Podcasts about etzel

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  • 28PODCASTS
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  • Oct 1, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about etzel

Latest podcast episodes about etzel

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano
BFT SHOW: Jaydon Grant, Jim Etzel, Jon Wilner, Matt Prehm

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 137:34


John Canzano talks with Beavers player Jaydon Grant about their upcoming game against Washington. Sport Oregon CEO Jim Etzel discusses next year's NASCAR event in Portland. Then Jon WIlner of the San Jose Mercury News shares his thoughts on the Pac-12. Finally Matt Prehm of 24/7 Sports previews the Ducks game at Stanford. We also play What's on Tap and more. Subscribe NOW to this podcast for more great content. Follow @JohnCanzanoBFT on Twitter

Voces del Español
VOCES DEL ESPAÑOL 075 Etzel Hinojosa, Mtra. en Lingüística Aplicada

Voces del Español

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 35:37


Entrevista con Etzel Hinojosa, Mtra. en Lingüística Aplicada por la UNAM. Nos habla sobre la visión del mexicano como un ser inferior en narrativas inglesas de tres grandes autores: D.H. Lawrence, Aldous Huxley y Graham Greene.

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano
BFT SHOW: Brian Kappel, Jeremy Ybarra, Jim Etzel

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2021 137:57


John Canzano talks with CFP designer Brian Kappel about the College Football Playoff. Then bodybuilder Jeremy Ybbarra joins the show to talk about his routine and why he shouldn't be judged based on his looks. Finally, Sport Oregon CEO Jim Etzel discusses the state of sports in Oregon. We also play The Big Splash, Punch It! Audio, and the Culligan Water Cooler Report. Subscribe NOW to this podcast for more great content. Follow @JohnCanzanoBFT on Twitter.

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano
BFT Interview: Jim Etzel

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2021 21:54


John Canzano talks to Sport Oregon CEO Jim Etzel about the current landscape of sports in the state of Oregon. Subscribe NOW to this podcast for more great content. Follow @JohnCanzanoBFT on Twitter.

Mind the Shift
62. Our state of consciousness alters every day – Etzel Cardeña

Mind the Shift

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 55:10


”We do not experience electro-chemical impulses. What we experience are colors, movements and shapes”, says Etzel Cardeña, one of the leading researchers on parapsychology in the world. What he is referring to is qualia, individual instances of subjective, conscious experience, whose origins have not been possible to directly connect to the brain. ”We don't have anything even close to a satisfactory account, from a reductionist or materialist position, for how we are conscious of anything”, says the professor of psychology at Lund university in southern Sweden. There is evidence that we receive information that is not coming from the senses, information that is temporally and spatially distant. There is also a lot of nonsense being said in the context of parapsychology. Therefore, Cardeña points out, the scientific method is crucial. Researchers must be able to independently confirm what people say they are experiencing and discount alternative plausible explanations. Properly made studies point to an array of psychic abilities that seem to be real. Cardeña lists four main categories: telepathy, clairvoyance, precognition and psychokinesis or telekinesis. It is actually common to have experiences that resemble at least the first three kinds of phenomenon. Many dismiss them because of fear. They hear these kinds of experiences are ”paranormal”, i.e. not normal. But we all have these abilities. Some are better at them than others. ”It's no different than the ability to hit a tennis serve”, Etzel Cardeña says. How can they be explained? A tenable theory is that time and space are not as we experience them in everyday life. There might be more dimensions. ”On some level where distance doesn't make any difference we might be interconnected in a way. Past, present and future might be adjacent.” And what about altered states of consciousness? The truth is that we all go through different states of consciousness every day: we sleep, we dream, we have deep sleep, we are in between waking state and sleep. ”This is not paranormal. We have them for a number of reasons”, Cardeña says. ”Our waking state is good for some things but not for others. It is good for reacting to the senses. But it is inflexible. You ruminate about things. In other states you may have another flexibility. In a dream you may come up with a creative, novel idea that you would never have come up with in the waking state. It's the same with psychedelic drugs.” Etzel Cardeña is somewhat skeptical of the idea that altered states of consciousness of the kind that for example near death experiencers report represent something ”higher” in ourselves. And when asked if he thinks the shaman-mystic traditions have insights about consciousness that were lost when western science came along, he answers by rejecting the notion, held by some, that everything was ”hunky-dory” until science came along and then it went down the drain. ”People have done ghastly things in shamanic and non-shamanic traditions alike. Humans have been in many ways terrible all along, with or without science.” Cardeña is also skeptical of the idea that humankind is becoming more enlightened. ”But fortunately there have always been people who have been caring and compassionate, and thanks to those people we haven't destroyed humanity or other sentient beings on the planet.”

The Joe Beaver Show
The Joe Beaver Show May 18 Kerry Eggers, Joe Etzel UOP, Brian Sleik UOP pbp

The Joe Beaver Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2021 121:48


Sports to the Max with Mike Max
Sara Etzel- Trades Ambassador Project

Sports to the Max with Mike Max

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2021 7:11


Mike Max talks with Sara Etzel from the Trades Ambassador Project about providing options for people needing a career, bringing companies together with educators, and being a Force For Good.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano
BFT SHOW: Jim Etzel, Nick Daschel, Tim Euhus

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2021 137:51


John Canzano talks with Sport Oregon CEO Jim Etzel about the return of fans to arenas in the state. Then the Oregonian's Nick Daschel talks Beavers football ahead of Saturday's spring game. Then former Beavers tight end Tim Euhus talks about his time with the program and his work with kids. We also play The Big Splash, The Culligan Water Cooler Report, and more. Subscribe NOW to this podcast for more great content. Follow @JohnCanzanoBFT on Twitter.

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano
BFT Interview: Jim Etzel, Sport Oregon

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2021 22:36


John Canzano talks with the CEO of Sport Oregon, Jim Etzel. Canzano asks Etzel for his reaction to fans returning to stadiums in the state, the advantages that more affluent families have when it comes to youth sports during the pandemic, how important it is to clean up the city when it comes to Portland remaining a viable option as an expansion city for the MLB and the women's Final Four, importance of having nationally televised soccer games at Providence park again, and more. Subscribe NOW to this podcast for more great content. Follow @JohnCanzanoBFT on Twitter.

Open Book and History
Learning from our life experience with Sarah Etzel

Open Book and History

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2021 54:13


In this episodes Sarah Etzel, shared her very inspiring insight on becoming a multi cultural person in today's diverse world as well as building a peaceful and a connected world by using her current teaching experience in Baltimore, her previous study abroad program and Internship in Rwanda (An African Country)

New Thinking Allowed Audio Podcast
Psi and the Visual Arts with Etzel Cardeña

New Thinking Allowed Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2021 49:14


Etzel Cardeña holds the endowed Thorsen Chair in psychology at Lund University in Sweden, where he directs the Center for Research on Consciousness and Anomalous Psychology (CERCAP). Among his books are Varieties of Anomalous Experience published by the American Psychological Association (APA) and now in its second edition, the two-volume Altering Consciousness: A Multidisciplinary Perspective, … Continue reading "Psi and the Visual Arts with Etzel Cardeña"

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano
BFT SHOW: AARON FENTRESS, JIM ETZEL, DAVE GUNDERSON

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2021 137:44


John Canzano talks with the Oregonian's Aaron Fentress about his exchange with Damian Lillard last night, and the Trail Blazers' chances this season. Then Jim Etzel and Dave Gunderson speak about Sport Oregon and their work with Sport Oregon and Hopscotch Foundation as they team up for Fuel the Future. We also play The Culligan Water Cooler Report, Punch It! Audio, the 2@2 and more. Subscribe NOW to this podcast for more great content. Follow @JohnCanzanoBFT on Twitter.

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano
BFT Interview: Jim Etzel and Dave Gunderson

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2021 23:39


John Canzano talks with Jim Etzel and Dave Gunderson regarding a special event they collaborated on in December called "Fuel The Future". The event was a collaboration between Sport Oregon and the Hopscotch Foundation, which generated $254k in donations. Both organizations continue to make a significant impact on sports and food for the youth in the state of Oregon. Canzano asks Etzel and Gunderson about the event, what their plans are for each organization moving forward, and much more. Subscribe NOW to this podcast for more great content. Follow @JohnCanzanoBFT on Twitter.

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast
Jared Etzel: Oral History Interview

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2020 102:57


This interview is with Jared Etzel of Domaine Roy & fils. In this interview, Jared talks about how he got into wine, what it was like growing up on the Beaux Fréres property, his experiences working in the industry and abroad, what it was like setting up Domaine Roy and what he looked for in the property, and some differences between Domaine Roy and Beaux Fréres. Jared also speaks about what he hopes consumers take away from the wines, how the industry has changed recently, and what he sees for the future for himself and the industry. This interview was conducted by Rich Schmidt at Domaine Roy on August 6, 2020.

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano
BFT SHOW: Scott Rueck, Jim Etzel

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2020 137:48


Guests: Scott Rueck, Jim Etzel John Canzano talks to Oregon State women's basketball head coach Scott Rueck as they prepared for their home game against San Francisco Thursday afternoon. Jim Etzel of Sport Oregon joins the show and talks to Canzano about the "Fuel The Future" event, a night to benefit the Hopscotch Foundation and Sport Oregon Foundation in an effort to help area kids. Plus Anna stops by the show, we play the Big Splash, Punch it Audio, the Culligan Water Cooler Report, and the 2@2. Subscribe NOW to this podcast for more great content. Follow @JohnCanzanoBFT on Twitter.

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano
BFT Interview: Jim Etzel

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2020 21:18


John Canzano talks with Jim Etzel, CEO of Sport Oregon, about the latest developments on the efforts of landing NCAA Tournament action in Portland, the next scheduled edition of the Phil Knight Invitational, why MLB to PDX is 'very much alive', and his participation in a fundraising event tonight 'Fuel the Future', partnering with the Hopscotch Foundation and helping area kids. Subscribe NOW to this podcast for more great content. Follow @JohnCanzanoBFT on Twitter.

PaperPlayer biorxiv neuroscience
Frontoparietal pattern similarity analyses of cognitive control in monozygotic twins

PaperPlayer biorxiv neuroscience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2020


Link to bioRxiv paper: http://biorxiv.org/cgi/content/short/2020.11.19.390492v1?rss=1 Authors: Tang, R., Etzel, J. A., Kizhner, A., Braver, T. S. Abstract: The ability to flexibly adapt thoughts and actions in a goal-directed manner appears to rely on cognitive control mechanisms that are strongly impacted by individual differences. A powerful research strategy for investigating the nature of individual variation is to study monozygotic (identical) twins. Clear evidence of twin similarity effects have been observed in prior behavioral and neuroimaging studies, yet within the domain of cognitive control, the specificity and neural underpinnings of this similarity remains elusive. Here, we utilize a multi-task, within-subjects event-related neuroimaging design (with fMRI) to investigate twin effects through multivariate pattern similarity analyses. We focus on a set of fronto-parietal brain parcels exhibiting consistently increased activation associated with cognitive control demands across four task domains: selective attention, context processing, multi-tasking, and working memory. In these parcels, healthy young adult male and female monozygotic twin pairs had similar activation patterns, reliably in all tasks, a finding not observed in unrelated pairs. Twin activation pattern similarity effects were clearest under high control demands, were not present in a set of task-unrelated parcels, and were primarily observed during the within-trial timepoints in which the control demands peaked. Together, these results indicate that twin similarity in the neural representation of cognitive control may be domain-general but also functionally and temporally specific in relation to the level of control demand. The findings suggest a genetic and/or environmental basis for individual variation in cognitive control function, and highlight the potential of twin-based neuroimaging designs for exploring heritability questions within this domain. Copy rights belong to original authors. Visit the link for more info

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano
BFT SHOW: Jim Etzel, Scott Leykam, Ruth Barrett

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2020 137:57


Guests: Jim Etzel, Scott Leykam, Ruth Barrett John Canzano talks with these guests about why Portland State and the University of Portland are the only schools in the country to not be cleared by the state government to practice, the toxic culture of niche youth sports on the East Coast, and shark attacks in Australia. Plus, The Big Splash and 2@2. Subscribe NOW to this podcast for more great content. Follow @JohnCanzanoBFT on Twitter.

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano
BFT Interview: Jim Etzel

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2020 27:52


Guest: Jim Etzel - CEO Sport Oregon John Canzano talks with Jim Etzel about why Portland State and the University of Portland are not cleared by the state government to practice, why Sport Oregon is getting involved, and what impact this could have on the state as a whole. Subscribe NOW to this podcast for more great content. Follow @JohnCanzanoBFT on Twitter.

The Behavioral Observations Podcast with Matt Cicoria
Inside JABA #5: SEAB Statement of Concern Issued for Rekers and Lovaas (1974); Session 135

The Behavioral Observations Podcast with Matt Cicoria

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2020 55:13


The latest issue of JABA starts off with an editorial by the Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior's (SEAB) board in which it issued a statement of concern for the controversial paper titled, Behavioral treatment of deviant sex-role behaviors in a male child. This paper described a case study conducted by George Rekers and Ivar Lovaas, and was published in the pages of JABA in 1974. To get right to the point, let me read you the editorial's abstract: In an early study in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Rekers and Lovaas (1974) evaluated the Behavioral Treatment of Deviant Sex-role Behaviors in a Male Child. They investigated the use of reinforcement and punishment to target non-gender conforming behaviors of a 5-year-old male child. This study was considered by some to be controversial and concerning, even near the time of publication (Nordyke et al. 1977; Winkler, 1977). The concerns focused on the ethicality of selecting non-gender conforming behavior as a target response and the use of punishment for this type of response, particularly at the behest of parents when the young child was not seemingly distressed. The study has subsequently been used as empirical support for conversion therapy creating concerns about misinterpretation of the original article and harm to the LGBTQ+ community. This editorial reviews the concerns originally presented by Nordyke et al. and Winkler and issues an official Expression of Concern about the various harms that have been associated with this paper. I first heard about this paper many years ago, but it was to my attention again at the 2019 NH ABA conference. At that event, Dr. Sarah Campeau did a great job reviewing this paper, along with cataloging the devastating effects the study had on the participant later on in his life. So in this episode of the podcast, Drs. Linda Leblanc and Henry Roane discuss the rationale behind the statement of concern. In doing so, they talk about why the statement was written now versus earlier in the history of JABA, and what exactly a Statement of Concern is, and why issuing the statement was the specific action taken instead of other options, such as retracting the paper altogether. We also get into the actual shortcomings of the study, particularly in light of the ethical and moral standards of modern times. Linda and Hank close the podcast by giving some advice for practitioners on how to respond to concerns of stakeholders if or when they bring up this or other studies that are not consistent with more modern ethics and values. I should also note that our Zoom connection was spotty here and there, and I apologize if it interferes with the audio quality that you've come to expect from the show. That said, I don't think it poor connection detracted from the substance of the conversation. Dr. Roane is a new voice in the Inside JABA Series, so by way of introduction, Hank is the Gregory S. Liptak MD Professor of Child Development in the Department of Pediatrics at Upstate Medical University in Syracuse NY. In this capacity, he serves as the Chief of the Division of Development, Behavior and Genetics where he directs medical and behavior analysis clinics that provide treatment services for children affected by autism and related disorders. Hank is also the Chair of the Behavior Analysis Studies program in the College of Health Professions at Upstate. As we mention during the conversation, Hank is also the Treasurer of SEAB. In keeping with the previous Inside JABA Series podcasts, there are no ads or sponsors on this episode. However, this episode is eligible for BACB Continuing Education. We also felt that the conversation touched on many code elements in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code, and as such, it can be counted as an Ethics CEU. Lastly, 50% of the proceeds from sales of the Inside JABA Series CEUs are donated to SEAB. So for more information on the Inside JABA Series CEUs, or any other CEUs that are available through Behavioral Observations, click here. I've also set up a Link Tree across all my social media platforms where you can access all the different podcast offerings, including episode shownotes. For example, if you follow the show on Instagram (@behavioralobservations), just go to the link in the bio, and you'll have many podcast-related links at your fingertips. Here are the links to the resources that were discussed in this episode: Editor's Note: Societal changes and expression of concern about Rekers and Lovaas' (1974) Behavioral Treatment of Deviant Sex‐Role Behaviors in a Male Child. The Rekers and Lovaas (1974) study. Nordyke, Baer, Etzel, and LeBlanc (1977), response to Rekers and Lovaas. Winkler (1977), response to Rekers and Lovaas. Rekers' response to Nordyke et al. and Winkler (1977). The Anderson Cooper four-part expose on the long term effects on the participant in Rekers and Lovaas. Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) website. Retraction Watch. CEU opportunities from Behavioral Observations. BOP linktr.ee (clearinghouse of podcast-related links).

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano
BFT SHOW: Jonathan Smith, Jim Etzel

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2020 136:37


Guests: Jonathan Smith, Jim Etzel John Canzano talks with these guests about the NCAA's decision to pass on Portland as a Final Four destination for 2025 & 2026, the factors at play in that decision, Oregon State suiting up for practice, and the importance of knowing your circle. Plus, The Big Splash, Punch It! Audio, the Culligan Water Cooler Report, and 2@2. Subscribe NOW to this podcast for more great content. Follow @JohnCanzanoBFT on Twitter.

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano
BFT Interview: Jim Etzel

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2020 21:46


Guest: Jim Etzel - Sport Oregon John Canzano talks with Jim Etzel about the NCAA's decision to pass on Portland as a Final Four destination for 2025 & 2026 and the factors that went into that decision. They also discuss upcoming events to look forward to in coming years. Subscribe NOW to this podcast for more great content. Follow @JohnCanzanoBFT on Twitter.

Round the Rotary Podcast with JP Warren
Round the Rotary guest Ethan Etzel

Round the Rotary Podcast with JP Warren

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2020 74:26


On this episode Ethan Etzel (CEO - Royal Composites, LLC) joins us to discuss how he got into the oil and gas industry after switching focuses from medical, to business to mechanical engineering. After several years doing various roles, he met his business partner and formed his current company. Ethan discusses how their company was able to adapt and pivot quickly during these times while maintaining their QA/QC. He gives a pretty optimistic stance on the oil and gas industry as it relates to renewables. We discuss how during these times it's important to take care of your mental health by: getting outside, unplugging from social media and the news, touching base with friends, separating work and personal life. His goal is to eventually go on a cell phone smashing spree as everyone is now addicted to them and he's tired of how things are progressing. Be dynamic with your expectations and unplug from the noise.

PaperPlayer biorxiv neuroscience
The Dual Mechanisms of Cognitive Control (DMCC) Project

PaperPlayer biorxiv neuroscience

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2020


Link to bioRxiv paper: http://biorxiv.org/cgi/content/short/2020.09.18.304402v1?rss=1 Authors: Braver, T. S., Kizhner, A., Tang, R., Freund, M. C., Etzel, J. A. Abstract: The Dual Mechanisms of Cognitive Control (DMCC) project provides an ambitious and rigorous empirical test of a theoretical framework that posits two key cognitive control modes: proactive and reactive. The framework central tenets are that proactive and reactive control reflect domain-general dimensions of individual variation, with distinctive neural signatures, involving lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC) in interactions with other brain networks and circuits (e.g., frontoparietal, cingulo-opercular). In the DMCC project, each participant is scanned while performing theoretically-targeted variants of multiple well-established cognitive control tasks (Stroop, Cued Task-Switching, AX-CPT, Sternberg Working Memory) in three separate imaging sessions, that each encourage utilization of different control modes, plus also completes an extensive out-of-scanner individual differences battery. Additional key features of the project include a high spatio-temporal resolution (multiband) acquisition protocol, and a sample that includes a substantial subset of monozygotic twin pairs and participants recruited from the Human Connectome Project. Although data collection is still continuing (target N=200), we provide an overview of the study design and protocol, planned analytic approaches and methodological development, along with initial results (N=80) revealing novel evidence of a domain-general neural signature of reactive control. In the interests of scientific community building, the dataset will be made public at project completion, so it can serve as a valuable resource. Copy rights belong to original authors. Visit the link for more info

CCBB: Dr. Bernard Beitman, MD
CCBB: Etzel Cardeña - Modern Art And Parapsychology

CCBB: Dr. Bernard Beitman, MD

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2020 60:20


Etzel Cardeña was born and raised in México, he has advanced degrees from Canada and the US and was a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University. He holds the endowed Thorsen Chair in psychology at Lund University in Sweden, one of the top universities in Europe, where he directs the Center for Research on Consciousness and Anomalous Psychology (CERCAP). His areas of research include alterations of consciousness and unusual or anomalous experiences (including parapsychological phenomena), dissociative processes and acute posttraumatic reactions, the neuroscience of hypnosis and meditation, and the stream of consciousness during waking and altered states. He has more than 350 publications, some in top journals in psychology and related disciplines, and his work has also been covered by various media including the New York Times, the New Yorker, and the BBC. Various professional organizations have awarded his empirical, theoretical, historical, and pedagogical contributions, and his research has been funded by organizations in the US, Sweden, and Portugal. He has also worked professionally in theatre as director, actor, and playwright, and is the artistic director of the International Theatre of Malmö.

CCBB: Dr. Bernard Beitman, MD
CCBB: Etzel Cardeña - Modern Art And Parapsychology

CCBB: Dr. Bernard Beitman, MD

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2020 60:20


Etzel Cardeña was born and raised in México, he has advanced degrees from Canada and the US and was a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University. He holds the endowed Thorsen Chair in psychology at Lund University in Sweden, one of the top universities in Europe, where he directs the Center for Research on Consciousness and Anomalous Psychology (CERCAP). His areas of research include alterations of consciousness and unusual or anomalous experiences (including parapsychological phenomena), dissociative processes and acute posttraumatic reactions, the neuroscience of hypnosis and meditation, and the stream of consciousness during waking and altered states. He has more than 350 publications, some in top journals in psychology and related disciplines, and his work has also been covered by various media including the New York Times, the New Yorker, and the BBC. Various professional organizations have awarded his empirical, theoretical, historical, and pedagogical contributions, and his research has been funded by organizations in the US, Sweden, and Portugal. He has also worked professionally in theatre as director, actor, and playwright, and is the artistic director of the International Theatre of Malmö.

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano
BFT SHOW: Jim Etzel, Austin Meek, Anna Canzano

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2020 138:38


Guests: Jim Etzel, Austin Meek, Anna Canzano John Canzano talks with these guests about getting the NCAA Regional back to Portland, Oregon's matchup with Ohio State, Damian Lillard's latest song on the BLM movement and racism, buried treasure, and fire drills. Plus, The Big Splash, Punch It! Audio, the Culligan Water Cooler Report, and 2@2. Subscribe NOW to this podcast for more great content. It’s free. Why wouldn’t you? Follow @JohnCanzanoBFT on Twitter.

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano
BFT Interview: Jim Etzel

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2020 21:33


Guest: Jim Etzel - Sport Oregon John Canzano talks with Jim Etzel about getting the NCAA Regional back to Portland, the inconsistencies of fans in stadiums, hosting a virtual NCAA Championship committee, and the importance of having a track record of success in these times. Subscribe NOW to this podcast for more great content. It’s free. Why wouldn’t you? Follow @JohnCanzanoBFT on Twitter.

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano
BFT SHOW: Jim Etzel, Joey Harrington, Valerie Cleary

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 19, 2020 139:01


Guests: Jim Etzel, Joey Harrington, Valerie Cleary John Canzano talks with these guests about preparing for the rebound of the economy post-Coronavirus, creating a rhythm amid the chaos, the key for Marcus Mariota in Las Vegas, and before & after pictures. Plus, The Big Splash, Punch It! Audio, and 2@2. Subscribe NOW to this podcast for more great content. It’s free. Why wouldn’t you? Follow @JohnCanzanoBFT on Twitter.

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano
BFT Interview: Jim Etzel

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 19, 2020 18:37


Guest: Jim Etzel - Sport Oregon CEO John Canzano talks with Jim Etzel about responding to the Coronavirus cancellations and preparing his team for the rebound of the economy post-Coronavirus. Subscribe NOW to this podcast for more great content. It’s free. Why wouldn’t you? Follow @JohnCanzanoBFT on Twitter.

Let's Talk
NHR Podcast - Hablamos de cine con Pericles Mejía y Etzel Baez

Let's Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 13, 2020 31:14


Hablamos de cine con Pericles Mejía y Etzel Baez

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano
BFT SHOW: Kelly Graves, Ken Field, Jim Etzel

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2020 142:00


Monday, January 27, 2020 Guests: Kelly Graves, Ken Field, Jim Etzel John Canzano talks with these guests about the legacy of Kobe Bryant, what he meant to the basketball program at Oregon, and bringing a Final Four tournament to Portland. Subscribe NOW to this podcast for more great content. It’s free. Why wouldn’t you? Follow @JohnCanzanoBFT on Twitter.

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano
BFT Interview: Jim Etzel

Bald Faced Truth with John Canzano

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2020 27:18


Guest: Jim Etzel – Sport Oregon John Canzano talks with Jim Etzel about Portland making the top four contending cities to host the Final Four Tournament in 2025-26. Subscribe NOW to this podcast for more great content. It’s free. Why wouldn’t you? Follow @JohnCanzanoBFT on Twitter.

Israel Show
Featuring: Meir Weingarten pays tribute to Geula Cohen, ob"m a passionate fighter for Israel. Plus, Meir presents an election update and a great Chanukah music mix

Israel Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2019


On this edition of The Israel Show: Remembering a fighter for Israel. Geula Cohen, passed away last week. She was a member of the Etzel, the Lechi, journalist, author and Knesset Member. For decades, she led the fight for Eretz Yisrael with a strong passion of heart and soul. Election III - update. Habayit HaYehudi's agreement to run with Otzma: Is The religious Zionist camp stronger and more untied now ? Plus a great Israeli Chanuka music mix including a debut by Yoni Genut.

The Power Company Podcast
Ep. 152: Alex Megos and Ken Etzel | Rotpunkt

The Power Company Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2019 52:17


Alex Megos may well be the strongest climber in the world. But is he the best?  In this episode I sit down with Megos and his good friend Ken Etzel, the director of the new film that we are discussing, Rotpunkt.  Rotpunkt gives us a rare glimpse into the up and down struggles of someone trying to become the best in the world. Maybe not suprisingly, these are struggles that every single one of us can relate to. Possibly even more fascinating is the bond that was forged between filmmaker and athlete, and the pressures that this bond had to endure while making the film.  You can find the film at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SbWvFjUIt5k You can find Alex Megos on instagram at https://www.instagram.com/alexandermegos You can find Ken Etzel on instagram at https://www.instagram.com/ken_etzel You can find the Petzl Pump Prep Scholarship at https://www.powercompanyclimbing.com/pump-prep-scholarship You can find us at www.powercompanyclimbing.com You can support the podcast at www.patreon.com/powercompanypodcast We don't tweet. We scream like eagles. 

New Thinking Allowed Audio Podcast
Altered States and Enhanced Functioning with Etzel Cardeña

New Thinking Allowed Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2019 43:34


Etzel Cardeña holds the endowed Thorsen Chair in psychology at Lund University in Sweden, where he directs the Center for Research on Consciousness and Anomalous Psychology (CERCAP). Among his books are Varieties of Anomalous Experience published by the American Psychological Association (APA) and now in its second edition, the two-volumes Altering Consciousness: A Multidisciplinary Perspective, … Continue reading "Altered States and Enhanced Functioning with Etzel Cardeña"

New Thinking Allowed Audio Podcast
Experimental Evidence for Parapsychological Phenomena with Etzel Cardeña

New Thinking Allowed Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2019 29:48


Etzel Cardeña holds the endowed Thorsen Chair in psychology at Lund University in Sweden, where he directs the Center for Research on Consciousness and Anomalous Psychology (CERCAP). Among his books are Varieties of Anomalous Experience published by the American Psychological Association (APA) and now in its second edition, the two-volumes Altering Consciousness: A Multidisciplinary Perspective, … Continue reading "Experimental Evidence for Parapsychological Phenomena with Etzel Cardeña"

AM 1180 WFYL
NEW DAY WEEKEND - 10 - 19 - 19 - LINDA ETZEL - JEFFREY LORD

AM 1180 WFYL

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2019 23:58


NEW DAY WEEKEND - 10 - 19 - 19 - LINDA ETZEL - JEFFREY LORD by WFYL 1180 AM

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast
Michael Etzel Jr.: Oral History Interview

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2019 63:50


This interview is with Michael Etzel Jr. of Beaux Fréres. In this interview, Michael talks about why he chose wine, what it was like growing up on the estate, and what made him decide to go into the wine industry. He speaks of the places he's traveled to and the many jobs he worked before ending up back home in 2015. Michael then goes on to describe how the sale of the company affected him, the evolution of the estate, and his winemaking philosophy. Towards the end of the interview, he speaks about the label “Coattails” that he started with his brothers, what it's like working with family, and balancing expectations with partnerships and consumer desires. To conclude, Michael offers his perspective of what the Oregon Wine Industry looks like today, how Beaux Fréres fits into the Oregon wine story, and offers his take on what the future looks like. This interview was conducted by Rich Schmidt at Beaux Fréres on August 30, 2019.

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast
Michael Etzel: Oral History Interview

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2019 52:16


This interview is with Michael Etzel of Beaux Fréres Winery. In this interview, Michael discusses how he got the “wine bug,” first selling wine, then transitioning to owning a winery and making wine. Michael then goes on to discuss how his farming lifestyle has informed his job in the wine industry, as well as how they acquired the Beaux Fréres property while on vacation in Oregon. Although he had no initial experience making wine or growing grapes, Michael's passion to succeed led him to having great success with his wines. Further into the interview, Michael talks about his wine making philosophy and how it has evolved into what it is today. Towards the end of the interview, Michael speaks about sustainable farming, his perspective, future plans for Beaux Fréres, his own personal goals, as well as the future of the Oregon Wine Industry. This interview was conducted by Rich Schmidt at Beaux Fréres Winery on April 12, 2019.

Washburn Radio - KRWU
Sunflower Sutras - Interviewing Dennis Etzel Jr.

Washburn Radio - KRWU

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2019 53:38


Sunflower Sutras hosts Tara Bartley and Ryan Thompson sit down with Dennis Etzel Jr., English professor at Washburn University. Reader submissions by Fred McDowell. (Originally aired Summer 2018)

CCBB: Dr. Bernard Beitman, MD
CCBB: Etzel Cardena - Parapsychology and Anomalous Experiences

CCBB: Dr. Bernard Beitman, MD

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2018 60:12


Etzel Cardeña holds the endowed Thorsen Chair in psychology at Lund University in Sweden, where he directs the Center for Research on Consciousness and Anomalous Psychology (CERCAP). His areas of research include extraordinary/anomalous experiences (including ostensible psi phenomena, and anomalous experiences and psychopathology), dissociative processes and acute posttraumatic reactions, hypnosis (its neurophenomenology and potential applications for posttraumatic conditions) and the stream of consciousness.

CCBB: Dr. Bernard Beitman, MD
CCBB: Etzel Cardena - Parapsychology and Anomalous Experiences

CCBB: Dr. Bernard Beitman, MD

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2018 60:12


Etzel Cardeña holds the endowed Thorsen Chair in psychology at Lund University in Sweden, where he directs the Center for Research on Consciousness and Anomalous Psychology (CERCAP). His areas of research include extraordinary/anomalous experiences (including ostensible psi phenomena, and anomalous experiences and psychopathology), dissociative processes and acute posttraumatic reactions, hypnosis (its neurophenomenology and potential applications for posttraumatic conditions) and the stream of consciousness.

Heather and Paul Christie
26: Interview with with Theo Etzel Part 2: Recapitalization and Succession

Heather and Paul Christie

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2018 44:21


We're excited to bring you the second half of this interview with Theo Etzel, Chairman and Partner at Conditioned Air Company, where we talk about recapitalization and the process of preparing for succession.

Evolve to Win
26: Interview with with Theo Etzel Part 2: Recapitalization and Succession

Evolve to Win

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2018 44:21


We're excited to bring you the second half of this interview with Theo Etzel, Chairman and Partner at Conditioned Air Company, where we talk about recapitalization and the process of preparing for succession.

Heather and Paul Christie
26: Interview with with Theo Etzel Part 2: Recapitalization and Succession

Heather and Paul Christie

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2018 44:21


We're excited to bring you the second half of this interview with Theo Etzel, Chairman and Partner at Conditioned Air Company, where we talk about recapitalization and the process of preparing for succession.

Evolve to Win
26: Interview with with Theo Etzel Part 2: Recapitalization and Succession

Evolve to Win

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2018 44:21


We're excited to bring you the second half of this interview with Theo Etzel, Chairman and Partner at Conditioned Air Company, where we talk about recapitalization and the process of preparing for succession.

Evolve to Win
25: Interview with Theo Etzel Part 1: Progression in Business

Evolve to Win

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2018 45:43


Today's guest is Theo Etzel, Chairman and Partner at Conditioned Air Company. Theo is part of Vistage, an international association of CEOs dedicated to constant improvement of business practices and personal development -- he has a strong passion for growing people and leaders to better do what they love. He is the author of the book, Invest Your Heartbeats Wisely, which focuses on practical, philosophical and principled leadership concepts for business and life. Theo is full of so much important and useful information that we have to span his interview over two episodes.

Heather and Paul Christie
25: Interview with Theo Etzel Part 1: Progression in Business

Heather and Paul Christie

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2018 45:43


Today's guest is Theo Etzel, Chairman and Partner at Conditioned Air Company. Theo is part of Vistage, an international association of CEOs dedicated to constant improvement of business practices and personal development -- he has a strong passion for growing people and leaders to better do what they love. He is the author of the book, Invest Your Heartbeats Wisely, which focuses on practical, philosophical and principled leadership concepts for business and life. Theo is full of so much important and useful information that we have to span his interview over two episodes.

Evolve to Win
25: Interview with Theo Etzel Part 1: Progression in Business

Evolve to Win

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2018 45:43


Today's guest is Theo Etzel, Chairman and Partner at Conditioned Air Company. Theo is part of Vistage, an international association of CEOs dedicated to constant improvement of business practices and personal development -- he has a strong passion for growing people and leaders to better do what they love. He is the author of the book, Invest Your Heartbeats Wisely, which focuses on practical, philosophical and principled leadership concepts for business and life. Theo is full of so much important and useful information that we have to span his interview over two episodes.

Heather and Paul Christie
25: Interview with Theo Etzel Part 1: Progression in Business

Heather and Paul Christie

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2018 45:43


Today's guest is Theo Etzel, Chairman and Partner at Conditioned Air Company. Theo is part of Vistage, an international association of CEOs dedicated to constant improvement of business practices and personal development -- he has a strong passion for growing people and leaders to better do what they love. He is the author of the book, Invest Your Heartbeats Wisely, which focuses on practical, philosophical and principled leadership concepts for business and life. Theo is full of so much important and useful information that we have to span his interview over two episodes.

The Lunar Saloon
The Lunar Saloon - Episode 94

The Lunar Saloon

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2018 112:51


Starving Daughters, Sunburn, Strange Valley Bixio, Frizzi, Tempera, Avangiù, Magnetic Systems Stimela, I Love You, Crown Ruler Sound Akira Itoh, 達多 Tatta, ブッダ (Buddha) Fabiano Orchestra, Rastaman Rock, Beach Diggin Vol. 1 Sandii, Drip Dry Eyes, Eating Pleasure Lu LaFayette's Wolfsmond, Zauberstadt, Zauberstadt Francisco & Cosmo, Juno Beat, Italian Dance Wave - Disco Due Opal, Ain't No Way (Dub Version - Killer Matos Mix), Ain't No Way Midnight Runners, Playing Your Game, Tagalog Edits Wolfgang Käfer / Peter Vanderlohren, Rainbow Rider, Number 16 - Prestige Themes Mariko Tone, Broken Eyes, Tokyo Nights Rome Jefferies, Good Love (Instrumental), Good Love José Pharos, Bass In Milky Way (PsycheMagick edit), Healin' Feelin' Ric Piccolo, Luna (Rework), Luna Nightfall, Nightime Boogie, Nightime Boogie Cloud 1, Patty Duke, DJ Andy Smith presents Reach Up – Disco Wonderland Jo Bisso, Give It Up, Africa Airways One Starving Daughters, Night Stalker, Strange Valleys Rocchi - De Piscopo, Perseus, Metamorphosis Roger Davy, Crazy Flute Happy Guitar, Luke Vibert's Further Nuggets Various Artists, Мираж (Mirage), Ритмическая Гимнастика (Aerobic Exercises) Plastic Zoo, Dog's Groove, Plastic Zoo Discodromo, Etzel, Dimensione Volume Uno Rie Murakami, T.N.T., Tokyo Nights The Movers, Kansas City, Kansas City 伊藤詳 - 未戸郎(みしらん)伝説 Starving Daughters, Diamonds, Strange Valleys Sam Spence, Electric Texas, Sam Spence Sounds Raymond Scott, "Twilight In Turkey", Manhattan Research Inc. Priscilla Ermel, Corpo Do Vento, Outro Tempo

Unsettled
Sulaiman Khatib

Unsettled

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2017 28:30


Sulaiman Khatib is a co-founder and the current Managing Director of Combatants for Peace,  a joint Israeli-Palestinian nonviolent movement to end the occupation of the West Bank. In this interview, Souli explains how he began to see Israelis as potential partners, rather than the enemy. He talks about the value of ex-combatants in the struggle to end the occupation, and addresses some of the the criticism that his organization has received from other activist groups. This episode of Unsettled is hosted by Asaf Calderon. Original music by Nat Rosenzweig. Recorded in Brooklyn, New York on August 6, 2017, and edited for length and clarity by Asaf Calderon and Yoshi Fields.  Sulaiman Khatib is a leading nonviolence activist in Israel and Palestine. He was born in the West Bank and was imprisoned at the age of 14 for stabbing two Israeli soldiers. It was during his time in prison that he learned about nonviolent resistance and first encountered Jewish Israeli perspectives. In 2006, he and other Israeli and Palestinian ex-militants founded Combatants for Peace: a grassroots nonviolent movement with the goal of ending the occupation. As part of his work, he tours in the US, giving talks with other ex-combatants on nonviolent resistance to the occupation. TRANSCRIPT SOULI:  I believe that if our people given like a good leadership with a vision that carry nonviolence and hope, I do believe that many Palestinians are happy to join. This takes time and energy. But I believe the majority of our people don’t want to live in bloody situation, of course. And if the Israelis given the opportunity to show their goodness of solidarity with the Palestinians to struggle together, I really believe also I have faith of the majority of the Israelis in this case also, they will behave differently.   _ ASAF: Welcome to_ Unsettled_, a podcast about Israel-Palestine and the Jewish diaspora. We are here to provide a space for difficult conversations and diverse viewpoints that are all too rare in American Jewish communities._ My name is Asaf Calderon. I'm one of the producers of Unsettled and your host for today's episode. Sulaiman Khatib, today's guest, grew up with his family in the West Bank under the Israeli occupation. At the age of 14, while trying to steal weapons, he stabbed two Israeli soldiers. Both soldiers survived, and Souli was sentenced by the military court to 15 years in prison. Fast forward 30 years -- today, Souli is a co-founder and Managing Director of Combatants for Peace, an organization founded by ex-combatants from the Israeli military and the Palestinian armed resistance. They are dedicated to ending the occupation, using only nonviolent means. How did Souli transform from a fighter who saw Israelis as the enemy, to a nonviolent activist committed to working in partnership with them? Why create an organization specifically with ex-militants? And how does he respond to the criticism he gets even from other anti-occupation activists? With these questions in mind, I interviewed Souli while he was visiting the United States to work on his upcoming book. We met in his rented room in Brooklyn, on a Sunday -- so of course, you’re going to hear some background music. Sorry about that. Another thing you may notice, is that we both have pretty strong accents. What you are about to hear is an Israeli interviewing a Palestinian, in English, which of course isn’t either of our first languages. So if you're having trouble understanding, please check out the transcript of this episode on our website, unsettledpod.com.   ASAF: So Souli, let’s start by you introducing yourself.   SOULI: My name is Sulaiman Khatib, so, people call me Souli -- some people -- and I was born in a village near Jerusalem, 10 minutes from Jerusalem, called Hizma. I grew up there, half of the time, and then I was in jail for a long time. I was one of the people that thought that the only way for freedom was joining the armed struggle. That was my mind when I was 14.   _ **ASAF: ** Like other Palestinian prisoners, Souli faced particularly difficult conditions in prison. In his bio for Combatants for Peace, he explains: The use of torture was routine: beating prisoners, spraying tear gas into prison cells, and violently stripping prisoners were daily occurrences._ But, it was in these difficult conditions that Souli learned how nonviolent struggle can make a difference. With no civil rights and with their most basic human rights severely limited, Souli and the other prisoners resorted to hunger strikes.   SOULI:  The prisoners were very organized, very smart, and represent all the factions in jail through committees that were elected, so we asked, for example, our demands were around having like water -- like in Hebron jail, we used to have a problem of water, especially like to clean ourselves, you know for showers -- to have access to books, education, and newspapers to bring them, and visiting our families -- it used to be half an hour, we demanded like 45 minutes.   _ **ASAF: ** The striking prisoners also had support from activists outside the prison walls._   SOULI:  In the first few days, we used to communicate with the youth organizations, and universities, and so we were sure that people support us outside, so we don’t reach the point where we die or something, because this was not our goal. We had the hunger strike to live a little better conditions while we were in jail. And that’s how I learned there is another path. There is another way. I did read about Gandhi, Martin Luther King, and Nelson Mandela that was in jail at that time, and I was inspired by, you know, like all these people. We do study about Che Guevara and the Vietnam War, and the guerrilla wars. So, it’s not: you go to jail, you come out as a new Palestinian Gandhi. It’s not that way, the truth. So I don’t really represent the mainstream prisoners.   _ **ASAF: ** Not only did Souli learn about other nonviolent movements, but he also began to explore Jewish narratives which he had never before heard. He recalled watching the Holocaust film_ Schindler’s List_ one day while he was in prison._   **SOULI: ** During the film, we turned the light off, and then we watched the film --through the film, you can see that everybody is really moved. This was really the effect on our hearts, if you wish, because everyone was crying. And after the film, it's really a complex feeling, because we have to ask hot water to make tea from the Israeli police that his maybe ancestors were there, that we feel sympathy with them, and he’s putting us in jail. Through the time I also read the history of the conflict from both eyes. I studied Hebrew also in jail and that made me realize there’s no either us or them. So I became beyond the typical narrative, and I became open for meeting Israelis after jail, and looking for partners on both sides to create a new narrative and new story for our peoples.   _ **ASAF: ** In 2003, during the second Palestinian Intifada -- or uprising -- a group of Israeli reserve soldiers, from elite combat units, decided to refuse serving in the occupied territories, so as to not contribute to the occupation. Soon after going public, the Israeli group was contacted by a Palestinian group of ex-prisoners. Souli, who was recently released from prison, was one of them. They started a series of internal talks, that eventually led to the creation of Combatants for Peace in 2006. The details of the formation of Combatants for Peace are presented in a documentary about them that came out last year,_ Disturbing the Peace_._   **SOULI: ** Everything in Combatants For Peace is based on certain principles, that’s very important to say: that’s joint and nonviolent and bi-national work, and opposing the occupation and slash violence. We are a grassroots organization that have nine local groups and working “twins” -- for example, Tel Aviv-Ramallah, Hebron-Be’er Sheva, Jerusalem-Jericho, Jerusalem-Beit Lechem and so on. And there’s above all also two bi-national groups, which is the woman group of Combatants for Peace that established last year, and the Theater of the Oppressed. Some of the activities are under the local groups -- from dialogue to personal story sharing to nonviolence demonstrations as well. And there is activities on the movement level, like the Palestinian-Israeli Memorial Day -- this is the highest activity every year -- the freedom marches, and we were also part of the initiative of the Freedom Sumud Camp.   ASAF: In Israel, we often hear the term “prisoners with blood on their hands.” Israelis are much less willing to work with and cooperate with people that have done what we call “terrorist activity.” Whatever it was, against soldiers or against citizens, this term “blood on their hands” is something that rings very powerfully in Israeli discourse. What do you think about it, as somebody that, you know, does have blood on your hands? Do you think that... why do you think that Israelis should be working with you?   **SOULI: ** Firstly, all the terminologies, the language... it really exists more or less the same on both sides, that’s one thing, and it really depends where you came from and how you look at things, eh… I attacked two Israelis when I was 14, believing, "This is our enemy, I want to protect my homeland." So these kind of people, like myself, used to be like our good guys, that sacrifice for the homeland. It reminds me for Israeli discourse, when Israelis used violence before 48, for example, or the pre-Israeli organizations -- Etzel, Haganah, and all that -- were heroes.   _ ASAF: The Etzel and the Haganah were Jewish paramilitary organizations that worked before 1948 for the establishment of the Jewish state. Both used terrorism to promote their goals; for example, the King David Hotel bombing in which 91 people were killed, mostly civilians. But of course Souli is right: in Israel, most people consider them to be heroes.   _   **SOULI: ** If we go ahead in the list of around the world, same thing in the Irish conflict and Mandela party, and everywhere else. It’s like two sides of the coin: the one called terrorist by Israelis mainly called hero by Palestinians, generally speaking. I’m generalizing now because there are many opinions. There's no one Israeli opinion or one Palestinian opinion. It’s a question of narratives, and how we see things. Yeah, it’s hard. It’s hard. You know, like you can always find like more soft stories to work with, in both sides, people that never been in jail or the army or any involvement, but I think this community is very crucial, important, and we know that from Mandela story, he was in jail. And from North Ireland -- we work with Irish organizations that both sides were also involved in violence and were in jail, and they worked together and we work with them to learn from their experience and this is very exceptional role for  ex-fighters to play.   **ASAF: ** And on the other side, how do you feel about working with people that have Palestinian blood on their hands, and why do you think it’s important to work with them?   SOULI: Yeah, it’s basically really the same question. First, I admit this is heavy and hard for people on both sides and I understand that, and if I remember the first few meetings of Combatants for Peace, we did meet people that have Palestinian blood on their hands -- much more than us, because they used to be in the Israeli Air Force, like pilots, and F16. Obviously, the Israelis never went to the court, or any legal thing. In the Palestinian case you got your punishment, or like over-punishing, because you are living under military rule. So let’s say my case: what I did, if it was Israeli person did the same, would go to rehabilitation center. I was 14. But I am not citizen of anywhere, so I go to military court. So basically, not to legitimize any violence of course, but to say we do have to see the human behind these terms, and in the case of Israelis I... this is heavy but somehow we reach the point to see the human behind the uniform. This take long time, it’s a very deep hard process to see, to look in the eyes of these people and meet somewhere on some level.   ASAF: Many people in the Palestinian struggle and also in solidarity movements in the United States see the kind of work that you do as the term "normalization" with Israel, and they see that as wrong. What do you have to answer to that?   SOULI:  Firstly, we got a lot of criticism in both sides. And I am really fine with that, I have to say. I understand why many people worry and criticize the joint work. But I believe in my experience -- in our experience from Combatants for Peace and other organizations -- the meetings of the other, what's so-called the other, is essential. I don't know also any Israeli that born and, you know, came directly from Tel Aviv to Bil’in. Firstly, they meet Palestinians and to trust and to build relations, and then they became like more activist. That's the one I know the majority of the Israelis that really show solidarity with the Palestinians. And -- we are not normalizing the occupation. We do a lot of activities to fight the status quo, and we are not happy with the status quo. Of course, it's controversial, always, to work with what's so-called the enemy. I personally don't think there is one way to end the conflict, or the occupation, whatever you want to say. But we are not part of the BDS movement, we have a neutral position about the BDS. This is a nonviolence legitimate tool, but we are not there. We are a bi-national organization, and I am not going to boycott my partner Chen Alon, that is teaching in Tel Aviv. He is very active to our cause together, and his daughter was just left the jail recently. And I am struggling for her, as for my sister. So I can't think in the principle of boycotting them.   _ **ASAF: ** Chen Alon is one of the Israeli founders of Combatants for Peace. Tamar Alon, his daughter, was one of a handful of Israeli youth who publicly refused to serve in the military for ideological reasons. While many Israeli members of Combatants for Peace don’t serve anymore, the organization doesn’t call for complete refusal._   **ASAF: ** In the movie, I remember that one of the Israeli Combatants for Peace activists, she says she's serving, she's still serving in the army in reserves, but she is not serving in the West Bank. But, I mean obviously the role that she does outside of the West Bank is affecting the army as a whole. So, how… how can you accept that?   SOULI:  I’m talking like as like formally Combatants For Peace. In general, when we started Combatants for Peace, was a clear condition that Israelis don’t serve beyond the 1967 borders. And on the Palestinian side you don’t, you can’t join Combatants for Peace if you support violence, for example. So there is a refusing in both sides to the mainstream. We work in Israel-Palestine: means we are also pragmatic, means we do thousands of lectures -- last year we met around 4,000 people at lectures. It’s all joint, always there are two speakers -- one Israeli, one Palestinian -- we share our personal stories of the narrative and the transformation and this always inspire people. We find this tool as very deep impact, and we don’t tell the people what to do, especially talking to youngsters, Israeli pre-army mechinot.     _ **ASAF: ** A mechina, or mechinot in plural, is a program that some Israelis go to before the army, where you study and volunteer in the community._   **SOULI: ** So in order to, to play in this space we need to be also careful with the language we use, or to tell them what to do exactly, but I believe that this model stay in the head of many of the youngsters as the only meeting maybe they ever meet a Palestinian before the army, before they go to the army.   **ASAF: ** Another thing that I noticed in the film is that you use a language of equivalency. A few times you mention dual responsibility. You’re saying, "We are both victims and we are both perpetrators." But as an Israeli, it’s difficult for me to accept the idea that you know, we are both equal in this. I feel like I am the perpetrator and you are the victim.   **SOULI: ** In Combatants for Peace, actually, after years of discussion, we recognized the imbalance in power. Of course, the Israelis are in charge. Of course. We know that. But in order to make change, we did decide to take our destiny in our hands, together as activists from both sides. And the... the truth is, usually the Palestinian come with this idea: we are the victims, Israelis they are in charge and they are criminal and... But we don’t want to stuck there. We want our peoples together to take responsibility of our life, our present, and to create a new future. A new story together. I don’t want to see more of feeding of the Palestinian victimhood, which exists deeply. Of course, the Jewish slash Israelis have the same unfortunately story of victimhood, and this is really like a very deep negative energy that will not take us anywhere. No, we can change our lives, and I believe Palestinians, as a Palestinian, if we are united, if we had a vision, if we have the right conditions, we do have responsibility, and we do can make change, together with our neighbors basically, because it will never be good to do it alone, either side. We basically in a non-divorce marriage, we have to manage. That’s what I believe.   **ASAF: ** This I can totally understand, that you’re saying that you know, just because you’re victims doesn’t mean you don’t have agency, and doesn’t mean you can’t change your own lives. But like you said, in Israel, for Israelis we also have this victimhood complex, and I think in a way, it makes it very easy for Israelis to feel connected to, or, it resonates with us, because we...we get to still be a victim.   **SOULI: ** Just to make myself clear, we do talk all the time about the imbalance in power, that’s clear, it’s the reality, nobody denying the reality as it is, first of all. And, but recognizing that, it doesn’t feed the Palestinian victimhood. So I can talk about it until tomorrow because it’s a list of suffering. You know, in October, my mom, to go to the olive harvest next to my village, for my family land, she needs Israeli permit -- which is five minutes away from our home, because there is the wall. You know, when I drive to see my mom, 20 minutes, I have a checkpoint, of course. I’m a little privileged Palestinian compared to other people, but still: when I travel, I have complexes that my Israeli partner doesn’t. You know even with Americans, with the international community, with visa, with the logistics. It's complicated, of course, to live under the military regime. And when I talk to Palestinians I don’t deny the suffering of this person or our people. But I don’t really believe in this competition that exists always in dialogue groups, that the Palestinian comes with full desire to share their suffering and story, which is legitimate, but to recognize the suffering of the other side, or the pain, it doesn’t take away our suffering. To recognize the legitimacy of the Palestinian connection to the land, or the jewish connection to the land, it doesn’t take the other connection to the land. That’s where I am now. I know this is complex for even my family when I say these things. I got criticism. Hard arguments. It’s not easy. Because you know what we learn in nonviolence communication, you meet people where they are. I believe we can play a model that cross all these cliches about our conflict. And I understand the Palestinian anger, of course, but we want this energy of anger, to use it instead of going into violence and like really hopeless action like the stabbing, to come join our nonviolence action. And I see this happens, actually. Some people come, youngsters come through Facebook, we don’t know them, not from our circles. So I believe that if our people given like a good leadership with a vision that carry nonviolence and hope, I do believe that many Palestinians are happy to join. This takes time and energy. But I believe the majority of our people don’t want to live in bloody situation, of course. And if the Israelis given the opportunity to show their goodness of solidarity with the Palestinians to struggle together, I really believe also, I have faith of the majority of the Israelis in this case also, they will behave differently.   **ASAF: ** You’ve been, Combatants For Peace have existed for about what 15 years now?   **SOULI: ** 11 years.   **ASAF: ** 11 years. In these 11 years, what do you think has changed in Israeli-Palestinian politics and how did you adapt to those changes?   SOULI: First of all, we… Combatants for Peace is not just a community of ex-fighters, these are the founders, so Combatants for Peace through the years became open to everybody. We started Combatants for Peace -- the meetings, before we call it Combatants For Peace -- started in 2005 secretly, illegally around Beit Lechem [Bethlehem] area. It was the Second Intifada and the political environment, of course, and the social economical situation changed a lot since then. One of the changes, the truth: at that time, the idea of two-state was the only solution people talk about. It's not anymore; it's one of the options. And the second: like, there are many changes, good and bad. I don't see things just black-white, the truth. Last year we did "Ten Years of Combatants for Peace" and we screened our film, Disturbing the Peace -- the film about us, Disturbing the Peace -- at the wall of of Beit Jala. We got a few hundred Palestinians, Israelis to watch it together, under full moon it was beautiful. And we did the Freedom March with 800 Palestinians, Israelis -- this was last year during the, what you call the Knife Intifada -- like really among violent situation. And we got the two Irish ex-prisoners to speak to us there. It was a beautiful feeling of successful, I have to say. And Avner, one of our wise founders, is my close friend, and he speak Arabic fluently, I speak Hebrew, and we are really close after years we are... and Avner told me -- because that time I brought my mom to see the film, and he brought his mom, and they met for the first time -- and his mom told him, “This is exceptional work that you do, the history will write you, and…” Avner was really, for the first time I see him super emotional and we hugged and he said, “Remember, ten years ago when we start?” It was hard to talk about the principle of nonviolence. And ten years later, we are talking not just about nonviolence, we are talking about joint nonviolence, and it’s accepted to a certain level.   ASAF: So just one more question, and that’s something I want to ask everybody that we will be interviewing here. How do you think that we, as Jews that live in the United States, can and should help the struggle from a place here in the United States?   **SOULI: ** Yeah. As we talked before, the American Jewish community have a very important role to play to help our peoples out. And when I talk about our peoples, I mean Palestinians slash Israelis. I don’t see a way for one of the two sides to be happy with this cake, piece of land, that we all love and belong to, without the other side. Is really like a marriage. So the American Jewish part of it is really highly important for us, and from the perspective of media awareness, among the Americans generally and American Jews specifically. So, also we call all the American Jews that come to visit Israel also to visit the Palestinian territory, and meet with our people and see the reality in their eyes and not to believe really the mainstream media. The American Jewish involvement is like deep, historical exist there, in all directions. You know, most, I would say Jewish community in the U.S. of course for a reason or another they care about Israel, that's the truth. And if I look at the extreme settlers, they’re basically American Jewish. They are not even Israelis.   _ **ASAF: ** Well, not all of the settlers. But according to an Oxford University research from two years ago, while Americans make only about 2% of all Israeli citizens, they make up about 15% of the settlers._   **SOULI: ** The American involvement there is so deep. So, instead of being part of the problem, I wish to see more Jewish slash Palestinians that are working together -- with all the imbalance in power and the rights the Jewish have that our diaspora don’t have to go back and all that -- but still to work together in order to change the story and to see, to create a new reality, a new story.   _ **ASAF: ** To learn more about Souli and Combatants for Peace, visit their website cfpeace.org. You can find the documentary_ Disturbing the Peace on Netflix. Unsettled is produced by Yoshi Fields, Max Freedman, Emily Bell, Ilana Levinson, and me. Yoshi and I edited this episode. Original music by Nat Rosenzweig. Special thanks to Mark Winston Griffith and Brooklyn Deep. Go to our website, unsettledpod.com, for show information. You can now support Unsettled by becoming a monthly sustainer through Patreon. Like us on Facebook, find us on Twitter and Instagram, and most importantly, subscribe on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts, to make sure you never miss an episode of Unsettled_._

Unsettled
Sulaiman Khatib

Unsettled

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2017 28:30


Sulaiman Khatib is a co-founder and the current Managing Director of Combatants for Peace,  a joint Israeli-Palestinian nonviolent movement to end the occupation of the West Bank. In this interview, Souli explains how he began to see Israelis as potential partners, rather than the enemy. He talks about the value of ex-combatants in the struggle to end the occupation, and addresses some of the the criticism that his organization has received from other activist groups. This episode of Unsettled is hosted by Asaf Calderon. Original music by Nat Rosenzweig. Recorded in Brooklyn, New York on August 6, 2017, and edited for length and clarity by Asaf Calderon and Yoshi Fields.  Sulaiman Khatib is a leading nonviolence activist in Israel and Palestine. He was born in the West Bank and was imprisoned at the age of 14 for stabbing two Israeli soldiers. It was during his time in prison that he learned about nonviolent resistance and first encountered Jewish Israeli perspectives. In 2006, he and other Israeli and Palestinian ex-militants founded Combatants for Peace: a grassroots nonviolent movement with the goal of ending the occupation. As part of his work, he tours in the US, giving talks with other ex-combatants on nonviolent resistance to the occupation. TRANSCRIPT SOULI:  I believe that if our people given like a good leadership with a vision that carry nonviolence and hope, I do believe that many Palestinians are happy to join. This takes time and energy. But I believe the majority of our people don’t want to live in bloody situation, of course. And if the Israelis given the opportunity to show their goodness of solidarity with the Palestinians to struggle together, I really believe also I have faith of the majority of the Israelis in this case also, they will behave differently.   _ ASAF: Welcome to_ Unsettled_, a podcast about Israel-Palestine and the Jewish diaspora. We are here to provide a space for difficult conversations and diverse viewpoints that are all too rare in American Jewish communities._ My name is Asaf Calderon. I'm one of the producers of Unsettled and your host for today's episode. Sulaiman Khatib, today's guest, grew up with his family in the West Bank under the Israeli occupation. At the age of 14, while trying to steal weapons, he stabbed two Israeli soldiers. Both soldiers survived, and Souli was sentenced by the military court to 15 years in prison. Fast forward 30 years -- today, Souli is a co-founder and Managing Director of Combatants for Peace, an organization founded by ex-combatants from the Israeli military and the Palestinian armed resistance. They are dedicated to ending the occupation, using only nonviolent means. How did Souli transform from a fighter who saw Israelis as the enemy, to a nonviolent activist committed to working in partnership with them? Why create an organization specifically with ex-militants? And how does he respond to the criticism he gets even from other anti-occupation activists? With these questions in mind, I interviewed Souli while he was visiting the United States to work on his upcoming book. We met in his rented room in Brooklyn, on a Sunday -- so of course, you’re going to hear some background music. Sorry about that. Another thing you may notice, is that we both have pretty strong accents. What you are about to hear is an Israeli interviewing a Palestinian, in English, which of course isn’t either of our first languages. So if you're having trouble understanding, please check out the transcript of this episode on our website, unsettledpod.com.   ASAF: So Souli, let’s start by you introducing yourself.   SOULI: My name is Sulaiman Khatib, so, people call me Souli -- some people -- and I was born in a village near Jerusalem, 10 minutes from Jerusalem, called Hizma. I grew up there, half of the time, and then I was in jail for a long time. I was one of the people that thought that the only way for freedom was joining the armed struggle. That was my mind when I was 14.   _ **ASAF: ** Like other Palestinian prisoners, Souli faced particularly difficult conditions in prison. In his bio for Combatants for Peace, he explains: The use of torture was routine: beating prisoners, spraying tear gas into prison cells, and violently stripping prisoners were daily occurrences._ But, it was in these difficult conditions that Souli learned how nonviolent struggle can make a difference. With no civil rights and with their most basic human rights severely limited, Souli and the other prisoners resorted to hunger strikes.   SOULI:  The prisoners were very organized, very smart, and represent all the factions in jail through committees that were elected, so we asked, for example, our demands were around having like water -- like in Hebron jail, we used to have a problem of water, especially like to clean ourselves, you know for showers -- to have access to books, education, and newspapers to bring them, and visiting our families -- it used to be half an hour, we demanded like 45 minutes.   _ **ASAF: ** The striking prisoners also had support from activists outside the prison walls._   SOULI:  In the first few days, we used to communicate with the youth organizations, and universities, and so we were sure that people support us outside, so we don’t reach the point where we die or something, because this was not our goal. We had the hunger strike to live a little better conditions while we were in jail. And that’s how I learned there is another path. There is another way. I did read about Gandhi, Martin Luther King, and Nelson Mandela that was in jail at that time, and I was inspired by, you know, like all these people. We do study about Che Guevara and the Vietnam War, and the guerrilla wars. So, it’s not: you go to jail, you come out as a new Palestinian Gandhi. It’s not that way, the truth. So I don’t really represent the mainstream prisoners.   _ **ASAF: ** Not only did Souli learn about other nonviolent movements, but he also began to explore Jewish narratives which he had never before heard. He recalled watching the Holocaust film_ Schindler’s List_ one day while he was in prison._   **SOULI: ** During the film, we turned the light off, and then we watched the film --through the film, you can see that everybody is really moved. This was really the effect on our hearts, if you wish, because everyone was crying. And after the film, it's really a complex feeling, because we have to ask hot water to make tea from the Israeli police that his maybe ancestors were there, that we feel sympathy with them, and he’s putting us in jail. Through the time I also read the history of the conflict from both eyes. I studied Hebrew also in jail and that made me realize there’s no either us or them. So I became beyond the typical narrative, and I became open for meeting Israelis after jail, and looking for partners on both sides to create a new narrative and new story for our peoples.   _ **ASAF: ** In 2003, during the second Palestinian Intifada -- or uprising -- a group of Israeli reserve soldiers, from elite combat units, decided to refuse serving in the occupied territories, so as to not contribute to the occupation. Soon after going public, the Israeli group was contacted by a Palestinian group of ex-prisoners. Souli, who was recently released from prison, was one of them. They started a series of internal talks, that eventually led to the creation of Combatants for Peace in 2006. The details of the formation of Combatants for Peace are presented in a documentary about them that came out last year,_ Disturbing the Peace_._   **SOULI: ** Everything in Combatants For Peace is based on certain principles, that’s very important to say: that’s joint and nonviolent and bi-national work, and opposing the occupation and slash violence. We are a grassroots organization that have nine local groups and working “twins” -- for example, Tel Aviv-Ramallah, Hebron-Be’er Sheva, Jerusalem-Jericho, Jerusalem-Beit Lechem and so on. And there’s above all also two bi-national groups, which is the woman group of Combatants for Peace that established last year, and the Theater of the Oppressed. Some of the activities are under the local groups -- from dialogue to personal story sharing to nonviolence demonstrations as well. And there is activities on the movement level, like the Palestinian-Israeli Memorial Day -- this is the highest activity every year -- the freedom marches, and we were also part of the initiative of the Freedom Sumud Camp.   ASAF: In Israel, we often hear the term “prisoners with blood on their hands.” Israelis are much less willing to work with and cooperate with people that have done what we call “terrorist activity.” Whatever it was, against soldiers or against citizens, this term “blood on their hands” is something that rings very powerfully in Israeli discourse. What do you think about it, as somebody that, you know, does have blood on your hands? Do you think that... why do you think that Israelis should be working with you?   **SOULI: ** Firstly, all the terminologies, the language... it really exists more or less the same on both sides, that’s one thing, and it really depends where you came from and how you look at things, eh… I attacked two Israelis when I was 14, believing, "This is our enemy, I want to protect my homeland." So these kind of people, like myself, used to be like our good guys, that sacrifice for the homeland. It reminds me for Israeli discourse, when Israelis used violence before 48, for example, or the pre-Israeli organizations -- Etzel, Haganah, and all that -- were heroes.   _ ASAF: The Etzel and the Haganah were Jewish paramilitary organizations that worked before 1948 for the establishment of the Jewish state. Both used terrorism to promote their goals; for example, the King David Hotel bombing in which 91 people were killed, mostly civilians. But of course Souli is right: in Israel, most people consider them to be heroes.   _   **SOULI: ** If we go ahead in the list of around the world, same thing in the Irish conflict and Mandela party, and everywhere else. It’s like two sides of the coin: the one called terrorist by Israelis mainly called hero by Palestinians, generally speaking. I’m generalizing now because there are many opinions. There's no one Israeli opinion or one Palestinian opinion. It’s a question of narratives, and how we see things. Yeah, it’s hard. It’s hard. You know, like you can always find like more soft stories to work with, in both sides, people that never been in jail or the army or any involvement, but I think this community is very crucial, important, and we know that from Mandela story, he was in jail. And from North Ireland -- we work with Irish organizations that both sides were also involved in violence and were in jail, and they worked together and we work with them to learn from their experience and this is very exceptional role for  ex-fighters to play.   **ASAF: ** And on the other side, how do you feel about working with people that have Palestinian blood on their hands, and why do you think it’s important to work with them?   SOULI: Yeah, it’s basically really the same question. First, I admit this is heavy and hard for people on both sides and I understand that, and if I remember the first few meetings of Combatants for Peace, we did meet people that have Palestinian blood on their hands -- much more than us, because they used to be in the Israeli Air Force, like pilots, and F16. Obviously, the Israelis never went to the court, or any legal thing. In the Palestinian case you got your punishment, or like over-punishing, because you are living under military rule. So let’s say my case: what I did, if it was Israeli person did the same, would go to rehabilitation center. I was 14. But I am not citizen of anywhere, so I go to military court. So basically, not to legitimize any violence of course, but to say we do have to see the human behind these terms, and in the case of Israelis I... this is heavy but somehow we reach the point to see the human behind the uniform. This take long time, it’s a very deep hard process to see, to look in the eyes of these people and meet somewhere on some level.   ASAF: Many people in the Palestinian struggle and also in solidarity movements in the United States see the kind of work that you do as the term "normalization" with Israel, and they see that as wrong. What do you have to answer to that?   SOULI:  Firstly, we got a lot of criticism in both sides. And I am really fine with that, I have to say. I understand why many people worry and criticize the joint work. But I believe in my experience -- in our experience from Combatants for Peace and other organizations -- the meetings of the other, what's so-called the other, is essential. I don't know also any Israeli that born and, you know, came directly from Tel Aviv to Bil’in. Firstly, they meet Palestinians and to trust and to build relations, and then they became like more activist. That's the one I know the majority of the Israelis that really show solidarity with the Palestinians. And -- we are not normalizing the occupation. We do a lot of activities to fight the status quo, and we are not happy with the status quo. Of course, it's controversial, always, to work with what's so-called the enemy. I personally don't think there is one way to end the conflict, or the occupation, whatever you want to say. But we are not part of the BDS movement, we have a neutral position about the BDS. This is a nonviolence legitimate tool, but we are not there. We are a bi-national organization, and I am not going to boycott my partner Chen Alon, that is teaching in Tel Aviv. He is very active to our cause together, and his daughter was just left the jail recently. And I am struggling for her, as for my sister. So I can't think in the principle of boycotting them.   _ **ASAF: ** Chen Alon is one of the Israeli founders of Combatants for Peace. Tamar Alon, his daughter, was one of a handful of Israeli youth who publicly refused to serve in the military for ideological reasons. While many Israeli members of Combatants for Peace don’t serve anymore, the organization doesn’t call for complete refusal._   **ASAF: ** In the movie, I remember that one of the Israeli Combatants for Peace activists, she says she's serving, she's still serving in the army in reserves, but she is not serving in the West Bank. But, I mean obviously the role that she does outside of the West Bank is affecting the army as a whole. So, how… how can you accept that?   SOULI:  I’m talking like as like formally Combatants For Peace. In general, when we started Combatants for Peace, was a clear condition that Israelis don’t serve beyond the 1967 borders. And on the Palestinian side you don’t, you can’t join Combatants for Peace if you support violence, for example. So there is a refusing in both sides to the mainstream. We work in Israel-Palestine: means we are also pragmatic, means we do thousands of lectures -- last year we met around 4,000 people at lectures. It’s all joint, always there are two speakers -- one Israeli, one Palestinian -- we share our personal stories of the narrative and the transformation and this always inspire people. We find this tool as very deep impact, and we don’t tell the people what to do, especially talking to youngsters, Israeli pre-army mechinot.     _ **ASAF: ** A mechina, or mechinot in plural, is a program that some Israelis go to before the army, where you study and volunteer in the community._   **SOULI: ** So in order to, to play in this space we need to be also careful with the language we use, or to tell them what to do exactly, but I believe that this model stay in the head of many of the youngsters as the only meeting maybe they ever meet a Palestinian before the army, before they go to the army.   **ASAF: ** Another thing that I noticed in the film is that you use a language of equivalency. A few times you mention dual responsibility. You’re saying, "We are both victims and we are both perpetrators." But as an Israeli, it’s difficult for me to accept the idea that you know, we are both equal in this. I feel like I am the perpetrator and you are the victim.   **SOULI: ** In Combatants for Peace, actually, after years of discussion, we recognized the imbalance in power. Of course, the Israelis are in charge. Of course. We know that. But in order to make change, we did decide to take our destiny in our hands, together as activists from both sides. And the... the truth is, usually the Palestinian come with this idea: we are the victims, Israelis they are in charge and they are criminal and... But we don’t want to stuck there. We want our peoples together to take responsibility of our life, our present, and to create a new future. A new story together. I don’t want to see more of feeding of the Palestinian victimhood, which exists deeply. Of course, the Jewish slash Israelis have the same unfortunately story of victimhood, and this is really like a very deep negative energy that will not take us anywhere. No, we can change our lives, and I believe Palestinians, as a Palestinian, if we are united, if we had a vision, if we have the right conditions, we do have responsibility, and we do can make change, together with our neighbors basically, because it will never be good to do it alone, either side. We basically in a non-divorce marriage, we have to manage. That’s what I believe.   **ASAF: ** This I can totally understand, that you’re saying that you know, just because you’re victims doesn’t mean you don’t have agency, and doesn’t mean you can’t change your own lives. But like you said, in Israel, for Israelis we also have this victimhood complex, and I think in a way, it makes it very easy for Israelis to feel connected to, or, it resonates with us, because we...we get to still be a victim.   **SOULI: ** Just to make myself clear, we do talk all the time about the imbalance in power, that’s clear, it’s the reality, nobody denying the reality as it is, first of all. And, but recognizing that, it doesn’t feed the Palestinian victimhood. So I can talk about it until tomorrow because it’s a list of suffering. You know, in October, my mom, to go to the olive harvest next to my village, for my family land, she needs Israeli permit -- which is five minutes away from our home, because there is the wall. You know, when I drive to see my mom, 20 minutes, I have a checkpoint, of course. I’m a little privileged Palestinian compared to other people, but still: when I travel, I have complexes that my Israeli partner doesn’t. You know even with Americans, with the international community, with visa, with the logistics. It's complicated, of course, to live under the military regime. And when I talk to Palestinians I don’t deny the suffering of this person or our people. But I don’t really believe in this competition that exists always in dialogue groups, that the Palestinian comes with full desire to share their suffering and story, which is legitimate, but to recognize the suffering of the other side, or the pain, it doesn’t take away our suffering. To recognize the legitimacy of the Palestinian connection to the land, or the jewish connection to the land, it doesn’t take the other connection to the land. That’s where I am now. I know this is complex for even my family when I say these things. I got criticism. Hard arguments. It’s not easy. Because you know what we learn in nonviolence communication, you meet people where they are. I believe we can play a model that cross all these cliches about our conflict. And I understand the Palestinian anger, of course, but we want this energy of anger, to use it instead of going into violence and like really hopeless action like the stabbing, to come join our nonviolence action. And I see this happens, actually. Some people come, youngsters come through Facebook, we don’t know them, not from our circles. So I believe that if our people given like a good leadership with a vision that carry nonviolence and hope, I do believe that many Palestinians are happy to join. This takes time and energy. But I believe the majority of our people don’t want to live in bloody situation, of course. And if the Israelis given the opportunity to show their goodness of solidarity with the Palestinians to struggle together, I really believe also, I have faith of the majority of the Israelis in this case also, they will behave differently.   **ASAF: ** You’ve been, Combatants For Peace have existed for about what 15 years now?   **SOULI: ** 11 years.   **ASAF: ** 11 years. In these 11 years, what do you think has changed in Israeli-Palestinian politics and how did you adapt to those changes?   SOULI: First of all, we… Combatants for Peace is not just a community of ex-fighters, these are the founders, so Combatants for Peace through the years became open to everybody. We started Combatants for Peace -- the meetings, before we call it Combatants For Peace -- started in 2005 secretly, illegally around Beit Lechem [Bethlehem] area. It was the Second Intifada and the political environment, of course, and the social economical situation changed a lot since then. One of the changes, the truth: at that time, the idea of two-state was the only solution people talk about. It's not anymore; it's one of the options. And the second: like, there are many changes, good and bad. I don't see things just black-white, the truth. Last year we did "Ten Years of Combatants for Peace" and we screened our film, Disturbing the Peace -- the film about us, Disturbing the Peace -- at the wall of of Beit Jala. We got a few hundred Palestinians, Israelis to watch it together, under full moon it was beautiful. And we did the Freedom March with 800 Palestinians, Israelis -- this was last year during the, what you call the Knife Intifada -- like really among violent situation. And we got the two Irish ex-prisoners to speak to us there. It was a beautiful feeling of successful, I have to say. And Avner, one of our wise founders, is my close friend, and he speak Arabic fluently, I speak Hebrew, and we are really close after years we are... and Avner told me -- because that time I brought my mom to see the film, and he brought his mom, and they met for the first time -- and his mom told him, “This is exceptional work that you do, the history will write you, and…” Avner was really, for the first time I see him super emotional and we hugged and he said, “Remember, ten years ago when we start?” It was hard to talk about the principle of nonviolence. And ten years later, we are talking not just about nonviolence, we are talking about joint nonviolence, and it’s accepted to a certain level.   ASAF: So just one more question, and that’s something I want to ask everybody that we will be interviewing here. How do you think that we, as Jews that live in the United States, can and should help the struggle from a place here in the United States?   **SOULI: ** Yeah. As we talked before, the American Jewish community have a very important role to play to help our peoples out. And when I talk about our peoples, I mean Palestinians slash Israelis. I don’t see a way for one of the two sides to be happy with this cake, piece of land, that we all love and belong to, without the other side. Is really like a marriage. So the American Jewish part of it is really highly important for us, and from the perspective of media awareness, among the Americans generally and American Jews specifically. So, also we call all the American Jews that come to visit Israel also to visit the Palestinian territory, and meet with our people and see the reality in their eyes and not to believe really the mainstream media. The American Jewish involvement is like deep, historical exist there, in all directions. You know, most, I would say Jewish community in the U.S. of course for a reason or another they care about Israel, that's the truth. And if I look at the extreme settlers, they’re basically American Jewish. They are not even Israelis.   _ **ASAF: ** Well, not all of the settlers. But according to an Oxford University research from two years ago, while Americans make only about 2% of all Israeli citizens, they make up about 15% of the settlers._   **SOULI: ** The American involvement there is so deep. So, instead of being part of the problem, I wish to see more Jewish slash Palestinians that are working together -- with all the imbalance in power and the rights the Jewish have that our diaspora don’t have to go back and all that -- but still to work together in order to change the story and to see, to create a new reality, a new story.   _ **ASAF: ** To learn more about Souli and Combatants for Peace, visit their website cfpeace.org. You can find the documentary_ Disturbing the Peace on Netflix. Unsettled is produced by Yoshi Fields, Max Freedman, Emily Bell, Ilana Levinson, and me. Yoshi and I edited this episode. Original music by Nat Rosenzweig. Special thanks to Mark Winston Griffith and Brooklyn Deep. Go to our website, unsettledpod.com, for show information. You can now support Unsettled by becoming a monthly sustainer through Patreon. Like us on Facebook, find us on Twitter and Instagram, and most importantly, subscribe on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts, to make sure you never miss an episode of Unsettled_._

Overcoming Everything
Jay Etzel - Great Aspirations

Overcoming Everything

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2017 29:29


Sometimes it isn’t a book or person that changes your life but simply your collected experience. Jay Etzel is one of those people whose collected life experience has allowed him become a private coach and consultant to many celebrities and successful business owners of today. “If you have such a hunger for good things, and that hunger drives you past mediocrity..You can direct your life in such a way that they things WILL work out” “Success in a singular dimension needs an alternative space to invest time in otherwise you burn out.” Tune in and Join Roger as he uncovers yet another powerful story of a soul guided by spirit. For more information please visit: http://www.overcomingeverything.com Twitter: @RogerBurnley@OvercomingEverything Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/overcomingeverything https://www.facebook.com/jay.etzel

TalkWithME
Kevin Rabas & Dennis Etzel, Jr., Writers & Friends

TalkWithME

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2017 58:26


Dennis Etzel, Jr. lives with Carrie and the boys in Topeka, Kansas where he teaches English at Washburn University. He has an MFA from The University of Kansas, &an MA & Graduate Certificate in Women and Gender Studies from KS State U. He has two chapbooks, The Sum of Two Mothers (ELJ Publications 2013) and My Graphic Novel (Kattywompus Press 2015), a poetic memoir My Secret Wars of 1984 (BlazeVOX 2015), and Fast-Food Sonnets (Coal City Review Press 2016). His work has appeared in Denver Quarterly, Indiana Review, BlazeVOX, Fact-Simile, 1913: a journal of poetic forms, 3:AM, Tarpaulin Sky, DIAGRAM, and others. He is a TALK Scholar for the Kansas Humanities Council and leads poetry workshops in various Kansas spaces. Please feel free to connect with him at dennisetzeljr.com www.DennisEtzelJr.com & http://DennisEtzelJr.blogspot.com

Moving Well Podcast
Ep 16: Jenna Etzel | How to become a group fitness instructor

Moving Well Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2016 34:15


In this episode, Janet and Nikki talk with Jenna Etzel, National Instructor Trainer for Les Mills US. They discuss the pros and cons of teaching free style group fitness classes vs pre choreographed ones and the difference between taking a training that gives you a base level of knowledge and one that teaches you how to run a class. They also chat about how mindset can influence your success as an instructor and how to avoid injury, overtraining and burnout. Finally, they offer sage wisdom on how to find acceptance that no matter where you go or how long you teach, there will always be problems with the microphone. Links mentioned Take a les mills training: https://www.lesmills.com/us/instructors/ Jenna Etzel is an ACE, AFAA and Les Mills Certified Group Fitness Instructor.  She graduated from W.S.U. with a degree in Psychology and a minor in Spanish, which has oddly come in handy frequently in Fitness!  Jenna currently works for Les Mills US as a National Instructor Trainer and Assessor Lead, teaching new Instructors and Assessors how to become certified/qualified in an effort to work toward our global mission of creating a fitter planet.  Jenna currently teaches Les Mills BODYSTEP®, BODYVIVE®, CXWORX®, BODYPUMP® and Trains CXWORX®, BODYSTEP® and Born To Move®. Jenna loves helping people get where they are trying to go, both in a classroom setting as Group Fitness participants and in a Training environment with new Instructors.  She loves to study and apply learning strategies that help people learn new skills quickly in a supportive environment.  It is paramount to her that people leave each class or Training experience feeling safe, successful and proud of what they've accomplished so they'll be willing to continue learning and growing. Jenna loves to write and to laugh with friends and family.  She finds much inspiration in seeing how other people overcome adversity and aspires to live and work from a place of helping others.  She believes each of us CAN change the world.  

The Therapycast
The LCCH Podcast - #44

The Therapycast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2016 19:03


In today's show we explore the therapeutic benefits of sighing, explore e-cigarettes as a gateway drug to tobacco use, and look at research that shows nicotine poisoning is on the rise in children. The sighing research: Vlemincx, E., Van Diest, I., & Van den Bergh, O. (2016). A sigh of relief or a sigh to relieve: The psychological and physiological relief effect of deep breaths. Physiology & Behavior, 165, 127-135. The e-cigarette as a gateway drug research: Barrington-Trimis, J. L., Urman, R., Berhane, K., Unger, J. B., Cruz, T. B., Pentz, M. A., Samet JM, Leventhal AM & McConnell, R. (2016). E-Cigarettes and Future Cigarette Use. Pediatrics, 138(1), e20160379. The nicotine poisoning research: Etzel, R. A., Wilson, K. M., Balk, S. J., Farber, H. J., Groner, J. A., & Moore, J. E. (2015). Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems. Pediatrics, 136(5), 1018-1026.

Vox Tablet
Reassessing Menachem Begin: Terrorist? Humanist? Man of the People?

Vox Tablet

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2014 30:52


Although he won the Nobel Prize for Peace in 1978, Menachem Begin had a reputation for violence that chased him his whole life. During the Holocaust he fled Europe (where he had been a leader in the radical Zionist group Betar) for Palestine, where he became a leader in the Jewish underground militia known as Etzel and was implicated in deadly events in the fight to help establish the state of Israel. Begin was reviled by the country’s first prime minister, David Ben-Gurion, but did not let the contempt he endured from Labor Party rivals run him out of politics. Instead he embraced his role as an opposition... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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Diese Episode ist ein Gespräch mit Hans-Joachim Schweinsberg von der IVG Caverns GmbH über deren Öl- und Gaskavernen in Etzel bei Wilhelmshaven. Dort werden große Mengen an Erdöl und Erdgas gelagert. In der Episode sprechen wir darüber, warum man diese Kavernen braucht, wie man geologisch geeignete Orte für Kavernen findet, wie man sie in Salzstöcke einbaut, und wie man sie befüllt und entleert.