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Up Your Creative Genius
Marcy Willard: Why this revolutionary mental health tool promises to unlock your child's potential

Up Your Creative Genius

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 41:14


Marcy Willard is a CEO with a Lean and Agile mindset. A huge source of pride is her team who has a culture of empathy, cross-functional teamwork, and an environment that says loud and clear “we've got your back.” They commit to not only their customer's mental health but also their own. Marcy and her team work hard while also respecting the importance of health, rest and family time. In doing so they bring a fresh and enthusiastic energy to the families they serve. Furthermore, her background as a school psychologist and licensed Psychologist with a PhD in Child, Family, and School Psychology. Believing in the power of offering accessible and reliable mental health expertise to parents and professionals, Dr. Willard's team has a mission to reach a million families with concerns about a child's mental health. Rather than the random walk from professional to professional with no clear guidance or direction our tools lead parents and professionals directly to the providers needed to get help right away for their kids. By telling parents 'what's the matter' kids can get off of the waitlist and get on with brighter futures. Timestamp 1:27 How Marcy Willard became who she is today 10:29 Teach your kid a skill; not to avoid consequences 11:14 Marcy shares CADE - Children mental health assessment tool 12:44 Marcy shares her process of starting as an entrepreneur 15:21 Listen to your kids and let them know it's alright 18:09 How did Marcy face her challenges? 21:27 Make a plan for the future you 26:31 Marcy's vision in the near future 33:00 Marcy shares tips about pivoting businesses or family dynamic Social Media Linkedin https://www.linkedin.com/in/marcy-willard-ph-d-ncsp-35a97692/ Website https://clearchildpsychology.com/ CADE https://clearchildpsychology.com/cade/ Follow Patti Dobrowolski - Instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/upyourcreativegenius/ Follow Patti Dobrowolski - Linkedinhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/patti-dobrowolski-532368/ Up Your Creative Geniushttps://www.upyourcreativegenius.com/ Patti Dobrowolski 00:03 Hello superstars. Welcome to the Up Your Creative Genius podcast where you will gain insight and tips to stomp on the accelerator and blast off to transform your business and your life. I'm your host, Patti Dobrowolski. And if this is your first time tuning in, then strap in because this is serious rocket fuel. Each week I interview fellow creative geniuses to help you learn how easy it is to up your creative genius in any part of your life. Hey, everybody, it's Patti Dobrowolski, as you know, and here we are. Today, my guest is Marcy Willard. Dr. Marcy Willard, let's get it right. She's a licenced psychologist. She's a tech entrepreneur. She's a nationally certified school psychologist and author of assessment of autism spectrum disorder. And that's a clinical book. So get that right today, I would download it and get it. But you are the founder of clear child psychology, which I think you're committed to making child psychology accessible to everyone. And I love that about you. And you are so amazing the things that you're doing. I am so happy to have you. Thank you for being here. Marcy Willard 01:22 Wonderful. Thank you for having me, Patti. I am. So looking forward to this. Patti Dobrowolski 01:27 I know, you know, we just met. So for those listeners, we just met randomly through a mutual friend. And we were like, Oh, my God, like this was the best conversation. And immediately I said, you have to be on the podcast. Because the things that you're doing Marcy are just so they're really game changing for parents of kids who have neurodiversity. And if you're a parent listening out there, or you know, someone who has a child with neurodiversity really want to tune in to this, because you're going to get an understanding for the things in the complexity of that. And so you understand. And Marcy, I hope you'll talk about this at some point. This is normal, you know, we think that kids are supposed to be treated in a certain way, and that you treat the special kids in a certain way. But everybody's special now. So people have to realise that change. So tell us tell us, Marcy, a little bit about you. So people can get to know you a little bit. Tell them about yourself. How'd you get here? Marcy Willard 02:29 Cool, right? Well, wonderful, Patti. I'm so excited to do this. So in terms of how I arrived here, and a little bit about me, I was a software salesperson, well over two decades ago, that's scary to say putty and had a really good experience. But I had this heart paying to do something to change the world. You can call it a blessing, you can call it a curse, right? But I wanted to make things better. And I was a psychologist working with this person, Dr. Anna Kroncke, who has now become my co founder. And we decided that something had to change and Child Mental Health. And I'll tell you why. Okay, we were on this mission to help these kids. And we were doing assessments. So we primarily did diagnostic assessment for children. Right. So paediatric diagnostic assessment, and we would have these parents come in, and we would tell them, hey, here's what's going on. You've got a great kid. Here's some of their amazing talents. And here are some of their challenges. And here's what you need to do. And here's some recommendations to get you moving forward. And they would look at us every time inevitably and say, Wow, thank you. This is amazing. This is life changing, that we can finally have the path forward. It's like a golden key that unlocks the door to my child's future and potential. And then they would look at us and say, I got one question for you, though. Where were you five years ago? Patti Dobrowolski 04:02 Oh, yeah. Right. Oh, my God. Can't you feel that pain of all those parents? Yeah. Marcy Willard 04:08 So it was just brutal to hear. And sometimes we'd be right down the street Patti. And you'd think, Gosh, this is a mess, right? So these parents that have waited for on average two years to get into get help for their child. And then the help is readily available, but it's just not accessible to people, right? The psychologist know what to do. There's a pretty clear formula for how to help these things. But nobody could find the psychologist. And now it's gotten even more dire. There are even fewer psychologists than there were then. And as you know, there's a mental health crisis on our hands. So you have about 500,000 mental health providers, many of which do not do diagnosis. And then you have 20 plus million families looking for those people. Patti Dobrowolski 04:55 Wow. Yeah, that is incredible. Right? Ah, wow, that said, wow, that's just like over the top. You know, I mean, I worked in mental health. So I understand really, I remember that change, you know, when we started to do HMO and how everything shifted, then I was like, oh, no, this is going to mean, healthcare isn't accessible support for people who have mental health issues isn't going to be accessible anymore? Because nobody's going to pay for it. Marcy Willard 05:25 Yeah. So what is really alarming and pretty unbelievable, is even when families do have the means right to get good help for their child, which is a blessing in itself. They still can't find people to help them. Right? So. Patti Dobrowolski 05:40 If so it doesn't matter. If you have money, or you don't, you can't find help, you can't find help. Wow. So then you and your partner, you stepped in to kind of fill that gap in you? Marcy Willard 05:52 Yeah. So what we did was we decided that we could make this assessment process more of a formula, right? So let's look across all the areas that could be impacted in a child's mental health behaviour or development. Let's put it in a model that makes sense. And let's create an image for each specific symptom, which is what those pictures are behind me. Patti Dobrowolski 06:15 Oh, that's fantastic. I was looking at those like, what are they? I was hoping you're going to talk about, okay, good. Marcy Willard 06:20 So you see the girl with a shell there. That's about auditory processing. So listening and understanding what's coming in through your ears and making sense of it. Right. So right, we made an image like that for every single symptom. And then we wrote an article for every single one. And we put them in that textbook that I had published with Dr. Anna Kroncke and Dr. Helena Huckabee, we've produced this textbook. And what happened there was we were able to say, here's the stuff that needs to be looked at for any kid. Right? Yeah. And then once the kid responds in a certain way, then you're going to dive deeper into certain areas. So it's a dynamic process. Patti Dobrowolski 06:56 Meaning that it's not really like you're going to tell them what to do is that you expect the parent to be engaged or teacher to be engaged in some way with the experience to see what does work. Right. Marcy Willard 07:09 Right. Right. Patti Dobrowolski 07:10 So because I think parents, you know, people, they love to have like a one thing fits all. And that's just not what we're dealing with. Marcy Willard 07:17 Yeah, the magic pill or that. It does not exist. I hate to break it to people. But yeah, yeah, it's a journey. And what we discovered in this process was that families really need ready access to tools that they can use right now. Patti Dobrowolski 07:33 Yeah. Marcy Willard 07:33 And that a lot of the tools that we were all taught as kids or generationally were passed down, really don't work, especially with neurodiverse kids. Patti Dobrowolski 07:43 Oh, give me an example of something like that, that you're talking about. That doesn't work that was passed down? Marcy Willard 07:48 Well, you're ready for one that I'm going to get in trouble for saying. Patti Dobrowolski 07:51 Yeah, of course, because this is Up Your Creative Genius. We're all about getting in trouble. Marcy Willard 07:56 Yes. Right. Right. So consequences. So that's a big one, right? So even, you know, really, very savvy parents are applying consequences to their child based on their behaviour. And it sounds good. It sounds like an idea. Right? So if they do these behaviours, Patti Dobrowolski 08:14 Because then it would be like Skinner box, right? That if you go down and press the lever, then I'm going to give you a pellet, like, AKA your phone back. Marcy Willard 08:23 Right? So what happens with that is, on the one hand, withholding reinforcement is a good thing. So let's say I don't work, I don't get paid. That's rare. Right? Right. If I'm a parent, and I'm essentially paying my kids through whatever means we give away things. Yes. And I withhold that because I'm expecting a certain behaviour to happen. I make it contingent. That works. Because you go, Oh, what do I have to do to get what I want? Oh, I have to do that. Okay. Okay. On the other side, it doesn't work. And this is what we've all been taught. And then when you go to try it, you'll realise that it almost never works. And it's this idea of you did this wrong thing. So I'm going to apply this consequence which kids think all consequences are negative, because parents are always saying, I'm going to give you a consequence. Right? And, and consequences are like, go to your room, get a timeout, get such and such taken away. I'm gonna take all these different privileges, things like that. So what ends up happening is, the kid feels the sense that you're trying to control them, right? Like a puppet. Yes. So they resist that. And then what they do, and this is a great example, another thing I can get in trouble for. So you're driving down the road, and you see a police officer, you know, on the side of the road. So what do you do? Instantly slow down, right? You take your foot off the gas, you slow down, and then the police officer drives away. So what do I do now? Speed it back up, right up. Right? Patti Dobrowolski 09:49 So that's what your kid does, then. Yeah, so um, I get a time out and then I'm gonna go right back to what I did before. Marcy Willard 09:56 So what they do is right, they gotta go. They have a lot of creative ways. To get out of that punishment, yeah, in the moment, the parent feels like they've won that because the child does comply. Right? But what ends up happening is it didn't teach me anything, right. I didn't learn anything. I just learned how to avoid your punishment. Patti Dobrowolski 10:13 Yeah, yeah, that's right, which is not good. Because then you don't ever understand your behaviour, you don't understand what's going to make the world work better for you. So you end up living a life filled with avoiding consequences, which Yeah, no, that's not good. Marcy Willard 10:29 And then what they've learned, and Dan Siegel is a big professor of this and both handle arson, and I talk about Dan Siegel's work all the time. We love it. And he talks about the idea of discipline, the root word of discipline is to teach, right? What am I trying to teach this child to do? Yeah. And so when you're teaching a skill, you would never just have I rip out the rug from under you, and then see if you're right, that's right. Right, you would go, let's partner on this. Let's mentor on this. Let's talk about creative ways we can address this. Yeah, it's okay to withhold your behaviours, right to say, I'm not going to pay you for that. We're not going to give you something for that. But to say, I'm going to put all these obstacles in your path is really just it's a game that we're playing with ourselves. Patti Dobrowolski 11:14 Yeah, yeah, no doubt, no doubt. So Marcy, you were in the schools, you saw these issues, and you were working with kids. And you saw these things happen. So you created this assessment that people could use, but talk about how you married your technology? Because this is really the thing that I was so impressed by and interested in, you know, was you created something from that, that made it easier for people to access it anywhere? Marcy Willard 11:44 Yeah, so this is from Clear Child Psychology, we created an app called CADE, CADE. And CADE is a method for families to access the kinds of strategies and recommendations they need to help their child. Yeah, and it's immediate. And that was really, really important. Because when parents are under stress, they don't have time to go make an appointment and sit down and have these long discussions with you, even if they can get in. So what we developed was an assessment that parents can do. It's dynamic, like we talked about, like we did in our clinical assessments. So yes, answer a certain set of questions, get recommendations right away for that. And then they can keep going if they have more questions that they want answers to, right. So we provide immediate recommendations in the moment through the app. Patti Dobrowolski 12:35 Yes. Marcy Willard 12:36 And then on top of that, they can upgrade to get live coaching from us, okay, a psychologist or other therapists to guide them on their journey. Patti Dobrowolski 12:44 Oh, that's so fantastic. I know that parents need that. Right now. They're just at a loss about what to do. So this to me is so incredible that you created this. Now, tell me you created then a whole business around this. So you did first the childcare psychology, the Clear Child Psychology, right. But so now the app is happening. And so where are you in the process of that? And now you're really an entrepreneur in the entrepreneur space. Right? So how did you adjust and learn what you needed to do? What did you do in your mindset in order to move and shift into this area where you're just desperate? And did that desperation lead to something tell me about the entrepreneur part of it? Because it's not easy to have a business that's around that? Marcy Willard 13:36 Right, right. Yeah, they say necessity is the mother of invention, right? Yeah, definitely. No doubt. So I knew from the beginning that I wanted our tools to be technology based. Patti Dobrowolski 13:46 Yes. Marcy Willard 13:47 And I also knew that I would never take the human element out of it. Patti Dobrowolski 13:51 Right. Marcy Willard 13:52 Right. So it's been an iterative adjusting process to determine what really is the best way to provide maximum access to the most people. Patti Dobrowolski 14:03 Because you're talking about a diverse audience that's listening with diverse needs. Like every kid is unique, right? Marcy Willard 14:10 And millions, millions of people, right? Patti Dobrowolski 14:12 So it's not did you say 200 million, right? Marcy Willard 14:16 Yeah, how many? 20 million? Patti Dobrowolski 14:18 20 million? Marcy Willard 14:19 Yeah. 20 million. Yeah. So at least 20 million families that are actively seeking help, yet, most of them won't get it. Most kids never get mental health support. So the idea that this is happening, right, kept me up at night and made us go, how can we get this into people's hands faster and more effectively, right. So yeah, everyone. So if it's just me in my office and Anna in her office, right, we can only help so many people. Patti Dobrowolski 14:48 No, you can only help however many patients you can see every week Right? Even that's not the most effective way because you want the parent to be the one who actually is helping the child and then the child helping themselves. You know. Marcy Willard 15:00 That your body is that agency, right? The agency for the parents because your child's best advocate, right? You care more than anybody? Yeah. And so you as the parent, having those tools makes all the difference in the world. So it's one thing for you to come in, get an assessment with a psychologist and you get your big fat report, and you're on your way. Patti Dobrowolski 15:21 Yeah. Marcy Willard 15:21 Right. You don't have that sense of agency yet, right? You need the tools in your own toolbox, so that the next time your child's freaking out at Target, you can say, Okay, I'm gonna help you, right, I know how to help you. Tools. And I'll just give you an example for that. So tantrums are a big when we talk about in our app, and on our website, tantrums, one of the big things that we teach, is to shut your mouth. Yeah, my child is having a tantrum, be quiet. And we all want to just dance around and talk to them and negotiate with them and tell them you can't do that. And that's not right. And let me tell you what you need to do. Let me give you some consequences, right? And the kid just spins up more and more and more. And now you're in the tantrum with them, right? Patti Dobrowolski 16:05 Yeah, exactly. So it's your chance from now. Marcy Willard 16:08 Right? All right. So we teach them to go sit by your child, be present, model your own calm demeanour, show that everything's okay. By the way, you present yourself and sit with them and breathe. And listen. And I'll tell you even working in the schools, nine times out of 10, that kiddo will open up and tell you what it really is. And even if you don't totally agree, you can just show that you get it right. Like, I hear you. You really wanted that. Yeah. And they'll look at you like, oh, you know, Oh, okay. Right. Yeah. So yeah, I'm still mad. Yeah, I'm not nearly as mad because you get it. Right. Yeah. Patti Dobrowolski 16:51 And you're listening to me? Yeah, you're listening to what it's really about. Marcy Willard 16:55 And so then you've taught them something, right? Versus like, I'm just gonna go toe to toe with you. And we're gonna escalate until one of us wins this. Instead of that you go, I'm going to teach you how to calm down when you're upset. And you're going to use this the rest of your life. Yeah. Patti Dobrowolski 17:10 Yeah. Oh, I just love this. This is such a nice way to start the day, in my opinion, you know, with this conversation, because, you know, you watch the parents on the plane, and you watch the parents who are in the grocery store, just freaking out, you think to them? Okay, you know, we're watching, but we're okay with it. You know, I think part of it too, we get so judgy about everybody, Marcy Willard 17:37 Right? Really important for all those parents listening, that if you're in that situation, and you see a parent with a child, that's freaking out, and the parent is doing the best they can, you know, give them a wink or a thumbs up or say, hey, you know, you got this, or, Hey, it's worse sometimes. Right? Yeah. Yeah. Parents are trying as hard as they can. And you know, if your kid is freaking out, there's not much you can do. Right? And it's okay. And it's an illusion to believe that we're in control of our child's behaviour. Right? Patti Dobrowolski 18:09 Okay. So, okay, so I love that that's really tangible for parents to take away now. Okay, so in this process of doing this, and transitioning, you must have hit your own series of roadblocks. So tell me, what did you do when things became challenging for you? What do you do? Marcy Willard 18:30 Yeah, that is a really good point. Patti Dobrowolski 18:32 Because your thing is your baby in a way, and sometimes it does have a tantrum. And so you know, for entrepreneurs that are listening your business is that so? What did you do? How do you help yourself? Marcy Willard 18:45 Yeah, there are a fair amount of tantrums in engineering and in startups, I would say That definitely happens. Yeah, yeah. So the biggest thing that I've learned is a which is going to be right in line with your work is keep your eyes on the prize. Right? So having goals and aspirations is not only important for our kids, but it's important for us, right? So when you know where you're going, a lot of times you can endure those rocky patches, number one, and then number two, the importance of self care. So I really provide the opportunity for that with my team. And I say you need a break, take it rest, you'll come back better, right? You'll be in a better place when you return. So self care. So I take a lot of walks, I have my morning meditation, I have my morning, check in with like, this is my plan for the day. And here's what I'm hoping and intending to do today. And then I check in with myself at the end of the day, and I check off my wins. Hey, yeah, you know, and I caught myself on the back. Hey, nice job, Marcy. Patti Dobrowolski 19:45 There we go. You know, really, you're hitting the success button. So I love that. I mean, normally I ask people, what's your day like? And there you have it, you gave it to us. But I love that what you said was, and I think for those of you that have teams that you're working with, even if it's As a small team, you just have a VA or you're doing courses online, or you've got whatever, what you're talking about is doing a daily check in with them. So that everybody's on the same page. And you know what you're working on? Were you a manager of people before you started your own business or and how did you grow into that? Marcy Willard 20:18 So I was in the business world before, I was not an entrepreneur before. So I didn't have the entrepreneurial background, but I certainly had a lot of business background. And I think the biggest thing that I learned and continuing to learn, as we all are. Patti Dobrowolski 20:36 Did you see her? Oh, if you're not watching, then she kind of looked off to the side, it was like a little in joke with herself about, Okay, we're ready. There you go. Marcy Willard 20:46 This is so it's to be myself, right? Be authentic. And I knew that if I needed those breaks, and those check ins and those, hey, that was rough. Let's all acknowledge that. If I needed those things, my team likely did too. Right? And what did up happening was, we're all mobilised toward this important mission to provide mental health and behavioural health access for children to everyone. Right? Right, every parent, because we were all mobilised towards the same mission, and we have permission to rest, you have the most motivated, energetic team you'll ever see. Patti Dobrowolski 21:27 Yeah, because the goal is really clear. And the need is really clear. I think this is, you know, part of it, when people are building their business or coming up with something they want to do in the world, you have to realise you're filling a need with what it is, it's not just that you want to go do something, you have to do something that fulfils a service for the world in some way. Right? When you marry your passion with service, then you accelerate your ability to expand, and you certainly have so tell people what happened. You know, Marcy did a mapping process. But actually, Marcy made me stop doing what I've done in the past and start doing something new, which is really amazing. For example, I used to always have people draw the current reality, and the desired future reality on the same map. But this year, I'm not doing it that way anymore, because I learned something from you. And so tell them what you did with your map and what happened? Marcy Willard 22:31 Yeah, so I do think that Up Your Creative Genius is genius. And I had such a good experience with it that I am delighted to be on your podcast. So what I did, Patti was I drew two pages, one with my current state and one with my future state. Patti Dobrowolski 22:51 Yeah. Marcy Willard 22:52 And I drew myself in the picture, which I learned was a really important aspect of this. Right, right. Putting yourself in the mindset of both places, right, my current reality and my future reality. And I drew them in black and white, and then I would put it away, right, I reflected on it. I got excited. I think I shouldn't say that first, before I put it away. I was really excited about it. So I went about this as a creative, enjoyable process. I'm not an artist, anybody listening to this, it's going to crack up. Patti Dobrowolski 23:27 That's right. And it doesn't matter. It's better if you draw stick figures, in fact, so okay, I love that. That's what the research shows you remember it better? Marcy Willard 23:34 Okay, great. I started drawing. And I just thought, well, wouldn't that be neat? And it led to Oh, and another thing I want to try. And another thing I want to do, so I start drawing that. And then on the current state, I say like, Okay, here's where I am right now. And what ended up happening was, after I put it away, things started to happen. And I would go back and colour in the picture. And then I would go, wow, like this is literally coming to life. Right? So the image that I had for my future self and my future vision was coming true and is coming true. And what I realised was a huge key that unlocked that was this getting in the creative process? It's one thing to set goals, and I am definitely for that. But goals are different than setting a vision, right? So you have goals, and those are important. You set your timeline, you say this is the thing I want to do by x date. But more than that, is that emotional charge that you get right from saying, wouldn't that be neat? Right? Patti Dobrowolski 24:35 Wouldn't that be incredible? Like that's what I say, you know, do the courageous, outrageous, so that you really put on your picture these outrageous things that you think wow, I mean, like that would be so cool if that happened. And I tell them what's one cool thing that happened that you had on your map that you didn't expect to I need to tell you which one this was about the trophy? Marcy Willard 24:59 Oh, the trophy Let me tell you about the trophy. So this is somewhat hilarious because I wanted to represent the idea had this big conference coming up, that I was going to be presenting it. And in the conference, the prize winner is the startup of the year. Right. So I wanted to be that. And I wanted the conference to go really well. So in order to have a picture of it, I drew a picture of a trophy, right? Yes, one trophy, I knew what it meant. I knew that if I get that, that means that I won the startup of the year, right. So I was really excited about that. So I drew this. And then time goes by we do the contest. I did not win for my company for startup of the year. But we did win for this People's Choice Award, which was another really cool opportunity, or People's Choice in the category that we're in. So in the Health Tech category. So when we won that, of course, excited and we're all celebrating, and time goes by right Patti. So I'm excited. That's all good. We celebrate, we move on. So months go by, and I get this package in the mail. And it said something about trophy on the outside. And I literally left it sitting in the kitchen, because I thought it was somebody else's trophy. Right. And my husband like I don't know. So I go and I open it up. And it's a trophy. Actually, I haven't here here, I'll grab it right here. Patti Dobrowolski 26:19 Yeah. So if you're watching, she's going to grab her trophy for Entrepreneur of the Year. And it's got a microphone. It's so amazing. Marcy Willard 26:27 Yeah, it is so great. That is so cool. So my trophy. Patti Dobrowolski 26:31 Yeah, love it. So, you know, this is I think what you're talking about is so essential, because we get caught in the day to day minutia of the things that we want to achieve. And so we do set these goals of things we want to accomplish in the day, in the week, in the month in the year. These are what we're talking about in terms of goals. And I think having action plans and getting things done. And the essential part that Marcy talked about is acknowledging at the end of the day, what you have done that day, so that you hit that success button. So your brain goes, Yeah, we're going to do more of that tomorrow, right. And that's really what you're trying to do. That's the rat in the skinner box with yourself is that you are pressing the success button which sends dopamine and then you sleep well and then you feel good. And then you wake up the next day, energised to get back to work on these actions, steps that move you further and further towards that bigger vision. But they are gold getting what I call gold getting. But the thing that you talked about was this, which was when you are dreaming the vision part. It's essential for it to be creative. And the way that you described it was you said it was then I thought of this when that'd be cool. And then within this, what if that happened, and then that like that. And so it was an organic process, it builds on itself. And if you allow it to be creative, organic and expansive, you step into the future. You never knew about you never imagined. Right that that to me is who you are. To me. You are that expansive self who, you know, was able to get enormous funding. Did people just threw money at you to get that app? Because the need, let me just say the need is so high. We're talking about 20 million parents with kids that have issues, right? Yes, yes. Yeah. So that's just incredible. Now, when you think about your vision, now, what's your bigger vision than when you imagine it? Marcy Willard 28:40 Yeah. So for myself, you mean? Patti Dobrowolski 28:43 Yes. And whatever you want to share? Marcy Willard 28:45 Yeah. So my bigger vision for the business is to make mental and behavioural health access available to everyone, right? So when we set out on this vision in the first place, we said, we're going to have 1 million kids. And we wrote 1 million kids over everything. We have 1 million kids plastered all over the place. And we still are going to do that. And it grew, right. So the more people that I realised are really struggling like this, a million is not enough. So we really need to go. Patti Dobrowolski 29:16 20 Millions 20 Millions what we're going for now. Marcy Willard 29:19 Yeah, yeah, we're going for 20 million. Right. So having that as our Northstar, our guiding light is huge, right? And then there's also this empathy and this accessibility piece, that it's not just that I want to help these families, because of course I do. I also want to make it a collaborative and accessible process where people are on the same page, and we're in a peer to peer collaboration, right on how to get their kid moving forward in the family moving forward. A lot of times when I say our family moving forward, a lot of times your child might not change that much. Patti Dobrowolski 29:55 Yeah. Marcy Willard 29:56 But you changed, right, right. Because now you get it. You can say You know, he doesn't have that skill yet. I'm gonna stop beating myself up and getting on his case about this thing that, you know, he just doesn't have that yet. Right? Yeah. So you're in a better place. And guess what all the tension in the house comes down, right? Yeah, no, when you go, Oh, I know what to do. It doesn't mean it's gonna be perfect, it doesn't mean it's gonna be easy. It's just means that I know what to do. And so my tensions lower, and I'm not putting the attention on my child, we say that it's, you know, very contagious when you're anxious, it goes to your child, right? So we know that we can help them with that way. That's a big thing for the business. And it's huge, right? Patti Dobrowolski 30:35 Yeah. Yeah, I love this. And I was thinking, you know, that's really the changing the homeostasis of everything, right? That we used to run, or I used to run these couples therapy experiences in Oakland when I was just getting certified right as a drama therapist, and finishing my degree, but I was with a clinical psychologist who had been doing couples therapy for years. So I got to create interactive experiences with her practice. But one of the things that she taught me was really about the face to face of the dynamic. And I practice the things that I learned there every single day, which is, when I want something to shift, I need to turn away from it, stop pushing for it to happen and turn away and allow the space for the change to occur. And that involves me changing me always, it's always about me, you changing yourself, and then it changes the dynamic. And then everything is different. But the main thing is, when you're holding firm and tight, it's the same with your business, you hold firm and tight to things that you want them a certain way, they get to look a certain way, the things on the right side of the picture in the desired future have to look a certain way. No, that's not how the world works, the world works by openness, the door opens in really, and once you let the door open, then you get inside. And I just think you're so incredible doing that. And I'm sure parents that are listening or with kids dealing with this, or if you know anybody in your neighbourhood you just got to go give them a thumbs up is what I have to say because you have no idea the level of stress that they've been dealing with. Because if you love your kids, you can imagine they love their kids just as much if not more, and they're doing everything they can to create a safe space for their child. And I like this, because there's so much downstream benefit for this, you know, we just see these pockets of kids that are just getting left behind and what you're left behind, then you don't have a choice, but you just go and do the wrong thing. And then you end up in a cycle of that, because at least you've gotten rewarded somewhere. Right? And so I think part of it is that if you can help early on to create a space for people to be who they are, right? And that's the authenticity to that you're talking about, even in your own experience of your life. When you think about, you know, a lot of our listeners really tune in because they want to learn something new of course, yeah. And also, but they are interested in pivoting. So what would you say, you know, are some things for people who need to shift and pivot in their business or their family dynamic? Or what tips would you give them? Marcy Willard 33:21 Yeah, so one of the biggest things that this is more for your own personal success in life, not necessarily for your parenting, I love that. One of the things that I would say is that I've learned and it's been so powerful for me, that the things that you're afraid to do, or the things that you must do. And the reason you're afraid is because that's the direction that your life needs to evolve. And so what I ended up doing that has been extremely transformative for me is, every morning before 9am, I list off what I call my power moves, which are the things that are moving me forward, that there's some reason why they just keep not happening, right? So they just don't make the list every day. Well, the reason that I make the list is I'm afraid to do that for whatever reason. Right? Patti Dobrowolski 34:11 Right. Like you think you don't know enough or you think it'll take too much time, or you're going to have to call somebody that you don't know. Right? Marcy Willard 34:19 Right. So we're all imposters, right? It's sometimes in our lives. Oh, if they only knew, right? And so you avoid those interactions. And so what I've learned to do is just kind of Benjamin Hardy talks about the Brian Tracy book, Eat That Frog, right? If you have to do two frogs eat the ugliest one first. If you have to eat frog, eat it first thing in the morning, right? So I do that. So I sit down, I write down what I want to accomplish. And the ones that are really the scary ones. I just make sure I do at least one first thing in the morning. And on a really good day. I do three, right. Patti Dobrowolski 34:54 Oh, that's so great, right? Marcy Willard 34:57 Yeah, 9am and I've had three wins, right? I can say, Yeah, I sent that email. I made that call. I wrote that thing. Right. I wrote a first draft you I wrote my crappy first draft of that thing that I don't want to write. Right. Yeah. And then what happens is those moves build momentum. Right? So along the investment line, one of the things that is hard as, of course, for everyone to go ask for money, right? That's what I'm doing. That's what you do when you're seeking investment. And so I would start that, right, I would say, you know, what, I'm gonna reach out to that person, they seem interested. And this might be a great opportunity for them. So let me reach out. So do that. And then what happens? They reach back, right? Then you have a great conversation, and you tell them what you're doing. And they say, you know, I know somebody else that would be interested in that. And I had mentioned to you before that, investors are very interested because they hear this. And people want to help, right? People are like, wow, like, I know, there's a mental health crisis. I know that parents are struggling, and they're like, gosh, what can I do? And every single investor I think I've ever talked to has someone in their life, who has a child with issues somebody, right? It could either themselves, or it could be their nephew, their grandson, they accept someone, right? Yeah, they hear this and they go, I want to do something. And what happens when I reach out and do that power move, like, Hi, good morning, Joe, I want to talk to you, they get this idea of, hey, I can be a part of this. And so that momentum begins to build as well. Patti Dobrowolski 35:15 Yeah. And people are always looking for ways to help. You know, the best way to get people engaged in your business is to ask for their help. Ask them to help you. Yeah, because people are longing to be helpful. They want to be needed. That's what's true. Marcy Willard 36:43 Yeah, yeah. And so you think in your mind about, let's go back to kind of traditional goal setting, if I set a goal, and if I work at that goal every day, odds are, I'm going to get closer and closer and maybe make it right. And this is even more powerful than that. Because not only am I setting a goal, but I have this long term vision for my life, right? And every day, I'm making bold power moves towards it, right? Patti Dobrowolski 37:09 Yes. And I would say this is how we leap over time. Really, this is how we close the time space continuum, is by doing something so challenging, it builds now on your confidence, and your courage, because you realise, hey, if I did that, once I did that yesterday, so this is gonna be no problem today, if I'm going to call somebody else, right. And so you get better and better at the things you're afraid of. And then you find these other things that you're afraid of, and you think, okay, but I had that success when I was afraid of that. Now, I'm going to move into that now. You've just retrained yourself, you know, the neuro programming. Now, the new record is playing that I'm capable of doing anything, which is what is true, and how you come into the world. And then you just forget it, because you get piled on with all kinds of beliefs, right? Marcy Willard 37:57 Lots of Yeah, I think that's so true. And so powerful. What you also find when you make those bold power moves, is the stuff you're afraid of, is not half as scary as you thought, right? Maybe not even a 10th as scary as you thought you had the conversation. And the person's like, yeah, I would love to hear more. And you're like, Okay, what was? Right? Couch worrying, wringing my hands when I could just ask, right, so I've learned that, that those things that I'm afraid of, are the things I need to run towards. Because what's happening is, the reason I'm scared of that is because that's exactly the thing, that's gonna make the most difference, and it's gonna require me to grow, right? It's gonna say, hey, it's gonna call on some skills that maybe need a little harvesting, right? Maybe that's not my best moment there. And so I've got to work harder at that one. So of course, I'm afraid to do it. I love doing it. And look, it works, right? Patti Dobrowolski 38:49 Yeah, it's fantastic. All right, I love that. That is the best tip. I'm gonna do that right away. As soon as we get off the call, there's something I'm afraid to do. And I'm going to do it right away, because I gotta change. You know how that is. And I know it's slightly after nine when we're recording this, but who cares. So I would just like to say this to you. I am so just awed by you all the things that you did. And as a therapist myself, I love the fact that I was a therapist back in the day, but I love the fact that you have chosen to do something that you took up the mantle to make a change in the world that really is helping to impact the lives of families everywhere. And I can't thank you enough for doing that Marcy, to having you here for this time. I can't wait to have you back. Because I know that you're going to have new information for us and and that future that you're stepping into is just only begun. I think it's only begun. And so just thank you so much for everything that you do. Marcy Willard 39:49 This is really wonderful to be here, Patti, and I'm really excited to get to share this message with your listeners. And I would tell them, Go do it. Do not afraid it will happen. Patti Dobrowolski 40:00 That's right. Do not afraid eat the frog. And in the show notes, you'll see how you can connect with Marcy and also you should go to her website Clear Child Psychology and find out what she's up to. There's a lot of information there that will be helpful to you and to others in your life. So go there. Thank you, Marcy, for being here for doing this with me today. Thanks. And I look forward to seeing you again. Here we go everybody, and you know what I say to you. Until next time, Up Your Creative Genius, right. Thanks so much for listening today. Be sure to DM me on Instagram your feedback or takeaways from today's episode on Up Your Creative Genius. Then join me next week for more rocket fuel. Remember, you are the superstar of your universe and the world needs what you have to bring. So get busy. Get out and Up Your Creative Genius. And no matter where you are in the universe, here's some big love from yours truly Patti Dobrowolski, and the Up Your Creative Genius podcast. That's a wrap

Methoden-Montag
Prio-Prozess statt OKR mit Sarah Schüle

Methoden-Montag

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 14:09


Wie können wir in einer Organisation Projekte und Ziele planen? In vielen Unternehmen sind OKRs als Methode aktuell beliebt. In der heutigen Folge erzählt uns Sarah, warum sie für ihren Bereich OKRs gerade nicht für den richtigen Weg hält – und wie trotzdem ein passender Prozess entwickelt wurde. Unsere allgemeinen Datenschutzrichtlinien finden Sie unter https://art19.com/privacy. Die Datenschutzrichtlinien für Kalifornien sind unter https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info abrufbar.

Das mit eligA - der Agile Hub
Lagerfeuerstimmung - Wir sammeln Agile Buzzwords und fragen uns, sind Anglizismen der Untergang einer (agilen) Transformation?

Das mit eligA - der Agile Hub

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 29:08


Kuschelig und Muckelig haben es sich meine Agile Fellows Christian und Patrick gemacht. Nicht weniger ernst fragen sie sich, ob Anglizismen der Untergang einer (agilen) Transformation sind? Open MInded gehen beide ins Gespräch und versuchen erst einmal Transparenz in die Datenlage zu bekommen. Nachdem Patrick den Purpose des Podcasts nochmals mit Christian aligned hat, sind beide ready to Talk. Kein Wunder, dass die niemand ernst nimmt ... #scherz

Working Draft » Podcast Feed
Revision 512: Agile II – Refinement, Wasserfall, Kanban (Sprint 2/2)

Working Draft » Podcast Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 79:40


Es ist so weit, wir sprechen wieder mit Nikolaus Rademacher über agile Methoden. Der zweite Sprint, in Revision 510 angekündigt, nun geht es rund. [00:00:59] Shownotes Agile II – Refinement, Wasserfall, Kanban Nachdem es in der letzten Sendung viel um die Grundlagen und die Aufgaben eines:r Entwickler:in im agilen Kontext ging, widmeten wir uns dies […]

Scrum meistern
#122 Auftragsklärung als Scrum Master / Agile Coach

Scrum meistern

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 22:38


Als Scrum Master oder Agile Coach unterstützen und führen wir ohne Macht und Weisungsbefugnis. Umso wichtiger ist es, dass wir aus einem klaren Auftrag ALLER beteiligten Personen heraus agieren. In dieser Folge arbeite ich auf, was sich für mich bewährt hat, um ein Mandat für mein Wirken von den beteiligten Personen zu bekommen.   LINK: https://cutt.ly/scrummeistern122

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast
From Scrum dictator, to Scrum Master - a learning journey | Linda van Sinten

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 10:11


Read the full Show Notes and search through the world's largest audio library on Scrum directly on the Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast website: http://bit.ly/SMTP_ShowNotes. As Linda worked with multiple teams, she saw a pattern emerge. When she brought all her experience, and advice to teams that were new to Agile, the teams would invariably run away from here, or even tell her to step back. This helped Linda learn a very important lesson for Scrum Masters: we are there to help the team, not to help the team “do what we want them to do”. Listen in to learn what Linda went through, and how she works with Scrum teams now. About ​​Linda van Sinten Linda van Sinten is an experienced Scrum Master and creator of the Liberating Structures Visual design cards. She combines her knowledge of Scrum with the powerful skill of creating visualizations and visual tools to drive teams forward. She has trained over 500 people in making powerful visuals out of ideas, structuring strategies and product visions in Tech, Healthcare and other industries.  You can link with ​​Linda van Sinten on LinkedIn.

Methoden-Montag
Folge 150: Zum Jubiläum sind wir #United

Methoden-Montag

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 8:22


RTL und Gruner + Jahr sind #United – und Jan und Florian mittendrin. In der Jubiläums-Folge 150 stellen gleich elf Kolleg:innen ihre Lieblings-Fragen für bessere Zusammenarbeit vor.Unsere allgemeinen Datenschutzrichtlinien finden Sie unter https://art19.com/privacy. Die Datenschutzrichtlinien für Kalifornien sind unter https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info abrufbar.

TestTalks | Automation Awesomeness | Helping YOU Succeed with Test Automation
On-demand environments for Automation Testing with Tommy McClung

TestTalks | Automation Awesomeness | Helping YOU Succeed with Test Automation

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 35:32


Automation testing is complex. Adding to it the complexity of getting the suitable environments in place can hold you back from scaling your tests. In this episode, Tommy McClung, founder of Release and a building-scalable-infrastructure expert, will share how using on-demand environments for automation in development, staging, and production can accelerate your testing efforts. Discover why environments play a critical factor in Agile development, how it assists testers, automation, and much more. Listen up!

The Daily Standup
Understanding Agile Roles Lends to Agile Maturity

The Daily Standup

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 9:22


Did you know that the level of understanding you have with regard to the Agile Roles directly correlates with your level of Agile Maturity? When you can easily breakdown each role and acknowledge what responsibilities lie with each, this will allow for greater Agile focus and execution. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/agiledad/support

The Stack Overflow Podcast
Making Agile work for data science

The Stack Overflow Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 20:53


Data scientists and engineers don't always play well together. Data scientists will plan out a solution, carefully build models, test them in notebooks, then throw that solution over the wall to engineering. Implementing that solution can take months.Historically, the data science team has been purely science-driven. Work on methodologies, prove out something that they wanted to achieve, and then hand it over to the engineering organization. That could take many months.Over the past three to five years, they've been moving their engineering and data science operations onto the cloud as part of an overall Agile transformation and a move from being sales-led to being product-led. With most of their solutions migrated over, they decided that along with modernizing their infrastructure, they wanted to modernize their legacy systems, add new functions and scientific techniques, and take advantage of new technologies to scale and meet the demand coming their way. While all of the rituals and the rigor of Agile didn't always facilitate the more open-ended nature of the data science work at 84.51°, having both data science and engineering operating in a similar tech stack has been a breath of fresh air. Working cross-functionally has shortened the implementation delay. At the same time, being closer to the engineering side of the house has given the data science team a better sense of how to fit their work into the pipeline. Getting everyone on the same tech stack had a side effect. Between the increasing complexity of the projects, geographic diversity of the folks on these projects, a rise in remote work, and continued growth, locating experts became harder. But with everyone working in the same tech, more people could answer questions and become SMEs. Of course, we'd be remiss if we didn't tell you that 84.51° was asking and answering questions on Stack Overflow for Teams. It was helpful when Chris and Michael no longer had to call on the SMEs they knew by name but could suddenly draw more experts out of the woodwork by asking a question. Check out this episode for insights on data science, agile, and building a great knowledge base for a large, increasingly distributed engineering org.

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast
How to start an Agile transformation without having to “push” teams | Samet Ulutas

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 8:26


Read the full Show Notes and search through the world's largest audio library on Scrum directly on the Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast website: http://bit.ly/SMTP_ShowNotes. The organization was going through an Agile transformation, when Samet joined the Agile Coaching office in that organization. As the Agile Coaching office developed they were tasked with helping the teams adopt Agile, but that would require more than just “coaching”. Together with the rest of the team, Samet developed an “Agile Mirror” that would help the teams assess their own performance and progress. Listen in to learn how they deployed that Agile assessment to help the team, and the organization adopt Agile.  About Samet Ulutas Samet has been working as an Agile Coach for more than 3 years and coached 35+ different teams until now. Samet has plenty of experience dealing with difficulties of an Agile Transformation, including being to witness the Agile Transformation of the largest private bank in Turkey from the beginning. Samet is also the co-owner of "Be Agile Stay Agile" YouTube channel.  You can link with Samet Ulutas on LinkedIn and connect with Samet Ulutas on Twitter.

Coffee Break - Loc-Doc Security
EP 156 | Tips to Succeed in Project & Change Management| Guest: Jana Axline

Coffee Break - Loc-Doc Security

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 39:28


Chad Lingafelt chats with Jana Axline, CEO and Chief Project Officer of Project Genetics all the way from Queensland, Australia! On this episode, we learn the differences of Agile and Waterfalll project management and what value you can get from each style. We also touch on the importance of daily standup meetings to help your team avoid roadblocks. We learn some Key Takeaways for Daily Stand ups: Make sure the stand up has everyone standing up! This makes it short and concise! You can also try doing planks during stand ups to encourage efficient meetings! Make sure you are asking your team these 3 questions: What I did Yesterday? What am I'm doing Today? What roadblocks do I have? Here are variants of these questions that our team currently uses in Team Stand up Meetings: What are your priorities for today? What is your team accomplishing? What do you need help with? Jana is a recognized leader in project management who is passionate about aligning big picture and small details to get things done efficiently! Connect with Jana Axline & Project Genetics Website: projectgenetics.com Instagram: @projectgenetics LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/janaaxline/

MedStreet Journal
Utilizing Workflow Automation in Increasing Patient Experience

MedStreet Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 22:57


Tim is the senior Product and Technology leader at AdvancedMD with 19+ years of experience in Product Lifecycle Management, He is an Agile expert with extensive experience bringing new products to market in short cycles to efficiently find Product-Market fit. Tim is also known for building scalable and extensible platforms to serve customers that are flexible, and easy to maintain. AdvancedMD was born as a true multi-tenant SaaS platform over 20 years ago and now serves over 40,000 medical providers in nearly all specialties and mental health providers in all 5 states with an integrated workflow for medical practices that help improve the overall patient experience.

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast
Helping a team willingly adopt Agile, even when they start by saying “no”! | Samet Ulutas

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 9:55


Read the full Show Notes and search through the world's largest audio library on Scrum directly on the Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast website: http://bit.ly/SMTP_ShowNotes. Samet was working with a team that was new to Agile. This team had been successful in the past, so they did not see any need to change, or move to a new process. As Samet tried to organize the Scrum ceremonies for the team, he was met with their absence. The team did not participate. Through this experience, Samet learned that trying to push Agile on a team that is not ready is not a good idea, but there are certain activities that are helpful even for teams that are not yet ready for Agile. Listen in to learn how Samet turned this situation around. Featured Book of the Week: Agile Retrospectives: Making Good Teams Great by Larsen and Derby In Agile Retrospectives by Diana Larsen and Esther Derby, Samet learned about the retrospective standard format, and started believing that retrospectives could have a great impact on the team's performance over time. This is a book that Samet now recommends to all Agile leaders, not only Scrum Masters.  How can Angela (the Agile Coach) quickly build healthy relationships with the teams she's supposed to help? What were the steps she followed to help the Breeze App team fight off the competition? Find out how Angela helped Naomi and the team go from “behind” to being ahead of Intuition Bank, by focusing on the people! Download the first 4 chapters of the BOOK for FREE while it is in Beta! About Samet Ulutas Samet has been working as an Agile Coach for more than 3 years and coached 35+ different teams until now. Samet has plenty of experience dealing with difficulties of an Agile Transformation, including being to witness the Agile Transformation of the largest private bank in Turkey from the beginning. Samet is also the co-owner of "Be Agile Stay Agile" YouTube channel.  You can link with Samet Ulutas on LinkedIn and connect with Samet Ulutas on Twitter.

The Daily Standup
5 Agile Transformation Pitfalls

The Daily Standup

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 5:46


When organizations are trying to transition from Waterfall to Agile they often struggle to get a few key foundational pieces in place and this leads to major Agile Pitfalls. Today we will discuss 5 of the most commonly encountered Agile Transformation pitfalls: 1) Placing Output Over Outcome 2) Abuse & Overuse of Agile Metrics 3) Rituals/Customs Over Culture 4) Tools and Data Valued More Than Principles 5) Process and Framework Dogma Over Pragmatism --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/agiledad/support

The Daily Standup
The Importance of Empathy Mapping And Personas

The Daily Standup

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 5:50


Have you ever wondered if you really know who your target customer really is? Join V. Lee Henson, President and Founder of AgileDad as we explore the real difference behind having empathy maps and clear personas to improve your Agile journey. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/agiledad/support

Right-Side Up Leadership Podcast
265 -Michael K Sahota "It's time to share the power in your organization"

Right-Side Up Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 26:16


On today's episode, Coach and author Michael Sahota talks candidly about how most organizations unknowingly oppress their employees with top-down leadership. The posture toward conventional leadership systems is intense, but warranted and timely. About Michael   Michael K Sahota is a Speaker, Trainer, & Consultant on Evolutionary Leadership. He is the founder and CEO of SHIFT314 Inc - a boutique training and consulting organization that specializes in the organizational, cultural and leadership shifts needed to unlock success with Agile, Digital, Lean, etc. Michael is the co-creator of the SHIFT314 Evolutionary Leadership Framework™ (SELF) that provides practical step-by-step for the inner and outer shifts needed to unlock Business Agility, Teal and other new ways of working. Michael has trained thousands of leaders worldwide through his highly accoladed Certified Agile Leadership Training. Since 2001, Michael has been guiding success with Agile. As a thought leader, in 2012, he published the ground-breaking book "An Agile Adoption and Transformation Survival Guide: Working with Organizational Culture". In 2018, he published “Emotional Science: The Key to High Performance”. Michael published “Leading Beyond Change” Aug 2021. His vision is to support the evolution of leadership capabilities that can create change and impact on a global scale Connect with Michael Books Website Twitter Level your leadership in 2022 Purchase a Right Side Up Journal https://www.rightsideupjournal.com Schedule your FREE breakthrough coaching session https://form.jotform.com/212656762431153 Invest in your leadership by joining free Right Side Up Community https://www.facebook.com/groups/rsulc

The Daily Standup
11 Laws of Agile Estimation

The Daily Standup

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 14:20


In this episode we review an article published by Maarten Dalmijn called the 11 laws of Agile estimation: The work still takes the same amount of time regardless of the accuracy of your estimate. No matter what you do, estimates can never be fully trusted. Imposing estimates on others is a recipe for disaster. Estimates become more reliable closer to the completion of the project. This is also when they are the least useful. The more you worry about your estimates, the more certain you can be you have bigger things you should be worrying about instead. When you suck at building software, your estimates will suck. When you're great at building software, your estimates will be mediocre. The biggest value in estimating isn't the estimate but to check if there is common understanding. Keeping things simple is the best way to increase the accuracy of estimates. Building something increases the accuracy of estimates more than talking about building it. Breaking all the work down to the smallest details to arrive at a better estimate means you will deliver the project later than if you hadn't done that. Punishing wrong estimates is often like punishing a kid for something they don't and can't know yet. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results, especially when it comes to software estimation. In 1943, at a casino in the USA, the color red won 32 times in a row. It's easy to fool yourself that there's some kind of pattern, but this is a classic example of the Gambler's fallacy --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/agiledad/support

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast
Helping organizations change by focusing on people | Matthew Green

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 12:52


Read the full Show Notes and search through the world's largest audio library on Scrum directly on the Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast website: http://bit.ly/SMTP_ShowNotes. Matthew shares with us two contrasting approaches to change, and change leadership. Company 1 wanted to go Agile in a way that would require only the IT department to change. Company 2 focused on helping the teams and viewed change as a slow, and people-centric process. In this episode, we talk about the role of creating “community” in a change process as well as supporting people through Communities of Practice. Listen in to learn how a community of practice can help your organization. About Matthew Green Before becoming a Scrum Master, Matthew worked in a variety of roles both inside and outside of IT. This eclectic background has served him well in working with teams and individuals to help them on their own journey to a more humane way of working.  You can link with Matthew Green on LinkedIn and connect with Matthew Green on Twitter.

GovExec Daily
Agile and DevSecOpps at the Pentagon

GovExec Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 32:05


Modernization takes technology, it takes people and it takes programs. At the Defense Department, the agile process is set to bring a new wind to the agency. DevSecOpps will bake security in from the start for national security programs. As part of GovExec Media's Roadmap to Modernization event recently, Nextgov Staff Correspondent Brandi Vincent spoke to Dr. George Duchak, Chief Information Officer at  Defense Logistics Agency and Maj. Christopher Olsen, Military Deputy at Office of the Department of the Air Force Chief Software Officer. In this episode, they talk about how Agile and DevSecOpps are being deployed at the Pentagon.

Screaming in the Cloud
Fear and Loathing on the re:Invent Show Floor of ‘21 with Aaron Booth

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 33:30


About AaronI am a Cloud Focused Product Management and Technical Product Ownership Consultant. I have worked on several Cloud Products & Services including resale, management & governance, cost optimisation, platform management, SaaS, PaaS. I am also recognised as a AWS Community Builder due to my work building cloud communities cross-government in the UK over the last 3 years. I have extensive commercial experience dealing with Cloud Service Providers including AWS, Azure, GCP & UKCloud. I was the Single Point of Contact for Cloud at the UK Home Office and was the business representative for the Home Office's £120m contract with AWS. I have been involved in contract negotiation, supplier relationship management & financial planning such as business cases & cost management.I run a IT Consultancy called Embue, specialising in Agile, Cloud & DevOps consulting, coaching and training. Links: Twitter: https://twitter.com/AaronBoothUK LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/aaronboothuk/ Embue: https://embue.co.uk Publicgood.cloud: https://publicgood.cloud TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open-source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers, and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Rising Cloud, which I hadn't heard of before, but they're doing something vaguely interesting here. They are using AI, which is usually where my eyes glaze over and I lose attention, but they're using it to help developers be more efficient by reducing repetitive tasks. So, the idea being that you can run stateless things without having to worry about scaling, placement, et cetera, and the rest. They claim significant cost savings, and they're able to wind up taking what you're running as it is in AWS with no changes, and run it inside of their data centers that span multiple regions. I'm somewhat skeptical, but their customers seem to really like them, so that's one of those areas where I really have a hard time being too snarky about it because when you solve a customer's problem and they get out there in public and say, “We're solving a problem,” it's very hard to snark about that. Multus Medical, Construx.ai and Stax have seen significant results by using them. And it's worth exploring. So, if you're looking for a smarter, faster, cheaper alternative to EC2, Lambda, or batch, consider checking them out. Visit risingcloud.com/benefits. That's risingcloud.com/benefits, and be sure to tell them that I said you because watching people wince when you mention my name is one of the guilty pleasures of listening to this podcast.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. So, when I went to re:Invent last year, I discovered a whole bunch of things I honestly was a little surprised to discover. One of those things is my guest today, Aaron Booth, who's a cloud consultant with an emphasis on sustainability. Now, you see a number of consultants at things like re:Invent, but what made Aaron interesting was that this was apparently his first time visiting the United States, and he started with not just Las Vegas, but Las Vegas to attend re:Invent. Aaron, thank you for joining me, and honestly, I'm a little surprised you survived.Aaron: Yeah, I think one of the things about going to Las Vegas or Nevada is no one really prepared me for how dry it was. I ended up walking out of re:Invent with my fingers, like, bleeding, and everything else. And there was so much about America that I didn't expect, but that was one thing I wish somebody had warned me about. But yeah, it was my first time in the US, first time at re:Invent, and I really enjoyed it. It was probably the best investment in myself and my business that I think I've done so far.Corey: It's always strange to look at a place that you live and realize, oh, yeah, this is far away for someone else. What would their experience be of coming and learning about the culture we have here? And then you go to Las Vegas, and it's easy to forget there are people who live there. And even the people who live there do not live on the strip, in the casinos, at loud, obnoxious cloud conferences. So, it feels like it's one of those ideas of oh, I'm going to go to a movie for the first time and then watching something surreal, like Memento or whatnot, that leaves everyone very confused. Like, “Is this what movies are like?” “Well, this one, but no others are quite like that.” And I feel that way about Las Vegas and re:Invent, simultaneously.Aaron: I mean, talking about movies, before it came to the US and before I came to Vegas, I was like, “Oh, how can I prepare myself for this trip?” I ended up watching Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. And I don't know if you ever seen it, with Johnny Depp, but it's probably not the best representation, or the most modern representation what Vegas would be like. And I think halfway through the conference, went down to Fremont Street in the old downtown. And they have this massive, kind of, free block screen in the sky that is lit up and doing all these animations. And you're just thinking, “What world am I on?” And it kind of is interesting as well, from a point of view of, we're at this tech conference; it's in Vegas; what is the reason for that? And there's obviously lots of different things. We want people to have fun, but you know, it is an interesting place to put 30,000 people, especially during a pandemic.Corey: It really is. I imagine it's going to have to stay there because in a couple more years, you're going to need a three block long screen just to list all of the various services that AWS offers because they don't believe in turning anything off. Now, it would be remiss for me not to ask you, what was announced at re:Invent that got you the most, let's call it excited, I guess? What got you enthusiastic? What are you happy to start working with more?Aaron: I think from my perspective, there's a few different announcements. The first one that comes to mind is the stuff of AWS Amplify Studio, and that's taken this, kind of, no-code Figma designs and turn into a working front end. And it's really interesting for me to think about, okay, what is the point of cloud? Why are we moving forward in the world, especially in technology? And, you know, abstracting a lot of stuff we worry about today to simple drag-and-drop tools is probably going to be the next big thing for most of the world.You know, we've come from a privileged position in the West where we follow technology along the whole of the journey, where now we have an opportunity to open this out to many more regions, and many more AWS customers, for example. But for me, as a small business owner—I've run multiple businesses—there's a lot of effort you put into, okay, I need to set up a business, and a website, and newsletter, or whatever else. But the more you can just turn that into, “I've got an idea, and I can give it to people with one click,” you'll enable a lot more business and a lot more future customers as well.Corey: I was very excited about that one, too, just from a perspective of I want to drag and drop something together to make a fairly crappy web app, that sounds like the thing that I could use to do that. No, that feels a lot more like what Honeycode is trying to be, as opposed to the Amplify side of the world, which is still very focused on React. Which, okay, that makes sense. There's a lot of front end developers out there, and if you're trying to get into tech today and are asking what language should I learn, I would be very hard-pressed to advise you pick anything that isn't JavaScript because it is front end, it is back end, it runs slash eats the world. And I've just never understood it. It does not work the way that I think about computers because I'm old and grumpy. I have high hopes of where it might go, but so far I'm looking at it's [sigh] it's not what I want it to be, yet. And maybe that's just because I'm weird.Aaron: Well, I mean, you know, you mentioned part of the problem really is two different competing AWS services themselves, which with a business like AWS and their product strategy being the word, “Yes,” you know, you're never really going to get a lot of focus or forward direction with certain products. And hopefully, there'll be the next, no-code tool announced in re:Invent in a few years' time, which is exactly what we're looking for, and gives startup founders or small businesses drag-and-drop tools. But for now, there's going to be a lot of competing services.Corey: There's so much out there that it's almost impossible to wind up contextualizing re:Invent as a single event. It feels like it's too easy to step back and say, “Oh, okay. I'm here to build websites”—is what we're talking about now in the context of Amplify—and then they start talking about mainframes. And then they start talking about RoboRunner to control 10,000 robots at once. And I'm looking around going, “I don't have problems that feel a lot like that. What's the deal?”Aaron: I think even just, like you said in perspective of re:Invent is like, when you go to an event like this, that you can't experience everything and you probably have a very specific focus of, you know, what am I here to do. And I was really surprised—again, my first time at a big tech conference, as well as Vegas and the US is, how important it was just to meet people and how valuable that was. First time I met you, and you know, going from somebody who's probably very likely interacted with you on Twitter before the event to being on this podcast and having a great conversation now is kind of crazy to think that the value you can get out of it. I mean, in terms of over services, and areas of re:Invent that I found interesting was the announcement of the new sustainability pillar, as part of the well-architected framework. You know, I've tried to use that before in previous workplaces, and it has been useful. You know, I'm hoping it is more useful in the future, and the cynical part of me worries about whether the whole point of putting this as part of a well-architected framework review where the customer is supposed to do it is Amazon passing the buck for sustainability. But it's an interesting way forward for what we care about.Corey: An interesting quirk of re:Invent—to me—has always been that despite there being tens of thousands of people there are always a few folks that you wind up running into again and again and again throughout the week. One year for me it was Ben Kehoe; this trip it was you where we kept finding ourselves at the same events, we kept finding ourselves at the same restaurants, and we had three or four meals together as a result, and it was a blast talking to you. And I was definitely noticing that sustainability was a topic that you kept going back to a bunch of different ways. I mean previously, before starting your current consulting company, you did a lot of work in the government—specifically the UK Government, for those who are having trouble connecting the fact this is the first time in America to the other thing. Like, “Wow, you can be far away and work for the government?” It's like, we have more than one on this planet, as it turns out.Yes, it was a fun series of conversations, and I am honestly a little less cynical about the idea of the sustainability pillar, in no small part due to the conversations that we had together. I initially had the cynical perspective of here's how to make your cloud infrastructure more sustainable. It's, isn't that really a “you” problem? You're the cloud provider. I can't control how you get energy on the markets, how you wind up handling heat issues, how you address water issues from your data center outflows, et cetera. It seems to me that the only thing I can really do is use the services you give me, and then it becomes a “you” problem. You have a more nuanced take on it.Aaron: I think there's a log of different things to think about when it comes to sustainability. One of the main ones is, from my perspective, you know, I worked at the UK Home Office in the UK, and we'd been using cloud for about six or seven years. And just looking at how we use clouds as an enterprise organization, one of the things I really started to see was these different generations of cloud and you've got aspects of legacy infrastructure, almost, that we lifted-and-shifted in the early days, versus maybe stuff would run on serverless now. And you know, that's one element, from a customer is how you control your energy usage is actually the use of servers, how efficient your code is, and there's definitely a difference between stringing together EC2 and S3 buckets compared to using serverless or Lambda functions.Corey: There's also a question of scale. When I'm trying to build something out of Lambda functions, and okay, which region is the most cost effective way to run this thing? The Google search for that will have a larger climate impact than any decision I can make at the scale that I operate at. Whereas if you're a company running tens of thousands of instances at any given point in time and your massive scale, then yeah, the choices you make are going to have significant impact. I think that a problem AWS has always struggled with has been articulating who needs to care about what, when.If you go down the best practices for security and governance and follow the white papers, they put out as a one-person startup trying to build an idea this evening, just to see if it's viable, you're never going to get anywhere. If you ignore all those things, and now you're about to go public as a bank, you're going to have a bad time, but at what point do you have to start caring about these different things in different ways? And I don't think we know the answer yet, from a sustainability perspective.Aaron: I think it's interesting in some senses, that sustainability is only just enter the conversation when it comes to stuff we care about in businesses and enterprises. You know, we all know about risk registers, and security reviews, and all those things, but sustainability, while we've, kind of, maybe said nice public statements, and put things on our website, it's not really been a thing that's, okay, this is how we're going to run our business, and the thing we care about as number one. You know, Amazon always says security is job zero, but maybe one day someone will be saying sustainability is our job zero. And especially when it comes down to, sort of, you know, the ethics of running a business and how you want that to be run, whether it is going to be a capitalistic VC-funded venture to extract wealth from citizens and become a billionaire versus creating something that's a bit more circular, and gives back as sustainability might be a key element of what you care about when you make decisions.Corey: The challenge that I find as well is, I don't know how you can talk about the relative sustainability impact of various cloud services within the AWS umbrella without, effectively, AWS explaining to you what their margins are on different services, in many respects. Power usage is the primary driver of this and that determines the cost of running things. It is very clear that it is less expensive and more efficient to run more modern hardware than older hardware, so we start seeing, okay, wow, if I start seeing those breakdowns, what does that say about the margin on some of these products and services? And I don't think they want to give that level of transparency into their business, just because as soon as someone finds out just how profitable Managed NAT gateways are, my God, everything explodes.Aaron: I think it's interesting from a cloud provider or hyperscaler perspective, as well, is, you know, what is your USP? And I think Amazon is definitely not saying sustainability is their USP right now, and I think you know, there are other cloud providers, like Azure for example, who basically can provide you a Power BI plugin; if you just log in with your Cloud account details, it will show you a sustainability dashboard and give you more of this information that you might be looking for, whereas Amazon currently doesn't offer anything like that automated. And even having conversations with your account team or trying to get hold of the right person, Amazon isn't going to go anywhere at the moment, just because maybe that's the reason why we don't want to talk about it: It's too sensitive. I'm sure that'll change because of the public statements they've made at re:Invent now and previously of, you know, where they're going in terms of energy usage. They want to be carbon neutral by 2025, so maybe it'll change to next re:Invent, we'll get the AWS Sustainability Explorer add-on for [unintelligible 00:15:23] or 12—Corey: Oh no.Aaron: —tools to do the same thing [laugh].Corey: In the Google Cloud Console, you click around, and there are green leafs next to some services and some regions, and it's, on the one hand, okay, I appreciate the attention that is coming from. On the other hand, it feels like you're shaming me for putting things in a region that I've already built things out in when there weren't these green leafs here, and I don't know that I necessarily want to have that conversation with my entire team because we can't necessarily migrate at this point. And let's also be clear, here, I cannot fathom a scenario in which running your own data centers is ever going to be more climate-friendly than picking a hyperscaler.Aaron: And I think that's sort of, you know, we all might think about is, at the end of the day, if your sustainability strategy for your business is to go all-in-on cloud, and bet horse on AWS or another cloud provider, then, at the end of the day, that's going to be viable. I know, from the, sort of, hands-on stuff I've done with our own data centers, you can never get it as efficient as what some of these cloud providers are doing. And I mean, look at Microsoft. The fact that they're putting some of their data centers under the sea to use that as a cooling mechanism, and kind of all the interesting things that they're able to do because they can invest at scale, you're never going to be able to do that with the cupboard beyond the desks in your local office to make it more efficient or sustainable.Corey: There are definite parallels between Cloud economics and sustainability because as mentioned, I worship at the altar of Our Lady of Turn that Shit Off because that's important. If you don't have a workload running and it doesn't exist, it has no climate impact. Mostly. I'm sure there are corner cases. But that does lead to the question then of okay, what is the climate sustainability impact, for example, of storing a petabyte of data and EBS versus in S3?And that has architectural impact as well, and there's also questions of how often does it move because when you move it, Lord knows there is nothing more dear than the price of data transfer for data movement. And in order to answer those questions, they're going to start talking a lot more about their architecture. I believe that is why Peter DeSantis's keynote talked so much about—finally—the admission of what we sort of known for ages now that they use erasure coding to make S3 as durable yet inexpensive, as it is. That was super interesting. Without that disclosure, it would have been pretty clear as soon as they start publishing sustainability numbers around things like that.Aaron: And I think is really interesting, you know, when you look at your business and make decisions like that. I think the first thing to start with is do you need that data at all? What's a petabyte of data are going to do? Unless it's for serious compliance reasons for, you know, the sector or the business that you're doing, the rest of it is, you know, you've got to wonder how long is that relevant for. And you know, even as individuals, we could delete junk mail and take things off our internal emails, it's the same thing of businesses, what you're doing with this data.But it is interesting, when you look at some of the specific services, even just the tiering of S3, for example, put that into Glacier instead of keeping it on S3 general. And I think you've talked about this before, I think cost the same to transfer something in and out of Glacier as just to hold it for a month. So, at the end of the day, you've got to make these decisions in the right way, and you know, with the right goals in mind, and if you're not able to make these decisions or you need help, then that's where, you know, people like us come in to help you do this.Corey: There's also the idea of—when I was growing up, the thing they always told us about being responsible was, “Oh, turn out the lights when you're not in the room.” Great. Well, cloud economics starts to get in that direction, too. If you have a job that fires off once a day at two in the morning and it stops at four in the morning, you should not be running those instances the other 22 hours of the day. What's the deal here?And that becomes an interesting expiratory area just as far as starting to wonder, okay, so you're telling me that if I'm environmentally friendly, I'm also going to save money? Let's be clear people, in many cases—in a corporate sense—care about sustainability only insofar as that don't get yelled out about it. But when it comes to saving money, well, now you've got the power of self-interest working for you. And if you can dress them both up and do the exact same things and have two reasons to do it. That feels like it could in some respects, be an accelerator towards achieving both outcomes.Aaron: Definitely. I think, you know, at the end of the day, we all want to work on things that are going to hopefully make the world a better place. And if you use that as a way of motivating, not just yourself as a business, but the workforce and the people that you want to work for you, then that is a really great goal as well. And I think you just got to look at companies that are in this world and not doing very great things that maybe they end up paying more for engineers. I think I read an interesting article the other day about Facebook is basically offering almost double or 150 percent of over salaries because it feels like a black mark on the soul to work for that company. And if there is anything—maybe it's not greenwashing per se, but if you can just make your business a better place, then that could be something that you can hopefully attract other like-minded people with.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of, “Hello World” demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking, databases, observability, management, and security. And let me be clear here, it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking, load balancing, and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build. With Always Free, you can do things like run small-scale applications, or do proof-of-concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free, no asterisk. Start now. Visit snark.cloud/oci-free that's snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: One would really like to hope that the challenge, of course, is getting there in such a way that it, well, I guess makes sense, is probably the best way to frame it. These are still early days, and we don't know how things are going to wind up… I guess, it playing out. I have hopes, I have theories, but I just don't know.Aaron: I mean, even looking at Cloud as a concept, how long we've all worked with this now ranges probably from fifteen to five, and for me the last six years, but you got to think looking at the outages at the end of last year at Amazon, that [unintelligible 00:21:57], very close to re:Invent, that impacted a lot of different workloads, not just if you were hosted in us-west or east-1, but actually for a lot of the regional services that actually were [laugh]… discovered to be kind of integral to these regions. You know, one AZ going down can impact single-sign-on logins around the world. And let's see what Amazon looks like in ten years' time as well because it could be very different.Corey: Do you find that as you talk to folks, both in government and in private sector, that there is a legitimate interest in the sustainability story? Or is it the self-serving cynical perspective that I've painted?Aaron: I mean, a lot of my experience is biased towards the public sector, so I'll start with that. In terms of the public sector, over the last few years, especially in the UK, there's been a lot more focus on sustainability as part of your business cases and your project plans for when you're making new services or building new things. And one of the things they've recently asked every government department in the UK to do is come up with a sustainability strategy for their technology. And that's been something that a lot of people have been working on as part of something called the One Gov Cloud Strategy Working Groups—which in the UK, we do love an abbreviation, so [laugh] a bit of a long name—but I think there's definitely more of an interest in it.In terms of the private sector, I'm not too sure if that's something that people are prioritizing. A lot of the focus I kind of come across as either, we want to focus on enterprise customers, so we're going to offer migration professional services, or you're a new business and you're starting to go up and already spending a couple a hundred pounds, or thousands of pounds a month. And at that scale, it's probably not going to be something you need to worry about right now.Corey: I want to talk a little bit about how you got into tech in the first place because you told me elements of this story, and I generally find them to be—how do I put this?—they strain the bounds of credulity. So, how did you wind up in this ridiculous industry?Aaron: I mean, hoping as I explain them, you don't just think I'm a liar. I have got a Scouse accent, so you're probably predisposed towards it. But my journey into tech was quite weird, I guess, in the sense that when I was 16—I was, again, like I said, born in Liverpool and didn't really know what I wanted to do in the world, and had no idea what the hell to do. So, I was at college, and kind of what happened to me there is I joined, like, an entrepreneurship club and was like, “Okay, I'll start my own business and do something interesting.” And I went to a conference at college, and there was a panel with Richard Branson and other few of business leaders, and I stood up and asked the question said, you know, “I'm 16. I want to start a business. Where can I get money to start a business?”And the panel answered with kind of a couple of different things, but one of them was, “Get a job.” The other one was, “Get money off your parents.” And I was kind of like, “Oh, a bit weird. I've got a job already. You know, I would ask my parents put their own benefits.”And asked the woman with the microphone, “Can I say something back?” And she said, “No.” So, being… a young person, I guess, and just I stood back up and said, you know, “You're in Liverpool. You've kind of come to one of the poorest cities in some sense in the UK, and you kind of—I've already got a job. What can I really do?”And that's when Richard Branson turned round and said, “Well, what is it you want to do?” And I said, “I make really good cheesecakes and I want to sell them to people.” And after that sort of exchange, he said he'd give me the money. So, he gave me 200 pounds to start my own business. And that was just, kind of like, this whirlwind of what the hell's going on here?But for me, it's one of those moments in my life, which I think back on, and honestly, it's like one of these ten [left 00:25:15] moments of, you know, I didn't stand back up and say something, if I didn't join the entrepreneurship club, like, I just wouldn't be in the position I am right now. And it was also weird in the sense that I said at the start of the story, I didn't know what I wanted to do in my life. This was the first time that anyone had ever said to me, “I trust you to do something, and here's 200 pounds to do it.” And it was such a small thing, and a small moment that basically got me to where I am today. And kind of a condensed version of that is, you know, after that event, I started volunteering for a charity who—a, sort of, magazine launch, and then applied for the civil service and progressed through six to eight years of the civil service.And it was because of that moment, and that experience, and that confidence boost, where I was like, “Oh, I actually can do something with my life.” And I think tech, and I think a lot of people talk about this is, it can be a bit of a crazy whirlwind, and to go from that background into, you know, working with great people and earning great money is a bit of a crazy thing sometimes.Corey: Is there another path that you might have gone down instead and completely missed out on, for lack of a better term—and not missed out. You probably would have been far happier not working in tech; I know I would have been—but as far as trying to figure out, like, what does the road not taken look like for you?Aaron: I'm not too sure, really. And at the time, I was working in a club. I was like 16, 17 years old, working in a nightclub in Liverpool for five pounds an hour, and was doing that while I was studying, and that was almost like, what was in my mind at the time. When it came to the end of college, I was applying for universities, I got in on, like, a second backup course, and that was the only thing to do was food science. And it was like, I can't imagine coming out of university three years after that, studying something that's not really that relevant to a lot of industries, and trying to find a good job. It could have just been that I was working in a supermarket for minimum wage after I came out for uni trying to find what I wanted to do in the world. And, yeah, I'm really glad that I kind of ended up where I am now.Corey: As you take a look at what you want your career to be about in the broad sweep of things, what is it that drives you? What is it that makes you, for example, decide to spend the previous portion of career working in public service? That is a very, shall we say, atypical path—I say, as someone who lives in San Francisco and is surrounded by people who want to make the world a better place, but all those paths just coincidentally would result in them also becoming billionaires along the way.Aaron: I mean, it is interesting. You know, one of the things that worked for the civil service for so long, is the fact that I did want to do more than just make somebody else more money. And you know, there are not really a lot of ways you can do that and make a good wage for yourself. And I think early on in your career, working for somewhere like the civil service or federal government can be a little bit of that opportunity. And especially with some of the government's focus on tech these days, and investments—you know, I joined through an apprenticeship scheme and then progressed on to a digital leadership scheme, you know, they were guided schemes to help me become a better leader and improve my skills.And I think I would have probably not gone to the same position if I just got the tech job or my first engineering job somewhere else. I think, if I was to look at the future and where do I want to go, what do I care about? And, you know, you ask me, sort of, this question at re:Invent, and it took me a few days to really figure out, but one of the things when I talk about making the world a better place is thinking about how you can start businesses that give back to people in local areas, or kind of solve problems and kind of keep itself running a bit like a trust does, [laugh], if only that keeping rich people running. And a lot of the time, like, you've highlighted is coincidentally these things that we try and solve whether it's, like, a new app or a new thing that does something seems to either be making money for VCs, reinventing things that we already have, or just trying to make people billionaires rather than trying to make everyone rise up and—high tide rise all ships, is the saying. And there are a few people that do this, a few CEOs who take salaries the same as everyone else in the business. And I think that's hopefully you know, as I grow my own business and work on different things in the future, is how can I just help people live better lives?Corey: It's a big question, and it's odd in that I don't find that most people asking it tend to find themselves going toward government work so much as they do NGOs, and nonprofits, and things that are very focused on specific things.Aaron: And it can be frustrating in some sense is that, you know, you look at the landscape of NGOs, and charities, and go, “Why are they involved in solving this problem?” You know, one of the big problems we have in the UK is the use of food banks where people who don't have enough money, whether they receive benefits or not, have to go and get food which is donated just by people of the UK and people who donate to these charities. You know, at the end of the day, I'm really interested in government, and public sector work, and potentially one day, being a bit more involved in policy elements of that, is how can we solve these problems with broad brushstrokes, whether it's technology advancements, or kind of policy decisions? And one of the interesting things that I got close to a few times, but I don't think we've ever really solved is stuff like how can we use Agile to build policy?How can we iterate on what that policy might look like, get customers or citizens of countries involved in those conversations, and measure outcomes, and see whether it's successful afterwards. And a lot of the time, policies and decisions are just things that come out of politicians minds, and it'd be interesting to see how we can solve some of these problems in the world with stuff like Agile methodologies or tech practices.Corey: So, it's easy to sit and talk about these things in the grand sweep of how the world could be or how it should look, but for those of us who think in more, I guess, tactical terms, what's a good first step?Aaron: I think from my point of view, and you know, meeting so many people at re:Invent, and just have my eyes opened of these great conversations we can have a great people and get things changed, one of the things that I'm looking at starting next year is a podcast and a newsletter, around the use of public cloud for public good. And when I say that, it does cover elements of sustainability, but it is other stuff like how do we use Cloud to deliver things in the public sector and NGOs and charities? And I think having more conversations like that would be really interesting. Obviously, that's just the start of a conversation, and I'm sure when I speak to more people in the future, more opportunities and more things might come out of it. But I'd just love to speak to more people about stuff like this.Corey: I want to thank you for spending so much time to speak with me today about… well, the wide variety of things, and of course, spending as much time as you did chatting with me at re:Invent in person. If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Aaron: So yep, got a few social media handles on Twitter, I'm @AaronBoothUK. On LinkedIn is the same, forward slash aaronboothuk, and I've also got the website for my consultancy, which is embue.co.uk—E-M-B-U-E dot co dot uk. And for the newsletter, it's publicgood.cloud.Corey: And we will, of course, include links to that in the [show notes 00:32:11]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. I really do appreciate it.Aaron: Thank you so much for having me.Corey: Aaron Booth, cloud consultant with an emphasis on sustainability. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn with an emphasis on optimizing bills. And this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment that you will then kickstart the coal-burning generator under your desk to wind up posting.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Techsauce Podcast
TS EP.97 Low-Code Platform อนาคตของการพัฒนา Software ที่ไม่เหมือนเดิมอีกต่อไป

Techsauce Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 49:13


ใน Episode นี้ชวนมาทำความรู้จัก Low Code Platform เทคโนโลยีที่จะทำให้การพัฒนาการพัฒนา Software ในอนาคตไม่เหมือนเดิมอีกต่อไป พร้อมทำความเข้าใจว่าเทคโนโลยีนี้ตอบโจทย์ต่อการทำ Digital Transformation ขององค์กร และสามารถที่จะเสริมการทำงานแบบ Agile ได้อย่างไร พูดคุยกับ คุณปนายุ ศิริกระจ่างศรี CEO และผู้ร่วมก่อตั้ง TBN Software

The Daily Standup
Agile or Waterfall - Which Should I Do?

The Daily Standup

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 7:51


Let's see... You are on an Agile Website, listening to an Agile podcast, asking one of the most prolific Agile Coaches on the planet if Agile or Waterfall is better? The answer WILL 100% surprise you! Agile is NOT always better. Listen now to learn more! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/agiledad/support

The Daily Standup
The Top 5 Product Owner Daily Mistakes & How To Resolve Them

The Daily Standup

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 10:40


Product Ownership is by far the most difficult role within the Agile framework. This means as you might expect, mistakes are part of the job. Here we identify the top 5 mistakes Product Owners make: 1) Taking Over Meetings - Becoming a Project Manager 2) Creating/Allowing Interruptions 3) No Time For The Team 4) Being The People Pleaser 5) Not Allowing Outside Help - POBAFATA --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/agiledad/support

Global Product Management Talk
366: This is modified Agile for hardware development

Global Product Management Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 38:00


Global Product Management Talk is pleased to bring you the next episode of... Product Mastery Now with host Chad McAllister, PhD. The podcast is all about helping people involved in innovation and managing products become more successful, grow their careers, and STANDOUT from their peers. About the Episode:  Today we are talking about using a modified version of Scrum for hardware projects. Many teams have tried adopting Scrum for developing hardware products, not always successfully. This is such as big topic, we have not one but two guests to help us with it—Dorian Simpson and Gary Hinkle. They think they have the answer for applying Agile principles to hardware projects, and they call it the Modified Agile for Hardware Development (MAHD) Framework. Dorian has a deep background in product development, starting in engineering and then moving to business leadership roles.  These include roles at Motorola and AT&T along with dozens of companies as an innovation and product development consultant. He's also the author of The Savvy Corporate Innovator, which is about applying Agile principles to idea development in organizations. Gary also has an extensive background in product development with senior roles at SAIC and Tektronix. He has held R&D leadership roles and founded Auxilium in 2002 to help companies improve their R&D and leadership practices and transform their new product development using Agile practices.

Our Agile Tales
Agile @ Tesla Episode 7: Prod Dev

Our Agile Tales

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 25:08


What's it like to work at the cusp of a radical company that's breaking all the rules, including Agile as most people know it?  From 3-hour sprints to very short-lived teams, we're chatting with Joe Justice about Elon Musk's desire and drive to innovate quickly. The result is tangible organizational agility at Tesla. We're going to cover everything about agility, from HR (Episodes 1-2), Finance (Episodes 3-4) and Management (Episode 5), Planning & Measurement (Episode 6) to applying agile methods to product development and hardware (Episodes 7-9).

Agile in Action with Bill Raymond
Agile in policy development

Agile in Action with Bill Raymond

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 33:32


Developing governmental policies can be a long and arduous task. At Citizens Advice, they streamline that process and use agile techniques to share ideas sooner, improve feedback loops, and focus on outputs. End State: 9 Ways Society is Broken - and how we can fix it Can you do agile policy work? LinkedIn @jamestplunkett

The Daily Standup
Resolve To Be Resolute

The Daily Standup

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 8:53


Have you ever wondered how to make a New Years Resolution Stick? How do these resolutions tie to Agile and what would a successful C-Level Shark Tank Executive tell you to do in order to be successful? Learn all this and more in todays Daily Standup. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/agiledad/support

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast
Helping COBOL teams adopt Agile and Scrum | Matthew Green

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 11:07


Read the full Show Notes and search through the world's largest audio library on Scrum directly on the Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast website: http://bit.ly/SMTP_ShowNotes. Matthew started working with 3 COBOL teams who promptly stated: “Scrum does not work here”. The team also had heavy deadline pressure which made it even harder for them to think about changing their way of working.  In this situation, the role of the Scrum Master is to look for opportunities. Not to push, but to help. Matthew shares his tips on how to handle this tough situation.  About Matthew Green Before becoming a Scrum Master, Matthew worked in a variety of roles both inside and outside of IT. This eclectic background has served him well in working with teams and individuals to help them on their own journey to a more humane way of working.  You can link with Matthew Green on LinkedIn and connect with Matthew Green on Twitter.

Innovation Talks
Innovation Themes from 2021

Innovation Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 18:43


Last year was an excellent year for Innovation Talks. We launched the podcast to discuss topics around innovation, providing value to you, our listeners. We brought in guests and experts—including practitioners, academics, thought leaders, authors, and a few experts from within Sopheon—to share insights regarding a gradient of topics: the innovation process, governance, portfolio management, decision-making, innovation workers, culture, and the role of technology. We hope you have found the episodes educational and enjoyable. In today's episode, I reflect on ten innovation themes from 2021. These include was governance, process, and portfolio—covering Agile, Stage-Gate, Scrum, Scaled Ads of Framework, and Lean. We also discuss the challenges of family-owned businesses, innovation ecosystems, start-up thinking, and disruptive and radical innovation. I highlight the guests who explored topics including sustainability, technology, ways of working, ways of thinking, and product management. I also share what we should expect in innovation in 2022 and the challenges ahead. “Nobody is doing innovation alone anymore; you are doing it with others.” - Paul Heller This week on Innovation Talks: The guests who delivered insights into governance, process, and portfolio The unique challenges of family-owned businesses Innovation ecosystems including universities, partners, suppliers, customers, and other companies The episodes that delved into start-up thinking and disruptive and radical innovation Three guests who discussed sustainability The discussions we had around technology, particularly in regards to managing your process and aligning your people and technology in products How ways of working and thinking are changing What we have learned about product management Innovations in the automotive industry, aerospace and defense, and chemicals The challenges and expectations for innovation in 2022 Resources Mentioned: Podcast archive: Innovation Talks Book: RE:Think Innovation by Carla Johnson This Podcast is brought to you by Sopheon Thanks for tuning into this week's episode of Innovation Talks. If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe and leave a review wherever you get your podcasts. Apple Podcasts | TuneIn | GooglePlay | Stitcher | Spotify | iHeart Be sure to connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn, and share your favorite episodes on social media to help us reach more listeners, like you. For additional information around new product development or corporate innovation, sign up for Sopheon's newsletter where we share news and industry best practices monthly! The fastest way to do this is to go to sopheon.com and click here.

The Everyday Innovator Podcast for Product Managers
366: This is modified Agile for hardware development – with Dorian Simpson and Gary Hinkle

The Everyday Innovator Podcast for Product Managers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 37:41


How product managers can use the Modified Agile for Hardware Development Framework Today we are talking about using a modified version of Scrum for hardware projects. Many teams have tried adopting Scrum for developing hardware products, not always successfully. This is such as big topic, we have not one but two guests to help us […]

Planet B612
Ep.57 – Service Design with Tania Levy

Planet B612

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 58:29


Show Notes Tania is a public servant who's also a working artist. In this episode, we talk about what it's like to be an artist with a job. We also deep dive into design strategy, including design thinking, user research, and service design. (0:02:28) Artists in the office: The challenges and value. (0:03:50) Receiving flak: The art world vs the corporate world. (0:05:42) Finding time for art: Using your leave and dispelling the myths. (0:07:58) Modifying work hours in the public sector. (0:10:20) The demise of the 'Working class artist': The risks of a lack of diversity. (0:14:21) Plays about public service and how working within affects the art.  (0:18:14) Working inside a framework: How it benefits creativity. (0:19:56) Being bilingual in Ottawa and the journey to public service.  (0:22:14) What a contact center does and the concept of service. (0:24:07) Design Thinking: Improving service and user experience. (0:26:45) Change Management and Design Thinking's link to theater training. (0:29:00) Transferable skills: How they can be beneficial on both sides. (0:30:59) MIT lectures and marketing mishaps: Why the end user is essential. (0:33:42) Convincing people that end users matter: User research and feedback. (0:37:30) Evidence based decision making and empathy. (0:38:08) A captive audience: Believing people want to do better. (0:41:17) Agile methodologies and development in the public sector. (0:42:43) Service design: What it is and why it is important. (0:44:57) AI, Machine Learning and Omnichannel Service Delivery. (0:47:31) Acronyms, buzzwords and the move to Plain Language use. (0:50:01) Plain Language: The benefits of making sure everyone understands. (0:52:41) Gaming: Faster thinking and strengthening focus. (0:55:08) Fortnite, MMO games and griefers. (0:56:40) Keeping up with the kids and esports. Follow Tania on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tanialevy Visit Planet B612 on the web: http://planetb612.fm/ Follow Planet B612 on Twitter: https://twitter.com/PlanetB612fm Support Planet B612 on Patreon: https://patreon.com/juliesworld

Agile Coaches' Corner
Agile Change Part 2 with Adam Ulery

Agile Coaches' Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 37:29


This week, Dan Neumann is joined by Adam Ulery to continue the conversation in regard to Organizational Change. In the previous episode, they discussed the first two steps proposed by the ADKAR Model for Change Management (Awareness and Desire), and today they follow with Knowledge, Ability, and Reinforcement.   Key Takeaways What does Knowledge Building look like? Training and education are needed to help people get the knowledge they are going to need to be successful in this change. The mindset component is a major part of an Agile Transformation; this mindset involves a different way to approach business and the delivery of a product. Dan and Adam talk about the “Follow the rules” approach. There has to be some knowledge acquisition before “learning by doing.” Formal training is very helpful (videos, books, classroom training). A potential pitful is not giving adequate time or resources to allow the knowledge acquisition to really take place. See one, do one, teach one. When someone teaches others they start to learn what they are teaching in a better way. Knowledge and Ability are tied together. Knowing something needs to go along with being able to do it. Acquiring more knowledge and improving abilities grow together. Feedback is crucial to increasing someone's ability to solve a problem. Failing safely is part of learning. Adam and Dan share on gradually increasing knowledge and ability from an enterprise perspective within a safe environment that fosters change. The Reinforcement piece. Celebrate examples of the change. Be happy and excited about the change. By reinforcing you are creating more awareness! Rewarding people is necessary. (Bonuses matter!) Public celebrations and peer-to-peer recognition are effective ways of reinforcement.   Want to Learn More or Get in Touch? Visit the website and catch up with all the episodes on AgileThought.com! Email your thoughts or suggestions to Podcast@AgileThought.com or Tweet @AgileThought using #AgileThoughtPodcast!

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast
The Product Owner anti-pattern that destroys collaboration | Kathryn Tancos

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 12:13


Read the full Show Notes and search through the world's largest audio library on Scrum directly on the Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast website: http://bit.ly/SMTP_ShowNotes. The Great Product Owner: Working with the team to make decisions Great Product Owners understand that they are part of the team, and try to setup collaborative decision making through active conversations with team and stakeholders. This develops the relationship between PO and team, and setups up a powerful partnership.  The Bad Product Owner: When the PO stands back and does not drive the product or the collaboration between teams When product organizations are separated into different silos, and the Product Owner stands back, problems emerge quickly. On top of that, when the PO does not feel, or want to be accountable for the product, things get even worse. We also discuss the anti-pattern of missing, losing the customer voice in the work of the Product Owner.  Are you having trouble helping the team work well with their Product Owner? We've put together a course to help you work on the collaboration team-product owner. You can find it at bit.ly/coachyourpo. 18 modules, 8+ hours of modules with tools and techniques that you can use to help teams and PO's collaborate. About Kathryn Tancos Kathryn is a certified Scrum Master focused on Agile transformations and helping teams build a better way of working. How did this Emmy Award-winning news producer become an avid Agilist? Through communication, curiosity, and collaboration, the pillars of successful Agile teams. Her goal is to inspire teams and organizational cultures to foster a sense of self-leadership throughout the transformation journey. You can link with Kathryn Tancos on LinkedIn and connect with Kathryn Tancos on Twitter.

Agile Thoughts
173 Troy Magennis shares a Failure Story in Forecasting with Metrics

Agile Thoughts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 7:56


You can find Troy’s free resources such as spreadsheets, here: https://www.focusedobjective.com/w/support/ Troy’s Amazon author page: https://www.amazon.com/Troy-Magennis/e/B00318V75A?ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1&qid=1640913039&sr=8-1 Troy’s business: https://www.focusedobjective.com/w/privateevent/ Troy wrote this article: https://medium.com/@troy.magennis Troy was interviewed on this video show: https://youtu.be/kicbluukPms Troy is on Twitter: @t_magennis

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast
Tweaking Retrospectives to help silent Agile teams speak up | Kathryn Tancos

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 14:38


Read the full Show Notes and search through the world's largest audio library on Scrum directly on the Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast website: http://bit.ly/SMTP_ShowNotes. Even when measuring our success can be difficult, we can define a set of questions that help us reflect and help teams. Kathryn shares some of those questions, as well as a “guideline” for our success as Scrum Masters. Listen in to learn about Kathryn's success questions.  Featured Retrospective Format for the Week: Tweaking Start/Stop/Continue to help teams that have a hard time speaking up Kathryn likes to adapt the format to the team. Even when using simple formats, such as Start/Stop/Continue, Kathryn prefers to add some twists so that all team members participate actively. In this segment, Kathryn shares a story of a team that had a hard time speaking up, and what she did to help the team contribute actively in the retrospective.  Do you wish you had decades of experience? Learn from the Best Scrum Masters In The World, Today! The Tips from the Trenches - Scrum Master edition audiobook includes hours of audio interviews with SM's that have decades of experience: from Mike Cohn to Linda Rising, Christopher Avery, and many more. Super-experienced Scrum Masters share their hard-earned lessons with you. Learn those today, make your teams awesome!   About Kathryn Tancos Kathryn is a certified Scrum Master focused on Agile transformations and helping teams build a better way of working. How did this Emmy Award-winning news producer become an avid Agilist? Through communication, curiosity, and collaboration, the pillars of successful Agile teams. Her goal is to inspire teams and organizational cultures to foster a sense of self-leadership throughout the transformation journey. You can link with Kathryn Tancos on LinkedIn and connect with Kathryn Tancos on Twitter.

The Ambitious VET Podcast
170: Being Emotionally Agile During Change with Phil Johnson

The Ambitious VET Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 42:28


During these times of accelerated change politically, socially, and economically in our nation, it's important for you as a military veteran to understand how to bring your emotional agility to the frontlines to lead our nation into the next chapter. In this episode, you will learn the primary factors of why people resist change and how you can develop your emotional intelligence to lead the pack! Impactful Moments of the Show: 4:00MM: How veterans are still an untapped pool for leadership talent and why that is. 6:00MM: What Phil has learned about emotional intelligence $1.5B in revenue, an executive title, and 50 years later. 12:00MM: How to do the emotional labor outside of your comfort zone.  15:00MM: How to stop looking for leadership and realize that you are the leader. 17:00MM: Why is emotional intelligence becoming mainstream?  26:00MM: How to take action in the midst of fear and anxiety. 28:00MM: The Butter Fly Story.  34:00MM: Last parting golden grenades.  Connect and learn more about Phil's work here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/philipjpjohnson/  Resources discussed during the show:  IQvsEQ Blog: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/career-advancement-corporate-success-phil-johnson/  Korn Ferry's Article on Military misperceptions:  https://www.kornferry.com/insights/this-week-in-leadership/veterans-employees-emotional-intelligence  Show Sponsor: Start your 30 day FREE trial of Audible here: https://www.audibletrial.com/AVPodcast 

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast
Scaling up an Agile transformation through practical actions by Scrum Masters | Kathryn Tancos

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 11:21


Read the full Show Notes and search through the world's largest audio library on Scrum directly on the Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast website: http://bit.ly/SMTP_ShowNotes. An organization that started an Agile transformation, hired 2 external consultants to help the transformation. However, the 2 transformation coaches were not enough to cover the many teams in that organization. This put Kathryn and other Scrum Masters in a tough spot. In order to contribute, Kathryn started to ask questions, and discuss with the 2 transformation coaches, which turned out to be a practical way to scale their knowledge and influence in the overall organization. In this segment, we discuss how we can help setup the Agile transformation in our organizations, starting by focusing on the “why” and the values the transformation is supposed to bring into the organization. About Kathryn Tancos Kathryn is a certified Scrum Master focused on Agile transformations and helping teams build a better way of working. How did this Emmy Award-winning news producer become an avid Agilist? Through communication, curiosity, and collaboration, the pillars of successful Agile teams. Her goal is to inspire teams and organizational cultures to foster a sense of self-leadership throughout the transformation journey. You can link with Kathryn Tancos on LinkedIn and connect with Kathryn Tancos on Twitter.

Dev Interrupted
Holidays, Entrepreneurship and SLOs with Nobl9

Dev Interrupted

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 36:51


It's finally here, the end of season 1 of the podcast is upon us! To celebrate, Santa is bringing something special - entrepreneurship advice for all the would-be founders of the world, ages 1 to 92.Brian Singer, co-founder & CPO of Nobl9, sits down with Dev Interrupted to help us close out season 1 with a conversation on what it takes to found your own company. Having founded a pair of companies, one of which he sold to Google, Brian has a deep understanding of what it takes to successfully found and scale a startup. More than that, he knows what VCs are looking for. In addition to our conversation on entrepreneurship, we also discuss Service Level Objectives, the ins and outs of Nobl9's SLO platform, and why SLOs and error budgets will become commonplace approaches in the industry, much in the same way we practice Agile today. From the entire team at Dev Interrupted, we want to give a heartfelt thank you to everyone who has supported us and continued on this journey with us. Producing this podcast every week has been an absolute pleasure and we are so thankful for the outpouring of support we have received this past year. Expect big things - and even bigger stories - in season 2 of the podcast!Have a wonderful New Year, we'll return on January 8th with a HUGE episode for the official start of season 2. Nobl9's website: https://nobl9.com/Join our Discord Community ►► discord.gg/devinterruptedOur Website ►► devinterrupted.com/Want to try LinearB?  Book a LinearB Demo and use the "Dev Interrupted Podcast" discount code.Have 60 seconds? Review the show on Apple Podcasts

PMP Exam Radioshow  (Project Management)
Will Agile Replace Predictive in 2022?

PMP Exam Radioshow (Project Management)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 21:47


PMP and CAPM Exam training for 2022: PMP: https://projectmanagementdoctor.com/pmmasterclass CAPM: https://projectmanagementdoctor.com/capmlive --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/pmpradio/support

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast
How to Agile transformations succeed or fail | Kathryn Tancos

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 12:02


Read the full Show Notes and search through the world's largest audio library on Scrum directly on the Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast website: http://bit.ly/SMTP_ShowNotes. Kathryn was part of an agile transformation and working with 6 different teams. As she dug deeper into the ways of working in those teams, she found that there were patterns in their behaviors that negatively affected their performance. Among these, there was the belief that the team knew all the solutions and did not need to talk to, or listen to other teams. In this segment, we hear about how Scrum Masters can help change these patterns, and the other organizational patterns that make Agile transformations fail.  Featured Book of the Week: Radical Candor by Kim Scott In Radical Candor by Kim Scott, Kathryn found a framework for giving and receiving feedback that helped her with the difficult conversations she needed to have in her Scrum Master role. The book shares ideas, and stories on how to build an environment of trust and respect.  How can Angela (the Agile Coach) quickly build healthy relationships with the teams she's supposed to help? What were the steps she followed to help the Breeze App team fight off the competition? Find out how Angela helped Naomi and the team go from “behind” to being ahead of Intuition Bank, by focusing on the people! Download the first 4 chapters of the BOOK for FREE while it is in Beta! About Kathryn Tancos Kathryn is a certified Scrum Master focused on Agile transformations and helping teams build a better way of working. How did this Emmy Award-winning news producer become an avid Agilist? Through communication, curiosity, and collaboration, the pillars of successful Agile teams. Her goal is to inspire teams and organizational cultures to foster a sense of self-leadership throughout the transformation journey. You can link with Kathryn Tancos on LinkedIn and connect with Kathryn Tancos on Twitter.

Mishia's Madness & Motivation
Raise Self-Confidence, Be Agile, Face Fears, and Validation with Aparna Sood

Mishia's Madness & Motivation

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 24:45


During this Monday with Mish, she is joined by a special guest Aparna Sood to speak about facing fears, social media validation, giving thanks, manage vs control, and so much more! Tune in to get inspired Discover More with Aparna here: AparnaSood | Linktree   Aparna Sood - YouTubeDiscover More with Mishia here: @Mishia | LinktreeSupport the show (Https://Cash.app/$everythingnamari)

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast
How to help Agile teams collaborate | Kathryn Tancos

Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 12:29


Read the full Show Notes and search through the world's largest audio library on Scrum directly on the Scrum Master Toolbox Podcast website: http://bit.ly/SMTP_ShowNotes. Kathryn started as a journalist, and was “recruited” to help in an IT project that aimed to help journalists in their day-to-day work, that took her on a journey towards Agile and eventually she took on the PO and later the Scrum Master role. As a Scrum Master, later on in her career, she tried to help a team working remotely, and that was only part of the challenge. As the team started to work on the product, they did not seek feedback from the partners and stakeholders, leading to a lot of surprises in the Sprint Reviews. This story helped Kathryn learn an important lesson for her as a Scrum Master. Listen in to learn about the critical tip she has to share based on this story.   About Kathryn Tancos Kathryn is a certified Scrum Master focused on Agile transformations and helping teams build a better way of working. How did this Emmy Award-winning news producer become an avid Agilist? Through communication, curiosity, and collaboration, the pillars of successful Agile teams. Her goal is to inspire teams and organizational cultures to foster a sense of self-leadership throughout the transformation journey. You can link with Kathryn Tancos on LinkedIn and connect with Kathryn Tancos on Twitter.

Own Your Career (formerly The Andy Storch Show)
Agile Unemployment with Sabina Sulat

Own Your Career (formerly The Andy Storch Show)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 39:26


In this episode of the Own Your Career Podcast, Andy's guest is Sabina Sulat. She is an accomplished HR and organizational development and learning executive. She's spent the better part of the past two decades studying how organizations function and how people work. She's been a consultant to multiple global and Fortune 1,000 organizations, and Sabina Sulat considers the primary purpose of her work to advise organizations on how to enable their employees to develop and grow. In 2020, Sabina Sulat recognized the impact COVID-19 would have on the American worker, forcing millions of people to lose their jobs in the wake of the pandemic. Inspired by her own period of unemployment, she began working on a book to help others navigate the path of being unemployed. Her new book is called Agile Unemployment: Your Guide to Thriving While Out of Work. She is dedicated to helping those who are unemployed navigate the uncertain waters. In this interview, you'll hear: The story behind Sabina Sulat's new book and how she and Andy became friends. Why she believes everyone should write a book and how it can change the trajectory of your life. The reason she almost gave up on her book and why she pushed through to the end. Why she wrote this particular book and feels so passionately about this subject. What you can do to combat the loss of your identity during unemployment and reconstruct yourself outside of work. How you can use a period of unemployment to get intentional about what you're doing with your career and your life. Sabina Sulat's advice for reevaluating your career and deciding if it's time to move in another direction. Why she viewed being laid off as a blessing and how it allowed her to help others going through the same transition. Who her book is written for and what she wants people to take away from it. The advice she'd give to someone who is out of work right now. How you can support someone if you know they're out of work. Connect with Andy Storch here: https://andystorch.com/ (andystorch.com) https://www.linkedin.com/in/andystorch/ (linkedin.com/in/andystorch) https://tdtt.us/ (tdtt.us/) Connect with Sabina Sulat: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sabinasulat/ (linkedin.com/in/sabinasulat) https://www.reworkingworks.com/ (reworkingworks.com)

Crypto Current
Dave Burrells on Pluto Digital's Yield Optimization Platform

Crypto Current

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 26:00


Dave Burrells, dexterous in software development, operations, business management and innovation. With in excess of 20 years proficiency in the finance and technology industries, Dave's experience spans both established enterprises such as JPMorgan and SaaS start-ups. Commencing his working career in accounting, in 2006 he moved into software development and then subsequently transitioned from software development to project management in 2009 and in 2011 he started working with various Agile methodologies. He has successfully held Product Owner roles in a variety of different industries including commercial banking, commodity trading, telecom and SaaS. Dave has experience in managing the delivery of innovative applications using both the latest and emerging technologies such as natural language processing (NLP) and artificial intelligence (AI). Dave served as the Chief Operations Officer of Avora, an AI data analytics start-up before moving to Pluto Digital, a crypto technology and operations company, where he serves as Chief Operating Officer heading up the DeFi division. https://twitter.com/dburrells (https://twitter.com/dburrells)  https://www.linkedin.com/in/daveburrells/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/daveburrells/)  https://plutodigital.com/ (https://plutodigital.com/)  https://yop.finance/ (https://yop.finance/) *Disclaimer. Richard Carthon is the Founder of Crypto Current. All opinions expressed by members of the Crypto Current Team, Richard or his guest on this podcast are solely their opinions and do not reflect the opinions of Crypto Current. You should not treat any opinion expressed by Richard as a specific inducement to make a particular investment or follow a particular strategy but only as an expression of his opinion. This podcast is for informational purposes only.  ~  Put your Bitcoin and Ethereum to work. Earn up to 12% interest back with https://get.tantralabs.io/earn/?utm_source=cryptocurrent&utm_medium=display&utm_campaign=advertising-display-cryptocurrent&utm_content=lp (Tantra Labs). ~  New to crypto? Check out our https://bit.ly/394YKFw (Crypto for Beginners) Step-by-Step Guide to Crypto Investing!  ~  Follow us on https://bit.ly/3CPwepn (Youtube), http://bit.ly/2TRIArp (Twitter), http://bit.ly/38yfrqo (Instagram), http://bit.ly/39DhpHi (Facebook), http://bit.ly/38wsXL5 (LinkedIn), & https://bit.ly/3yQ30Es (Tik Tok).  ~  Want to make ~$25+ a month for FREE? Sign up to get a FREE https://www.emrit.io/?referral=cryptocurrent (emrit.io Coolspot today)!  ~  Want to learn more about cryptocurrency? Check out our https://bit.ly/2CbaYzw (educational videos) today!  ~  https://bit.ly/2TF3Gtb (Swan) is the easiest and most affordable way to accumulate Bitcoin with automatic recurring purchases. Start your plan today and get $10 of free Bitcoin dropped into your account.  ~  Want access to cool crypto/blockchain projects that you can use immediately? Check out our https://bit.ly/3eZ8J1E (partnerships page)!  ~  Looking to attend a cryptocurrency or blockchain event? Check out our https://bit.ly/2ZVCV8f (events page)!  ~  Tune in on https://bit.ly/2CN9bl1 (Crypto Current TV) throughout the week for a 24/7 crypto stream on the latest action on crypto markets, news, and interviews with the industry's top experts!  ~  Enjoying our podcast? Please leave us a 5 star review http://bit.ly/2Is3iJ9 (here)!  ~  Stay up to date with the latest news in cryptocurrency by opting-in to our http://bit.ly/2xmkKfQ (newsletter)! You will receive daily emails (M-S) that are personalized and curated content specific to you and your interests, powered by artificial intelligence.  ~  We were featured as one of the http://bit.ly/2vRAGGl (Top 25 Cryptocurrency Podcasts) and one of the http://bit.ly/33cnus9 (16 Best Cryptocurrency Podcasts in 2020). ...

The Daily Standup
5 Days of Agile - Day 5 - Tell A Story

The Daily Standup

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 7:48


Part of being successful in life is telling a great story. Join V. Lee Henson as he shares with you "the Greatest Story Ever Told" May you and your family have a safe and Merry Christmas! 

The Daily Standup
5 Days of Agile - Day 4 - Show Gratitude

The Daily Standup

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 2:46


How sweet it is to be loved by YOU!!  Thanks to all of you for being part of the AgileDad Family! A little love and gratitude sure does go a long way. Join V. Lee Henson, President and Founder of AgileDad as we discuss exactly where gratitude can take you. 

The Daily Standup
5 Days of Agile - Day 3 - Be of Service

The Daily Standup

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 4:04


What does service mean to you? Do you personify a true servant leader? How do you see those closest to you both at work and at home? Join V. Lee Henson, President and Founder of AgileDad as we explore what true servant leadership is and how we can become the best at this practice. 

The Talent Development Hot Seat
Agile Unemployment with Sabina Sulat

The Talent Development Hot Seat

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 44:04


In this episode of THE TALENT DEVELOPMENT HOT SEAT, Andy's guest is Sabina Sulat. She is an accomplished HR and organizational development and learning executive. She's spent the better part of the past two decades studying how organizations function and how people work. She's been a consultant to multiple global and Fortune 1,000 organizations, and Sabina Sulat considers the primary purpose of her work to advise organizations on how to enable their employees to develop and grow. In 2020, Sabina Sulat recognized the impact COVID-19 would have on the American worker, forcing millions of people to lose their jobs in the wake of the pandemic. Inspired by her own period of unemployment, she began working on a book to help others navigate the path of being unemployed. Her new book is called Agile Unemployment: Your Guide to Thriving While Out of Work. She is dedicated to helping those who are unemployed navigate the uncertain waters. In this interview, you'll hear: The story behind Sabina Sulat's new book and how she and Andy became friends. Why she believes everyone should write a book and how it can change the trajectory of your life. The reason she almost gave up on her book and why she pushed through to the end. Why she wrote this particular book and feels so passionately about this subject. What you can do to combat the loss of your identity during unemployment and reconstruct yourself outside of work. How you can use a period of unemployment to get intentional about what you're doing with your career and your life. Sabina Sulat's advice for reevaluating your career and deciding if it's time to move in another direction. Why she viewed being laid off as a blessing and how it allowed her to help others going through the same transition. Who her book is written for and what she wants people to take away from it. The advice she'd give to someone who is out of work right now. How you can support someone if you know they're out of work. Connect with Andy Storch here: https://andystorch.com/ (andystorch.com) https://www.linkedin.com/in/andystorch/ (linkedin.com/in/andystorch) https://tdtt.us/ (tdtt.us/) Connect with Sabina Sulat: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sabinasulat/ (linkedin.com/in/sabinasulat) https://www.reworkingworks.com/ (reworkingworks.com)