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The Rehumanize Podcast
Black Lives Matter from Conception to Natural Death: A Roundtable from #Rehumanize2022

The Rehumanize Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 50:29


From abortion to police brutality and the death penalty, Black Americans suffer disproportionate amounts of state-sanctioned lethal violence. This roundtable discussion from our 2022 Rehumanize Conference brings together Black activists who hold a Consistent Life Ethic to discuss the critical importance of challenging racial injustice as we advocate for human rights for all human beings.   Watch the video version of this session on our Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j91o_IL63Kw   Transcript: Herb Geraghty: So this session is titled Black Lives Matter from Conception to Natural Death. I am so grateful to be joined by these three individuals. I'm going to just briefly introduce each of our participants and then hand the conversation over to them. First, Jack Champagne is a graduate of the University of Pittsburgh School of Law. He currently works as an educator in Albuquerque, New Mexico. He formerly worked for the Capital Habeas Unit of the Federal Public Defender's Office, the Innocence Project, the Project, and the Southern Poverty Law Center. He is also a staff writer for Rehumanize International. Cherilyn Holloway is the founder of Pro Black Pro-Life. She specializes in initiating tough conversations surrounding racial equity, including in the womb. She travels the country, educating her community about the negative messaging they receive regarding motherhood and the sanctity of life. Finally, Gloria Purvis is an author, commentator, and the host and executive producer of the Gloria Pur podcast. Through her media presence, she has been a strong Catholic voice for life issues, religious liberty, and racial justice. She has appeared in numerous media outlets, including The New York Times, the Washington Post, PBS News Hour, npr, Newsweek Live and she hosted Morning Glory, an international radio show. She recently debuted a video series entitled Racism, Human Dignity, and the Catholic Church through the Word on Fire. I. Again, I am so, so grateful for each of our participants. With that said, I am going to get out of here and give them the opportunity to discuss their work and tell us what Black Lives matter from conception to natural death means to you. Thank you all. Thank you.  Jack Champagne: Thank you, Herb.  Gloria Purvis: Jack, why don't you start us off.  Jack Champagne: Oh man, . I was, I'm, I'm a,  Cherilyn Holloway: I was gonna vote for Jack.  Yes. .  Jack Champagne: Ah, alright then. So yeah, I was, I was, I, I've spent most of my life kind of with the sort of mainstream understanding of, uh, of life issues, of kind of being, you know, kind of, not super, uh, decided on the issue. It was actually working at the capital habeas unit that I actually, developed a, I mean, you try working with condemned prisoners and not develop a healthy respect for human life. It's, you know, dealing with, you know, prisoners who do not have living victims and who are themselves usually scheduled to die at the hands of the state. Having to advocate for these people and, you know, if you don't have an opinion on the death penalty going in, you will definitely have one coming out. And, I mean, it, it's a, it's a powerful experience, you know, just looking at the conditions they live in, the legal issues, that, uh, that surround capital punishment, and, uh, you know, just working under, Marshall Diane, who I think is still working there, who was a, who was a very, you know, loud voice against the death penalty. Just kind of, just kind of, you know, uh, formed my thinking on that. And of course it's, you know, Uh, very short distance from there to, you know, you know, concern about the lives of the disabled and the unborn. And you know, that, that, that of course interacts with my, my perception of race, both as, uh, both as a black man and as somebody who was clientele was almost always black men as well. So, you know, that's, that's. Uh, you know, that's, that's, I I have a very tangible, you know, grasp on what that looks like for me. I don't know about the, I don't know about you, uh, you all, but that's kind of where I come from with it.  Gloria Purvis: Uh, you know, I, I think, I'm a child of south. I mean, I grew up in Charleston, South Carolina. Which is where the Civil War started. Long history of bad race relations, . Still, we have people having a love affair with the lost cause mythology that the South had race relations, uh, correct by subjugating black people and that we were happier with the way that it was and that they had it right in terms of human relations between men and women. Uh, right in terms of the race question, but it wasn't. And, this — growing up in that environment, but at the same time, growing up in a very strong black community, in that environment, in a strong black community of people who, despite all the obstacles were achievers, were people who created things within the black community. And so while I grew up down there, I also had an environment where black excellence was normal, was normative. And, encountering people there that thought that, you know, I shouldn't think so highly and be so sure of myself. And that was their problem, not mine, but at the same time also seeing the uneven application of law enforcement, the uneven application of good healthcare. You know what I mean? Things like that, that you just as a black person moving through the world is paying attention. You see these things. And then, as a person of faith, also as a person that, believed in the science, you know, and I studied biology, uh, I understood that the human person. It, you know, is a human person, is a human life, a member of the human family from that moment of conception. And it just made sense to me, that we'd wanna protect and defend that life from the moment of conception all the way through natural death. And it was inconsistent to me to, in, on the one hand, say, we wanna defend lives in this instance, and yet in another instance, get rid of that life it in as a means of empowering others. So it just seemed illogical to me, some positions that I've seen in different justice movements. So it made me question, well, what is justice really? And as a, a person of faith and studying with the Catholic church understands justice, being justice means every human person — life being, uh, gets what they, you know, they merit something their life merits, protection, nurturing, flourishing. And that's what each of us is entitled to. Whether we're, whether we're the condemned on death row, whether we're in the womb, whether we're on our deathbed as a sick person, our lives of worthy of protection. And, and, and now even I think people are struggling with the notion that the death penalty should be no more. You know, we, we have this idea that really is really vengeance if you ask me. It's not justice. This idea that, you know, people need to get what's coming to 'em in a negative way without ever looking, also, at the way racism influences how the death penalty, who gets the death penalty. How, someone's wealth or lack thereof, influences who gets the death penalty, influences who even gets arrested and prosecuted. So, uh, there's so much uneven in our legal system. I've learned to call it the legal system instead of the justice system. There's so much uneven in our legal system that, it, it, it really, in terms of fairness, makes no sense to have the death penalty. Not to mention that each and every person, no matter what they've done, has made the image and likeness of God and is worthy of dignity and respect. And we as believers, I'm speaking as myself, are called to respond differently to persons who have harmed the community. We want restorative justice, not, not vengeance. And I think that's a difficult thing for people, but we can get into that and, and all, uh, later, but just as a high level, that has influenced, you know, my views and understanding of the human person and, and the dignity and why their lives need to be respected and protected. Cherilyn Holloway: Yeah, that's, both of those are like, spot on. So I, got into this. I was a community outreach director for a pregnancy center. I had made two previous abortion choices and I came outta those really feeling duped. Like I wasn't given all my options. And had I been given all my options, I would've made different choices. And I didn't want another woman to have to go through that. I had no idea that there was like a pro-life, pro choice. I had no clue. I was completely ignorant. And even when I joined the first pregnancy center, it wasn't something that they talked about. Nobody ever talked about Roe versus Wade. Nobody ever talked about the March for Life. It was just kind of like hand to the plow. We're just helping women. And it wasn't until I moved back to Ohio. I'm originally from Oberlin, Ohio, where the college is, and I grew up just with this, bubble. And in the bubble we were all like working towards justice. And so , you know, racial justice, food equity, everything you could think of, you know, Oberlin College was a first college to openly accept gay and lesbian couples. It was before like, I don't know, there's a session earlier where someone was saying that like being trans really was, wasn't a big deal in the 2000s and now it's a big deal. Like that is, that was my world and. So I grew up in a very different community that was surrounded by all white rural communities that were extremely racist. And so it wasn't that we were going out somewhere far to do work. We were, had work to do right where we were in our county. And so I moved back to Oberlin. and, uh, became the executive director of my local pregnancy center. And that's where I learned about this pro-life, pro-choice, uh, overturning Roe versus Wade. But the biggest thing I learned about was the disparities of abortion in the black community. And I couldn't wrap — I'm very li I'm not very sensational. Like I'm not, nobody would describe me as sensitive. Nobody would describe me as overly emotional. I'm very logical, data driven, straight to the point. And to me it just, I couldn't figure out why the, why everyone didn't know this. Like why isn't this obvious to everyone else? Like, I know I'm not like crazy, but this is obvious. And so when I began to go to conferences and look around and see, you know, five to 10 people that look like me and wonder, and everyone's stopping me saying, Why isn't the black community enraged about the abortion numbers? And I'm like, Have you, I don't know. Like I'm trying to figure it out myself and like, Well, what can we do? And so then I started pushing back and asking, Well, what do you do for their other circumstances? Like what do you do to help them with the children that they already have? Like, what are you doing to help them find, you know, equitable jobs? Like how are you helping them in other ways? Like, what else are you doing aside from, you know, telling them that we're having too many abortions? and I've — I kept being met with the same response, which was, Oh, well we wanna keep to the main thing. The main thing. It doesn't really matter if the baby doesn't make it out the womb, but it does matter because unless you are pregnant, you're not really thinking about abortion. So it absolutely does matter. If we're not actually doing something in the community to help the lives that are earth side, then it does matter. And so there just became, Pretty obvious tension between me and, uh, some of my, uh, pro-life comrades , because I wasn't going to be the person who, who just stood and talked about, you know, racism and the abortion issue without tying everything else together. And that's how I began to reach my community, inadvertently just without knowing, just randomly talking to people at the barbershop in the grocery store and , uh, wherever I could, because I talked to people everywhere. Um right. And that led me to start Pro-Black Pro-life just to be able to have a place. Where people who thought like me, because I just like, I can't be the only one gonna keep me to have this place. And then I built it. People came . That was kind of my, uh, way into really thinking about how Black lives matter from womb to tomb and how to be able to communicate that to the greater black community.  Gloria Purvis: You, you know, Cherilyn. That question that you know, well, why aren't black people more outraged about abortion? I would hear a, a flavor of that just about everywhere I went. But it was asked in a way, like in some cases like, is your community stupid? You know? Right. It's so condescending. And so when I felt like it, 'cause a lot of times I was like, remain in your ignorance because I don't have the wherewithal right now emotionally to deal with this. But in, in cases where I felt that it was worth having the conversation, I help people understand that there's a difference between abortion and the kinds of racialized, other racialized violence that we experience. I said, So for example, abortion. An abortion is something somebody has to go out and get. I said, me walking through the street and getting cold jacked by the police, I have to do nothing except be me and move through the space. So in terms of, uh, actual threats, nobody's jumping out and putting an abortion on you per se, you know what I mean? Right. So in terms of actual threats, what I'm thinking about as I'm leaving out of the safety of my home are those things that I cannot control. So I cannot control being followed in the department store and having security called on me. I cannot control when the doctor is ignoring me. When I say I'm, I'm hurting, you know, I need help with this pain. I cannot control when, I come in for a job interview and although I'm qualified and my name hints my ethnicity, that I'm not given the job. But I can control whether or not, at least in some sense, of going to choose abortion. So the threats are perceived differently. You know, the existential threats are perceived differently. Even though our community is heavily targeted, uh, for abortion and heavily marketed to, for abortion and all that kind of stuff, it's just perceived as a different kind of threat. So while it's not that we're not outraged, it's just that we got a lot of other things we got like going on. We got a lot already going on. So it's not that we don't care, it's not that it's, it's frankly that the people asking question are so far removed and so uninvested in the black experience that they can't fathom that we move through the world differently than they do. Jack Champagne: Mm-hmm. . Yeah, I think, I think, I think Cherilyn gets at something. When she talks about how isolating it is to sort of be in the black community, but also be pro-life because you're kind of, you know, the, there's sort of some kind of, there's kind of a regulatory capture in black communities in which the most politically active of us also feel the need to go in, all in on being pro-abortion, because that's where the political allies are. And then on the flip side, you have, you know, pro-life movement, which is not, uh, not always responsive to black voices. And black voices are not always present, you know, and I had occasion to think about this, you know, when, uh, Kamala Harris, you know, had brought, brought those leaders together to talk about, you know, reproductive justice and how effectively they were able to, to, do the messaging on that as sort of a civil rights. Uh, sort of or group, you know, you had buy in from Al Sharpton, from Mark Morial of the Urban League, from the NAACP, from all of these groups, these big names, and it was, it was, and you know, it's stunning how easy it was and how effectively they had kind of, you know, seized on this black organizing tradition and had kind of made it into — you know, this is the natural continuity of, you know, this black organizing tradition and kind of how uncritically, you know, is kind of accepted in these communities. So, you know, that isolation, it does have real political results and, you know, we're seeing it become, you know, increasingly stark and, you know, sort of a post Dobbs reality where, you know, these sharp political lines are being drawn. Cherilyn Holloway: Yeah. And I think that, I mean, I, I feel like. We'd be remiss if we didn't address the fact that the idea of a black woman, woman, having the right to have an abortion really becomes a rights issue. It's a control issue of a right that she did not used to have. Mm-hmm. . And so we can't ignore that. Right? We can't ignore that. There was a time when black women were not in control of their bodies and were not in control of what, you know, when they had babies and how many they had, and their children were sold, you know, into, in being enslaved. We cannot ignore that. And so this, this idea, you know, overturning Roe and the Dobbs decision takes us back to to, you know, black women not being able to control their bodies is, is a very real fear for some black women. But, but on the flip side of that, on the flip side of that, there's a huge difference between women's rights and reproductive justice, right? And so what ends up happening is that the Women's Rights Movement does what the Women's Rights Movement does, right? It isolates black women. Because what women's rights are fighting for are very different than what black women are fighting for with reproductive justice, right? Black women are fighting for this idea, not just to have an abortion. The abortions like the caveat, like it's stuck on the end and doesn't actually make sense because all the other rights have to do with, maternal mortality, infant mortality, being able to take care of their children. Having healthy relationships, having healthy schools, healthy childcare, like all of those things are in the reproductive justice, like being able to have a good birth experience — and then abortion is like tacked on that, and it almost doesn't make any sense. Where, in the women's rights movement, it's solely about abortion. That's it. and what black women are saying, like our issues are more complex. And I feel like even on the pro-life side, that's what we're saying, right? We're saying, yes, we get it. We're pro-life, but our issues are more complex. If we cannot figure out why women are jumping in and go upstream and stop that, we're just gonna be steady pulling 'em off the river. And there is no, there is no relief when we're consistently pulling them out the river. We're not actually solving the problem. And for 50 years we have not actively solved this problem . And so now everyone's like, Oh, well, you know, what does post, you know, Dobbs look like? Well, it looks like what it should have looked like in 1973. Like, we should have been working to solve some of these systemic issues that Gloria just named in order to help women. If 70% of women, black women, are having abortions for financial reasons, and we're talking that they only need $20,000 more to, to make a choice, to say, to keep their baby. And I say only because I know that there are people who are donating $20,000 to pregnancy centers. Which they need to do. Don't stop doing that. But it's — there is no lack of funds in the pro-life movement.  Gloria Purvis: Okay. So couple things. I do think it's a temptation — and I think it's not, I think it's on purpose that, around abortion, it's always marketed to black women as if you're losing something. Oh, these rich white women can do it, and if you can't do it, therefore it's not equal. And I think that's the biggest bunch of hokey. Because frankly, the thing that we want that, that that white women take for granted, isn't abortion. We want safe and affordable housing, clean water, jobs for our spouses, a good education for our children. And I think it is an absolute insult that the thing that they're like, well, you can have this thing though. You can have abortion, and you should really be rallying for abortion because that makes you equal to these wealthy white women. I'm like, no it doesn't. All it does is remove our children from these substandard conditions, while we still remain in those substandard conditions. Let's remove the substandard conditions from our community. That is what we need to be focusing on. If you want equality for black women, for black men, for black families, for black children. And so it has just been. Just, I, I, it has just been shocking to me how much, how much energy and effort is put into abortion. I mean, I just saw a member of the Divine Nine say something positive about abortion. Kamala Harrison, I are both members of Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority. I'm hoping the sorority doesn't say anything along those lines, but they probably will, if they haven't already. So it is absolutely, like you say, Jack, going to all these large black organizations and getting their buy-in and getting them to send a message out to their membership. And I think we need to start speaking, you know, among our friends, among our families. So whoever wants to listen in our churches, our parishes, our sororities, fraternities, our fraternal groups, whatever, to challenge, you know, this notion that abortion is a good thing for the black community. I think we also need to understand the idea of rights. Rights cannot go contrary to the nature of a thing. And so for people to, at at least in my opinion, call abortion a right. I'm like, but that goes exactly against the nature of what it is to be female, to be able to conceive and bring life forward. So to me, to say that it's a right to terminate that pregnancy — as if our biology is some inherent injustice against being female. To me, it's very anti-woman. And it never allows us to have these broader conversations about what the economy, what our culture, what society needs to look like, to be more inclusive of women as we are. I mean, if, if the answer for every difficulty that we experience is, you know, get that abortion, that's gonna liberate you, that's gonna free you, you can go and achieve, you can make more money. Then we never really talk about the structures or the systems that hold us back from achieving and making money. And then one last thing I wanna say: when they do studies on who wants an abortion, it's typically those women or families making a combined income of more than a hundred thousand dollars a year. Those making less — like, let's say 40,000 or less — by and large want to keep their children. So abortion is even being marketed to the very communities, poor black women, as liberating with those poor black women do not want abortion. And then one lesson, I will say this: bell hooks, who died recently, talked about in the feminist movement, how black women's aims were very different from white women. They weren't pushing for abortion. But because white women carried the day, abortion became central to being feminist, to being liberated, but that is not at all what black women wanted. So yeah, I think we need to recapture what it means to, as black women, what, what, uh, equality and liberty really means. And I don't think, having the ability to end the lives of our children in the womb is the answer. Jack Champagne: We popped over to the Q and A real quick. There are two kind of related questions. I wanted to see what y'all thought about — uh, first one's anonymous. Uh, it says, As advocates for racial justice and people who have interacted with the pro-life movement, which is often tied to conservative circles, what are some strategies you might suggest for how we can push back against the racism that has grown so loud in the G O P and Trump movements. And then second one, uh, this is, uh, Miles Bedlan, I think. How can we make the pro-life movement appeal more to black Americans? I've noticed that the pro-life movement is overwhelmingly white.  Cherilyn Holloway: I'll do, I'll do the second question. Yeah.  Gloria Purvis: You know, sometimes I'm, sometimes I'm like, I really think some that's gonna be something that, white pro-lifers need to take up. I really am not interested in, to tell you the truth, I'm really not interested with the limited energy I have and having to fight the obvious racism. Right? And quite frankly, the people who are prone to those kinds of behaviors or coded, coded language, probably can't hear me when I talk to them about why something is racist or inappropriate. But they probably could hear, uh, their fellow white pro-lifers explaining or calling out why something is racist or dehumanizing to black people. And so I'm gonna really invite all my white pro-lifers to, to take up that, to take on that calling something out directly and helping people recognize that something's racist. Because I'm finding that unless the slur, a racial slur is used, people cannot recognize that something is racist. And I'm like, you know, there's a lot of coded language. There's a lot of — people know not to just come out with racial slurs, but they still can be very racist in their language and the way in which they address certain things. So, white pro-lifers, call 'em out, and also make room for black pro-lifers to come and just speak and be a part of the movement. Invite us to come and talk at your conventions, your meetings and things like that. If you want us to be more included and at the same time, call out, you know, these racist talking points that you see sometimes in the movement. Cherilyn Holloway: Oh, well I'm gonna tell you right now, like, don't invite me unless you're ready to burn it down. Like, if you're not ready, don't invite me, because I'm, I'm just, I'm gonna say what I wanna say and it may upset some people, and that's just the way it is. So, if you're not ready to restart, uh, or if you haven't recently restarted, you know, and I 100% agree with, like, I don't have the bandwidth. Like I, I don't, like, I spent a couple years very early on answering these questions and my final answer was — a very sweet southern white woman stopped me at a conference and said, how do we reach the black community? And I said, Let us do it. Like each state, like state, like if you're not there, like, that doesn't mean like there shouldn't be services or things like that, but we don't trust you. Yeah, like we do not trust, you know, the G O P, the Trumpist movements, we don't trust, you know — we don't trust it. And so, you know, I picked the name Pro Black, Pro-Life for a reason. Because I was done, but I felt like I wanted to still own the pro-life where like — you're not, I'm pro-life. You're not going to convince me to call myself something else. Like it is what it is, but I'm womb to tomb. I'm gonna tell you what it means to me and like it'll love it. Like it doesn't matter. It's not gonna change the way I feel. And so the pro-life movement itself is not going, we're not going to be able to make a mass appeal. What we, what we're gonna need to do is be more present, and seen, so that people who are sitting in the closet with their pro-life views, that they feel like they're, they're consistent, but everything around them is inconsistent, right? So like here, we all have a consistent life ethic. This — we know this exists, but people don't know this exists. And so when I talk to people, you know about being pro-life or about the womb, or about. They all say the same thing. I just went to a doctor and she goes, and she goes, Well, what do you do? And I told her what I did and she goes — It's just her and I there. And she's like, I'm pro-life too. I'm like, Why are we whispering? Because, right. It's just me and you. Right. But the idea was, she was like, But I don't wanna tell somebody else what not to do. And I told her, it's not about telling somebody else what to do, but people need to know. So when people know better, they do better. And most of the people in the black community, not the people that we see, you know, at these large national conventions, not, these are the people that I'm talking to. Most people in my church and in my community don't know the truth about abortion. They don't. They think that it's legal, so it must be okay. And so we just need to continue to speak the truth. You know, if you're gonna platform someone, you know, a black, you know, a black speaker, don't ask 'em what they're gonna say. Like, listen to a couple of their stuff. Ask 'em to come and let them have at it. Like, don't always tell people like, If you're gonna raise some money, don't ask me. Because I can't promise you people are gonna give. Gloria Purvis: Cherilyn let me ask you something because I think the name Pro-Black is in the name Pro-Black Pro-Life — putting Pro-Black right there. I think it sends a message because there are. Prominent black voices in the conservative pro-life movement who are def — definitely anti-black. I mean, I'm thinking of one woman in particular who I will not name because I feel like I'd conjur the devil if I ever mentioned the name. But, so anti-black in the things that she says and I'm like, how do people, in the pro-life movement, listen to this person and not hear the odious anti-gospel message in what she says. And I've come to recognize because they have not unlearned the racist conditioning that they've been exposed to just by mere fact of being born and going through the educational system or even entertainment, uh, system in the United States that has definite, uh, programming around blackness that seems to reinforce a criminality. A promiscuousness, an ignorance, a laziness, an untrustworthiness, just everything negative that you could think of, is out there. And so there hasn't been this unlearning and with people like this particular person and, and there are many of them, smaller level, you know, I, I can think of a number of people trying to, go for her crown, but they cater to that, those kind of, talking points about this inherent brokenness in black culture and which, you know, tries to imply there is something inherently criminal and broken in us, which is just nonsense. And so I will say, yeah, have the black person come speak, but please do check to make sure they're not reiterating a bunch of anti-black talking points, because we don't need more of that. No, you know, it, it doesn't, it, it does nothing to help the movement and it certainly says to other black people, other healthy, normal black people out there that they are not welcome.  Cherilyn Holloway: Yeah. And, and, and people, like the person you speak of, they're not talking to the black community. That is something that I often have to talk about in trainings and what I'm speaking is that they're, they're, they, they're saying that that's who they're talking to, but we're not listening to them. Right. So they're not. They're talking to you, like, they're talking to a white, conservative audience saying what the white, conservative audience wishes they could say to black people. But at the end of the day, ain't nobody saying that to black people. Cause black people ain't listening. Right. So Jack, do you have anything to say? I was gonna go to more questions cause I think we have 10 minutes.  Jack Champagne: So, so I'm very much in the Cherilyn Holloway school of Prepare To Get Your Feelings Hurt. , I'm gonna, I'm gonna answer it like this because it also tangentially answers Ben Conroy's question, which is that, you know, I was born Jackson, Mississippi, Heart of the Beast. Did a lot of work in Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, you know. Things that black people care about, voting rights, uh, rights for convicted felons, rights for housing. I see never one pro-life person involved with any of that. There are more black people in Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana than there are anywhere else in the country. And I didn't see one black person involved with any, you know, any pro-life, anything. And I didn't see any outreach from pro-life people to any of these groups. All of my volunteers were, you know, working for democrat, governors, governor candidates, pro — pro-choice people, you know, those are the people who were asking me to speak at events. Those are the people who are asking me, how can I help? Those who are people — you know, fundamentally it's a problem that conservative, uh, a lot of pro-life people, they fundamentally don't respect black voices and they don't care about black issues. And that is, that is probably the most fundamental problem. There's no, you know, magic tool. There's no, there's no way to speak about these issues. Sometimes it's just caring. Sometimes it's just caring about, uh, helping people that can't help you. You know, we shouldn't, we shouldn't really be having a conversation about how we convince, can convince pro-life people to care more about racial justice — that should just be an inherent part of their calculus. But it's not because they're not pro-life. They're anti-abortion. And some of them are self-conscious about that. Some of them were like, I don't wanna be pro-life, I just want to be anti-abortion. And you know, because it requires them to do it, requires them to do things that don't directly benefit themselves and instead benefit a community that they don't care about and can't get anything from. And, you know, you can't tell me. You cannot tell me you are working in some of the only counties in the country that have a majority black population and you can't find any black people that agree with you? Give me a break. Like that is not, That is, That is a, Wow. That is, That is, That requires such an instrumental view of black people. That, you know, it, it kind of makes you tell on yourself like, Oh yeah, they might agree with me on abortion, but they might be too militant. They might be, they might care too much about racism. You know, they might not talk about it in a way that, you might, you. You, you might, you might offend my audience and things like that, right? So, you know, you need to, you need to, you need to step, basically what you need is you need to step outside of this, this paradigm in which, "I will only care about black people if they can help me. I go, I can only care about black people if they're not too extreme." You know that, this is why, you know, we get anti-black, black people that are so highly valued in the movement because that's all the only voices that the movement values. And will tolerate.  Gloria Purvis: Exactly. And will tolerate. So. Well, you know, Jack, you made me actually think of a time that I went to Community Action Arkansas and there was a bunch of black people that I was down there with, and we were talking about the upcoming election. And this was before Trump. And the issue of abortion came up, and every single one of those persons that I spoke to was pro-life, but they also told me their experience of going down to — I don't know how they did the primaries or something, you had to vote by party or whatnot — so they had to go down where all the Republicans were, and the open hostility that they experienced from these white Republicans when they went over there to vote pro-life made them say, "They don't want us here." And so, they have no interest in our thriving as a community. And so their actual experience of the so-called pro-life movement in their state when it came time to exercise their right to vote, was that it was very much anti-black. And they didn't see, so, they don't vote Republican because of their particular experience of that party in their local experience, and what their party locally has done or not done, you know, for or against the black community. And so while they are pro-life, they cannot vote locally with the Republicans who are so called the party of life because of their overt racism. Mm-hmm. , so you know. I, I, So at the same time, and I get it, I was like, Hey, I'm not telling you to go vote with people who'd, you know, just as soon slit your throat or hang you up from a tree. You know, in reality, while they may say they're pro-life, they're not really talking about your lives in the womb. When they're saying that they're pro-life, That's not their vision of being pro-life. So maybe that's the reality for quite a number of folks. So.  Jack Champagne: Yeah, I mean, we, we, what we, what we want is, It's relatively simple. It's if you can be a pro-life candidate and have a stance against racism that is not limited or qualified, you're golden. You — there's no one — there's no one else like you in the country. Yeah. And it's so easy and people stumble on it so much, and I simply don't understand it.  Gloria Purvis: Can we, I see one question. Cheryl, did you wanna say something else?  Cherilyn Holloway: Yeah, I was gonna read a question. Yeah, go ahead. Go ahead. So Lisa Stiller said, How do you answer people that say reversal of Roe negatively impacts BIPOC communities the most? So my first response is always, Why? Why does it negatively impact — and they're gonna always say the thing. Same thing, right? Poverty. So we don't have an abortion issue. We have a poverty issue. Mm-hmm. . And so if you want to not negatively impact the black community, help them get outta poverty. Mm-hmm.  Gloria Purvis: and Lisa, please remind them. Killing the poor does not solve poverty. Never. Okay. And that's what what they're saying, you know, is the solution to poverty for these BIPOC communities is to eliminate their children. Again, eliminating children from a substandard condition instead of eliminating the sub standard conditions from the community. Cherilyn Holloway: ,  yeah, this is another good one. That I may have an answer to. I don't know. What are some things you've seen well-intentioned activists do in an attempt to be pro-black that have been unhelpful? Oh, so a big one for me. This is a huge pet peeve for me and I hate to say that like I was inadvertently a part of it. Like I didn't know I was beginning my years, you guys. So this is like a pass. This is my pass. I don't like it when people take sayings and, change them to fit what they want. I forget what the word is. There's like a word for this,  Gloria Purvis: Appropriation? Is that it?  Cherilyn Holloway: Like Black Lives Matter, right? Right. So when black activists take that and they put like pre-born in front of it or all, or like when someone does that, and I feel like that is well intentioned. I get it. I get the intention, but the saying Black Lives Matter is true. There's nothing wrong with that saying, right? And I feel like if you're saying Black Lives Matter as someone who's pro-life, you should mean from womb to tomb. So it, it, it, uh, irritates me or agitates me or aggravates me. Like it won't send me like off the rock or when people do that, like when there are activists that take things like that and that's just an example, but I've taken other things with other, like it picking up other issues and tried to like formulate them into. Gloria Purvis: Oh, conflating them? Cherilyn Holloway: Yes, Conflate. Thank you . Gloria Purvis: You're welcome. Yeah. I don't know if I've ever seen anybody be attempt to really be pro black. I mean, I just remember there was a big brouhaha about a, pro-life organization on their — was it their Instagram? Around the time of the George Floyd murder, for some reason they put up this unhelpful thing that more black children die in the womb than they do in police custody. Cherilyn Holloway: They're more safe. They're more safe in police custody.  Gloria Purvis: Oh, they're safer. I mean, what, how — Just yeah, as if they were trying to, redirect the conversation — again, we can walk and chew gum. And also why, why the need to have to downplay our real suffering? And the real threats to our lives by, uh, from, unjust policing, you know, and to try to say, Oh, no, no, no. You don't have time to be, You're safe actually. You're safer in police hands than you are as a black child of woman. Please shut up. That it was not only unhelpful, it was, it was, it, it was so insensitive. Was very insensitive. It was so insensitive. And I think there was another, one last instance that I'm sure you all aware of is there was a well known pro-life activist on Twitter that. Jumped into Bishop Talbot Swan's Twitter feed to tell him that he was a problem with the black community and, and that he was, you know, all this stuff on abortion, which clearly the person had no idea that Bishop Talbot Swan is a member of Church of God in Christ, which is like one of the largest black Christian denominations that is pro-life. Yep. And, and, and that Bishop Swan had actually written an open letter to Hillary Clinton, challenging her on her abortion support and its negative impact on the black community. But this very well known pro-life white activist just, I guess, felt that she needed to help him understand that the real racism. Because that's the words she used, that the real racism was an abortion or something like that. I can't remember what it was, but the, the idea that she was gonna tell this man, this civil rights activist, this pro-life, uh, bishop from the Church of God in Christ, that she knew better what the real racism was than he did as a black man moving through this earth. For the number of years that he did. It was clearly, I guess supposed to be pro-black because she's gonna educate about real racism. But it was just very, ignorant and, tone deaf and condescending.  Jack Champagne: Yeah, I mean, I can virtually guarantee you that just living as a black person in America makes you more of an expert on racism than just about anybody on the planet. You know, it, it's one of those things where if you feel the need to redirect discussion about issues that directly affect black communities to abortion. What you're saying is that you don't actually care about black lives. You care about this issue and you want to use that in order to draw attention to the issue you do care about. And you have to be very, you know, you need to be cognizant of the fact that that's what you're doing — intentionally or not, that's what you're doing. And you know, that is very off putting that, that's something,  Gloria Purvis: Well, it, it shows a sense of entitlement that you feel entitled to — that we don't have the agency to decide what we wanna discuss, uh, at a particular time and place. I had a girlfriend that was at, talking about racism and, uh, someone jumped up in the q and a and said, Well, why aren't you talking about abortion? Da da, da, da, as if we were not entitled to discuss racism at that time. You know, somehow we should not be concerned about racism, as it demonstrates itself through, uh, abuses in the legal system, through abuses and policing and whatnot — that over and above all else, we had to only always and everywhere discuss abortion. And it is so, uh, to me, indicative of that person's, like you said, Jack, lack of respect for us and also doesn't — don't respect that we have our own minds and we can decide what it is that we wanna talk about at any time. Uh, and we can decide what we wanna focus our conversation on a particular moment. It doesn't mean, uh, we will never address abortion. It means right now this is what we wanna talk about. And if you can't handle that, or you can't participate or listen quietly, please go. Leave. We, we don't need you to be a part of it. We certainly don't need you trying to deflect, you know, from it. Mm-hmm. .  Jack Champagne: Yeah. Oh, we just got the five minute warning.  Cherilyn Holloway: Okay. It's two minutes. It was two minutes. Two minute. Okay. There aren't, I think Aimee asked about books. One is Killing the Black Body. It used to be up there. It's up here and I can't remember who it's by. Killing the Black Body is a good one about reproductive justice and the history of black women and their bodies.  Gloria Purvis: Was that Harriet Washington? Oh, I'm thinking Medical Apartheid. Go ahead. Apartheid — oh, Dorothy Roberts. Killing the Black Body by Dorothy Roberts. Yeah.  Cherilyn Holloway: And the other one I would highly recommend is, So You Wanna Talk About Race, which is by, uh, Ijeoma Oluo. And that one is just really, really good. It's an easy read, like easy by, not a lot of tension, but a lot of like, true fact. I ha— I have eight kids. Like it just.  Gloria Purvis: That's gonna happen.  Cherilyn Holloway: Wouldn't be a live from me without a child showing up.  Gloria Purvis: When I mention Medical Apartheid, I will tell you how Washington is very much pro-choice for abortion. But just in terms of, getting some history of the abuses of the black body in the United States, Medical Apartheid by Harriet Washington was a, was a good read. But with warning, she is very much pro-abortion, pro-choice. And that kind of comes across. Maybe right before we go, if I, I wanna ask each of you maybe, what is the one thing I think that still gives you hope, in discussing racial justice?  Cherilyn Holloway: Go ahead, Jack. Jack Champagne: Well, when I, when I, was, uh, when I was, uh, when I was watching, John Lewis's, uh, funeral, uh, a couple years ago, I was, uh, I was with my grandfather. And He, he, he leaned over and told me and, uh, asked me: do you know anything he did while he was in Congress? And that was very funny to me. But I always thought that, you know, I always, you know, I always think to myself, it's kind of nice that my grandfather who was born in like 1927 is able to take something like that for granted. and, you know, it is, it is, which is to say that, you know, there's a lot of work to do, but we still have accomplished a lot in a relatively short amount of time. In about less than the eighth of the time that we've been here in this country. We've accomplished a lot and, uh, you know, being able to, uh, share that moment with my grandfather. Is a, is a, is a very nice experience. So, uh, I look forward to being able to, you know, uh, look at an all black Supreme Court with my grandsons. So.  Gloria Purvis: Hey. Hmm.  Cherilyn Holloway: Uh, I think the thing that gives me hope is, is people. I, you know, like I said, what I, what I know most is that people who live their everyday lives who don't think about the abortion issue, or even like the racism issue all the time like I do, are always open to these conversations and always seem like they just learned something. Like, there's always like a light bulb moment, like, Oh, I never thought about that. And so it's, you know, my hope is in the, that I'm like planting ideas in people's heads and concepts and things for them to continuously think about as they see the news stream, you know, going across. Is, is why I feel like I, I'm always hopeful it, you know, not what I see on the news, not where I see the media focusing attention, not where I see any of these, but the everyday people I talk to, that literally, have these light bulb moments. That's what continues to give me hope.  Gloria Purvis: I would say what gives me hope is the prevalence of these kinds of conversations that are happening now. The fact that I've, you know, I'm able to have this conversation with both of you, to me, is — it gives me hope because it signals two things or three things, maybe. A, we exist. B, we can be in community. And three, we can use the microphone that's not controlled by major media to still get our messaging out. To be able to use the current technology now to give another narrative about pro-life and pro black from the womb to the tomb. And so I hope that the, the three of us together can at some point do this again on a larger stage for more people. So that gives me hope.  Cherilyn Holloway: Thank you everybody.  Gloria Purvis: Thank you.  Herb Geraghty: Thank you. Thank you three. So, so, so, so, so much for this, uh, for this round table discussion. We are so grateful. I know that the chat has been very active and very grateful for your perspective. This was wonderful. Thank you so much. We are now going into our break. We will reconvene in the sessions at 7:15 Eastern. Thank you all.

Crime Writers of Color
The Many Lives of Delia C. Pitts

Crime Writers of Color

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 35:21


Robert Justice interviews Delia C. Pitts, author of the Ross Agency Mystery series. Born and raised in Chicago, Delia graduated from Oberlin College with a Bachelor's degree in history. After working as a journalist, she earned a Ph.D. in African history from the University of Chicago. She is a former university administrator and U.S. diplomat. Murder My Past is the fifth book in her contemporary noir mystery series. The next entry, Murder Take Two, will be published in 2022. Her short story, “The Killer,” was published in The Chicago Quarterly Review, #31. It was selected for inclusion in Best American Mystery and Suspense 2021. Another story, “A Deadly First,” was published in the 2020 holiday crime anthology, Festive Mayhem. Her short story, “Talladega 1925,” was published in The Chicago Quarterly Review, #33. She is an active member of Sisters in Crime and Crime Writers of Color. Her next novel, featuring small town African American private investigator Vandy Myrick, will be published by Minotaur in 2024. Delia and her husband live in central New Jersey and have twin sons living in Texas.

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
Pharma Only Treats The Symptoms Of Disease, Not The Disease Itself

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 15:11


New 2022 - Pharma Only Treats The Symptoms Of  Disease, Not The Disease Itself Dr. John Abramson, M.D• https://hcp.hms.harvard.edu/people/john-david-abramson • Book – Sickening Ian Harris, MD • https://med.unsw.edu.au/our-people/ian-harris • Book - Surgery, The Ultimate Placebo: A Surgeon Cuts through the Evidence Dr. Robert Yoho • http://www.robertyohoauthor.com • Book - Butchered by “Heathcare” Dr. Robert Lustig • http://www.robertlustig.com • Book - Metabolical #BigPharma #AmericanHealthCare #HealthCarePolicy Dr. John Abramson, M.D. is an author and medical doctor and has served as a family physician for over 20 years. His recently release book Sickening  How Big Pharma Broke American Health Care and How We Can Repair It. Is about the inside story of how Big Pharma's relentless pursuit of ever-higher profits corrupts medical knowledge—misleading doctors, misdirecting American health care, and harming our health. John Abramson MD,  He was twice voted “best doctor” in his area by readers of the local newspapers and three times selected by his peers as one of a handful of best family practitioners in Massachusetts. He has been on the faculty at Harvard Medical School for over 15 years, where he has taught primary care and currently teaches health care policy. To Contact Dr John Abramson MD go to hcp.hms.harvard.edu/people/john-david-abramson Dr Ian Harris is a practicing orthopedic surgeon, university professor and an acclaimed author of several books including Hippocrasy: How doctors are betraying their oath. Professor Ian Harris is an orthopedic surgeon who works at Liverpool, St George, St George Private and Sutherland Hospitals in Sydney. His academic affiliation is with UNSW, South Western Sydney Clinical School at Liverpool Hospital, in Sydney. In addition to approximately 200 peer-reviewed publications, he also wroteSurgery, The Ultimate Placebo - an eye-opening evaluation of commonly performed surgical operations that have been tested and shown to be no more effective (and arguably worse) than placebo, or that have never even been tested. He suggests we treat new surgical procedures like new drugs, and only pay for those that are part of a trial to find out if they really work. To Contact Dr Harris go to Email: ianharris@unsw.edu.au Dr. Robert Yoho is an author and accomplished retired Los Angeles cosmetic surgeon. His Book, Butchered by “Heathcare”: What to Do About Doctors, Big Pharma, and Corrupt Government Ruining Your Health and Medical Care. Dr Robert Yoho grew up in Kent Ohio. He was an Eagle Scout and a Judo wrestler. Went to Oberlin College and Case Western Reserve Univ. Medical School. In 2019 Dr Yoho retired from his medical and surgical practice. He now is a full time writer and speaker. No longer responsible for patient care he is able to write full time without conflicts of interest. To Contact Dr Robert Yoho go to  robertyohoauthor.com  Dr. Robert Lustig is a The New York Times bestselling author and author of Metabolical: The Lure and the Lies of Processed Food, Nutrition, and Modern Medicine and a Professor of Pediatric Endocrinology at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Robert Lustig, a pediatric neuroendocrinologist who has long been on the cutting edge of medicine and science, challenges our current healthcare paradigm which has gone off the rails under the influence of Big Food, Big Pharma, and Big Government. Dr. Lustig has authored 125 peer-reviewed articles and 73 reviews. He has mentored 20 pediatric endocrine fellows, and trained numerous other allied health professionals. He provides endocrinologic support to several protocols of the Children's Oncology Group. He is the former Chairman of the Ad hoc Obesity Task Force of the Lawson Wilkins Pediatric Endocrine Society, a member of the Pediatric Obesity Practice Guidelines Subcommittee of The Endocrine Society, a member of the Obesity Task Force of the Endocrine Society, a member of the Pediatric Obesity Devices Committee of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, a member of the Bay Area Board of Directors of the American Heart Association, and a member of the Steering Committee of Health Foods, Healthy Kids of the Culinary Institute of America. He also consults for several childhood obesity advocacy groups. Dr. Lustig lives in San Francisco with his wife Julie and two daughters. Spare time (what little there is) is spent cooking, theater-going, and traveling. To Contact Dr Robert Lustig, M.D.  go to robertlustig.com CLICK HERE - To Checkout Our MEMBERSHIP CLUB: http://www.realtruthtalks.com  • Social Media ChannelsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConferenceInstagram : https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/RTAHealth Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-real-truth-about-health-conference/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealth    • Check out our Podcasts  Visit us on Apple Podcast and Itunes search:  The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast Amazon: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/23a037be-99dd-4099-b9e0-1cad50774b5a/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RZbS2BafJIEzHYyThm83J Google:https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zaW1wbGVjYXN0LmNvbS8yM0ZqRWNTMg%3D%3DStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastAudacy: https://go.audacy.com/partner-podcast-listen-real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-real-truth-about-health-li-85932821/ Deezer: https://www.deezer.com/us/show/2867272 Reason: https://reason.fm/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcast • Other Video ChannelsYoutube:https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealthVimeo:https://vimeo.com/channels/1733189Rumble:  https://rumble.com/c/c-1111513 Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConference/videos/?ref=page_internal DailyMotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/TheRealTruthAboutHealth BitChute: https://www.bitchute.com/channel/JQryXTPDOMih/ Disclaimer:Medical and Health information changes constantly. Therefore, the information provided in this podcast should not be considered current, complete, or exhaustive. Reliance on any information provided in this podcast is solely at your own risk. The Real Truth About Health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, procedures, or opinions referenced in the following podcasts, nor does it exercise any authority or editorial control over that material. The Real Truth About Health provides a forum for discussion of public health issues. The views and opinions of our panelists do not necessarily reflect those of The Real Truth About Health and are provided by those panelists in their individual capacities. The Real Truth About Health has not reviewed or evaluated those statements or claims.  

The Plant a Trillion Trees Podcast
Episode 104 - Christy Rollinson is the Forest Ecologist at The Morton Arboretum.

The Plant a Trillion Trees Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 49:41


Christy Rollinson is the Forest Ecologist at The Morton Arboretum in Lisle, Illinois. As a research scientist, much of her work looks at how individual trees, forest communities, and ecosystems respond to changing weather and climate. Christy's work involves a variety of approaches, including tree rings, phenology and citizen science, and computer modeling. Christy holds a Bachelor of Arts in Biology and Environmental Studies from Oberlin College and a Master of Science and Ph.D. degrees in Ecology from Penn State University. At The Morton Arboretum, Christy has been highly involved with science and climate change communication to a variety of professional and non-professional audiences. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/plantatrilliontrees/support

The Rose Woman
V the Vote with the States Project - Hosted by Paten Hughes

The Rose Woman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 75:15


We continue on sharing with you the different live talks from the Sensing Woman 2022: A multisensory event that took place at C24 Gallery in Chelsea, New York City a few weeks ago. Next in this series about the 2022 Midterm Elections (that will end in a few days). Most likely the major factor in how Americans vote are policies, women's autonomy, health care, and inflation.This panel is led by Paten Hughes, along with Sasha Eden, Lisa Kron, and Tzipora Lederman. They talk about their call for activism. their community of changemakers and some of the current challenges that can impact the elections. Your voice matters and Your vote matters #vthevote #novembHER8 #2022midterms In this episode, we cover:A brief overview of how the election system works in the USA.How to use your voice through phone activismThe Swingleft organization and their missionWhat is the Giving Circle by The States Project?The latest United States redistricting cycleScripts and volunteering at phone and text bankingHow do we let the younger generation understand the impacts of the current eventsWhat are the battleground states? Helpful Links:Paten Hughes - Actress and creator, known for the series HEIRLOOM inspired by her journey into organic tomato farming. Check out her instagram @tresapay and Facebook @patenhughesSasha Eden - an actor and producer; known for blending her innovative creativity with activism. Also recognized as a leader in the parity movement, Sasha is a frequent guest speaker on gender equality, media literacy, girls' empowerment and producing your own work. Check out her Facebook and Instagram @sashaedenLisa Kron - Award-winning writer and performer who's been creating theater for four decades. Her best-known plays include WELL, 2.5 MINUTE RIDE, and the musical, FUN HOME. She's part of SOS, a giving circle that's raised money in every election cycle since 2018 to support The States Project's in their game-changing work shifting the balance of power in state legislatures. Follow her on Instagram @elkay100Tzipora Lederman - she has spent the last decade working to elect Democrats and improve elections. She has a B.A. in Politics from Oberlin College. Check out @swingleftThe States Project - A Community of Change MakersChop Wood, Carry Water Newsletter Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Relentless Health Value
EP385: Morgan Health and the 5 Things Self-insured Employers Should Do Right Now, With Dan Mendelson

Relentless Health Value

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 34:59


If you listened to the show with Dan O'Neill (EP359), you would know this already. But let me tell you: If you're a provider, even a provider very confident in your office's ability to confer better patient health, you will still have a super hard time getting off the fee-for-service (FFS) hamster wheel. Why? Because it's hard to find payer contracts out there which will reward you (the provider) for actually taking care of your patients and to be accountable for the value of healthcare that you deliver. This is a tangled web we weave because, despite some payers offering risk-based contracts, a lot of times there's some IPA (independent physician association) or other “holder of the actual payer contract” who does not pass along these contract terms. These IPAs or health systems even sometimes just keep paying docs or provider offices FFS even if they themselves have a risk-based or capitated or value-based-of-any-kind agreement. If I actually kept track of the issues raised in the emails I receive from docs, there's one thing that I would likely find amongst the most frequently cited points of consternation: Physicians or practices or CINs (clinically integrated networks) or ACOs (accountable care organizations) want contracts where they can do right by patients. These are the good docs. These are the ones burned out and suffering from moral injury because physicians, PAs (physician assistants), nurses, clinicians who actually follow up and coordinate care and spend time making accurate diagnoses instead of cramming in more procedures … these are the clinicians who want to do the right thing and are also the ones who are getting dinged on performance reports and paid less. Bottom line here, for a physician practice to transform itself from an FFS machine cranking out volume but not necessarily health or care, the office has to have a high enough percentage of their patients in value-based arrangements to make it actually feasible to transform. It is only when they hit a tipping point of enough volume, enough patients in risk-based contracts that they can afford to be accountable for their results. At that point, yeah, everybody wins—doctors, patients, actually the entire community wins because when a local practice transforms, all of their patients tend to benefit at some level from the new processes and procedures and standardizations and pop health systems that get put in place. So, let's move forward with this with all haste, shall we? Why aren't we? What's the problem here? Well, there are lots of problems, don't get me wrong. But a big one is self-insured employers on the whole are not offering any sort of accountable care arrangements to the providers in their community. This is 150 million patient lives we're talking about here—a huge chunk of many providers' patient panels. Self-insured employers have a really big opportunity to level up the care in their whole community due to the spillover effect when a provider practice transforms itself because it has enough patients to do so. But these employers are stuck. They are paralyzed. They are doing the same thing this year that they've done last year, and therefore their whole community is equally stuck in a smorgasbord of suboptimal FFS goings-on. So, offering accountable care contracts is one thing (a very big consequential thing) that is also one of the five things self-insured employers can do to improve employee health that I talk about in this healthcare podcast with Dan Mendelson. Dan Mendelson, my guest today, also wrote a Forbes article listing out these five things. Here are all five things that Dan mentions in one handy list: Expand availability of accountable care models to improve the care experience, quality, and affordability at a local level. For a deep dive on this, listen to the show with Dave Chase (EP374). Invest in the data access needed to assess health outcomes. For a deep dive on this, listen to the show with Cora Opsahl (EP372). Align employees' health benefits with pop health outcomes. For a deep dive on this, listen to the show with Mark Fendrick, MD (Encore! EP308). Prioritize care models that can meet employees wherever they are. For a deep dive on the DEI (diversity, equity, and inclusion) aspect of this, listen to the show with Monica Lypson, MD, MHPE (EP322). Make care navigation a central part of the benefits package and experience. I am looking for an expert to take a deep dive on care navigation who does not work for a care navigation company. Hit me up if you know someone (again, who does not work for a care navigation company). My guest today, Dan Mendelson, is CEO of Morgan Health at JPMorgan Chase. He previously founded Avalere Health. Before that, Dan served as associate director for health at the Office of Management and Budget. Besides exploring the why and the what for each of the five things employers should do right now, I also wanted to find out from Dan what's going on at Morgan Health and how they are looking to help self-insured employers who want to do these five things actually do them.   You can learn more at the Morgan Health Web site. Dan Mendelson is the chief executive officer of Morgan Health at JPMorgan Chase & Co. He oversees a business unit at JPMorgan Chase focused on accelerating the delivery of new care models that improve the quality, equity, and affordability of employer-sponsored healthcare. Mendelson was previously founder and CEO of Avalere Health, a healthcare advisory company based in Washington, DC. He also served as operating partner at Welsh Carson, a private equity firm. Before founding Avalere, Mendelson served as associate director for health at the Office of Management and Budget in the Clinton White House. Mendelson currently serves on the boards of Vera Whole Health and Champions Oncology (CSBR). He is also an adjunct professor at the Georgetown University McDonough School of Business. He previously served on the boards of Coventry Healthcare, HMS Holdings, Pharmerica, Partners in Primary Care, Centrexion, and Audacious Inquiry. Mendelson holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Oberlin College and a Master of Public Policy (MPP) from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.   05:53 Why did Dan direct his article about health benefits at CEOs? 06:56 What does an accountable care model mean to a self-insured employer? 08:50 “This alignment of value will never work … if the 150 million Americans … getting their health insurance through their employer are not also aligned in the same way.” 12:21 “We're offering them a higher level of service.” 12:32 “Everything that we do is intended to be scalable and not just for us.” 13:01 “We have an obligation to do better for our employees.” 15:44 “Employers need to understand, the only way to get outstanding care is locally.” 18:21 Encore! EP206 with Ashok Subramanian and EP358 with Wayne Jenkins, MD. 19:10 Why is getting quantitative metric data important? 19:42 Encore! EP308 with Mark Fendrick, MD. 21:50 “This is a much broader vision of accountable care than … primary care.” 23:41 “Until everything is aligned, the employer is just not going to be providing an optimal product.” 24:32 “There are substantial issues with … health equity, and employers are paying for the care of 150 million Americans in this country.” 26:15 Is digital health access important for creating meaningful relationships between patients and providers? 30:43 What is the myth that employers need to tackle? 31:10 Why is care navigation important for employees? 32:37 EP334 with Sunita Desai, PhD. You can learn more at the Morgan Health Web site. @dnmendelson of @JPMorgan discusses #selfinsuredemployers on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast Why did Dan direct his article about health benefits at CEOs? @dnmendelson of @JPMorgan discusses #selfinsuredemployers on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast What does an accountable care model mean to a self-insured employer? @dnmendelson of @JPMorgan discusses #selfinsuredemployers on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast “This alignment of value will never work if the 150 million Americans getting their health insurance through their employer are not aligned in the same way.” @dnmendelson of @JPMorgan discusses #selfinsuredemployers on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast “We're offering them a higher level of service.” @dnmendelson of @JPMorgan discusses #selfinsuredemployers on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast “Everything that we do is intended to be scalable and not just for us.” @dnmendelson of @JPMorgan discusses #selfinsuredemployers on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast “We have an obligation to do better for our employees.” @dnmendelson of @JPMorgan discusses #selfinsuredemployers on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast “Employers need to understand, the only way to get outstanding care is locally.” @dnmendelson of @JPMorgan discusses #selfinsuredemployers on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast Why is getting quantitative metric data important? @dnmendelson of @JPMorgan discusses #selfinsuredemployers on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast “This is a much broader vision of accountable care than … primary care.” @dnmendelson of @JPMorgan discusses #selfinsuredemployers on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast “Until everything is aligned, the employer is just not going to be providing an optimal product.” @dnmendelson of @JPMorgan discusses #selfinsuredemployers on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast “There are substantial issues with … health equity, and employers are paying for the care of 150 million Americans in this country.” @dnmendelson of @JPMorgan discusses #selfinsuredemployers on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast Is digital health access important for creating meaningful relationships between patients and providers? @dnmendelson of @JPMorgan discusses #selfinsuredemployers on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast What is the myth that employers need to tackle? @dnmendelson of @JPMorgan discusses #selfinsuredemployers on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast Why is care navigation important for employees? @dnmendelson of @JPMorgan discusses #selfinsuredemployers on our #healthcarepodcast. #healthcare #podcast Recent past interviews: Click a guest's name for their latest RHV episode! Wendell Potter, Brian Klepper (Encore! EP335), Dr Aaron Mitchell (EP382), Karen Root, Mark Miller, AJ Loiacono, Josh LaRosa, Stacey Richter (INBW35), Rebecca Etz (Encore! EP295), Olivia Webb (Encore! EP337), Mike Baldzicki, Lisa Bari, Betsy Seals (EP375), Dave Chase, Cora Opsahl (EP373), Cora Opsahl (EP372), Dr Mark Fendrick (Encore! EP308), Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu (EP371), Erik Davis and Autumn Yongchu (EP370), Keith Hartman, Dr Aaron Mitchell (Encore! EP282), Stacey Richter (INBW34), Ashleigh Gunter, Doug Hetherington, Dr Kevin Schulman, Scott Haas, David Muhlestein

Corralling the Chaos
Handling More Shows With Less Crew feat. Susan Conner & Aaron Merkin

Corralling the Chaos

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 44:18


It's no secret the events industry is changing. Trying to supply enough people for the increase in events is a very real challenge for our industry right now.  What we're talking about: 1. The importance of industry relationships now more than ever. 2. A pattern of crews not showing up to the job.3. Why too much lead time can actually be a bad thing.4. Companies giving little to no lead time in a high demand low supply market. 5. Crew personnel being treated poorly at the show site due to high levels of stress.For more information on Susan Conner: Susan Conner is a Labor Coordinator at Fuse Technical Group. She spent 9 years doing the same at VER.She was married to a freelance tech for 11 years and understands life from that side. She also loves puzzles and mysteries, which is really what we solve every day! For more information on Aaron Merkin: Aaron is a founding partner and Director of Operations. He devises and directs our internal processes, working to create and implement business solutions that keep us on the cutting edge of the industry. Clients, vendors and partners rely on Aaron for strategic consultation on logistics, information management and team communication. His pre-event planning helps save valuable human, financial and temporal resources. With 20 years of experience in Event Production, Aaron has a big-picture vision and an eye for detail. He holds a regents diploma from Stuyvesant High School, a Bachelor's degree in Anthropology from Oberlin College, is a multi-instrumentalist, visual artist, and self-proclaimed logicist. Born and raised on Manhattan's Upper West Side, Aaron currently resides with his wife Sharyn, their son Max, and their dog, Taco, in Fairmount, Philadelphia. 

THE EMBC NETWORK featuring: ihealthradio and worldwide podcasts

2 https://www.kevineubanks.com George and I are thrilled to welcome Kevin Eubanks to the show! We've been fans for a long time so this is going to be awesome! Bio: Kevin Eubanks, guitarist and prolific composer. He is well known by many as the former Music Director of The Tonight Show band, appearing on the show 18 years (1992 - 2010). His laid-back style and affability seems to belie the concentration and focus that have made him successful both as a consummate musician and a household name for late-night TV viewers. Kevin was born into a musical household in Philadelphia, PA. His mother, Vera Eubanks, is a gospel and classical pianist and organist with a Masters Degree in music education. She has taught both privately and in the school system, until her recent retirement. Vera's brother, the late Ray Bryant, was a journeyman jazz pianist who recorded and toured with jazz greats such as Miles Davis, Sonny Rollins, John Coltrane, and Sarah Vaughan not to mention a hit record of his own. Kevin was thus exposed to world-class music in his formative years as he began violin lessons, his first instrument, at age seven. His brother Robin, is a trombonist, arranger and tenured professor at Oberlin College and his brother Duane is consistently influencing so many younger musicians as a trumpet teacher and continues to expand his recording career. Kevin also studied the trumpet before making his commitment to the guitar which was solidified with his entrance to the world-renowned Berklee College of Music in Boston from which he has received an ‘Honorary Doctorate' degree. He has also received an ‘Honorary Doctorate' degree from Redlands University in California. Kevin moved to New York after attending Berklee College of Music where his career kicked off in earnest. He started playing with some of the greats of Jazz, including Art Blakey, Slide Hampton, McCoy Tyner, Sam Rivers, Roy Haynes, Dave Holland, Ron Carter and others. In addition to working in other bands, Kevin become the leader of his own group and traveled to Jordan, Pakistan, India and Kuwait on tours sponsored by the US State Department, not to mention the European/Japanese Jazz circuit which so many artists frequent. Contact Counterparts: www.counterpartsshow.com

THE EMBC NETWORK featuring: ihealthradio and worldwide podcasts

2 https://www.kevineubanks.com George and I are thrilled to welcome Kevin Eubanks to the show! We've been fans for a long time so this is going to be awesome! Bio: Kevin Eubanks, guitarist and prolific composer. He is well known by many as the former Music Director of The Tonight Show band, appearing on the show 18 years (1992 - 2010). His laid-back style and affability seems to belie the concentration and focus that have made him successful both as a consummate musician and a household name for late-night TV viewers. Kevin was born into a musical household in Philadelphia, PA. His mother, Vera Eubanks, is a gospel and classical pianist and organist with a Masters Degree in music education. She has taught both privately and in the school system, until her recent retirement. Vera's brother, the late Ray Bryant, was a journeyman jazz pianist who recorded and toured with jazz greats such as Miles Davis, Sonny Rollins, John Coltrane, and Sarah Vaughan not to mention a hit record of his own. Kevin was thus exposed to world-class music in his formative years as he began violin lessons, his first instrument, at age seven. His brother Robin, is a trombonist, arranger and tenured professor at Oberlin College and his brother Duane is consistently influencing so many younger musicians as a trumpet teacher and continues to expand his recording career. Kevin also studied the trumpet before making his commitment to the guitar which was solidified with his entrance to the world-renowned Berklee College of Music in Boston from which he has received an ‘Honorary Doctorate' degree. He has also received an ‘Honorary Doctorate' degree from Redlands University in California. Kevin moved to New York after attending Berklee College of Music where his career kicked off in earnest. He started playing with some of the greats of Jazz, including Art Blakey, Slide Hampton, McCoy Tyner, Sam Rivers, Roy Haynes, Dave Holland, Ron Carter and others. In addition to working in other bands, Kevin become the leader of his own group and traveled to Jordan, Pakistan, India and Kuwait on tours sponsored by the US State Department, not to mention the European/Japanese Jazz circuit which so many artists frequent. Contact Counterparts: www.counterpartsshow.com

JAF Project Podcast
Counterparts - Kevin Eubanks - October 11th 2022

JAF Project Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 63:55


https://www.kevineubanks.com George and I are thrilled to welcome Kevin Eubanks to the show! We've been fans for a long time so this is going to be awesome! Bio: Kevin Eubanks, guitarist, and prolific composer. He is well known by many as the former Music Director of The Tonight Show band, appearing on the show 18 years (1992 - 2010). His laid-back style and affability seem to belie the concentration and focus that have made him successful both as a consummate musician and a household name for late-night TV viewers. Kevin was born into a musical household in Philadelphia, PA. His mother, Vera Eubanks, is a gospel and classical pianist and organist with a Masters Degree in music education. She has taught both privately and in the school system, until her recent retirement. Vera's brother, the late Ray Bryant, was a journeyman jazz pianist who recorded and toured with jazz greats such as Miles Davis, Sonny Rollins, John Coltrane, and Sarah Vaughan not to mention a hit record of his own. Kevin was thus exposed to world-class music in his formative years as he began violin lessons, his first instrument, at age seven. His brother Robin, is a trombonist, arranger and tenured professor at Oberlin College and his brother Duane is consistently influencing so many younger musicians as a trumpet teacher and continues to expand his recording career. Kevin also studied the trumpet before making his commitment to the guitar which was solidified with his entrance to the world-renowned Berklee College of Music in Boston from which he has received an ‘Honorary Doctorate' degree. He has also received an ‘Honorary Doctorate' degree from Redlands University in California. Kevin moved to New York after attending Berklee College of Music where his career kicked off in earnest. He started playing with some of the greats of Jazz, including Art Blakey, Slide Hampton, McCoy Tyner, Sam Rivers, Roy Haynes, Dave Holland, Ron Carter and others. In addition to working in other bands, Kevin become the leader of his own group and traveled to Jordan, Pakistan, India and Kuwait on tours sponsored by the US State Department, not to mention the European/Japanese Jazz circuit which so many artists frequent. Contact Counterparts: www.counterpartsshow.com

Under the Radar with Callie Crossley
What is re-wilding? We get to the bottom of it!

Under the Radar with Callie Crossley

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 58:00


This week on Under the Radar with Callie Crossley:  As the threat of climate change looms ever nearer, many are asking: what can I do? For a growing number of people across the world, the answer to that question is re-wilding. So what exactly is re-wilding? It's conservation efforts aimed at restoring and protecting natural processes and wilderness areas. It can look like many things, but for most it looks like introducing plants in your yard that are native to your area.  Not everyone is ready to make the jump, however. Re-wilding re-introduces small animals and predators, who are important for ecosystems but not always a welcome additon, into these areas.  Join us as we examine the pros and cons or urban rewilding. Plus: During the height of the pandemic, medical experts characterized group singing as a potential superspreader EVENT. Choirs and choruses were relegated to a very unsatisfying Zoom experience until some determined musicians –including a local Massachusetts couple–figured out a way for individual singers to sing together– while apart– each from the safety of their cars. These unusual melodic assemblies became so-called “driveway choirs.” Their story is captured in the new documentary, “The Drive to Sing.”  You can find their festival schedule here. Guests: William Lynn is a research scientist in the George Perkins Marsh Institute at Clark University and a research fellow at Knology. He is also the founder of PAN Works, an independent non-partisan think-tank dedicated to the wellbeing of animals. C. Ian Stevenson is Director of Advocacy for Greater Portland Landmarks, a non-profit historic preservation organization in Portland, Maine. Ian holds a PhD in American & New England Studies from Boston University. His research and publications include such topics as historic dams, river rewilding, railroad station architecture, and the creation of national parks.  Bryce Denney is the director of the film. He is a microchip verification engineer, as well as a singer and pianist. He has a degree in physics and piano performance from Oberlin College. Kathryn Denney is the producer of the film. She sings in the Labyrinth Choir a professional choir in Metrowest Boston, has directed choirs and has taught elementary school music for many years. She has a bachelor of music degree in French Horn from Oberlin Conservatory.

New Glam Gal Podcast by Judith Gaton
Shit My Mama Said Series: Reclaiming what you want

New Glam Gal Podcast by Judith Gaton

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 34:59 Very Popular


On this week's episode of the Style Masterclass Podcast, we have another episode of Shit My Mama Said with Victoria Albina. We laugh, we talk about experiences we have as humans and so much more.   You'll learn: Important things to understand about our body What happens when we value other's opinions above our own How to reclaim what your body actually wants  [Victoria Albina](https://victoriaalbina.com/) (she/they) is a Master Certified Life Coach, UCSF-trained Family Nurse Practitioner and Breathwork Meditation Guide with a passion for helping women realize that they are their own best healers, so you can break free from codependency, perfectionism and people-pleasing and reclaim your joy. She is the host of the [Feminist Wellness Podcast](https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/feminist-wellness/id1454980022) and holds a Masters degree in Public Health from Boston University School of Public Health and a BA in Latin American Studies from Oberlin College. Victoria has been working in health & wellness for over 20 years and lives on occupied Munsee Lenape territory in New York's Hudson Valley. Victoriaalbina.com/stylecoach   (Mentioned in the episode) The Sisters of Perputal Indulgence: https://www.thesisters.org/ 

The Thomistic Institute
Why Did God Become Man? Motives for the Incarnation | Prof. Corey Barnes

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 50:07


This lecture was given at Florida State University on April 22, 2022. For more information on upcoming events, please visit our website: www.thomisticinstitute.org About the speaker: Corey Barnes is an Associate Professor of Religion at Oberlin College specializing in scholastic thought from the 12th to the 14th centuries. His research areas include Christology, causation, creation, providence, knowledge of God, theological language, and scholastic receptions of classical, patristic, and late antique sources.

Rattlecast
ep. 162 - Bruce Bennett

Rattlecast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 119:05


Bruce Bennett was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1940. He received his A.B., A.M., and Ph. D. from Harvard, and taught at Oberlin College from 1967-70, where he co-founded and served as an editor of Field. In 1970 he moved back to Cambridge, where he co-founded and served as an editor of Ploughshares. Bruce is the author of ten books of poetry and more than thirty poetry chapbooks. His New and Selected Poems, Navigating The Distances (Orchises Press), was chosen by Booklist as “One Of The Top Ten Poetry Books Of 1999.” Just Another Day in Just Our Town, Poems: New And Selected, 2000-2016, was published by Orchises in January 2017, and has gone into a second printing. His newest project, Images into Words, is a series of ekphrastic poems, co-authored by Jim Crenner. For more information, visit Bruce's website: https://justanotherdayinjustourtown.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. A Zoom link will be provided in the chat window during the show before that segment begins. For links to all the past episodes, visit: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: Open a poetry journal to any page. Go to the end of a poem. Use all or part of the last line to begin a new poem. Next Week's Prompt: In his long autobiographical poem, The Prelude, Wordsworth writes about what he called “spots of time,” small memorable events we experience that thereafter remain in our consciousness and “give profoundest knowledge,” helping us determine who and what we are and what we may become. Write a poem in which you focus on one of these “spots of time” in your own life and what it has subsequently meant to you. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

Round Table Radio
Uncomfortable Truths in Theatre and Fiction

Round Table Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 31:51


What is it like to develop a story through dialogue, how do you get your work on the stage, and where does inspiration itself come from? These questions and many more are explored as Odin and Rachel sit down for a deep dive into the world of writing for the stage and the page. Rachel's play, "Little Egg, Big World" premiered Off Broadway at Theatre Row on June 24th, 2022. An autofiction piece about growing up as a sperm donor child and then becoming an adult egg donor. Co-Produced with BBTF. Rachel Leighson is an actress/singer/writer hailing from Los Angeles, CA. She literally fell into performing at the age of seven when she nearly spun off stage during the tornado dance in The Wizard of Oz and never looked back. In Los Angeles, she performed with the Los Angeles Opera in Noye's Fludde, Judas Maccabaeus, and Friedl under Maestro James Conlon. She then attended Oberlin College and Conservatory and Vancouver Film School for Acting in Film and Television. ​ Rachel has performed all over the United States (38 states and counting!) and in NYC at Carnegie Hall, Playwrights Horizons, St. Luke's Theatre, and The Actor's Temple Theatre. Her acting and writing passions center around moralistically grey women and finding the nuanced perspective in a piece or character. She believes theatre gives people a safe opportunity to explore uncomfortable truths and grow, and that is the base of everything she wants to do. ​ Rachel is a donor child with two moms, too many cats, too many half-siblings, and too many opinions. She wouldn't have it any other wacky way. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/roundtablewriters/support

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - JANE MILLER - Healing Companions

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 41:28


Jane Miller works in private practice as a licensed psychotherapist/clinical social worker, with a particular interest in holistic modalities of healing. She currently focuses on educating others about the legal, ethical, and practical criteria of working with Psychiatric Service Dogs (PSDs). Miller has lectured about PSDs in a variety of settings, ranging from The Cleveland Clinic & MetroHealth Medical Centers' Departments of Psychiatry & Psychology, The International Association of Animal Behavioral Consultants Conference (IAABC), The Cleveland Natural History Museum, The Psychology of Health, Immunity & Disease Conference (NICABM), The National Association of Social Workers Conference and many other national and local organizations, schools, and dog-training facilities. Miller recently was approached by the VA Hospital to present for their Departments of Psychiatry & Psychology Grand Rounds focusing on PSD's for soldiers returning from combat with PTSD and to speak for the Veteran's Administrations PTSD Consortium. She appeared in the PBS program "Health Visions - Animals As Healers" on the healing power of animals and joined world-renowned veterinarian/author Dr. Allen Schoen to present a workshop on the topic of animals as healers at a national conference for medical professionals (See NICABM). She is also a practitioner of QiGong and Reiki and teaches stress reduction techniques to her clients and their service dogs. Miller earned her BA in psychology and biology from Oberlin College, and her MA in Clinical Social Work from Case Western Reserve University. She has received the Irene Sogg Gross Award for Humanitarian Services and has contributed scholarly essays for professional journals and anthologies in the field of clinical social work. Her professional experience includes serving as a counselor at a battered women's shelter and at a group home supervisor for the developmentally disabled, and as a research assistant in microbiology/immunology at Temple University Medical School. Jane Miller's lifelong passion for healing has emphasized the human-animal connection, culminating in certifications as a Canine Massotherapist and as a Consultant for Therapy and Service Animals by the International Association of Animal Behavior Consultants (IAABC). - http://www.healing-companions.com/ To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com

Forefront Brooklyn
Forefront Conversations with Margaret Kamitsuka

Forefront Brooklyn

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 56:27


With the recent SCOTUS Dobbs decision, Christians who have long been declaring abortion to be Biblically condemned rejoiced as their conservative theology was validated. But does the Bible actually explicitly condemn abortion? In her book, "Abortion and the Christian Tradition: A Pro-Choice Theological Ethic," Margaret Kamitsuka uses rigorous academic research to debunk the assumption that the Bible is inflexibly anti-choice, examining the patriarchal structure that early church leaders established and that contemporary church leaders reaffirm to oppress and dehumanize pregnant people. ABOUT MARGARET Margaret Kamitsuka is Professor Emeritus at Oberlin College in Ohio. After getting her PhD in theology from Yale University, she taught at Oberlin College for over 20 years, where she focused on courses in gender and religion. Now she does research and writing in the area of theological ethics--specifically reproductive issues. Her most recent book is titled Abortion and the Christian Tradition: A Pro-Choice Theological Ethic, published in 2019. She and her coeditor have just completed a textbook that will come out later this year titled, The T & T Clark Reader on Abortion and Religion: Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Perspectives. Margaret and her husband David are the parents of twin sons, now age 21. Legal and advocacy resources to further explore: Abortion Conversation Projects: http://www.abortionconversationprojects.org/mission-and- vision Catholics for Choice: https://www.catholicsforchoice.org/ Exhale: https://exhaleprovoice.org/pro-voice/ Faith Aloud: https://www.faithaloud.org/ Interfaith Voices for Reproductive Justice: https://www.iv4rj.org/ Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice: https://rrlc.thinkific.com/ Sister Song: https://www.sistersong.net/ Faith Voices for Reproductive Justice: https://faithvoicesforreproductivejustice.co.uk/

Free Library Podcast
Tommie Smith, Derrick Barnes, Dawud Anyabwile | Victory. Stand! Raising My Fist for Justice

Free Library Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 62:09


In conversation with Tracey Matisak, award winning broadcaster and journalist Tommie Smith and John Carlos made history at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics when they stood at the winners' podium and raised their black-gloved fists to protest racial injustice in the United States. Smith, gold medalist in the 200-meter sprint, and Carlos, the bronze medal winner, were forced to leave the games and faced a swift and brutal backlash at home. In his illustrated memoir for young readers, Smith tells the story of his rural Texas childhood, early career, Olympic victory, and internationally famous protest. In addition to his Olympic gold medal, Tommie Smith held the record for the 200-meter sprint for more than 44 years, held an additional six running world records, won the 1966 NCAA Men's Outdoor Track and Field Championship, and was drafted into the NFL. The author of the memoir Silent Gesture, he coached track and taught sociology at Oberlin College. Smith is an inductee to the United States National Track and Field Hall of Fame and the California Black Sports Hall of Fame. Derrick Barnes is the author of more than a dozen bestselling children's books that celebrate African American culture, including The Making of Dr. Truelove, Crown: An Ode to the Fresh Cut, and the Ruby and the Booker Boys series. He has been honored with a Newbery Award and a Coretta Scott King Award Emmy Award–-winning illustrator Dawud Anyabwile designed storyboards for Cartoon Network, TBS, TNT, and Boomerang. He illustrated the graphic novel adaptation of Walter Dean Myers' book Monster and is the illustrator of the Brotherman: Dictator of Discipline comic series, among numerous other projects. His many other honors include an Eisner Award and a Glyph Comics Award. (recorded 9/23/2022)

On Religion
On Black Religion, Music, and Friendship

On Religion

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 48:30


Ambre Dromgoole (she/her/hers) is a doctoral candidate in the Departments of Religious Studies and African American Studies at Yale University. She graduated from Oberlin College & Conservatory in 2015 with a B.A. in Musical Studies and Religion, where she received the Jonathon Kneeland Prize for Religion and the Africana Studies Award for Artistic Excellence and Community Service upon graduation. She then obtained an M.A. in Religion from Yale Divinity School and Institute of Sacred Music with a concentration in Black Religion and the Arts receiving the Hugh Porter Prize of Distinction. Ambre is interested in the convergence of Black religion and popular culture, focusing on the emergence of various musical genres from women in the Black Holiness-Pentecostal tradition. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Honey Badger Radio
Bakery Beats Oberlin College, Texas Wins Free Speech Battle | HBR News 374

Honey Badger Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 102:02


Hello and welcome to HBR News where we talk about the news of the week! This week we talk about some updates regarding Oberlin College and the family bakery is slandered as racist, 141 people have been arrested in a child sex crime operation, the Biden administration guts protections for students accused of sexual assault on campus, and more!

How I Got That Way
AMFMA - The Woke Hangover

How I Got That Way

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 15:12


Larry says that small business owners should just let people rob them. Oberlin College begins payment of $36.59 million to Gibson's Bakery after Ohio Supreme Court refuses to hear appeal

'Cuse Conversations
Get to Know Ethan Bair, Hillel at Syracuse University's New Rabbi

'Cuse Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 25:32


As a student at Oberlin College, Ethan Bair experienced such a meaningful connection with Hillel and with his rabbi that he was inspired to become a rabbi. Something about building community and teaching the ways of the Torah to college students resonated with Bair, who earlier this summer was named Hillel at Syracuse University's new rabbi and will serve as Jewish chaplain at Hendricks Chapel. An accomplished Jewish community leader, Rabbi Bair shares how he assists with the holistic development of Syracuse University's Jewish students, why he's passionate about forming meaningful connections and impactful relationships with the campus community, the importance of finding your joy and passion, and why being part of the multi-faith community at Hendricks Chapel is such a blessing.

Smart Humans with Slava Rubin
Smart Humans: The Riverside Company's Stewart Kohl on managing $15B AUM, doing 900 transactions in Private Equity, and scaling globally

Smart Humans with Slava Rubin

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 71:51


Stewart A. Kohl is Co-Chief Executive Officer of The Riverside Company, a $10 billion global private equity firm founded to invest in premier companies at the smaller end of the middle market. Since 1988, Riverside has invested in more than 700 companies globally. The firm's investors include leading pension funds, endowments, funds-of-funds, insurance companies and banks. The firm employs more than 300 people in offices across North America, Europe and the Asia-Pacific region. Mr. Kohl joined Riverside in 1993. Prior to that, he was a vice president of Citicorp Venture Capital, Ltd., the private equity arm of Citibank. In addition to his work with Riverside, Mr. Kohl serves as an Honorary Trustee of Oberlin College and of the Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland. He is also on the Board of Directors of Cleveland Clinic and Co-Chairs its $2 billion Power of Every One Capital Centennial Campaign. He was inducted into the Ohio Foundation of Independent Colleges Hall of Excellence in 2009. He previously served as Co-Chair of the Building for Hope Capital Campaign of the Center for Families and Children. Mr. Kohl earned the George S. Dively Entrepreneurship Award in 2018. He was inducted into the Northeast Ohio Business Hall of Fame in 2014. After spending 16 years as a “Heavy Hitter” participant in the Pan-Mass Challenge bicycle fundraiser, Mr. Kohl founded VeloSano, a similar event that has raised more than $20 million to fund cancer research since 2014. Mr. Kohl holds a BA from Oberlin College.

The BreakPoint Podcast
Oberlin College and the Critical Theory Mood

The BreakPoint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 6:09 Very Popular


In November 2016, a student at Oberlin College in Ohio attempted to steal two bottles of wine from Gibson Bakery. The owner confronted and then chased the student down the street. He was arrested and later pleaded guilty to shoplifting. Recently, nearly six years after the incident, a judge ordered Oberlin College to pay more than $35 million in damages to the bakery.   How did just two bottles of wine become so expensive?   The student who shoplifted is black. The shop owners are white. That was enough to start an uproar on the Oberlin College campus. The story is an example of a culture that is in a critical theory mood.   The day after the incident, Oberlin students started to protest the treatment of the accused outside of Gibson's Bakery. Soon after that, the Oberlin student senate passed a resolution that called for Oberlin College to “officially condemn Gibson's Bakery” as a racist institution. Professors  got involved, passing out fliers and encouraging students to join the protest. The college then severed longstanding catering contracts with the bakery.   Neither the protestors nor the school ever claimed the student had not shoplifted but, in their public statements, the fact that he did was conveniently ignored. This allowed them to turn the shoplifter, the store owner, and even the bakery into symbols that served a narrative they were telling. In a recorded audio, one student protester yells, “Shoplifting, the stuff on the surface, does not matter. This runs so much deeper.”  It is not uncommon for any discussion of critical theory, in any of its forms, to be dismissed. After all, critical theory, we are told, is an academic theory that few people have studied. That, of course, is true. Few people have studied the original source materials for this formalized theory.  This dismissal not only ignores that many of those who dismiss concerns about critical theory are those mostly actively advocating its core ideas, it misunderstands the way that ideas work within a culture.  If you happen to be listening to this commentary on radio, you have two people to thank: German physicist Heinrich Rudolf Hertz, who discovered radio waves in the 1880s and Guglielmo Marconi, an Italian engineer who invented wireless radio communication in the 1890s. However, whether you knew these names before now and regardless of how well you understand how radio waves work, it is still quite possible to conceptualize radio and to hear my voice.   Worldviews often work like this. A person does not have to fully understand an idea before being shaped by it. When Oberlin College faculty and administration determined, in the face of the evidence, that the white bakery owners were guilty and the student was not, they were applying a critical theory lens to the situation and interpreting the facts accordingly. When the Oberlin College student said that the shoplifting did not matter because of deeper issues at play, the student was parroting a critical theory way of thinking about the world, in which every interaction must be understood and explained by the demographic groupings of the people involved. Moral status is awarded based on these groupings, not on actions. Certain groups are oppressed, and others are oppressors. End of story.  Far from being “too complicated” of a theory to infect culture, critical theory offers a simplistic substitute for the actual complexities of life and people. We cannot determine a person's character by tallying their list of demographic features or applying assumptions of privilege. Individuals are not stereotypes, but critical theory reduces them to such. No one need be able to pronounce multisyllabic academic jargon used by critical theorists to be infected by this mood. We simply are infected by it.  A few months ago, a friend told me of something that points to the level of cultural infection. She had asked a friend of hers, a junior high teacher, how many students in that class identified as LGBTQ. The answer, offered immediately in a sort of “don't you know this” tone, was, “Oh, all of them do.”   “All of them?” my friend replied. “Are they sexually active?”  “Not at all,” the teacher replied. “But none of them want to be straight or cis.”  Ideas that have infected college students, academics, and junior highers should not be so easily dismissed. The first way to counter infectious cultural moods is not to share that mood. Intentionally, and especially with our own kids, we must talk about and treat every human being as essentially valuable as image bearers of God, and as equally fallible because of their common descent from Adam and Eve. These are essential truths about the world and people and are far better ideas than the ones assumed by the critical theory mood.    Ideas are especially dangerous when assumed, as C.S. Lewis once put it, so we must also not allow the bad ideas to go unchallenged, lest they become normalized.   Finally, within a critical theory framework, in both its academic theory and cultural mood forms, there is no possibility of forgiveness or redemption. In a Christian vision of God and people, there is. In Christ, there is solid ground for forgiveness (He first forgave us) and for finding redemption (He has taken the punishment for our guilt). So, in Christ, we not only counter bad ideas, we point to a better way.  

Adam Carolla Show
Part 1: Dave Dameshek + Liked Tweets (ACS September 19)

Adam Carolla Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 77:00 Very Popular


The gang looks at some of Adam's liked tweets including a crow drinking water from a bottle and Oberlin College paying $36.6 million to a bakery they labeled 'racist'. They take a deep dive into what happened to Chongo from ‘Danger Island' before welcoming Dave Dameshek to the show. Dave talks about getting kicked out of his fantasy football league by Jon Hamm in pure defiance of a legal contract and reviews some highlights from the Chargers Chiefs game. PLUGS: Check out Dave Dameshek's new trivia show, ‘Mister Lister', Tuesday Nights at 7pm eastern on Spotify Live Check out his podcasts ‘Extra Points with Cousin Sal & Dave Dameshek' and ‘Minus Three' available wherever you listen to podcasts And check him out on Twitter, @Dameshek THANKS FOR SUPPORTING TODAY'S SPONSORS: Con-Cret.com/PODCAST Geico.com

Bevington Banter
Bevington Banter Live

Bevington Banter

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 66:43


The FBI overreach continues: they subpoenaed Mike Lindell and showed up at the door of a suburban New Jersey wife and mother. (1:15) They'll be coming to your door for your guns soon too as your credit card company is conveniently categorizing your gun store sales for them. Meanwhile, the “elite” know absolutely nothing about guns. (7:40) This is all happening while crime is running rampant, good cops are leaving their jobs, and many of those remaining don't know the law and see themselves as above it. (17:39) This replacement of good people with “yes” men is also happening in the military. Though there may be no one left in the military soon since due to continuing inflation, the pentagon has told struggling soldiers to apply for food stamps to feed their families. Inflation and supply chain problems could jump even more with the threat of an impending railway and port strike. (20:34) Since the U.S. likes to make a habit of funding both sides of wars, we are now funding both sides of a potential China and Taiwan military incident. (24:09) Our military is also continuing to push the COVID vaccine while losing more soldiers to sudden unexplained death. Meanwhile, the Netherlands has stopped the AstraZeneca vaccine for anyone under 60. (25:51) Oberlin College was ordered to pay $37 million in damages to a local bakery after slandering them as racists. (28:55) (31:13) We have an idea of why the FBI application process for a friend of ours was suddenly halted. (33:38) Sports! The Denver Broncos should fire their head coach after one game. (35:58) Questions and comments from our audience. (39:15) #FBI #MikeLindell #Biden #Trump #election #electionfraud #COVID #vaccine

Radical Grace/The Lutheran Difference
The Sneaky Ways Churches Deny The Gospel

Radical Grace/The Lutheran Difference

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 59:58


Eminem makes the top spot on the Christian Charts, Oberlin College gives in, and Queen Elizabeth II passes away. Later we take a look at how the sneaky ways churches and pastors rob their flocks of the good news. Visit Matthew Pancake's Facebook http://www.facebook.com/matthew.pancake Visit Pastor Gary Held's Facebook http://www.facebook.com/garyheld Visit our Website www.RadicalGraceRadio.com Visit Our Youtube Page

The BreakPoint Podcast
Parents Engaging Locally, Lila Rose Debating Dr. Phil, and Oberlin College in a "Critical Theory Mood"

The BreakPoint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 65:57 Very Popular


John and Maria discuss that parents who are engaged in community organizations or events can promote Christian morality, and even have a redemptive influence, without being deemed Christian nationalists. Afterwards, they point out how Lila Rose, founder and president of the pro-life organization Live Action, powerfully debated with Dr. Phil and other audience members on the Dr. Phil show. They conclude with how the story of the lawsuit against Oberlin College shows the “critical theory mood” of our culture.

Your Day In Court
Your Day in Court Podcast

Your Day In Court

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 43:40


Bruce Hagen and Ray Giudice discuss the lawsuit at Oberlin College, what constitutes a medical malpractice suit and why does your insurance pay if you did nothing wrong?Atlanta's ONLY All Conservative News & Talk Station.: https://www.xtra1063.com/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Smoke 'Em If You Got 'Em Podcast
34. When Do-Gooders Do Bad Things

Smoke 'Em If You Got 'Em Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 84:54


Nancy's reporting from Portland, where tragedy struck after a man accused of domestic abuse was bailed out by an activist organization. Sarah's reporting from her couch, where the Emmys forced her to sit through a women-pooping commercial not once but three times. They discuss the glory of Sheryl Lee Ralph bursting into song and how Jimmy Kimmel's gag went wrong. Is “White Lotus” worth watching? Did everyone but Sarah know that Matthew McFayden, aka Tom on “Succession,” was British? And can Ricky Gervais just host all future award ceremonies, please?We turn to the dust-up at Oberlin College, where an altercation at a beloved local bakery exploded into accusations of racial profiling and protests that cratered a family business. The resulting court case led to a $36 million fine for the college, which has not paid a dime — until now. We wonder if cases like this will make administrators think twice before jumping into the fray, and we notice how enclaves of privilege often protest the loudest about other people's privilege. In the hot box this week: Nancy praises the genius who made “Pet Sounds,” while Sarah tries to decode the sounds of her pet. This is a public episode. If you'd like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit smokeempodcast.substack.com/subscribe

Business Daily
The real state of the Russian economy

Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 17:27


As Ukraine seemingly makes dramatic advances on the battlefield, we look at what this may say about the situation inside Russia itself. Military analysts are describing what seems to be a depleted Russian military machine, lacking in morale, but also possibly lacking in the kinds of military equipment it needs to sustain its war effort. One estimate in August put the loss of hardware (not including missiles) at $16 billion. That's hard to replace, given the supply problems and falling growth brought about by wide-ranging western economic sanctions. We look inside the country at the way the economy is progressing, with the thoughts of one Russian business-owner, Dmitry Nechaev, and from western-based economists, Sergei Guriev at Sciences Po University in Paris, and Elina Ribakova, deputy chief economist at the International Institute of Finance. The US-based political scientist Stephen Crowley, of Oberlin College, then considers how much a weakened economy is likely to create the type of political pressure to make President Putin reassess his war strategy. Presenter/producer: Ed Butler (Image: Russian President Vladimir Putin at the desk in his office; Credit: BBC)

Police Off The Cuff
The Week in Crime and Policing with Mayo & Mayso

Police Off The Cuff

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 61:40


Mark and Angel are back with a funny episode. Shoplifting how bad of a crime is it. Ask the 77 year old women who was bulldozed over by a shoplifter stealing Funco Pop toys in Barnes and Nobles. Oberlin College must pay $38 mil to Gibson Bakery in Ohio for defaming the Businesses name. An UWS Concierge gets slashed by machete wielding crazy. NYC most liberal neighborhood the West Village hires armed guards to protect their neighborhood. Anthony Varvaro former MLB relief pitcher turned NYC Port Authority Police Officer killed in car accident on the way to a 9/11 Memorial. Much more... --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/otcpod1/support

College Recruiting Mindset Podcast
ISR #48- Bethune-Cookman University Basketball Head Coach - Janell Crayton - Inside Basketball Recruiting

College Recruiting Mindset Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 60:50


In this episode, we talked with Head Coach Janell Crayton;Coach Crayton has an extensive resume of leadership on and off the court and comes from Kennesaw State University where she served two years as assistant coach/recruiting coordinator. Prior to Kennesaw State, she worked under Coach David Six at Hampton University where she was a part of three straight winning seasons which included a place in the NCAA tournament in 2016-17. Prior to Hampton, Coach Crayton also served a well-respected list of other fine institutions including UNC Asheville, the College of William and Mary, Colgate University, Oberlin College, and Oglethorpe.Off the court, Coach Crayton served as a Campaign Associate for The United Way of Greater Atlanta where she led multiple fundraising campaigns and coordinated with large corporate partners to help raise tens of thousands of dollars for the organization.An amazing athlete, Coach Crayton boasts international playing experience that includes stops throughout the Czech Republic and Izmir, Turkey, where she also ran youth camps. Coach Crayton also had the opportunity to teach basketball fundamentals to high school students at Wesley Girls School in Ghana West Africa.Play College Sports Download iSportsRecruiting App

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, Energy, it is front and center and it is at the heart of the battle for freedom around the world

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice— I am a radical MAGA American extremist— AND I have heard enough! The radical Green New Dealers and those that think your gender is determined by the pants you wear or the color of your hair—are done here—we will prevail!   Here are three big things you need to know right now— ONE— Radical far left Oberlin College in Ohio is prepping to pay $36 Million in damages to a local family owned bakery—falsely accused of being racist in a shop-lifting incident— TWO— The funeral for Queen Elizabeth the Second is now just days away—and the nation is in mourning for the 96 year old Sovereign who died Friday—King Charles the Third is now head of The Royal Family— THREE— Energy—it is front and center and it is at the heart of the battle for freedom around the world—are we going to bend over and take it—are we going to allow governments around the world—including the American Government—to hide behind the smokescreen of regulations and use it as a weapon against your ability to drive a car—to own a boat—a snowmobile or anything else you fancy—   The U-K's new Prime Minister was the first to hit back hard against the fantasy—yes fantasy that somehow sending Western Civilization back to the Dark Ages by pulling the plug of Hydro-Carbons—that they love to call Fossil Fuels—is the only way to save us all from certain doom in just a few years—   Liz Truss on her first day as Prime Minister—ended the nations ban on Fracking—that will open up the flow of natural gas to address the energy crisis impacting all of Europe—   Other countries as we have been talking about—like Germany, France and numerous others are also rejecting the globalist attack on Freedom that was unleashed by trying to choke off reliable energy sources—including oil, natural gas and coal—   Germany and France are leading the way in re-opening or building brand new nuclear power plants to drive prices down by creating tremendous supply—and that is now spreading to America—   In fact something remarkable happened in Michigan that you may not have heard about—Governor Gretchen Whitmer who has been a leader in the war on domestic energy—has also reversed course and is now working to re-open the Pallisades Nuclear Power plant that was shut down a few weeks ago—years ahead of it needing to—   The political and scientific reality is even setting in for far left politicians in some very blue places—BUT—there seems to be a war going on—not just between Red and Blue—but inside the Democrat Party—over a host of the most radical policies—   But I don't think you should take one very sensible move by one far-left Governor as a sign that Bernie Sanders and the 4 Horsemen of the American Energy Apocalypse are going to dismount from the attack any time soon—because they are not—   They have drawn their swords and they are looking to take away your energy freedom—in the ongoing darkening of America—even as Europe begins to light the way to a better future—  

Improve the News
September 10, 2022: Ukraine gain, China-India deal and $36M racism libel

Improve the News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 27:10


Facts & Spin for September 10, 2022 top stories: Ukrainian claims more big gains, India and China reach border deal, A new North Korea law allows nuclear first-strike, US sanctions firms over alleged Iranian drones in Ukraine, A Michigan abortion rights initiative will appear on November's ballot, Oberlin College will pay $36M to bakery racism libel, The Memphis livestream shooter appears in court, Former PM Imran Khan in indicted in Pakistan, UN selects a new human rights Chief and South Korea proposes talks with the North on separated families. Sources: https://www.improvethenews.org/ Brief Listener Survey: https://www.improvethenews.org/pod

Drew and Mike Show
Drew And Mike – September 8, 2022

Drew and Mike Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 163:55 Very Popular


RIP Queen Elizabeth II, Mr. Methane reports live from England, the NFL returns, elder abuse of Louie Anderson, Zack Efron's face, Tom Mazawey's weekly check-in, a new Bonerline, TikTok crying, Steve Bannon charges, and murders in Memphis.The Queen is dead. Long live the King. The NFL will honor her before Game #1 tonight. RIP Bozo was trending. A college professor crapped all over the Queen, but Jeff Bezos slams her. Elton John is sad and Ozzy is crushed.RIP Bernard Shaw, the Farrah Fawcett of today. He famously asked Michael Dukakis a wild opening question in the '88 debate.The Beatles Revolver re-mix is coming out.We check in with world famous Brit, Mr. Methane, for a eulogy of Queen Elizabeth.More QE2: Thomas Markle has made his statement. Reggie Jackson shares a quip on Twitter.Trudi remains on vacation... as far as her tether would allow her to go.20% of our audience have been "broken".Crying on TikTok is so hot right now.TMZ covered the death of Michael Jackson by focusing on his amazing opioid addiction.Cara Delevingne is a complete mess right now.In Las Vegas, Robert Telles was arrested for murdering journalist Jeff German.Jerkmate brings you a brand-new Bonerline (use promo code BONER). Call of text 209-66-Boner.We know that there is a Hulu series called Candy. Stop calling about it.The Mike Tyson show on Hulu is pretty decent.Ezekiel Kelly goes on 22-hour Facebook Live rampage leaving 4 dead in Memphis.We learn even more disturbing details about jogger Eliza Fletcher's alleged killer.Steve Bannon turns himself in for the We Build the Wall scheme.Inflation sucks for everyone.Tom Mazawey joins the show to praise John Daly's first pitch, praise Mark McGwire for his steroid-fueled home run record, wade into the Tom Brady vs Gisele Bündchen relationship, debate the Cade McNamara / J.J. McCarthy QB battle, give out his football/wedding season schedule, cover Ryan Ermanni's tweets, guarantee a Detroit Lions victory on Sunday. and give the worst eulogy for Queen Elizabeth possibly ever.Learn about Anthony Templet, the worst son possibly ever in Netflix's I Just Killed My Dad.Louie Anderson was forced to make last-minute changes to his will. His sister files claims of elder abuse.More QE2: Jemele Hill, Michigan professor Ebony Elizabeth Thomas and more attack all Queen Elizabeth for all the colonizing she personally did.EMU professors strike and remain scared of COVID.Oberlin College coughs up $20+M dollars to Gibson's Bakery.Ricky Martin sues his nephew for $20,000,000.Zac Efron tries to explain why his face looks so different now.Britney Spears finally gets that long deserved vacation.Olivia Wilde is on damage control... but everyone still hates her.El Salvador's gamble on crypto doesn't seem to be working out too well.Social media is dumb, but we're on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter (Drew and Mike Show, Marc Fellhauer, Trudi Daniels and BranDon).

The Rush Limbaugh Show
Clay Travis and Buck Sexton Show H1 – Sep 9 2022

The Rush Limbaugh Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 36:55 Very Popular


Nashville Tennessean echoes Buck, compares the Queen to Dolly Parton. BYU investigation finds no evidence of racism on volleyball court during match against Duke. Oberlin College to pay $36.59M to a bakery that said it was falsely accused of racism after it caught a student shoplifting. Clay and Buck in Austin to see Texas-Alabama game. Polls show Brian Kemp and Herschel Walker leading in Georgia. Caller on false racism accusation against BYU.Follow Clay & Buck on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/clayandbuckSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Rich Zeoli
The Woke Culture had to Pay Up for False Accusation

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 56:15


In the second hour, Rich discusses Nearly six years after a shoplifting incident exploded into controversy, Oberlin College has announced that it has begun the payment of $36.59 million to Gibson's Bakery for its tainted reputation as being labeled as a racist bakery. What more Eco-Friendly Plastic or Paper Bags? Rich will tell you which one is better for the environment. A Sex Education Book Instructs Parents To Let Their Young Children Watch Them Have Intimacy? John Fetterman has agreed to battle Dr.Oz in a debate. What's on the cut sheet Pt.1

Rich Zeoli
A Special Tribute to The Royal Family (Full Show)

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 207:37


Queen Elizabeth  Rich and the gang pay homage to Queen Elizabeth. In the remarkable life of the Queen, Rich talks about the history of England and her reign as the ruler of England. Reminiscing Queen Elizabeth, Rich provides stories of her life and interesting facts about her journey as the Queen of England. A Nashville PR firm drops Jason Aldean after his wife talked about being happy she didn't change gender when she went through her 'tomboy phase'. Jason's wife Brittany Aldean's comment was "I'd really like to thank my parents for not changing my gender when I went through my tomboy phase. I love this girly life." This statement causes an uproar which results in her husband losing his job. The Woke Culture had to Pay Up for False Accusation  In the second hour, Rich discusses Nearly six years after a shoplifting incident exploded into controversy, Oberlin College has announced that it has begun the payment of $36.59 million to Gibson's Bakery for its tainted reputation as being labeled as a racist bakery. What more Eco-Friendly Plastic or Paper Bags? Rich will tell you which one is better for the environment. A Sex Education Book Instructs Parents To Let Their Young Children Watch Them Have Intimacy? John Fetterman has agreed to battle Dr.Oz in a debate, Dr.Oz decided to join the show to discuss this potential upcoming debate. What's on the cut sheet Pt.1 Lets Stand for Change In the third hour, Rich brought in a PA Candidate Mehmet Oz to discuss his latest candidacy and talk about his opponent John Fetterman's potential debate. The Interior Department removes anti-Native slur from usage in federal place names. Rich talks about Jack the Ripper. Rich talks about the Royal family History. Our Rights As Citizens  In the final hour, Rich discusses how the democrats are still attempting to remove your amendment rights to protect yourself with a firearm. Rich provides history on the reason why the second amendment was formed and its design to protect our family not having the government protecting us. Ryan Manion joins the show to discuss the 9/11 event. Ryan talks about the Travis Manion Foundation and the hero run. What's on the cut sheet Pt.2

The Commute with Carlson
Sept. 9th, 2022 show--w/ Kirby Wilbur

The Commute with Carlson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 115:02


Hour 1 -- Kirby Wilbur in for John Carlson: Gov Jay Inslee finally announces he'll end his state constitution-suspending emergency powers but he'll wait 7 more weeks to actually make it official, what will change with vaxx mandates as of Oct. 31st in WA, what Inslee's end of emergency powers means for nurse/hospital staffing levels, Inslee cites 'ability of people to protect themselves' as reason for lifting his emergency powers, measuring the impact of Britain's Queen Elizabeth II after her death yesterday at age 96, Queen Elizabeth's visit to the Reagan Ranch in California, GUEST: KNWN Northwest Newsradio reporter (and former 570 KVI morning news anchor) Carleen Johnson joins Kirby to reflect on the September 11th terror attacks on America 21 years later, KVI's Lars Larson examines the CNN reality check as their ratings continue to sag. Hour 2 -- one new polling sample in a major American city shows that 'non-white' residents are much more concerned with public safety and crime than 'white' residents polled, the polling shows 'people of color' want to "refund the police", Seattle officials realizing that city could receive bus loads of illegal aliens apprehended in Texas as New York, DC and Chicago already have; Vancouver BC buys an EV fire truck but the price and firefighting limitations raising some serious question marks about the purchase, GUEST: realtor Robbyn Adelsman talks about the interest rate hike impact on buying or selling a house right now, GUEST: host of Full Measure, Sharyl Attkisson, previews her newest story about border security and the impact of illegal crossings on Eagle Pass, Texas. Hour 3 -- Oberlin College loses appeal in the Ohio Supreme Court and now forced to pay $36 million for supporting a student boycott over an alleged racial incident at a bakery near campus, evaluating the pros and cons of COVID lock downs and emergency powers by Gov. Jay Inslee, WA OSPI wants to give 1.1 million public school students free lunch and breakfast every school day, GUEST: attorney John DiLorenzo is suing city of Portland over the ADA accessibilty problems connected to impassable sidewalks covered with tents and belongings of homeless people, DiLorenzo wants three results from this lawsuit in Portland, compare the up to 5000 homeless people to the 12% of Portland residents that have some sort of ADA disability, says some of the plaintiffs have volunteered for years in efforts to help assist homeless people, says Portland's politics are like trying to "walk up the down escalator", cites venerable Sen. Daniel Moynahan who criticized social programs studying poverty; the public is invited to a Sept. 11th memorial ceremony at Federal Way fire station #64 at 1pm on Sunday.

All American Savage Pod cast
BYU Apologizes, Oberlin College Pays Out, And The World Talks About The Queen-

All American Savage Pod cast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 53:01


-BYU apologizes to special needs fan -Oberlin pays out to the small business they accused of racism -The Queen and why the NYT doesn't like her

Daily Signal News
TOP NEWS | Dobbs Leak, Ben Shapiro, War in Ukraine | Sept. 9

Daily Signal News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 7:35


On today's Daily Signal Top News, we break down: Justice Neil Gorsuch says he hopes there will be news soon regarding who leaked the Dobbs draft decision back in May.Podcast Movement apologizes to conservative news site The Daily Wire following backlash over how it treated Ben Shapiro.U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken urges Europe in the face of rising energy prices from EuropeBrigham Young University reports there was no evidence to confirm a black Duke women's volleyball player's allegation that she was racially harassed at a game last month after concluding an investigation into the matter. Oberlin College says it will pay small family owned Gibson's Bakery nearly $37 million after the school lost a defamation lawsuit that began in 2016. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Love thy Lawyer
Richard Zitrin - Escape to San Quentin

Love thy Lawyer

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 33:03 Transcription Available


lovethylawyer.comA transcript of this podcast is available at lovethylawyer.com.Richard Zitran535 PACIFIC AVENUE, SUITE 100 SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94133 (415) 354-2701 DIRECT RICHARD@ZITRINLAWOFFICE.COM CURRICULUM VITAE - LEGAL ETHICS Member, State Bar of California, 1974 - present A.B., Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio, l968 (with Honors in Government) J.D., New York University School of Law, 1974 Attendee, University of San Francisco School of Law, 1973-1974; Executive Director, Moot Court Lecturer in Law, University of California, Hastings College of the Law, teaching Professional Responsibility (Legal Ethics in the Practice of Law), 2010 – present; Emeritus Lecturer, 2019 – present Director/Founder, Center for Applied Legal Ethics, University of San Francisco School of Law, 2000 - 2004; Faculty Coordinator, Legal Ethics Seminar courses, 1991 - 2000 Adjunct Professor of Law, University of California, Hastings College of the Law, 1994 – 2010 Adjunct Professor of Law, University of San Francisco, Professional Responsibility, Professional Responsibility Seminar, and Seminar in Legal Ethics and the Practice of Law, 1977 - 2006; and Trial Practice, 1986 - 1987, 1991 - 1994 and 1997 - 2000 Visiting Lecturer, Fordham University Law School, first year orientation program – “Truth, Justice, Ethics, and Morality” 2001 – 2005, as well as other law schools SELECTED LEGAL AFFILIATIONS, COMMITTEES Certified Specialist, Legal Malpractice, State Bar of California Board of Legal Specialization, 2010 – present Chair, State Bar of California Committee on Professional Responsibility and Conduct, 1994-1995; Special Consultant, American Bar Association, Program of Assistance and Review, 1989 – 2006 Member, American Bar Association Standing Committee on Lawyer Information and Referral Service, 1991 - 1995; Principal Drafter, ABA Model Rule and Legislation governing lawyer referral services Pro Bono Consultant to Bay Area legal services and criminal defense groups, including the California Appellate Project; the First District Appellate Project; the Bar Association of San Francisco Justice & Diversity Center – Pro Bono Project and Homeless Advocacy Project; the Legal Aid Society Employment Law Center; Bay Area Legal Aid; East Bay Community Law Center; and several Northern California county public defender offices  Louis Goodman www.louisgoodman.comhttps://www.lovethylawyer.com/ 510.582.9090  Musical theme by Joel Katz, Seaside Recording, Maui Technical support: Bryan Matheson, Skyline Studios, OaklandAudiograms & Transcripts: Paul Roberts    We'd love to hear from you.  Send me an email at louis@lovethylawyer.com. Please subscribe and listen. Then tell us who you want to hear and what areas of interest you'd like us to cover.  Please rate us and review us on Apple Podcasts.