı kolesistitten daha kötü seyredebilir. Safra Yolları Koledokolithiazis ise safra taşlarının koledokta olmasıdır. Primer olarak orda oluşmuş olabilirler ya da safra kesesinde oluşan taşların yer değiştirmesiyle orda bulunabilirler. Koledokolithiazis ya da striktür, tümor gibi dışardan basılarla koledok kanalının obstrüksiyonu safra yollarının enfeksiyonuna yol açar ve bu duruma da akut kolanjit denir​3​. Laboratuvar tetkiklerinde belirgin obstrüksiyon sebebiyle staz parametrelerinde yükselme ve lökositoz tespit edilir. Yine bir intraabdominal enfeksiyondan bahsettiğimiz için, tıpkı kolesistit gibi, iv antibiyotik tedavisi ve cerrahi müdahale gerekecektir. Bu enfeksiyonların doğru tedavi edilmediğinde sepsise kadar ilerleyebileceği unutulmamalıdır. Buraya kadarını hepimiz teoride biliyoruz. Peki biz acilciler için yaklaşımda neler önemli? Ne Yapmalı? Öncelikle hastaların kliniğini hatırlayalım. Sağ üst kadranda belirgin karın ağrısı tipik semptomumuz. Ağrıya, bulantı kusma da sıklıkla eşlik eder. Kolesistit ve kolanjitte tıkanıklığın uzun sürmesi sarılığa sebep olabilir ve inflamatuar süreçlerle ateş görülebilir. Hastanın muayenesinde sağ üst kadranda defans, rebound ve Murphy bulgusu (sağ üst kadranın kot al...

PaperPlayer biorxiv neuroscience
Plasma concentrations of anti-inflammatory cytokine TGF-β are associated with hippocampal structure related to explicit memory performance in older adults

PaperPlayer biorxiv neuroscience

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022


Link to bioRxiv paper: http://biorxiv.org/cgi/content/short/2022.12.21.521442v1?rss=1 Authors: Raschick, M., Richter, A., Fischer, L., Knopf, L., Schult, A., Yakupov, R., Behnisch, G., Guttek, K., Düzel, E., Dunay, I. R., Seidenbecher, C. I., Schraven, B., Reinhold, D., Schott, B. H. Abstract: Human cognitive abilities, and particularly hippocampus-dependent memory performance typically decline with increasing age. Immunosenescence, the age-related disintegration of the immune system are increasingly coming into the focus of research as a considerable factor contributing to cognitive decline. In the present study, we investigated potential associations between plasma levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and learning and memory performance as well as hippocampal anatomy in young and older adults. Plasma concentrations of the inflammation marker CRP as well as the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF- and the anti-inflammatory cytokine TGF-{beta}1 were measured in 142 healthy adults (57 young, 24.47 +/- 4.48 years; 85 older, 63.66 +/- 7.32 years) who performed tests of explicit memory (Verbal Learning and Memory Test, VLMT; Wechsler Memory Scale, Logical Memory, WMS) with an additional delayed recall test after 24 hours. Hippocampal volumetry and hippocampal subfield segmentation were performed using FreeSurfer, based on T1-weighted and high-resolution T2-weighted MR images. When investigating the relationship between memory performance, hippocampal structure, and plasma cytokine levels, we found that TGF-{beta}1 concentrations were positively correlated with the volumes of the hippocampal CA4-dentate gyrus region in older adults. These volumes were in turn positively associated with better performance in the WMS, particularly in the delayed memory test. Our results support the notion that endogenous anti-inflammatory mechanisms may act as protective factor in neurocognitive aging. Copy rights belong to original authors. Visit the link for more info Podcast created by Paper Player, LLC

Carnivore Diet
Ep 32 - Carnivore Diet | I Interviewed 50 CARNIVORE Experts In 2022, Here's What I Learnt

Carnivore Diet

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 12:45


I interviewed 50 Carnivore experts in 2022. The stars of this year were Dr Shawn Baker, Dr Anthony Chaffee, Kelly Hogan, and Dr Elisabeth Bright, and wow... I learnt a lot! There were many surprises, but the most startling of all was how much I learned about the importance of fat. The experts were adamant that we should be eating more fat, especially saturated fats like butter and ghee. They argued that this is what makes us human and it's what our bodies need to thrive. They said that fatty meat is so important—and fruit and nut consumption should be minimized because they're toxic (at least in large quantities). The experts also told me why fasting doesn't work: it causes a loss of muscle protein which slows down your metabolism by around 10% per day (compared with if you didn't fast). This can result in weight gain over time so it's not recommended unless you want to lose weight very slowly over months or years! It seems obvious now but I didn't know this before talking with these experts. And there's so much evidence for Carnivore If you're considering Carnivore, there's a lot of evidence backing it up. Here are some things that the experts told me: Carnivore is great for weight loss. One study found that people on a carnivorous diet lost an average of 15 pounds in eight weeks—and most participants were able to keep the fat off after they switched to a vegetarian or omnivorous diet again. Another study found that eating meat was more effective than other diets at reducing body mass index (BMI), even without exercise. Carnivore is good for your mental health, too! A third study found that people who ate more meat had better moods and higher self-esteem compared with those who ate fewer animal products, while another showed how beneficial it can be for those suffering from depression or anxiety. People on carnivorous diets also reported improved physical health outcomes like lower cholesterol levels and triglyceride counts, as well as reduced inflammation markers like C-reactive protein (CRP). Get 24/7 community support to achieve your fat loss, health and Carnivore goals. Join the 60-Day Fat Loss Program. This episode was brought to you by 5minutebody.com

High Intensity Health Radio with Mike Mutzel, MS
Brain Health Foods & Preventing Cognitive Decline via Lifestyle with Max Lugavere

High Intensity Health Radio with Mike Mutzel, MS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2022 85:25 Very Popular


Max Lugavere is a best-selling author of books to help you maintain and preserve cognitive decline. Crush your next workout and support your Intermittent Fasting lifestyle with the Electrolyte + Creatine Combo by MYOXCIENCE : https://bit.ly/electrolyte-stix Use code podcast at checkout to save Link to Genius Kitchen https://amzn.to/3FA4TJT Episode Time Stamps 0:00 Intro 2:25 We believed that amyloid beta was the cause of Alzheimer's and dementia. 9:10 Drugs can reduce amyloid, but do not improve cognitive function. 14:30 Exercise is close to being a magic bullet for prevention of Alzheimer's. 15:30 Resistance training is the most effective form of exercise to slow cognitive decline. 22:50 IGF-1 is important for neuroplasticity. 28:05 Milk fat globulin membrane has a beneficial effect on cognitive function in children. 30:53 The presence of amyloid is a protective response to the brain's immune system. 21:40 Chronic hyperglycemia is associated with an impaired ability for glucose to enter the brain. 34:40 Inflammation exacerbates cognitive issues. 35:40 Loss of sense of smell is one of the first indicators for cognitive dysfunction. 38:20 Constipation is an early pre-clinical sign of impending Parkinson's disease. 39:10 Eyes are the only neurologic tissue that exists outside the brain. 40:15 Hearing loss is significant risk factor for developing dementia. 43:20 Insulin resistance: 80% of patients with Alzheimer's are insulin resistant. 46:10 With every food, a risk benefit analysis should be performed. 47:50 Fiber and caffeine can help you be a better cholesterol recycler. 55:35 Vegan diets starve your brain of valuable nutrients. 56:55 Red meat provides a great number of nutrients that are important for brain health. 01:03:40 Valuable blood makers: Fasting triglycerides, fasting blood sugar, fasting insulin, homocysteine, high sensitivity CRP, and omega 3 index. 01:05:40 You have modifiable dementia risk factors.

Life in the Leadership Lane
137. Mark Waller, General Manager on Life in the Leadership Lane – Career Moments with my Brother!

Life in the Leadership Lane

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 59:35


Welcome to Life in the Leadership Lane where I am talking to leaders making a difference in the workplace and in our communities. How did they get to where they are and what are they doing to stay there! Buckle up and get ready to accelerate in the Leadership Lane! This week, I am talking with my brother, Mark Waller, CRP, PHR, SHRM-CP, General Manager at A-1 Freeman Moving Group and former President of DallasHR and North Texas Relocation Professionals How did Mark get started in his career? What led him to the world of leadership? What does Mark share about his early childhood? What leadership lesson did Mark learn from his state championship team? Who are some of the people that Mark had admired in his career? When did Mark “find his lane” his purpose in his career? What does Mark share about employee recognition? What does Mark share about volunteer leadership? What does Mark share about serving in the jail ministry? What does Mark share about other “big moments” in his career? What is some advice Mark shares to help others in their every day? …and more as we spend “Time to Accelerate” with a few more questions. Interview resources: Favorite quote from Mark: “When you learn to work through people toward common goals, your ability to get things done multiplies.” Connect with Mark on LinkedIn Mark's book recommendations 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership, 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, Jack Welch and the GE Way, and Life in the Leadership Lane Learn more about DallasHR Learn more about North Texas Relocation Professionals Check out Bruce's books Life in the Leadership Lane Moving Leaders to Inspire and Change the Workplace Find Your Lane Change your GPS, Change your Career (“Book Authority” Best Books) Milemarkers A 5 Year Journey …helping you record daily highlights to keep you on track. Subscribe to Bruce's Blog “Move to Inspire” https://brucewaller.com/blog-2/ Connect with Bruce on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/brucewaller/ Connect with Bruce on Twitter https://twitter.com/BruceWaller Connect with Bruce on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/bruceww300/ Connect with Bruce on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/brucewwaller Need relocation support for your office or employees? https://www.armstrongrelocation.com/ Visit www.brucewaller.com for more information on Life in the Leadership Lane podcast and more!

NextGen Radio
Four Stages of Success in Fitness and Business | Next Gen Radio

NextGen Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 87:40


In this episode of Next Gen Radio, Mike Ercolano and Kelly Krauss have a conversation with Vince Gabriele, the owner and founder of Gabriele Fitness and Performance. They discuss their journeys into the fitness world and entrepreneurship. They talk about using visualization and manifestation as tools for success, the 75 Hard program, and Vince's mastermind for business owners in the fitness industry. The conversation also touches on the four stages of fitness and business success, Tony Robbins' core value of health and energy, and C-reactive protein (CRP) as a health metric to be aware of in order to prevent diseases. Lastly they talk about Vince's upcoming book which will focus on football, and business. Tune in to learn more about how to succeed in fitness and in life!

Philip Teresi Podcasts
Friday 12/9 - Olive Garden, Twitter Files, & Toys4Tots

Philip Teresi Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 39:42


CRP. Jessica Montano (Head Cordinator US Marines) joined the show to talk more on the Toys4Tots drive. She discussed the local Vets that help out each year to collect organize and distribute the toys to the kids across the central valley.    KMJ's Toy4Tots Drive goes on in the KMJ parking lot until 6pm today.    A Kansas Olive Garden manager told employees that if they needed to take time off, “[they] might as well go and look for another job.” The message shared with employees read, “Our call-offs are occurring at a staggering rate. From now on, if you call off, you might as well go out and look for another job. We are no longer tolerating ANY EXCUSE for calling off. If you're sick, you need to come prove it to us. If your dog died, you need to bring him in and prove it to us,” the manager wrote.    The second installment of Elon Musk's so-called "Twitter Files" shed light on the company's practices of secretly "blacklisting" certain tweets and users. "Twitter once had a mission ‘to give everyone the power to create and share ideas and information instantly, without barriers.' Along the way, barriers nevertheless were erected," Bari Weiss wrote.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KMJ's Afternoon Drive
Friday 12/9 - Olive Garden, Twitter Files, & Toys4Tots

KMJ's Afternoon Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 39:42


CRP. Jessica Montano (Head Cordinator US Marines) joined the show to talk more on the Toys4Tots drive. She discussed the local Vets that help out each year to collect organize and distribute the toys to the kids across the central valley.    KMJ's Toy4Tots Drive goes on in the KMJ parking lot until 6pm today.    A Kansas Olive Garden manager told employees that if they needed to take time off, “[they] might as well go and look for another job.” The message shared with employees read, “Our call-offs are occurring at a staggering rate. From now on, if you call off, you might as well go out and look for another job. We are no longer tolerating ANY EXCUSE for calling off. If you're sick, you need to come prove it to us. If your dog died, you need to bring him in and prove it to us,” the manager wrote.    The second installment of Elon Musk's so-called "Twitter Files" shed light on the company's practices of secretly "blacklisting" certain tweets and users. "Twitter once had a mission ‘to give everyone the power to create and share ideas and information instantly, without barriers.' Along the way, barriers nevertheless were erected," Bari Weiss wrote.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Podcasty Aktuality.sk
Pediater v živote dieťaťa: Kedy k nemu prísť a čo možno žiadať či očakávať? Ako riešiť a liečiť choré dieťa, podcast Najmama.sk

Podcasty Aktuality.sk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 104:46


Na čo má nárok detský pacient, čo môže žiadať matka a o čom rozhoduje a na čo má právo detský lekár? Vypočujte si podcast Najmama.sk. Rozprávame sa s detskou lekárkou a hlavnou odborníčkou Ministerstva zdravotníctva SR pre všeobecnú starostlivosť o deti a dorast, doktorkou Elenou Prokopovou. V živote mamy a jej dieťaťa je detský lekár niekým, s kým od prvých chvíľ preberáme a konzultujeme všetky naše obavy a je to tiež niekto, u koho hľadáme ako u prvého pomoc v prípade pochybností, problémov, neskôr detských chorôb. Najmama.sk vám dnes prináša komplexný prehľad, v ktorom si priblížime základnú starostlivosť o dieťatko v rámci vyšetrení u pediatra, ale aj najčastejšie otázky, ktoré riešia mamičky - ako napríklad, čo očakávať od poradní, cez návštevy pediatra počas chorôb až po odporúčania ku špecialistom, rozoberieme si aj, na čo má dieťa ako pacient nárok, ako postupovať pri ochoreniach a rozobrať aj ich problémy v praxi. V podcate sa dozviete: - ako si vybrať pediatra a či máme nárok vybrať si aj niekoho mimo nášho obvodu - kedy a ako by mala prebehnúť prvá návšteva po pôrode - či konzultovať problémy s dojčením s pediatrom, ako si pomôcť a prečo až po jeho odporúčaní kontaktovať zdravotníčku, profesionálnu laktačnú konzultantku IPD - prehľad poradní a prečo sú dôležité - všetko o očkovaní, povinných aj nepovinných a o správnej príprave i ošetrení dieťatka - kedy ísť k lekárovi, keď je dieťa choré - či sú rutinou výtery, CRP a iné vyšetrenia - ako a prečo sa naučiť rozoznávať soplík u detí - ako liečiť kašeľ - ako na horúčku u detí, ako podávať lieky a správne zábaly - kedy odosiela pediater dieťa k špecialistovi, a či si môžeme vyberať.  

The Keto Kamp Podcast With Ben Azadi
10 Scientifically Proven Ways to Boost Your Metabolism & Burn Fat! KKP: 499

The Keto Kamp Podcast With Ben Azadi

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 21:15


Discover 10 scientifically proven ways to boost your metabolism to lose weight fast. This episode reveals the best diet for weight loss, how coffee and caffeine help assist in burning more calories, the best fats to eat for fat loss, and more! / / E P I S O D E   S P ON S O R S  Dr Phillips CBD Oil & Keto Fruit Chews. Visit www.drphillipscbd.com Good Idea Functional Sparkling Water Drinks. Visit http://www.goodidea.us and use the coupon code KETOKAMP at checkout.  Text me the words "Podcast" +1 (786) 364-5002 to be added to my contacts list.  00:55​ The first way is with broccoli sprouts. Broccoli sprouts has many benefits, and one of them is with weight loss. Study: sci-hub.do/10.1016/j.clnu.2018.03.006 After 10 weeks of daily broccoli sprout consumption, weight and BMI were not altered, but body fat mass significantly decreased Limitations: no randomized control group so causality can't be inferred, but there were also significant reductions in inflammatory markers (IL-6, CRP) [obesity characterized by chronic low-grade inflammation] 500mg daily Supplement: https://amzn.to/3uOTbFe​ 02:20​ Turmeric helps you lose weight! sci-hub.do/10.1002/biof.1074 Obesity contributes to chronic low-grade inflammation. Curcumin may suppress inflammation by directly interacting with white adipose tissue. Curcumin may also increase antioxidant activity and decrease adipocyte differentiation. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/arti...​ Curcumin Attenuates Adipogenesis by Inducing Preadipocyte Apoptosis and Inhibiting Adipocyte Differentiation https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31799...​ The effects of curcumin supplementation on body mass index, body weight, and waist circumference 70 - 2,400mg daily Supplement: https://amzn.to/30juNh3​ 03:41​ Coffee/tea (caffeine) helps you lose weight fast. sci-hub.do/10.1056/NEJMra1816604 Caffeine may reduce appetite and increase basal metabolic rate. Caffeine intake may modestly reduce body fat Caffeine intake throughout the day led to a 5% increase in 24-hour energy expenditure sci-hub.do/10.1093/ajcn/nqz306 Participants drinking coffee versus placebo experienced greater loss of fat mass Recommended dose is around 100mg per day ☕Coffee: http://www.ketokampcoffee.com​ Use "ketokamp" for 10% off 04:51​ Spicy foods have a component in it called capsaicin which can speed up your metabolism. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/arti...​ Consumption of foods containing capsaicin associated with lower prevalence of obesity. Capsaicin may help sustain fat oxidation, increase resting energy expenditure,. Chilli pepper may increase energy expenditure by triggering BAT (brown adipose tissue) activity [similar to cold thermogenesis] Recommended dose 1,500mg per day Supplement: https://amzn.to/3r9Tx6V​ 05:55​ Astaxanthin has many health benefits including weight loss. sci-hub.do/10.1002/ptr.3494 The strong antioxidant properties of astaxanthin may play a role in reducing oxidative-stress (being overweight or obese may increase oxidative stress). Biomarkers of oxidative stress decreased after supplementation with astaxanthin. Dosage: 8mg per day Supplement: https://amzn.to/305c7kL​ 06:59​ The best fats for weight loss are walnuts, hemp seeds, sunflower seeds, avocado oil, eggs. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/arti...​ High omega-3 fatty acid intake contributes to homeostasis and weight loss versus high omega-6 fatty acid intake which increases leptin & insulin resistance. 08:46​ The best diet for weight loss is the keto diet. https://www.mdpi.com/2075-4663/8/10/1...​ sci-hub.do/10.1080/07315724.2020.1725686 KETO PLAYLIST: https://bit.ly/37jbybL​ 09:57​ Exercise in the morning helps with weight loss. sci-hub.do/10.1139/apnm-2019-0917 https://www.nature.com/articles/s4136...​ GC3 FITNESS: https://bit.ly/3e3JMno​ 10:51​ Fasting for serious weight loss. sci-hub.do/10.1007/s11154-019-09524-w sci-hub.do/10.1017/S0029665119000636 https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32003...​ 12:53​ Fasted exercise https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/arti...​ sci-hub.do/10.3390/nu12082349 https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30334...​ https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29315...​ *Links Are Affiliates* // F O L L O W ▸ instagram | @thebenazadi | http://bit.ly/2B1NXKW​ ▸ facebook | /thebenazadi | http://bit.ly/2BVvvW6​ ▸ linkedin | http://bit.ly/2PNRh40​ ▸ email | support@ketokamp.com

Agriculture Today
1323 – CRP Expansion for Migratory Water Fowl and Changes in Protecting the Lesser Prairie Chicken … An Update on the Uptick in HPAI in the U.S.

Agriculture Today

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 28:00


Expansion of CRP for Migratory Water Fowl and Changes in Protecting the Lesser Prairie Chicken An Update on the Uptick in HPAI in the U.S. BCI's Ask the Experts: Heart Disease in Cattle   00:01:00 – CRP Expansion for Migratory Water Fowl: Kansas Farm Service Agency state executive director, Dennis McKinney, discusses upcoming December deadlines, expansion of CRP for migratory water fowl, and changes in Kansas in regards to protecting the lesser prairie chicken.   00:12:00 – An Update on the Uptick in HPAI in the U.S.: K-State poultry specialist, Scott Beyer, and Kansas Department of Agriculture animal health commissioner, Justin Smith, have an update on Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) in the United States. They explain why there has been a recent uptick in cases as well as where the disease has been seen in Kansas. Kansas Department of Agriculture - HPAI Map USDA HPAI resources 00:23:00 – Beef Cattle Institute's Ask the Experts: K-State experts Brad White, Bob Larson, and Blaine Johnson answer a listener's question on the prevalence of heart disease in cattle. BCI Cattle Chat Podcast To have your beef cattle questions answered by the BCI Ask the Experts team - send them an email at bci@ksu.edu Send comments, questions or requests for copies of past programs to ksrenews@ksu.edu. Agriculture Today is a daily program featuring Kansas State University agricultural specialists and other experts examining ag issues facing Kansas and the nation. It is hosted by Samantha Bennett and distributed to radio stations throughout Kansas and as a daily podcast.   K‑State Research and Extension is a short name for the Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, a program designed to generate and distribute useful knowledge for the well‑being of Kansans. Supported by county, state, federal and private funds, the program has county Extension offices, experiment fields, area Extension offices and regional research centers statewide. Its headquarters is on the K‑State campus in Manhattan.    

Taylored Talks
Impacts of Poor Sleep (Ep. 98)

Taylored Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 23:09


Taking a minor break from ruffling the f*cking cages and feathers of what we call modern society these days and I wanted to talk about something a bit more conventional but important nevertheless and that is sleep. I have a multitude of studies for you to do your own research as I want to present this topic as clear cut as possible.   Time Stamps:   (0:28) Are You Enjoying the Podcast? (2:30) Going On a Journey With Sleep (6:40) Adverse Effects From Poor Sleep (16:30) Stress and the Blood-Brain Barrier (18:50) Naps ---------------------------- Resources: [i] Pilcher JJ, Walters AS. How sleep deprivation affects psychological variables related to college students' cognitive performance. J Am Coll Health. 1997 Nov;46(3):121-6. View Abstract [ii] Walker MP, et al. Practice with sleep makes perfect: sleep-dependent motor skill learning. Neuron. 2002 Jul 3;35(1):205-11. View Abstract [iii] Rosen IM, et al. Evolution of sleep quantity, sleep deprivation, mood disturbances, empathy, and burnout among interns. Acad Med. 2006 Jan;81(1):82-5. View Abstract [iv] Cohen S, et al. Sleep habits and susceptibility to the common cold. Arch Intern Med. 2009 Jan 12;169(1):62-7. View Full Paper [v] Patel SR, et al. Association between reduced sleep and weight gain in women. Am J Epidemiol. 2006 Nov 15;164(10):947-54. View Full Paper [vi] Donga E, et al. A single night of partial sleep deprivation induces insulin resistance in multiple metabolic pathways in healthy subjects. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2010 Jun;95(6):2963-8. View Abstract [vii] Williamson AM, Feyer AM. Moderate sleep deprivation produces impairments in cognitive and motor performance equivalent to legally prescribed levels of alcohol intoxication. Occup Environ Med. 2000 Oct;57(10):649-55. View Full Paper [viii] Kim TW, Jeong JH, Hong SC. The impact of sleep and circadian disturbance on hormones and metabolism. Int J Endocrinol. 2015;2015:591729. View Full Paper [ix] Vgontzas AN, et al. IL-6 and its circadian secretion in humans. Neuroimmunomodulation. 2005;12(3):131-40. View Abstract [x] Meier-Ewert HK, et al. Absence of diurnal variation of C-reactive protein concentrations in healthy human subjects. Clin Chem. 2001 Mar;47(3):426-30. View Full Paper [xi] Meier-Ewert HK, et al. Effect of sleep loss on C-reactive protein, an inflammatory marker of cardiovascular risk. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2004 Feb 18;43(4):678-83. View Abstract [xii] van Leeuwen WM, et al. Sleep restriction increases the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases by augmenting proinflammatory responses through IL-17 and CRP. PLoS One. 2009;4(2):e4589. View Full Paper [xiii] Chennaoui M, et al. Effect of one night of sleep loss on changes in tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) levels in healthy men. Cytokine. 2011 Nov;56(2):318-24. View Abstract [xiv] Vgontzas AN, et al. Chronic insomnia is associated with a shift of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor secretion from nighttime to daytime. Metabolism. 2002 Jul;51(7):887-92. View Abstract [xv] He J, et al. Sleep restriction impairs blood-brain barrier function. J Neurosci. 2014 Oct 29;34(44):14697-706. View Full Paper [xvi] Zlokovic BV. The blood-brain barrier in health and chronic neurodegenerative disorders. Neuron. 2008 Jan 24;57(2):178-201. View Abstract [xvii] Hurtado-Alvarado G, et al. Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Induced by Chronic Sleep Loss: Low-Grade Inflammation May Be the Link. J Immunol Res. 2016;2016:4576012. View Full Paper [xviii] Esposito P, et al. Corticotropin-releasing hormone and brain mast cells regulate blood-brain-barrier permeability induced by acute stress. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2002 Dec;303(3):1061-6. View Full Paper [xix] Steiger A. Sleep and the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical system. Sleep Med Rev. 2002 Apr;6(2):125-38. View Abstract [xx] Vgontzas AN, et al. Daytime napping after a night of sleep loss decreases sleepiness, improves performance, and causes beneficial changes in cortisol and interleukin-6 secretion. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2007 Jan;292(1):E253-61. View Full Paper ---------------------------- Follow Me on Instagram! @tayloredwellbeing ---------------------------- Click Here to Apply to Work with Me or visit taylorsappington.com/application

Beyond Wellness Radio
The Top 7 Root Causes of Inflammation with Dr. Jockers | Podcast #372

Beyond Wellness Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 25:42


The Top 7 Root Causes of Inflammation with Dr. Jockers | Podcast #372 Schedule a FREE Consult: http://www.justinhealth.com/free-consultation Review us at: http://www.beyondwellnessradio.com/itunes Recommended products: Magnesium Supreme: https://justinhealth.com/products/magnesium-supreme TruKeto Collagen: https://justinhealth.com/products/truketo-collagen Trucollagen (Grassfed): https://justinhealth.com/products/trucollagen Enzyme Synergy: https://justinhealth.com/products/enzyme-synergy Organic Grassfed Meat: https://justinhealth.com/products/organic-grass-fed-meat Amino Acid Supreme: https://justinhealth.com/products/amino-acid-supreme Genova NutErval: https://justinhealth.com/products/genova-nutreval-fmv Podcast Transcription: https://justinhealth.com/the-top-7-root-causes-of-inflammation-with-dr-jockers-podcast-372/ Get Show Updates Here: http://justinhealth.com/beyondwellness-newsletter You-tube Podcast Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=justinhealth 0:00 - Introduction 0:36 - Inflammation 4:41 - Acute Inflammation 5:21 - Root Causes 10:30 - Food Recommendations 18:22 - Herbs and Compounds When your body activates your immune system, it sends out inflammatory cells. These cells attack bacteria or heal damaged tissue. If your body sends out inflammatory cells when you are not sick or injured, you may have chronic inflammation or other underlying issues. Dr. J and Dr. Jockers suggest checking in with your healthcare provider if you experience a problematic injury or health issues. Also, talk with your functional doctor if you have ongoing pain, swelling, stiffness, or other symptoms. They can narrow down the cause and find ways to help you feel better. ===================================== Subscribe on I-Tunes: http://www.beyondwellnessradio.com/itunes Review us at: http://www.beyondwellnessradio.com/itunes Visit us at: http://www.beyondwellnessradio.com Have a question: http://www.beyondwellnessradio.com/question

The Upland Rookie Podcast
Ep. 68: Bird Dogs and Babies with Bayley Taylor

The Upland Rookie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 81:53


On episode 68 I sit down and chat dogs with Bayley Taylor from Steelfork Kennels and learn more about her journey into upland hunting and bird dogs.  ------------ Subscribe to the Upland Rookie YouTube Channel by clicking here.  As a reminder, if you are enjoying the podcast, please go leave a rating and review on whichever podcast platform you listen on. Much appreciated.  ----------- *TITLE SPONSOR - BPro Kennels* LISTENERS CAN SAVE 10% ON A DOG BOX FROM BPRO KENNESL USING PROMO CODE ROOKIE10)  BPRO Kennels was founded with a vision to create a premium dog box that was customizable to fit any needs and stand the test of time. These hand-crafted kennels are proudly built in the USA with no corners cut, with your dog's safety as the first priority. These are made of high grade, lightweight aluminum that can be left raw or powder coated to whatever color combinations you can think of. The podcast is presented by: Final Rise - Preimum upland gear for the serious bird hunter. Check out the new Sidekick fest for ultra slim design and light weight. Every product is made in the USA and is durable season after season.   Sponsor of the podcast: Trinity Bretons. Angels in the home and demons in the field. Trinity offer puppies, The Trinity Upland Academy with George Hickox, Started Dogs and Stud Service and some damn fine bird dogs.  ---------- AFFILIATES: OnX Hunt. Save 20% off your subscription today by using promo code TUR20  ---------- CONNECT WITH ME:  Email: uplandbritts@gmail.com Instagram: @upland_britts or @theuplandrookiepodcast Facebook: The Upland Rookie Podcast Twitter: @uplandrookiepod

KY X FILES
S248 - Bringing back the mammoth!

KY X FILES

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 73:37


Todays episode we discuss the finding of 25000 year old mammoth cells, and the possibility of de-extinction!

Life in the Leadership Lane
132. Jack Jampel, Senior Manager Global Mobility on Life in the Leadership Lane-WorldwideERC Recap!

Life in the Leadership Lane

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 47:37


Welcome to Life in the Leadership Lane where I am talking to leaders making a difference in the workplace and in our communities. How did they get to where they are and what are they doing to stay there! Buckle up and get ready to accelerate in the Leadership Lane! This week, I am talking with Jack Jampel, CRP, Senior Manager Human Resources and Global Mobility at Stryker. How did Jack get started in his career? What led him to the world of HR, Mobility, and Leadership? What does Jack share about “doing the right thing”? What does Jack share about mentorship? When did Jack “find his lane” his purpose in his career? What does Jack share about the question “what makes us qualified”? What topics did Jack enjoy about “WorldwideERC GWS” Conference? What does Jack share about “sustainability”? What does Jack share about mobility exceptions when relocating talent? What does Jack share about the household goods move experience? What is some advice Jack shares to help others in their every day? …and more as we spend “Time to Accelerate” with a few more questions. Interview resources: Favorite quote from Jack: “There is no policy, outline, or guide on how to treat employees better. Do what you feel is right” Connect with Jack on LinkedIn Learn more about Stryker Learn more about WorldwideERC Visit Bruce's Blog “Move to Inspire” for WorldwideERC GWS Conference Recap Jack's book referral The Giving Tree Check out Bruce's books Life in the Leadership Lane Moving Leaders to Inspire and Change the Workplace Find Your Lane Change your GPS, Change your Career (“Book Authority” Best Books) Milemarkers A 5 Year Journey …helping you record daily highlights to keep you on track. Subscribe to Bruce's Blog “Move to Inspire” https://brucewaller.com/blog-2/ Connect with Bruce on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/brucewaller/ Connect with Bruce on Twitter https://twitter.com/BruceWaller Connect with Bruce on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/bruceww300/ Connect with Bruce on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/brucewwaller Need relocation support for your office or employees? https://www.armstrongrelocation.com/ Visit www.brucewaller.com for more information on Life in the Leadership Lane podcast and more!

The Land Podcast - The Pursuit of Land Ownership and Investing
New CRP Money is Coming? Best CRP Practice for Whitetails!

The Land Podcast - The Pursuit of Land Ownership and Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 50:13 Very Popular


Many a hunter has heard the term CRP, which has become synonymous with thick, brushy parts of a property that is ideal deer habitat. While, yes, that's what a CRP field is, the acronym stands for Conservation Reserve Program, a land conservation program that improves habitat. Learn about some of the best blends, practices, and what is to come for conservation practices! Save a Life: Be The Match  https://linktr.ee/TheLandPodcast https://linktr.ee/exodustrailcamera https://bit.ly/TheDeerGearPodcast

America’s Land Auctioneer
Investing in Cropland and CRP Land

America’s Land Auctioneer

Play Episode Play 44 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 43:50


Kevin Pifer, America's Land Auctioneer, offers his recommendations on investing in cropland and CRP land.  What are the advantages and disadvantages of investing in these two types of farmland.Follow Kevin at www.americalandauctioneer.com and on Instagram & Facebook

Agriculture Today
1297 – Update on ARC-PLC and Responding to Disease Outbreaks … A Feed the World Award and Preserving Historical Prints

Agriculture Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 28:00


Update on ARC-PLC and Responding to Disease Outbreaks  A Feed the World Award and Preserving Historical Prints BCI's Ask the Experts: Sustainability in Beef Cattle Production   00:01:00 – Update on ARC-PLC and Responding to Disease Outbreaks: Kansas Farm Service Agency ag programs specialist, Emily Evans, provides updates on ARC-PLC planning for 2023, non-insured crop programming, and payments for CRP and ARC-PLC for 2021 crops. During this segment we also share a recent clip from the Beef Cattle Institute's Cattle Chats Podcast where Brad White, Bob Larson, and Dustin Pendell discuss responding to disease outbreaks with Kelli Almes, the associate coordinator of the National Animal Health Laboratory Network.   00:12:00 – A Feed the World Award and Preserving Historical Prints: K-State Entomology students Mollie Toth, Victoria Pickens, Hannah Quellhorst, Cameron Osborne, and Molly Edeburn discuss their experiences winning an award for the best innovative idea to feed the world and their efforts to raise money to refurbish and preserve prints from well-known entomologist C.V. Riley that date back to the late 1800s.   00:23:00 – Beef Cattle Institute's Ask the Experts: K-State experts Brad White, Phillip Lancaster, and Dustin Pendell answer a listener's question on what sustainability means in beef cattle production.     Send comments, questions or requests for copies of past programs to ksrenews@ksu.edu. Agriculture Today is a daily program featuring Kansas State University agricultural specialists and other experts examining ag issues facing Kansas and the nation. It is hosted by Samantha Bennett and distributed to radio stations throughout Kansas and as a daily podcast.   K‑State Research and Extension is a short name for the Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, a program designed to generate and distribute useful knowledge for the well‑being of Kansans. Supported by county, state, federal and private funds, the program has county Extension offices, experiment fields, area Extension offices and regional research centers statewide. Its headquarters is on the K‑State campus in Manhattan.  

What the F...45!
Ep.24 Naturopathic Doctor Justin Gallant and JB sit down for a live interpretation of his blood panel

What the F...45!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 77:25


If you have ever wondered what the difference between a GP and and ND this episode can give you some insight!Time Stamps:Measurements: 3:37 -  Glucose measurements: fasted glucose and HBA1C11:00 - Calcium11:00 - Vitamin D & Calcium21:30 - Magnesium21:10 - High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein (hs-CRP)25.30 - Reynolds Risk Score27:15 - Iron35:00 - Protein before bed37:12 - B1241:19 - Creatine Kinase (muscle inflammation measure) 42:25 - Liver enzymes 45:14 - DHEA46:50 - Testosterone50:55 - Insulin56:50 - Zinc/Copper57:49 - CBC - Blood counts and cell morphology 1:00:55 - Evidence of COVID in bloodwork? Supplements: 1:02:30 - Glutathione and NAC1:04:22 - Resveratrol1:05:25 - CoQ101:07:45 - RLA, R-Lipoic Acid 1:09:25 - Arginine 1:10:20 - STAY AWAY FROM COMMERCIAL "PRE-WORKOUTS"1:11:35 - Supplements and strategies for boosting testosterone naturallyDr. Justin gallant :"If you are looking for a Naturopathic Doctor in Hamilton, Ontario who is a passionate and educated health detective, then you have come to the right place. I strive to optimize, educate, and guide you when it comes to your health. When a patient comes in, I make it my mission to determine the actual cause of their issues. I provide top-level healthcare. I care about my patients. I love teaching about how the body works so patients can understand why they are experiencing the symptoms they have and guide them to better health. I love analyzing blood work and I provide expert supplement and nutrition advice. Life is too short and precious to constantly be sick and tired of being sick and tired. "Most people see their GP ( general practitioner) for yearly check ups, vaccines or maybe an unidentified rash or concerns about a mole. But if you try and ask your GP to help you with nagging fatigue, digestive issues, stress or weight management problems they will likely prescribe a medication or an over the counter drug to help the SYMPTOM.  Naturopathic doctors ask WHY you have the symptom and look at your blood work to become a "health detective" to help solve the root of the cause of the issue. Their focus is to help you thrive not just survive or mask issues with a bandaid approach.  We do realize that not all GP's act this way but with our experience, it is rare they have the time to sit down with you and go through all these little nuances to understand your lifestyle habits and how to improve in all aspects of life. Furthermore, Naturopaths get a VERY thorough list of levels to look at on your bloodwork panel compared to very few from the GP. After your bloodwork is interpreted Justin recommends supplements, diet changes and perhaps lifestyle changes like workouts/stress management and more to help achieve better results when we retest. Generally we see him at least twice a year sometimes 3-4 to keep an eye on how things are changing.If you're interested in working with  Dr. Gallant you can find him at www.drjustingallantnd.comIf you liked this episode please like and share with your friends and family!

Beasts Of Burden
Ep 80: The Habitat Buisness Spraying and Mowing

Beasts Of Burden

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 75:26


In this episode we go over an important aspect of the Habitat Buisness: spraying and mowing. Spraying food plots, clover, CRP burn downs, or invasive species control is all demanded as a habitat manager. Learning what different hebicides do and when to use them can earn you a good pay day or a major deficet if used incorrectly. Also what kind of tools: backpack sprayer, ATV sprayer, tractor sprayer, or even the local co-op.Mowing is simple, but it can be profitable or it can be a liability on your paycheck at the end of the day. It's a short segment, but I explain my thoughts on how to charge and how to stay effecient.

Modern Healthspan
Identifying The Biomarkers Of Inflammaging - Professor David Furman Interview Series Ep 3

Modern Healthspan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 8:17


In this episode Dr Furman discusses what are the chief components of that make up the iAge clock and how they differ from the markers of acute inflammation. In particular CXCL9 is the main element of the iAge clock while classic marker of inflammation such as CRP, IL-6, TNF-alpha do not appear at all. Dr. David Furman is the Director of the Stanford 1000 Immunomes Project, Chief of the Center for AI and Data Science of Aging at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging, and a Adjunct Investigator for The National Scientific and Research Council, Austral University, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Dr. Furman received his Ph.D. (summa cum laude) from University of Buenos Aires, Argentina, for his work on the identification of factors produced by tumors that enable cancer cells to escape immune attack. During his postdoctoral training at the Stanford School of Medicine, Dr. Furman focused on the application of advanced analytics to study the aging of the immune system in humans and decipher how cumulative inflammatory responses associated with aging lead to an accelerated cardiovascular aging. Dr. Furman has published dozens of scientific articles in top-tier journals such as Cell, Nature Medicine, PNAS, The Lancet, and others. Dr Furman's paper on iAGE An inflammatory aging clock (iAge) based on deep learning tracks multimorbidity, immunosenescence, frailty and cardiovascular aging https://www.nature.com/articles/s43587-021-00082-y https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/840363v1 Prof David Furman's Lab in Buck Institute Website https://www.buckinstitute.org/lab/furman-lab/ Stanford 1000 Immunomes Project (KIP) Website: https://med.stanford.edu/1000immunomes If you would like to support our channel, we'd love a coffee ☕…thank you! https://www.buymeacoffee.com/mhealthspan You can also find us on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/c/modernhealthspan 15% off Bulletproof products at https://www.bulletproof.com/ with discount code HEALTHSPAN15. Renue By Science 10% discount code MHS at https://renuebyscience.com/all-products-2/ 10% off all products at DoNotAge with code MODERNHEALTHSPAN at https://donotage.org/ $5 off any purchase if users use code MODERN5 at NOVOS Labs https://novoslabs.com/?ref=3957

Agriculture Today
1287 — Don L. Good Impact Award Recipient…Getting Weight on a Bull Ahead of Spring Breeding

Agriculture Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 27:52


FSA CRP Emergency Grazing, Committee Elections, and Mental Health Reminders ASI's Family and Friends Reunion BCI's Ask the Experts   00:01:10 —FSA CRP Emergency Grazing, Committee Elections, and Mental Health Reminders: We are joined this week by Kansas Farm Service Agency state executive director, Dennis McKinney. He shares an update on expansion of emergency grazing with the CRP program, upcoming committee elections, and a reminder on the importance of mental health for producers. Kansas Farm Service Agency website Mental Health Resources: Lifeline Chat website (988lifeline.org) Kansas Ag Stress website 00:12:09 — ASI's Family and Friends Reunion: Discussing this year's upcoming K-State Animal Sciences and Industry Family and Friends Reunion is professor emeritus, Dave Nichols, and K-State reunion committee member, Justin Janssen. Dr. Nichols shares how honored he is to be receiving the Don L. Good Impact Award and Dr. Janssen shares all of the family fun in store for those who attend. Family and Friends Reunion information and registration 00:23:03 — BCI's Ask the Experts:  We end with this week's Beef Cattle Institute's Ask the Expert, where experts Brad White, Bob Larson, and Phillip Lancaster address a listener's question on how best to put weight on a bull ahead of breeding in the spring. BCI Cattle Chat Podcast To have your beef cattle questions answered by the BCI Ask the Experts team - send them an email at bci@ksu.edu   Send comments, questions, or requests for copies of past programs to ksrenews@ksu.edu. Agriculture Today is a daily program featuring Kansas State University agricultural specialists and other experts examining ag issues facing Kansas and the nation. It is hosted by Samantha Bennett and distributed to radio stations throughout Kansas and as a daily podcast.   K‑State Research and Extension is a short name for the Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, a program designed to generate and distribute useful knowledge for the well‑being of Kansans. Supported by county, state, federal and private funds, the program has county Extension offices, experiment fields, area Extension offices and regional research centers statewide. Its headquarters is on the K‑State campus in Manhattan.

Polski Daily
PD138 Pierwsza pomoc po polsku

Polski Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 34:36


Posłuchaj ciekawostek o wypadkach w domu oraz o udzielaniu pierwszej pomocy!Słownictwo:rana - woundskaleczenie - scratchugryźć - to bitekrwawić- to bleedzastrzyk - injectionszczepionka przeciw tężcowi - tetanus shotszwy - sticheszszywać ranę - to sew a woundblizna - a scarwezwać pomoc - to call helpudzielać pomocy - to give helppierwsza pomoc - first aidopatrunek - a dressingbandaż - a bandageplaster - a bandaidoparzyć się / poparzyć się - to get burnedopatrzyć ranę - to dress a woundkaretka pogotowia / karetka / ambulans - ambulanceratownik - a rescuermasaż serca - heart massagesztuczne oddychanie - CRP ( artificial respiration)oddech - breathoddychać - to breatheodchylić - to lean backpochylić - to lean forwarduciskać - to pressrobić wdech - to inhalerobić wydech - to exhaleresuscytacja krążeniowo-oddechowamostek - sternumzadławić się / zakrztusić się - to chokeĆwiczenia z tego tematu: Have you discovered the Polski Daily Club yet? If not go to https://www.polskidaily.eu/signup and join the club!

Oklahoma Outdoors - Sportsmen's Empire
2022 Nebraska Hunt Breakdown

Oklahoma Outdoors - Sportsmen's Empire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 54:47


John is back from his early season Nebraka whitetail hunt, and he is ready to break down what he learned this week on the Oklahoma Outdoors Podcast. It was a quick trip over a long weekend full of car trouble, getting stopped by land owners, learning a heck of a lot about whitetails, and having a blast doing it all. Everyone has heard that whitetail deer are "creatures of edge" and over Labor Day weekend John really got to learn what that meant. The mixture of crop fields, CRP, and timbered creeks gave ample opportunity to see how deer use different terrain features and vegetation types to their advantage. John also learned that not all soybeans are created equal, or have the same appeal to deer.One of the best surprises of the trip though, was how easy it ended up being to gain access to private land. It definitely helped having a local inside man to speak on John's behalf, but over all most of the people John interacted with were happy to help or at least give some knowledge. John left his house with 110 acres to hunt, and driving home he now has access to over 1,300 acres for future trips! So even though he came home with a giant pot of tag soup, the trip was far from a waste, and the knowledge he gained on this out of state trip will absolutely help him bag more bucks back on his home turf. 

Sportsmen's Nation - Whitetail Hunting
Oklahoma Outdoors - 2022 Nebraska Hunt Breakdown

Sportsmen's Nation - Whitetail Hunting

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 56:17


John is back from his early season Nebraka whitetail hunt, and he is ready to break down what he learned this week on the Oklahoma Outdoors Podcast. It was a quick trip over a long weekend full of car trouble, getting stopped by land owners, learning a heck of a lot about whitetails, and having a blast doing it all. Everyone has heard that whitetail deer are "creatures of edge" and over Labor Day weekend John really got to learn what that meant. The mixture of crop fields, CRP, and timbered creeks gave ample opportunity to see how deer use different terrain features and vegetation types to their advantage. John also learned that not all soybeans are created equal, or have the same appeal to deer. One of the best surprises of the trip though, was how easy it ended up being to gain access to private land. It definitely helped having a local inside man to speak on John's behalf, but over all most of the people John interacted with were happy to help or at least give some knowledge. John left his house with 110 acres to hunt, and driving home he now has access to over 1,300 acres for future trips! So even though he came home with a giant pot of tag soup, the trip was far from a waste, and the knowledge he gained on this out of state trip will absolutely help him bag more bucks back on his home turf.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Balancing Point Podcast
Q&A 7/26/22 Simple Lab Tests that Can Make a Big Difference

The Balancing Point Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 31:21


PODCAST HIGHLIGHTS: 03:19 Simple Lab Testing 04:18 Ideal Functional Ranges 07:20 White Blood Cells 10:25 Hemoglobin 12:06 RDW 14:17 MCV 15:13 Platelets 20:05 hs-CRP 20:55 Homocysteine 21:19 D-Dimer 23:25 Fibrinogen 24:09 GGT  24:48 Ferritin 25:49 Can high platelets lead to menstrual cramps https://youtu.be/6V3L-DhKLEs Transcript from Webinar: Welcome to another edition of "Ask Dr. Neiters" here...... Continue Reading →

Off-Farm Income
OFI 1485: Farmers Turning Adversity Into Inspiration | Nik & Karen Fitch | Cuddle Cow Company

Off-Farm Income

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 41:19


We have talked about the different ways in which businesses get started on this show many, many times.  The most common answers are people being frustrated that something does not exist and then creating it, or people seeing a product or service and knowing that they could do it better.  While these encompass the vast majority of stimulus behind business development, there are other reasons that can be even more compelling.  In today's episode our guests, Karen and Nik Fitch, will share their story of the development of the Cuddle Cow Company and how unbelievable adversity inspired this business. Nik and Karen have been married since 2017, and prior to meeting each other they were both already on a path to farming and raising cattle.  After they exchanged vows, they were able to obtain a farm together that was in CRP.  This gave them time to focus on fixing up facilities as well as the home, and they continued to build a herd of cattle that Karen had already started on her father's property. Since she was very young, Karen had been dealing with a congenital condition called "AVM" or "arterial venous malformation" which was located on her upper spine.  This had required constant monitoring by physicians and some surgery to deal with, but the prognosis was good.  However, in 2019, quite by surprise, that all changed and Karen found herself with a significant spinal cord injury as a result of the "AVM".  This led to months in multiple different hospitals, her having a very elevated risk to Covid when that began and her not not having the use of her limbs and needing 24 hour care. This is the type of situation that can and does lead so many people to lose hope or to blame the world for being unfair.  However, in Karen and Nik's case it led to inspiration.  After the spinal cord injury took place they were inspired to start a business that would raise money for spinal cord research at the same time as it functioned as a business for them. Seeing a gentleman whose business model was donating a pair of shoes to somebody in need for every pair that he sold inspired them to try the same thing.  There were a few criteria for this business.  First, they wanted the business to somehow share their farm and love of agriculture with the world.  Second, they wanted the business to help further spinal cord research.  And last, they wanted to provide the comfort to their customers that had been brought to Karen when somebody sent her a blanket to snuggle with while she was in the hospital.  Cuddle Cow Company was born. In today's episode hear the incredible story from Karen and Nik themselves, and find out all about how they decided to sell blankets, how they are able to enhance those blankets and how they have broadened their product line! More Places You Can Listen to Off-Farm Income And Matt Brechwald:    

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 09.08.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 61:49 Very Popular


Video: Scientist Carl Sagan testifying to the U.S. Senate in 1985 on the greenhouse effect: (2:00) WEF: The Most Evil Business in the World – Samuel Leeds (10:49) Israel caught hiding BOMBSHELL Pfizer   Frequent nut consumption associated with less inflammation Brigham and Women's Hospital, September 1, 2022 In a study of more than 5,000 people, investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital have found that greater intake of nuts was associated with lower levels of biomarkers of inflammation, a finding that may help explain the healthbenefits of nuts. The results of the study appear in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. “Population studies have consistently supported a protective role of nuts against cardiometabolic disorders such as cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, and we know that inflammation is a key process in the development of these diseases,” said corresponding author Ying Bao, MD, ScD, an epidemiologist in BWH's Channing Division of Network Medicine. “Our new work suggests that nuts may exert their beneficial effects in part by reducing systemic inflammation.” Previously Bao and her colleagues observed an association between increased nut consumption and reduced risk of major chronic diseases and even death, but few prospective cohort studies had examined the link between nut intake and inflammation. In the current study, the research team performed a cross-sectional analysis of data from the Nurses' Health Study, which includes more than 120,000 female registered nurses, and from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, which includes more than 50,000 male health professionals. The team assessed diet using questionnaires and looked at the levels of certain telltale proteins known as biomarkers in blood samples collected from the study participants. They measured three well-established biomarkers of inflammation: C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 6 (IL6) and tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2). After adjusting for age, medical history, lifestyle and other variables, they found that participants who had consumed five or more servings of nuts per week had lower levels of CRP and IL6 than those who never or almost never ate nuts. In addition, people who substituted three servings per week of nuts in place of red meat, processed meat, eggs or refined grains had significantly lower levels of CRP and IL6. Peanuts and tree nuts contain a number of healthful components including magnesium, fiber, L-arginine, antioxidants and unsaturated fatty acids such as α-linolenic acid. Researchers have not yet determined which of these components, or if the combination of all of them, may offer protection against inflammation, but Bao and her colleagues are interested in exploring this further through clinical trials that would regulate and monitor diet. “Much remains unknown about how our diet influences inflammation and, in turn, our risk of disease,” said Bao. “But our study supports an overall healthful role for nuts in the diet and suggests reducing inflammation as a potential mechanism that may help explain the benefits of nuts on cardiometabolic diseases.” Blueberry extract could help fight gum disease and reduce antibiotic use Laval University (Quebec), September 2, 2022 Gum disease is a common condition among adults that occurs when bacteria form biofilms or plaques on teeth, and consequently the gums become inflamed. Some severe cases, called periodontitis, call for antibiotics. But now scientists have discovered that wild blueberry extract could help prevent dental plaque formation. Their report in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry could lead to a new therapy for periodontitis and a reduced need for antibiotics. Many people have had some degree of gum inflammation, or gingivitis, caused by dental plaque. The gums get red and swollen, and they bleed easily. If left unchecked, the condition can progress to periodontitis. The plaque hardens into tartar, and the infection can spread below the gum line and destroy the tissue supporting the teeth. To treat this condition, dentists scrape off the tartar and sometimes have to resort to conventional antibiotics. But recently, researchers have started looking at natural antibacterial compounds to treat gum disease. Daniel Grenier and colleagues wanted to see if blueberry polyphenols, which work against foodborne pathogens, could also help fight Fusobacterium nucleatum, one of the main species of bacteria associated with periodontitis. In the lab, the researchers tested extracts from the wild lowbush blueberry, Vaccinium angustifolium Ait., against F. nucleatum. The polyphenol-rich extracts successfully inhibited the growth of F. nucleatum, as well as its ability to form biofilms. It also blocked a molecular pathway involved in inflammation, a key part of gum disease. The researchers say they're developing an oral device that could slowly release the extract after deep cleaning to help treat periodontitis. Meat consumption contributing to global obesity University of Adelaide, August 11, 2022 Should we be warning consumers about over-consumption of meat as well as sugar? That's the question being raised by a team of researchers from the University of Adelaide, who say meat in the modern diet offers surplus energy, and is contributing to the prevalence of global obesity. “Our findings are likely to be controversial because they suggest that meat contributes to obesity prevalence worldwide at the same extent as sugar,” says Professor Maciej Henneberg. “In the analysis of obesity prevalence across 170 countries, we have found that sugar availability in a nation explains 50% of obesity variation while meat availability another 50%. After correcting for differences in nations' wealth (Gross Domestic Product), calorie consumption, levels of urbanization and of physical inactivity, which are all major contributors to obesity, sugar availability remained an important factor, contributing independently 13%, while meat contributed another 13% to obesity. “While we believe it's important that the public should be alert to the over-consumption of sugar and some fats in their diets, based on our findings we believe meat protein in the human diet is also making a significant contribution to obesity,” Professor Henneberg says. “There is a dogma that fats and carbohydrates, especially fats, are the major factors contributing to obesity,” Mr You says. “Whether we like it or not, fats and carbohydrates in modern diets are supplying enough energy to meet our daily needs. Because meat protein is digested later than fats and carbohydrates, this makes the energy we receive from protein a surplus, which is then converted and stored as fat in the human body.” “Nevertheless, it is important that we show the contribution meat protein is making to obesity so that we can better understand what is happening. In the modern world in which we live, in order to curb obesity it may make sense for dietary guidelines to advise eating less meat, as well as eating less sugar,” he says. Study suggests possible link between artificial sweeteners and heart disease French National Institute for Health and Medical Research, September 7, 2022 A large study of French adults published by The BMJ today suggests a potential direct association between higher artificial sweetener consumption and increased cardiovascular disease risk, including heart attack and stroke. The findings indicate that these food additives, consumed daily by millions of people and present in thousands of foods and drinks, should not be considered a healthy and safe alternative to sugar, in line with the current position of several health agencies. Artificial sweeteners are widely used as no- or low-calorie alternatives to sugar. They represent a $7.2 billion (£5900m; €7000m) global market and are found in thousands of products worldwide, particularly ultra-processed foods such as artificially sweetened drinks, some snacks, and low calorie ready meals. Several studies have linked consumption of artificial sweeteners or artificially sweetened beverages (ASB) to weight gain, high blood pressure, and inflammation. To investigate this further, a team of researchers at the French National Institute for Health and Medical Research (Inserm) and colleagues drew on data for 103,388 participants (average age 42 years; 80% female) of the web-based NutriNet-Santé study, launched in France in 2009 to investigate relations between nutrition and health. Dietary intakes and consumption of artificial sweeteners were assessed by repeated 24-hour dietary records and a range of potentially influential health, lifestyle, and sociodemographic factors were taken into account. A total of 37% of participants consumed artificial sweeteners, with an average intake of 42.46 mg/day, which corresponds to approximately one individual packet of table top sweetener or 100 mL of diet soda. The researchers found that total artificial sweetener intake was associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (absolute rate 346 per 100,000 person years in higher consumers and 314 per 100,000 person years in non-consumers). Artificial sweeteners were more particularly associated with cerebrovascular disease risk (absolute rates 195 and 150 per 100,000 person-years in higher and non-consumers, respectively). Aspartame intake was associated with increased risk of cerebrovascular events (186 and 151 per 100,000 person-years in higher and non-consumers, respectively), while acesulfame potassium and sucralose were associated with increased coronary heart disease risk (acesulfame potassium: 167 and 164 per 100,000 person-years; sucralose: 271 and 161 per 100,000 person-years in higher and non-consumers, respectively). Your soap and toothpaste could be messing with your microbiome University of Chicago, September 2, 2022 Antimicrobial chemicals found in common household products could be wreaking havoc with people's guts, according to a research paper out this week in the journal Science. Triclosan is an antibacterial compound used in soaps, detergent and toothpaste, as well as toys and plastics. It was originally only used in hospitals, but it found its way into homes as Americans became more germ-phobic. (However, recent studies have found it no more effective at killing bacteria than plain soap. ) Now, there are growing concerns about the possible negative effects of the chemical on human health and the environment. According to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), animal studies have shown that the chemical can act as a hormone disruptor. A 2008 study found traces of triclosan in the urine of 75% of the participants – some as young as six. The chemical has also been found in more than half of freshwater streams in the US. Disturbing the human microbiome has been “linked to a wide array of diseases and metabolic disorders, including obesity, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and behavioral and metabolic disorders,” wrote the paper's authors, Alyson L Yee and Jack A Gilbert. Yee and Gilbert also suggested that exposure to triclosan could be even more detrimental to the health of developing fetuses and newborns than to adults. A 2014 New York University study found that gut disruptions in early infancy could have lasting negative effects on immune and brain development. Triclosan could also be contributing to antibiotic resistance, which scientists believe is caused by the overuse of antimicrobials in humans and animals. There are partial bans of the chemical in the European Union and in Minnesota, and the FDA says it will continue reviewing the chemical for its safety. Exposure to phthalates could be linked to pregnancy loss Peking University, September 2, 2022 A new study of more than 300 women suggests that exposure to certain phthalates — substances commonly used in food packaging, personal-care and other everyday products — could be associated with miscarriage, mostly between 5 and 13 weeks of pregnancy. The research, appearing in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology, is the first epidemiological study on non-work-related exposure to phthalates to provide evidence for the possible link among a general population. Out of concern over the potential health effects of phthalates, the U.S. has banned six of these substances from use in certain products made for young children. But many are still included as ingredients in paints, medical tubes, vinyl flooring, soaps, shampoos and other items. Research on phthalates has shown that long-term exposure to low levels of some of these compounds harms lab animals' health and can increase their risk for pregnancy loss. Additionally, at least one study found that female factory workers exposed to high levels of phthalates through their work were at a higher risk for miscarriage. But there is little epidemiological evidence of phthalates' effects on pregnancy among women with non-occupational exposure. Jianying Hu, Huan Shen and colleagues wanted to find out if there might be a link. The researchers tested urine samples from 132 women who had miscarriages and 172 healthy pregnant women in China. They found pregnancy loss was associated with higher levels of urinary phthalate metabolites from diethyl phthalate (DEP), di-isobutyl phthalate (DiBP) and di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP). Although this doesn't prove that phthalates cause pregnancy loss, the study suggests an association exists that the researchers say should be studied further.

Curious Women
026 An Functional Medicine Approach to Hashimoto's and Hypothyroidism with Dr. E

Curious Women

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 57:30


Dr E is a firecracker, comedian and potential future mayor of Staten Island (just ask her). She truly is one of a kind in what she does and she does it with such intention and focus. She is more fierce than fluff and here to talk to Kylie & Meg today about her functional approach to Hashimoto's Thyroiditis. Dr. Efrat LaMandre, PHD owns and operates her own Medical practice, EG Healthcare, which provides pediatric, adult and geriatric care to over 20K patients. In addition to her primary care practice, she has taken conventional medicine to the next level with her signature process The Knew Method. Dr. E is co-chair of the Staten Island Hospital Board of Trustees. She at also serves as the President of the Nurse Practitioner Association State Board. In addition, she is Clinical Faculty at Wagner College. She is also the Primary Care Provider for the City University New York, College of Staten Island Athletic Department. Efrat owns a Medical Scribe company, HawkScribes, that allows providers fo focus on their patients instead of charting. Dr. E is also a public speaker and offers consulting services to other nurse practitioners who are opening up their own practices. You can connect with Dr E and her team on TikTok, YouTube and IG @theknewmethod , check our her website www.theknewmethod.com or grab a copy of her book The Knew Method! TLDL takeaways/action steps: 1) So many people are unwell but not sick. There's no room in conventional medicine for those who are unwell but NOT sick OR those who are both unwell and sick but want alternatives to medication 2) Hashimoto's: your body attacks your thyroid, stops reducing thyroid hormone (T4). From a functional perspective, Hashimoto's is due to leaky gut (Dr E specifies gluten consumption here too). It starts with a source of inflammation which can be gluten sensitivity, toxins, mold, etc. The exposure is usually never addressed and eventually the body starts producing antibodies against the thyroid 3) Typical Hashimoto's patient: cold all the time, trouble losing weight, tired, family thyroid issues, hair thinning, fatigue. This patient may be symptomatic for YEARS before a diagnosable "illness" is actually diagnosed 4) Typically conventional doctors only do TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) test. You can ask your provider for the antibody test if you actually want to do something about it (if positive). 5) It starts with a source of inflammation which can be gluten sensitivity, toxins, mold, etc. The exposure is usually never addressed and eventually the body 6) If you're not feeling WELL - "I don't feel good ITIS", as Dr E puts it: STEP 1: Get the full conventional workup done- you want to know 100% that there is no pathology STEP 2: "Clean up" your diet/heal gut i.) Dr E's definition of a "clean"diet is an intense (but brief!) elimination period; no gluten/dairy/grains or legumes for 30 days. Then reintroduce "intensely" ii) She also mentions using short chain fatty acids, pre/probiotics when appropriate and usually after the reintroduction phase iii) Dr E encourages intermittent fasting, particularly an 18:6 schedule for her autoimmune patients STEP 3: Conventional testing: ferritin, CRP, H pylori, lime disease, check for gingivitis (gum disease); if you are 40+ or have/suspected PCOS hormone panel is helpful too STEP 4: Functional testing: Mold, heavy metals --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/curious-women/support

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 09.01.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 56:58 Very Popular


Vax Whistleblower – Mary Hollen Anna Maria Mihalcea – D-Dimer elevation in the Unvaccinated. A Marker of Shedding? Why You Should Have Faith  Plandemic – Indoctrination    Green tea compound shows promise for treating rheumatoid arthritis Washington State University August 25, 2022 A compound found in green tea could be an effective treatment for rheumatoid arthritis, according to the results of a new study. Green tea being poured into a cup] EGCG – a compound found in green tea – could help treat rheumatoid arthritis, new research suggests. In the journal Arthritis and Rheumatology, researchers from Washington State University (WSU) in Spokane reveal how the compound – called epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) – reduced ankle swelling in a mouse model of the disease. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a disease that affects the joints of the body, most commonly the joints of the hands, feet, wrists, elbows knees and ankles. In RA, the immune system mistakingly attacks the synovial tissues surrounding the joints, causing inflammation, swelling and pain. This can cause damage to the cartilage and bone. Current treatments for RA include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS), corticosteroids and JAK inhibitors. But study leader Salah-uddin Ahmed, of the WSU College of Pharmacy, notes that some of these treatments are expensive, reduce immune system activity and can be unsuitable for long-term use. In their study, Ahmed and colleagues suggest that the compound EGCG may be a promising alternative to current treatments for RA. EGCG targets key signaling protein to reduce RA inflammation EGCG is a chemical compound that belongs to a class of flavanols known as catechins. After giving EGCG to mouse models of RA for 10 days, the team noticed that treatment with the compound led to a significant reduction in ankle swelling. The researchers found that EGCG reduces the activity of TAK1 – a key signaling protein through which pro-inflammatory cytokines transmit their signals to trigger the inflammation and tissue damage found in RA. What is more, the team says that EGCG reduced inflammation in RA without interfering with other cellular functions – unlike some current medications for the disease. According to Ahmed, their study suggests the green tea compound may be highly effective against RA. Antioxidant-rich pomegranate juice may aid blood sugar management for diabetics: Human data Jordan University of Science and Technology, August 20, 2022 Daily consumption of pomegranate juice may help control blood sugar levels in type-2 diabetics, as well as improving the function of beta cells in the pancreas, say data from a human trial. Scientists from the Jordan University of Science and Technology report that pomegranate juice at a dose of 1.5 mL per kg of body weight (or 105 mL for a 70 kg human) was associated with reductions in fasting glucose levels in type-2 diabetics. “Studying the effects of pomegranate consumption (in a juice form) on the reduction of blood glucose levels in type-2 diabetes patients could lead to a dietary approach to control this disease,” they added. “Since there are many herbs and fruits that are easily available and of value in controlling this disease, this study may contribute to a better understanding and improved management of type 2 diabetes by the individual.” To investigate this, they recruited 85 people with type-2 diabetes and assigned them to receive 1.5 mL of the juice per kg of body weight. Blood sugar and insulin levels, and beta cell function were assessed three hours after ingestion. (Beta-cells are found in the pancreas and their primary function is to store and release insulin.) Results showed that pomegranate juice was associated with significantly lower fasting glucose levels (8.5 mmol/L) compared with the control participants (9.44 mmol/L). However, this result was an average for the whole cohort and about 20% of the participants did not experience this benefit. Going with the flow: Study shows canals and rivers help boost your mood King's College London, August 31, 2022 Researchers report that the combination of blue and green space with wildlife, has a greater impact on well-being than spending time in an environment that is characterized by only green space. The researchers used Urban Mind, a smartphone-based app, to collect thousands of real time audits about participants' location and mental well-being. Results from this first of its kind study showed positive associations between visits to canals and rivers and mental well-being, as well as a positive experience for feelings of safety and social inclusion relative to all other types of environments (such as indoors, or outside in an urban environment, or near green spaces). Andrea Mechelli, Professor of Early Intervention in Mental Health, King's College London, said, “Canals and rivers contain not only water but also an abundance of trees and plants, which means their capacity to improve mental well-being is likely to be due to the multiple benefits associated with both green and blue spaces. Canals and rivers also provide homes to a range of wildlife, and we know from other research that there is a positive association between encountering wildlife and mental well-being. Taken collectively, these findings provide an evidence base for what we thought about water and well-being and support the proposal that visits to canals and rivers could become part of social prescribing schemes, playing a role in supporting mental health.” The study found that visiting canals and rivers was associated with a greater improvement in mental well-being, and this relationship was still present when accounting for individual variation due to age, gender, education, ethnicity, and a diagnosis of a mental health condition. People also reported continued improvements in their mental well-being for up to 24 hours after the visit had taken place.”The powerful mix of blue, green and wildlife-rich space shows that although built for industry, repurposed canals are actually amongst our most important places of health and well-being in our towns and cities. Men, people over 65 sleep better when they have access to nature University of Illinois College of Agricultural, August 24, 2022 Men and persons age 65 and older who have access to natural surroundings, whether it's the green space of a nearby park or a sandy beach and an ocean view, report sleeping better, according to a new University of Illinois study published in Preventive Medicine. In the study, Grigsby-Toussaint worked with both U of I researchers and scientists from the New York University School of Medicine. The team used data from the CDC's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, which surveyed 255,171 representative U.S. adults, to learn whether there was an association between self-reported days of insufficient sleep and access to green space. The team also used a USDA index that scores the country's geographical areas for their natural amenities, using hours of sunlight, which is important in regulating a person's circadian rhythm, and temperature. In response to the survey question about sleep quality in the last month, the researchers found that the most common answer was that respondents had slept poorly for less than one week. “Interestingly, though, across the entire sample, individuals reporting 21 to 29 days of insufficient sleep consistently had lower odds of access to green space and natural amenities compared to those reporting less than one week,” she said. For men, the relationship between sleep and exposure to green space was much stronger than for women. And males and females 65 and over found nature to be a potent sleep aid, she added. Grigsby-Toussaint noted that living near green landscapes is associated with higher levels of physical activity and that exercise in turn predicts beneficial sleep patterns. But men appeared to benefit much more from their natural surroundings. The researcher speculated that women may take less advantage of nearby natural settings out of concern for their safety, but she added that more research is needed. New study links ultra-processed foods and colorectal cancer in men Tufts University and Harvard University, August 31 ,2022 For many Americans, the convenience of pre-cooked and instant meals may make it easy to overlook the less-than-ideal nutritional information, but a team led by researchers at Tufts University and Harvard University hope that will change after recently discovering a link between the high consumption of ultra-processed foods and an increased risk of colorectal cancer. In a study published in the BMJ, researchers found that men who consumed high rates of ultra-processed foods were at 29% higher risk for developing colorectal cancer—the third most diagnosed cancer in the United States—than men who consumed much smaller amounts. They did not find the same association in women. “We started out thinking that colorectal cancer could be the cancer most impacted by diet compared to other cancer types,” said Lu Wang, the study's lead author and a postdoctoral fellow at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts. “Processed meats, most of which fall into the category of ultra-processed foods, are a strong risk factor for colorectal cancer. Ultra-processed foods are also high in added sugars and low in fiber, which contribute to weight gain and obesity, and obesity is an established risk factor for colorectal cancer.” The study analyzed responses from over 200,000 participants—159,907 women and 46,341 men—across three large prospective studies which assessed dietary intakeand were conducted over more than 25 years. The analyses revealed differences in the ways that men and women consume ultra-processed foods and the prospective associated cancer risk. Out of the 206,000 participants followed for more than 25 years, the research team documented 1,294 cases of colorectal cancer among men, and 1,922 cases among women. The team found the strongest association between colorectal cancer and ultra-processed foods among men come from the meat, poultry, or fish-based, ready-to-eat products. “These products include some processed meats like sausages, bacon, ham, and fish cakes. This is consistent with our hypothesis,” Wang said. The team also found higher consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, like soda, fruit-based beverages, and sugary milk-based beverages, is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer in men. However, not all ultra-processed foods are equally harmful with regard to colorectal cancer risk. “We found an inverse association between ultra-processed dairy foods like yogurt and colorectal cancer risk among women,” said co-senior author Fang Fang Zhang, a cancer epidemiologist and interim chair of the Division of Nutrition Epidemiology and Data Science at the Friedman School. Overall, there was not a link between ultra-processed food consumption and colorectal cancer risk among women. It's possible that the composition of the ultra-processed foods consumed by women could be different than that from men. “Foods like yogurt can potentially counteract the harmful impacts of other types of ultra-processed foods in women,” Zhang said. 8 Benefits of Pine Bark Extract for Your Brain GreenMedInfo, August 31, 2022 Our brains can be harmed by many factors such as disease, stress from the environment, physical injuries or natural aging but pine bark extract may be one key to a healthier brain Pine bark extract (PE), trade name Pycnogenol (pronounced “pig-nah-gen-all”), has many beneficial properties such as being anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and neuroprotective. It can help with memory, cognition, inattention, hyperactivity, mood, thinking and various symptoms of brain injuries, aging and neurological diseases. Fights Inflammation and Protects the Brain In a systematic review and meta-analysis of Pycnogenol supplementation on C-reactive protein (CRP) — a marker of oxidative stress — researchers examined five trials including 324 participants. Pycnogenol supplementation had a significant effect in reducing CRP and demonstrated a strong anti-inflammatory effect.[i] In a study of gerbils, pine bark extract was administered at 100 milligrams (mg) per kilogram (kg) once a day for seven days before the brain was submitted to a brain ischemic injury. The PE treatment markedly inhibited the death of neurons in the brain, significantly decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines — interleukin 1β and tumor necrosis factor α — and showed a strong activation effect on anti-inflammatory cytokines of interleukin 4 (IL-4) and interleukin 13 (IL-13). Pine bark protected the brain and decreased inflammation.[ii] Improves Attention, Memory, Executive Functions and Mood in Healthy People In a study over eight weeks, Pycnogenol supplementation improved sustained attention, memory, executive functions and mood ratings in 53 healthy students compared to an equivalent control group.[iii] In a trial of 60 healthy professionals from 35 to 55 years old, half of the participants supplemented with Pycnogenol of 50 mg three times a day for 12 weeks in combination with a controlled health plan — regular sleep, balanced meals and daily exercise — and the other half followed only the health plan as the control group. PE significantly improved mood by 16%, mental performance by 9%, attention by 13% and memory by 4%, and reduced oxidative stress by 30%, outperforming all results of the control group.[iv] Prevents Brain Aging and Cognitive Decline Brain aging is a complex process involving changes in the brain's structure, neuron activity and biochemical profile that has been linked to age-associated variations in cognitive function. Increased oxidative stress may also be an important factor related to reduced cognition in older people. In a systematic review of over 100 research trials and animal studies, the antioxidant Pycnogenol significantly improved cognitive function after chronic administration.[v] Improves Cognition and Stress in the Mildly Impaired or Highly Oxidative Stressed Eighty-seven healthy subjects with mild cognitive impairment scores were included in a trial with one group given standard management (SM) and the other half given Pycnogenol supplements for two months. The median increase in mild impairment scores was 18% with Pycnogenol compared to 2.48% in the SM group, largely due to its effects on oxidative stress levels.[vi] In a study of 88 healthy patients ages 55 to 70 who had high oxidative stress, half were supplemented with 100 mg per day of Pycnogenol for 12 months and the other half were the control group followed as a reference point for a year. Those in the pine bark group had significantly improved cognitive function scores, attention and mental performance and lowered oxidative stress levels compared to those in the reference group.[vii] Increases Cognitive Function and Helps Symptoms in Parkinson's Disease Researchers studied 43 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients who had been diagnosed at least one year before the trial. The condition was considered “mild,” with minimal progression. The standard management (SM) for PD — carbidopa/levodopa — was used in a similar-sized reference group of PD subjects for comparison purposes. The trial subjects were supplemented with Pycnogenol of 150 mg per day along with SM for a period of four weeks. Cognitive function was significantly higher with the Pycnogenol group. Target symptoms including tremors, rigidity, bradykinesia — slow or impaired movements in limbs — and speech were improved in the PE group compared to the control group. Oxidative stress was also significantly lower in the pine bark group at four weeks.[viii] Enhances Memory and Prevents Harmful Plaque and Tau Buildup in Alzheimer's Disease In Alzheimer's disease (AD), the release of amyloid-beta (Aβ) is a marker. Aβ aggregates into oligomers, then plaques, which induce inflammatory responses, synapse loss and misfolding of tau, a second hallmark of AD. Accumulation of tau misfolding leads to tangles in the brain and neuron cell death impacting brain synapses in a pattern of progression closely related to cognitive decline, which can happen years before memory loss symptoms even appear.[ix] Pycnogenol significantly decreased the number of plaques in both pre-onset and post-onset treatment paradigms and improved spatial memory in the pre-onset treatment only in an AD-induced mouse model.[x] In an in vitro study of AD-induced animals, pine bark — Oligopin — prevented and halted the progression of AD preclinically by inhibiting oligomer formation of not only Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42, but also tau in vitro.[xi] Reduces Inflammation and Improves Outcomes for Traumatic Brain Injuries In a scientific trial of 67 traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU), the intervention group received 150 mg of the PE supplement Oligopin with enteral nutrition — tube feeding through stomach or intestine — for 10 days while the control group received a placebo.[xii] Pine bark supplementation significantly decreased inflammatory biomarkers of IL-6, IL-1β and CRP compared to the control group after 10 days. In addition, pine bark reduced clinical scores for acute physiology and chronic health evaluation as well as sequential organ failure. The Nutric score — a way to measure if a patient is under-nourished and at critical risk of dying[xiii] — was reduced compared to the control group as well. Overall, the survival rate was 15% higher in the pine bark group compared to the placebo group. PE supplementation for TBI patients in ICUs reduced inflammation, improved their clinical status and malnutrition score and, thereby, reduced their mortality rate. Improves Attention, Focus, Thinking, Behavior and Antioxidant Levels in ADHD Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impulsivity, distractibility and hyperactivity. One of the factors associated with ADHD is oxidative stress. Pycnogenol consists of bioflavonoids, catechins, procyanidins and phenolic acids.[xiv] Pycnogenol acts as a powerful antioxidant stimulating certain enzymes, like superoxide dismutase (SOD) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), which can defend against oxidative stress. In the pathophysiology of ADHD, damage to adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine metabolism occurs in the brain. These changes can modify attention, thinking and acting.[xv] In a trial of 43 children ages 6 to 14 with ADHD, patients were administered Pycnogenol — 1 mg per kg of body weight every day — or a placebo of look-alike pills daily for a month. The PE group had a significant decrease in GSSG and a highly significant increase in GSH levels as well as improvement of GSH/GSSG ratio in comparison to the placebo group. The total antioxidant status (TAS) decreased in children with ADHD who took pine bark, showing a normalization of TAS in ADHD children.[xvii] In a crossover study of 20 children with ADHD, participants experienced two experimental units — four weeks of pine bark supplementation with 25 or 50 mg PE and four weeks with placebo supplementation — separated by two weeks of a washout period. PE supplementation caused a significant reduction in inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity measures.

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 08.25.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 61:25


Videos: 2. Mark Steyn questions why young healthy people are dying across the UK   Tea, flavonoid intake associated with lower fracture risk University of Western Australia, August 14 2022 An article published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition adds more evidence to a protective effect for tea drinking against the development of osteoporotic fractures in women. The study included 1,188 women over the age of 75 years enrolled in the Calcium Intake Fracture Outcome Study, which evaluated the effect of calcium supplementation in the prevention of osteoporosis. Tea intake was assessed at the beginning of the study and at two and five years. The subjects were followed for ten years, during which 288 women developed an osteoporotic fracture, including 212 major fractures and 129 hip fractures. Among women whose intake of tea was three cups or higher per day, there was a 30% decrease in the risk of any osteoporotic fracture in comparison with those whose intake was a cup or less per week. Subjects whose flavonoid intake from tea and foods was among the highest one-third of subjects had risks of osteoporotic fracture, major osteoporotic fracture and hip fracture that were 35%, 34% and 42% lower than those whose intake was among the lowest third. When individual flavonoids were analyzed, higher consumption of flavonols, flavan-3-ols and flavones was significantly associated with a protective effect against osteoporotic fracture risk. “The current study found that flavonoid intake was associated with a reduced risk of hip, major, and all osteoporotic fractures in elderly women,” write authors Gael Myers and colleagues. “The major flavonoids found in tea, flavan-3-ols, and flavonols were also associated with a reduced fracture risk, providing evidence for the role of tea flavonoids in promoting bone health.” Skipping breakfast may increase chance of kids and teens developing psychosocial health problems University of Castilla-La Mancha (Spain), August 23, 2022 Young people who eat healthy breakfasts at home have better psychosocial health, shows a recent study in Frontiers in Nutrition. While previous research has reported the important role of a nutritious breakfast, this is the first study to look at the reported effects of whether kids eat breakfast, as well as where and what they eat. These results provide valuable insights and recommendations for parents and their children. “Our results suggest that it is not only important to eat breakfast, but it's also important where young people eat breakfast and what they eat,” said first author Dr. José Francisco López-Gil of the University of Castilla-La Mancha in Cuenca, Spain. “Skipping breakfast or eating breakfast away from home is associated with increased likelihood of psychosocial behavioral problems in children and adolescents. Similarly, consumption of certain foods/drinks are associated with higher (eg, processed meat) or lower (eg, dairies, cereals) odds of psychosocial behavioral problems.” Among the most important results, López-Gil and the team found that eating breakfast away from home was nearly as detrimental as skipping the meal entirely. The authors suggest that this may be because meals away from home are frequently less nutritious than those prepared at home. The results also showed that coffee, milk, tea, chocolate, cocoa, yogurt, bread, toast, cereals, and pastries were all associated with lower chances of behavioral problems. Surprisingly, eggs, cheese, and ham were linked with higher risks of such issues. Amla Tea in Hospitalized Patients With COVID-19 Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences (Iran), August 14, 2022 Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate whether the addition of Phyllanthus emblica (amla) tea to standard protocols affects lung function, symptomology, and length of hospital stay in a population of hospitalized patients with Covid-19 While amla tea did not reduce the severity of lung involvement nor significantly affect the reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) results, it did lessen severity of symptomology and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Duration of hospital stay was significantly shorterin those taking amla versus placebo. First-line therapy for all patients consisted of hydroxychloroquine tablets (200 mg) and lopinavir/ritonavir (Kaletra) every 12 hours after meals for 7 to 14 days. Phyllanthus emblica (Linn), Euphorbiaceae, known as Indian gooseberry or amla or Emblica officinalis, 2 grams of powder in a sachet for 10 days was the intervention, and the placebo was starch, 2 grams of powder daily for 10 days. Both treatments were taken as 100 mL tea every 12 hours. Hospital nurses administered the treatments every 12 hours for 10 days, and the study team tracked the patients with daily phone calls. Key Findings Lymphocytes decreased significantly in the intervention group but increased significantly in the control group (P=0.001). There was no significant difference in hemoglobin, polymorphonuclear (PMN) count, platelets, or erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) between the intervention versus placebo groups. CRP was significantly less in the intervention group versus the control (P=0.004). Fever decreased in both groups, with a significantly greater reduction in the intervention group (P