Podcasts about gen zers

  • 426PODCASTS
  • 537EPISODES
  • 39mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 10, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about gen zers

Latest podcast episodes about gen zers

The Carpool with Kelly and Lizz
THE FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH IS AT TRADER JOE'S

The Carpool with Kelly and Lizz

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 50:28


The queen herself and the Carpool's most iconic guest, Car Grandma Kris, returns for a family-packed episode with Kelly and Lizz.  ‘Guap' — not guac — is today's millennial word of the day. And while Kelly and Lizz don't need to be ‘coutin' their guap,' at least they now know Gen Zers are talking about their cash-money, not an add-on to their Chipotle bowl.  A love and wisdom-filled Q&A with today's guest brings you all the secrets to life, love, and aging in reverse. Kris shares where you can find the fountain of youth on your local Trader Joe's shelves and names one of her favorite products for achieving a little glow every day. Kelly and Lizz also ask their mom about her current ride, how she met their dad, and how she juggled raising five kids along with the rest of life. You won't want to miss her sage parenting, marriage, and holiday planning advice. The Car Grandma also joins Kelly and Lizz for a special taste drive of Mom Water. Mom Water sponsors today's test drive, sending over their iconic, fun, and refreshing drinks for the gals to sip (and spit, in Kelly's case). Not only is Mom Water a fantastic non-carbonated seltzer alternative, their cans are also stunning, and their ingredients are super simple. Each flavor has a cute and classic mom name like Linda, Karen, Sandy, or Carol. In short, the gals are hooked. Grab your Mom Water merch with our 20% off code CARMOM20 and Follow Mom Water on Instagram at @drinkmomwater. A leaked video of the Honda Pilot — that has now been scrubbed from the internet — headlines today's industry news while deer crashes are up 16% with the daylight savings time change and dealership pushback on Ford EV mandates. @brunchwithbabs brings us today's ditch the drive-through: dump and bake pizza casserole. This four-ingredient recipe from Kelly and Lizz's favorite 74-years-young insta-obsession is baked mac and cheese with a twist. To share your ditch the drive-through recipe with us, call (959) CAR-POOL and leave us a message! Uncommon Goods — today's sponsor — is your secret weapon if you want to avoid basic and bland gifts this holiday season. They scour the globe for the most remarkable and truly unique gifts for everyone on your list. From jewelry to kitchen, bar, him, her, kids, and more, Uncommon Goods has something for everyone. Uncommon Goods is here to make your shopping stress free.  To get 15% off your next gift, go to uncommongoods.com/carpool for 15% off. Don't miss out on this limited-time offer on Uncommon Goods! Want our advice on your next car (or just got a life question for us)? Shoot us an email for a chance to get your questions featured on the show at hello@thecarmomofficial.com Follow the Carpool Podcast on IG Follow the Carpool Podcast on YouTube Follow Kelly on IG Follow Lizz on IG Visit thecarmomofficial.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Normal Lies
Generational Myths from a Baby Boomer & a Gen "Z"er, with Jonathan Goehring

Normal Lies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 41:19


Episode 72.  “Things are not the way they used to be. And a lot of times when people who will criticize the younger generation will say that we are soft, that we don't work hard.  They're thinking of what hard work was like for them when they were our age.”Jon Goehring is a voiceover artist and audio producer specializing in creating radio commercials and imaging, narrating audiobooks, and bringing brands to life through sound. Jon is a Rochester native and holds a Masters Degree in Media Management from The Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University. He's also 23 years old, newly married and a proud member of Gen Z. Jon and Linda explore the myths and stereotypes of the generations, specifically Baby Boomers, Millennials and Gen Z.Some wisdom from Jon:“… (Baby Boomers) are thinking of manual labor, which certainly is still important and very relevant and even in our society today, but they're thinking of factories and the types of work that they did back then. And certainly there is that work available today. But at the same time, so much of our work has been automated.”“Innovation is what really provides value in our market. And that's what a lot of us Gen Zers have is that innovation.  And then, that courage to relentlessly push that innovation until we do make something better.”“The whole phrase of “If you find something you love, you won't work a day in your life.”  I think the concept behind that has driven us to realize that there's gotta be something more. And maybe we don't have to be miserable at work.”“… cumulative innovation to me is like passing on a basketball court. Okay, I don't have a shot here, but I'll pass to an open teammate. It's more of learn from what isn't going right, or is just a little bit off. Perfect that so that you can shoot and score this time. And I think that's why we've been so afraid in the past of failure and we still are in some cases."You can learn more about Jon at JonathanGoehring.comConnect with Jon on Linked InWhat came up for you as a result of this conversation?  Let Linda know by going to Normal-Lies.com and leave a review.  Linda reads every one and every month, she chooses one review to read on air.  If you have a question or a topic you'd like addressed on an upcoming episode, go to Normal-Lies.com and click the contact page to send Linda a message.Be sure to follow Linda on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Linked In.

The Conversationalist Podcast
Is it a crucial time for Gen Zers to unify America? | Isabel Brown Exclusivez

The Conversationalist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 34:11


Sophie Beren sits down with Isabel Brown to talk about how Isabel became such a political powerhouse and her book Frontlines, the importance of unifying young people in America, challenging our perspectives through conversation and handling the challenges of being a political advocate. Are we losing our ability to connect with each other? Drop your hottest take Answers these questions with Isabel Brown during this episode by texting "POVZ" to 1 (877) 222-1119 to share your POVz! The Conversationalist is a non partisan platform that doesn't affiliate or identify with any viewpoints, beliefs, or opinions that may be featured throughout our content.

Have You Not Heard?
"Keeping the Faith" w/ Caleb DelMarter

Have You Not Heard?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 39:45


What a joy to hear the deep faith coming from a 20 year old man. Caleb shares how life events have shaped his faith and view of the world. He also gives us wisdom in relating the Gospel to his age group - the Gen Zers. We even discuss the Russian/Ukrainian war. Whether you are a life long Christian, a new believer or a seeker, I think you will enjoy and gain insight from our chat. Grab a friend and listen in. Please like, share, and review this episode so more people can be encouraged by the hope and healing that comes from Jesus! Selah... --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/angel-h-davis/message

The Power Pod
The Power Pod S4/E044 – Campaign Camp

The Power Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 87:51


Jared Yamamoto, RandiO, Nicole Bennett, Christina Aicklen, MikeB and Producer George discuss everything from endless breadstick heaven to Swiftie zombies. The gang also talks about grumpy Gen Zers, art farts, the Tina treatment, and more. The gang also talked with Georgia Senate candidate Chase Oliver about the upcoming Midterm election. Enjoy! Listen to the Power Pod on your smart speaker, just say "Play the Power Pod Podcast." Want even more Power Pod? Check out the gang here: https://www.wgauradio.com/on-air/the-power-pod/ .

#GenZ
Episode 42: Gen Z & Military Service

#GenZ

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 35:38


Is there alignment between military service and Gen Z's interests and passions? This episode features a conversation with Gen. Charles Q. Brown, Jr., Chief of Staff of the United States Air Force. We discuss the strengths of Gen Z service members and the opportunities for Gen Zers within military service and the United States Air Force. 

Human Solutions: Simplifying HR for People who Love HR
The Courage of Inclusion with John Regan and Juliette Mayers

Human Solutions: Simplifying HR for People who Love HR

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 33:52


What does it mean to be inclusive? A 2018 Pew Research Center report says that nearly half of post-Millennials or Gen-Zers are non-white. We know a diverse organization leads to diversity of thought and insight, but for HR pros? If you're not thinking about diversity and inclusion in your recruiting and retention efforts, you're missing critical talent across younger generations. Success starts with leaders at all levels and this week we're starting at the top as we highlight what it takes to be an inclusive leader and HR's role in the process. Our guests this week are CEOs who have rolled up their sleeves to do the work of transformation as inclusive leaders. Juliette Mayers is founder and CEO of Inspiration Zone, a strategic consulting firm specializing in diversity and inclusion strategy and has spent the last 30 years with Fortune 500 companies and large not-for-profits helping to create diverse and inclusive environments with built-in accountability.John Regan is President and Chief Executive Officer of Associated Industries of Massachusetts (AIM). Among his accomplishments at AIM, John led a coalition of Massachusetts business groups in calling for significant change around racial equity in the workplace, and he spearheaded an effort to recommend businesses alter their policies to effectively address equity for female employees who suffered disproportionately during the COVID pandemic.  John was named by Boston Magazine to the 2021 list of 100 Most Influential Bostonians.Inclusive leadership is critical for today's leaders, allowing organizations to attract diverse talent, customers, and ideas. We're lucky to have Juliette Mayers and John Regan with us today to explore what it takes to be an inclusive leader.Links & Notes ‘Are You an Inclusive Leader?' — by Juliette Mayers Become a Member of Associated Industries of Massachusetts

Words, Words, Words: A Podcast by Robert Tinajero
Episode 57: The Thumbs Up Emoji

Words, Words, Words: A Podcast by Robert Tinajero

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 9:02


A look at how Gen Zers find the thumbs up emoji passive aggressive and other emoji talk.

The Tightrope with Dan Smolen
Why Doesn’t My Boss Get Gen Z?

The Tightrope with Dan Smolen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 34:33


On What's Your Work Fit we ask a viewer's question: why doesn't my boss get Gen Z? This week, work futurist and LinkedIn top voice for Gen Z Danielle Farage and the founder and CEO of BRANDthrō Billee Howard answer this and other questions. Why doesn't [my boss] get Gen Z? According to Danielle, it is because Gen Zers don't live to work. "We're working to live." Main segment starts at 3:16 In this episode, we ask Danielle and Billee: Why doesn't my boss get Gen Z? Starts at 3:16 What's wrong with Goldman Sachs' Gen Z-targeted recruitment ads? (Click here to view the ad discussed.) Starts at 13:45 Are bosses prioritizing productivity and profits above their people? Starts at 25:01 What's your work fit? Starts at 28:56 Why Doesn't My Boss Get Gen Z? Billee adds that "these are fractured times, and we're seeing a reversal of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs." Main segment starts at 3:16 About our guests: Danielle Farage is a member of the Gen Z cohort, a LinkedIn top voice for Gen Z discussion, and a respected work futurist. She tackles timely workplace issues such as neurodiversity and civility. Danielle serves as the Director of Growth and Marketing for Café (YC S21). She lives and works in New York City. Billee Howard is a globally recognized marketing insights leader and the founder and CEO of market research firm BRANDthrō. Her research leverages emotional insight to help marketers connect well with their consumers and hired talent. She is a member of the Fast Company Executive Board, and, she is a Senior Contributor to Forbes. Billee lives and works in New York City. This episode originated as a live show on October 18, 2022. You can watch the show in its entirety on the What's Your Work Fit YouTube Channel. EPISODE DATE: October 21, 2022 Danielle's social media: LinkedIn Website Billee's social media: LinkedIn Book Page Fast Company Forbes Website Please Subscribe to What's Your Work Fit on: – Apple Podcast – Android – Google Podcasts – Pandora – Spotify – Stitcher – TuneIn …or wherever you get your podcasts. You may also click HERE to receive our podcast episodes by email. Image credits: Gen Z, SeventyFour for iStock Photo; portrait, Danielle Farage; portrait, Billee Howard; podcast button, J. Brandt Studio for The Dan Smolen Experience.

The Undressing Room Podcast Presented by Macy’s
Dating in 2022 | Episode 90

The Undressing Room Podcast Presented by Macy’s

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 52:24 Very Popular


Dating is putting millennials and Gen-Zers in debt. Eva and Lore'l have some great inexpensive date ideas to help you out. Plus, have you ever had a new potential boo cross the line too early? Look out for red flags so you can keep it moving to the next bae.   The Final Question To Undress got real. These Gen-Z folks have unrealistic expectations.   If you want your question featured on the show, send us a DM @TheUndressingRoomPodcast  The Undressing Room Podcast is presented by Macy's. Head to  www.theundressingroompod.com for more details. It's sweater weather season!  Head to  Macys.com/TheUndressingRoom and check out Lore'l and Eva's hottest fashion picks. Subscribe and check us out every Thursday.   Follow: @theundressingroompodcast  @evamarcille @starringlorelSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Couched in Color
S3E13: Spreading Hope Through Content Creation Featuring Gigi Robinson

Couched in Color

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 42:32


In this episode, 24-year-old guest Gigi Robinson, a master content creator, graduate student and model, shares insights for living with chronic illness and addressing mental health issues, inspired to use her story to move the masses through her highly successful social media channels. She calls the Internet “an oyster” for Gen Zers to see beyond the corporate world and live their dreams, based on their unique passions and dreams. Topics covered in this interview: Sharing the vulnerabilities that come with chronic illness and mental health issues to help others (and letting go of the stigmas related to getting therapy). Gen Z opportunities to create new careers for themselves on the Internet, as guest Gigi did, with an average of 100K TikTok views daily. The Internet has become “a game changer” for work and also for sharing chronic illness and mental health challenges. The “Elder Millennial” as described by Stand-Up Comedian Iliza Shelsinger on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CWsJPr3ML4M and  her related Netflix Show: https://www.netflix.com/title/802136582. The burnout that comes from being an influencer, and “saying yes to everything.” Gigi's contract with Spotify for “Everything you need is within” podcast (link below at end), which is Gigi's mantra. Gigi's selection for consideration as a model for the first “chronically ill” person to be represented in Sports Illustrated's swimsuit edition–as a 5'4” inch, 165-pound model of “empowerment.” Brands heavily female-dominated giving “everyone a seat at the table.” Struggle through college is “very normal”–mental health and weight will fluctuate, with this time period being the first time many are on their own. Know where to look for help, follow influencers and mental health resources. About Gigi Robinson: Gigi Robinson is a digital artist, health & wellness advocate, current M.S. Candidate, and graduate of the University of Southern California with a Bachelors in Fine Arts, Design, and Photography. She has strong presences across TikTok (100k views on average)and Instagram (15.5k+ followers), and, as of this year, she has been developing her YouTube and Podcast content.  Living with chronic illnesses, she has been challenged in many ways with everyday tasks, such as showering, cooking, walking, and even sitting down. Despite all of the physical and psychological challenges that threatened the path to becoming who she is today, she has challenged adversity and dedicated a majority of her life to become a master content creator, always keeping her values of creating positive and impactful messages to her diverse audience as a priority.   Follow Gigi: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/itsgigirobinson/ TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@itsgigirobinson Twitter: https://twitter.com/itsgigirobinson Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/everything-you-need-is-within/id1584177000   Follow Dr. Alfiee: Website:  https://dralfiee.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dralfiee Twitter: https://twitter.com/dralfiee Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dralfiee/ Website: https://dralfiee.com   Find out more about the AAKOMA Project here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yvTKmYKi24I   Season 3 Produced By: https://socialchameleon.us   More Couched in Color: https://dralfiee.com/podcast Music Produced by: Mark “King” Batson (Superproducer of your favorite artists and Grammy award-winner for albums with Eminem and Beyoncé)

Couched in Color with Dr. Alfiee
S3E13: Spreading Hope Through Content Creation Featuring Gigi Robinson

Couched in Color with Dr. Alfiee

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 42:32


In this episode, 24-year-old guest Gigi Robinson, a master content creator, graduate student and model, shares insights for living with chronic illness and addressing mental health issues, inspired to use her story to move the masses through her highly successful social media channels. She calls the Internet “an oyster” for Gen Zers to see beyond the corporate world and live their dreams, based on their unique passions and dreams. Topics covered in this interview: Sharing the vulnerabilities that come with chronic illness and mental health issues to help others (and letting go of the stigmas related to getting therapy). Gen Z opportunities to create new careers for themselves on the Internet, as guest Gigi did, with an average of 100K TikTok views daily. The Internet has become “a game changer” for work and also for sharing chronic illness and mental health challenges. The “Elder Millennial” as described by Stand-Up Comedian Iliza Shelsinger on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CWsJPr3ML4M and  her related Netflix Show: https://www.netflix.com/title/802136582. The burnout that comes from being an influencer, and “saying yes to everything.” Gigi's contract with Spotify for “Everything you need is within” podcast (link below at end), which is Gigi's mantra. Gigi's selection for consideration as a model for the first “chronically ill” person to be represented in Sports Illustrated's swimsuit edition–as a 5'4” inch, 165-pound model of “empowerment.” Brands heavily female-dominated giving “everyone a seat at the table.” Struggle through college is “very normal”–mental health and weight will fluctuate, with this time period being the first time many are on their own. Know where to look for help, follow influencers and mental health resources. About Gigi Robinson: Gigi Robinson is a digital artist, health & wellness advocate, current M.S. Candidate, and graduate of the University of Southern California with a Bachelors in Fine Arts, Design, and Photography. She has strong presences across TikTok (100k views on average)and Instagram (15.5k+ followers), and, as of this year, she has been developing her YouTube and Podcast content.  Living with chronic illnesses, she has been challenged in many ways with everyday tasks, such as showering, cooking, walking, and even sitting down. Despite all of the physical and psychological challenges that threatened the path to becoming who she is today, she has challenged adversity and dedicated a majority of her life to become a master content creator, always keeping her values of creating positive and impactful messages to her diverse audience as a priority.   Follow Gigi: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/itsgigirobinson/ TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@itsgigirobinson Twitter: https://twitter.com/itsgigirobinson Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/everything-you-need-is-within/id1584177000   Follow Dr. Alfiee: Website:  https://dralfiee.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dralfiee Twitter: https://twitter.com/dralfiee Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dralfiee/ Website: https://dralfiee.com   Find out more about the AAKOMA Project here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yvTKmYKi24I   Season 3 Produced By: https://socialchameleon.us   More Couched in Color: https://dralfiee.com/podcast Music Produced by: Mark “King” Batson (Superproducer of your favorite artists and Grammy award-winner for albums with Eminem and Beyoncé)

Payments Innovation
Democratising wealth management through technology

Payments Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 36:32 Transcription Available


For many, investing is seen as the preserve of the wealthy or financially savvy. Thanks to Mary Agbesanwa, Fintech Growth Lead at Seccl championing the transformative power of technology and how it can be used to democratize investing, more people are accessing the financial markets and making educated, informed investment decisions In the latest episode of Payments Innovation, we discussed: The role of embedded investing in democratizing the investment space Millennials and Gen-Zers becoming more engaged in their investing How Wealthtech can take steps to open up investment to newcomers How Seccl is educating ordinary people to be long term investors  To ensure that you never miss an episode of Payments Innovation, subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or here and don't forget to check out our YouTube! Until next time!

#GenZ
Episode 41: Measuring Cohort Culture-Part 2

#GenZ

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 30:43


Measuring cohort culture is no small feat, which is why we need multiple minds working to build greater knowledge. In part 2 of Measuring Cohort Culture, Tyler Mitic, the CEO and founder of Teen View, shares about his work in developing a community of Gen Zers to help companies and organizations gain insights into the world of Generation Z. 

HeartMath's Add Heart
Become a Heart-Centered Citizen Scientist

HeartMath's Add Heart

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 22:45


Topic – What it means to be a citizen scientist and how it can help you align with your purpose Guest – Dillon Brooks Many Gen Zers and millennials have lost trust in humanity and hope for the future. Most will tell you they're stressed much of the time. Driving their stress are feelings of being financially insecure and mentally burned out, fears over climate change, and world unrest. As a 29-year-old, Dillon Brooks is on a mission to help other millennials and Gen Zers listen to their heart to empower themselves. Dillon, a TikTok channel creator, has established a sizable TikTok community for Gen Zers and millennials called “Citizen Scientists,” and he is on a mission to help others empower themselves. Dillon and our podcast host, Deborah Rozman, discuss what it means to be a heart-centered citizen scientist and why it is important to step into this role to create the change we desire personally and collectively. Dillon and Deborah discuss the power of the heart and its ability to transform and lift perception. Dillon believes this is, in part, what the younger population is in search of. Gen Zers and millennials need to connect more deeply to themselves, according to Dillon, and become citizen scientists in all aspects of their lives: diet, exercise, sleep, stress management, mental health, and spiritual growth. He shares his foundational principles for feeling a strong sense of purpose and connectedness to others. This insightful episode closes with a heart meditation on empowering your intentions and commitments.

Bulture Podcast
The Chelsea Boot Warriors!Ep202

Bulture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 186:01


texting other people while living with someone else is a wild sport to play!! 22% of millennials (ages 26 to 41) and 19% of Gen Zers (ages 18 to 25) are going broke from dating. Women said they spend an average of $81 on a date, Men spend $104. Latto Shares Audio From Her Chat With Nicki Minaj, Calls Onika A “40-Year-Old Bully” Nicki Minaj Calls Latto A “Karen”, Reveals Their Text Exchange Drake Removes Himself From Competition for 2022 Grammy Awards GloRilla gifted Cardi B a Patek Philippe Tee Grizzley Gets In His Storytelling Bag On “Chapters From The Trenches” Wack 100 calls out N.O.R.E for backtracking after he received backlash for Kanye's Drink Champs interview Charles Barkley is staying with TNT on a 10-year deal that could be worth between $100M-$200M The members of BTS will serve in South Korea's military as required by law. They're the 2nd most streamed group in America this year with 1.5 BILLION streams. Uber Eats announced People in Toronto Canada can get weed delivered to your house from the app, starting today. Jamaica has banned music and TV broadcasts from glorifying & promoting criminal activity, violence, drug use, scamming and weapons Glorilla responds.. “I haven't made 1 red penny from FNF (other than shows) I can rap in real life & ain't no one hit wonder!” Producer of “FNF” says Glorilla & her team are taking him to court so they can own the song Camron says he's been shooting his shot at Nia Long since last week: “Still no response” Lil Baby "Its Only Me" is on paced to sell 210K first week. Jordan Poole and the Warriors have agreed to a $140M contract extension Apple officially fined $19 million for not including chargers with iPhones Netflix finally announced that the new "Basic with Ads" tier will be released on November 3 & will cost $6.99 a month, and will max out at 720p for its streaming quality. Arizona Iced Tea founder will keep 99-cent price “for as long as we can” Inflation calculations has it priced at $2.00 per can, but for 30 years he's kept the same price. 2 Thieves broke into Megan Thee Stallion's Los Angeles home, making out with around $300K-$400K in jewelry, cash, and more Alaska's snow crab season has been canceled for the first time in history. An estimated 1 billion crabs have mysteriously disappeared, which is a 90% drop in their population. Wiz Khalifa speaks on people not wearing the same thing twice… “that's not a flex”. Chief Keef is dropping his new project “Almighty So 2” on December 16th Popular shows “85 South & Funny Marco” have taken down their interviews with Charleston White after his exchange with T.I & Boosie's son. Lil Baby seemingly responds to Quavo's request: “I don't want your b**** we can't swap out” Shaquille O'Neal sold his 17 locations of Auntie Anne's pretzel franchise, says “Black people don't like pretzels that much.. we like pizza. The numbers weren't adding up” Tsu Surf arrested on fed DEA RICO charges in Jersey Fivio Foreign's baby mama apologizes after Gay porn claims: “I should have not went live and said those things they were not true” Saucy Santana accuses Kodak Black of stealing his song Gunna has been denied bond for a third time

Align with Alora
Why Now is the Best Time to Start Your Photography Business

Align with Alora

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 16:13


Now is the best time to start a wedding photography business now more than ever businesses are popping up left, and right. To be honest, I think that small business is taking over the world like even GEN Zers as it turns out in the statistics say over 62% of them already plan to be entrepreneurs so the entrepreneur lifestyle is not going anywhere anytime soon which means that it's time to start now

On The Market
43: Does Gen Z Stand a Chance in Today's Housing Market?

On The Market

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 43:53 Very Popular


Gen Z, the generation just on the cusp of homebuying age, may not have a chance to buy homes in the first place. For years, we've heard how millennials have been struggling to buy homes—but what about the generation behind them? With rising affordability issues, wages that won't match inflation, and a recession on the horizon, will this newest generation ever be in the clear to become homeowners? Or, will they become the largest generation of renters the world has ever seen?In today's episode, Dave breaks down the data behind the demand, showing where Gen Zers are heading, what they're buying, and whether or not they even want to buy homes at all. This data highlights significant differences in where renters/homebuyers of this generation are moving. Landlords, pay close attention—buying in any of these high-demand cities could mean steady rent checks for years to come.We also chat with twenty-four-year-old investing mogul, Soli Cayetano, a Bay Area-based investor who grew her portfolio entirely out-of-state. Soli, being one of the oldest Gen Zers, has insight into why some of her peers will/won't be buying homes anytime soon. She also gives some stellar advice to new or young investors just getting into the rental property game.In This Episode We CoverWhether or not millennial housing demand is peaking and how household formation is changingGen Z's outlook on homeownership and why many are choosing to rentThe top cities where Gen Z renters and homebuyers are moving toHome affordability and why it may stop Gen Z dead in their tracksThe easiest way for Gen Z to begin investing in real estate (low money down!)Starting and scaling an out-of-state rental property portfolio And So Much More!Links from the ShowBiggerPockets ForumsBiggerPockets AgentJoin BiggerPockets for FREEOn The MarketJoin the Future of Real Estate Investing with FundriseConnect with Other Investors in the “On The Market” ForumsSubscribe to The “On The Market” YouTube ChannelFind an Investor Friendly Agent in Your AreaDave's BiggerPockets ProfileDave's InstagramYardeni Demographic DataRocket HomesmoveBuddhaNYT/CommercialCafeBook Mentioned in the ShowReal Estate by the Numbers by Dave Meyer and J ScottConnect with Soli:Soli's BiggerPockets ProfileSoli's InstagramCheck the full show notes here: https://www.biggerpockets.com/blog/on-the-market-43Interested in learning more about today's sponsors or becoming a BiggerPockets partner yourself? Check out our sponsor page!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

KNX In Depth
KNX In Depth: Major grocery store merger could impact food prices--More Latino voters siding with Republicans--LA City Council tries to move forward--Gen Zers don't like "thumbs up" emoji--Infidelity could be contagious

KNX In Depth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 47:47


Your choices for food shopping are shrinking now. Kroger, which owns Ralphs, is merging with Albertsons. It's a massive deal that would now create a mega-chain of about 5-thousand stores across the country. This merger isn't without its criticisms. Union workers are saying it could create a monopoly that hurts workers and consumers. We go In Depth.  Still no resignations from Kevin DeLeon and Gil Cedillo from the LA City Council. We talk about how the council moves forward.  The UK economy is in a precarious situation right now. The new prime minister is trying to steady it but her plans aren't quite working.  Control of Congress might come down to Latino voters. We go In Depth into a new poll that shows they're warming up more to Republican candidates.  Speaking of the upcoming elections, we'll look into the close races and what the big issues are for voters here in California and across the country.  And if you like to use the "thumbs up" emoji at work you better pay attention when you send it. Some younger workers find it offensive.  Watch out if you know someone who's cheating on their partner. Those same temptations might overcome you too. We explain the surprising findings of a new study.  To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Womansplaining with Julie Barrett
Public School District Sees 582% Explosion in Students Identifying "Gender Non-Conforming" - Episode 98

Womansplaining with Julie Barrett

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 22:01


Maryland school district saw a 582% increase in students identifying as "gender non-conforming" between 2019 and 2022! Let's do the math here...Montgomery County Schools Saw 582% Increase In Reported Gender Nonconforming Students Over Two Years, Data Shows | The Daily CallerMichigan's Prop 3, crafted by Planned Parenthood, would allow children to get puberty blockers and "gender affirming" surgeries without parental consent. Michigan Hides Kids' Right To Sterilization In Abortion Amendment (thefederalist.com)A win in Florida! Federal judge upholds new law that does not allow for "gender affirming care" for state medicaid patients. Judge upholds Florida's ban on Medicaid coverage for gender-affirming care (19thnews.org)Dumb things you'll hear today: The 9 emojis Gen Zers have declared too offensive for use. I say, use them anyway. Gen Z has canceled the thumbs-up emoji because it's 'hostile' (nypost.com)Connect with me:info@juliebarrett.usjuliebarrett.usJulie Barrett (@juliecbarrett) / TwitterJulie Barrett Womansplaining | FacebookSupport the show

A Need To Read
#179 The Law of Attraction debunked by David Grimes, an actual scientist.

A Need To Read

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 20:40


David Robert Grimes is a Science communicator and author. His book The Irrational Ape has been discussed on this show many times. He joins me today to discuss the Law of Attraction, the pseudoscientific craze that has made millennials, Gen-Zers, and Gwyneth Paltrow believe they can bend the universe to suit their will.   More from David is on his website: https://www.davidrobertgrimes.com   I highly recommend reading his book if you have ever wondered what on the flat earth makes people believe in conspiracy theories. David's an excellent communicator. and a great voice for science and rationality.    Support for the podcast   Hey!   I'm an independent podcaster, which is a fancy way of saying no one pays me a regular wage. And, to level with you, that is terrifying- all of the time. So, if you like what I do and want me to keep doing it please support the show in one of the following ways.   - Share the podcast with a friend, or review the podcast.    - Make a one-off donation with BuyMeACoffee   I work with a couple of great companies who have discounts arranged for A Need To Read listeners, they're listed below. The discounts (BH) + freebies (AG) will already be applied when you click the link.    - Go to Therapy and get 10% off your first month with BetterHelp, who sponsor the show   - Get your nutrition covered with the all-in-one AG1 shake from Athletic Greens, who also sponsor the show.    - You can also give me feedback/comments/validation by emailing me: hello (at) aneedtoread.co.uk

My Business On Purpose
607: Generational Awareness In The Workplace

My Business On Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 6:25


Greedy Boomers are feeling frustrated and overrun by entitled Millennials, while skeptical Gen Xers are interviewing unaware Gen Zers who are scrolling TikTok in a job interview; and for the first time we are all working together in the same businesses. College sports is awash in generational misunderstanding. The newly minted Name, Image, and Likeness rules are in place and for the first time in our lifetime you are seeing college athletes representing the hometown HVAC company, or in some cases, an international brand like Alabama's Quarterback Bryce Young who is already being featured in Nissan commercials. En masse the younger generations are all for this loosening of regulations, the older generations are on the spectrum between skeptical and opposed. In his new book A New Kind Of Diversity, Author Dr. Tim Elmore highlights these generational challenges saying, “the generation gap is more distinct because new technology creates subcultures. Hence, generations often don't have to connect to survive.” When you look around your business you are beginning to see a Boomer (55 and older) working side by side with a Gen Xer, a Millennial, and a Gen Zer, all staring cross-eyed at the other trying to figure out why they are so peculiar and strange…and wrong. Generational diversity in the workplace is an unavoidable reality and a massive opportunity. Our response to this reality makes waves; waves of optimism and hope, or waves of pessimism and doubt. First, to provide the greatest amount of optimism for working within the healthy diversity of the generations we must be aware that rightness and wrongness is being replaced with angle and perspective. The commonly agreed upon straight edges of society are becoming less and less agreed upon and in their place are the self-published perceptions of the generations. We used to believe that only a few key players had their fingers on the submit buttons of our societal publishing houses, and now everyone can and does publish something. The voices of angle and perspective are rising and it is leaving little space for a declaration of rightness or wrongness. You have a couple of different responses to this reality; we can either dig in our heels and fight for limited options, or we can open your ears and our minds to listen. Listening is not agreeing. Listening is not acquiescing. Listening is not giving permission. Listening is simply listening. To be generationally aware is to make time to listen to the different angles, and then to make further time to digest and process what you have sincerely heard. We will do well to inform our own current angles and perspectives with the angles and perspectives of others as we make time to listen. The second action we can take to bring hope to the generations is to believe that each person and each generation brings a value layer that was otherwise missing. Recently we did some renovation work at our home. The project was 99% complete barring a few pieces of artwork. The rooms looked fantastic! The new floors, paint, trim, and tile were all a pop of design that we had been missing. There was 1% missing though…the artwork. Most of us went through school moaning about art class. The addition of that 1% that was missing completely brought wholeness to the room. In a Wikipedia entry, resolve is what the music world refers to as “the move of a note or chord from dissonance (an unstable sound) to a consonance (a more final or stable sounding one)”. In our renovation, something was missing. The 1% of artwork brought resolve; brought a more final visual to the renovations we had completed. Multiple generations working in concert help to bring resolve to a workplace; a more final or stable sounding environment by which all roles can contribute to the overall mission of the organization. By collectively and repetitively pressing towards that agreed-upon mission, culture is built, and the flavor of that culture is enhanced by the diversity of its generational ingredients. Generational awareness is to learn the intentionality of great listening, and to set the stage for each generational player to bring the ingredients and notes that provide a full resolve and satisfaction for the culture that is headed towards its mission.

UncommonTEEN: The Podcast for Christian Teen Girls

Growing up, I saw myself as a reject.  That word reject means to throw away, as anything useless or disgusting. Something that is despised. To cast away or abandon.  My dad was very physically, mentally and verbally abusive toward me and my mom would leave for weeks at a time, leaving us to think that maybe this time she wasn't coming back. It left me in a place where I felt unloved, unaccepted and rejected.  Each one of us are born with a God-shaped hole in our hearts. We can try to fill it with all kinds of different things, but the only thing that actually fills that hole is God. For me, try to fill it with…friends, school, music, boyfriends, but no matter what I tried, nothing could satisfy my heart until I met Jesus.  You may have heard me talk about this statistic before, but it is projected that only 4% of Gen Z is Bible believing Christians. Those who are between the ages of 10 and 25. So, if you think of the statistic, it looks like this…out of every 100 Gen Z'rs you see walking around in your city or your school, only 4 of them are projected to be Bible believing Christians. The average number of students in a public school in America is 500 students. If your school had 500 students, that means that only 20 of them are projected to be Bible believing Christians. That's not a lot. According to another research that was recently done, that says 79% of Gen Zers reported feeling lonely. Ladies, this generation needs the hope that you have on the inside of you. Just because we see that statistic of 4% of your generation being Bible believing Christians, doesn't mean that it has to stay that way! People need and want to know Jesus! Back in Jesus' time Zacchaeus was considered to be the biggest reject of them all. Nobody liked him, because he was wicked to the core.But even as a reject…there was something on the inside of him that was empty…that wanted more.  Zacchaeus was drawn to Jesus, because there was something different about Him. Jesus went out of His way to see Zacchaeus, the one person nobody wanted to see. Jesus went out of His way to let Zacchaeus know that God even loves Him…the one that everyone else rejected.  To learn more about how God wants to use you to to shine a light in this world!Connect with Us!Website: UncommonTEEN.comInstagram: @uncommon.teenUncommonTEEN App: UncommonTEENapp.comJoin us LIVE on Instagram on Friday evenings at 9pm Central for a Live Q&A with Coach Jamie!

The Lost Debate
Ep 84 | Snowden Debate, Redshirting Boys, Microtargeting, Generation COVID

The Lost Debate

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 57:53


Ravi and Rikki begin by discussing the proliferation of social media data in campaign ad targeting, before turning to two recently renewed debates: the legacy of Edward Snowden, and whether boys should start school a year later than girls. Finally, the hosts finish with a conversation around a recent Newsweek cover story on the growing number of “disconnected” Gen Zers. [01:57] Voter Microtargeting [12:22] Snowden Debate [34:00] Redshirting Boys [45:47] Generation COVID Check out our show notes: https://lostdebate.com/2022/10/07/ep-84/ Subscribe to our channel: https://bit.ly/3Gs5YTF Subscribe to our Substack: https://thelostdebate.substack.com/ Sticher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-lost-debate iheart: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-the-lost-debate-88330217/ Amazon Music: https://music.amazon.co.uk/podcasts/752ca262-2801-466d-9654-2024de72bd1f/the-lost-debate LOST DEBATE ON SOCIAL: Follow Lost Debate Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lostdebate/ Follow Lost Debate on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@lostdebate Follow Lost Debate on Twitter: https://twitter.com/thelostdebate

The Spirit Of 77
Episode 140: Mega Concert Report Ep! Def Leopard, Joan Jett, Poison, & Mötley Crüe + more

The Spirit Of 77

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 56:26


Amy replays her latest concert adventure seeing Def Leopard, Joan Jett, Poison, & Mötley Crüe. The takeaway: this audience was bananas - a real human soup. Surprisingly a lot of young people! Moms with sons and tons of Gen Zers with their stiff high waisted jeans. She and her husband ask the important question, “Is Joan Jett really enjoying touring anymore?” Amy is suddenly Bret Michaels' biggest fan. Spoiler alert: Bret Michaels wears his own t-shirt, and Amy suspects he has someone hand sand the crotch of his jeans. Maya asks the question how is Mick Mars still alive? The ladies discuss how old rockers start to look weird, like the lead singer from Def Leopard, who has a haircut that makes him look like Amy's mom's best friend Cindy. Amy finally clears up the NSFW difference between Poison and Mötley Crüe. Maya also has concert reports for Cabana Boy and a backyard concert featuring a Tom Petty cover band. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/the-spirit-of-77/message

Payments Innovation
The Evolving World of Investing: Creating a Community of Investors with Hayden Smith

Payments Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 42:53 Transcription Available


Investing has always been about the education of the individual instead of the community.   Thanks to Hayden Smith, COO and Co-founder of Pearler, that stigma is changing. Creating a community of confident investors for long-term success through financial education.   Join us as we discuss: The evolving world of investing with confident, educated investors Millennials and Gen-Zers becoming more engaged in their investing  The challenges of launching Fintech in foreign countries What is the future for Pearler as Fintech continues to expand   To ensure that you never miss an episode of Payments Innovation, subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or here and don't forget to check out our YouTube!  Until next time!

HRchat Podcast
Engaging Gen Z with Tina Zwolinski and Cynthia Jenkins, skillsgapp

HRchat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 25:06


Did you know that Gen Z constitutes over one-quarter of the total population of the world? This means 2 billion people are Gen Zers! Many of whom are about to join, or are already entering, the workforce. In this episode, we consider ways to engage with Gen Zers. Our guests today are Tina Zwolinski and Cynthia Jenkins, the Co-founders of skillsgapp, the first company to offer customized, location-based gaming apps focused on helping Generation Z gain career and pathway awareness along with the middle and soft skills necessary to participate in the skills-based jobs sector that includes manufacturing and other technical industries.Questions For Tina and Cynthia Include: Can you give an overview of skillsgapp?How do these games help students prepare for possible careers?In terms of engaging with Gen Zers - what's so unique about their generation?Why should the HR community take an interest in the games that skillsgapp are creating?How can skillsgapp help HR departments with recruiting and building their workforce pipelines?Let's say you are working with a company and students are playing a game specifically designed for their industry, what kind of data is available to the HR and recruiting departments? How should they interpret the data and what would the steps be in reaching out to players they might be interested in?More About Tina ZwolinskiTina is the CEO and Co-founder of skillsgapp. Prior to founding skillsgapp, Tina launched and led ZWO, a branding and marketing firm focused on economic and workforce development and generational consumer brands. Tina serves on the national board for Fostering Great Ideas, a non-profit working to improve the experience for every teen and child in foster care. She also serves on the Academic Advisory Council for the national Skilled Trades Alliance, on the South Carolina Association of Continuing Higher Education board, and on the board of Greenville Professional Women's Forum. Tina also mentors middle and high school youth.More About Cynthia JenkinsCynthia is the CMO and Co-founder of skillsgapp. Prior to skillsgapp, Cynthia forged a decades-long career in marketing and creative development for several global brands with ZWO, Firebrand Media, and as the CEO of her own Advertising PR firm, CPJ & CO among other well-established organizations. Over her career, Cynthia gained in-depth experience within a range of industries, including workforce, manufacturing, talent recruitment, colleges/universities, student and senior housing, apps/services, and economic development agencies.We do our best to ensure editorial objectivity. The views and ideas shared by our guests and sponsors are entirely independent of The HR Gazette, HRchat Podcast and Iceni Media Inc.   

Girl, Take the Lead!
36. Part 2 of 2 - A Discussion: Susan Cain's Quiet, The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking

Girl, Take the Lead!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 26:14


Andrea Boerries, Consultant, Member of Society International Development, DGVN (United Nations Association Germany) and DGAP (German Council of Foreign Relations), terrific thought partner, joins Yo to discuss Susan Cain's book, Quiet. Andrea brings a global perspective to help us see being an introvert as a human phenomenon we can be proud to be. Because of the depth of our conversation and richness of the content, we decided to make this into two parts. Here's how the discussion went: · How has the book uncovered our own tendencies toward being an introvert? · How can companies help acknowledge introverts in their training efforts? · Are there characteristics of Gen Zers that could be more introverted than other generations? · How did reading this book change our thinking about being an introvert? · How can teachers and other leaders help introverts learn to be comfortable leading? During the episode, Andrea mentioned a few additional sources that might be helpful: 1. German Book, English translation Jennifer B. Kahnweiler (2018) The Introverted Leader: Building on your Quiet Strength 2nd ed, Berrett-Koehler Publishers; Germany. 2. Aguas, J. (2019) Millenial and Generation Z's Perspectives on Leadership Effectiveness in Emerging Leadership Journeys Vol. 13, Issue 1, @Regent University School of Business and Leadership 3. Prof. Dr. Amarendra Bushan Dhiraj, (03/24/2022), Quote on Satya Nadella, CEO and Chairman, Microsoft, Redmond, WA. in CEO World Magazine, @ceoworld.biz. More about Andrea: Andrea grew up in Central Germany's beautiful Taunus area, close to Frankfurt. She spent her Senior year at Carlisle High School, PA. After graduation in 1981 and finishing her German diploma, she spent 2 years traveling the world as an air hostess with Lufthansa, went to Paris, France and received a language diploma, worked in a consultancy and got hired as an event manager in an advertising agency in Hamburg. She went on to work in the advertising business as a client consultant while pursuing a degree in Marketing and Communication. She started her family in 1994, moved to Silicon Valley and stayed for 10 years. In 2007, her daughter got very sick and she changed her life style completely to become healthier and strong to best support her family during this time. She became a yoga teacher but had a severe accident which led to numerous surgeries and couldn't continue teaching yoga. She always enjoyed following politics, and after participating in a few online classes (Women's Health and HR, Stanford, Sustainability, Columbia, Intro to Intl. Development, Cambridge), she settled for studying International Development at University of Cambridge, England. While in Cambridge, she volunteered as an intern for NGOs in Kenia, Myanmar and India. She also worked as a volunteer in the Hamburg refugee program for a year in school administration and founded and built a refugee camp library. She received an invite to further her education in Sustainability in a summer program at the UN Systems Staff College in Bonn. She graduated from Cambridge and went on to pursue a bachelor's degree in Political science at University of Hamburg, while working as an intern and later student employee for a Federal German development project in Youth employment, SIFA (Skills Initiative for Africa) in Johannesburg in cooperation with eight African countries. She has three grown children 20, 25 and 28 yrs. old. Ways to reach Andrea: Email: aboerries904@gmail.com Ways to reach Yo: Email: yo@yocanny.com

Helping Families Be Happy
Let's Talk About Gen-Z with John Schlimm

Helping Families Be Happy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 40:05


In today's episode of the “Helping Families Be Happy” podcast, host Christopher Robins, Co-founder of Familius Publishing (A Husband, Father, Author, Fisherman, Backpacker, and Aspirational Musician based in the Central Valley of California) talks with guest John Schlimm, Harvard Trained Educator, Artist, Advocates, International Award-Winning Author about what would Gen Z do, and what we can learn from this magnificent and inspiring Generation?   Episode Highlights 01:17 – Christopher introduces John and shares about his work toward Gen Z. John is an author of Children's Picture Book (The Star jumped over the moon) and the upcoming (What Would Gen Z Do?) 03:00 – Christopher enquires from John about who is it that defines or decides that certain years become a certain type of generation, and what that even means. 05:05 – John discusses the stereotypes about Gen Z. 07:22 – John reveals that what he has learned from Gen Z is to always be the first one to initiate conversation. Oftentimes we as Non-Gen Z adults have to take that first step and ask the first question, initiate that conversation. 09:40 – John recognizes how open and courageous Gen Z was, unlike any other generation to be sharing their mental health challenges and struggles. 11:50 – Although Gen Zs are open and courageous and tell us anything we want to know about their mental health or their thoughts on it. But as a generation, they do have the highest suicide rate in history, states John. 13:09 - There's a lot more learning and understanding that we need to address, states Christopher. 15:10 – John shares that Gen Z has taught him about gaming and gamers, this stereotype that they have had since the PacMan days of the lazy kid sitting in a dark basement maybe someone even in their 20s and 30s sitting in mom and dad's basement just playing video games all day letting their brain and life waste away is not accurate. 17:18 – Christopher says, there's so much to embrace about new generations and their innovation.  19:17 – John has started encouraging Gen Zs to put a section on their resumes, if they're active gamers, especially if they are in competition and are winning competitions. 21: 40 – John encourages Non-Gen Z adults to ask Gen Zs about their tattoos. 23:00 – What needs to happen with education, discusses John. 27:10 - If we don't deliver then as educators, Gen Zers are already turning to YouTube and other sources to teach themselves, mentions John. 29:00 – One of the funniest parts about Gen Z and certainly something unexpected was when they started telling him how much they love the 1980s culture of movies, music, fashion, etc. 30:28 - It is nice of a stereotype as it is because they're looking at us through the lens of the music, movies, big hair, fashion, and the neon, says John. 33:49 – Christopher asks John that every chapter in his book ends with two questions, one for the reader to ask themselves and one for the reader to ask Gen Zers. He asks, why it was important to him to do that for every chapter. 35:15 - This book in many ways is for parents, teachers, employers, and people who are working with this wonderful generation on an everyday basis, says Christopher. 37:00 – John gives an example of an activity that is helpful for us to engage in with Gen Z and Y. Three Key Points John says his number one piece of advice when it comes to Gen Z is if we want to know something, just ask them. One of the ad-raps that Gen Z give is that they seem so quiet and introspect or introverted and that's when they come off as being maybe a little bit aloof or rude in social settings. So, what he has learned after talking to 1000s of Gen Zers now across the country is that it's not that they don't have anything to say, but again, and again, they tell him that many of them have social anxiety. John says - the more skill-based we can make every facet of education, it's better. Especially for Gen Z as they want to learn skills. So, the traditional model of lecture, homework, test, and repeat, just doesn't cut it for them anymore. That's not to say that we have to do away with that model completely. There is still a place where lecturers are needed. Homework for sure is needed but if we as academic culture, and academic society, those of us who are in the academic world can take a look at every class we teach, and transition as much of it as possible to be in a skill-based model that's going to better serve our students and give them what they need. John explains the reason for having two questions in every chapter of his book. He wanted this to be interactive on different levels, not only as a way for the reader to get to know Gen Zers better, but he also in that process wanted the reader to get to know themselves a little better and to check in with themselves and ask themselves the questions about how do I perceive my mental health? So, it became a great opportunity with those two questions at the end of each chapter for the reader to check in with themselves about the topic at hand, but also then to ask Gen Zers because again, he's all about facilitating better communication between Gen Zers, and the rest of the world. So, he thought that those two questions allowed that to happen and gave some guidance and even sort of permission to the reader to engage in a better line of communication with themselves and with Gen Z.   Tweetable Quotes “The age range of Gen Z years is 10 to 25.” – John Schlimm “Mental health part of Gen Z is what initially drew me to these young people.” - John Schlimm “They've pulled me more into the realm of mental health advocacy.” - John Schlimm “I went to the source rather than trying to make up answers in my head or rely on stereotypes.” - John Schlimm “But for Generation Z, first of all, gaming has become a bona fide sport.” - John Schlimm “The US military are now actively recruiting gamers to come work for them.” - John Schlimm “One of the things I learned early on from Gen Z as well as they are taking the art of the attack to a whole new level of sentiment and storytelling.” - John Schlimm “As an artist and a storyteller, I'm fascinated by tattoos.” - John Schlimm “It's all about at the end of the day having fun and connection.” - John Schlimm Resources Mentioned Helping Families be Happy Podcast Apple John Schlimm: Website Podcast Editing  

The Glossy Podcast
Irina Lazareanu on the ‘indie sleaze' vibe shift: ‘It's not a trend. It's a feeling of expression'

The Glossy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 47:48


From getting discovered by Chanel's former creative director Karl Lagerfeld to becoming his muse and eventually a supermodel, Irina Lazareanu has decades worth of experience in fashion. "It was very much being at the right place at the right time," said Lazareanu on the latest episode of the Glossy Podcast. "I could never be [the perfect model]. I had to find something that was completely mine. And I had to stick to that conviction that I'm still going to show up like [myself]. I'm not going to change because everybody else looks a certain way. [Being different] was terrifying at 18." Staying true to herself came with a lot of rejection, she said, but it was worth it when Lagerfeld noticed her at a casting call. From there, Lazareanu's career took off, and unbeknownst to her at the time, she ruled the early aughts runway. Two decades into her career, Lazareanu has had a lot of time to reflect on her upbringing and ascension to superstardom. She published her first book "Runway Bird" in April, an insight into her whirlwind career along with the people who helped her along the way. Below are additional highlights from the conversation, which have been lightly edited for clarity. The social media effect "It's good that people are using their platforms to talk about [issues in the fashion industry]. At the same time, I also think it's very important for somebody to pay their dues and do the work. If you have worked in fashion for years, you want to be paid for your work. But if you had a viral video on TikTok because you did a funny dance and all of a sudden, you want to be paid millions of dollars when people [like] journalists, models, stylists, designers, et cetera have worked for 20 or 30 years to get somewhere [then] I don't agree with that. Your work needs to also reflect your value and what you bring to the industry." Pioneering the "indie sleaze" trend "Indie Sleaze as the Gen Zers call it was just called indie [when I was growing up]. It was an amazing time in music and fashion in the early 2000s where you had groups like The Libertines coming and creating this movement that wasn't grunge. It was post-grunge. It had a little bit of the '90s baggy jeans, dirty hair and ripped jeansthing going on, but it was also mixed with glamorous aspects. It wasn't about following trends and wearing brands, it was about getting through your day and surviving it. That's how I look at it. It was authentic. It's not a trend and it's not a movement. It was a feeling of expression."

The PR Maven Podcast
Episode 204: How Publicists and Marketers Can Begin To Adapt to Web3

The PR Maven Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 9:39


The online world is changing. Web3 is here, powered by millennials and Gen Zers who are morphing the internet into a more interactive playing field for all of us. As publicists and marketers, our new challenge is to change with the times and advance our usage of online technologies. We need to keep up with the rest of the world since there is a new age of consumers with new demands. There is a new age of clients, meaning that our client service will have to look different. Web 1.0 was not much more advanced than television. It was not a very interactive medium. Websites dating back to the 1990s came across as extremely flat, with minimal opportunities for user interactivity. Trust me: They seemed like pieces of paper turned digital - very, very basic stuff. In the early 2000s, Web 2.0 shifted to user interactivity. Whereas Web 1.0 was more static, Web 2.0 enhanced connectivity through social media platforms, public forums, wikis and much more. Websites and applications leveraged user-generated content for everyday consumers - from Myspace and Twitter to Wikipedia, which now attracts billions of global visitors each month (including editors who curate content). Now comes Web3, the next phase of the internet. Continue reading here. The article read in this episode originally appeared on the Forbes Agency Council CommunityVoice™ in July 2022.   Activate The PR Maven® Flash Briefing on your Alexa Device.  Join The PR Maven® Facebook group page.  Sign up for email notifications for when new episodes are released.

The S.A.L.T. Podcast
I Love God, But I Hate Church

The S.A.L.T. Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 61:55


On this episode of TheSALTPod, Jay and Jas break down the facts about millennials and Gen Zers moving further and further away from church and the reasons why. Scriptures in this episode: Romans 12:4-5, Romans 15:5-7, Hebrew 10:25 (NIV) Songs of the week: "Make Room" By: Jonathan McReynolds, "He's Preparing Me" By: Daryl Coley Hispanic Heritage Month - September 15th - October 15th Leave a comment on Apple Podcasts or our Instagram page (@wethesaltpodcast).

Music Talks
An amalgam of youthful antiquity

Music Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 29:17


Founded in 2015, the Beijing Traditional Chinese Orchestra's musical style has an authentic Beijing sound with creative improvisations. Li Changjun is director of the ensemble and shares with us some intriguing stories about how the orchestra has made a breakthrough among Millennials and Gen Zers.

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots
441: Creative Startups with Alice Loy

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 40:47


Alice Loy is a Founding Partner at DaVinci Ventures and the Co-Founder and CEO of Creative Startups, the leading global startup accelerator and company builder for design, food, immersive, and creative companies. Victoria and Chad talk with Alice about what she means by creative companies, how much judgment she must pass as an investor with a love for the "weird and wonderful," and some of the challenges faced in bringing diversity to the rest of the accelerator world. DaVinci Ventures (https://www.davinciventures.co/) Creative Startups (https://www.creativestartups.org/) Follow Creative Startups on Twitter (https://twitter.com/createstartups), Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/createstartups/), Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/createstartups/), Substack (https://creativestartups.substack.com/), YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1SCTGPWdes6ArrYJU0YJ-g), or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/global-center-for-cultural-entrepreneurship/). Follow Alice on Twitter (https://twitter.com/aliceloy) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/aliceloy/). Alice's Blog (http://www.aliceloy.com/) Etkie (https://etkie.com/) Embodied Labs (https://www.embodiedlabs.com/) Follow thoughtbot on Twitter (https://twitter.com/thoughtbot) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/150727/). Become a Sponsor (https://thoughtbot.com/sponsorship) of Giant Robots! Transcript: CHAD: This is the Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots Podcast, where we explore the design, development, and business of great products. I'm your host, Chad Pytel. VICTORIA: And I'm your other host, Victoria Guido. And with us today is Alice Loy, Founding Partner at DaVinci Ventures and the Co-Founder and CEO of Creative Startups, the leading global startup accelerator and company builder for design, food, immersive, and creative companies. CHAD: Alice, thank you so much for joining us. ALICE: Thanks for having me. CHAD: Can you tell us a little bit more about Creative Startups in general but also what you mean by creative companies specifically? Like, isn't every company creative? [laughs] ALICE: Yeah, it's so funny. That's often the first question. And sometimes people I can feel their sense of indignation in thinking maybe I think they're not creative. CHAD: [laughs] ALICE: First of all, the creative industries are pretty well defined globally by the World Bank and entities like that. I'll come back to that. Yes, all human beings are creative. I like to joke that that's what got us out of caves in the first place. But more importantly, all entrepreneurs are very creative regardless of what sector you're operating in. So when we're talking about creative, we're just referencing the set of industries that are measured as the quote, "creative industries." They include film, our museums, design certainly is a core element of that. Increasingly, we're seeing more and more people move toward the creative industries as mechanized labor takes over things like building cars or even running data analysis. CHAD: Has getting support and funding and that kind of thing traditionally been easy in the creative space or hard? ALICE: No. I know you know the answer to that question because you're a designer. [laughs] CHAD: I usually don't ask questions that I don't know the answers to, so... [laughs] ALICE: But it's a great question because actually what it uncovers, you guys, is that it has changed dramatically for people who I call creatives or creators in the last two or three years. It's a little tough to measure with the pandemic, but we know at least $2 billion have gone into platforms that support creators, businesses led by creators. The creative industry has really turned a corner. So when we started this work 15-16 years ago, I co-founded the organization with a gentleman named Tom, who is now in his 80s. But he had come out of what's called the cultural economy, which was the precursor to the creative economy. And, of course, now we're all living in the creator economy. So like every other industry, it evolves. And one turn in this evolution is that creatives are now understood as economic drivers, not just people who add nice flourishes to things at the end. When you're building new products, people think about engineers, but it's really a creative process. And people increasingly bring in creatives from the outset to think about how the design process can be more humanized, can be more effective to solve people's problems so that your products really delight customers instead of just get the job done. CHAD: Is there something you can point to that triggered or pushed along that turning point? ALICE: Well, not to be overly philosophical, but I would say the general sense in the U.S. and increasingly in other countries where we work is that human beings don't want to be cogs in a wheel. They don't want to just be bit parts in a system. When you talk to Gen Zers, they understand that they are complete human beings. And somehow, I think older generations bought into the idea that you have the same job for 40 years. You go to work at 8:00; you come home at 5:00. You repeat the next day. I think the sense in the economy is that people want to be fulfilled. If they're going to give that much time to a job, they want it to be meaningful and valuable. And they want it to solve some of the big problems. Frankly, big tech is not approaching the world in that way these days. And so I think younger people are looking for values-aligned opportunities. And the creative economy is a space where values tend to align with really reaching the full potential of each human being instead of just extracting their physical and occasionally mental labor toward building a capitalist system. And so I think that zeitgeist has helped open the door. I also then think when you look at the kinds of technologies that are being utilized, they're still fundamentally about communicating ideas, and art, and inspiration. That's what Facebook is. That's what TikTok is. That's what even news channels are. And as more people come into the world of saying, "Oh, I can share my ideas, my art, my jokes, my music, my whatever," they see themselves as creatives, and they go, "I wonder how I could get paid for that?" I mean, there are a multitude of factors weaving together to shift. I also think, quite frankly, the SaaS investment area has become so saturated. I mean, if you walk down the street in San Francisco, if you don't bump into three venture capitalists who are SaaS investors, it's like, what are you doing? And so I think other types of investors with a different background maybe are saying, hmm, what about this area over here? How could we make money? So that would be another thread I would say is helping drive. CHAD: It strikes me that what you've shared sort of creates a self-fulfilling cycle too. ALICE: Yes. CHAD: Because once creatives have examples of other creatives that have done this, it becomes an aspirational thing that they understand that they, too, could do themselves. ALICE: Yeah, 100%. So our goal when we started the startup accelerator...we launched the first accelerator for creative founders in 2013 in the world. And we said to ourselves, if we get one company that becomes the poster child for this creative movement and demonstrating that you can be, as we like to say, weird and wonderful and build a company, then we will unleash a flood of people who now see themselves in that light. We were very fortunate in that we got that one poster child, and that has really helped us paint a picture that's clear for a lot of people where they see themselves as entrepreneurs, even though they're a tattoo artist or they're a hard rock Navajo metal band from the reservation or whatever their background is. Now they look and go, "Oh yeah, I could do that," and they certainly could. Being an entrepreneur is really hard but not intellectually challenging; it's more heart-challenging. CHAD: Oh, that's really interesting, more heart challenging. ALICE: Yeah. I mean, you're an entrepreneur. You guys have built a business, so you know that being an entrepreneur is more about being able to just sort of stay calm in the waves than it is about building the world's best boat and being able to steer toward that destination no matter how the winds blow. CHAD: Yeah, I've often referred to it almost as grit, like the ability to, no matter what happened yesterday, get up and do it again. ALICE: Get up, yeah. And unfortunately, I think there's a myth, maybe at least in the U.S., that what drives most people to get up and go, again, is money. And I don't think that's true at all. I think what drives people to get up and go again is their love of customers or end users. And their feeling they're just irrefutable despite there being no evidence feeling that this is going to work. This is going to make a difference in people's lives. And that's why the sort of slog. And there are days when...one of the things we always start a Creative Startup's program with is find your tribe. Cling to the people who believe in you. Ignore the naysayers. The naysayers are ten to one. Blow them off and cling to the people who say, "Wow, dude, that sounds cool. I bet you could do that." Yes, do another coffee meeting with that person. [laughs] Because sometimes you just need people who can say, "You got this. You got this. Just do another day, man." What do you guys do? Let me ask, what do you guys do when things get really rocky for you? How do you guys collect that internal okay, I'm going to get back in the saddle. CHAD: I've talked about this with people before, and I actually think that this is going to be a non-answer, but I'll do my best. I actually don't know exactly what does this for me. But I do know a side effect is I also don't celebrate the wins as much as other people wish that I did. And I think it's because I just move on very quickly from things. I don't dwell on the downs as much. I also don't dwell on the highs as much. And so I don't know if it's just something about me that does it or I just trained myself to do that. But it does have some downsides to it. ALICE: That was a real answer. That wasn't a non-answer at all. CHAD: [laughs] ALICE: Victoria, what about you? VICTORIA: I think to add on to what Chad said is kind of that thoughtbot mentality of viewing things as an experiment. And so if you come in with that mentality, like, this is the experiment. We'll see if it works or it doesn't. And if it doesn't work, there are some lessons to be learned, and we can grow from that and do better next time. And if it does work, great; [chuckles] this is cool. And I actually like to celebrate the wins a lot. I like to really dwell in those moments and feel like we did something right. We should remember this and learn from that as well and then try to repeat it, right? ALICE: Yeah. Oh, I love that. CHAD: You mentioned that when you were first starting Creative Startups, you hoped to get one win, and you did. Which one was it? ALICE: To be clear, as a mom, we don't have favorite children, okay? [laughter] And there are different companies that have had enormous impact in different ways, so let me tick some off. Let me name first Etkie. It's a design company built by a woman named Sydney, who grew up in rural New Mexico with a passion for working with indigenous communities. Her design company makes spectacular handmade bracelets, average price point around 250 bucks. And she sells in about 100 different high-end galleries around the world. She creates 40 jobs for Navajo women on the reservation at twice the annual pay that they would receive if they worked any other job there. Pretty astounding, pretty astounding. Those women have gone on to reinvest their money in things like rebuilding the school, putting in wells for family. The Navajo Nation lacks drinking water all over the place. So really fundamentally shifting the economic and social trajectory of that community. She designs every single bracelet with a woman, and you'll see they're named after the women. And they just do a recollection process where the woman recalls something from her childhood, and they weave a story around that. And then, they create the bracelet design. They're beautiful, Etkie, E-T-K-I-E. The next one I would say that has really inspired me is founded by another woman who does...now she's doing more XR AR, But they started as a virtual reality company doing films for medical providers who needed to better understand the disease experience of their patients in order to come up with not just solutions to their lived experience but actual medical procedures, and technologies, and pharmaceuticals that could shape the outcomes of that patient. So that company is called Embodied Labs, founded by a woman named Carrie and her team out of LA. And they're now selling to hospital systems across California and increasingly in the Midwest, et cetera, changing thousands of lives. And then the one that most people do point to us and say, "Hey, good job," is a company called Meow Wolf. We were their first investor back in 2014. They've gone on to raise upwards of $250 million. They're kind of a competitor now to Disney. So they're in the immersive art and experience realm. They had a million visitors in their Denver spot. So far this year, they've had about a million visitors in their Las Vegas spot. They were founded here in Santa Fe, our hometown. And we didn't even know they existed. They didn't know we existed. [chuckles] The night before our application was to close, somebody wandered into a meeting they were having where they were talking about dissolving the art collective. And somebody said, "Oh before you guys make a decision, you should check out this thing." [laughs] So in some ways, it was angels on our shoulders in that it's a homegrown company, and Santa Fe is a small city. We needed a shift here around our creative economy. And they needed somebody to believe in them. They had gone to every business support organization they could find and had been told, "Well, you're probably trying to start an arts nonprofit." And they thought, "That's not really our vision. That's not...we want to build a company. We think art is something people will pay for if it's put forward in a way that blows your mind," and Meow certainly blows your mind. CHAD: That's really interesting. I mean, I totally get why people would say that just because...but that's like saying...when Disney was getting started [chuckles] people saying "It sounds like you're trying to create an arts nonprofit." ALICE: Yes. And I'm guessing a lot of people did. The future happens when we're all looking backwards, and very few people are looking forwards. And so I think it's important for entrepreneurs to keep in mind you're probably just statistically talking to somebody who's looking backwards because human beings tend to do that more than they look forward. And so better to find people early on who say, "You know, I'm not exactly sure what you're talking about because you're the expert in your startup, and I'm not. But let me ask you this, how could I be helpful?" That's the right question. If they give you an answer and they don't even know what you're talking about, you probably don't need their help. And that's hard for entrepreneurs because there are so many doubters out there that you have to kind of keep plucking through to find the one or two people who say, "That's really interesting. That seems like it might work. How could I help?" Did you guys have somebody at thoughtbot early on who you can remember sort of said, "Huh, that's interesting. How could I help?" CHAD: I think it was our early clients who most did that. ALICE: Oooh, yeah. CHAD: Because we're a consulting company, because we're an agency, finding clients who believed in us and wanted to work with us in part because they liked us was an important aspect to that. If it wasn't for those early clients, no amount of passion would have kept us going because we needed to support ourselves. ALICE: What a great insight, honestly. I think the sort of rhetoric around passion is really abused. Because there's now this sense that, well, if you have passion, you can build a business, and that's just not true. That's not true. I hate to say it, and people are always stunned when I say it because they think that I lead Creative Startups; I must be the core passion champion. But here's what I would say is if you have a passion for solving your client or your customers' problems, then you might have a business. [laughs] There's a huge difference there. There's a difference between well; this is what I want to make. This is what I love doing. That is not necessarily going to answer the question is anybody paying you to do that? And I like to encourage people to think about if you have passion for doing something, you probably have a hobby. If you do stuff that people want to pay you to do, you might have a business. And crossing that bridge is an analytical and a heart-wrenching process. Because usually, what you end up with is I mostly get to do what I love to do. But I do a lot of stuff I don't want to do because that's what building a business is, just like being a parent or any other really amazing, wonderful thing in life. Running a business is not just about doing what you love doing all day; it's mostly about doing what people want to pay you to do. And if you're doing what people want to pay you to do and you love it, that is beautiful. That is a blessed position to be in. It's rare. And you have to ask yourself very real questions and be brutally honest with yourself, or you could waste your retirement savings. You could spend a year or two away from your family before you figure that out, not to be depressing. [laughs] But we always say from our programs we look...not from our more advanced accelerator programs, but we also provide programs that are more; how do you figure out this idea? You have this idea, or you have what we call lucky revenue. A lot of creatives get lucky revenue where their friend sees them doing something, and they go, "Man, would you do one for me?" And then somebody else wants one, and now they have lucky revenue. And they're ready to say, "I think this might be a business." And those people we say you have three outcomes from our programs. One, you realize this is not a business. It's just not going to make any money. The business model does not pan out. Two, this might be a business if I do it differently, and now I need to figure out if I want to do it differently. And three is, yeah, I'm on track. Now I got to go grow it. And all three are valid outcomes. Because we've worked with people who came to us late, took out a loan. And we said, "Well, what's your plan for paying it back?" "Well, we don't know." That's bad. That's really dangerous. That can ruin families' economic futures. And so we're much happier to catch people before that happens so they can ask those critical questions about is this really a market opportunity? Is this a business I want to build? Is this, therefore, a business opportunity for me? And those questions are deceptively simple. In our more advanced programs, we focus on, okay, you've got revenue, you've got traction. You're ready to start maybe thinking about what's the next three years? Where are your cash flow gaps? Where's your, as people like to call it, the valley of death that you have to cross as you grow? What kind of financing can you go raise to help cross that valley? How do you get to 10 million in revenue, 50 million in revenue? People are at different stages of growing a business. MID-ROLL AD: Are you an entrepreneur or start-up founder looking to gain confidence in the way forward for your idea? At thoughtbot, we know you're tight on time and investment, which is why we've created targeted 1-hour remote workshops to help you develop a concrete plan for your product's next steps. Over four interactive sessions, we work with you on research, product design sprint, critical path, and presentation prep so that you and your team are better equipped with the skills and knowledge for success. Find out how we can help you move the needle at: tbot.io/entrepreneurs. CHAD: How much judgment do you pass as an investor as people who are reading applications about who gets into the accelerator program? How much judgment do you pass, and how do you strike that balance? ALICE: That's kind of a peek behind the curtain; how do people really pick companies? Different people do it differently. For us, we really hue toward weird and wonderful. We actually prefer...and this goes against what people say you should do, [laughs] but we kind of go against the grain in general. And it's worked out. We prefer to look at things that we don't totally understand partly because often creatives don't speak business speak. So I'm pretty turned off by (I'm going to make something up.) the Harvard Business School grad who has a music-sharing platform and doesn't play music. I'm like, how would you know about a music-sharing platform? Whereas a musician who comes with their garage band and they happen to have a computer science degree from the college down the road and they've invented this thing and all of a sudden, it's taking off, and they're not even sure why. I'm listening, and I'm like, oh, that's really interesting. A lot of creatives tend to pick up on opportunities in the market, and they don't frame it so much as a business opportunity because that's just not the language that they've learned to speak yet. But they have an insight into a particular sector or a need that people who are not really in that space... It feels like a lot of the startup world has been overtaken by people who want to be startup founders but don't necessarily have their hands dirty in a particular sector where they know how to really solve a problem that either a lot of people have, or that very few people have but that a lot of people have in the future if you build the market. And that's where you make a lot of money is if you build a market. So we look for things like that. So what does that mean when we're reading applications? We don't ask for financial statements. We ask, how much money did you make last year, and where do you think most of that money came from? We're more interested in are they interested in analyzing their business so they understand where growth could come from next? Instead of, what is your financial statements? Most of the entrepreneurs who come through our programs don't have financial statements. They might not even have a cash flow projection, which is really exciting. We have entrepreneurs who come to us who...I'll tell you a story. We had an entrepreneur come to us who ran underground music clubs in old houses in Denver. And he was like, "I think this is a business, but I don't know anything about business. I just started hosting these a few years ago." And I said, "Well, how many people...like, if you took an average year..." and I said, "You don't charge anything?" And he said, "No, people just hear about it." And I'm thinking, okay, so you get a couple thousand. "How many people in an average year come to your basement music club thing?" "50,000." [laughs] Yeah, I think you might have a business. I mean, those are the kinds of things that you think, wow, why did that take off? What is going on there? That's really interesting. Let's talk. And he had a mohawk. He played in a metal band. Business was not his deal. And so that wasn't the lens he was applying. I think a lot of designers and a lot of people who invent products and solutions start with; I'm doing this for myself, wouldn't this be rad? Without even knowing that, they touched a nerve in the market that now is kind of catching on fire. Those are really exciting entrepreneurs for us to work with. They do have to turn a corner on I'm building a business now. I'm not just doing something that's cool with my friends. And that can be a difficult place because it means you have to cross a bridge into the world of finance, and you're probably going to have to hire product managers. And now you go hire that Harvard Business School grad and they work for you. And a lot of people frankly don't want to turn that corner. And I get it because when you come back to that topic of, is this values-aligned? A lot of that world is not yet totally values-aligned. That's shifting, more impact investors, more investors who want to see more different types of people starting companies, but we're not there yet. And so there's this cultural clash. When creatives walk toward that space, they go, ew, I've been fighting against the man my whole life. And now you want me to get in the car and go on a long road trip with them? No thanks. [laughs] And I'm sitting there with the Doritos going, yeah, man, but I got all the good munchies, let's go. It often does work out. But I also understand why people say, "You know, that's just not my deal now." VICTORIA: Yeah. And you have a tremendous amount of diversity in your alumni. ALICE: We do, yeah. VICTORIA: And so do you find that there are some challenges in bringing in that group to the rest of the accelerator world? ALICE: Yeah, you know, funny, I was thinking about that yesterday. So about 70% of our alumni, and this has been true across the board from day one, are people of color or women. At one point, it was around 30% were women of color. I haven't looked at that number in a while. We've worked with about 550 companies worldwide. In the Middle East, half of our alumni are women-led companies. In the U.S., we are fortunate to be able to work with a lot of indigenous communities. New Mexico is home to a large indigenous population. And it's a lot of the reason our culture is so dynamic and beautiful. So for us, that was always a no-brainer that that was where a lot of the interesting creativity would come from and that that was where the rising markets were. We, for example, accelerated and were the first investor in a company called Native Realities, which is a comic book. And they founded the first indigenous Comic Con, which is now called Indigenous Pop X worldwide. And they saw obviously before even Black Panther, and it became kind of like people said, "Oh yeah, superheroes come from all communities." They saw that that market was rising. There are 300 million indigenous people worldwide. There are two comic book companies. Let that sink in. [laughs] It's like, oh my God, what is the possibility then not just around comic books, but gaming, animation, all kinds of creative tools, film, music? That's a huge market that has not been served at all. And we understood early on that that was an area where people want to tell their own stories. People want to understand the stories of other people. And then people want to build new stories together across those cultural or geographic boundaries. And the technology had shifted such that that was possible. In 1980, that wasn't really possible. The distribution channels of film were such that you had to raise money in Hollywood and have Tom Hanks and whatever. That's just not true anymore. So we saw that early on, and that has helped attract a lot of entrepreneurs who share our passion for really telling those stories. However, I would say for people who want to support rising entrepreneurs out of what I'm going to call distressed communities or communities that have been literally discouraged from becoming their own economic leaders is that the burden that most of the people bear who are building businesses, for example, from Black communities, or native communities, or women in the Middle East, those people tend to bear a larger burden than someone from a more privileged background like myself. They're often the person in their family and for their community who is helping to ensure that people get the health care they need, that that kid was able to visit the college that they wanted to apply to. They become that sort of anchor of support for more people than in situations where we have more support and more what I call margin. They have really little margin. And so to ask them to, for example, join an accelerator full-time for 12 weeks that just doesn't work. Because the decision that they're making, you know, from a very privileged position, we can say, "Well, either you're dedicated to your business, or you're not." But really, what we're saying to them is, well, either you do your business, or you love your family and your culture. That's the question we're asking them, and that's a totally unfair question. That's a ridiculous question. Every single one of us would say, "I love my family. Thanks, see ya." CHAD: So how do you balance that? ALICE: Well, it's tough. I mean, first of all, we have adopted in the programs where it's more for early-stage entrepreneurs, and we're opening doors to entrepreneurship. And we are being first and foremost patient, patient with they're crossing that threshold. We understand that our core outcome is that people come always saying, "I'm an entrepreneur. I'm ready for the journey." That means we do things like, first of all, we do all online. If possible, we do a meeting upfront, so everybody meets each other in person because that kind of sets a tone of just it's a lot of fun. We have food and drink, and we have a good time. And then we do 6 to 12 weeks online, and then we do a gathering at the end. And we build a community first and foremost of people who are understanding how they can help one another. So Creative Startups is a little different in how we do accelerators. We do not ever have people stand at the front of the room and tell people what they should do with their business partly because we're educators first and foremost, and we understand...I have a Ph.D. in entrepreneurship. I understand that entrepreneurs tend to be experiential learners, not all but many. And we're not going to be there in a year building their business. They're going to be building their business. We have to build their self-confidence. We have to build their ability to say, "I know how to row the boat. You're along for the ride." I'm just along for the ride. [laughs] That requires us to do things like, okay, so let's work on your business model and really carefully chunk out here's one piece of that. Let's go deeply into understanding that. Let's tackle the vocabulary. Let's look at how people talk about it online. Let's open that door culturally so that you can take that into your experiences and say, "Oh, I already kind of do that. I just use a different language," which is what a lot of designers do. A lot of designers, whatever your background, already do entrepreneurial processes. They use different language, and it's just a translation. It's literally just vocabulary. So we help people understand that the best way to figure out your client's needs are by listening; all people know that. If you want to understand someone else, listen, and unpacking that into then business speak a little bit, and then giving them opportunities to go do that in the real world. And being patient with how they might do that or why they couldn't get it done this week. Or maybe they want to come back with a different way of describing it than maybe a White person like me might describe what they experienced. And just giving a lot of latitude to people to have that own experience themselves. That honestly...I know that sounds very philosophical. But it breaks down into tactical things that we do in an accelerator that opens the door to a lot more entrepreneurs. And our Net Promoter Score is 9. Over 90% of people would recommend our program. People love our programs. And 70% of our alumni are still in business. So I think it's working. We have a lot of learning to do. We're doing an indigenous accelerator right now, and it's a lot of learning for me. It's very eye-opening. CHAD: As an accelerator specific to indigenous peoples, what made you decide to do that? Some people I know, thoughtbot included, sometimes hesitate to do things like that because we don't want...there's some hesitation around doing something like that. ALICE: So we share all of those hesitations, and we think they're spot on. We are doing this in partnership with a group called Creative Nations out of Colorado. They are all indigenous people. They're a new group. And we envision Creative Startups moving more toward a place of being kind of like the intel, you know, the old intel inside. We are inside, and we're an engine within another organization. So here in Santa Fe, we partnered with Vital Spaces, which serves Black and Brown creative entrepreneurs and artists. And our goal is to help build their capacity to be able to keep doing programs as they see fit for entrepreneurs. And we're standing by as they would like us to help. So we took that same approach with working with Creative Nations. It's been a fantastic partnership. The lead working with us is a woman named Kelly Holmes. She is Lakota Sioux. She's from the Cheyenne River Reservation. And she founded Native Max Media, which publishes Native Max Magazine, the world's first fashion magazine for indigenous entrepreneurs. She is a brilliant, creative entrepreneur. She is self-taught. She eked it out. She has been around ten years now. It's astounding. And you see the magazine, and it's spectacular. It is high glamour, beautiful. And it is reshaping the way not only indigenous people see themselves but how White people see indigenous people. And those reframed stories are so important to building a more equitable society. So I was over the moon to partner with her. Then I learned her mom is one of the few Lakota language teachers. So Lakota is her first language. Her mother teaches Lakota and teaches teachers how to teach Lakota. So she grew up with an educator. So she has taken to building this, again, patient, very exploratory online environment for indigenous entrepreneurs. And then I bring sometimes the more technical like, oh, you're asking a specific question about how to do structured interviews with customers. Sure, let me talk a little bit about that. But as we started out this conversation, you guys, entrepreneurship is not an intellectual challenge usually; it's a heart challenge. I don't mean that in a way to disparage how important it is to be really strategic and smart about your business. But I think at the outset especially, you just have to be able to hang in there and keep doing it. And then, as you grow into that opportunity, you start to see that the intellectual challenges unfold because your opportunities become more complex. But at this outset with Kelly, it's been a conversation with people who are frankly reframing themselves as business leaders, people who own businesses and have employees based on their creative output. And that's a really exciting space to work in. We wouldn't work in this space if we didn't have a partner who shared our vision and who wanted to be that native leader of a program like this. It just wouldn't really feel exciting. CHAD: I think that that's great advice and a framing that helps me think about the things that we've tried to do in the past and the things that we hope to do in the future and realizing that really genuinely partnering with someone in the actual community that we're trying to serve or to have an impact with is sometimes an important missing component that we need to incorporate. That'll help solve a lot of the hesitations that we might have around doing something. ALICE: Yeah, yeah. VICTORIA: Right. And we've all heard before that culture eats strategy for breakfast, which I think -- [laughs] ALICE: That's my favorite line, Victoria. You nailed it. VICTORIA: It makes sense that the more connected you are to your culture and to your community, that's where you'll be the most successful when your heart is in it. ALICE: Yeah. And I want to give sort of a plug for stepping outside of the zone of the way...I went to business school. I have an MBA. I'm really well-versed in that whole world. I'm married to a venture capitalist. He teaches how to do venture capital at Stanford. That whole world is very familiar to me. And it seems to not be helping us solve the problems that we have now as a society. And so one of the reasons I encourage people to go to those partners, go to those places where you're like, I don't fit in here; I don't understand what's going on here; these people speak a different cultural language, form, way of doing things, I encourage that because I think that for people who want to build a different world, we have to stop looking to the world that we already have. And we have to say, "Well, who does things differently? What could we learn?" One of the most beautiful things about working with the entrepreneurs in the cohort right now, the indigenous cohort, is they first talk about taking care of their people, that's first. And it's like, wow, if that's your entire frame, you start to make really different decisions in business. If you're talking about well, I want to take care of the people in my community; I want people to be healthy and happy and be able to pursue their own dreams; that's a really different frame of mind for a baseline for decision making. The other thing that Kelly talks about that I love (I'm stealing it from her.) is she talks about fighting for her business, fighting for her business. And that, to me, is such a great way to feel like, okay, if I'm fighting for my business, I know how much Creative Startups has achieved. I'm not fighting for myself. It's not my ego. It's none of that. It's fighting for my business so my business can keep having the impact. Everything that I think about now in terms of working with indigenous entrepreneurs is this has nothing to do with me. Their frame is very much my community, my people, my business, which is over there. And it's a humble way of understanding one's place. And that is a really exciting reframe for me to think about how we can solve problems like the climate crisis, like the disparity between rich and poor, like the disintegration of our democracy. What if we had a different frame? How could we solve problems differently, maybe better? So for us, these partnerships unlock a whole vast area of new thinking, new ways of doing business, new ways of taking care of other people. And at the end of the day, that's what gets me back in the rowboat [laughs] is this idea of, wow, we are having an impact on other people. And doing it with people who have a different starting point has really shaped a lot of the work that we do. CHAD: Well, I'm sorry that we have to wrap up. Otherwise, we could keep on going and solve the climate crisis and unraveling of our democracy, but -- [laughs] ALICE: Yeah, I have an appointment at 2:00 where I'm doing climate crisis. So I'll let you know how it goes. CHAD: Okay, wonderful. ALICE: [laughs] CHAD: Alice, thank you so much for joining the show and sharing everything with us. We really appreciate it. ALICE: Yeah, I was delighted to be with you guys and hope to continue the conversation. CHAD: You can subscribe to the show and find notes along with a complete transcript for this episode at giantrobots.fm. VICTORIA: And if you have questions or comments, email us at hosts@giantrobots.fm. CHAD: You can find me on Twitter at @cpytel. VICTORIA: And you can find me on Twitter @victori_ousg This podcast is brought to you by thoughtbot and produced and edited by Mandy Moore. CHAD: Thanks for listening, and see you next time. ANNOUNCER: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success. Special Guest: Alice Loy.

The Other Side of Midnight with Frank Morano
Sticky Fingers | 09-21-2022

The Other Side of Midnight with Frank Morano

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 212:21


On tonight's edition of the Other Side of Midnight: Frank starts things off by taking callers on a story regarding someone's private life and how much of it should affect their private life and then callers cue up for the Other Side of Governors Island segment. After, Frank shares his fly paper experience and then Michelle Caruso-Cabrera, CNBC Contributor & Formerly Chief International Correspondent joins Frank live from Italy to talk about ancestry and genealogy. Later, some talk about tipping, Gen Zers and their love for subtitles, and much more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Unsolicited Views
Episode 197: Can We Talk… About Baecations?

Unsolicited Views

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 47:33


This week the guys are back together to address some of the comments from the Gen Zers, talk about their first baecation, what good (or bad) communication looks like in different kinds of relationships, and more! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/baltimore-podcast-studio/message

FT Everything Else
How do young Brits feel about the monarchy?

FT Everything Else

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 28:18


This week we discuss how young people view the late Queen Elizabeth with journalist Imogen West-Knights and our own producer Lulu Smyth. For many Millennials and Gen Zers, the first royal succession in 70 years is also the first time they've considered their stance on the monarchy more broadly. And it's eliciting some mixed feelings. Then, we explore how we're spending money on culture now. The FT's US business editor Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson explains all the ways our post-pandemic restlessness is colliding with growing inflation. It turns out we're now more discerning in how we stay in and how we go out.Want to stay in touch? We love hearing from you. Email us at ftweekendpodcast@ft.com. We're on Twitter @ftweekendpod, and Lilah is on Instagram and Twitter @lilahrap.-------Links and mentions from the episode: Imogen's dispatch from Buckingham palace: https://on.ft.com/3eVMr50 The FT Weekend essay this week, ‘King Charles and the future of the monarchy': https://on.ft.com/3qPsVcM Edge and Lilah's conversation on Instagram live: https://www.instagram.com/reel/Ch20tSdJQ8v Imogen is on Twitter @ImogenWK. Edge is on Twitter @Edgecliffe. -------Special offers for FT Weekend listeners, from 50% off a digital subscription to a $1/£1/€1 trial can be found here: http://ft.com/weekendpodcast-------Original music by Metaphor Music. Mixing and sound design by Breen Turner and Sam GiovincoRead a transcript of this episode on FT.com Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

FT News Briefing
How do young Brits feel about the monarchy?

FT News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 28:18


This week we discuss how young people view the late Queen Elizabeth with journalist Imogen West-Knights and our own producer Lulu Smyth. For many Millennials and Gen Zers, the first royal succession in 70 years is also the first time they've considered their stance on the monarchy more broadly. And it's eliciting some mixed feelings. Then, we explore how we're spending money on culture now. The FT's US business editor Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson explains all the ways our post-pandemic restlessness is colliding with growing inflation. It turns out we're now more discerning in how we stay in and how we go out.Want to stay in touch? We love hearing from you. Email us at ftweekendpodcast@ft.com. We're on Twitter @ftweekendpod, and Lilah is on Instagram and Twitter @lilahrap.-------Links and mentions from the episode:Imogen's dispatch from Buckingham palace: https://on.ft.com/3eVMr50 The FT Weekend essay this week, ‘King Charles and the future of the monarchy': https://on.ft.com/3qPsVcM Edge and Lilah's conversation on Instagram live: https://www.instagram.com/reel/Ch20tSdJQ8v Imogen is on Twitter @ImogenWK. Edge is on Twitter @Edgecliffe. -------Special offers for FT Weekend listeners, from 50% off a digital subscription to a $1/£1/€1 trial can be found here: http://ft.com/weekendpodcast-------Original music by Metaphor Music. Mixing and sound design by Breen Turner and Sam GiovincoRead a transcript of this episode on FT.com Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Readout
Future of News Consumption

The Readout

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 21:37


Morning Consult media and entertainment analyst, Kevin Tran, joins the podcast to discuss how Gen Zers are less likely than their older counterparts to be aware of or have favorable views toward major news brands, and what that means for the future of news.

Under the Radar with Callie Crossley
Encore: How will future generations remember 9/11?

Under the Radar with Callie Crossley

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 58:00


For some of us, September 11th, 2001 still rings clear in our minds, even 20 years after the attacks. But newer generations have little to no memory of that tragic day — either having been too young to remember, or not yet born. Under The Radar is marking the upcoming 20th anniversary of 9/11 by reflecting on how Gen-Zers recognize an event that they learn about in history books. How does generational trauma affect those who didn't even live through the event? And, once it was clear that the 9/11 hijackers were Muslim, American Muslims became targets 20 years ago. The pain and anger of the tragedy drove anti-American sentiment as well as ongoing suspicion and misconception of Islam. Has public perception towards Muslims shifted, as the 20-year marker of 9/11 approaches? Under The Radar is examining the systemic and structural racism against Muslims that has long been embedded in the U.S. Guests: Garrett Graff, journalist and historian, whose latest book “The Only Plane in the Sky,” is the first comprehensive oral history of September 11th. Graff also serves as the director of the Aspen Institute's cybersecurity and technology program. Sam Sommers, experimental social psychologist, author, and professor at Tufts University. Dana Rose Garfin, trauma scholar and assistant professor at the University of California, Irvine. Amaney Jamal, the Edwards S. Sanford professor of politics at Princeton University, dean of the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs, director of the Mamdouha S. Bobst Center for Peace and Justice and author of "Race and Arab Americans Before and After 9/11." Journalist Malika Bilal, host of “The Take” podcast by Al Jazeera and former co-host of The Stream, a social-media led talk show on Al Jazeera English. Fatema Ahmad, executive director at Muslim Justice League, here in Boston.

Think Like A Founder
043: Gen Z Edition

Think Like A Founder

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 22:08


Season 5 of Think Like A Founder features Gen Zers and young founders disrupting the norm, creating new paths, and figuring out how they can make a positive impact on the planet. To kick off the season, SNP Co-Founder & CEO Maureen Taylor speaks with Daliana Morassuti, Thomas Dahlke (TK), and Sydney Thomas, her Gen Z Advisory Board, about what has shaped Gen Z, where they're coming from, and what their philosophy is. Presently, TK and Sydney are project managers at SNP. Daliana is the director of solution architecture. Think Like A Founder is produced by SNP Communications in San Francisco, California. Learn more about the Think Like A Founder podcast and curriculum by visiting us at https://snpnet.com/tlaf/ or connect with Maureen Taylor on LinkedIn to continue the conversation there. Series Producer: Mike SullivanSound Design: Marc Ream Content and Scripting: Catherine Hardy and Jaselin DrownProduction Coordinator: Natasha ThomasThanks also to Róisín Hunt, Selena Persiani-Shell, Jordan Bailey, Matt Johnson, Eli Shell, John Hughes, and Renn Vara.

Restoration Domination Show for Contractors & Entrepreneurs
064: Changing With The Times W/ Michelle Blevins

Restoration Domination Show for Contractors & Entrepreneurs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 58:54


How do you feel about women in the industry? What about millennials or Gen Zers? How important is salary to you when looking for a job?  Do you trust that these big data companies that are buying out the tech companies whose products and services you use daily in your business are going to keep your sensitive data safe?  Episode 064 of the Restoration Domination Podcast with your Host Rico Garcia Jr and Special Guest Michelle Blevins of C&R Magazine explore all of these questions and more in the most controversial episode we've had to date!Big Takeaways:-We need to question our unconscious biases against women and young people in the industry and use their unique perspectives to improve our businesses and our industry.-Companies like NextGear and Verisk are bringing in contractors so that there can be fair and positive change for our industry BUT you need to be involved so that your voice can be heard and positive changes can occur.-There have been many changes in the magazine and in the industry over the last year.  We are growing bigger and more unified and there are ways we should work to continue that path.Guest Contact:Website:   www.candrmagazine.com Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/CandRMagazine Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/michelle-blevins-821bab22/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/c-r-magazine/?viewAsMember=true Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/CRMagazine1 Email: michelle@candrmagazine.comPodcast: https://anchor.fm/michelle-blevins Sponsors:mpartial uses geospatial data to assist in creating accurate estimates, invoices, documentation of damages or work done and assisting in faster and fairer claim settlement. Use DOMINATE60 for 99% off Enterprise Plan https://bit.ly/3tz2Xwz CompanyCam allows for unlimited time/location-stamped photos that can be notated & can be easily annotated/tagged. Attach the photos to specific files and easily share the entire file with others on your team or other pros and see the updates in real time. Special Offer: Get 14 days FREE & 50% off of your first 2 months https://bit.ly/3FNmJb2 Sureti Corporation removes the time and financial headaches of getting the mortgage company to release funds or a customer to pay their deductibles in insurance claims. They cut the middle man getting you paid faster and in full. Learn More: https://bit.ly/3pyVLxr C&R Magazine is the oldest trade publication specifically dedicated to the cleaning and restoration industry. C&R is available in print and digital formats for free. Learn more and subscribe for FREE here: https://bit.ly/310KLjp Our Platinum Legal Sponsor Lawyer Britt, shares tricks carriers use to deny claims she learned from her time defending them. She now represents property owners and restoration companies across Florida. Learn More: https://bit.ly/3kKxzFZ Our Platinum Public Adjuster Sponsor Carlos Machin from Policyholder Advocates, Inc.. shares the secrets he learned after seven years of being an adjuster for the carriers and puts his knowledge to help the policyholder get their claims paid. Learn More: https://bit.ly/3w8iXps

#GenZ
Episode 40: Measuring Cohort Culture-Part 1

#GenZ

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 33:32


Can you quantify the culture of a generational cohort? This two-part series dives into that question and kicks off with a conversation with Andrew Roth, founder and CEO of dcdx, a Gen Z research and strategy firm. We chat about how Andrew and the dcdx team are leading a community of Gen Zers to develop better insights to support brands and organizations to truly understand Gen Z culture. 

Turley Talks
Ep. 1139 Why Are Democrats Doing This?

Turley Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 13:10


Highlights:     “Trafalgar found that 57% of those who watched the speech thought it was a dangerous escalation in rhetoric designed to further incite conflict among Americans, which is precisely what it was… Every single demographic found the speech objectionable, in fact, 60% of Gen Zers, those between the ages of 18 and 24, found the speech abhorrent.” “Democrats are doubling down on what's called resentment politics. Resentment politics seek to deflect blame and indignation and discontent away from the political class and focus it squarely on a portion of the population. And the Democrats are doing this precisely because they literally don't have anything else! Everything else, any major political or cultural issue, blows up in their face the moment they touch it.” “To make things even worse for Biden and the legacy media, we now have some pretty solid data that shows that far from hurting the Republican candidates, Trump is radically helping them.” Timestamps:        [02:14] On the strange activities coming out of the Democratic Party lately and why [06:29] Why the Democrat's plan will not work [08:47] How Trump is helping Republican MAGA candidates   Resources:  Learn how to protect your life savings from inflation and an irresponsible government, with Gold and Silver. Go to http://www.turleytalkslikesgold.com/ SAVE OVER 25% OFF your 1-Month Emergency Food Supply Kit here! Don't wait for an emergency before you prepare for one! http://getreadywithsteve.com. Click on the link now before time runs out!  Watch the full movie The Return of the American Patriot for 25% off Pre-Sale Now at http://thereturnoftheamericanpatriot.com. Releasing September 15! 1138 Europe Has Begun to FALL!!! Get 25% off Patriotic Coffee with Code TURLEY at https://mystore.com/turley Get your own MyPillow here. Enter my code TURLEY at checkout to get a DISCOUNT: https://www.mypillow.com/turley Join Dr. Steve's Exclusive Membership in the Insiders Club and watch content he can't discuss on YouTube during his weekly Monday night show!: https://insidersclub.turleytalks.com/welcome Get Your Brand-New PATRIOT T-Shirts and Merch Here: https://store.turleytalks.com/ It's time to CHANGE AMERICA and Here's YOUR OPPORTUNITY To Do Just That! https://change.turleytalks.com/ Fight Back Against Big Tech Censorship! Sign-up here to discover Dr. Steve's different social media options …. but without censorship! https://www.turleytalks.com/en/alternative-media.com Thank you for taking the time to listen to this episode.  If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe and/or leave a review. Do you want to be a part of the podcast and be our sponsor? Click here to partner with us and defy liberal culture! If you would like to get lots of articles on conservative trends make sure to sign-up for the 'New Conservative Age Rising' Email Alerts.

David Gornoski
Tho Bishop on Making GOP Pro-liberty, David Analyzes Today's News - A Neighbor's Choice

David Gornoski

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 49:15


The Mises Institute's Tho Bishop comments on Hillary Clinton's latest remarks, inflation as state-sponsored terrorism, how the GOP primaries turned out in Florida, why the pandemic topics shouldn't be ignored, how the GOP can be rid of RINOs, and more. Is there any truth to Biden's claim of fighting Big Pharma? Why can't Millenials and Gen Zers afford their own homes? Visit A Neighbor's Choice website at aneighborschoice.com

Sarah and Vinnie Full Show
8-9am- Talking to Horses & People Pleasers

Sarah and Vinnie Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 40:12


There's some audio of Britney Spears and Elton John singing at a party, Ozzy quit acid after talking to a horse, you can take a class on Taylor Swift lyrics, Sammy Hagar has a song called Thank You that was inspired by a dream about Eddie Van Halen, a video of a San Rafael policeman is caught doing something wrong, 49 percent of people consider them a people pleaser, things Gen Zers say they dislike about themselves, and Vinnie reads your texts!

Sarah and Vinnie Full Show
7-8am- Burning Jet Fuel & Gen Z

Sarah and Vinnie Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 37:28


Johnny Depp is back, there is an episode of Bluey that involves farting, a new HBO show called The Idol, Stephen Spielberg is burning a ton of fuel in his private jet, Jonah Hill is quitting social media, Gen Zers are traveling, getting old is scary, over half of Americans enjoy hot gossip, and Vinnie reads your texts!

#RolandMartinUnfiltered
Inflation Reduction Act & the black community,Trump's Warrant, Black Census Month, Gen Z & TikTok

#RolandMartinUnfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 119:19


8.18.2022 #RolandMartinUnfiltered: Inflation Reduction Act & the black community,Trump's Warrant, Black Census Month, Gen Z & TikTok Now that the Inflation Reduction Act is law, how will it address our climate crisis and impact the black community? Dr. Mustafa Santiago Ali, a former senior advisor for Environmental Justice of the EPA, will be here to explain it all.   We'll also look at how the other aspects of the Inflation Reduction Act will help black communities. A federal judge says he's willing to unseal redacted portions of Trump's search warrant affidavit. We'll talk about what that means and what details it could reveal about the investigation. Rudy Giuliani went down to Georgia to testify before a special grand jury about the 2020 election. Former Vice President Mike Pence says he'd consider appearing before the Jan. 6th committee if asked. August is National Black Census Month. We'll talk to the folk from Black Futures Lab about their goal of reaching 200,000 Black people with the Black Census Project. We'll tell you how you can participate. And why do Gen Zers prefer to use TikTok as a search engine versus Google? We'll look at how this shift influences a generation of voters who prefers video delivery over reading. Support RolandMartinUnfiltered and #BlackStarNetwork via the Cash App ☛ https://cash.app/$rmunfiltered PayPal ☛ https://www.paypal.me/rmartinunfiltered Venmo ☛https://venmo.com/rmunfiltered Zelle ☛ roland@rolandsmartin.com Annual or monthly recurring #BringTheFunk Fan Club membership via paypal ☛ https://rolandsmartin.com/rmu-paypal/ Download the #BlackStarNetwork app on iOS, AppleTV, Android, Android TV, Roku, FireTV, SamsungTV and XBox

The Carpool with Kelly and Lizz
INTRODUCING MR. AND MRS. ST. JOHN

The Carpool with Kelly and Lizz

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 45:23 Very Popular


The newlywed St. Johns are in the house for the season finale of the Carpool podcast. Of course, a wedding recap is on the agenda. Gen Zers are unhinged about today's millennial phrase, and Lizz and Kelly agree it was overused on the wedding weekend. The episode rounds out with a test drive and ditch the drive-through.  Wedding questions from the carpool crew reveal Lizz and Mattie's favorite parts of the day, what went wrong, how was Kelly's speech, and who was the most fun (hint: his wife is pregnant).  The gals share a hilarious story about Tyler's love for our Carpool fans, which is so next level that it resulted in two Carpool listeners making a forced appearance at the wedding reception. You'll also hear who was bridezilla, what Mattie thought about the ‘first look,' who saved the day with their seltzers, and the one thing Kelly didn't have on hand. The only thing close to industry news today is that the crew rode off into the sunset in the new Expedition.  The unanimous consensus from Lizz, Mattie, and Kelly is that the day was one of the best days of their lives.  ***Lizz and Mattie are now off on honeymoon in Mexico, so there will be no episode next week! The following week Kelly and Lizz will be back with two episodes a week for the brand new season.*** Today's test drive is the Dime Perfume sample set. 7 Summer is giving popular girl in 8th grade with a bit of Victoria's Secret, Lovely Dream is sweet and sassy, ILYSB is gushers in a bottle, and Malibu Night brings the straight-up coconut vibes.  Bubble guts, anyone? Today's episode is brought to you by My Binto and their incredible digestive enzymes. Kelly and Lizz rave about how easy it is to message an actual health professional anytime through My Binto and how much they love their My Binto products.  Take the free My Binto quiz or talk to a qualified health professional to see what My Binto can do for you. Go to mybinto.com and use code CARPOOL for 20% off your order. To share your ditch the drive-through recipe with us, call (959) CAR-POOL and leave us a message! Want our advice on your next car (or just got a life question for us)? Shoot us an email for a chance to get your questions featured on the show at hello@thecarmomofficial.com Follow the Carpool Podcast on IG Follow Kelly on IG Follow Lizz on IG Visit thecarmomofficial.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Chiquis and Chill
Generation Gap: Millennials vs. Gen Zers

Chiquis and Chill

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 32:06 Very Popular


How different is one generation from another? In this episode, Chiquis (millennial) chats with her sister Jenicka and brother Johnny (Gen Zers) about their views on a variety of topics ranging from marriage to monogamy, and having children, vaping, marijuana and influencers versus celebrities.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.