Podcasts about costumes

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Wardrobe and dress in general

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Best podcasts about costumes

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Latest podcast episodes about costumes

MobileX Podcast
Talking MSF with Valley Flyin'

MobileX Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 64:32


Welcome back! Today the boys are joined by Valley Flyin' and they talk what's new and good and bad in MSF.... 01-Introductions 0:00.000 02-Hot Topic Red Star are TRASH? 0:39.947 03-Tower Mode Good and Fun? 3:18.409 04-How to Build our Rosters for Future Game Modes 6:48.523 05-Tower Mode Poll 7:37.024 06-New Character Release Methods!! 8:20.837 07-Scarlett Spider Woes...Pocket Dimension... 13:52.843 08-Gating Characters, locking down new players 19:12.475 09-Optimizing Pocket Dimension 21:20.359 10-Value of Web Warriors 22:18.539 11-Next Level Raids??? 27:48.063 12-Xcaliber...West Coast Avengers with Drew the Rumor Guy??? 31:17.158 13-Arena is FUN AGAIN? 36:00.656 14-More Red Star talk... 39:01.712 15-New Player Experience...sucks 41:47.805 16-What's next...and what do we invest in? 45:34.727 17-Hope for the future of MSF... 49:13.023 18-Final Thoughts...Costumes 58:17.655 19-DD5...DON'T EQUIP ANYTHING 1:01:43.325 Adventures by A Himitsu https://soundcloud.com/a-himitsu Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported— CC BY 3.0 Free Download / Stream: http://bit.ly/2Pj0MtT Music released by Argofox https://youtu.be/8BXNwnxaVQE Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/MkNeIUgNPQ8

60 Cycle Hum: The Guitar Podcast!
Should Tribute Bands wear costumes?

60 Cycle Hum: The Guitar Podcast!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 59:23


Episode 411 is brought to you by... Big Ear Pedals: https://www.bigearpedals.com/ Chase Bliss Audio: https://www.chaseblissaudio.com/ Support this channel: https://www.patreon.com/60CycleHumcast f-stop? f, stop! 00:00 This is not the greatest band in the world. This is just a tribute 14:13 Firbird 22:40 Ryan is hatching a plan. What is it? What is the plan? 33:35 Super-Sonic Deal 36:50 Peavey T-60 Pickups 45:35 Is this really the worst guitar? This week's song was sent by Janice Lalla and is called "F#m" ***************************** 60CH on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/60CycleHumcast Buy Something with our affiliate links: Buy a Shirt - https://teespring.com/stores/60-cycle-hum Sweetwater: https://imp.i114863.net/rMb1D Thomann: https://www.thomannmusic.com?offid=1&affid=405 Amazon: https://amzn.to/2PaUKKO Ebay: https://ebay.to/2UlIN6z Reverb: https://reverb.grsm.io/60cyclehum6164 Cool Patch Cables: https://www.tourgeardesigns.com/discount/60cyclehum +++++++++++++++++++++ Social Media Stuff: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/60cyclehum/ Discord: https://discord.gg/nNue5mPvZX nstagram and Twitter @60cyclehum TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@60cyclehum? Hire us for Demos and other marketing opportunities   https://60cyclehumcast.com/marketing-packages/ #60cyclehum #guitar #guitars #shameflute

Los Fanboys Podcast
Morbius Delayed, Thor & Jane's Costumes, The Flash Undoing Snyderverse? Maybe, Kinda... | Daily COG

Los Fanboys Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 44:36


#Morbius #ThorLoveAndThunder #TheFlash #DailyCOG #TheGenreverse #LRMOnline WE'RE ALSO ON OUR NEW YOUTUBE CHANNEL! SUBSCRIBE HERE: m.youtube.com/channel/UCnGVcI3Swk6XdnkgLLPEySg In today's episode, Kyle (@ThatKyleMalone) and Christine (@adorabledoom) discuss entertainment news from across The GenreVerse. Why was Morbius delayed? The obvious answer is the Omicron wave in North America, but what if they're filming No Way Home connections? Let's discuss this crazy idea! Also, there's an alleged leak of Thor and Mighty Thor's costumes for Thor: Love and Thunder. Lastly, a rumor that Zack Snyder's DCEU is being erased gets out of hand, but it doesn't look like we'll be revisiting it any time soon. WE HAVE A SPONSOR! Check them out here: www.GrowGeneration.com "Where the pros go to grow." 00:00- Intro & Getting Old As A Geek 07:46- Why Was Morbius Delayed? 12:42- We Need New Stories! Let The Past Die (Or Only Redo Things Once) 20:10- Thor And Mighty Thor's (Jane) Costumes Look Okay, But Christine Wants Boob Armor! 28:12-Will The Flash Erase The Snyderverse side of DC? Kinda, sorta, but not really... 34:27- But, What About The Batman & DC Competing Against Itself 38:49- The DC Multiverse Danger & Final Thoughts Catch the last episode here: https://open.spotify.com/episode/1M2e8DlggiSItwcVuIYzxx?si=D_OmFQQiRA-VCF5hUbO8cw Be sure to follow the hosts, co-hosts, and LRM Twitter to get the latest on upcoming guests, new segments, and chances to be a guest on one of our podcasts! Join our Discord: discord.gg/PyrzzmrceY Question(s) of the day: Why do you think Morbius was delayed? Also, what is your opinion on the costumes from Thor: Love and Thunder? Lastly, do you think the Snyderverse will still be used by DC? Support: We have SO MANY podcasts! Anime-Versal Reviews Podcast covers anime (duh!), LRM's No Mercy covers Cobra Kai, and the Marvel craze continues with Thor reviews on Marvel Multiverse Mondays. Also, classics like BGRtP, The Cantina Podcast, and The Daily COG (Formerly LRMornings) are still going! Please like, share, and SUBSCRIBE to the podcast. This will help us help you! Also, by getting more visibility, with more feedback, and a bigger audience, we can provide more content for YOU! Websites: www.LRMOnline.com www.Genreverse.com Kyle Twitter: twitter.com/ThatKyleMalone Christine Twitter: twitter.com/AdorableDoom Subscribe to our podcast channel where ever you get podcasts: Spotify: open.spotify.com/artist/4h1ngeRAmfYxWdzeblFmNe Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/@los-fanboys

Spencer & Vogue
Touching Noses, Panto Costumes & Coal

Spencer & Vogue

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 41:48


Welcome to Spencer and Vogue!In this ep, Spen and Vogue recap Christmas with the family, best and worst Christmas gifts, look to the New Year and set each other resolutions, they've been the the panto, Spen's been pulling his weight with the kids and a little beginning of the year plug. Remember, if you want to get involved you can:Email us at Spencerandvoguepod@gmail.com OR drop find us on socials @voguewilliams @spencermatthewsListen and subscribe to Spencer and Vogue on Global Player or wherever you get your podcasts.

Rabino Avraham Stiefelmann
Como no mesmo judaísmo há tantas divergências e costumes?

Rabino Avraham Stiefelmann

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 35:11


B´´H Dedicado à Refua Shlemá de David ben Sara

Haunted Attraction Network
Haunted Attraction Industry News for Dec 29

Haunted Attraction Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 8:21


Scream in the New Year with Dead Hollow's New Year's Nightmare; Sir Henry's Haunted Trail debuted a new Christmas event this December; "Turkish Halloween", Bocuk Night, will be celebrated on January 15th; UK's ASA rules Blackpool Pleasure Beach's Halloween is too disturbing for young children; Sign-ups now available for the Haunted Attraction Association's first two mixers of 2022 and Crisis Management Webinar; Monsterpalooza 2022 tickets now on sale; Dallas & Co. Costumes & Magic are holding an online auction of their retail inventory through January 18th; Learn about the 2021 & 2022 haunt industry trends with the November Haunters Toolbox Masterclass; A Joplin, Missouri family turned leftover Halloween candy into Christmas kindness by raising money for a local charity and family in need; Arizona teens help a man whose Halloween display had been vandalized. Read more: https://mailchi.mp/hauntedattractionnetwork.com/haunt-industry-news-dec-29

31 Thoughts: The Podcast
Mark Messier on Winning (and Losing), Costumes & Commercials

31 Thoughts: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 46:09


In their final episode of the year, Jeff and Elliotte chat with six-time Stanley Cup champion Mark Messier on his new book. No One Wins Alone. The guys chat with Mark about his younger days hanging out with the Portland Buckaroos and Connie Madigan, if he had a certain way of winning, the type of player he'd be in today's game, how Wayne Gretzky was always thinking about the team before himself, why Halloween parties were so important to him, what losing taught him, and they talk about some of his more memorable commercials.Outro Music: Moon King - Come Away with MeListen to the entire “Voice of Lovers” LP on SpotifyThis podcast is produced and mixed by Amil Delic, and hosted by Jeff Marek and Elliotte Friedman.Audio Credits: CBC, Frito-Lay, Sportsnet and Tide.The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the hosts and guests and do not necessarily reflect the position of Rogers Sports & Media or any affiliates. 

Fishnet Flix
Donnie Darko (2001)

Fishnet Flix

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 34:34


For the last episode of Drewcember and this podcast season, we're doing something a little different and picking a movie where Drew isn't the lead: Donnie Darko! The movie stars Jake Gyllenhaal as a sleepwalking '80s teen who has visions of a scary rabbit man named Frank who tells him that the world will end in 28 days. Drew plays his teacher and her company, Flower Films, produced the film. Costumes were by April Ferry, who did Game of Thrones, Big Trouble in Little China, Jurassic World, the OG Child's Play, and so much more. There isn't a ton to discuss for costumes and looks but we spot a few gems! Now, if you were alive when this movie came out, you probably remember how much of a mindf*** this was...and its cool and mysterious website companion.  We'll be back in February! In the meantime, follow us on Instagram at @fishnetflixpod and TikTok @fishnetflix. DM or email your movie requests at info@fishnetflix.com! Don't forget to rate, subscribe, and leave a review on iTunes!

Come On, Fhqwhpods! - A Homestar Runner Podcast
148: Fan Costumes Commentary (2003)

Come On, Fhqwhpods! - A Homestar Runner Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 35:06


The gang criticizes their first round of fan costumes! Watch the toon:https://homestarrunner.com/toons/fan-costume-commentary Watch the next episode's toon: https://homestarrunner.com/sbemails/88-couch-patch USSHOMESTARRUNNER.COM Get the "Intro'd!" EP: https://michaelwilliamhunter.bandcamp.com/ Get the "Intro'd!" t-shirt: https://www.teepublic.com/user/come-on-fhqwhpods Email us:  howdoyoutypewithboxinggloveson@gmail.com Join our Discord: https://discord.com/invite/AXurs5j Join the Pipedream Podcast Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/pipedreampodcasts Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/fhqwhpods Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fhqwhpods/ Join our Facebook Discussion Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/fhqwhpods Find more episodes and other shows at:  www.pipedreampodcasts.com

RudeBoyz PowerHour+
Episode 113 - Too White to Wrap

RudeBoyz PowerHour+

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 103:29


The Boyz are fresh from the newest Spider-Man movie so they're ranking the movie suits in a new edition of RudeBoyz RankUp! Also be wary of spoilers & check the timestamps! Plus! Gifts! Nog! Echoey Mics!     Intro - 00:26 "Who's in Your Mouth?" - 01:43 Blitzkrieg News - 04:47 RudeBoyz CatchUp (Superior Spider-Man, The Fellowship of the Ring, Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy, Halo) - 26:16 *SPIDER-MAN NO WAY HOME SPOILERS FROM 42:05 to 01:04:57 RudeBoyz RankUp: Spider-Man Movie. Costumes - 01:04:57 The Giving of the Gifts - 01:36:56 Outro - 01:40:00   For all things RudeBoyz, head to: linktr.ee/rudeboyz   Find us on Podbean, YouTube, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, and TuneIn!   Thanks for listening, leave a comment & join the RudeNation!

Domestic Don
Weed Festival Costumes, Single Children, and Sauna Artists

Domestic Don

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 66:29


In this episode, the Don covers most of society's ills in one fell swoop.  Slut voices, weed festival goers, bad single children, and sauna conversations all have a moment in the sun.  But, as always, he hits hardest on his own demise.  Listen with your family around the hearth during this holiday season.  

Frommer's Day by Day Audio Walking Tours
Props and Costumes from TV’s “Dickinson” Join Collection at Emily Dickinson Museum

Frommer's Day by Day Audio Walking Tours

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021


Props and costumes from the TV show "Dickinson" will go on display at the Emily Dickinson Museum in Amherst, Massachusetts. | Frommer's

Fishnet Flix
50 First Dates (2004)

Fishnet Flix

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 46:36


Drewcember continues with 50 First Dates, which stars our queen Drew Barrymore as an amnesiac living in her own personal Groundhog's Day who falls in love with ladies man Adam Sandler. Costumes are by Clare Hallworth and Ellen Lutter, but as you can guess, any standout looks are few and far between. Still, we have a good time chatting about mesh tops, “dresses over jeans,”  the Paul Rudd/Wilford Brimley meme, and movies that make Blaire “internally uncomfortable.” Question: Is 50 First Dates low-key a super sad film? Also, Marie makes a vow not to buy new clothes — or specifically, not to shop from SHEIN — in 2022.  For visuals of the costumes, follow us on Instagram at @fishnetflixpod  DM or email your movie requests at info@fishnetflix.com! Don't forget to rate, subscribe, and leave a review on iTunes!

Mamilos
Ter esperança é negacionismo?

Mamilos

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 78:26


Em um mundo cético, que tenta ser dominado pela razão e a racionalidade, a esperança foi substituída por previsões, algoritmos, expectativas de mercado... Tudo o que tirasse da nossa visão pelo futuro o desejo e o direito de sonhar. Até que passamos por uma tormenta onde o que nos restou para seguir em frente, era acreditar num futuro que contrariasse as estatísticas e as viabilidades, no qual o espírito coletivo superasse o individual e o amanhã que se erguesse fosse melhor do que hoje. Um futuro que não fosse provável, mas ainda assim possível. Mas quando voltamos nossa atenção à esperança, muitos de nós descobrimos que restabelecer esse laço pode ser mais difícil do que imaginávamos. Depois de tanto tempo esperando o pior dos outros, e deixando o pessimismo manchar o espírito coletivo, é um exercício complexo - e até doloroso - repetir frases simples como "vai dar tudo certo", ou "as coisas vão se ajeitar". É possível reaprender a esperançar? Como exercitar a esperança para que ela se torne uma prática diária, saudável e complementar aos fatos e narrativas? Pastor Henrique Vieira e o psicólogo Alexandre Coimbra Amaral guiam Cris Bartis e Ju Wallauer nessa travessia, rumo aos nossos sonhos ocultos. Abre o coração e a mente e vem com a gente! _____ PUMA: SHE MOVES US Neste episódio, você ouviu a conversa da Ju e da Cris com a atleta Isadora Pacheco. E quer saber o que você, a Ju e a Cris, a Bruna Marquezine, a psicóloga olímpica Carla di Pierro, um montão de atletas como a Isadora e tantas outras mulheres no mundo? Então a gente sugere você dar uma passadinha no “Mamilos 326 – Quem tem síndrome da impostora?“. A Puma nos reuniu com essas 2 grandes mulheres para uma discussão de peito aberto sobre essa sabotadora que mora em muitas de nós, e porque nunca nos achamos boas o suficientes. Nesse papo, a gente abriu o coração, compartilhou as experiências e angústias, e trouxemos questionamentos necessários para entender como esse problema pode afetar profundamente a vida das mulheres – de qualquer idade, em qualquer lugar ou posição. Você pode muito mais. Mas tá tudo bem tropeçar de vez em quando. Assim como a Puma, que criou a plataforma She Moves Us para conectar mulheres em todo o mundo, a gente acredita que juntas, nossa força é maior. Acesse agora e descubra esse universo de força, mãos dadas, inspiração e acolhimento. Então, se você ainda não ouviu, volte alguns episódios no feed do Mamilos para descobrir nosso episódio 326. Você também pode ouvir esse e todos os episódios no site mamilos.b9.com.br e na sua plataforma favorita. _____ B9 ENSINA: PODCAST Fazer um programa como o Mamilos é descortinar e aprofundar em um Universo diferente todas as semanas. A gente sempre inventa uma nova: Política, Economia, Cultura, Costumes, Psicologia. Onde tem polêmica, cê sabe, é só chamar a gente. Mas pra mergulhar no desconhecido precisamos de método, rotina, fluxo e planejamento. Depois de tanto tempo montando nosso espaço de acolhimento, respeito, diálogo e empatia, chegou a hora de compartilhar mais do que as diferentes visões sobre os assuntos do momento. Por isso, está no ar o grande curso B9 ensina "PODCAST: DA CONCEPÇÃO À MONETIZAÇÃO", com Ju Wallauer, e Cris Bartis. Nos juntamos com a Curseria para desenvolver o único curso online que traça uma jornada completa pela produção de podcasts. São 17 aulas supercompletas, além de uma penca de conteúdos extras, materiais complementares... Então, se você tem um podcast, ou se pretende ter, ou se apenas quer entender melhor desse universo, vem com a gente! _____ FALE CONOSCO . Email: mamilos@b9.com.br . Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mamilospod . Twitter: https://twitter.com/mamilospod . Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mamilospod . LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/mamilos-podcast . YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVYbjLZeD1sWzbxSd3TBXDw _____ CONTRIBUA COM O MAMILOS Quem apoia o Mamilos ajuda a manter o podcast no ar e ainda participa do nosso grupo especial no Telegram. É só R$9,90 por mês! Quem assina não abre mão. https://www.catarse.me/mamilos _____ EQUIPE MAMILOS Mamilos é uma produção do B9 Pra ouvir todos episódios, assine nosso feed ou acesse mamilos.b9.com.br A apresentação é de Cris Bartis e Ju Wallauer Quem coordenou essa produção foi a Beatriz Souza. O apoio à pauta e pesquisa foram de Hiago Vinícius e Jaqueline Costa. A edição foi de Mariana Leão e as trilhas sonoras, de Angie Lopez. A identidade visual é de Helô D'Angelo. A curadoria nos programas de história é realizada por Déia Freitas. A publicação ficou por conta do Agê Barros. O B9 tem direção executiva de Cris Bartis, Ju Wallauer e Carlos Merigo. A coordenação digital é do Pedro Strazza, Matheus Fiore e Costa Gustavo e o atendimento e negócios é feito por Rachel Casmala, Camila Mazza, Greyce Lidiane e Telma Zenaro.

Phillip Gainsley's Podcast
Episode 53: Robert Israel has designed sets and costumes for over sixty productions in opera houses worldwide. His work has been exhibited at numerous museums and galleries, including the Whitney Museum, the Museum of Modern Art, the Milwaukee Art Center

Phillip Gainsley's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 55:56


RudeBoyz PowerHour+
RudeBoyz Top 10 024 - Top 11 Spider-Man Comic Costumes

RudeBoyz PowerHour+

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 13:36


The Boyz celebrate their Top 11 Spider-Man Comic Costumes. Published December 11 2021. For all things RudeBoyz, head to: linktr.ee/rudeboyz   Find us on Podbean, YouTube, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, and TuneIn!   Thanks for listening, leave a comment & join the RudeNation!

Rock n Roll Experience with Mike Brunn
Ep. 162 - KISS : Our Favorites and Least Favorites (Songs, Album Sides, Costumes, Stage Logo and more)

Rock n Roll Experience with Mike Brunn

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 98:34


In this episode we cover all things KISS and discuss our favorite and least favorite songs, album covers, stages, concert logos, makeup designs, and so much more!

Making The Impact - A Dance Competition Podcast
Q&A With Courtney LIVE - December Edition

Making The Impact - A Dance Competition Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 62:55


In the December Edition of Q&A With Courtney LIVE, Courtney and special guest Danny Dwaine Wells II answer your questions on topics including: Tips for new soloists How to bring out artistry in young dancers Ways to help dancers with expressing emotion on stageCLICK HERE to send in your questions to be answered on a future Q&A with Courtney episode. You can request to stay anonymous or have Courtney give you a shout out live on the air!If you love Making The Impact and want to support our podcast, buy us a coffee now on Ko-Fi! Your donation will go directly towards helping us create quality content for future episodes. We appreciate your support! ❤️This episode is sponsored by:ArrangeUs Dance Formations App. Download  now to manage your formations and transitions for all of your choreography needs! Click here to try it now for FREE in the App Store!Follow your Host & Guests!Courtney Ortiz - @courtney.ortizDanny Dwaine Wells II - @TinyEarsJoin our NEW Facebook Group and connect with us! Making The Impact - A Dance Competition Podcast Community Leave us a review on Apple Podcasts! We would love to hear from you! Join our Newsletter for weekly episode releases straight to your inbox! For a list of affiliated dance competitions, visit our website at www.impactdanceadjudicators.comSupport the show (http://www.ko-fi.com/makingtheimpact)

7:31 AM
December 5th, 2021: Virtua Fighter 5 is Getting Yakuza Costumes, Football Sunday Preview, 25 Days of POAP & More.

7:31 AM

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 8:03


On today's show:On This Day: Ocean 11 Was Released in 2001.Happy Birthday & RIP Walt Disney & Little Richard.Virtua Fighter 5 is Getting Yakuza Crossover Costumes.NFL Sunday Preview.Day 5 of 25 Days of POAP.On This Day in 2018, A Letter by Albert Einstein Sold at Christie's for $2.9 Million.For more details on these stories and many more, follow ONE37pm on IG, Twitter, FB and TT.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 139: Part 2 - The “Ambassador of Wearable Art” Shares Her Insights from Two Decades in the Business with Lisa M. Berman, Owner of Sculpture to Wear Gallery.

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 23:53


What you'll learn in this episode: The history of Sculpture to Wear and how Lisa maintains its legacy Why editorial and media coverage is crucial for getting art jewelry recognized as a fine art What the role of a jewelry gallery is Why Lisa always advises artists to keep good records of their work How the bold brooches of the 80s paved the way for today's art jewelry About Lisa M. Berman Lisa M. Berman is an internationally recognized “Ambassador of Wearable Art.” Based in Southern California, her expertise extends to major manufacturing and retail markets, museums and corporations in the United States, Canada, Mexico, Asia and Europe. Lisa is the owner of the iconic gallery Sculpture to Wear, which was instrumental in launching the studio jewelry movement in the United States. The gallery offers an eclectic array of art, jewelry and unique objects to discerning collectors, media producers and institutions, which have been featured in film, television and publications. Her recently launched Berman Arts Agency offers artist representation, career management, corporate acquisition, sponsorship advisement, museum placement, exhibition curation and education services on the disciplines of fine art, jewelry, design and fashion. Lisa holds degrees in Plastics Manufacturing Technology from California State University Long Beach, Product & Jewelry Design from Otis College of Art & Design and Merchandising/Marketing from Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising (FIDM). She has served on the Board of Governors for OTIS College of Art & Design; as Public Relations Chair for the Textile and Costume Council at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA); and on the Museum Collection Board at FIDM. She volunteers for Free Arts for Abused Children, STEAM projects and Art & Fashion Councils. Additional Resources: Sculpture To Wear Website Sculpture To Wear Instagram Sculpture To Wear Facebook Berman Arts Agency Instagram Photos: Lisa M. Berman wearing Archival 18k gold plate PEBBLES Necklace by Robert Lee Morris, her own sterling silver pendant by K. Lamberti, Issey Miyake coat and holding a signed ARTWEAR Catalog (RLM). Photo by Daniel Oropeza NUE Magazine Holiday 2020  Model Neva Cole, Photo by Daniel Oropeza  ICE Collar by Greg Orloff, 2018, $15,000 Creative Director / styled by: Lisa M. Berman  NUE Magazine Holiday 2020  Feature article "Powerful Woman of Dissent" from the "Feel the Frill" Exhibition honoring RBG curated by L.M. Berman.  Sculpture: LUX MAXIMUS, Winner of ARTPRIZE 2017 by Daniel Oropeza $350,000.  Model Neva Cole wears Emancipation Collar by 2Roses, 2020, $1,500.  Photo by Daniel Oropeza  Creative Director / styled by: Lisa M. Berman  Cover of IONA Magazine  Model wears Beaded Galaxy by 3 Tribes, from our Timeless Measures Exhibition 2006, curated by Lisa M. Berman & Pamela McNeil  1 year collaboration with women from 3 tribes in Africa - elders teaching the younger generation how to bead.  Cuffs (sterling Silver & Copper) by Tana Action  IONA Magazine  Models wears pieces by Jan Mandel: “REVEALED” Collar $50,000 (worn to the EMMY Television Academy's Governors Ball) and “POIGNET” (French meaning Wrist) $25,000 - both with created from Stainless steel mesh, outlined with 18k gold wire, Citrine, 2001. IONA Magazine  Models wears pieces by Jan Mandel: Earrings - 18k gold & aqamarine (NFS), “TRANSITION” Collar, 18k gold, Onyx, Aquamarine $20,000  and “GOLDEN” Cuff, 18k gold, $10,000, made in 2001. Niche Magazine - TOP RETAILER SPIKED, red collar (Collection of Myra Gassman) & Cuffs on left side by Michelle Ritter  “POIGNET” (French meaning Wrist) $25,000 -  both with created from Stainless steel mesh, outlined with 18k gold wire, Citrine. Bouquet Ring, Stainless steel & garnet by Wendy Gwen Hacker $800 Collaboration with Sculpture To  Wear Designer Gina Pankowski & MOEN Facet manufacturer. Utlilitary into Wearable Art Cover of W Magazine  - January Jones wears LATTICE necklace (oxidized Sterling Silver) by Gina Pankowski, $4,000 And Bridge Bracelet sterling silver by Sergey Jivetin, SOLD in Private Collection    The images below are from a PHOTO shoot based in the music video Rico Mejia Photography Fashion Beauty Celebrity Lifestyle Mobile number: 323-370-0555 https://www.behance.net/ricomejia https://twitter.com/RicoMejiaFoto https://www.instagram.com/ricomejiaphoto/ Perpetual Light in Motion - editorial photography by Rico Meija for Costumes bResin and Diamond Bangle by Cara Croninger from 24K Show, 1979, $4,000 Citrus Collar of acrylic, stainless steel & magnetic closure $650, and Bracelet $300 by Adriana Del Duca of Genos Jewelry  Vintage Earrings- acrylic, one of a kind by Frank & Anne Vigneri, 1984, $350 Perpetual Light in Motion - editorial photography by Rico Meija for Costumes by Swinda Reichelt  Resin DROP earrings by Cara Croninger $200 REGINA Collar of acrylic, stainless steel & magnetic closure $800 by Adriana Del Duca of Genos Jewelry for "Feel the Frill" exhibition honoring RBG, curated by L.M. Berman. Bracelet by Genos, NFS in collection of Julie Laughton Perpetual Light in Motion - editorial photography by Rico Meija for Costumes by Swinda Reichelt  BLUE DROP earrings Teri Brudnak $98 HEDGEHOG Collar of acrylic, stainless steel & magnetic closure $850 by Adriana Del Duca of Genos Jewelry for "Feel the Frill" exhibition honoring RBG, curated by L.M. Berman. Clear CUFF by Cara Croninger, NFS collection of L.M. Berman        Cover of Vogue with Cherize Theron     Transcript: Lisa Berman, owner of art jewelry gallery Sculpture to Wear, has been a figure in the art jewelry world for over 20 years, and she has a wealth of insight to share with fellow jewelry lovers. For her second appearance on the Jewelry Journey Podcast, she talked about how she's maintained relationships with hundreds of designers and collectors over the years, what advice she offers the designers she works with, and why art jewelry is coming into its own as a fine art collected by museums. Read the episode transcript here. Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Today, my guest is Lisa Berman. Although we share the same last name, I'm not related to Lisa; however, over the years she has become a friend and a trusted dealer. Lisa has been a guest on the show before. Today, we'll have a wide-ranging discussion with less of a focus on a particular piece, more talking about her experience in the jewelry and fashion world. Per our practice, the podcast is audio only. We will be posting photos of many of the pieces Lisa mentions today on our website, which is JewelryJourney.com. This is also a two-part podcast, so please keep your eyes open for our second episode which will air later this week. Please make sure you're a member of our jewelry community by subscribing to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. That way you can listen to both episodes hot of the presses, so to speak. With that, I'd like to welcome Lisa to the program.   Sharon: When you say editorial—you talked about editorial versus advertorial—what do you mean?   Lisa: Years ago, we had magazines like W and Vogue and Vanity Fair, and the word advertorial did not exist. You had true editorial, where you were a new designer, you were creating something different, you had a new statement necklace, and they wanted to feature it. By the way, the vernacular “statement jewelry” wasn't in vogue 25 years ago. We talked about it. Now you see something on the cover and people talk about. From a marketing and selling point, it's a statement piece. That's something we were using in studio jewelry decades ago.    Let's see, we were talking about editorial, working with creative directors of publications. You have a timeline that's three months in advance because you didn't have digital. You had film; you had slides; you had all these timelines that were completely different. Then publications changed. They had to find a way to stay afloat, to stay in business, and like any other business they said, “Look, if you buy an ad, we'll promote you in an editorial article.” That's why you have some galleries now charging artists to physically have their work on the walls, which is something we didn't do, of course.   Sharon: That's interesting. Then you have people like me who walk into a gallery—I didn't know a lot—but depending on the gallery, they might pay to have their work on the wall. Having come from public relations, I immediately look at something to see whether they paid for that article or if it was chosen. I think it's important to point out—people might say, “Well, it sounds dated to be talking about all this print stuff,” but that goes immediately online. All the print is immediately online. There may be some things that never make print that are online, but it's important because whatever you see in print is going to be online.    Lisa: Well, I'll tell you why it's important and relevant. It actually goes back to catalogues and museums. I will get to museums in a second. As much as we want to save the planet and save paper and all of that, museums still demand catalogues for their major exhibitions. That's an important part of collecting. An important part of an artist's career is to have that physical catalogue, that tangible item that can be placed on a bookshelf, or talked about, or brought to a dinner party or a lecture series or whatever it may be. That's really important. An editorial and a printed editorial are the same. Obviously, there are more online publications and it's literally just flipping through the images.    For example, we just filmed a music video with Linda Hikel. We used a number of pieces from Sculpture to Wear in the music video. People loved it. They will use it for promotion, but she called me and said, “We want to capitalize on the fact that you brought such extraordinary work to the video. We want to capture those for editorial.” Then she called me and said, “We actually want to take it a step further. We're thinking about a book,” so these are the conversations. Printed materials are not a thing of the past, thankfully; they're an important element of documentation. That's why I tell artists, when I'm on an artist's tour or in their studio or we're having a conversation, “Please, if you're not a good note taker or you're not good about keeping files, literally keep a box on your desk, and anything—a summary or a note or something in regard to that project—keep it in there. This is so important for telling the story for an exhibition in a museum or just a gallery or online show.”   Sharon: Lisa, you mentioned that makers, jewelers, artists don't understand the role of a gallery. They think, “What am I paying you for?” in a sense. Tell us what your response to that is.   Lisa: I no longer have a physical, permanent location, but I do curate exhibitions. I will collaborate with fine art galleries or other locations to host exhibitions within their space. Even if a show is online, you still get the attachment of being in an exhibition that is part of Sculpture to Wear history and legacy. You have the exposure that I bring to that particular artist, whether it be through my website, through the newsletters I send out, through Art Jewelry Forum, through Indelible, which is my new column for older jewels. That's under the umbrella of Artistar Jewels.   Sharon: Artistar Jewels?   Lisa: Artistar Jewels; I'll tell you about that. Also, there's the collector base. A lot of artists think they pick up the phone and it just happens. Well, it does in some instances. It happens because I've cultivated a relationship for five to eight to 10 years. Yes, I can ask for a favor. Yes, I can propose an idea and I will be taken seriously because there's a track record of credibility. That's important for artists to understand. I think a lot of them coming from major schools do understand that. That is something that's part of their curriculum.    Sharon: You mentioned the importance of keeping all your sketches and notes and everything like that because it helps the gallerist tell a story.   Lisa: Right. In my garage, I literally have over two decades of artists' submissions. I know it sounds crazy. I have artists' submissions that were done on slides and then zip drives. I don't even know how I will convert those images, but I was so afraid of throwing away some of the most magnificent images I've ever seen and shown. Then each one of my exhibitions is in chronological order in a binder with the title and if there's any traveling accompanying that exhibition. I think I learned that from my days in the fashion industry, because you had to document, document, document. That has served me well, because if you don't document it, it never happened. So, you've got the documentation of the visuals and the notes and the advertising, and those are really important. Of course, now artists are saving all of that online, but hopefully there's still something tactile to incorporate.   Sharon: It's so important for credibility, whether it's online or not. Ideally, it's legitimizing it. I know for me, when I'm considering a piece of jewelry, if I know the artist has been in this museum or that museum or it's in the writeup, that makes a difference to me. It weighs more in favor of purchasing something, that credibility.   Lisa: Yes, and that's a whole round robin of a conversation. For example, the pieces I placed in LACMA on behalf Lynn Altman—unfortunately, Lynn is deceased. She was one of my favorite and dearest people on the planet. The three pieces that LACMA acquired were actually owned by me first, so it tells me I have a good eye, and it will also tell a collector I have a good eye. I know the process; I know what museums might be interested in. Mostly whatever I thought was interesting or fascinating, that's what I would collect, but it does matter. It plays a role in credibility in the conversation, if I'm going to be working with a client for consulting, either with a one-on-one client, with an artist or with a company or museum. By the way, one of the misnomers with museums and donations is that people think, “Oh, I have these amazing pieces and I want to donate them.” That's a very long process.   Sharon: From what I've heard, it's a challenge.   Lisa: It's a challenge because good museums will only accept pieces they can properly store. Of course, everyone wants them to be on display 100 percent of the time, but you can't do it. That's a conversation as well. You've got museums looking to acquire pieces, but they need funding for it. There's a whole program with their donors and collectors; “How do we buy this?” Then there are pieces they want that are being donated to them, but maybe they're going under renovation. Whatever the story may be, they want to make sure they're going to acquire them and be able to sort them, so that during their downtime another museum doesn't take them. It's really testing out there.   Sharon: When I've heard of collectors who have donated their collections, it sounds like it's been a long process. It's been something that took years before they even decided to do it. They were being wooed, or they would ask the museum, “What should I buy? What would you like to see in the collection?” that sort of thing. It doesn't sound like you just drive up and unload your station wagon.   Lisa: Oh, no.   Sharon: Do people have station wagons anymore?   Lisa: I don't know. They're called SUVs.   Sharon: Yes, SUVs.   Lisa: At least at a reputable location, that is definitely not the case. I think it's a very exciting time because you have people creating these secondary market pieces, people auctioning them, collecting them, and then you have some of the most dynamic makers. What's interesting to me is also the variations of ages from very young, 19 to 20, and then you have some jewelers I've met that were famous. They were architects or sculptors, and they wanted to change direction.    I've also talked to some of them in regards to ageism. They can't apply for certain grants because they're too old for one at 66. There are a lot of new conversations, like how we've had to learn to communicate with this new technology in Zoom. Life throws us curve balls and we go with it, and there are different trends, too. Brooches were so important probably 20 years ago and they still are, but you had it peak with the “Brooching it Diplomatically” book and Madeline Albright. For many years, large-scale collars were important. You have the Susan Lewin book that just came out and the exhibition book about rings. It's exciting. This field is constantly growing, constantly renewing itself, and I'm always inspired by it.    Sharon: I think we had a conversation once where you told me that brooches helped people segue to art jewelry. People could understand those and wear an avant garde brooch before they would wear something in their hair or an earring or something like that.   Lisa: Yes. People won't believe this, but fashion also played a role in that. For example, 25, 30 years ago, you had women entering the workforce—I know I'm going to get backlash on this—but they were wearing these blazers. So, they can't wear a large collar, plus they're downplaying it. They still want to make a nonverbal statement, and the easiest thing is to put a large-scale piece on a lapel. The ideal wall to place a brooch was on a blazer. For example, I'm wearing a Miyake shirt today. You can't put anything heavy through that. These blazers and large-scale shoulders, that was a perfect wall space to wear these pieces. For makers, these are the easiest way for them to literally make sculpture to wear. It was in a format that made sense to them, a smaller-scale sculpture that was on the left shoulder most often, but there are no rules now. Literally everything goes.    I happen to personally enjoy large-scale collars, just because I like to be hands free and my hands are always moving when I'm talking. I don't wear a lot of rings. When I had much shorter hair, I wore giant earrings. Now I don't, but it's all about personal preference. It was also interesting with the gallery. Someone would see a necklace or a piece in a feature editorial in the Los Angeles Times or W or whatever it may be, and they would call and say, “That's the piece I want.” Then, ultimately, they would come to the gallery and try it on, and they thought, “You know what? This just doesn't sit right on me. I want to look at something else,” or we would specifically have the artist there to meet with them and talk with them.   Sharon: You've talked about the fact that relationships are so important. I know what you mean. It's not just a matter of calling up Sally Smith who you've never talked to before and doesn't know you from Adam, versus calling somebody you've worked with or who knows you always bring her great pieces or something interesting. I want people to understand what you do and why they should call you, because you have your fingers in so many different areas.   Lisa: You know what's interesting about your statement, Sharon, is that I do. I am that person who will call anyone. I have the zero-fear factor.   Sharon: That's great.   Lisa: Completely, because the fact is the worst they can say is no. I'm on a phone call and I present the idea. I think it makes sense, otherwise I wouldn't call them or present them with the idea or exhibition or whatever it may be. I literally will pick up the phone, or I have a crazy idea and I will create a way to connect the dots. Most people think, “Oh my gosh! I would have never thought about that.” Often it's thinking about who's in that particular trade industry, how can we possibly get sponsorships, what's a different avenue. Let's think out of the box. We always hear that: let's think out of the box. I like to be creative, and I like communication. I literally will pick up the phone, and I always like to have a conversation.    So many people hide behind this little mouse on their computer or Facebook or Instagram or private messages. I say if we're going to work together or any of this, I have to have a conversation. Let's go on WhatsApp. If you're in a different time zone, a different county—it doesn't matter if they're speaking Latvian and they're mumbling through a translator, you just get their essence. That's really important, especially now with the lack of human interaction. I'm always an advocate for having a conversation because you never know where it's going to lead, that next step, that next unturned stone. You learn so much more when you have the conversation with the person.   Sharon: I always envy you people who have zero fear factor. I don't fall in that category, so I think it's great. Why should people call you today? To curate an exhibition?   Lisa: Thank you. I do a number of things. Obviously, first and foremost, I do represent certain artists' careers on an ongoing basis, whether it's curating exhibitions for their particular body of work. I can also host a show where we would sell work, because that's the fuel that makes the engine go: selling artists' work, curating exhibitions, connecting them to editorial, getting them placement for exposure. I would say 50 percent of what I do is a PR agency. That is the bulk of most of my day. It's writing articles, sending out newsletters, Instagram, Facebook posts, calling institutions or perhaps sponsors who are creating an exhibition, and creating those business alignments to further these ideas. Whenever I'm on Zoom conferences, I'm taking notes. Editorial, promotional, selling—it's like an ad agency as well.   Sharon: And when you say artists, that's bench jewelers, retailers, makers and fine artists.   Lisa: Yes, now I have branched out with the Berman Art Agency. That umbrella encompasses the very few select sculptors and photographers I've worked with throughout the years. For example, Bonnie Schiffman, she's a very well-known, iconic photographer in 16 museums worldwide. She came to me to make a commission piece in a gallery with Claudia Endler. That was an heirloom piece, and she wears it every day. Now we have this relationship where I'm working with her photographs. We've done shows throughout LA. I picked up the phone and created a museum exhibition for her back east. Some of these artists have had a rich career, and then they either hit a lull or they're on hiatus. How do I resurrect this? It's looking at those types of people. Like Marc Cohen—   Sharon: We just had Marc Cohen on the podcast with his box jewelry, which is so unique.   Lisa: I've known Marc for almost 35 years. I'm working with him on his 40 years of archives to make sense of them and understand how to present wearable art box sculptures, which are little, unique maquettes of a stage, like a Broadway stage. He incorporates iconic photography, and each of those tells a story. I'll be wearing one, and from across the room, someone will point at me and say, “That's the box man.” He's done a lot of much larger installations at the Museum of Jerusalem and some other work. So, presenting that work, how do we package that? How do we package it for a museum exhibition, for a gallery exhibition? Of course, we want to do a book.   Then I was working with Teri Brudnak. She was Karen McCreary's partner for Star Trek. We met 35 years ago in a plastics technology class. She and Karen were making work for Star Trek: The Next Generation, the television show. We were the only three women in this class, and people were making fun of us until they would see their pieces on television within the two-week period. They stopped the teasing and said, “O.K., this is something.” For example, the Skirball Museum has a Star Trek exhibition. How do we incorporate the legacy of what Terry and Karen created with their jewelry? It's always about peeking around the curve and finding a placement that makes sense. It is in alignment in an authentic way with their artist's voice and what they've created; not necessarily a stretch, but completely in alignment with their work and their creativity.   Sharon: Lisa, thank you so much. I learned so much today about how an artist has to sell their work. I know that's where so many get caught. Thank you so much for being here today.   Lisa: I appreciate the opportunity to tell your audience about this. It's very important. Thank you, Sharon.   Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.

You Might Know Her From
Elisa Donovan

You Might Know Her From

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 70:25


We are joined this week by actress and author Elisa Donovan. You Might Know Her From Clueless, Sabrina the Teenage Witch, A Night at the Roxbury, The Dog Who Saved Christmas films, and her memoir, Wake Me When You Leave: Love and Encouragement via Dreams from the Other Side. We had a total ball with Elisa chatting about her beginnings on the sets of both the Clueless film and TV show, joining Sabrina right as they approached 100 episodes, and trying not to break while dancing alongside Will Ferrell and Chris Kattan. We also got to discuss her new book, a really honest portrayal of grief, family, and picking up the pieces. All that plus Judging Amy, 90210, and Matthew Lawrence talk. This one was anything but whatever. Follow us on social media @damianbellino || @rodemanne  Discussed this week: Annie Live! Starring Nicole Scherzinger and Megan Hilty (Krakowski's replacement) Harry Connick Jr.'s bald cap was ROUGH on the Macy;s Day Parade Andrea McArdle original Annie on Broadway (was cast as Eleanor Roosevelt in this live production but has to drop out) Will they replace her with Aileen Quinn or SJP (movie Annie or Annie #3?) Laurie Beechman was the original “Star to Be” in Annie. Here's every part she sang in the show. Seth Rudetsky's breakdown of Laurie Beechman's insane talent (cabaret under the West Bank Cafe is named after her) Tick Tick Boom! Was wow very very good Company Cast Recording Documentary (D.A. Pennebaker) Some of our Fave Sondheim Clips Madeline Kahn doing “Not Getting Married Today” (and former guest Veanne Cox doing the same song on Broadway) Company “Not a Day Goes By” Merrily We Roll Along Donna Murphy doing “Could I Leave You” Follies Ruthie Henshall “More” “Worst Pies in London” Sweeney Todd Former guest, Joanna Gleason's “A Moment in the Woods” Into the Woods Bernadette Peters doing “Greens Greens” Into the Woods “Everybody's Got the Right” Assassins “The Little Things You Do Together” (clip from aforementioned Company doc) =========== Real World Homecoming: Los Angeles Elisa's book about her father's death: Wake Me When You Leave: Love and Encouragement via Dreams from the Other Side Plays Amber, Cher's frenemy in the American classic, Clueless (1995) Costumes of Clueless are iconic thanks to designer, Mona May Had read Emma before Clueless  A Night at the Roxbury opposite Chris Kattan and Will Ferrell Clueless was supposed to be the hit, but it ended up being Sabrina the Teenage Witch Typed with a pencil as Sharona on Sonny with a Chance Dropped out of a play at LaMama to move to Los Angeles Tested for Tiffani Amber-Thiessen's role of Valerie Malonel on the original 90210 Sings “Rose Tint My World” in A Rocky Horror 25th Anniversary Special Played Shelby, a jam band singer on Judging Amy who hires Amy's brother to play bass in her band The Dog Who Saved Christmas (dog voiced by Joey Lawrence and Mario Lopez) Loves Gary Valentine who played her husband on the movies Played Ginger LaMont/LaMonica on 90210 (Val's bff) Would save Melissa Joan Hart over Joey Lawrence, and David Lascher over Joey Lawrence Play Joey Fatone's girlfriend in the “Drive Myself Crazy” music video and gets to slap him  Matthew Lawrence is married to Cheryl Burke from Dancing with the Stars JoJo Siwa lost Dancing with the Stars (Iman won and we both loved him)

Tulsa Talks: A TulsaPeople Podcast
The harsh reality of reality TV - Meg Ferguson, fashion designer and Project Runway contestant

Tulsa Talks: A TulsaPeople Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 53:45


Welcome to Tulsa Talks presented by Tulsa Regional Chamber. I'm your host Tim Landes. Like many people these days, I have a love/hate relationship with social media. I've taken month long breaks from my personal Facebook and Twitter. Even today, I find myself more of a lurker and heart giver than posting random thoughts that will be misunderstood by Aunt Gertrude. I do still love to look at images on Instagram. We recently published a Q&A with Meg Ferguson, my guest on this episode. The Tulsa fashion designer was a participant in this season of Project Runway. The Q&A got a lot of views and shares. Then a couple weeks later it was shared a lot. I did a quick search on Meg's name and there were lots and lots of hateful tweets. We're not talking the fun mean tweets Jimmy Kimmel would have her read in a segment. I knew there was a reality show controversy involving Meg and she was no longer on the show. I knew there was some criticism of her and some evil tweets sent to her. She agreed to come on the podcast to talk about life after reality TV. While many of us have imagined winning Survivor or some other reality show at some point, we never imagine what it would be like to be painted in a certain light and then not win. As you'll hear it's awful. I greatly appreciate Meg opening up about the struggles that came from being on the show and how it impacted her mental health. People are really mean and enjoy typing awful things from the safety of their couch. It's gross. It's sad. We knock out the tough stuff and then go on to talk about happier news like how Meg is currently based in Dallas working on costumes for the new Yellowstone prequel “1883.” I mean how cool is it to be able to say you've designed a costumes for Faith Hill, her hubby Tim McGraw and more? In this conversation recorded over Zoom, we talk about her experiences creating costumes and go through her bucket list of people she dreams to design for someday. When she's not helping make movies and TV shows come to life, Meg also has her own company that allows her to create memorable attire for clients. A note, in the second half of the conversation there will be some background noises you might here from time to time while Meg talks. I've left in the sounds and the reveal because it brought laughs to what had been a tough conversation in the beginning. Thank you Meg for the open and honest talk. Following our conversation, hear a Christmas song from teenage rising country star Mikayla Lane. More on that later. OK, let's get this going. This is Tulsa Talks with Meg Ferguson.  Breakout indie country recording artist Mikayla Lane has been dubbed “Today's Traditional Country Trendsetter.” On the heels of her sophomore EP release, the 16-year-old singer is celebrating the holiday season with a dual rollout of Christmas classics. She says:“Christmas time is my favorite time of year; for so many reasons, and these two songs (‘Amazing Grace' and ‘O Holy Night') are both meaningful and magical. They paint a moving imagery of the birth of baby Jesus and convey the true meaning of Christmas. I chose to record these songs for those very reasons.”And with that here is Mikayla Lane with “O Holy Night.” 

Fishnet Flix
Wild Things (1998)

Fishnet Flix

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 50:20


It's the last episode of Erotic Thriller Month aka Naked November, and we've GOTSTA do Wild Tings (1998)! Starring Neve Campbell, Denise Richards, Kevin Bacon, Matt Dillon, and Bill Murray, this is the erotic thriller version of the Scooby Doo Reveal. So many twists and turns! Costumes are by Kimberly Tillman, who also did 10 Things I Hate About You, So I Married An Axe Murderer, Cougartown, Dirt.  We also talk about our dogs, the movie Dog starring Channing Tatum, the new Showtime series Yellowjackets, plus what to expect for Drewcember and our fifth season next year! For visuals of the costumes, follow us on Instagram at @fishnetflixpod  DM or email your movie requests at info@fishnetflix.com! Don't forget to rate, subscribe, and leave a review on iTunes!

Inspired Design
Liesl Alice Gatcheco | Opera Opulence

Inspired Design

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 32:08


In this episode of Inspired Design, Liesl Alice Gatcheco, Director of Costumes, Hair and Makeup at Seattle Opera reveals what it takes to bring a performance to life. Learn how Playboy altered her career path and how she is now paying tribute to traditional opera while developing modern performances that culturally represent our world today.

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 139: Part 1 - The “Ambassador of Wearable Art” Shares Her Insights from Two Decades in the Business with Lisa M. Berman, Owner of Sculpture to Wear Gallery.

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 22:50


What you'll learn in this episode: The history of Sculpture to Wear and how Lisa maintains its legacy Why editorial and media coverage is crucial for getting art jewelry recognized as a fine art What the role of a jewelry gallery is Why Lisa always advises artists to keep good records of their work How the bold brooches of the 80s paved the way for today's art jewelry About Lisa M. Berman Lisa M. Berman is an internationally recognized “Ambassador of Wearable Art.” Based in Southern California, her expertise extends to major manufacturing and retail markets, museums and corporations in the United States, Canada, Mexico, Asia and Europe. Lisa is the owner of the iconic gallery Sculpture to Wear, which was instrumental in launching the studio jewelry movement in the United States. The gallery offers an eclectic array of art, jewelry and unique objects to discerning collectors, media producers and institutions, which have been featured in film, television and publications. Her recently launched Berman Arts Agency offers artist representation, career management, corporate acquisition, sponsorship advisement, museum placement, exhibition curation and education services on the disciplines of fine art, jewelry, design and fashion. Lisa holds degrees in Plastics Manufacturing Technology from California State University Long Beach, Product & Jewelry Design from Otis College of Art & Design and Merchandising/Marketing from Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising (FIDM). She has served on the Board of Governors for OTIS College of Art & Design; as Public Relations Chair for the Textile and Costume Council at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA); and on the Museum Collection Board at FIDM. She volunteers for Free Arts for Abused Children, STEAM projects and Art & Fashion Councils. Additional Resources: Sculpture To Wear Website Sculpture To Wear Instagram Sculpture To Wear Facebook Lisa Berman Instagram Photos: Lisa M. Berman wearing Archival 18k gold plate PEBBLES Necklace by Robert Lee Morris, her own sterling silver pendant by K. Lamberti, Issey Miyake coat and holding a signed ARTWEAR Catalog (RLM). Photo by Daniel Oropeza NUE Magazine Holiday 2020  Model Neva Cole, Photo by Daniel Oropeza  ICE Collar by Greg Orloff, 2018, $15,000 Creative Director / styled by: Lisa M. Berman  NUE Magazine Holiday 2020  Feature article "Powerful Woman of Dissent" from the "Feel the Frill" Exhibition honoring RBG curated by L.M. Berman.  Sculpture: LUX MAXIMUS, Winner of ARTPRIZE 2017 by Daniel Oropeza $350,000.  Model Neva Cole wears Emancipation Collar by 2Roses, 2020, $1,500.  Photo by Daniel Oropeza  Creative Director / styled by: Lisa M. Berman  Cover of IONA Magazine  Model wears Beaded Galaxy by 3 Tribes, from our Timeless Measures Exhibition 2006, curated by Lisa M. Berman & Pamela McNeil  1 year collaboration with women from 3 tribes in Africa - elders teaching the younger generation how to bead.  Cuffs (sterling Silver & Copper) by Tana Action  IONA Magazine  Models wears pieces by Jan Mandel: “REVEALED” Collar $50,000 (worn to the EMMY Television Academy's Governors Ball) and “POIGNET” (French meaning Wrist) $25,000 - both with created from Stainless steel mesh, outlined with 18k gold wire, Citrine, 2001. IONA Magazine  Models wears pieces by Jan Mandel: Earrings - 18k gold & aqamarine (NFS), “TRANSITION” Collar, 18k gold, Onyx, Aquamarine $20,000  and “GOLDEN” Cuff, 18k gold, $10,000, made in 2001. Niche Magazine - TOP RETAILER SPIKED, red collar (Collection of Myra Gassman) & Cuffs on left side by Michelle Ritter  “POIGNET” (French meaning Wrist) $25,000 -  both with created from Stainless steel mesh, outlined with 18k gold wire, Citrine. Bouquet Ring, Stainless steel & garnet by Wendy Gwen Hacker $800 Collaboration with Sculpture To  Wear Designer Gina Pankowski & MOEN Facet manufacturer. Utlilitary into Wearable Art Cover of W Magazine  - January Jones wears LATTICE necklace (oxidized Sterling Silver) by Gina Pankowski, $4,000 And Bridge Bracelet sterling silver by Sergey Jivetin, SOLD in Private Collection    The images below are from a PHOTO shoot based in the music video Rico Mejia Photography Fashion Beauty Celebrity Lifestyle Mobile number: 323-370-0555 https://www.behance.net/ricomejia https://twitter.com/RicoMejiaFoto https://www.instagram.com/ricomejiaphoto/ Perpetual Light in Motion - editorial photography by Rico Meija for Costumes bResin and Diamond Bangle by Cara Croninger from 24K Show, 1979, $4,000 Citrus Collar of acrylic, stainless steel & magnetic closure $650, and Bracelet $300 by Adriana Del Duca of Genos Jewelry  Vintage Earrings- acrylic, one of a kind by Frank & Anne Vigneri, 1984, $350 Perpetual Light in Motion - editorial photography by Rico Meija for Costumes by Swinda Reichelt  Resin DROP earrings by Cara Croninger $200 REGINA Collar of acrylic, stainless steel & magnetic closure $800 by Adriana Del Duca of Genos Jewelry for "Feel the Frill" exhibition honoring RBG, curated by L.M. Berman. Bracelet by Genos, NFS in collection of Julie Laughton Perpetual Light in Motion - editorial photography by Rico Meija for Costumes by Swinda Reichelt  BLUE DROP earrings Teri Brudnak $98 HEDGEHOG Collar of acrylic, stainless steel & magnetic closure $850 by Adriana Del Duca of Genos Jewelry for "Feel the Frill" exhibition honoring RBG, curated by L.M. Berman. Clear CUFF by Cara Croninger, NFS collection of L.M. Berman        Cover of Vogue with Cherize Theron     Transcript: Lisa Berman, owner of art jewelry gallery Sculpture to Wear, has been a figure in the art jewelry world for over 20 years, and she has a wealth of insight to share with fellow jewelry lovers. For her second appearance on the Jewelry Journey Podcast, she talked about how she's maintained relationships with hundreds of designers and collectors over the years, what advice she offers the designers she works with, and why art jewelry is coming into its own as a fine art collected by museums. Read the episode transcript here. Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Today, my guest is Lisa Berman. Although we share the same last name, I'm not related to Lisa; however, over the years she has become a friend and a trusted dealer. Lisa has been a guest on the show before. Today, we'll have a wide-ranging discussion with less of a focus on a particular piece, more talking about her experience in the jewelry and fashion world. Per our practice, the podcast is audio only. We will be posting photos of many of the pieces Lisa mentions today on our website, which is JewelryJourney.com. This is also a two-part podcast, so please keep your eyes open for our second episode which will air later this week. Please make sure you're a member of our jewelry community by subscribing to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. That way you can listen to both episodes hot of the presses, so to speak. With that, I'd like to welcome Lisa to the program. Lisa: Thank you, Sharon. I'm so delighted to be back here again. Sharon: It's great to have you. For those who don't know your background, can you give us a brief overview of your background? Lisa: Of course. I grew up in the fashion industry and had a career in fashion design. I had an accessory business for many, many years, and then I acquired the name of Sculpture to Wear Gallery in 1998. Of course, that was originally launched in 1973 in New York City in the Park Plaza Hotel. I launched my first exhibition at Bergamot Station Art Center, which I'll tell you about in a second, on January 16, 1999. I'm proud to be the second owner of Sculpture to Wear Gallery. Now, location is important. Location, location, location, you've heard a million times in real estate. Bergamot Station Art Center is in Santa Monica, California, Southern California, and it was formerly the home to 25 thriving contemporary galleries and the Santa Monica Museum of Art. It was, I believe, a five-acre complex. Now the Red Line runs through it. Sharon: The Red Line being the Metro. Lisa: Yes, the metro. Anyway, that's where I started my journey. I actually met my former husband, Robert Berman, there as well. It was the heyday. It was like Soho. It was the happening place on the West Side; it was a lot of fun. Every Thursday, Friday and Saturday night for 10 years, there were gallery openings. There was constant influx of artists and jewelers and collectors and educators and writers, so it was definitely the place to be. Sharon: What was groundbreaking about—first, it was groundbreaking that Sculpture to Wear was on the West Coast, but what was groundbreaking about the original Sculpture to Wear? Lisa: The owner, Joan Sonnabend, was basically located in Boston, but she had a tiny, little, postage-stamp gallery. Robert Lee Morris told me it was only about 400 square feet. The delineation was that she only showed work by signed artists. For example, you had Alexander Calder making jewelry, and he actually made his jewelry. There were pieces by Picasso; those were in addition to the series and those were made by other craftsmen. Of course, you have people like Robert Lee Morris, whose entire career was launched at the original Sculpture to Wear. The idea was that she was selling one-of-a-kind, sculptural jewelry made by fine artists, not by jewelry artists. That was the idea. Sharon: From what I've heard, nobody else was doing that then. This was unusual. Lisa: It was extremely unusual. The only person that was doing something similar was in Philadelphia. That's our beloved Helen Drutt, who is about to turn 91. She was also very monumental and important in bringing studio jewelry and wearable art to the United States, but she worked with jewelers and makers, mostly in Europe. Sharon: How did you know the Sculpture to Wear license was available? How did you find out about that? Lisa: I was introduced to the idea through Cindy Forbes, who's now Cindy Brown. She ultimately ended up being my gallery manager. We had a conversation, one thing led to another, and that was kind of it. It was available, so I capitalized on that and the domain and the name. When I acquired the name, I felt it was very important that every decision I made was legacy-driven, because it was a very important part of history. This is not something I just launched; they had an important history and legacy on the East Coast. That's why for my business card, I purposely selected the title of “visionary proprietor,” because it kept me on point and on target. At first, I got a little flak from it, but as I explained, that kept me on point to do my best. That was it. Sharon: Flak because people said, “Oh my gosh—”  Lisa: A lot of gumption that I would profess to be this visionary proprietor. Now, everyone on social media is a visionary and all the museum collectors' groups are visionaries. I don't know; I guess I was ahead of the curve. Sharon: You are a visionary. Lisa: This was 23 years ago. There you go.  Sharon: So, you opened at Bergamot Station and then you moved the gallery to Montana Avenue in Santa Monica? Well, they're both in Santa Monica. Lisa: I was in Bergamot Station from 1999 until 2003. In Bergamot Station, I had two separate little locations. In 2003, I moved to a much larger location. That was on Montana Avenue at the cross street of 11th Street. I moved there knowing I was a destination, that I had built a brand with Sculpture to Wear and with the artists through a number of different ideologies and media and exposure. We'll get into that in a second, but I knew I was a destination. I was not going to rely on walk-in traffic on Montana Avenue, like so many of the other stores did. That was really important, that I had built up that mailing list, the collector base. People would be traveling, or friends would be coming in from out of town and our collectors would pick them up at the airport and say, “We have to take you to Sculpture to Wear first.” It was those kinds of relationships we had built there. Sharon: Did people stumble on your gallery in Bergamot Station? How did they find you? Lisa: Bergamot had 25 galleries, so at any given day at any given moment, you had tons of people walking around. It's completely different than it is today; of course during the pandemic, but completely different. There was no problem reaching collectors, and I was the complete anomaly. You have this sculptural jewelry, and it was an education to a new audience. A lot of these people weren't necessarily open to the idea of jewelry not having diamonds or gold. People that had an educated eye in regard to design, like architects, were some of our first clients because they understood the design. It literally was a small-scale sculpture.  I think my passion for that and some of the artists were also incorporated into that conversation. I made a request of any artists that were local to the gallery that they do three things: they had to work in the gallery, they had to come and help set up an exhibition that wasn't theirs, and they had to attend an opening that wasn't theirs. I wanted them to understand the role of a gallery and what we did. At first it was, “Well, why I would give you 50 percent of the retail price?” This was a demonstration for them to learn why. There wasn't any artist who partook in those three requests that came to me and said, “No, this isn't right.” They all were shocked at what we did on a daily basis. Robert Lee Morris, I told him about that, and he was shocked. He said, “You did that?”  Sharon: You mentioned Robert Lee Morris. A lot of people will know who he is, especially New Yorkers or fashionistas, but tell us who he is and why he's important. Lisa: Robert Lee Morris is an icon. He's been designing jewelry for over 50 years. He's the only designer to earn the Coty Award for his jewelry design an unprecedented three times. He was the designer who made the big, bold, gold jewelry in conjunction with Donna Karan's black cashmere new work uniform in the late 80s, early 90s. Digressing to understand why he's important in my world, our world of art jewelry, is that he was one of the most important and prolific designers at the original Sculpture to Wear in New York.  He was self-taught. He was literally found at a tiny, little show in an offbeat path. He was immersed in this incredible work from Alexander Calder, Salvador Dalí, Louise Nevelson—amazing artists who already had these incredible careers, and as it turns out, people loved Robert's work. He outsold all the other artists combined at Sculpture to Wear. Then he launched his own gallery. After Sculpture to Wear closed, he launched Artwear. That launched a number of careers from a lot of famous artists, jewelers, studio jewelers, some of whom are still with us and some are not. That's his legacy; first at Sculpture to Wear, then Artwear. He has these amazing archives, and we'll talk about how editorial and prior images play a role in the secondary market. That might be a good place to talk about that. Sharon: O.K., please. Lisa: What's a phenomenon for me is that when I started and someone would ask if I sold jewelry, I knew the context. They would immediately think of CZ or— Sharon: Engagement rings. Lisa: Engagement rings. I said, “No, that's not at all what I do,” and I would always be wearing a piece. I was always wearing largescale pieces of jewelry. At that time when I first opened my gallery, I had very short hair; I think it was two inches long. People may not have remembered my name, but they would point at me from across the room and say, “Oh, that's the jewelry lady. That's the Sculpture to Wear lady,” and that was just fine.  This type of work, like photography 80 or 60 years ago, was not accepted in the realm of a fine art museum. Now you see photography auctioned at over $1 million, and some of the most incredible collections in the world are simply photography. Art jewelry is now collected in some specific fine art institutions, and that is for a number of reasons. First of all, it's because of exposure from editorial and media, and also because of the stewardship of specific collectors and designers like Helen Drutt, who bequeathed her collection to the Houston Fine Art Museum. I think it was almost a decade ago, and there's an incredible book. It's on my bookshelf. I can see it from here; it's very orange and large. She wanted her collection to be viewed at a fine arts museum versus a craft museum, and that started that conversation.  Lois Boardman on the West Coast donated her collection to LACMA, LA County Museum of Art, I believe five years ago. Also, for example, the Renwick Gallery at the Smithsonian has been collecting this work for a lot longer. For example, Jen Mandel and I were there for her induction into the Smithsonian. That was incredible. We were standing right next to a piece made by Alexander Calder, and that's where her vitrine was placed. It's really about this conversation, and I think it's a conversation of education.  As for the secondary market, we were just attending the Bonhams preview for the Crawford Collection. That's an unprecedented phenomenon, to have a collection of that level, of that stature, being auctioned by Bonhams without diamonds, without gold. There are a few elements and pieces to that, but you're looking at Art Smith pieces, modernists, studio jewelers. This is a very exciting and fertile time to be involved in studio and art jewelry. This is what I've been doing for the last 22, 25 years. We're at a very exciting place and there are a number of forums, especially with Covid and Zoom, with Art Jewelry Forum having open conversations about this, introducing collectors to artists and, of course, your podcast. There are a lot of variations and factors for the secondary market. Sharon: Lisa, because your jewelry and art jewelry in general is still avant garde—although it's coming into its own—do you think collectors or people like you are going to say, “O.K., what's next? What's on the horizon now? That's become old hat.” It hasn't, but do you think people are going to move on? Lisa: Sharon, I hope not. Within the genre of studio jewelry and wearable art, it has progressed and become so sophisticated. There are so many different makers out there, especially with the internet connecting us. When I first started in 1999, we didn't really have the internet; we barely had email, and now that's how everyone communicates. I think that people's creativity, the way people wear pieces and where they wear them—the reality is that we're not going anyplace right now during the pandemic, and I'm looking at different generations and how to include that next generation in collecting. For example, some of my first clients were in their 60s and 70s when they started collecting, and some are no longer with us. So, how do we engage their family members? You're our most recent convert to art jewelry. My gallery was so close to your house, yet you would have had no interest in what we did. I think it's a journey. Can you say someone's going to have a different trend? No.  I also think technology has played an important role not only in studio jewelry and the exposure, but also the techniques. People are using laser cutting, 3D printing. Technology has also been accepted into fine arts institutions and it has blurred the lines of the conversation of craft and fine art. Even five years ago, there was a delineation that was very distinct. There are still institutions that are not interested in immersion, but I think technology has been a friend, not a foe, to studio jewelers and the paths they can cross. Sharon: I do have to tell a story. Lisa and I were laughing because I lived close to where her gallery used to be. I lived not so far in the Valley, 10 miles away. I was never in your gallery, but I remember seeing an ad one day and thinking, “Who is going to wear this stuff?”  Lisa: And now the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Sharon: It was way out. When you say that people who were older started collecting it, that's the sort of people who don't automatically say, “Wow, that's so new and so cool.” Lisa: My collectors—and I'm sure a number of the gallerists across the United States who have been around for decades would say the same—our clientele, they're not interested in trends. If they open a Vogue, they might see a dress they like, but they're not going to buy it because it's on trend or in fashion. All my clientele, they're well-traveled; they're well-heeled; they're generally educated. They're willing to be avant garde. They don't want to wear the same thing everyone else is wearing, so it's a little bit different. The whole conversation now is that there are younger generations. I just met an incredible student at USC at the Bonhams preview. She's running this entire magazine department in her off time while she's full-time at USC. That's to reach a new collector base and new makers, but that's exciting. That's what makes it viable. Sharon: Yes, it keeps on going. Lisa: Right. That was one of the things I wanted to talk about in regards to when I first started in 1999: it was not only the relationships we built with the artists and the collectors, but we also had our version of social media, which was just printed publications. We didn't have social media, so building relationships with well-known stylists, who were either Emmy award winners or high-profile people that worked with celebrities, that was really important. We got to the point where they would literally call me up with the theme, tell me what it was, and I would already pull the pieces and have a box ready for them. We had a shorthand. That was, again, a relationship that would have to be cultivated. It was very exciting, and that's part of building the legacy of why this work is important. For example, Robert Lee Morris is pulling out his archives. Part of the excitement of these presentations is showing some of the editorial, these great magazine covers and shows that these pieces were included in. I have two decades of binders of images. So, that's very exciting, to show the relevance 20 years ago to now.

Help and Hope Happen Here
Courtney Durante will talk about her daughter Lilli whose cancer battle inspired her to start COSTUMES FOR COURAGE, which in one year has distributed 250 costumes to kids in 41 states and 6 countries who are battling cancer.

Help and Hope Happen Here

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 41:32


Courtney Durante's daughter Lilli was diagnosed with an Optic Pathway Glioma Brain Tumor when she was 4 years old. Lilly decided to wear a different costume to each of her year long chemotherapy sessions . Now 7 years old, Lilly is doing very well health wise. In honor of Lilly, Courtney started the Non Profit COSTUMES FOR COURAGE which provides costumes to pediatric cancer patients in hospitals in the United States and other countries. Because of Covid this non profit did not truly get its start until October of 2020, but has already provided 250 patients in 41 states and 6 countries with costumes that help to make their cancer treatments easier to endure. 

Making The Impact - A Dance Competition Podcast
A Conversation on Cultural Appropriation on the Competitive Stage

Making The Impact - A Dance Competition Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 71:39


Guests - Tracey Boon and Richard Riaz YoderHosted By - Courtney Ortiz and Lesley MealorIn Episode 79 of Making The Impact - A Dance Competition Podcast, Courtney and Lesley are joined by dance educators Tracey Boone and Richard Riaz Yoder to have an important discussion about cultural appropriation in the competitive dance world.Topics Include: Thoughts on reasons why we see so much appropriation of other cultures in the dance competition world Should cultural appropriation be penalized at competition? How studio owners can best expose their students to other cultures and their dance stylesIf you love Making The Impact and want to support our podcast, buy us a coffee now on Ko-Fi! Your donation will go directly towards helping create quality content for future episodes. We appreciate your support! ❤️Follow your Hosts & Guests!Courtney Ortiz - @courtney.ortizLesley Mealor - @miss.lesley.danceTracey Boon - @traboon1Richard Riaz Yoder - @richardriazBe sure to read Richard's recent article "Racism Has No Place on the Competition Stage: One Judge's Experience Watching 'Modern-Day Blackface'"This episode is sponsored by:Dance Costumes by UrzúaCustom Dance Costumes and Dancewear for made every body! Use code: IMPACT15 for 15% off all costumes and dancewear!Check out IDA Affiliated Competition DecaDance Competition!View their 2022 tour dates and register now at www.decdancecompetition.comJoin our NEW Facebook Group and connect with us! Making The Impact - A Dance Competition Podcast Community Leave us a review on Apple Podcasts! We would love to hear from you! Join our Newsletter for weekly episode releases straight to your inbox! Follow Impact Dance Adjudicators on social media @impactdanceadjudicators and for a list of affiliated dance competitions, visit our website at www.impactdanceadjudicators.comSupport the show (http://www.ko-fi.com/makingtheimpact)

An Acquired Taste Podcast
S4 Ep366: Holiday Costumes Parties... Fun or Lame?

An Acquired Taste Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 25:24


Happy Mondee! Kathleen has an important update on the John Eisenman case out of Spokane. Then, Bethany weighs in on an insane holiday party requirement that Kathleen's friend is facing. Would YOU go? -------- Check out our merch! —> https://store.dftba.com/collections/an-acquired-taste-podcast  ------- Join our November Patreon Show! —> https://www.patreon.com/acquiredtaste Nov. 30 @ 7:30 PM ET December dates TBD. ------ Please support the companies that support us!  Scribd - Right now, Scribd is offering our listeners a FREE 60-day trial. Go to try.scribd.com/TASTE for your free trial!

Jon and Tom Talks
#63 - Halloween and Hockey

Jon and Tom Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 17:48


Costumes and candy. Tom is out of place in a Flyers jersey.

The Dance Edit
“Chicago” at 25, Dance as Renewable Energy, and “Good” Costumes

The Dance Edit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 20:27


A transcript of this episode is available here: https://thedanceedit.com/transcript-episode-90Subscribe to The Dance Edit Extra: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-dance-edit-extra/id1579075769Links referenced in/relevant to episode 90:-The Guardian coverage the inquest into Liam Scarlett's death: https://www.theguardian.com/stage/2021/nov/11/choreographer-killed-himself-after-sexual-misconduct-claims-inquest-hears-Complete Out100 list: https://www.out.com/print/2021/11/08/see-all-names-2021-out100-list-here-New York Times feature on "Chicago" revival's 25th anniversary: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/11/10/theater/chicago-broadway-anniversary.html-BBC video on Glasgow nightclub using dance as renewable energy source: https://www.bbc.com/news/av/uk-scotland-59194559-Fast Company piece on the same nightclub's effort: https://www.fastcompany.com/90674380/this-nightclub-traps-dancers-body-heat-to-warm-and-cool-the-building-Dance Magazine story on what makes a "good" costume: https://www.dancemagazine.com/dance-costumes-2655347703.html

Mamilos
Quem tem síndrome da impostora?

Mamilos

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 73:35


Mamilândia, pra esse programa de hoje vamos trazer a vulnerabilidade. Você já teve aquele momento que se sentiu insegura, despreparada, diminuída por alguma coisa - mesmo em um ambiente para o qual você tinha ensaiado ou uma atividade que você sempre dominou? Se sua resposta foi um "sim" bem sonoro, complementando quase automaticamente com algo como "até mais vezes do que gostaria", pode ser que, em algum ponto do meio do caminho, você tenha desenvolvido uma relação problemática com a sua Impostora, aquela vozinha que fica o dia inteiro sussurrando no seu ouvido que nada vai dar certo. Isso não é culpa sua, nem de ninguém: é resultado de uma estrutura que foi pensada para empurrar todas as mulheres para o mesmo lugar - e toda vez que tentamos romper com esse lugar, surge a insegurança; e mesmo quando tentamos conciliar um novo jeito de estar mundo com as estruturas tradicionais, surgem a culpa, as dúvidas e várias sabotadoras internas que atrapalham todo nosso caminho até à linha de chegada. Ter uma avaliação crítica e honesta de si é sempre bom, mas quando essa "avaliação" nos paralisa, impede ou atrapalha nossos planos, é sabotagem pura - e pode ter problemas mais sérios do que a gente pensa. Mas, no programa de hoje, a gente pega na sua mão (e na da sua impostora) pra dizer que você não está sozinha, que esse é um problema mais social do que pessoal e que tem muita gente séria entendendo e cuidando desse fenômeno. Como exemplo, Cris Bartis e Ju Wallauer abrem o peito dos momentos em que suas próprias impostoras tentaram falar mais forte que a vontade de ser melhor. E para completar a mesa, a triatleta, podcaster e psicóloga da Comissão Olímpica Brasileira, Carla di Pierro, e a atriz e influenciadora mundialmente conhecida, Bruna Marquezine, abrem o coração e a mente para tocar fundo nessa ferida tão secreta pra muitas mulheres do mundo inteiro. Uma conversa como essa não dá pra perder, né? _____ FALE CONOSCO . Email: mamilos@b9.com.br _____ PUMA: SHE MOVES US Para cada começo, tem uma de nós. Ao longo desses anos, Cris e Ju aprenderam que uma mulher é uma potência. Mas duas mulheres, juntas, são um universo. E por isso, que a gente acredita que pra virar o jogo da desigualdade de gênero, a gente precisa de todas. E se os passos de cada mulher ressoam em todas nós, é muito melhor quando fazemos isso juntas. Todos os dias, somos inspiradas pela presença de mais uma mulher, quebrando outra barreira histórica. E dessa barreira, nascem as frestas por onde nossas filhas, netas e até nós mesmas, vamos poder passar. Fala sério, quando a gente vê uma executiva virando o jogo; a Tamires Dias sendo mãe e jogando na Seleção Feminina na Copa do Mundo, a Bruna Marquezine estreando mais uma série de sucesso... dá vontade de estar próxima, né? Dar uma forcinha, chegar junto, se sentir parte daquilo. E é pra fazer essa conexão que a Puma criou a plataforma She Moves Us. Uma campanha mundial que reúne mulheres inspiradoras e compartilha sua potência com cada uma de nós, a distância de um clique. Descubra esse universo de força, mãos dadas, inspiração e acolhimento. _____ B9 ENSINA: PODCASTS Fazer um programa como o Mamilos é descortinar e aprofundar em um universo diferente todas as semanas. A gente sempre inventa uma nova: Política, Economia, Cultura, Costumes, Psicologia. Onde tem polêmica, cê sabe, é só chamar a gente. Mas pra mergulhar no desconhecido precisamos de método, rotina, fluxo e planejamento. Depois de tanto tempo montando nosso espaço de acolhimento, respeito, diálogo e empatia, chegou a hora de compartilhar mais do que as diferentes visões sobre os assuntos do momento. Por isso, está no ar o grande curso B9 ensina "PODCAST: DA CONCEPÇÃO À MONETIZAÇÃO", com Ju Wallauer, e Cris Bartis. Nos juntamos com a Curseria para desenvolver o único curso online que traça uma jornada completa pela produção de podcasts. São 17 aulas supercompletas, além de uma penca de conteúdos extras, materiais complementares... Então, se você tem um podcast, ou se pretende ter, ou se apenas quer entender melhor desse universo, vem com a gente! https://podcastcurseria.com/inscricoes-abertas _____ CONTRIBUA COM O MAMILOS Quem apoia o Mamilos ajuda a manter o podcast no ar e ainda participa do nosso grupo especial no Telegram. É só R$9,90 por mês! Quem assina não abre mão. https://www.catarse.me/mamilos _____ EQUIPE MAMILOS Mamilos é uma produção do B9 A apresentação é de Cris Bartis e Ju Wallauer Pra ouvir todos episódios, assine nosso feed ou acesse mamilos.b9.com.br Quem coordenou essa produção foi a Beatriz Souza. O apoio à pauta e pesquisa foram de Hiago Vinícius e Jaqueline Costa. A edição foi de Gabriel Pimentel e as trilhas sonoras, de Angie Lopez. A identidade visual é de Helô D'Angelo. A curadoria nos programas de história é realizada por Déia Freitas. A publicação ficou por conta do Agê Barros. O B9 tem direção executiva de Cris Bartis, Ju Wallauer e Carlos Merigo. A coordenação digital é do Pedro Strazza e Jade Teixeira e o atendimento e negócios é feito por Rachel Casmala, Camila Mazza, Greyce Lidiane, Luzi Santana e Telma Zenaro.

The Ryan Kelley Morning After
11-11-21 Segment 1 Lady Gaga and Missouri's Costumes

The Ryan Kelley Morning After

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 47:10


Tyler Herro is the lead story. You gotta hit your free frows in Mar... November. Lady Gaga on 60 minutes. We have the audio. Missouri uniforms. SLUH v. CBC. Pick 6 controversy. Iggy and Tim's vacation. 

The Ryan Kelley Morning After
11-11-21 Segment 1 Lady Gaga and Missouri's Costumes

The Ryan Kelley Morning After

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 47:10


Tyler Herro is the lead story. You gotta hit your free frows in Mar... November. Lady Gaga on 60 minutes. We have the audio. Missouri uniforms. SLUH v. CBC. Pick 6 controversy. Iggy and Tim's vacation. 

Short Stories for Kids: The Magical Podcast of Story Telling
Crew makes Magical Fancy Dress costumes that come to life!

Short Stories for Kids: The Magical Podcast of Story Telling

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 14:01


Crew makes Magical Fancy Dress costumes that come to life!Written by Simon ChadwickIf you would like a shout out at the start of the show send your name and where you live to shortstoriesforkidspodcast@gmail.com or through our website at shortstoriesforkidspodcast.com

Tea At No. 5
Bridgerton Lewks, Costumes & Cooking

Tea At No. 5

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 15:25


Phoebe Dynevor and Golda Rosheuvel looked amazing at the Harper's Bazaar Women of the Year Awards!Three beautiful and talented Bridgerton show women were on The Hollywood Reporter's Rising Young Stars list.Speaking of lists, Bridgerton's Lady Danbury was listed to be a popular Halloween costume this year.  We managed to have Lady Danbury in our costume pictures and Adjoa Andoh commented.  All the Bridgerton costumes we saw really were phenomenal!Now we're headed into the holiday season aka cooking season.  If you want to try something new this year, check out the latest in its kind, “The Unofficial Bridgerton Cookbook” by Lex Taylor.They say a cup of tea fixes everything.  Someone spilled and it fixed our need for spilled Bridgerton tea especially about the Bridgerton brothers!We hope you're cooking up with your own Bridgerton brothers season two theories!  Until then, join us as we discuss lewks, costumes and cooking!Hosts – Toni Rose  & Wendy WooEmail - bridgerton2000@gmail.comLike – www.facebook.com/bridgerton2000Follow - www.instagram.com/bridgerton2000Follow - www.twitter.com/bridgerton2000Shop - www.zazzle.com/store/lit_wallflowers/productsSubscribe - www.youtube.com/channel/UCVbwzumQy5Gx1TKc-O4OCzQWebsite - linktr.ee/bridgerton2000www.juliaquinn.com www.facebook.com/AuthorJuliaQuinn www.instagram.com/juliaquinnauthorwww.shondaland.com

Inside the Pallet House
Spooky Late Night

Inside the Pallet House

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 110:17


Candy, Check, Costumes, Check, Facial Hair, Check...for now. We gather for a post Halloween show, and are joined in spirit by our most mysterious friend BooBoo. We also have a few screams, but these are from crazy youth sports parents.

Latino Happy Hour
67 - Costumes vs Culture

Latino Happy Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 93:00


This week on the happy hour, we talk about dia de los muertos and the saying "my culture is not your costume". Plus, one must go. Tickets for our live event on December 9th: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/188888238807

Mike Busey Show
Drunk People In Costumes 22

Mike Busey Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 150:04


After a three week hiatus the boys return! We've been busy here at the castle getting ready for DPIC 22! Plus we recently worked on the new Joyner Lucas video Duck Duck Goose, We we're featured in the Tiger King 2 trailer and we are getting ready for the 10th annual Free Blow Jobs Veterans Party! Plus we recap the entire DPIC weekend See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The tastytrade network
Tweeting Live with LIZ & JNY - November 1, 2021 - ZEBRAs, PTON, and Babies in Costumes

The tastytrade network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 30:39


Liz and jenny take live tweets on ZEBRAS, PTON trades, and adorable babies in halloween costumes.

The tastytrade network
Tweeting Live with LIZ & JNY - November 1, 2021 - ZEBRAs, PTON, and Babies in Costumes

The tastytrade network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 31:29


Liz and jenny take live tweets on ZEBRAS, PTON trades, and adorable babies in halloween costumes.

Holmberg's Morning Sickness
11-01-21 - Recapping A Great Fun Night At Copper Blues For Night Of Singing Dead - Dog Named Peroni After The Penis Disease - The Band's Costumes - Brady's Night As Thanos In His Hood

Holmberg's Morning Sickness

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 32:20


Holmberg's Morning Sickness - Opening Break - Monday November 1, 2021

Middle Children
Between Being Productive and Clown Fuckers

Middle Children

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 55:49


Chris has been SUPER productive these past couple days. We get into some PE horror stories and other gym woes. Jessie gives us the scoop from Jessieland, she went out in Brooklyn and took some shots. We talk about pre nups and marrying for money before the time gets away from us. It's nice when that happens once in awhile, it feels organic. If you need more hit the Patreon, you won't regret!

The Non-Prophets
The Non-Prophets 20.44 10-27-2021 Cynthia McDonald, August, Neil the 604 Atheist and Jason Sherwood

The Non-Prophets

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 72:56


This week our NP crew talks about where the line is on inappropriate costumes, christian hell houses, Greg Locke has some strange ideas on the Druids and cultural appropriation of Halloween by Xians.

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand
Hour 2 | High School Lap Dances and Squid Game Costumes @MrMoKelly @ConwayShow

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 29:37


High school lap dances//Squid Game costumes banned in NY elementary schools//Elex Michaelson//Mo'Kelly Wins 2 Southern California Journalism Awards Including ‘Journalist of the Year – Radio'//

The Brian Lehrer Show
Covid Safe Halloween and Newsy Costumes

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 18:16


As the CDC gives the greenlight for outdoor trick-or-treating and Halloween activities, callers talk about their plans for the holiday keeping Covid in mind. Plus, listeners reveal their costume ideas that are ripped from the headlines. 

Stuff Mom Never Told You
Halloween and Women: Soothsaying Foods and Sexualized Costumes

Stuff Mom Never Told You

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 53:05


For centuries, girls and women have used food on Halloween to divine any clues about the identity of their future spouse. Anney and Samantha bite into past Halloween soothsaying traditions like snap-apple and nut-crack night. We also take a quick look at gender differences in costuming and why they matter. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show ON DEMAND
The Day of Rethinking Our Costumes

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show ON DEMAND

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 114:22


Happy Thursday with Elvis Duran and The Morning Show. The day before our BIG HALLOWEEN show! Skeery thinks Gandhi might want to rethink her costume for a party they are going to. Elvis went over a list of 13 things terrible people say! How well do you know "trademarked sounds"?!?! Froggy goes over the best and worst candy for Halloween! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Front Porch with the Fitzes
Episode 368: Parables, Costumes and Ezekiel 36

Front Porch with the Fitzes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 43:41


In this week's podcast we talk about teaching parables on Halloween. We talk about what costumes to wear. Then Elyse closes us with a devotional from Ezekiel 36. 

Giggly Squad
Giggling about scammers, cults, and couples costumes

Giggly Squad

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 56:10


Paige is having a problem with her couples costume and Hannah is on her second marriage. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.