Podcasts about Cabernet Sauvignon

Red-wine variety of grape

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Cabernet Sauvignon

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Latest podcast episodes about Cabernet Sauvignon

Vino101
VinoWeek - Episode 72 - Holiday Wines

Vino101

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022


With Christmas around the corner we put together a list of some of our favorite wines for the holidays. The Federal Reserve's aggressive interest rate hikes hasn't slowed the uptick in wine prices. It can be fairly easy to blow up your wine budget with just one or two bottles of splurge purchases. Most of the wines on our list can all be had for under $35. Searching for one wine that pleases everybody is a fools errand. It's invariably better to select a variety of wines, open them all at once and let your guest choose what they would like to drink. There are plenty of wines here to please even your most finnicky guests. Thanks for listening to our podcast and Happy Holidays.2019 Château Vitallis Pouilly-Fuissé Vielles Vignes - Father and son team Denis and Maxime Dutron use Chardonnay from their oldest parcels, some as old as 85 years of age to craft this beautiful White Burgundy. 100% Chardonnay, natural fermentation, left on the lees for a year, 70% stainless steel the rest in barrel. Taut and mineral, with green apple and grapefruit. A distinctive Macon that may bring the ABC (anything but Chardonnay) crowd back into the fold. $272019 Ramey Russian River Valley Chardonnay - In contrast to the former old world Chardonnay the Ramey's make a 100% Chardonnay using a plethora of the old world techniques. Whole cluster pressing, native yeast barrel fermentation, lees aging, malolactic fermentation and light fining sans filtering. Baked apple and pear notes complement the layers of savory oak and baking spice. Beautifully textured and balanced. $38 2021 Joel Gott Sauvignon Blanc - A perennial crowd pleaser the grapes for this Sauvignon Blanc are sourced from all over California. Its style remains remarkably consistent from year to year. Ripe melon and white peach aromas jump out of the glass. Lemon and lime flavors work well with the clean mineral finish. $122020 Michel Delhommeau “Harmonie” Muscadet Sèvre et Maine Sur Lie - Michel and Nathalie Delhommeau farm the Melon de Bourgogne grapes for their Muscadet in the volcanic rich soils of the Loire Valley in northwest France. After fermentation the wine spends 5 months “Sur Lie” (in the tank on the lees). Lemon, apple, fresh and vibrant with a bracing minerality and tingling acidity on the finish. This Muscadet calls out for fresh oysters on the half shell and other light seafood dishes. $17 2021 Quivira Rosé Wine Creek Ranch - Cranberries, rhubarb and strawberries aromas compliment the zippy acidity of this 70% Grenache, 11%Counoise, 9% Mourvèdre, 5% Petite Sirah blend. Made with organically grown grapes. $202020 Concerto Reggiano Lambrusco - Most of us have never served a dry red sparkling wine. Here's your chance to wow your guests. Concerto, made from 100% Lambrusco Salamino comes in an attractive bottle that is shaped like a bowling pin. The grapes are organically farmed. When poured into a glass you get a beautiful purple froth. Dark ruby red in color the wine taste of raspberry and strawberries with hints of licorice. It's completely dry on the palate with a fresh zippy clean finish. Serve it slightly chilled not cold. $30Frederic Magnien Crémant De Bourgongne Blanc De Noir - If you love Champagne but you need to watch your coins a bit more closely try exploring sparkling wines from other regions of France. French sparkling wines that use the traditional method and are made outside of the Champagne region are called Crémant. This 100% Pinot Noir from the Burgundy area can be served as an aperitif and also has the body and weight to be served throughout a meal. A light amber color, very fine bubbles, aromas of bing cherries and strawberry. Champagne quality without the sticker shock. $202019 Siduri Russian River Valley Pinot Noir - The consistency of the Siduri brand which was acquired by Jackson Family Wines several years ago continues unabated. Adam Lee may no longer be the winemaker but the assertive and beautiful Pinot Noir style he pioneered continues. Black cherry and spicy raspberry flavors on the palate, medium in length with good acidity. A very attractive entry level Pinot Noir. $302020 Bedrock Wine Co. Old Vine Zinfandel - Morgan Twain-Peterson crafts this deep ruby colored wine from old vineyards (some 100+ years old) throughout Sonoma County. Made with native yeast fermentation and aged in French and Austrian oak puncheons and foudres. In the glass black and red fruit, lavender and pepper aromas. On the palate black plums, a round texture with good acidity and length. Drink and enjoy this youthful Zinfandel now and do yourself a favor and save a few bottles for the next few years. $222019 Hess Collection Allomi Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon - This 79% Cabernet Sauvignon 9% Petite Sirah 5%Malbec 4% Merlot 3% Petit Verdot blend comes from the Allomi vineyard in Pope Valley of northeast Napa Valley. Black and blue fruit, tobacco and oak lead the way for this seemlessly integrated full bodied red. A cushy textured mouthfeel with a long finish. $302019 Obsidian Ridge Lake County Cabernet Sauvignon - 94% Cabernet Sauvignon 2% Petit Verdot 2%Malbec 1% Petite Sirah 1% Syrah. Grown in the volcanic rich soils of the Red Hills of Lake County the wine is aged for 18 months in Hungarian oak barrels. Black fruit, black cherry and vanilla, full bodied and tannic. $35 Show LInks:Best WinesColumbia Winery Tasking RoomLets talk with Maureen DowneyAMOS Electric Autonomous Tractor Tour Visits LodiMendoza declares emergency after late season frostFreak frost hits Argentinian vineyards as Mendoza declares emergencyE & J. Gallo Winery Announces Acquisition of Denner Vineyards in Paso Robles AVAhttps://www.sfchronicle.com/food/wine/article/carlo-trinchero-arrest-17584624.php

The Wine Vault
Episode 335 - Kilikanoon Killerman's Run Cabernet Sauvignon

The Wine Vault

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 54:21


Kilikanoon Killerman's Run Cabernet Sauvignon In this episode, Rob and Scott explore Clare Valley in Australia by reviewing the Kilikanoon Killerman's Run Cabernet.  So come join us, on The Wine Vault.

Bodega Runner
111. 120 Cabernet Sauvignon Reserva Especial. Codzienne wino z Rossmanna (29,99zł) z Arsenalem w tle

Bodega Runner

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2022 10:43


Codzienny Cabernet Sauvignon z Nowego Świata. A dokładniej z Rossmanna :) Dobrze wydane 30zł, które spodoba się nie tylko fanom Arsenalu. Aż żałuję, że mój Rossmann nie ma półeczki z winami...

Urban Music Report
JACK'S SPLENDID WINE AND FOOD SHOW : CALIFORNIA NAPA VALLEY

Urban Music Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 14:17


California wine people have a saying, it is said:  "  Napa is King. "  Most often they are talking about the Cabernet Sauvignon wine from the Napa Valley. Long regarded as the best fruit area, grapes were planted as early as 1838.  Affluent Traveler Jack Maraffi gives you the names of the very top vineyards. Comprising only 4% of wines grown in California, wine guru Robert Parker says that most of the wines there are "outstanding'.Watch The Complete Episodes of  ArtTV on AppleTV, Roku, and Verizon ConnectedTV Devices. Add The H20 Channel To Your Device.

Wine Road: The Wine, When, and Where of Northern Sonoma County.
Chris Taddei Owner and Wine Maker of Taddei Wines

Wine Road: The Wine, When, and Where of Northern Sonoma County.

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 28:47


Wine Road Podcast Episode 163 Sponsored by Ron Rubin Winery Episode 163 | Chris Taddei Owner and Wine Maker of Taddei Wines. Chris Taddei of Taddei wines joins us to tell us about his winemaking philosophy and how he got into making wine. He shares his Project X, 2018 Cabernet Sauvignon from Alexander Valley. Our Fast Five Recipe is Lamb Chops with Blue Cheese Compound Butter from Julius Orth from Ektimo. Wine of the Day: Taddei Project X, 2018 Cabernet Sauvignon, Alexander Valley Fast Five Recipe: Lamb Chops with Blue Cheese Compound Butter from Julius Orth from Ektimo. Podcast Sponsor: Ron Rubin Winery https://ronrubinwinery.com/ SHOW NOTES 1:04 Starting off with 2018 Taddei Cabernet Sauvignon from Alexander Valley (Project X) But Chris brought a whole case of wines to try! 3:00 Chris's tasting room philosophy is he wants people to understand who he is and what he does through his wine. He will open anything you are interested in. 5:08 Wine is a slow beverage. The learning experience is a part of the wine tasting experience. And his vertical tastings are a rare treat. 7:10 How Chris came to be a winemaker, his wine epiphany with a bottle of La Tâche, and how he met his wife. 10:53 Chris started the winery in 2003 and made first wine in 1999. Self taught in winemaking with a background in chemistry. Chris Makes wine with intention and deliberateness. 17:38 Fast Five Recipe –Lamb Chops with Blue Cheese Compound Butter from Julius Orth from Ektimo. Ingredients: Rack of Lamb, Butter, and Blue Cheese. Directions: Separate the chops from the rack of lamb and trim off fat. Put olive oil on the chops and sear on a hot grill about 2 minutes. In advance create the Blue cheese compound butter. Crumble the blue cheese into softened butter. Mix well and roll into a tube in wax paper. Put in refrigerator to chill. Cut a medallion of the lamb chop and slater with the butter. Serve with a roasted root vegetable medley. Pair with Ektimo Pinot Noir 21:05 Chris will also take guests through barrel samples too. Open by appointment only but Chris is always there at the Bell Road location. 25:42 Tickets are now available on wineroad.com for Winter WineLand January 14 & 15 with 70 wineries participating. Also check out the Insider Club -- link on the website with all the details. Fill your bag with wine and tag with #mywineroadadventure Links: Taddei Wines Ektimo Wines WinterWineLand Wine Road Insider Club Ron Rubin Winery Credits:The Wine Road podcast is mixed and mastered at Threshold Studios Sebastopol, CA. http://thresholdstudios.info/

Wine Soundtrack - USA
The Brander Vineyard - Fabian Bravo

Wine Soundtrack - USA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 37:55


The Brander Vineyard, in the Los Olivos District AVA of Santa Barbara County, focuses on Bordeaux varieties. It was planted in 1975. The first wine was produced in 1977 and it was Sauvignon Blanc. Today, Brander releases approximately 6/8 different Sauvignon Blanc offerings in any given vintage. Brander Sauvignon Blancs are known to age well given their high acidity, balanced alcohol, and quality fruit. Brander also produces other Bordeaux varieties such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Sauvignon Gris, and Semillon.Fabian and his wife also have their own small label, Casita de Bravo, currently producing around 350 cases.

The Inside Winemaking Podcast with Jim Duane
Ep. 143 KK Carothers Bryant - Estate Complete

The Inside Winemaking Podcast with Jim Duane

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 62:17


This episode features KK Carothers, who is the winemaker at Bryant Estate in Napa Valley. Our conversation covers KK's path to winemaking, the wines from Bryant Estate, estate grapegrowing, building a fumé blanc wine, and a review of harvest 2022. Bryant Estate - Napa, CA This podcast is sponsored by Innovint. Has your winery turned into a complete Excel sheet show? Say hello to InnoVint, it's winemaking software to get you off of spreadsheets and into the modern era. InnoVint was founded and built by winemakers, so they know where your pain points are. No matter the size of your winery, InnoVint provides you with instant access to your production records in n the format you need to make quick, informed decisions. Basically, they take the tedious data management stuff off your plate. With a desktop and mobile platform, the insights you need are just a few clicks away (even if you're offline!). Make the right calls at the right time. InnoVint is an approachable solution focused on exactly what winemaking teams need. Automate your TTB compliance. Know the true cost of each wine. Improve your cellar workflow, and be more effective than ever before! Join the 4,500 winery professionals saving up to 30 hours per week. Schedule a call today on InnoVint.us and don't forget to mention the Inside Winemaking Podcast. This podcast is sponsored by Total Wine. When you discover a new favorite bottle of Chardonnay, sparkling wine, or gin at Total Wine & More, you'll discover a whole lot more. Like the friendly smile of an expert guide ready to help you find that perfect bottle. And the confidence of knowing you just found something special. So, explore the wondrous selection and totally low prices at Total Wine dot com; where you'll find what you love, and love what you find. Drink responsibly. Be 21.   The Inside Winemaking Podcast on iTunes Now on Spotify And Stitcher Radio Too

In The Vineyard With Podcast
Episode 55 - Keermont Vineyards - Alex Starey

In The Vineyard With Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 32:28


In the episode I was in the vineyard with Alex Starey, winemaker at Keermont Vineyards, in Stellenbosch, South Africa. Keermont is located in a long narrow valley that is tucked between the Helderberg and the Stellenbosch Mountains. Right at the tope of his vineyards, near an open pool feeding from the local spring, we sat on a sunny mid-winter day to chat about this relatively new estate. Keermont was bought by current owners Mark and Monica Wraith in 2003. they originally planned to plant vineyards and sell the grapes but a chance introduction to Alex changed that. A single barrel was made in 2007 and since the results were so good the green light was given to make more wine under the Keermont label. Since 2007 the estate under Alex's leadership is going from strength to strength with emphasis on Syrah, Cabernet Sauvignon and Franc, Merlot with some petit Verdot and malbec too. The range includes an excellent Chenin Blanc as well a white blend that includes seven varieties. Enjoy hearing the personal story of a wine maker returning home from making wines abroad to make wines in his childhood valley and the story of an estate that is less than 20 years old.

Fearless Fabulous You
Allie Ketcham, Ketcham Estate: On Love, Loss & Wine

Fearless Fabulous You

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 46:54


Allie Ketcham, proprietress of Ketcham Estate in the Russian River Valley, has hiked both the Appalachian Trail and Santiago de Compostela and believes in living life to the fullest every day. After losing her husband and soulmate Mark Ketcham after a long illness in 2020, Allie took over the reins at Ketcham Estate, a winery recognized for being women-run and for producing exceptional small lot Russian River Pinot Noir, Cabernet Sauvignon and Viognier wines. www.ketchamestate.comFearless Fabulous You is broadcast live Wednesdays at 12 Noon ET.Fearless Fabulous You Radio Show is broadcast on W4WN Radio - Women 4 Women Network (www.w4wn.com) part of Talk 4 Radio (www.talk4radio.com) on the Talk 4 Media Network (www.talk4media.com). Fearless Fabulous You Podcast is also available on Talk 4 Podcasting (www.talk4podcasting.com), iHeartRadio, Amazon Music, Pandora, Spotify, Audible, and over 100 other podcast outlets.

In The Vineyard With Podcast
Episode 54 - Oldenburg Vineyards - Nic Van Aarde

In The Vineyard With Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 35:09


In this episode I chatted to Nic Van Aarde, winemaker at Oldenburg Vineyards in Banghoek, Stellenbosch, South Africa. You can hear all about the mystical Rondekop Hill, the centrepiece vineyards at the heart of this beautiful estate. We discussed the Grenache, each vine supported by a rock, against the ferocious wind, the Cabernet Sauvignon, with putting green grass between the rows of vines, the Stone Axe Shiraz and why the valley was called 'Scary Corner' by the Dutch settlers. Join us for a visit to one of the most beautiful High valleys in the Cape, Banghoek. Make sure you hold on to something solid once the wind come rushing over the mountains!

Gourmet FM
236.2 Entrevista a Vicente Cortes, jefe de ventas nacional de Bodegas Hispano+Suiza

Gourmet FM

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 23:55


Programa 236.2 de GourmetFM en Radio Tomares Bienvenidos a la Octava Temporada. Entrevista a Vicente Cortes, jefe de ventas nacional de Bodegas Hispano+Suiza. Hubo un día en que tres almas gemelas compartieron el mismo sueño después de media vida en el mundo del vino: elaborar los vinos que querían hacer, comenzando en la cepa y terminando en la etiqueta. Entre los caprichos del vino de autor para iniciados, el vino elaborado según las dictadas de la moda y el mercado, hay una tercera vía que Marc Grin, Pablo Ossorio y Rafael Navarro han querido explorar con una apuesta personalísima a la que han dado el nombre de Bodegas Hispano+Suizas por el origen de sus socios. Bodegas Hispano+Suizas cuenta con 61 hectáreas de viñedo propio, de las cuales 46 están situadas alrededor de la bodega y 15 más que se encuentran a 500 m de las instalaciones. Las variedades plantadas son Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Bobal, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Syrah, Pinot Noir y Petit Verdot. La densidad de plantación es de 4.000 plantas por hectárea, desarrollando una viticultura de precisión para conseguir la mayor calidad de la uva y que así se vea reflejada en los vinos de Bodegas Hispano+Suizas. Los rendimientos por hectárea se sitúan entre 6 y 8 mil Kg/Ha. Es decir, escasamente 2 Kg por cepa. Debido a las diferentes variedades y tipos de vinos que elaboramos, pueden realizar una vendimia de casi 3 meses de duración, desde el cava, cuya recolección comienza a principios de agosto, y los vinos tintos de guarda hasta finales de octubre. Con Fran León.

Lounge Lizards - a Cigar and Lifestyle Podcast
Ep. #54: Ramón Allones Superiores LCDH (w/ Jordan Cabernet Sauvignon, La Casa Del Habano Releases, Decanting Wine & Poobah Loves His Flat Top Grill)

Lounge Lizards - a Cigar and Lifestyle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 83:47


Recorded at the Ten86 Cigar Lounge in Hawthorne, New Jersey, the lizards pair the Ramón Allones Superiores LCDH w/ Jordan Cabernet Sauvignon from 2017. The guys discuss La Casa Del Habano speciality cigars, Senator details the importance of decanting wine, and Poobah shares the glory of the flat top grill.Vinturi Wine Aerator System (discussed in episode): https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00T1F5CSU?ref_=cm_sw_r_apin_dp_H3RWVP15TFFDY1K2FD2KJoin the Lounge Lizards for a weekly discussion on all things cigars (both Cuban and non-Cuban), whiskey, food, travel, life and work. This is your formal invitation to join us in a relaxing discussion amongst friends and become a card-carrying Lounge Lizard yourself. This is not your typical cigar podcast. We're a group of friends who love sharing cigars, whiskey and a good laugh.website/merch/rating archive: loungelizardspod.comemail: hello@loungelizardspod.com to join the conversation and be featured on an upcoming episode!instagram: @loungelizardspodThis episode is brought to you by PerfectCigarBlend.com - the exclusive Lounge Lizards online new world cigar retailer. Use promo code "LIZARD" at checkout to save 15% off your first order! Free domestic US shipping included.

Two Guys Talking Wine
A Chat With Marianna Velenosi - Episode 310

Two Guys Talking Wine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 35:21


André has admitted that Italy is his blind spot in wine knowledge. However Michael and André have the opportunity to unpack some more from what André learned in Abruzzo. They sit down with Marianna Velenosi from her eponymous winery and talk about "Super Marche" - Will Montepulciano make great dance partners with Cabernet Sauvignon or Syrah?

Wine for Normal People
Ep 449: All About Oak Barrels with Craig Holme of Tonnellerie Radoux

Wine for Normal People

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 45:50


This week's show is about the essential art of cooperage, or barrel making. Aussie winemaker and current US National Sales Manager for Tonnellerie Radoux, Craig Holme, takes us through how barrels are made, from forest to cellar. We discuss sustainability (Hint: the issue isn't the barrels or the trees, it's the fact that they come on container ships fully assembled, as winemakers order. Hello, carbon footprint!), how different regions look at barrels, and how barrels are a very personal thing to a winemaker. A cool look inside of an essential part of wine!     Thanks to the Patrons for their insightful questions that augmented the show! To join Patreon, click here.    Here are the show notes: 1. Craig tells us briefly about his early life in Mount Benson, South Australia where his family farmed Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz. He discusses how he worked in the wine industry, working harvests around the world, and then becoming a winemaker himself. For 10 years, Craig and his wife owned a small wine brand, called Holme Estate Cellars, which specialized in Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz sourced from their family vineyards in Australia. They also bought Zinfandel and Chardonnay from California. He moved into barrels about 10 years ago.   2. We discuss the process of barrel making: Forests -- Troncais, Limousin, Atelier, and American and Hungarian wood The age and requirements for a tree to make barrels (only 2-3 barrels come out of each tree. You read that right). We discuss the French laws and a bit about forestry management Radoux's proprietary tannin scanning method -- Oakscan Splitting wood Seasoning wood -- what it accomplishes, where it's done, the terroir of seasoning Toasting oak -- the process, toast levels available, how toasting is done, and the most popular toasts Radoux's wood, fresh from the forest 3. We discuss the size and shape of the barrel and why it matters (Bordeaux is 225L, Burgundy is 228 L, we explain why they are different and the other common options for barrel size)   One of Radoux's yard for seasoning the staves  4. I become just slightly obsessed with the elephant in the room -- It is completely wasteful for barrels to be assembled in France or Missouri or Eastern Europe and shipped to California, Washington, etc. It's not the fault of the barrel makers, but the expectations of the winemakers. Craig tells us where winemakers are about shipping air thousands of miles, and wasting space in cargo ships, rail and trucks (the coopers are businesses, they are fulfilling orders, it's the winemakers that are mainly at fault here for not demanding assembly close to home).      5. We discuss how winemakers pick barrels and what the choices could lead to in the wine.  Fire shapes and bends the barrels, then toasts them   6. Finally we end with some trends and the fact that oak is awesome, and it's an essential part of wine.    Thanks to Radoux and Craig Holme for joining the show!       All photos from https://www.tonnellerieradoux.com/ ____________________________________________________________________

Wine Time Fridays Podcast
133 - A Wine Threesome With a Ménage à Trois Merlot, a Rioja & a Napa Cabernet Sauvignon From Mira Winery

Wine Time Fridays Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 36:48


In todays episode, Shelley and Phil open THREE wines to taste through! An easy to find Merlot, in honor of International Merlot Day on Monday, a 100 point Rioja, in honor of International Tempranillo day next Wednesday and another recent #NFT Cuvée Collective #WineNFT drop, this one from Mira Winery! It IS a wine threesome, if you will, and it IS Friday! #HappyFriday! #ItsWineTime! #Cheersing #EasterEggWines this episode: -- 2019 Ménage à Trois Lavish Merlot ($12 at Fred Meyer, Coeur d'Alene)

Wine Time Fridays Podcast
132 - A Chalk Hill Chardonnay and a Conn Creek Cabernet

Wine Time Fridays Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 29:52


In todays episode, Shelley and Phil open and taste through an easy to get Chalk Hill Chardonnay and another NFT Wine, this time a Cabernet Sauvignon from Conn Creek in Napa Valley! Wait until you hear what THIS NFT brings you! The leaves are turning and we are knee deep into Fall! #HappyFriday! #ItsWineTime! #Cheersing #EasterEggWines tasted this episode:   2021 Chalk Hill Sonoma Coast Chardonnay ($16 at Fred Meyer)

Whine About Wine
Getting Back to Buttonwood Grove...

Whine About Wine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 11:24


From a spacious multi-level deck, you can enjoy spectacular views of the lake and the beautifully landscaped grounds. The well-established vineyards produce classic European vinifera grapes including Chardonnay, Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Riesling. Vines planted more recently are Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Noir, and Gewurztraminer. Savor a tasting from your choice of many award-winning wines, then browse the extensive gift shop for the perfect item for yourself or a friend. Enjoy live music all summer long on the spacious deck while enjoying a favorite wine or trying something new! Meet fellow wine enthusiasts and enjoy the summer outdoors. The complete schedule can be found on the Winery Events page. Looking for a longer visit? Stay overnight in one of our cozy log cabins, available from April through November. Drink in the ambiance of the Finger Lakes at Buttonwood Grove! Once you visit you won't be able to wait to get back to Buttonwood Grove....

The Wine Pair Podcast
Costco Kirkland Cabernet Challenge! (Kirkland Signature Cabernet Sauvignon wine review, why Cabernet is so popular)

The Wine Pair Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 48:58 Transcription Available


Costco sells a ton of its Kirkland Signature brand Cabernet Sauvignon, but how good is the quality of their wine?!? To answer that question, in this episode we do a review and wine tasting challenge with 3 different Kirkland Signature Cabernet Sauvignons to tell you if we think they are worth your hard earned money! Cabernet Sauvignon is the most popular red wine in the United States, and Costco sells the most wine in the US, so it only makes sense to do a challenge with these two behemoths. We also talk about why Cabernet Sauvignon is so popular (at least in the US), and how Costco is starting to put more “named wines” under its Kirkland Signature brand. We are also proud to announce that Decanter magazine recommended The Wine Pair Podcast in its October 22 issue! Wines reviewed in this episode: 2020 Kirkland Signature California Cabernet Sauvignon, 2020 Kirkland Signature Columbia Valley Cabernet Sauvignon, and 2020 Kirkland Signature K Vine Wahluke Slope Vineyard Cabernet Sauvignon.Contact The Wine Pair Podcast - we'd love to hear from you!Visit our website, leave a review, and reach out to us: www.thewinepairpodcast.comFollow and DM us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thewinepairpodcast/Send us an email: joe@thewinepairpodcast.com

In The Vineyard With Podcast
Episode 51 - Rebekah Wineburg - Quintessa

In The Vineyard With Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 52:00


Can a bottle of wine change your life? If you are in a receptive mode, the stars are aligned for you and the right questions asked, Yes says Rebekah Wineburg, winemaker at Quintessa. In our latest episode she recalls such an encounter with a bottle of Ornellaia 1998 while having lunch in San Francisco, with her father. This bottle started her very own ‘Butterfly Effect' that led her eventually to be at the helm of one of California's premium estate, Quintessa.

Jeg kan ingenting om vin
85. Amerikansk Cabernet Sauvignon

Jeg kan ingenting om vin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 28:51


I denne episoden snakker vi for første gang om amerikansk Cabernet Sauvignon. Produsenter: RidgeOpus OneDunnCorison TogniHeintz Stags LeapDominusEiseleCh. Montelena MatthiassonMatthiasson Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon 2016Stag's Leap Wine Cellars Cabernet Sauvignon Artemis 2019 Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Cork & Taylor Wine Podcast
Episode 62: Maximillian Riedel, 11th Generation CEO of Riedel

Cork & Taylor Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 33:49


Glass glass, more glass and more glass on this weeks Cork & Taylor Wine Podcast as we sit down with 11th generation CEO of Riedel, Maximillian Riedel. We chat the importance of wine glasses and decanting wine. Really interesting podcast as always as you can't have great wine without great wine glasses-elevate the experience!Don't forget to Subscribe, Rate and Review! Please please It only takes a few minutes and helps me/the show grow. The more subscribers, reviews and rates helps us to get discovered! Also, follow us on our Facebook @corkandtaylor and Instagram accounts @corkandtaylorpodcast.Also, Please consider supporting the show as it would be appreciated. This helps me offset  expenses to continue to run and grow the Cork & Taylor Wine Podcast. Thanks! Lukehttps://www.patreon.com/corkandtaylor

Vin for begyndere
Walla Walla - Cabernet Sauvignon - Washington State

Vin for begyndere

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 84:58


Vinene i dette afsnit er skænket af Juuls Vin og Spiritus https://www.juuls.dk/ Smagekasse: https://www.juuls.dk/radioteket ………………… Vi skal til et område i den østlige del af Washington State, Columbia Vallay og mere specifikt i Walla Walla, hvor klimaet er perfekt til at dyrke cabernet sauvignon. Hvordan smager cabernet sauvignon i sin rene form i området og hvordan smager den, når den er i et bordeaux-blend? Hvordan er klimaet i og hvilke forskelle er der på den vestlige og østlige del af Walla Walla? Hvordan ser det ud med nedbør og temperaturer og hvad svarer det til i Europa? Hvorfor laver man ikke kun enkeltmarksvine i den forbindelse; hvorfor laver man sammenstik med druer fra 10 marker? Hvorfor er der opstået denne særlige lille appellation Walla Walla og hvilket terroir gør sig gældende her? Hvad kan man spise til cabernet sauvignon og hvor længe kan vin egentlig tåle at lægge på træfade? Skal vi mon lave en lille pariser-smagning med jer lyttere og se om Amerika slår Frankrig igen? Det kunne være sjovt! Til slut snakker vi om 100-pointsskalaen og hvordan den kan og skal forstås til eget brug og til brug ved indkøb.   100-points skala (starter ved 50 point)   Farve 5 point Aroma 15 point Intensitet og kompleksitet Smag 20 point Følesans, smagssans, struktur, syre, tannin, alkohol,  intensitet og kompleksitet, balance og længde Overordnet kvalitet og finish 10 point Sammenhæng mellem de tre foregående punkter samt det “subjekltive element”   Men hey; hvad med stedsmagning og kontekst?! Hvor spiller det ind?   Vi smager på 1) Woodward Canyion, Artist Series #26, Cabernet Sauvignon, 2017 https://www.juuls.dk/roedvin/varekort/woodward-canyon-artist-series-26 2) L'Ecole No 41, Cabernet Saouvignon, Columbia Valley, 2018 https://www.juuls.dk/roedvin/varekort/lecole-no-41-cabernet-sauvignon-columbia-valley-1 3) L'Ecole No 41, Estate Ferguson Vineyard, 2018 https://www.juuls.dk/roedvin/varekort/lecole-no-41-estate-ferguson-vineyard-4 ....................... KØB BOGEN HER http://vinforbegyndere.com/ Besøg os på Facebook og Instagram, hvor man kan se billeder af vinene og få tips til vin og mad sammensætning. https://www.facebook.com/vinforbegyndere https://www.instagram.com/vinforbegyndere Web: https://www.radioteket.dk/ Kontakt: radioteket@radioteket.dk Musik: Jonas Landin

Dilettante Ball
500 - Cabernet Sauvignon

Dilettante Ball

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 27:56


What's crappening in this episode: Support us on Patreon! Eggnog, FF7, everything becomes a crab If you'd like to play along at home click here.

True Crimes Against Wine
Sidebar Ep. 33: What's In A Grape?

True Crimes Against Wine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 5:11


Judge Topher explains the difference between the Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot grapes.

Wine for Normal People
Ep 444: The Wines of Lisboa, Portugal (the wine region around Lisbon)

Wine for Normal People

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 32:11 Very Popular


This week's show is short but extremely valuable! We tell you about one of the best value regions in the wine world: Lisboa, the area around Lisbon in Portugal.   Although it has extensive hills and regional variation in climate, the real action is less in the smaller DOCs (Denominacão de Origem Controlada) and more within the larger Lisboa IPR (Indicação de Proveniência Regulamentada or Protected Designation of Origin). Using the freedom of the larger IPR, winemakers are making spectacular blends of native and international grapes for prices that seem too good to be true.   The city of Lisbon. Photo: Pexels   The pressure is off to feel like you have to age these wines, spend a lot of money, or save these bottles for a special occasion. For less than US$10 you can often get a lovely bottle of red or white that drinks above its price point and is great for weeknight drinking.    Here are the show notes: We give an overview of the Lisboa Region Location: It's the wine region around the capital of Portugal, Lisbon. It extends 150 km/93 miles up the coast, following the Serra de Montejunto, which go north from Lisbon, and divide Lisboa in half. Wines near the Atlantic side in the west are influenced by strong winds, mists, and weather. On the other side of the hills, the climate is warmer and the ripening more predictable (the wines are often better!) One of Portugal's most prolific regions (there are many co-ops here), until recently it was called Estremadura and was relatively unknown until it changed the name of the IPR to Lisboa, making it easier to recognize on the shelf Wine has been made in the region since the Phoenicians and regions around Lisbon became famed in England over the centuries but have lost much of their cachet Map: Wines of Lisboa   Terroir: Lisboa is a large, hilly, varied region with two main soil types: clay-limestone and clay-sand Due to the mountains and Atlantic influence, there are hundreds of microclimates so wines come in many styles The climate is either marked by strong Atlantic influence on the coast with high winds and fall rains OR by a Mediterranean climate, when the vines are protected by the Montejunto   Grapes: More than 30 grape varieties are used, the majority for white wine production. Almost all are blends. The main grapes include: Whites: Arinto, Fernão Pires, Malvasia, Seara-Nova, Vital with Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc and other international whites. They tend to favor the Arinto grape and can have richness but with balanced acidity to go well with seafood. Reds: Alicante Bouschet, Aragonez, Castelão, Tinta Miúda (Graciano), Touriga Franca, Touriga Nacional, Trincadeira with Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah, Merlot and other international reds. Reds are known to be quite fruity but with balanced acidity and tannin and no to low oak treatment Arinto grape. Photo: Wines of Portugal    Subregions: There are nine DOCS within a short drive of the capital city South, very close to Lisbon: Bucelas, Colares and Carcavelos Center: Alenquer, Arruda, Lourinhã, Óbidos, Torres Vedras North: Encostas d'Aire   Photo: Courtesy of MC Ice Here is a short summary of the DOCs: Bucelas: “the prince of Portuguese wine” this is the best of Lisboa's regions for white wine and as such, it's delimited only for whites. Arinto dominates and is likely native to here. The wines are like citrus and they have high acidity with salinity, minerality and sparkling Bucelas is also made successfully in the region. This wine was famed during the Age of Exploration, cited by Shakespeare in Henry VI, and a favorite of the royal family in England under King George III   Colares: Very close to Atlantic, northwest of Lisbon, there are only166 acres/67 ha left to this DOC. The area gained fame because it was one of the only places in Europe never touched by phylloxera -- its loose sandy soils allowed ungrafted Ramisco vines to thrive on coastal sand, even while everything else perished. The sandy soils have clay underneath to hold the grapes in the ground. The Malvasia Fina grape makes aromatic whites, and the famed red is the flavorful, tannic Ramisco with Castelão   Photo: Sands of Colares, (c) Wines of Portugal   Carcavelos: A small area of just 47 acres/19 ha, Carcavelos is west of Lisbon and the area is pretty much gone because of urban sprawl, although some producers are reviving the fortified sweet wine of Galego Dourado, Ratinho, Castelão and Arinto. The wine can be vintage or non-vintage, white or red     Center of the Lisboa IPR: Alenquer: The most esteemed of the sub-regions with Bucelas, Alenquer is an inland region on the southeast side of the Serra de Montejunto. The mountains shield Alenquer from cold, Atlantic winds. The warmer climate ensures good ripening of red grapes, although aromatic whites and rosé are also made in Alenquer. The wines are blends of the main grapes (mentioned above)       Óbidos: Located near the Peniche peninsula, west of the Candeeiros mountains, and an hour north of Lisbon, this very windy and cold area is close to the coast and makes top sparkling wines. Cold, wet winds, and high humidity seep in through breaks in the mountains, making viticulture a challenge. The moisture promotes vigor, so it is very hard to make quality dry wine here, although some producers are trying to make red.       Arruda: Behind hills, protected from storms, Arruda makes red and whites (mainly blends) from indigenous and international grapes. The reds are better known than the whites.     Torres Vedras: A bulk wine region of red and white grapes. Most of the wines are designated Vinho de Mesa even though it is a DOC     Lourinhã: Windy and cold, the grapes don't ripen so this area is demarcated for Aguardente or Brandy. The sauce is made from the Tália varietal, which is Ugni Blanc (also used to make Cognac and Armagnac) North Encostas d'Aire: On limestone slopes and hills in the western Candeiros and Aire Mountiains, this DOC makes full, fruity reds, and acidic but ripe whites from traditional grapes. It's the largest DOC in Lisboa.   Lisbon, Photo: Pixabay Bonus: MC Ice was just there so he shares some advice on food and wine pairing!    Lisbon is a great city to visit and it's easy to get to the wine regions. Better yet, it's SO affordable that traveling there nightly through your glass is 100% attainable!   _______________________________________________________________ Thanks to our sponsors this week: Wine Spies uncovers incredible wines at unreal prices - on every type of wine in a variety of price points. It's not a club and there's no obligation to buy. Sign up for their daily email and buy what you want, when you want it. They have a build-a-case option, so you can mix and match wines while enjoying free shipping on every purchase. Visit www.winespies.com/normal you'll get $20 credit to use on your first order! Check them out today!   If you think our podcast is worth the price of a bottle or two of wine a year, please become a member of Patreon... you'll get even more great content, live interactions and classes!  www.patreon.com/winefornormalpeople   To register for an AWESOME, LIVE WFNP class with Elizabeth go to: www.winefornormalpeople.com/classes    

So Can I
Surviving Fires + Making Wine in Sonoma with Elizabeth Pollock

So Can I

Play Episode Play 41 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 47:24


Today I am joined by Elizabeth Pollock. Elizabeth is the owner of Adelaide Thomas Wines, a boutique, family-owned winery in Sonoma County, California. Adelaide Thomas produces three different wines every year - a Rosé of Pinot Noir, a Sauvignon Blanc, and a Cabernet Sauvignon. Elizabeth's wines are made from organic grapes, and with a low-intervention, clean, wine-making style. In this episode we talk about how Elizabeth and her husband stumbled upon a beautiful property in Sonoma...that just happened to have a winery on it, how she transitioned from an attorney in the corporate world to the owner of a winery, and how she rebuilt her life after the devastating Glass Fire in Sonoma county engulfed her home. Drink Katy'sAdelaide Thomas Winery WebsiteAdelaide Thomas Winery InstagramSonoma Ecology CenterBest Friends Animal Society

CheapWineFinder Podcast
Exquisite Collection Paso Robles Cabernet Sauvignon 2020

CheapWineFinder Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 6:37


Exquisite Collection Paso Robles Cabernet Sauvignon 2020This is an Aldi $13.99 exclusive wine.The Exquisite Collection is roughly the equivalent of Trader Joe's Reserve line of wines.Wines from elite growing regions selling for bargain prices.Is it any good?Check out www.cheapwinefinder.com and listen to the podcast for all the details!!!

Wine Time Fridays Podcast
128 - Tasting a Goosecross Cabernet Sauvignon & Celebrating Orange Wine Day With an Eternal Wine Evolution

Wine Time Fridays Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 33:17


In todays episode, Shelley and Phil, after talking about it for weeks, finally pop the cork on an Orange Wine in honor of Orange Wine Day, which is this coming Thursday, October 6. They also taste through the 3rd Winery NFT from Cuvée Collective, a Goosecross Cabernet Sauvignon from Napa Valley! Lots to talk about in this episode! #HappyFriday! #ItsWineTime! #CheersingWines tasted this episode:  2019 Eternal Wine Evolution Skin Contact White Wine ($39 from winery) 2017 Goosecross Summit Selection Game Farm Cabernet Sauvignon ($95 from winery)To find out more about the Cuvée Collective Goosecross Winery NFT collection head tohttps://www.cuveecollective.com/marketplace/wine/goosecross-winery.  Thanks to our sponsors: Cuvée Collective, Elsom Cellars and 3D Kitchens by Design  Cuvée Collective: Cuvée Collective is the first members only wine NFT club. Your membership gives you access to exclusive benefits and experiences within the world of wine. Keep an eye out future Cuvée Collective NFT drops by signing up for their newsletter at www.cuveecollective.com and following them on on Twitter, Instagram and in Discord. Elsom Cellars Good times are meant to be shared and so are great grapes and great wines! Since 2006, Elsom Cellars has been producing brilliant Washington wines. For more information about Elsom Wines, please visit http://www.elsomcellars.com or call them at 425-298-3082.3D Kitchens by Design Is your kitchen in need of a facelift? A complete overhaul? Visualize your dream kitchen and let 3D Kitchens by Design do the rest! 3D Kitchens by Design: Dream, Design, Deliver. To make your dream kitchen a reality, please visit https://www.3dkitchensbydesign.info or call 208-818-8742And of course, a HUGE thank you to Tod Hornby who wrote and recorded our official Wine Time Fridays theme music, which is ANYthing but average.  Please visit https://todhornby.com or contact him at veryaveragemusic@gmail.com The Eternal Wine Wine Word of the Week -  Orange WineIt's a type of white wine made by leaving the grape skins and seeds in contact with the juice, creating a deep orange-hued finished product. The deep color of orange wine comes from lignin in grapeseeds.For more information on Eternal Wine, please visit https://eternalwine.com or simply call 509-240-6258. Eternal Wine: Drink Wine, Be Happy.Mentions: Bill Nancarrow, Robert Craig Winery, Massican, Dan Petroski and Jody Beckham.Wines we enjoyed this week:  The Archimage Reserve from Sleight of Hand, Escape to Walla Walla Red Blend, Pianirossi Solus Maremma Toscana, Au Contraire Chardonnay, Rutherford Ranch Chardonnay and Massican Annia.Please find us on Facebook (httpsCuvée Collective Cuvée Collective is the first members only wine NFT club and the next chapter in wine culture.Elsom Cellars Since 2006, Elsom Cellars has been producing brilliant Washington wines. 3D Kitchens by Design Wine tastes better in an updated kitchen! Visualize your dream kitchen and let us do the rest!

Cork & Taylor Wine Podcast
Episode 61: Michael Keenan, Keenan Winery - We uncork the truth behind Wine

Cork & Taylor Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 45:47


We got my good friend and talented winemaker/vintner, Michael Keenan, of famed Spring Mountain Winery, Keenan Vineyards. I sell his wine in the great state of Ohio and we always have a blast when we are together. Figure lets be free and open about wine!!! We speak the truth and talk about Merlot, 2020 vintage and many other things in this weeks Cork & Taylor Wine Podcast.Don't forget to Subscribe, Rate and Review! Please please It only takes a few minutes and helps me/the show grow. The more subscribers, reviews and rates helps us to get discovered! Also, follow us on our Facebook @corkandtaylor and Instagram accounts @corkandtaylorpodcast.Also, Please consider supporting the show as it would be appreciated. This helps me offset  expenses to continue to run and grow the Cork & Taylor Wine Podcast. Thanks! Lukehttps://www.patreon.com/corkandtaylor

California Wine Country
Sonoma Valley Wine

California Wine Country

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 30:55


Laura McGilley and Andriana Duckworth from Sonoma Valley Wine join Steve Jaxon, Dan Berger and Harry Duke on California Wine Country. Andriana Duckworth is the Executive Director and Laura McGilley is the Marketing and Communications Manager for the Sonoma Valley Vintners. The Sonoma Valley Vintners and Growers Alliance, known as Sonoma Valley Wine, is the voice of the Sonoma Valley wine region where there are 6 AVAs and 14,000 acres of vineyards. Dan Berger points out that in 1879 at Kunde Ranch, at the time called Dunfillin, made the first Cabernet Sauvignon in California. The Valley of the Moon Vintage Festival Sonoma Valley Wine is promoting The Valley of the Moon Vintage Festival in the uniquely beautiful town of Sonoma, on October 7 and 8, 2022. They have taken over the longest running festival of its type. The festival will be located mainly in the Sonoma Plaza. Friday October 7 is the Sonoma Legends dinner where wineries will host tables and bring their cellar wines. Saturday October 8 is the Grand Tasting with 45 or more wineries pouring. Don't miss the Grape Stomp on Saturday during the daytime festival, from 10 am to 4 pm. There will be live music, beer, wine, barbeque, kid zone, artisans and craftspeople. Valley of the Moon is the name that Jack London gave to this area. Dan Berger says the side roads in the area go through some of the most beautiful land anywhere. If you come for the festival, plan to take an extra day or two. Dan's cellar wine today is from Joiefarm, a Canadian winery in British Columbia. It is a 2012 called A Noble Blend. This wine is not available in the US but if you visit Canada, look for it. It is a blend of Gewurtstraminer and Riesling and others. It has a very interesting flavor profile. There is great diversity in the Sonoma Valley and Dan points out that there is also great quality. It is the birthplace of California wine, with Buena Vista being the first licensed winery in California. Three Tastings from Sonoma Valley They are tasting a 2019 Walt Chardonnay from San Giacomo Family Vineyards and Steve Jaxon really likes it. Dan says it is “really high quality wine” and that it is made to age two or three years, in order to show the oak against the fresh fruit flavors. The second wine is a Rose of Grenache from Hamilton Family Wines, an estate grown Sonoma Valley vineyards. Jess Wade is the winemaker who also has his own label. They do Rhone style wines very well in the Sonoma Valley. This wine is very dry but succulent. At room temperature, the earthy component of Grenache and a trace of cranberry are coming in. The third wine is a 2016 Muscardini Cellars Merlot from San Giacomo Family Vineyards, as is the first Chard. The famlly has been growing grapes for almost a hundred years. “Delicious” says Dan Berger.

XChateau - Navigating the Business of Wine
Casting Long Shadows over Columbia Valley w/ Gilles Nicault, Longshadows

XChateau - Navigating the Business of Wine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 31:29


After spending two decades promoting the wines of Washington State, Allen Shoup founded Longshadows, a collective of partnerships leveraging internationally renowned winemaking talent to express the best of the Columbia Valley. Director of Winemaking, Gilles Nicault, describes how the partnerships work from both a business and winemaking perspective; what he's learned from making wines with the likes of Michel Rolland to Randy Dunn; and how Washington State's wine profile has been elevated from this concept.  Don't forget to support the show on Patreon!Detailed Show Notes: Allen Shoup founded LongshadowsHe was CEO of Ste Michelle Wine Estates (“SMWE”) for 20 yearsHis mentor was Robert Mondavi, who founded Opus One, a collaboration between the old and new worldAt SMWE, Allen started collaborations with Eroica (Dr. Loosen) and Col Solari (Antinori)Wanted to build partnerships for Longshadows - showcase the Columbia Valley, which is east of the Cascade Mountains and has very dry terroir (~6 inches of rain/year), enabling great diversity of grapes to be grown (Bordeaux, Rhone, Italian, Spanish varieties)The name “Long Shadows” refers to renowned winemakers casting long shadows over the Columbia ValleyPartnershipsPoet's Leap, a Riesling w/ Armin Diel (Schollsgut Diel in Nahe, Germany)Saggi, a Super Tuscan (Sangiovese, Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah blend) w/ Ambrogio & Giovanni Folonari (Tuscany)Pedestal, a Merlot w/ Michel Rolland (Pomerol)Pirouette, a Bordeaux style blend w/ Agustin Huneeus, Sr and Phillipe Melka (Napa)Feather, a Cabernet Sauvignon w/ Randy Dunn (Napa)Sequel, a Syrah w/ John Duval (Barossa Valley, Australia)Gilles crafts his own Cab / Syrah blend with 30 months in French oakAll partnerships were established when Longshadows was founded in 2003 except Folonari, which came in 2004All are true partnerships - each partner owns 25% of their labels, which are separate companies. They are not consultants and are not paid any other feesLongshadows does the sales & marketing for the winesWorking relationships w/ partners varyJohn Duval can be there during harvest (Southern Hemisphere)Partners did not give any recipes for wines but pitched in and developed styles togetherFruit sourced from across Columbia Valley and its 15 sub-AVAs through acreage contractsSource both old vines and can work with growers to plant specific clones (e.g., German clones for Poet's Leap Riesling vineyards)Volume of wines set by Allen Shoup and Dane Narbaitz (current President and Allen's son-in-law), choose quality over quantityWines that don't make the main wines go into 2nd label Nine HatsEach winemaker is so different. Gilles learned there are many ways to make winesE.g., Randy Dunn wants the jacks of the fruit in the wine, whereas Michel Rolland wants all of them outWinemakers are interested in what each other does but do not work togetherEach winemaker has their own allocation of vineyards and blocks for their winesSelling LongshadowsThe wine club “Key Club” is a big part of sales2 tasting rooms - at the winery (Walla Walla) and in Woodinville (near Seattle)Some distribution in the US and a few international marketsLongshadows was honored to be selected 4x to be served at the White HouseThe future - partners are getting older, and many are on the verge of retirement. Gilles to carry the flame forward with lessons he's learned from them Get access to library episodes Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

In The Vineyard With Podcast
Episode 49 - Cathy Corison - Power and elegance

In The Vineyard With Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 31:40


In this episode, I chatted with a real Californian pioneer, Cathy Corison, of Cathy Corison Winery in Napa Valley. Cathy is a champion of Cabernet Sauvignon, who always managed to marry the qualities of power alongside elegance and finesse beautifully. Not an easy fit. You can hear about her early years as a young winemaker. She spoke of taking on complex and big operations, for which in hindsight, she is happy to admit, they (her and other 20-something-year-old winemakers of the time) should probably not have been responsible. In our conversation, Cathy was telling the story of what it was like, standing by your fruit and not bowing to the ‘Parker trend' of big, overripe and extracted Cabernets of old, in the process forgoing any salary for a decade! She also described her ‘Bench' Terroir, what it is like and how it translates in her wines. We discussed the challenges of fires and water shortages and the obligatory question of what wine she'd be happy to take with her to a desert island (Cabernet-Sauvignon?... you might be surprised!). This episode is the first of 4 episodes exploring the people and wineries of Northern California. Please consider subscribing to the newsletter and follow the show on your favourite podcast platform. Your comments, either here or on Instagram are always greatly appreciated! Moshé

The Rosé Hour Podcast

Hey There, Friends! This week we chat with our new cousin Marcus Johnson, an independent Billboard-ranked musician, NAACP Image Award nominee, owner of FLO Brands and FLO Wine, JD and MBA, philanthropist, father, friend... and so much more! What is FLO (For the Love Of)? It represents the journey through which we discover those things in life that fulfill us and make each experience a little better. For the love of life, self, happiness, passion, joy…love itself. While pursuing his JD and MBA at Georgetown, he independently produced and distributed his first CD (Lessons in Love), which sold more than 40,000 units; a phenomenal success for an unknown independent artist's debut release. This album helped him launch his career as a renowned jazz keyboardist/pianist, and later, he released his second CD (Inter Alia), with staggering success This success caught the attention of Black Entertainment Television (BET) founder and businessman Robert L. Johnson, who invested and partnered with Marcus to establish Marimelj Entertainment Group. Under their partnership, MEG's label Three Keys Music housed Studio 8121, a full-service recording studio, and two music publishing companies: Marimelj Music Publishing and Three Keys Music Publishing. As head of Three Keys Music, Johnson produced and released on the Three Keys Music label national jazz artists: Michael Lington, Jaared Arosemena, Bobby Lyle, Nick Colionne, R&B singer, Alyson Williams, neo-soul songstress, Zahzarah; and smooth jazz Saxophonists Phillip Martin and Brian Lenair. To date, Marcus has released more than fifteen Billboard charted CDs, and has the distinction of having his groundbreaking 2008 Billboard Top 20 Contemporary Jazz FLO (For the Love Of) Anthology, which consisted of three distinct CDs -- FLO Chill, FLO Romance and FLO Standards - all chart Top 10 on Billboard Contemporary Jazz Charts simultaneously. The release of Poetically Justified (2009) and This is How I Rock (2011), which were Top 20 Contemporary Jazz CDs, solidified Marcus Johnson as the heir apparent to the funky urban groove music style and sound made famous by legendary jazz greats, George Duke and Herbie Hancock. FLO Wines FLO {for the love of...} represents the journey through which we discover those things in life that fulfill us and make each experience a little better; for the love of life, self, happiness, passion, joy…love itself. FLO Wine is but one expression. Named a top 10 Celebrity Wine by USA Today. Marcus Johnson's Sips & Sounds are uniquely curated tasting experiences featuring sips from Flo Wine; varietals Chardonnay, Cabernet Sauvignon and our new Rosé, and Jazz sounds by Marcus Johnson with a special music set customized to the region/location we're in. The Sips + Sounds tasting experience strives to go “Behind the Apron” with collaborations highlighting diverse/minority-owned catering companies and/ or chefs that create exclusive culinary pairings with Flo Wine. ROSÉ The Rosé gives bright, floral aromas of lilac and rose petal with flavors of fresh strawberry and raspberry on the palate. It is light in body with refreshing acidity and a crisp, clean finish. CHARDONNAY The Chardonnay uses minimal oak, allowing the bright fruit to take center stage. Well-balanced, it offers Lemon and citrus notes with a hint of green apple. Flavors of tropical fruit, baked fig and vanilla with buttery overtones on the finish. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/therosehourpodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/therosehourpodcast/support

CheapWineFinder Podcast
Hwy 5 Cabernet Sauvignon 2020-Aldi $5 Cab Sauv...Any Good?

CheapWineFinder Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 6:26


Hwy 5 Cabernet Sauvignon 2020-Aldi $5 Cab Sauv...Any Good?Are five bucks too cheap for a California Red wine?Check out www.cheapwinefinder.com and listen to the PODCAST to find out!!!

Fine Wine Confidential Podcast
EPISODE # 40 LEE HARTMAN BLUESTONE VINEYARD WINEMAKER

Fine Wine Confidential Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 42:34 Transcription Available


Bluestone Vineyard started out as a small family vineyard when Curt and Jackie Hartman were, encouraged by their friends Phil and Lois Kreider, to help them expand their own availability of grapes for the purpose to produce wine for their own personal use in 2003.  In 2007 the decision was made to turn it into a commercial venture and in 2008 they began to plant more vines at their already existing property on the hill alongside of their house.  In 2009 they had their first production of just 500 cases.In 2010 a winery was built when Lee Hartman, their son joined them and assumed the position of winemaker and production manager. His 2010 Cabernet Sauvignon won a Gold at the Governor's Cup competition and was in the inaugural Governor's Case. That wine was also named one of the "37 Great American Wines" by Saveur magazine. He has never looked back.HIGHLIGHTS:a). Lee draws attention to the fact that he was a history major before he started making wine without any formal training or education in Enology. b). We learn what sets the Shenandoah Valley apart from the other wine growing regions in Virginia.c). He explains how the idea and ultimately the execution of putting some of his wine in cans made so much sense to him and why it has worked.d). The story behind the branding with the name Bluestone and how it ties back to the land/vineyard.e). Lee takes pride in the fact that his first vintage, 2010 a Cabernet Sauvignon they produced made in into the Inaugural Governor's Cup Case.f). we get his take on Climate Change and what it has meant to his winemaking.Much, much more.  Read the transcript below or listen to the audio.

Italian Wine Podcast
Ep. 1075 Elija Muzic | Wine, Food & Travel With Marc Millon

Italian Wine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 26:40


Welcome to Episode 1075 Marc Millon interviews Elija Muzik of Cantina Muzic in this episode of Wine, Food & Travel with Marc Millon on the Italian Wine Podcast. More about today's winery: Our company is located in San Floriano del Collio, a small village on the highest hills of Collio production area. Our winery is focused on white wines. Local varieties include Ribolla Gialla, Friulano and Malvasia, and international varieties include Pinot Grigio, Sauvignon and Chardonnay. We also produce a Collio Bianco: a blend of the three local varieties that age in oak barrels for six months and one year in bottle before sale. A small part of the production is also dedicated to red wines: Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Cabernet Franc. Our winery follows all the production phases: we work 24 hectars of vineyards, and produce about 110.000 bottles of wine per year. Our company is a family company: Ivan is the owner that runs the estate with his two sons Elija and Fabijan. Fabijan also focuses on the cellar production. Orieta (Ivan's wife) works in the office and carries out all the administration responsibilities. To learn more visit: Website: www.cantinamuzic.it Instagram: muzic_wine Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/people/Muzic/100057230780312 More about the host Marc Millon: Marc Millon, VIA Italian Wine Ambassador 2021, has been travelling, eating, drinking, learning and writing about wine, food and travel for nearly 40 years. Born in Mexico, with a mother from Hawaii via Korea and an anthropologist father from New York via Paris, he was weaned on exotic and delicious foods. Marc and his photographer wife Kim are the authors of 14 books including a pioneering series of illustrated wine-food-travel books: The Wine Roads of Europe, The Wine Roads of France, The Wine Roads of Italy (Premio Barbi Colombini), and The Wine Roads of Spain. Other titles include The Wine and Food of Europe, The Food Lovers' Companion Italy, The Food Lovers' Companion France, Wine, a global history. Marc regularly lectures and hosts gastronomic cultural tours to Italy and France with Martin Randall Travel, the UK's leading cultural travel specialist. He is soon to begin a regular series on Italian Wine Podcast, ‘Wine, food and travel with Marc Millon'. When not on the road Marc lives on the River Exe in Devon, England To learn more visit: quaypress.uk/ marcmillon.co.uk vino.co.uk quaypress.com LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/marc-millon-50868624 Twitter: @Marc_Millon Let's keep in touch! Follow us on our social media channels: Instagram @italianwinepodcast Facebook @ItalianWinePodcast Twitter @itawinepodcast Tiktok @MammaJumboShrimp LinkedIn @ItalianWinePodcast If you feel like helping us, donate here www.italianwinepodcast.com/donate-to-show/ Until next time, Cin Cin!

The Wine Pair Podcast
If You Like Merlot, You'll Love Malbec (Red wine alternatives for Merlot, Argentinian red wines tasted and reviewed, reasonably priced red wine)

The Wine Pair Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 47:00 Transcription Available


Do you love big, bold red wines, and are looking for new wines to try to expand your horizons? Then this episode is for you! There is no doubt that Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon are popular wines, but there are other great red wines out there - like Malbec - that will satisfy your craving and maybe be a little easier on the old pocketbook! Malbec from Argentina is an up and coming wine that is getting really easy to find, and so it is one you should know about! And did you know that about 75% of all Malbec wine grapes are grown in Argentina?!? Well, now you do! Find out even more fun facts in this episode, including why the high altitude at which grapes from the Mendoza region of Argentina are grown makes such an impact on the taste of the wine. Wines reviewed in this episode: 2020 Alamos Malbec, 2020 Chalkboard Malbec, 2019 Catena Malbec. 

Long Island Tea
Put down that Pumpkin Spice Latte! It's Still Summer! (With Bri and Michael)

Long Island Tea

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 46:18


Today on Long Island Tea, Bri and Michael are guest-hosting while Kristen is in India. The three are sipping Raphael Vineyards La Fontana, a Bordeaux style red blend. They recap their weeks, Sharon recaps her 40th birthday. Bri talks about being a “30 under 30” recipient at the Destinations International Conference. Michael talks about his fun travels following Lady Gaga on tour. With Labor Day around the corner, it may feel like summer is coming to a close, but September is one of the best months of the summer. There are so many events going on over Labor Day weekend and even after. Plus the water is warmer and the crowds and traffic have died down, this is the time to be on Long Island. Of course the 3 have some celebriTEA to spill as well. Plus Bri gives our HotTeas a dating life update. #LONGISLANDLIFEShinnecock Powowhttps://shinnecockindianpowwow.com/Long Beach Arts in the Plaza:https://www.artsintheplaza.com/Huntington Lighthouse Music Fest:https://www.huntingtonlighthouse.org/music_festBethpage Polo at the Parkhttps://meadowbrookpoloclub.com/Six Harbors Brewery Clam Bake:https://sixharborsbrewingcompany.com/event/summers-end-labor-day-clam-bake/Flynns Labor Day Closeout Party:https://www.flynnsfireislandny.com/events-one/labor-day-close-out-partyMiss Fire Island Pageanthttps://www.grovehotel.com/MissFireIslandPageantAnd For more end of summer events, check out our Endless Summer Blog post:https://www.discoverlongisland.com/endless-summer-long-island/ASK US ANYTHING!DM us on Instagram or email us at spillthetea@discoverlongisland.com. Tell us what you want to hear! Whether it is Long Island related or not, the ladies are here to spill some tea with you!ABOUT LONG ISLAND TEA:For more details on our show, visit https://discoverlongisland.com/tea.TAG US!@DiscoverLongIsland and @LongIslandTeaPodcast and join the conversation!WINE OF THE WEEK:Raphael Vineyard and Winery: La Fontana: A Bordeaux blend comprised of Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbec, & Petit Verdot. This is a balanced, full bodied wine full of complexity and flavor, softened by velvety tannins. https://www.raphaelwine.com/Long Island Tea is sponsored by Long Island Wine Country. Visit https://liwines.comTEA TIME:Kristen and Sharon's recommendations are listed on Amazon!Check out our Amazon Affiliate link:https://www.amazon.com/shop/discoverlongislandWATCH US:And SUBSCRIBE on YouTubehttps://www.youtube.com/DiscoverLongIslandNYFOLLOW US:Follow The Long Island Tea podcast on:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/longislandteapodcast/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Long-Island-Tea-Podcast-101538728517461Twitter: https://twitter.com/longislandteapodcastWRITE TO US:Email spillthetea@discoverlongisland.com if you are interested in collaborating with us, need some "uncorked advice"or if you just want to say “How you doin?”RATE AND REVIEW US:Be sure to leave us a 5 star rating and review on Apple podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/long-island-tea/id1538642018Kristen and Sharon will read their favorite reviews on a future episode.WEAR US:Shop Long Island gear at https://shop.discoverlongisland.com Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

CheapWineFinder Podcast
Bogle Cabernet Sauvignon 2019-90 Point $10 CAB SAUV

CheapWineFinder Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 6:51


Bogle Cabernet Sauvignon 2019-90 Point $10 CAB SAUVBogle is the main winery in the Clarksburg AVA.They were named Winery of the Year in 2020 by Wine Enthusiast magazine.90% of Clarksburg grapes are shipped to wineries in other AVAs.Bogle Vineyards is changing all of that.Read www.cheapwinefinder.com and listen to the PODCAST for all the details!!!

The Wine Vault
Episode 321 - Bar Dog Cabernet Sauvignon

The Wine Vault

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 41:02


Bar Dog Cabernet Sauvignon In this episode, Rob and Scott continue their search for a decent Californian designate Cabernet by reviewing Bar Dog Cabernet.  So come join us, on The Wine Vault.

Wine Time Fridays Podcast
123 - Fruit, Elegance, Complexity: Let's Have S'more Cabernet Sauvignon

Wine Time Fridays Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 38:44


In todays episode, Shelley and Phil taste through two Cabernet Sauvignon's from two different valleys, one from Columbia Valley and one from Napa Valley, in honor of National Red Wine Day which is this Sunday and International Cabernet Sauvignon Day which is this coming Thursday. Not only that, they talk about wines to pair with S'mores! An episode full of fun! #HappyFriday! #ItsWineTime! #Cheersing #EasterEgg Wines tasted this episode:  2015 Drink Washington State Cabernet Sauvignon ($34 from the winery)2017 Antica Cabernet Sauvignon (($70 from Wine Library)For information on the 2015 Drink Washington State Cabernet Sauvignon, please visit https://eternalwine.orderport.net/product-details/0209/Drink-Washington-State-2015-Cabernet-SauvginonFor information on the wines of Antica, please visit https://www.anticanapavalley.comThanks to our sponsors: Culinary Stone & 3D Kitchens by Design!The Culinary Stone. Looking for that special bottle of wine or a wine club that really over delivers? How about cooking classes for every taste? Considered a foodies paradise, The Culinary Stone is a gourmet heaven that was dreamt up for, and by, those with a serious passion for the culinary arts and gathering of community. For more information about The Culinary Stone, please visit https://culinarystone.com or call them at 208-277-4116.3D Kitchens by Design Is your kitchen in need of a facelift? A complete overhaul? Visualize your dream kitchen and let 3D Kitchens by Design do the rest! 3D Kitchens by Design: Dream, Design, Deliver. To make your dream kitchen a reality, please visit https://www.3dkitchensbydesign.info or call 208-818-8742And of course, a HUGE thank you to Tod Hornby who wrote and recorded our official Wine Time Fridays theme music, which is ANYthing but average.  Please visit https://todhornby.com or contact him at veryaveragemusic@gmail.com The  The Social Web Wine Word of the Week -  Ah-SoA double pronged device used to remove old corks.The Social Web is helping small businesses untangle the web of social media marketing. For more information, please visit https://www.thegreatestsongyouneverheard.comMentions: Williamson Vineyards, Rich Perry, Mod Pizza, North Idaho Fair, Blazen Divaz, Eternal Wine, Brad Binko, Daphne Howe, Russell Mann, Networking CDA, Nicole Barnett, Antinori Family Estate, Sarah Mann, Studio 107.Wines we enjoyed this week:  Anthony Koster Family Estates Barrel Select Chardonnay, Tenimenti Ricci Brunell di Montalcino, Empathy Red Blend, Marqués de Murrieta Reserva Rioja, Saint Clair Family Estate Dillons Point Sauvignon Blanc, Arco Nova Vinho Verde, Bodegas El Nido Clio, Myka Cellars Chardonnay and En Garde Pinot Noir.Please find us on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/WineTimeFridays), Twitter (@VintageTweets) and Instagram (@WineTimeFridays). You can also “Follow” Phil on Vivino. His profile name is Phil Anderson and will probably “Follow” you back!The Culinary Stone A gourmet heaven with a serious passion for the culinary arts and gathering of community. 3D Kitchens by Design Wine tastes better in an updated kitchen! Visualize your dream kitchen and let us do the rest!

Riderflex
Shae Frichette, Co-Owner; Frichette Winery | Riderflex

Riderflex

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 52:15


What is your Core Purpose? - Shae Frichette, Co-Owner; Frichette Winery | Riderflex - Recruiting & Sourcing Shae Frichette is the Co-Owner of Frichette Winery, a family owned boutique winery in the Red Mountain AVA in Washington State. Prior to starting Frichette Winery, Shae lead the Organizational Development Function for Stanley Black & Decker - HHI where she designed Leadership Development Programs for associates in four countries. Frichette Winery is located in the Red Mountain AVA in Washington State and feature premium wines including Semillon, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Malbec, Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot and Syrah. Frichette Winery produces 3.000 cases annually with over 97 percent sales direct to consumer and a strategic plan to grow to 3,500 cases by year 2023. Frichette Winery: https://www.frichettewinery.com/ Watch the Full Interview: https://youtu.be/wepQvtbw_kU On the Riderflex podcast, CEO Steve Urban interviews some of the most successful entrepreneurs, CEO's, and business leaders. Hear them tell the "REAL" stories of what it's like to start and lead businesses. Riderflex is a national, Colorado based, premier headhunter, RPO and employment agency; recruiting and searching the top talent for staffing your teams. Top Executive Recruiting Firm - https://riderflex.com/ Podcast sponsor: Marketing 360 is the #1 platform for small business and it's everything you need to grow your business. marketing360.com/riderflex #ShaeFrichette #FrichetteWinery #winemaking #podcast #interview #entrepreneur #ColoradoRecruitingFirm #TopExecutiveRecruitingFirm #staffingagency #employmentagency #headhunter #recruitingfirm #staffing #staffingfirm #Denver #Colorado #National #Riderflex --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/riderflex/support

Dracaena Wines Podcast
Brian Babcock of Suisun Creek Winery

Dracaena Wines Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 66:02


It's Monday, Let's raise a glass to the beginning of another week. It's time to unscrew, uncork or saber a bottle and let's begin Exploring the Wine Glass! Today, I am sitting down with Brian Babcock of Suisun Creek Winery in you guessed it, Suisun Valley. They currently grow and maintain 7 different varietals of grapes, including: Petite Sirah, Zinfandel, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Verdelho, Charbono, and Cabernet Sauvignon. The property was originally purchased by Brian's father Howard, who planted it with cherry, prune and pear trees over 40 years ago.  If you enjoy Exploring the Wine Glass, I'd appreciate you giving me some love by taking two minutes out of your day to write up a review on whatever app you listen on. It is the best way to support the show. Music: WINE by Kēvens Official Video Follow me on Instagram!   Follow me on Twitter! SUBSCRIBE ON iTUNES STITCHER | iTUNES | GOOGLE PLAY | SPOTIFY | PODBEAN l AUDIBLE Even ask your smart speaker to play Exploring the Wine Glass GIVE US A RATING AND REVIEW STAY IN THE KNOW - GET SPECIAL OFFERS Thoughts or comments? Contact Lori at exploringthewineglass@gmail.com. Please like our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/exploringthewineglass Find us on Twitter, Instagram , Pinterest, and Snapchat (@dracaenawines) Want to watch some pretty cool livestream events and wine related videos. Subscribe to our YouTube Channel.  Find out more about us and our award winning Paso Robles wines on our website.  Looking for some interesting recipes and wine pairings? Then head over to our wine pairing website.  Thanks for listening and remember to always PURSUE YOUR PASSION! Sláinte!  Please support our sponsor Dracaena Wines - Our Wines + Your Moments + Great Memories Use code 'Explore' at checkout to receive 10% off your first order

The Wine Pair Podcast
WTF is Cabernet Franc? (aka Chinon and Bouchet, the parent of Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, a red wine you can chill)

The Wine Pair Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 46:49 Transcription Available


Ok, real talk. Cabernet Franc is not Cabernet Sauvignon. Yes, both are red wines, and both have the same first name, but they are pretty different wines, and we are betting that Cabernet Franc may be a wine you are not super familiar with. We are here to change that! In this episode, we discuss just WTF Cabernet Franc is, where it comes from, where it is grown (hint, it is grown all over the world), and how its use and taste can vary tremendously depending on the climate it comes from and whether or not it is blended with other grapes or bottled on its own. As usual, we taste and review three Cabernet Francs that are reasonably priced and let you know how we really feel about them, and Cabernet Franc in general. Definitely put this wine on your list if it is not one you have tried yet. Wines reviewed in this episode: 2019  Isenhower Vineyards I Series Cabernet Franc, 2019 Horton Vineyards The Tower Series Cabernet Franc, and 2019 Mascota Vineyards Cabernet Franc. 

The Wine Pair Podcast
Italian Wine Adventure #1: Aglianico (King of Southern Italian wines, learning Italian wine, wines you must try, wines for red wine lovers)

The Wine Pair Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 51:50 Transcription Available


Are you feeling like it's time to expand your wine horizons?!? Are you ready to deepen your knowledge of Italian wines? Then this episode is perfect for you! We take our first Italian wine adventure and introduce you to the King of Southern Italian wines - Aglianico - which is considered one of the three great wines of Italy. As you grow in your knowledge of wine, this is definitely one to add to your repertoire. Aglianico is a beautiful wine, great for red wine lovers, and an excellent option for those who love both Burgundy and Bordeaux (or, if you prefer, Pinot Noir and Cabernet Sauvignon). Aglianico is a wine that is great on its own, and amazing with food - including grilled foods, and foods cooked in wood fired ovens. And in this episode, we award our first 10 out of 10 rating - but you need to listen to find out which wine it is! Wines reviewed in this episode: 2019 Mastro Aglianico Campania, 2017 D'Angelo Aglianico del Vulture, and 2019 Donnachiara Aglianico Montefalcione.

Janey Lee Grace - Alcohol Free Life
193: Can moon energies affect us? - Davina MacKail & introducing Eisberg AF wines

Janey Lee Grace - Alcohol Free Life

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 41:37


Can moon energies affect us?  leading Feng Shui and Moon expert Davina MacKail explains how it works. Please note she references the new moon in Leo which was last week, but the principles apply for future moons! We also introduce Eisberg AF wines Eisberg is the UK's number one alcohol-free wine, the perfect alternative to your favourite tipple. Whether it's a fruity Rosé or a crisp Sauvignon Blanc, the low calorie, vegan range – super good af wines  Eisberg delivers 0.0% without sacrificing on quality or taste. You can also use the alcohol-free wines to make delicious cocktails and in your cooking.   The full range includes Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Merlot, Rosé, Sauvignon Blanc, Sparkling Rosé, and Sparkling White.  Enter to try and win 6 bottles here  www.eisberg.co.uk.  For support connection and accountability join us in The Sober Club 

Sustainable Winegrowing with Vineyard Team
143: Can Barrier Sprays Protect Against Smoke Taint in Wine?

Sustainable Winegrowing with Vineyard Team

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 39:26


“When smoke impact in the vineyard is great enough to impact the fruit and causes inferior wine, then we start calling it smoke taint.” explains Anita Oberholster, Professor Cooperative Extension Enology in the Department of Viticulture and Enology at the University of California, Davis. During a wildfire event, the lignin in vegetation is broken down, releasing volatile phenols. While there are naturally occurring phenols in grapes, this release causes an excess which can impact the final product. Some tainted wines smell like camp fire, smoky, BBQ, and even bacon. New research shows there is an aftertaste, an aroma you perceive in the back of your throat, that creates that ash tray character. Fruity aromas natural to some varieties can mask smoky aromas quite well. While green aromas like green pepper bring out the undesirable smoky traits. Some varieties may stand up to smoke taint better than others but there has not been a definitive research project on this yet due to the complexity of the testing process. Barrier spray research is still in its infancy. Early testing shows that barrier sprays need to be used preventatively. One trial showed a slight impact that could make a positive difference in a light smoke taint situation. The additional challenge with sprays is that they need to be washed off which uses a lot of water. Listen in for Anita's number one tip for growers. References: Anita Oberholster, UC Davis Viticulture and Enology Webpage Key Information on Smoke Effect in Grapes and Wine: What can be done to identify and reduce smoke effect in grape and wine production? (Western Australia Agriculture Authority) Grower-Winery Contracts and Communications about Smoke Exposure to Oregon's 2020 Wine Grape Harvest SIP Certified Step-by-Step: How to do small scale fermentations Sustainable Ag Expo November 14-16, 2022 | Use code PODCAST for $50 off The Australian Research Institute Smoke Taint Resources Get More Subscribe wherever you listen so you never miss an episode on the latest science and research with the Sustainable Winegrowing Podcast. Since 1994, Vineyard Team has been your resource for workshops and field demonstrations, research, and events dedicated to the stewardship of our natural resources. Learn more at www.vineyardteam.org. Transcript Craig Macmillan  0:00  And with me today is Dr. Anita Oberholster . She is Professor of Cooperative Extension, enology in the department of Viticulture and Enology, UC Davis. And today we're gonna talk about smoke taint. Welcome to the show.   Anita Oberholster  0:11  Thank you. Thank you for having me.   Craig Macmillan  0:13  This is a problem that has gotten a lot of attention in the last few years in California, I think a lot of us was surprised to find out it's been a topic of conversation in Australia for much longer than that. And yet, we still have a lot of questions. And we still don't have a lot of answers. But we're making progress. We're learning more about this. So first off, can you define what smoke taint is?   Anita Oberholster  0:35  Sure. So the first thing I would want to say is that, you know, when a vineyard is exposed to smoke, we talk about smoke impact, this potential smoke impact. Smoke taint is actually a sensory term. So that is when you have something that causes a decrease in quality or fault in the wine, then we start calling it taint. So when smoke impact in the vineyard is great enough that it impacts the fruit in such a way that it makes wine that is inferior and has a fault, then it is smoke taint. So smoke impact in grapes causes potentially smoked taint in wine. That clear?   Craig Macmillan  1:16  Absolutely. So there would be smoke impact then, as a standalone, what would be smoke impact?   Anita Oberholster  1:21  Okay, so smoke impact would be that there was fresh enough smoke that the grapevines were exposed to that the grapes absorb some of the volatile phenols coming from the smoke, so that it's more than normal. So smoke impact would be there were some absorption that took place. So grape composition is not totally what it was before smoke exposure, that would be smoke impact.   Craig Macmillan  1:47  And then smoke taint is what happens when you turn it into wine. The aromas that you get from that?   Anita Oberholster  1:51  Yes, and if the smoke impact was enough, because if you only have a little bit of absorption, that may still be a result in a wine that has no problems, right. So the smoke impact has to be at a certain significant level before we see a problem in the wines. So it's very important to know just a little bit of absorption do not always equal a problem in the winery.   Craig Macmillan  2:16  What kinds of aromas in terms of like descriptors and also then what kind of compounds, their aromas are compounds, what kind of compounds are we talking about?   Anita Oberholster  2:27  Okay, so I'm gonna get a little bit scientific.   Craig Macmillan  2:29  Do it please.   Anita Oberholster  2:30  So if you think of smoke, right, if we think a wildfire smoke, you have a lot of vegetation burning . So 15 to 25% of wood is lignin now lignin is what give celery its crunch, okay, so it's what it's the fiber you food. It's what gives wood its structure, its hardiness. When lignin burns, it actually release a lot of compounds. When it breaks down, we call thermal degradation. It releases a lot of compounds that we call volatile phenols. It's a whole range of compounds. And these compounds are naturally present in grapes. So that is something to remember, naturally, in different grape varieties in different regions would have natural, a certain amount. Now you have an excess amount in the air that can absorb onto those grapes because grapes are little little sponges, that absorbs the extra volatile phenols. Now if you have an excessive amount of volatile phenols, then it can result in wines with off flavors. Now what we talk about here is on the nose, you can get very campfire, smoky, BBQ, bacon, medicinal and the list goes on, aromas, but what for me is very distinctive, I call smoke taint, we call it a ritrum nasal character, or people talk about an aftertaste, it's actually an aroma you perceive in the back of your throat because what happens when these volatile phenols absorbed onto grapes, part of their defense mechanism is they attach sugars to it so as soon as you add sugars to it, this moment of fear now there was a really small compounds that's volatile and you can smell becomes non volatile because it is now larger in weight. But when you make wines both the free and without, so both of those with sugars on and those who have no sugars on, gets released into the wine. That rates your changes within the enzamatic activity, the pH of wine. And when you taste a wine, you have enzymes in your saliva that can actually release that bound. And we think it's that action that gives you that ashy character in the back of your throat. So it's a ritual nasal character because the back of your nose is connected to your throat as we all know when you have a cold and basically that release makes you perceive it and it's like an ashtray character if you can imagine an old campfire in the morning but that smells like if you licked that what that would taste like or if you smoking you have the old ashes there. I mean, I used to as a kid, my dad used to smoke a pipe, put the old coal pipe in your mouth and suck on it, that kind of taste. So obviously, that's very awful. So that would not be something that will increase the quality of your wine. So that for me is smoke taint. I have to caution that if you smell like, you know, smoke or something in wine, and only that, that doesn't always mean smoke taint. And there's other things that can happen in the wine that could also give you those characters. And you know, even barrel aging, some barrels can give you smoky character. So I want to caution people not to smell smoke and go oh, this is what tainted. Really focus on is there that aftertaste character that ritrum nasal, ashy character that's really distinctive.   Craig Macmillan  5:48  Are there particular compounds that are kind of hallmarks that either are the most commonly found in wines that are identified as having ssmoke taint from a descriptor standpoint. Or ones that just tend to travel with those descriptors, even if they're not the compound itself? You know, what I'm talking about, like a proxy? What are those? And where did it come from?   Anita Oberholster  6:05  Yeah, so we do have, you know, and we can thank our Australian researchers for that, because they've been working on this for much longer. And they have found about seven key volatile phenols, I can list them guaiacol, 4-methylguaiacol, syringol, 4-methylsyringol, p-cresol, o-cresol and m-cresol. they have identified six individual bound compounds that also correlate with smoke. So they've actually isolated them looked at them showed that they correlate with smoky characters, and the distinctive smoke taint character in wine. However, research continues. Even analyzing all those compounds, does not give you 100% predictive power, it's only about 70%. So we do think that there are more compounds that we need to keep on looking for. And that's something we're actively researching, but also the matrix. So the matrix is everything but what you're talking about. So for wine, it would be everything but the volatile phenols. We know that how much phenolic or color, polysaccharides, proteins, alcohol, sugar is in that wine, all of that influence the perception of smoke. So that can also be why the predictive power isn't that great. It could be everything else, not just the mark compounds. For instance, we know like fruity aromas can mask the smokiness quite well. But green characters like you know, the green pepper character or grassy characters, they actually uplift, smokiness, that's from research coming from South Africa. Very complex, everything in the wine influences something else.   Craig Macmillan  7:41  You know, that actually just remind me of another another question. Do we know? Are there certain varieties that seem to be much more prone to either suffering from smoke impact or if they do suffer from smoke impact, having being identified as having smoke taint later on down the line?   Anita Oberholster  7:57   Yes, you know, it's it's difficult. We really need more data. We we know, a variety like Pinot Noir, for instance, seems to be pretty prone to showing smoke. But is that because they absorb more? Is it something to do with the skin structure? Or is it just because they many times make wines where most simpler matrix is then, for instance, a full bodied Cabernet Sauvignon? And it's really difficult to know, we know that, for instance, Syrah naturally have very high levels of volatile phenols and can handle additional volatile phenols come from smoke quite well. That doesn't mean you can't get smoke impacted Syrahs. I've seen them. But so Syrah seems to be more robust. It seems to ask you know, Pinot Noir definitely more sensitive, say then Cabernet Sauvignon. Cabernet, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot. I think the Petite Verdot perhaps a little bit more sensitive to the Cabernet Sauvignon but this is more based on anecdotal experience, rather than having enough research data to really piece it out. For us to really determine this, we would have to intentionally smoke different varieties so that they actually at the same ripeness point gets exposed to exactly the same volatile phenol compositions and smoke composition, and then evaluate them. As you can imagine, that's not easy to do.   Craig Macmillan  9:20  No, it's not. Maybe I'm misremembering this, but I think I read an article where researchers were tenting rows of vines, and then building fires at one end and then blowing the smoke into the tent. And I was like, that's genius. But then in the, in the conclusions, right, the discussion, limitation, it's like, yes, but did we use the right wood? Is the intensity right? Is this over top, you know, you know, all these other variables and you're like, oh, God, you know, holy crap, what are we going to do? You know. And a lot of it's going to end up being what work that you guys are doing, which is just real in the field research when things happen, you just go study it as best you can. Yeah, you know, so it's gonna be a long time for us to figure a lot of these things out.   Anita Oberholster  10:03  Yeah, we do a combination of it. But it's not easy. We've done some intentional smoking last year. And you know, we built a tank, it was like 36 feet by seven feet by 10 feet to cover for vines in our Vineyard. Just to test barior sprays, right. And then to figure out what to burn, we had some natural ash that we analyze. So Tom Collins in Washington State University, he used to burn natural vegetation and gave up because to keep it consistently the same, to know that everything was exposed to exactly the same smoke. It's difficult. So we've moved to like using pellets, but then not all pellets give up the same depending on what what they're made of, and usually hard work. And what we usually burns here in California is soft wood. So yeah, it's tricky. We had to play around with a lot of different fires to figure out which source material we should be using for for our intentional smoking. And we will keep investigating, we're trying to mimic the real situation as much as possible, but it's not perfect.   Craig Macmillan  11:06  What is the window, or the progression of the windows for smoke impact on grapes when they're most vulnerable?   Anita Oberholster  11:13  Yeah, you know, unfortunately, I have to tell you, basically, from the moment you have a berry,. There was this research in Australia on Merlot vines where they actually intentionally spoke, expost ir to smoke over three seasons at different growth stages. And they did find in that study, the most sensitive was from verasion on onwards. So from sugar accumulation onwards, right, our color change onwards. However, we've had many instances of now our vineyards that were only exposed to smoke before veraion. At pea size even and still ended up making smoke impacted wines. So I want to caution I would say the risk gets higher from verasion onwards. But unfortunately, you're not safe if your smoke exposure was earlier.   Craig Macmillan  12:04  So it's an issue no matter what, basically.   Anita Oberholster  12:07  Yes, unfortunately.   Craig Macmillan  12:08  That's unfortunately, but also, that's good to know, that's really, really good to know, because I think we're thinking, oh, you know, it's a tiny berry and its all waxy and you know, it's not going to be an issue. And then, you know, four months later, three months later, suddenly, it's a problem.   Anita Oberholster  12:20  I also heard this rumor of my grapes are fine, because they were overripe with smoke exposure. Now, unfortunately, that does not work either. It will absorb smoke, even if it's very ripe. The enzyme activity within the berry do decrease somewhat. So there might be a difference in how much they actually attach sugars to it, or, like these volatile phenols. But they're still sensitive, you still have a risk, there's unfortunately no period that you don't have a risk if you have a berry on the vine.   Craig Macmillan  12:50  Got it. Oh, related. This reminds me of something. So the volatile phenols that we're talking about. These are compounds that are out in the air. They're part of smoking in quotes, but they're not ash. Ash is something's completely different, right?   Anita Oberholster  13:05  Yeah. So ash is carbon, mostly right? So what can happen and this is the confusing thing. When you have a fire ,volatile phenols are very small, you can't see them, right. So what you see is the debris or the particulate matter, volatile phenols on their own actually break down very quickly, they phyto oxidize in the air within hours. But now they can absorb on to particulate matter. So they can absorb onto the ash. And when they absorb onto the ash, we do not know how that impacts their degradation. So there's where the issue comes. So and this is why we say only when smoke is fresh, is there any kind of relation between particulate matter and risk of smoke exposure. The older that ash gets, the older that smoke gets, the less it contains volatile phenol, phenols. And the lower your risk of smoke impact, if that makes sense.   Craig Macmillan  14:02  I was just going to ask you about that. You've mentioned freshness in some of your other work. How fresh is fresh and how does it change over time? And is there any way I can sleep at night thinking that this has been out there for three days or whatever?   Anita Oberholster  14:14  Yeah, you know, it's difficult, So basically at the moment, fresh ash is defined as anything less than 24 hours old. Now that's based on anecdotal data. The Australians had a fire, all the smoke moved in a column over the ocean and came back as one big column over  McLaren Vale. And it was more than 24 hours later, and McLaren Vale was fine, there was no impact. So that was all anecdotal, but my own observations really do confirm that. I'm not saying you have no risk if the smoke is older than 24 hours, but your risk definitely substantially decrease. The older that smoke gets. Because what happens the volatile phenols starts breaking down, even those absorbed onto particulate matter starts breaking down. So after you know two, three days eyes that smoke is particulate matter. It doesn't contain the compounds that can absorb onto the grapes and into the graves and cause a problem.   Craig Macmillan  15:10  We've talked about time, in fact about windkow. Let's pretend Craig's a grower, I was at once but I am not now. What can I do? What should I do? What should I not? Do I have any kind of agency in this process?   Anita Oberholster  15:21  I wish I could tell grapegrowers what to do. I have some cautionary tales. If I can put it that way. Please, please. So what I would say is currently, we do not recommend anything. We've looked at some berry sprays, things they can spray onto the berry to protect it against the volatile phenols in the air. We've tried kaolin or surround, you know, the claim. Yep, yep. And it has shown some efficacy. So if you want to spray that on, you can try it. But it's not a silver bullet. In laboratory conditions. This is now 100% coverage, I saw about a 30% decrease in the amount of volatile phenols absorbing from smoke. But now remember, in a vineyard setting, you're not going to get 100% coverage, you may get 30 to 40% coverage. But it's a fact where if you only have a little bit of smoke exposure, that every little bit of prevention could actually mean the difference so that you end up with grapes that's not impacted and make good wine. This is always going to be preventative. Growers might have heard of the study that you looked at Praka, and it showed really, really good efficacy. However, after that initial study, there's been two more studies that showed no efficacy, and some that actually showed it resulted in the absorption of more of volatile phenols. So I'm cautioning against using Praka.  I've looked at EMP barrier, I've only done one study 100% coverage. So keep that in mind. And one of their compilations, jin3e showed something very similar to surround not better. But in a similar similar realm. Here's the problem with whatever you put on, you need to wash it off. At this stage, it seems the volatile phenols absorbs onto the barrier instead of absorbing onto the berry. However, if that barrier is still there, when you pick the grapes and make the wine, it dissolves from the barrier into your wine, so you're no better off, you still have to wash it off. And that's the problem because removing that clay from the berries, that's very difficult and will need a lot of water, which is my other problem with the solution. We are continually looking at other barrier sprays, if we can find something that potential you don't have to rinse off. Because that would obviously logistically and for many other reasons be a better option. There's something else I would like to say. Some of these studies looked at compounds I just mentioned, like Praka in some of the studies and actually made it worse. We are concerned a lot of applications use the stickers, many times it's oil to get the compact stick to the berry. If there's too much oil in whatever you are applying, it seems like it doesn't dry out. And if you have something wet on the outside of the barrier that increases the volume of the berry, or potentially is a liquid and the outside of which the volatile phenols can absorb and then absorb for concentrate in that liquid and then go into the berry. That may be why in some circumstances, some compounds are making it worse. Some berry sprays are making it worse. We saw people applying fungusicides and things like that that also made absorption worse. So currently, really if there's smoke in the air, and you do not have to apply something to your grapes, don't. We're really worried about applying anything while there's smoke in the air. If you want to apply something as a protection, the only things that showed some efficacy is basically surround or potentially some of these EMP various sprays you have to do it preventative, you need to do it before there's any smoke. So you're going to do this not knowing whether you actually need this protection or not. When the smoke is there, it's too late. Please do not apply anything to you grapes, your vines while there's smoke in the air. Wait until the smoke clears. If you do have to apply fungicides and other things. That's important. The other thing also there's been some studies looking at leaf removal or not leaf removal. Now the thing is the volatile phenols can also absorb onto leaves. And actually when you have a big canopy, that canopy can actually sort of protect your grapes because the volatile phenols is absorbing onto the leaves, not onto your grape bunches.   Craig Macmillan  19:40  We don't believe or we don't know at this point or we don't believe that those things aren't going to be transported from a mature lead back to the berries just like I'm transporting all these other precursors and amino acids and you know excetera?   Anita Oberholster  19:52  Yes, good question. So here's the thing. There's one study that looked at this and showed that translocation from the leaves to the grapevine bunches is possible. Now here's the problem, we think it's very limited, because we still see more advantage from having a canopy there than not having a canopy. So here's the thing. There's a study that looked at a big canopy that looked at leaf removal before smoke, and then looked at leaf removal after smoke. Now, having the big canopy resulted in grapes with the least impact from the smoke than those that had leaf removal before smoke, worst impact as you can think, because the berries were totally exposed. And then the leaf removal off the smoke did help with the smoke impact in the final wines. However, there's other studies that didn't see a great impact by doing leaf removal. And there's a risk with doing leaf removal. Because if you do leaf removal, and there's another fire, or more smoke than you might do just made it worse. And obviously we are in California, you actually sometimes need some shade for your berries. So we are concerned about sunburn and other things like that. So we're not, even in Australia, I've talked to them as well, they're not recommending leaf removal, we think that risk is too high in the benefit too low at this stage. We are I'm just started a study at Oakville experimental station where we can look at translocation between leaf and vines a little bit more and get a better and I should say leafs and grapes and get a better idea about the kinetics of this translocation. When does it happen? Does it only happen when you also have sugar translocation happening? We would no more than a couple of years.   Craig Macmillan  21:32  That's good. And I hope that everything continues apace. I'm very pleased to see how much research has been funded in this area. And also the collaboration. I think that the whole West Coast working together I think is a fantastic thing. And I hope that we can continue that model going forward. This isn't one of those problems where you know, we got a supply side grower, and then we have a consumer, the winery. And often we draw a line between those two. This is an issue that somehow we got to find a way of working together on this, we've got to find a way of finding some balance in terms of what the outcomes are going to be or what's going to happen. At this point qhat do you what do you think about that? What are what are things that you've come across that seemed like they made the community that if you will function or where things just clearly were problems that were going to be really, really bad? In kind of the more like logistical, social, economic realms?   Anita Oberholster  22:20  Yes, I guess communication is key, right. And I do feel that this is a heavy burden that should be carried equally by the grape grower and the winemaker, there's been a little bit of everything. You have the situations where some grape contracts were canceled with no rhyme or reason, it seems like. And then you have the situations where you have winemakers that talk to their grape growers. Made bucket fermentations with their grapes, brought them in, tasted together, looked at the data, had a discussion. And that's really optimal. So what I really would like to see is that before there's a smoke event, before harvest, right, in the offseason, there needs to be clear communication about how this process is going to work. You know, the grape grow needs to know, okay, what stands in my contract? Okay, what does that mean? When are we going to evaluate the grapes? Who's going to pay for the testing? Who needs to take the samples, take it to the lab? Do we do bucket fermentations? Who do the bucket fermentations? Who's going to taste these wines? And all of these things optimally should be about communication and a shared experience right effort between the grape grower and the winemaker, that's really the best situation. So for growers, I would say, talk to the winery and make sure that there are steps in place, don't assume they are there, make sure that they are actually in place and what they are, what's going to be your responsibility. How's that conversation going to go? If there is a smoke event, it's really important. But also for growers, you know, I'm recommending, I know that testing is really expensive. However, if you can, for crop insurance, you need a sample of each block of each variety, which is a lot. But even if you can just take a composite sample, you know, 300 berries in a bag. I mean 100 If you don't have a lot of grapes, in a bag, throw it in your freezer. Every couple of weeks from verasion. I would say our risk for smoke exposure really exponentially goes up from verasion onwards. So I would say from verasion, take a berry sample, throw it in your freezer. If don't need it, you don't need it. But if there's a smoke event, then you can go back to your pre smoke sample. You can have that analyzed with your harvest sample. And you can see what's the difference? Because the problem is we do not have public baseline. And we're at baseline I mean for the main varieties, what is normal for your area, what is the normal amount of volatile phenols. Because this is the problem we're all doing testing, and then say, now we're supposed to know what's elevated. How do you know what's elevated if you don't know what's normal. And then like I just said, you can get smoke impact without wine taint, right? How much elevation do you need before it actually results in a wine that's tainted, and that's what we're also trying to address. But we're only now this season will be our second year for baseline. Trying to determine baseline for the seven main varieties in California to at least as a reference when you get numbers back from the lab so that you can interpret it more easily. And we're also doing threshold studies in wine. That is, how much of these compounds can be in a specific wine matrix before it results in a decrease in quality. That's what we're trying to do. I call it the two bookends. If we have the two bookends, then contracts can be more specific, perhaps they can even have numbers in them. Now numbers is difficult because we just don't have enough data to know whether what is a good number to put in a contract. I mean, there's some numbers out there based on guaiacol and 4-methylguaiacol. That's only two of the seven free vlatine phenols. That doesn't even take the bound into account. So this is something I do want to tell a grower and this is really important. Crop insurance is based on only guaiacol and 4-methylguaiacol, only to marker compounds. Here's the problem, you may have smoke impacting your berries, and that guaiacol and 4-methylguaiacol number is below quantification limits, right? So you think you're good, no problem. The issue is most of these free volatile phenols depending on when grapes are exposed to smoke can be in the bound form. So you don't see it. But now the winemaker takes those grapes, he makes wine during the winemaking process, up to 30% of that bound can be released to free. And now suddenly you have a problem because it made wine that impacted but according to crop insurance, your data did not show smoke impact. And this is why we're really telling people to do small scale fermentations. And I know don't ask a grower to do fermentation is not a small ask. So that would be great if your winery was prepared to do it. But it's not that difficult. I do have a video on my website. I cringe saying this. But it was done overnight. But there you go,   Craig Macmillan  27:31  There will be a link to that particular video, by the way, I think I thought it was great. I thought it was I thought was fantastic. It is a little intimidating, I have to admit, but it was really, really good and a lot of numbers and a lot of things. But but you got it, you got to do it, you got to do it. Right. I mean, there's no other sense.   Anita Oberholster  27:45  I think, you know, I tried to on the fly, in my brain, make it so that somebody in a kitchen can do it, using things that you may have at on hand right to make the wine. So the advantage here is crop insurance meeting us halfway. They said so long as you can show chain of custody, so long as I bucket fermentation actually represents that block for that specific variety, they will take that wine number so that one you can take that bucket fermentation and get that analyzed for guaiacol and 4-methylguaiacol. That may still show safe and then why may still end up being smoke impacted six, nine months later that unfortunately do happen. However, your chances is much greater that it will show you impact if you had impact just because you had that 20 to 30% that can be released during the primary fermentation process. And this is why we recommend that. Now that you know the story gets convoluted because there's some people now saying but grape analysis and wine analysis gives you the same number. There's some researchers out there saying that. And it's true for how they looked at the grapes, the grape number and the wine number was the same. However, most labs will take the grapes, homogenize it spin down the juice and analyze the juice. That's not an extensible amount of skin contact you really to get the same amount that will end up in the wine, you need at least five days of contact.   Craig Macmillan  29:15  Okay, there is the key.   Anita Oberholster  29:16  And so that's why I'm saying just do not do a mini fer