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Human settlement in Scotland

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Torrin

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Best podcasts about Torrin

Latest podcast episodes about Torrin

Grow A Small Business Podcast
233: With over 33 years of experience as a business owner, now the Founder of a consulting company. Became the most Trusted Mentor on the Inner Game of Success helping business owners evolve to the best version of themselves. (Torrin Minutillo)

Grow A Small Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 34:59


In this episode, I interview Torrin Minutillo, the Founder, and CEO of Attergy Coaching Service based in Perth, Western Australia. Torrin has set up his own business to help entrepreneurs and business leaders through personal leadership. With over 33 years of experience as a business leader, Torrin has decided to pursue bigger opportunities. Attergy was established in 2018 and has been running for 4 years.  Torrin has said that growing a small business requires self-awareness. So he says, “Self-awareness is the number one skill in business. When you need to understand yourself internally your external results exponentially grow quicker.” This Cast Covers: Building a business coaching business, particularly focused on business owners. Expert in human behavior. Help business leaders through personal leadership. Helping entrepreneurs focus their time and energy as the business grows. Understanding how to lead yourself before you can start thinking about leading a team. Coaching one on one and doing some other different programs. Learning how to help your clients grow. Evolving a world-class ecosystem to support business leaders thriving past their own experiences. Learning how to develop a very narrow focus. Became the most Trusted Mentor in the Inner Game of Success Additional Resources: Attergy Coaching Service The 7  Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen Covey Thinking Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman     Quotes: “You need to understand yourself at a deeper level.” —Torrin Minutillo “Success is when you align yourself with your soul.” —Torrin Minutillo “Be very clear and specific about who it is you're serving.” —Torrin Minutillo “When you achieve stability, you'll be able to be more resilient to outside factors.” —Torrin Minutillo “Focus on the three things that you can control.” —Torrin Minutillo     Music from https://filmmusic.io “Cold Funk” by Kevin MacLeod https://incompetech.com. License: CC by http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 632 (7-18-22): Checking on the Chesapeake's Condition

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:30).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 7-15-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of July 18 and July 25, 2022. SOUNDS – ~6 sec Those sounds of shorebirds and Chesapeake Bay waves open an episode on the condition of that bay, which we last explored in an August 2020 episode.  We set the stage with the instrumental opening of a song whose title calls to mind some colors of the Chesapeake region's waters, lands, sky, and creatures.  Here's about 30 seconds of “The Deep Blue Green,” by Andrew VanNorstrand. MUSIC – ~31 sec – instrumental In June 2022, the University of Maryland's Center for Environmental Science issued its latest annual Chesapeake Bay and Watershed Report Card, for conditions in 2021.  For the report's first part, to assess Bay waters, the report compares the status of several physical, chemical, and biological indicators to established goals, in order to generate condition scores ranging from zero to 100%.  Combining the indicator scores, the overall score for 2021 was 50, an increase from the 45 score for 2020 data; the report characterized the 50 score as “moderate health” and gave it a letter grade of C.  The score when the Report Card started in 1986 was 48; the highest score since then was 55 in 2002, and the lowest was 36 in 2003. For the report's second part, the overall watershed assessment, the report for 2021 looked at three categories of indicators: ecological, societal, and economic.  These resulted in a score of 56, characterized as “moderate health” and given a letter grade of C+.  This was the first year that three categories of indicators were used for the watershed assessment, so the results aren't directly comparable to previous years. Besides the Maryland center's annual report, several other Bay condition reports are regularly available.  These include the Chesapeake Bay Program's annual “Bay Barometer” report; the Bay Program's “Chesapeake Progress” Web site, with updates on progress toward the goals of the 2014 Chesapeake Bay Agreement; the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's biennial “State of the Bay” report; and reports by various groups on specific Bay areas, such as the James River Association's “State of the James” reports.  All depend on data gathered by various sources, including universities; governmental agencies at the federal, state, and local levels; and non-governmental organizations. The Chesapeake Bay is the United States' largest estuary.  Monitoring its condition is a large part of decades-old efforts to improve and sustain this irreplaceable water body. Thanks to Andrew VanNorstrand for permission to use “The Deep Blue Green.”  We close with about 50 seconds of another musical selection, created for our previous episode on Chesapeake Bay conditions.  Here's “Chesapeake Bay Ballad,” by Torrin Hallett, a graduate student at the Yale School of Music. MUSIC – ~51 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The waves sound was recorded by Virginia Water Radio at the Chesapeake Bay on Kent Island, Maryland, June 22, 2010. The shorebirds sound was taken from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife National Digital Library, http://digitalmedia.fws.gov/cdm/; the specific audio file was “Shore birds close,” online at https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/audio/id/66/rec/8. “The Deep Blue Green,” from the 2019 album “That We Could Find a Way to Be,” is copyright by Andrew VanNorstrand, used with permission.  More information about Andrew VanNorstrand is available online at https://greatbearrecords.bandcamp.com/.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 504, 12-23-19. “Chesapeake Bay Ballad” is copyright 2020 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 604, 11-22-21. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES (Unless otherwise noted, photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) View of the Chesapeake Bay looking downstream from the Bay Bridge-Tunnel (between Virginia Beach and Northampton County), October 7, 2007.View of the Chesapeake Bay looking upstream from Sandy Point State Park in Anne Arundel County, Maryland, March 21, 2010.Summary charts for Chesapeake Bay waters (upper) and watershed (lower) from the “Chesapeake Bay & Watershed 2021 Report Card” (covering data through 2021; published in June 2022), University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science.  Images accessed from the report PDF, online at https://ecoreportcard.org/site/assets/files/2560/2021-chesapeake-bay-watershed-report-card.pdf, as of 7-18-22. SOURCES Used for Audio Chesapeake Bay Foundation, “State of the Bay,” online at https://www.cbf.org/about-the-bay/state-of-the-bay-report/. Chesapeake Bay Program, online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/.  Specific pages used were the following:“Slight improvements in Bay health and new economic data added in 2021 Chesapeake Bay Report Card,” June 7, 2022, news release by Caroline Grass;“Bay Barometer,” April 2021 (for 2019-20 data), online (as a PDF) at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/documents/Bay_Barometer_2019-2020_Web.pdf;“Chesapeake Bay Watershed Agreement” (signed June 16, 2014), online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/what/what_guides_us/watershed_agreement;“Chesapeake Progress,” online at https://www.chesapeakeprogress.com/;“The Estuary,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/the_estuary_system.Jeremy Cox and Timothy Wheeler, “Maryland, Virginia clamp down on crab harvests; cuts imposed as crab population hits record-low,” Bay Journal, June 30, 2022. Maryland Department of Natural Resources, “2022 Blue Crab Winter Dredge Survey,” online at https://dnr.maryland.gov/fisheries/Pages/blue-crab/dredge.aspx.Maryland Department of Natural Resources, “Eyes on the Bay,” online at http://eyesonthebay.dnr.maryland.gov/.See http://eyesonthebay.dnr.maryland.gov/eyesonthebay/whatsitmean.cfmfor “Data Available for Viewing” (dissolved oxygen, pH, salinity, turbidity, algal blooms, and temperature).See http://eyesonthebay.dnr.maryland.gov/eyesonthebay/links.cfmfor links to other Bay water-quality data and information sources.University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, online at https://www.umces.edu/.The “Chesapeake Bay & Watershed Report Card” is online at https://ecoreportcard.org/report-cards/chesapeake-bay/; note links for “Bay Health,” “Watershed Health,” and “Indicators.”A June 6, 2022, news release on the report of 2021 data is online https://www.umces.edu/news/chesapeake-bay-health-score-held-steady-in-2021.A PDF of the report of 2021 data is online at https://ecoreportcard.org/site/assets/files/2560/2021-chesapeake-bay-watershed-report-card.pdf. Virginia Institute of Marine Science, “How big is the [Chesapeake] bay?”  Online at https://www.vims.edu/bayinfo/faqs/estuary_size.php. For More Information about the Chesapeake Bay and its ConditionChesapeake Bay Program, “Discover the Chesapeake,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover. Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, “Chesapeake Bay Map,” online at https://coastalscience.noaa.gov/products/vmrc-chesapeake-bay-map/.Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, “Chesapeake Bay,” online at https://www.deq.virginia.gov/water/chesapeake-bay. Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS):“Bay Info,” online at https://www.vims.edu/bayinfo/index.php;“SAV Program: Monitoring and Restoration,” online at https://www.vims.edu/research/units/programs/sav/index.php;“Virginia Coastal and Estuarine Observing System,” online at http://vecos.vims.edu/. Virginia Marine Resources Commission, online at https://mrc.virginia.gov/links.shtm. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Rivers, Streams, and Other Surface Water” subject category.  The previous episode on Chesapeake Bay conditions was Episode 537, 8-10-20, Following are links to some other episodes on the Chesapeake Bay. Bay Barometer and other reports – Episode 305, 2-29-16.Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL), Phase II Watershed Implementation Plan – Episode 115, 6-18-12.Bay TMDL, Phase III Watershed Implementation Plan – Episode 475, 6-3-19.Chesapeake Bay Commission – Episode 496, 10-28-19.Estuaries introduction – Episode 326, 7-25-16.Oysters and nitrogen (Part 1) – Episode 279, 8-24-15.Oysters and nitrogen (Part 2) – Episode 280, 9-7-15.“Smart” buoys – Episode 538, 8-17-20.Submerged aquatic vegetation (“Bay grasses”) – Episode 325, 7-18-16.Winter birds of the Chesapeake Bay area – EP565 – 2/22/21. Following are other music pieces composed by Torrin Hallett for Virginia Water Radio, with episodes featuring the music.“A Little Fright Music” – used in Episode 548, 10-26-20, on water-related passages in fiction and non-fiction, for Halloween; and Episode 601, 10-31-21, connections among Halloween, water, and the human body.“Beetle Ballet” – used in Episode 525, 5-18-20, on aquatic beetles.“Corona Cue” – used in Episode 517, 3-23-20, on the coronavirus pandemic. “Flow Stopper” – used in Episode 599, 10-18-21, on “Imagine a Day Without Water.”“Geese Piece” – used most recently in 615, 2-7-22, on Brant.“Ice Dance” – “Ice Dance” – used most recently in Episode 606, 12-6-21, on freezing of water.“Lizard Lied” – used in Episode 514, 3-2-20, on lizards. “New Year's Water” – used most recently in Episode 610, 1-3-22, on water thermodynamics and a New Year's Day New River wade-in.“Rain Refrain” – used most recently in Episode 559, 1-11-21, on record rainfall in 2020.“Runoff” – in Episode 585, 7-12-21 – on middle schoolers calling out stormwater-related water words.“Spider Strike” – used in Episode 523, 5-4-20, on fishing spiders.“Tropical Tantrum” – used most recently in Episode 580, 6-7-21, on the 2021 Atlantic tropical storm season preview.“Tundra Swan Song – used in Episode 554, 12-7-20, on Tundra Swans.“Turkey Tune” – used in Episode 343, 11-21-16, on the Wild Turkey.“Wade in the Water” (arrangement) – used most recently in Episode 616, 2-14-22.  FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes2.5 – Living things are part of a system.3.5 – Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems support a diversity of organisms.4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems3.7 – There is a water cycle and water is important to life on Earth.4.7 – The ocean environment.Grades K-5: Earth Resources 1.8 – Natural resources can be used responsibly, including that most natural resources are limited; human actions can affect the availability of natural resources; and reducing, reusing, and recycling are ways to conserve natural resources.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 66.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment.6.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems.6.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment. Life ScienceLS.6 – Populations in a biological community interact and are interdependent.LS.8 – Change occurs in ecosystems, communities, populations, and organisms over time.LS.9 – Relationships exist between ecosystem dynamics and human activity.LS.11 – Populations of organisms can change over time. Earth ScienceES.6 – Resource use is complex.ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity.ES.10 – Oceans are complex, dynamic systems subject to long- and short-term variations. BiologyBIO.2 – Chemical and biochemical processes are essential for life.BIO.7 – Populations change through time.BIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems. 2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 Geography Theme1.6 – Virginia climate, seasons, and landforms.2.6 – Major rivers, mountains, and other geographic features of North America and other continents.3.6 – Major rivers, mountains, and other geographic features of North America and other continents. Grades K-3 Economics Theme2.8 – Natural, human, and capital resources.3.8 – Understanding of cultures and of how natural, human, and capital resources are used for goods and services. Grades K-3 Civics Theme3.12 – Importance of government in community, Virginia, and the United States. Virginia Studies CourseVS.1 – Impact of geographic features on people, places, and events in Virginia history.VS.10 – Knowledge of government, geography, and economics in present-day Virginia. United States History to 1865 CourseUSI.2 – Major land and water features of North America, including their importance in history. United States History: 1865-to-Present CourseUSII.9 – Domestic and international issues during the second half of the 20th Century and the early 21st Century. Civics and Economics CourseCE.6 – Government at the national level.CE.7 – Government at the state level.CE.8 – Government at the local level.CE.10 – Public policy at local, state, and national levels. World Geography CourseWG.2 – How selected physical and ecological processes shape the Earth's surface, including climate, weather, and how humans influence their environment and are influenced by it.WG.3 – How regional landscapes reflect the physical environment and the cultural characteristics of their inhabitants.WG.4 – Types and significance of natural, human, and capital resources. Government CourseGOVT.7 – National government organization and powers.GOVT.8 – State and local government organization and powers.GOVT.9 – Public policy process at local, state, and national levels.GOVT.15 – Role of government in Va. and U.S. economies, including examining environmental issues and property rights.Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels.Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade. Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade. Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade. Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school. Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school. Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school. Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th grade. Episode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia's water resources, for 4th and 6th grade. Episode 606, 12-6-21 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.

The Scottish History Podcast
EP 76 - Strath, pt2 - Isle of Skye

The Scottish History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2022 13:38


In part 2 of our Isle of Skye series, we talk about the town of Broadford and the Villages of Torrin and Elgol.http://scothistorypod.comscothistorypod@gmail.comhttp://patreon.com/scothistorypod See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Encouragement Engineering
The Encouragement Engineering podcast with Torrin Minutillo

Encouragement Engineering

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 39:36


The Encouragement Engineering podcast offers listeners the ability to combat the negativity that inundates our daily lives with a positive perspective and positive actions. Our guest today is Torrin Minutillo. Torrin Minutillo is the founder of Attergy Coaching System but began his entrepreneurial career back in 1989, cutting his teeth in the retail space. The first venture at the tender age of 24 was in the video rentals business. Within a few short years he was part-owner in 3 locations. This was a time before mobile phones and internet instant communication. Fast forward a period of 18 years after starting, buying, and selling 8 different enterprises. Torrin arrived at a career in real estate, establishing his own agency in 2007 that focused on commercial real estate sales, leasing and property development. At the age of 44 with a young family and business going very well, he ran into the global economic crash of 2008, which almost wiped him out. Upon reflecting, he realized he did not deal with the crisis very well but learned some huge lessons. Rather than being a reactive business owner, he began to use his research, observations, and experiences to create different habits, behaviors, and responses. The result was dramatically increased success and a new way of doing business using an inner game operating system created from internal strength. More importantly, this newfound success gave rise to an idea. Torrin is now helping many other business owners discover their own pathway to a fulfilled business life through Attergy Coaching System. Listen as we discuss: Midset Inner operating System Courage Assumptions Awareness Website: https://attergy.com Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/Attergy Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/torrinminutillo/?hl=en LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/torrin-minutillo/ Be sure to follow The Encouragement Engineering podcast at https://encouragementengineer.com or https://bobbrummspeaks.com

Going North Podcast
Ep. 512 – “The Essential Inner Game” with Torrin Minutillo

Going North Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 54:41


“Life is easier when you have a solid base.” - Torrin MinutilloToday's featured author is entrepreneur and The Most Trusted Business Mentor on the Inner Game of Success, Torrin Minutillo. Torrin and I had a chat about his book, “The Essential Inner Game: 10 Insights And Guiding Principles Every Business Leader Should Know to Achieve Money And Time Freedom”, the power of self-awareness, and more!! Key Things You'll Learn:How he got into business.The importance of self-awareness and why it's a necessary skill in entrepreneurship.Why self-awareness is integral to your success as a business owner.The 3 Categories of Business Growth. Torrin's Site: https://linktr.ee/attergy Torrin's Book: https://attergy.com/book/ This week's opening track is titled HIRAMEKI-Mirai-未来 by Rukunetsu AKA Project R. Be sure to click this link to check out his wonderful music. https://soundcloud.com/rukunetsu/hirameki-mirai You May Also Like… Ep. 493 – “The Three R's of Business Growth” with Edwin Dearborn (@edwindearborn): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-493-the-three-rs-of-business-growth-with-edwin-dearborn-edwindearborn/ Ep. 481 – “Breakthrough” with Thomas Gelmi: https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-481-breakthrough-with-thomas-gelmi/ Ep. 494.5 – “Disruption @ Work” with Fabiaan Van Vrekhem (@Fabiaanvanvrekh): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-4945-disruption-work-with-fabiaan-van-vrekhem-fabiaanvanvrekh/ Ep. 447 – “Crucible Leadership” with Warwick Fairfax (@CrucibleLeaders): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-447-crucible-leadership-with-warwick-fairfax-crucibleleaders/ Ep. 373.5 – “Business Secrets for Walking on Water” with Frank Zaccari (@FZaccari): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-3735-business-secrets-for-walking-on-water-with-frank-zaccari-fzaccari/ Ep. 470.5 – “Business and Personal Secrets for Avoiding Relationship Landmines” with Frank Zaccari (@FZaccari): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-4705-business-and-personal-secrets-for-avoiding-relationship-landmines-with-frank-zaccari-fzaccari/ Ep. 405 – “Leadership Lessons From The Pub” with Dr. Irvine Nugent (@irvinenugent): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-405-leadership-lessons-from-the-pub-with-dr-irvine-nugent-irvinenugent/ Ep. 451 – “The Divine Comedy of Sales” with Matt McDarby (@mmcdarby): https://www.goingnorthpodcast.com/ep-451-the-divine-comedy-of-sales-with-matt-mcdarby-mmcdarby/

Beantalking Podcast
Are You Avoiding Hard Tasks? With Torrin Minutillo

Beantalking Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 52:03


We all do it, that phone call you don't want to make. The task in our business we have been putting of, all of these things we withdraw from How do you stop that? Well today in this episode Torrin Minutillo tells you how to stop withdrawing and become a couragous version of your best self Torrin started his business journey in 1989 at the age of 24, not having attended any business school. What I did have was plenty of enthusiasm, optimism and courage which helped me to make it all work. Over the last 32 years he have bought, sold, started, ended, failed and succeeded in many businesses. After 24 years of fluctuating between doing okay , doing very well and other times just getting by, a combination of bad decisions, bad planning and bad luck led to reaching the lowest ebb in my business journey. This was the catalyst to look for a new pathway forward. Over the next few years Torrin was influenced to look inwardly to my inner game and started to turn things around. Since 2014 he has been looking deeper to find more sustainable answers to business growth problems. https://attergy.com/

Popping Corks w/ Winemaker Eric Jensen
Sitting down w/ Scott & Anthony local winemakers

Popping Corks w/ Winemaker Eric Jensen

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 54:57


Long-time friends Scott and Anthony are local Paso neighbors. Scott Hawley is the winemaker at Torrin and Anthony Yount is the Winemaker at the Royal Nonesuch Farm and Denner.

Profit Answer Man: Implementing the Profit First System!
Ep 102 The Inner Game of Business with Torrin Minutillo

Profit Answer Man: Implementing the Profit First System!

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 35:39


Hi, I'm the Profit Answer Man Rocky Lalvani! I help small business owners simplify their financial reports so that they can make more informed business decisions with fewer hassles. We utilize the Profit First system created by Mike Michalowicz Effortless Cashflow Course: http://bit.do/effortlesscashflowcourse Schedule your free, no-obligation intro call: https://bookme.name/rockyl/lite/intro-appointment-15-minutes More about making profitability simple: http://profitcomesfirst.com/ Questions: questions@profitanswerman.com Bio: Torrin Minutillo   I started my business journey in 1989 at the age of 24, not having attended any business school. What I did have was plenty of enthusiasm, optimism and courage which helped me to make it all work.   Over the last 32 years I have bought, sold, started, ended, failed and succeeded in many businesses. After 24 years of fluctuating between doing okay , doing very well and other times just getting by, a combination of bad decisions, bad planning and bad luck led to reaching the lowest ebb in my business journey.   This was the catalyst to look for a new pathway forward. Over the next few years I was influenced to look inwardly to my inner game and started to turn things around.   Since 2014 I have been looking deeper to find more sustainable answers to business growth problems.   The culmination of that is the enterprise Attergy creating an ecosystem to pass on the valuable lessons and information I have gathered over the last 30 years.   Links: https://attergy.com/ https://attergy.com/book/ Email: rocky@profitcomesfirst.com Profit Answer Man Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/profitanswerman/ My podcast about living a richer more meaningful life: http://richersoul.com/ First 2 chapters of Profit First: https://sendfox.com/rocky Music provided by Junan from Junan Podcast Any financial advice is for educational purposes only and you should consult with an expert for your specific needs.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 616 (2-14-22): Uses of Water By and Against African Americans in U.S. Civil Rights History (Episode Three of the Series “Exploring Water in U.S. Civil Rights History”)

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 16, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:35).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Image Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 2-11-22.TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of February 14, 2022.  This week's episode –the third in a series of episodes on water in U.S. civil rights history—explores water access and use in African-American civil rights history.  The episode particularly focuses on a May 2018 essay, “The Role of Water in African American History,” written by Tyler Parry, of the University of Nevada-Las Vegas, for the blog Black Perspectives, published by the African American Intellectual History Society.  We set the stage with three water sounds related to different aspects of African American and civil rights history.  Have a listen for about 30 seconds and see what connections you think these sounds have to that history.   SOUNDS – ~32 sec. You heard Chesapeake Bay waves, children swimming at a public pool, and water coming out of a fire hose.  These represent three broad themes in African Americans' relationships with water: 1) uses of natural water bodies for livelihoods, recreation, transportation, repression, and resistance; 2) access, or lack thereof, to officially segregated water facilities, as occurred with swimming pools, water fountains, river ferries, and other facilities prior to the federal Civil Rights Act of 1964; and 3) water used as a weapon against citizens demonstrating for civil rights, as in the use of fire hoses on demonstrators in Birmingham, Alabama; Danville, Virginia; and other places.  In his essay on water in African American history, Tyler Parry notes these and several other ways that, quote, “water was often present at key moment in the Black experience.  Here are some other examples from Dr. Parry's essay: the location of African societies near water; the Atlantic transport of enslaved Africans to American colonies and then the United States; use of American waterways—including the James and other Virginia rivers—in the movement of enslaved people; rivers and other waters providing routes of escape from slavery; segregation of African Americans into areas susceptible to flooding; and the importance of water in culture and spiritual practices. Viewing these examples collectively, Dr. Parry's essay states, quote, “One finds that water holds a dual role in the history of Black culture and intellectual thought.  In one sense, water is an arena for resistance that liberates, nourishes, and sanctifies a people, but it can also be weaponized by hegemonic forces seeking to degrade, poison, or eliminate rebellious populations,” unquote. Thanks to Tyler Parry for his scholarship on this topic and for assisting Virginia Water Radio with this episode. We close with some music for the role of water in African American history.  Here's a 50-second arrangement of “Wade in the Water,” an African American spiritual dating back to the time of slavery in the United States and connected to the history of the Underground Railroad and the modern Civil Rights Movement.  This arrangement was composed by and is performed here by Torrin Hallett, a graduate student at the Yale School of Music. MUSIC - ~ 50 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Virginia Water Radio thanks Dr. Tyler Parry, University of Nevada-Las Vegas, for his help with this episode. The sounds heard in this episode were as follows:Chesapeake Bay waves on Kent Island, Md., recorded by Virginia Water Radio on June 22, 2010;swimmers at Blacksburg Aquatic Center in Blacksburg, Va., recorded by Virginia Water Radio in July 2019;fire hose sound recorded by user bigroomsound, made available for use by purchase on Pond5, online at https://www.pond5.com/sound-effects/item/5499472-watersprayfireman-hosevarious. The arrangement of “Wade in the Water” (a traditional hymn) heard in this episode is copyright 2021 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing this arrangement especially for Virginia Water Radio.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 566, 3-1-21, the introduction to Virginia Water Radio's series on water in U.S. civil rights history. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGE Sculpture in Birmingham, Alabama's, Kelly Ingram Park, recalling fire hoses being used on civil rights protestors in the 1960s.  Photo by Carol M. Highsmith, March 3, 2010.  Accessed from the Library of Congress, online at https://www.loc.gov/item/2010636978/, 2/15/22. SOURCES Used for AudioJeff Adelson, “New Orleans segregation, racial disparity likely worsened by post-Katrina policies, report says,” Nola.com (New Orleans Times-Picayune and New Orleans Advocate), April 5, 2018. Taylor Branch, Pillar of Fire: America in the King Years, 1963-65, Simon & Schuster, New York, 1998. Waldo E. Martin, Jr., and Patricia Sullivan, Civil Rights in the United States, Vol. One, Macmillian Reference USA, New York, 2000. Middle Passage Ceremonies and Port Markers Project, Transport on James River: “African Presence in Virginia,” undated, online at https://www.middlepassageproject.org/2020/04/29/african-presence-in-virginia/.  National Civil Rights Museum (Memphis, Tenn.), “Jim Crow Water Dippers,” online at https://www.civilrightsmuseum.org/from-the-vault/posts/water-dippers. Tyler Parry, “The Role of Water in African American History,” Black Perspectives, African American Intellectual History Society, May 4, 2018, online at https://www.aaihs.org/the-role-of-water-in-african-american-history/. James Patterson, Grand Expectations: The United States, 1945-1974, Oxford University Press, Oxford, England, and New York, N.Y., 1996. Donald M. Sweig, “The Importation of African Slaves to the Potomac River, 1732-1772,” The William and Mary Quarterly, Vol. 42, No. 4 (October 1985), pages 507-524; online at https://www.jstor.org/stable/1919032?seq=1#metadata_info_tab_contents. Virginia Commission to Examine Racial Inequity in Virginia Law, “Identifying and addressing the vestiges of inequity and inequality in Virginia's laws,” November 15, 2020, online at https://www.governor.virginia.gov/racial-inequity-commission/reports/, as of August 2021.  As of February 2022, this report is no longer available at this URL.  A description of the project is available in a February 10, 2021, news release from then Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam, online at https://www.governor.virginia.gov/newsroom/all-releases/2021/february/headline-892615-en.html. Victoria W. Wolcott, “The forgotten history of segregated swimming pools and amusement parks,” UB NOW, University of Buffalo, July 11, 2019. Ed Worley, “Water fountains symbolize 1960s civil rights movement,” U.S. Army blog (unnamed), February 22, 2018, online at https://www.army.mil/article/200456/water_fountains_symbolize_1960s_civil_rights_movement. Water Citizen LLC, “Until Justice Rolls Down Like Waters—Water & the Civil Rights Movement,” Water Citizen News, January 16, 2014, online at http://watercitizennews.com/until-justice-rolls-down-like-water-water-the-civil-rights-movement/. Howard Zinn, A People's History of the United States, HarperCollins, New York, N.Y., 2003. For More Information about Civil Rights in the United States British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), “The Civil Rights Movement in America,” online at https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/guides/zcpcwmn/revision/1. Georgetown Law Library, “A Brief History of Civil Rights in the United States,” online at https://guides.ll.georgetown.edu/civilrights. Howard University Law Library, “A Brief History of Civil Rights in the United States,” online at https://library.law.howard.edu/civilrightshistory/intro. University of Maryland School of Law/Thurgood Marshall Law Library, “Historical Publications of the United States Commission on Civil Rights,” online at https://law.umaryland.libguides.com/commission_civil_rights. U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, online at https://www.usccr.gov/. U.S. House of Representatives, “Constitutional Amendments and Major Civil Rights Acts of Congress Referenced in Black Americans in Congress,” online at https://history.house.gov/Exhibitions-and-Publications/BAIC/Historical-Data/Constitutional-Amendments-and-Legislation/. U.S. National Archives, “The Constitution of the United States,” online at https://www.archives.gov/founding-docs/constitution. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “History” subject category. This episode is part of the series, Exploring Water in U.S. Civil Rights History.  As of February 14, 2022, other episodes in the series are as follows: Episode 566, 3-1-21 – series overview.Episode 591, 8-23-21 – water symbolism in African American civil rights history. Following are links to some other previous episodes on the history of African Americans in Virginia. Episode 459, 2-11-19 – on Abraham Lincoln's arrival in Richmond at the end of the Civil War.Episode 128, 9-17-12 – on Chesapeake Bay Menhaden fishing crews and music.Episode 458, 2-4-19 – on Nonesuch and Rocketts Landing in Richmond. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATIONFollowing are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 History Theme1.2 – Virginia history and life in present-day Virginia.Grades K-3 Civics Theme3.12 – Importance of government in community, Virginia, and the United States, including government protecting rights and property of individuals.3.13 – People of America's diversity of ethnic origins, customs, and traditions, under a republican form of government with respect for individual rights and freedoms.Virginia Studies CourseVS.7 – Civil War issues and events, including the role of Virginia and the role of various ethnic groups.VS.8 – Reconstruction era in Virginia, including “Jim Crow” issues and industrialization.VS.9 – How national events affected Virginia and its citizens. United States History to 1865 CourseUSI.5 – Factors that shaped colonial America and conditions in the colonies, including how people interacted with the environment to produce goods and service.USI.9 – Causes, events, and effects of the Civil War. United States History: 1865-to-Present CourseUSII.3 – Effects of Reconstruction on American life.USII.4 – Developments and changes in the period 1877 to early 1900s.USII.6 – Social, economic, and technological changes from the 1890s to 1945.USII.8 – Economic, social, and political transformation of the United States and the world after World War II.USII.9 – Domestic and international issues during the second half of the 20th Century and the early 21st Century. Civics and Economics Course CE.2 – Foundations, purposes, and components of the U.S. Constitution. CE.3 – Citizenship rights, duties, and responsibilities. CE.6 – Government at the national level.CE.7 – Government at the state level.CE.8 – Government at the local level.CE.10 – Public policy at local, state, and national levels. World Geography CourseWG.2 – How selected physical and ecological processes shape the Earth's surface, including climate, weather, and how humans influence their environment and are influenced by it.WG.3 – How regional landscapes reflect the physical environment and the cultural characteristics of their inhabitants.Virginia and United States History CourseVUS.6 – Major events in Virginia and the United States in the first half of the 19th Century.VUS.7 – Knowledge of the Civil War and Reconstruction eras.VUS.13 – Changes in the United States in the second half of the 20th Century.VUS.14 – Political and social conditions in the 21st Century.Government CourseGOVT.4 – Purposes, principles, and structure of the U.S. Constitution.GOVT.5 – Federal system of government in the United States.GOVT.7 – National government organization and powers.GOVT.8 – State and local government organization and powers.GOVT.9 – Public policy process at local, state, and national levels.GOVT.11 – Civil liberties and civil rights. Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/.Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade.Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade.Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade.Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school.Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school.Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school.Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school.Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th grade.Episode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia's water resources, for 4th and 6th grade.

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Virginia Water Radio
Episode 615 (2-7-22): Winter Brings Brant to Atlantic Coastal Waters

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 7, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:17).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 2-4-22.TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of February 7, 2022.  This revised episode from December 2019 is part of a series this year of winter-related episodes. SOUND – ~ 5 sec. This week, we feature a feathered Virginia winter-resident mystery sound.  Have a listen to the sound for about 10 more seconds, and see if you know a relatively small, dark-colored goose species that migrates from Arctic shores to the mid-Atlantic coast for the winter.  And here's a hint: the name rhymes with migrant.SOUNDS - ~10 sec.If you guessed the Brant, you're right!  From its summer breeding grounds in northern Canada and Greenland, the Brant travels to wintering areas along the Atlantic from Massachusetts to North Carolina, including coastal Virginia and the Chesapeake Bay region.  That's the pathway for eastern sub-populations of the species; westernsub-populations migrate from Arctic parts of Canada and Alaska to the Pacific coastline.One of eight species of geese native to North America, Brant live in a variety of saltwater or estuarine habitats, feeding mostly on a number of kinds of aquatic plants.  In their winter habitats along the Atlantic Coast and around the Chesapeake, they prefer areas where they can feed on Eelgrass [Zostera marina].  Wintering Brant will eat various other aquatic plants, too, especially in response to reduced populations of Eelgrass.  According to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, however, Brant are more dependent on a single food type than other geese species, and this dependence can make Brant more vulnerable than other geese to starvation in some years.  Regarding Brant winter feeding, the Cornell Lab notes that severe conditions in eastern North America during the winter of 1976 and 1977 kept Brant from traditional winter habitats for several months.  As a result, Brant that year moved inland to feed in agricultural fields, suburban lawns, and golf courses, and over 40 years later, eastern Brant still forage inland from New York to Virginia. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use this week's sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs.  We close with about 40 seconds of music for Brant and other kinds of geese.  Here's “Geese Piece,” by Torrin Hallett, and graduate student at the Yale School of Music. MUSIC - ~43 sec – instrumental.SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 502, 12-9-19, The Brant sounds were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott, whose work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. “Geese Piece” is copyright 2016 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  This music was previously featured in Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 500, 11-25-19.  Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Brant in defensive position in Alaska.  Photo by Tim Bowman, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; specific URL for the photo was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/4267/rec/1, as of 2-7-22.Brant in Cape Charles, Va. (Northampton County), January 31, 2019.  Photo by Robert Suppa, made available on iNaturalist at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/20014700(as of 2-7-22) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT BRANT The scientific name of the Brant is Branta bernicla.Here are some points about Brant, excerpted from the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service/Brant/Life History/Brant,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040046&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19030, as of 2-7-22. Physical Description “The adult neck and head are black, except for a broken white crescent on each side of the neck.  The bill is black and the eye is brown.  The chest and foreback are black, sharply defined against the breast and sides.  The back and scapulars are brown with the feathers vaguely tipped with lighter brown.  The rump is dusky brown to dusky, with the sides of the rump white.  The forebreast and sides are pale ashy-gray, and the feathers of the sides are slightly browner, and broadly tipped with white.  The breast, belly and flanks are pale grayish to light grayish-brown.  The feet are black, and the tail is black….” Nesting Habitat and Behavior “This species breeds in Arctic North America, Arctic islands, northern Canada, [and] Greenland off- shore islands, river deltas, marshy uplands, and tundra lakes.  This species is seldom far from the coast.  They use marshy ground, sandy beaches, talus slopes, coastal sedge tundra, lowland coastal tundra just above the high tide line, low islands of tundra lakes and dry inland slopes covered with vegetation, low grass-covered flats dissected by tidal streams, [and] grassy islands and grassy slopes of low mountains near the coast.  The nest site is always in the open, on offshore or lake islands, or on low lying land. …The nest cover is low, thick, grass or sedge mat vegetation.  They nest in colonies. …The nest is initially a depression formed in soggy earth.  Sedges are molded around the scrape and down is later added. …The young are led to tidal flats or pools where they consume quantities of insects as well as grass….” Winter Habitat (of Eastern Sub-populations) “Non-breeding habitat is on the Atlantic Coast from Massachusetts to North Carolina.  They are coastal but also occur in lower Chesapeake Bay, the mouth of Chesapeake Bay, Chincoteague Bay, Gargathy Bay, and Accomack County.  Most of the time the 8000 that winter in Virginia are concentrated in Back Bay, [other] bays, tidal flats with abundant pondweed growth, mudflats, …lagoons, estuaries, saltmarshes, islands, …marine habitat, and shallow expanses of saltwater.  They are most abundant on Chesapeake Bay on the barrier beach side of the bays. They may be in shallow areas of brackish water.  They are gregarious, and often form large rafts on open water while feeding and resting.  They rest on sandbars, and roost on banks or on water near the feeding grounds.” Diet “This species forages in water, mud, and fields.  It immerses the head and neck and grazes or up-ends. This species prefers to feed in bays, shallow plant filled waters on the leeward side of barrier islands, spits, and sandbars and grassy fields.  This species feeds at low tide and does not dive. …The juveniles eat insects, grass, larvae, small crustaceans, sedge, marine invertebrates, mosquito larvae, and pondweed.  Eelgrass is the primary food, and they have been recently feeding extensively on sea lettuce due to the destruction of eelgrass beds.   They may also graze on saltmarsh pastures.  Other foods include moss, lichens, algae, sea lettuce, widgeon grass, …sedge, [and other materials]. …Animal foods are taken accidentally and include fish eggs, worms, snails, amphipods, insects, crustaceans, and clams.  When saltmarshes and bays freeze over, they will graze on grass planted in yards.” SOURCES Used for Audio Chesapeake Bay Program, “Eelgrass,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/entry/eelgrass.  Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org; the Brant entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Brant/. Cornell Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home(subscription required); the Brant entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/brant/cur/introduction.  This is the source for the information mentioned in the audio about Brant's dependence on Eelgrass.  Ducks Unlimited, online at https://www.ducks.org/hunting/waterfowl-id/geese. Encyclopedia Britannica, “Brant,” online at https://www.britannica.com/animal/brant-bird; and “Goose,” online at https://www.britannica.com/animal/goose-bird. Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, 2001.Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/; the Brant entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040046&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19027. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODESAll Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” and “Weather/Climate/Natural Disasters” subject categories.Following are links to several other winter-related episodes, including episodes on some birds that reside in Virginia typically only in winter (listed separately).  Please note that some of these episodes may be redone in early 2022; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes. Frost – Episode 597, 10-4-21.Freezing and ice – Episode 606, 12-6-21 (especially for grades K-3).Ice on ponds and lakes – Episode 404, 1-22-18 (especially for grades 4-8).Ice on rivers – Episode 406, 2-5-18 (especially for middle school grades).Polar Plunge® for Special Olympics – Episode 356, 2-20-17.Snow physics and chemistry – Episode 407, 2-12-18 (especially for high school grades).Snow, sleet, and freezing rain – Episode 613, 1-24-22.Snow terms – Episode 612, 1-17-22.Surviving freezing – Episode 556, 12-21-20.Winter precipitation and water supplies – Episode 567, 3-8-21.Winter weather preparedness – Episode 605, 11-29-21.Water thermodynamics – Episode 610, 1-3-22. Bird-related Episodes for Winter Audubon Society Christmas Bird Count – Episode 607, 12-13-21.American Avocet – Episode 543, 9-21-20.Canvasback (duck) – Episode 604, 11-22-21.Common Goldeneye (duck) – Episode 303, 2/15/16.Green-winged Teal (duck) – Episode 398, 12-11-17.Grebes (Horned and Red-necked) – Episode 233, 9-29-14.Loons – Episode 445, 11-5-18.Fall migration – Episode 603, 11-15-21.Northern Harrier – Episode 561, 1-25-21.Snow Goose – Episode 507, 1/13/20.Tundra Swan – Episode 554, 12-7-20.Winter birds sampler from the Chesapeake Bay area – Episode 565, 2-22-21. Following are other music pieces composed by Torrin Hallett for Virginia Water Radio, with episodes featuring the music. “A Little Fright Music” – used most recenlty in Episode 601, 10-31-21, on connections among Halloween, water, and the human body.“Beetle Ballet” – used in Episode 525, 5-18-20, on aquatic beetles.“Chesapeake Bay Ballad” – used most recently in Episode 604, 11-22-21, on Canvasback ducks.“Corona Cue” – used in Episode 517, 3-23-20, on the coronavirus pandemic.“Flow Stopper” – used in Episode 599, 10-18-21, on “Imagine a Day Without Water.”“Ice Dance” – used most recently in Episode 606, 12-6-21, on freezing of water.“Lizard Lied” – used in Episode 514, 3-2-20, on lizards.“New Year's Water” – used most recently in Episode 610, 1-3-22, on water thermodynamics and a New Year's Day New River wade-in.“Rain Refrain” – used most recently in Episode 559, 1-11-21, on record rainfall in 2020.“Runoff” – used in Episode 585, 7-12-21, on middle schoolers calling out stormwater-related water words.“Spider Strike” – used in Episode 523, 5-4-20, on fishing spiders.“Tropical Tantrum” – used most recently in Episode 580, 6-7-21, on the 2021 Atlantic tropical storm season preview.“Tundra Swan Song – used in Episode 554, 12-7-20, on Tundra Swans.“Turkey Tune” – used in Episode 343, 11-21-16, on the Wild Turkey. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLsSOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.”2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes 1.5 – Animals, including humans, have basic life needs that allow them to survive. 2.4 – Plants and animals undergo a series of orderly changes as they grow and develop, including life cycles. 2.5 – Living things are part of a system. 3.4 – Adaptations allow organisms to satisfy life needs and respond to the environment. Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems K.9 – There are patterns in nature. 1.7 – There are weather and seasonal changes. 2.7 – Weather patterns and seasonal changes affect plants, animals, and their surroundings. 4.4 – Weather conditions and climate have effects on ecosystems and can be predicted. Grades K-5: Earth Resources 3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems. 4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 6 6.8 – Land and water have roles in watershed systems, including the Chesapeake Bay estuary. Life Science LS.7 – Adaptations support an organism's survival in an ecosystem. LS.8 – Change occurs in ecosystems, communities, populations, and organisms over time. Biology BIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems. Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels (* indicates episode listed above in the “Related Water Radio Episodes” section). Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade.Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade.*Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade.*Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school.*Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school.Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school.Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school.Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th grade.Episode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia's water resources, for 4th and 6th grade.*Episode 606, 12-6-21 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.

Shin Megami Tensei Network
Fantasy Game Critic 2022 Draft Picking Special-Link 253 LIVE

Shin Megami Tensei Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 93:59


Spencer, Torrin, and May are back to pick games for 2022. This year we bet on even more games and know even less games that are coming out later this year. So stayed tuned as we update this league throughout the year. Support SMTN on https://www.patreon.com/SMTN Subscribe on YouTube Here: https://www.youtube.com/user/torchwood4SP Check out the Shin Megami Tensei Network podcast on iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/shin-megami-tensei-network/id1527210478 Spotify: https://t.co/wOXqDqPqoc?amp=1 Find us online Twitter @SMTNetwork @Torchwood4sp Join the Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/SMTNetwork Join our discord.gg/TkBgNpp

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 610 (1-3-22): Wading into the New Year, the New River, and Water Thermodynamics

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:20).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 12-31-21.TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of January 3, 2022.  This revised episode from January 2014 is part of a series this year of winter-related episodes. For this first week of 2022, we listen in on one Virginian's annual New Year's challenge to the laws of physics and chemistry—water-temperature physics and chemistry, that is.  Have a listen for about 35 seconds. SOUNDS AND VOICE - ~35 sec – “It's the New Year, on the shore of the New River. It's 22 degrees and perfect time for a swim. Happy New Year, everyone! Happy New Year! [Series of exclamations about the cold.] Ah, welcome to Antarctica.” You've been listening to Blacksburg resident Alan Moore during the 2014 version of his annual New Year's Day wade into the New River.  The watery welcome to that January 1st—unaided by a wet-suit—lasted only a few seconds, not as much because of the 22-degree air temperature as because of the 39-degree water temperature.  Water that cold can cause exhaustion or unconsciousness within 15 to 30 minutes, and even water at 60 or 70 degrees can be dangerously chilling over one to two hours, depending on a person's body size and other factors. Water's capacity to chill a human body is much greater than that of air at the same temperature, for two reasons.  First, liquids generally conduct heat more rapidly than gases, because liquids are denser (that is, the molecules are closer together).  And second, liquid water has chemical attractions between molecules that can absorb high amounts of energy, such as heat energy coming from a person's body.  These and other interactions among water, heat, and temperature are part of water's thermodynamics, and they exert a big influence on weather, aquatic environments, biology, and taking a plunge on New Year's or any other day. Thanks to Alan Moore for lending his voice and wade-in sounds to this episode.  We close this first episode of the New Year with about 45 seconds of music to give a hydrological hello to 2022. Here's “New Year's Water,” by Torrin Hallett, a graduate student at the Yale School of Music. MUSIC - ~46 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 195, 1-6-14. Thanks to Alan Moore for allowing Virginia Water Radio to record sounds during his annual New River wade-in on January 1, 2014.“New Year's Water” is copyright 2016 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing the piece especially for Virginia Water Radio.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music. More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio in Episode 349, 1-2-17.Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Two photos of the New River near the county line between Giles and Montgomery counties in Virginia, looking upstream: At dawn on January 1, 2014 (upper photo) and at 8:40 a.m. on January 1, 2022 (lower photo). EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT COLD WATER SAFETY The following is quoted from the National Weather Service, “Cold Water Hazards and Safety,” online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/coldwater. “Warm air doesn't always mean warm water in lakes, streams or oceans.  Fifty-five degree water may not sound very cold, but it can be deadly.  Plunging into cold water of any temperature becomes dangerous if you aren't prepared for what the sudden exposure can do to your body and brain.  Warm air temperatures can create a false sense of security for boaters and beach goers, so if you are planning to be on or near the water, arrive knowing the conditions and how to protect yourself.  Cold water drains body heat up to 4 times faster than cold air.  When your body hits cold water, “cold shock” can cause dramatic changes in breathing, heart rate and blood pressure.  The sudden gasp and rapid breathing alone creates a greater risk of drowning even for confident swimmers in calm waters. In rougher open water this danger increases.  Unplanned immersion in cold water can be life-threatening for anyone without protection from the temperatures or a lifejacket to help you stay afloat.  When Cold Shock and Hypothermia begin to impact your ability to think and act, life jackets and flotation can create extra time for help to arrive or for you to get out of danger.   Even the most experienced cold water surfers, swimmers or boaters know to prepare for the conditions.” SOURCES Used for Audio Encyclopedia Britannica, “Thermodynamics,” online at https://www.britannica.com/science/thermodynamics. J. J. Hidore and J. E. Oliver, Climatology—An Atmospheric Science, MacMillian, New York, 1993, pages 55-58. Linus Pauling, General Chemistry, Dover, New York, 1970, pages 343-350. On survival in cold water: National Weather Service, “Cold Water Safety,” online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/coldwater. University of Minnesota Sea Grant, “Hypothermia Prevention: Survival in Cold Water,” at http://www.seagrant.umn.edu/coastal_communities/hypothermia; see the site's “How Long Have I Got?” section for information on how long one can survive being immersed in cold water. For More Information about Cold Weather Safety, Hypothermia, and Frostbite National Weather Service, “Cold Weather Safety,” online at https://www.weather.gov/safety/cold. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Prevent Hypothermia & Frostbite,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/winter/staysafe/hypothermia.html. Virginia Department of Health, “Newsroom/Winter Weather Preparedness,” at https://www.vdh.virginia.gov/news/public-relations-contacts/winter-weather-preparedness/. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Science” and “Weather/Climate/Natural Disasters” subject categories. Following are links to other episodes that focus on an incoming New Year. Episode 296, 12-28-15 – Setting a Course for 2016 with ‘On a Ship' by Kat Mills.Episode 349, 1-2-17 – Water for a World of New Years, Featuring “New Year's Water” by Torrin Hallett.Episode 401, 1-1-18 – Diving into 2018 with “Driving Rain” by Chamomile and Whiskey.Episode 453, 12-31-18 – Water and the New Year of 2019.Episode 505, 12-30-19 – Eyes on the Water as the 2020s Arise. Following are links to several other winter-related episodes, including episodes on some birds that reside in Virginia typically only in winter (listed separately).  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in late 2021 and early 2022; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes.Frost – Episode 597, 10-4-21.Freezing and ice – Episode 606, 12-6-21 (especially for grades K-3).Ice on ponds and lakes – Episode 404, 1-22-18 (especially for grades 4-8).Ice on rivers – Episode 406, 2-5-18 (especially for middle school grades).Polar Plunge® for Special Olympics – Episode 356, 2-20-17.Snow physics and chemistry – Episode 407, 2-12-18 (especially for high school grades). Snow, sleet, and freezing rain – Episode 461, 2-25-19.Snow terms – Episode 300, 1-25-16.Surviving freezing – Episode 556, 12-21-20.Winter precipitation and water supplies – Episode 567, 3-8-21.Winter weather preparedness – Episode 605, 11-29-21.Bird-related Episodes for Winter Audubon Society Christmas Bird Count – Episode 607, 12-13-21.American Avocet – Episode 543, 9-21-20.Brant (goose) – Episode 502, 12-9-19. Canvasback (duck) – Episode 604, 11-22-21.Common Goldeneye (duck) – Episode 303, 2/15/16.Green-winged Teal (duck) – Episode 398, 12-11-17.Grebes (Horned and Red-necked) – Episode 233, 9-29-14.Loons – Episode 445, 11-5-18.Fall migration – Episode 603, 11-15-21.Northern Harrier – Episode 561, 1-25-21.Snow Goose – Episode 507, 1/13/20. Tundra Swan – Episode 554, 12-7-20. Winter birds sampler from the Chesapeake Bay area – Episode 565, 2-22-21. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.”2018 Science SOLs Grades K-3 plus 5: Force, Motion, and Energy 5.2 – Energy can take many forms. Grades K-3 plus 5: Matter 5.7 – Matter has properties and interactions. Grades K-5: Earth and Space Systems 4.4 – Weather conditions and climate have effects on ecosystems and can be predicted. Grade 6 6.4 – There are basic sources of energy and energy can be transformed. 6.6 – Water has unique physical properties and has a role in the natural and human-made environment. Physical Science PS.5 – Energy is conserved and transformed. Chemistry CH.7 – Thermodynamics explains the relationship between matter and energy. Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels (* indicates episode listed above in the “Related Water Radio Episodes” section). Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade.*Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade.*Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school.*Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school.Episode 483, 7-29-19 – on buoyancy and drag, for middle school and high school.Episode 524, 5-11-20 – on sounds by water-related animals, for elementary school through high school.Episode 531, 6-29-20 – on various ways that animals get water, for 3rd and 4th grade.Episode 539, 8-24-20 – on basic numbers and facts about Virginia's water resources, for 4th and 6th grade.*Episode 606, 12-6-21 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 609 (12-27-21): A Year of Water Sounds and Music – 2021 Edition

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:31).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 12-24-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of December 27, 2021.  SOUND - ~ 5 sec That's the sound of a Belted Kingfisher at Stroubles Creek in Blacksburg, Va., on December 21, 2021.  The year-end chattering of Virginia Water Radio's favorite bird sets the stage for our annual look-back on Water Radio's year.  We start with a medley of mystery sounds and voices from six episodes in 2021.  Have a listen for about 40 seconds, and see how many you recognize. SOUNDS – ~38 sec If you guessed all of most of those, you're a water-sound world champion! You heard Brimley's Chorus Frog;Virginia Tech graduate Maddy Grupper discussing her research on public trust in water systems;Virginia Tech's siren used for tornado warnings;names of some 2021 Atlantic tropical cyclones;Canvasback ducks; andice on Claytor Lake in Pulaski County, Va. Thanks to the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources for permission to use the chorus frog sound; to Lang Elliott for the Canvasback sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs; to Maddy Grupper for the episode on her research; and to Blacksburg friends for the tropical cyclone name call-outs. We close out 2021 with a two-minute sample of music heard in episodes this year.  Here are excerpts of “Wade in the Water,” by Torrin Hallett; “Racing the Sun,” by the Faux Paws; “All Creatures Were Meant to Be Free,” by Bob Gramann; “John Ashe's Spring,” by New Standard; “The Coming Spring,” by Andrew VanNorstand with vocalist Kailyn Wright; and “On a Ship,” by Kat Mills, with violinist Rachel Handman. Thanks to those musicians for permission to use their music. So long, soon, to 2021, and here's hoping for a safe, sound, and sufficiently hydrated 2022. MUSIC – ~105 sec From “Wade in the Water” - ~18 sec – instrumental. From “Racing the Sun” - ~20 sec – instrumental. From “All Creatures Were Meant to be Free” - ~10 sec – instrumental. From “John Ashe's Spring” - ~13 sec – instrumental. From “The Coming Spring” - ~20 sec – Lyrics: “I went outside, the rain fallin' on the branches bare.   And I smiled, ‘cause I could feel a change in the air.” From “On a Ship” - ~25 sec – Lyrics: “We are riding on a ship.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Sounds Used and Their Previous 2021 Virginia Water Radio Episodes (Listed in order heard in this episode's audio) The Belted Kingfisher sound was recorded by Virginia Water Radio at Stroubles Creek in Blacksburg, Va., December 21, 2021. The sound of Brimley's Chorus Frog was from “The Calls of Virginia Frogs and Toads” CD, copyright 2008 by the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (now the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources) and Lang Elliott/NatureSoundStudio, used with permission.   The CD accompanies A Guide to the Frogs and Toads of Virginia, Special Publication Number 3, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries; as of February 5, 2021, that publication is no longer available at Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources online store, https://www.shopdwr.com/.  For more information, contact the Department at P.O. Box 90778, Henrico, VA 23228-0778; phone: (804) 367-1000 (VTDD); main Web page is https://dwr.virginia.gov/; to send e-mail, visit https://dwr.virginia.gov/contact/.  This sound was used in Episode 563, 2-8-21. Virginia Tech 2020 graduate Maddy Grupper discussed her research on public trust in water systems in Episode 564, 2-15-21. The tornado-warning siren was recorded in Blacksburg, Va., in the early morning of April 28, 2011.  This sound was used in Episode 568, 3-15-21. The call-out of Atlantic tropical cyclone names for the 2021 season were recorded by Blacksburg friends of Virginia Water radio in June 2021.  The voices were sued in Episode 580, 6-7-21. The sounds of Canvasback ducks were sound were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot's work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, online at https://musicofnature.com/.  These sounds were used in Episode 604, 11-22-21. The Claytor Lake ice sound was recorded at the Sloan Creek inlet of the lake, near Draper in Pulaski County, Va., on January 6, 2018. This sound was used in Episode 606, 12-6-21. Musical Selections Used and Their Previous 2021 Virginia Water Radio Episodes (Listed in order heard in this episode's audio) The arrangement of “Wade in the Water” (a traditional hymn) heard in this episode is copyright 2021 by Torrin Hallett, used with permission.  Torrin is a 2018 graduate of Oberlin College and Conservatory in Oberlin, Ohio; a 2020 graduate in Horn Performance from Manhattan School of Music in New York; and a 2021 graduate of the Lamont School of Music at the University of Denver.  He is currently a graduate student at the Yale School of Music.  More information about Torrin is available online at https://www.facebook.com/torrin.hallett.  Thanks very much to Torrin for composing this arrangement especially for Virginia Water Radio.  This music was used in Episode 566, 3-1-21, water in U.S. civil rights history. “Racing the Sun,” from the 2021 album “The Faux Paws,” is copyright by Great Bear Records, used with permission of Andrew VanNorstrand.  More information about The Faux Paws is available online at https://thefauxpawsmusic.com/.  More information about Great Bear Records is available online at https://www.greatbearmusic.com/.  This music was used in Episode 602, 11-8-21, on photosynthesis, including its connection to climate change. “All Creatures Were Meant to Be Free,” from the 1995 album “Mostly True Songs,” is copyright by Bob Gramann, used with permission.  More information about Bob Gramann is available online at https://www.bobgramann.com/.  This music was used in Episode 561, 1-25-21, on the Northern Harrier. “John Ashe's Spring,” from the 2016 album “Bluegrass,” is copyright by New Standard, used with permission.  The title refers to a spring near Ivy, Virginia (Albemarle County).  More information about New Standard is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com.  This music was used in Episode 576, 5-10-21, an introduction to springs. “The Coming Spring,” from the 2019 album “That We Could Find a Way to Be,” is copyright by Andrew VanNorstrand, used with permission.  More information about Andrew VanNorstrand is available online at https://www.andrewvannorstrand.com/.  Information on accompanying artists on “The Coming Spring” is online at https://andrewvannorstrandmusic.bandcamp.com/track/the-coming-spring.  This music was used in Episode 572, 4-12-21, on warblers and spring bird migration. “On a Ship,” from the 2015 album “Silver,” is copyright by Kat Mills, used with permission.  Accompanying artists on the song are Ida Polys, vocals; Rachel Handman, violin; and Nicholas Polys, banjo.   More information about Kat Mills is available online at http://www.katmills.com/.  This music was used in Episode 602, 11-8-21, on photosynthesis, including its connection to climate change. IMAGESAn Image Sampler from Episodes in 2021 From Episode 561, 1-25-21: Northern Harrier, photographed in southeastern Virginia, January 23, 2021.  Photo by iNaturalist user keyojimbo, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/68521040(as of 12-27-21) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.From Episode 563, 2-8-21: Brimley's Chorus Frog, photographed in Chesapeake, Virginia, February 28, 2019.  Photo by iNaturalist user jkleopfer, made available online at https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/20834796(as of 2-8-21) for use under Creative Commons license “Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0.”  Information about this Creative Commons license is available online at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.From Episode 580, 6-7-21: Predictions for the 2021 Atlantic tropical storm season.  Graphic from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, “NOAA Predicts Another Active Atlantic Hurricane Season,” 5/20/21, online at https://www.noaa.gov/media-release/noaa-predicts-another-active-atlantic-hurricane-season.From Episode 602, 11-8-21: Diagram explaining carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake by trees and other woody plants during photosynthesis, resulting in carbon storage, or “carbon sequestration,” a key concept in the issue of climate change.  Diagram courtesy of John Seiler, Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation.From Episode 606, 12-6-21: Thin ice on a pond in Heritage Park, Blacksburg, Va., December 9, 2021.SOURCES Please see the episodes mentioned and hyperlinked above under “Audio Notes and Acknowledgments” for sources of information about the topics of the individual episodes. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Overall Importance o

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