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American multinational oil and gas corporation

  • 672PODCASTS
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  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 22, 2022LATEST
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Latest podcast episodes about ExxonMobil

The John Batchelor Show
ExxonMobil Goes Green-tinted. Vijay Vaitheeswaran @TheEconomist

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 10:50


Photo:  In the time of block-long Cadillacs and enormous tail fins, long before Exxon was imagined, the premier gasoline station was Esso. ExxonMobil Goes Green-tinted. Vijay Vaitheeswaran @TheEconomist https://www.economist.com/business/what-is-exxonmobils-new-climate-strategy-worth/21807259

Drilled
Exxon Takes Its First Amendment Battle to Texas Supreme Court

Drilled

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 19:06


Guardian journalist Chris McGreary joins to discuss ExxonMobil's attempts in Texas to cast litigation against it as a conspiracy to muzzle its free speech rights. Read Chris's story: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2022/jan/18/exxon-texas-courts-critics-climate-crimes

Economist Radio
Drilling into the numbers: ExxonMobil

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 22:56


America's biggest oil firm has long been recalcitrant on climate matters, so its new net-zero targets may seem surprising. We examine the substance of its pledges—and motivations. For an economist, tipping is an odd practice; whether you love it or hate it may be a question of control. And how unusual Novak Djokovic's refusenik vaccine stance is among elite athletes. Additional audio courtesy of Tennis Australia. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Intelligence
Drilling into the numbers: ExxonMobil

The Intelligence

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 22:56


America's biggest oil firm has long been recalcitrant on climate matters, so its new net-zero targets may seem surprising. We examine the substance of its pledges—and motivations. For an economist, tipping is an odd practice; whether you love it or hate it may be a question of control. And how unusual Novak Djokovic's refusenik vaccine stance is among elite athletes. Additional audio courtesy of Tennis Australia. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Squawk on the Street
Microsoft Gaming and Activision Blizzard CEOs on Their Companies' Mega-Deal, Goldman Sachs Misses and Stocks Tumble, Exxon's Net Zero Carbon Emissions Goal, and BlackRock's Fink on "Woke" Capitalism

Squawk on the Street

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 46:31


Carl Quintanilla, Jim Cramer and David Faber led off the show with news of a mega-deal: Microsoft agreeing to acquire "Call of Duty" videogame publisher Activision Blizzard for $95 per share or $68.7 billion in cash. Becky Quick, Jim and David interviewed Microsoft Gaming CEO Phil Spencer and Activision Blizzard CEO Bobby Kotick in a CNBC Exclusive. There was more for the anchors to discuss on a busy Tuesday: Markets in sell-off mode as yields rise and Goldman Sachs posts a fourth-quarter earnings miss, BlackRock CEO Larry Fink out with his annual letter in which he says stakeholder capitalism is not "woke," Exxon Mobil aims for net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, the tech sector extends its 2022 slump and GlaxoSmithKline rejects Unilever's $68.4 billion offer to acquire GSK's consumer health business.

Marketplace Minute
Microsoft reaches deal to acquire video game maker Activision Blizzard - Midday - Marketplace Minute - January 18, 2022

Marketplace Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 1:50


The deal, valued at almost $69 billion, is the largest in the video game industry; Exxon Mobil pledges net-zero emissions by 2050; Goldman Sachs shells out cash for employees, profits fall; FAA says 45% of airplanes cleared to fly around 5G signals

MoneyBall Medicine
What Exponential Change Really Means in Healthcare, with Azeem Azhar

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 57:25


As we say here on The Harry Glorikian Show, technology is changing everything about healthcare works—and the reason we keep talking about it month after month is that the changes are coming much faster than they ever did in the past. Each leap in innovation enables an even bigger leap just one step down the road. Another way of saying this is that technological change today feels exponential. And there's nobody who can explain exponential change better than today's guest, Azeem Azhar.Azeem produces a widely followed newsletter about technology called Exponential View. And last year he published a book called The Exponential Age: How Accelerating Technology is Transforming Business, Politics, and Society. He has spent his whole career as an entrepreneur, investor, and writer trying to help people understand what's driving the acceleration of technology — and how we can get better at adapting to it. Azeem argues that most of our social, business, and political institutions evolved for a period of much slower change—so we need to think about how to adapt these institutions to be more nimble. If we do that right, then maybe we can apply the enormous potential of all these new technologies, from computing to genomics, in ways that improve life for everyone.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian. Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare.Artificial intelligence. Big data. Predictive analytics. In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening way faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own health and the health of your loved ones, you'll need to learn everything you can about how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of my new book, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.So, when you step back and think about it, why is it that people like me write books or make podcasts about technology and healthcare?Well, like I just said, it's because tech is changing everything about healthcare works—and the changes are coming much faster than they ever did in the past.In fact, the change feels like it's accelerating. Each leap in innovation enables an even bigger leap just one step down the road.Another way of saying this is that technological change today feels exponential.And there's nobody who can explain exponential change better than today's guest, Azeem Azhar.Azeem produces a widely followed newsletter about technology called Exponential View.And last year he published a book called The Exponential Age: How Accelerating Technology is Transforming Business, Politics, and Society.He has spent his whole career as an entrepreneur, investor, and writer trying to help people understand what's driving the acceleration of technology — and how we can get better at adapting to it.Azeem argues that most of our social, business, and political institutions evolved for a period of much slower change. So we need to think about how to adapt these institutions to be more nimble.If we do that right, then maybe we can apply the enormous potential of all these new technologies, from computing to genomics, in ways that improve life for everyone.Azeem and I focus on different corners of the innovation world. But our ideas about things like the power of data are very much in sync. So this was a really fun conversation. Here's Azeem Azhar.Harry Glorikian: Azeem, welcome to the show.Azeem Azhar: Harry, what a pleasure to be here.Harry Glorikian: I definitely want to give you a chance to sort of talk about your work and your background, so we really get a sense of who you are. But I'd first like to ask a couple of, you know, big picture questions to set the stage for everybody who's listening. You like this, your word and you use it, "exponential," in your branding and almost everything you're doing across your platform, which is what we're going to talk about. But just for people who don't, aren't maybe familiar with that word exponential. What does that word mean to you? Why do you think that that's the right word, word to explain how technology and markets are evolving today?Azeem Azhar: Such a great question. I love the way you started with the easy questions. I'm just kidding because it's it's hard. It's hard to summarize short, but in a brief brief statement. So, you know, exponential is this idea that comes out of math. It is the idea that something grows by a fixed proportion in any given time period. An interest-bearing savings account, 3 percent growth or in the old days, we'd get 3 percent per annum, three percent compounded. And compound interest is really powerful. It's what your mom and your dad told you. Start saving early so that when you're a bit older, you'll have a huge nest egg, and it never made sense to us. And the idea behind an exponential is that these are processes which, you know, grow by that certain fixed percentage every year. And so the amount they grow grows every time. It's not like going from the age of 12 to 13 to 14 to 15 were actually proportionately—you get less older every year because when you go from 15 to 16, you get older by one fifteenth of your previous age. And when you go from 50 to fifty one, it's by one 50th, which is a smaller proportion. Someone who is growing in age exponentially would be growing by, say, 10 percent every year. So you go from 10 to 11 and that's by one year. From 20, you go to 22, two years. From 30 to 33. So that's the idea of an exponential process. It's kind of compound interest. But why I use the phrase today to describe what's going on in the economy and in the technologies that drive the economy, is that many of the key technologies that we currently rely on and will rely on as they replace old industrial processes are improving at exponential rates on a price-performance basis.Azeem Azhar: That means that every year you get more of them for less, or every year what you got for the the same dollar you get much more. And I specifically use a threshold, and that threshold is to say essentially it's an exponential technology if it's improving by double digits, 10 percent or more every year on a compounding basis for decades. And many of the technologies that I look at increased by improve by 30, 40, 50, 60 percent or more every year, which is pretty remarkable. The reverse of that, of course, is deflation, right? These capabilities are getting much cheaper. And I think the reason that's important and the reason it describes the heartbeat of our economies is that we're at a point in development of, you know, sort of economic and technological development where these improvements can be felt. They're viscerally felt across a business cycle. Across a few years, in fact. And that isn't something that we have reliably and regularly seen in any previous point in history. The idea that this pace of change can be as fast as it as it is. And on the cover of my book The Exponential Age, which I'm holding up to you, Harry. The thing about the curve is is that it starts off really flat and a little bit boring, and you would trade that curve for a nice, straight, sharp line at 45 degrees. And then there's an inflection point when it goes suddenly goes kind of crazy and out of control. And my argument is that we are now past that inflection point and we are in that that sort of vertical moment and we're going to have to contend with it.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, we are mentally aligned. And I try to talk to people about this. I mean, when we were doing the genome project that Applied Biosystems, you know, when we had finished, I think it was 2 percent or 4 percent of the genome, everybody's like, Oh, you have like ninety something [to go], and they couldn't see the exponential curve. And then we were done like five years later. And so it's it's this inability of the human mind. You know, it's really not designed to do that, but we're not designed to see exponential shift. We're sort of looking around that corner from an evolutionary perspective to see what's happening. But, you know? Exponential growth is not a new concept, if you think about, you know, really, I think the person that brought it to the forefront was Gordon Moore, right? With, you know, how semiconductor chips were going to keep doubling every two years and cost was going to stay flat. And you know, how do you see it playing out? Today, what is so different right now, or say, in the past two, three, four, five years. What you can see going forward that. May not have been as obvious 10 or 15 years ago.Azeem Azhar: I mean, it is an idea that's been around with us for a long time. You know, arguably Thomas Malthus, the British scholar in the 18th century who worried about the exponential growth of the population destroying the land's carrying capacity and ability to produce crops. And of course, we have the sort of ancient Persian and Hindu stories about the vizier and the chessboard, who, you know, puts a grain of rice and doubles on each square and doubles at each time. So it's an idea that's been around for a while. The thing that I think has happened is that it's back to its back to that point, the kink, the inflection in the curve. The point at which in the story of the chess, the king gets so angry with his vizier that he chops off his head. The point with the semiconductors, where the chips get so powerful and so cheap that computing is everything, and then every way in which we live our lives is mediated through these devices. And that wasn't always the way. I mean, you and I, Harry, are men of a certain age, and we remember posting letters and receiving mail through the letterbox in the morning. And there was then, some 15 years later, there were, or 20 years later, there was a fax, right? I mean, that's what it looked like.Azeem Azhar: And the thing that's different now from the time of Gordon Moore is that that what he predicted and sort of saw out as his clock speed, turns out to be a process that occurs in many, many different technology fields, not just in computing. And the one that you talked about as well, genome sequencing. And in other areas like renewable energy. And so it becomes a little bit like...the clock speed of this modern economy. But the second thing that is really important is to ask that question: Where is the bend in the curve? And the math purists amongst your listeners will know that an exponential curve has no bend. It depends on where you zoom in. Whatever however you zoom, when you're really close up, you're really far away. You'll always see a band and it will always be in a different place. But the bend that we see today is the moment where we feel there is a new world now. Not an old world. There are things that generally behave differently, that what happens to these things that are connected to exponential processes are not kind of geeks and computer enthusiasts are in Silicon Valley building. They're happening all over the world. And for me, that turning point happens some point between 2011, 2012 and 2015, 2016. Because in 2009, America's largest companies wereAzeem Azhar: not in this order, Exxon, Phillips, Wal-Mart, Conoco... Sorry, Exxon Mobil, Wal-Mart, ConocoPhillips, Chevron, General Motors, General Electric, Ford, AT&T, Valero. What do all of them have in common? They are all old companies are all built on three technologies that emerged in the late 19th century. The car or the internal combustion engine, the telephone and electricity. And with the exception of Wal-Mart, every one of those big companies was founded between about 1870 and sort of 1915. And Wal-Mart is dependent on the car because you needed suburbs and you needed large cars with big trunks to haul away 40 rolls of toilet paper. So, so and that was a century long shift. And then if you look out four years after 2009, America's largest firms, in fact, the world's largest firms are all Exponential Age firms like the Tencent and the Facebooks of this world. But it's not just that at that period of time. That's the moment where solar power became for generating electricity became cheaper than generating electricity from oil or gas in in most of the world. It's the point at which the price to sequence the human genome, which you know is so much better than I do, diminished below $1000 per sequence. So all these things came together and they presented a new way of doing things, which I call the Exponential Age.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, in my last book. I, you know, I do state that the difference between evolution and revolution is time, right? If you wait long enough, things happen evolutionarily, but at the speed that things are changing, it feels revolutionary and in how it's affecting everybody. So let's rewind and talk about your background. You've been active as a business columnist, as a journalist, a startup founder, a CEO, a leader of corporate innovation, incubators at Reuters and a venture capital partner. Lately you've built what eems like a very busy career around books and talks and podcasts and all around this theme of accelerating technologies, I'd love to hear how you how you first got interested in all these themes about technological change. You know, how society can manage this change? I know you were in Oxford. You got your master's degree in the famous PPE program. The politics, philosophy and economics. You know, was it soon after that that you went down this road? Or is Oxford where it all started?Azeem Azhar: It started well before then in, in a weird way. So, so you know, my interest really is between sits between technology and an economic institutions and society. And I, I was born, like most of us are, to two parents, and my parents were working in in Zambia in the early 70s, and my dad was working on helping this newly independent country develop economic institutions. It didn't have them and it needed them to go through that sort of good institutions, make for healthy economies, make for social welfare and sort of civil politics. That's the argument. So he was out there doing all of that. And I was born the year after Intel released its 4004 chip, which is widely regarded as the sort of the chip that kicked off the personal computing revolution. And so, so in the backdrop of people talking about development and development economics and being curious about my own personal story, I was exposed to these ideas. I mean, you don't understand them when you're eight or 10 and you know, but you're exposed to them and you have an affiliation to them and so on. And at the same time, computers were entering into the popular consciousness.Azeem Azhar: You know, you had C-3PO, the robot and computers in Star Trek, and I saw a computer in 1979 and I had one from 1981. And so my interest in these things, these two tracks was start set off quite early on and I really, really loved the computing. And I did, you did notice, but you don't necessarily understand that, why computers are getting more and more powerful. My first computer only had one color. Well, it had two, white and black. And my second could manage 16 at some time, probably not 16. Eight out of a palette of 16 at any given time. And they get better and better. And so alongside my life were computers getting faster. I'm learning to program them and discovering the internet and that, I think, has always sat alongside me against this kind of family curiosity. I suspect if my parents had been, I don't know, doctors, I would have been in your field in the field of bioinformatics and applying exponential technologies to health care. And if my parents had been engineers, I would have been doing something that intersected engineering and computing.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, no, it's you know, it's interesting, I remember when we got our first chip, when I was first learning about, you know, computers like it was, you know, eight bits, right? And then 16 bits and oh my god, what can we do with them? And we were building them, and I actually have to get you a copy of my new book because I think if you read the first chapter and what you just said, you'll be like, Oh my God, we have more in common than we may think, even though you know you're where you are and I'm in the health care field to. But you were co-founder and CEO of a company, I believe that was called PeerIndex, which was a startup in the late 2000s. And even back then, you were trying to quantify people's influence on different social media platforms. And I'm trying to remember like, do I even know what the social media platform was back in 2000? It seems like so long ago, and you successfully sold it to Brandwatch in, like, 2014. What did that experience sort of teach you about, you know, the bigger issues and how technology impacts society and vice versa? Because I have to believe that you know your hands on experience and what you were seeing has to have changed the way that you thought about how fast this was going and what it was going to do.Azeem Azhar: Oh, that is an absolutely fantastic, fantastic question. And. You know, you really get to the heart of all of the different things that you learn as a founder. When we when I started PeerIndex, the idea was really that people were going on to the internet with profiles that they maintained for themselves. So up until that point, apart from people who had been really early on the internet, like you and I who used Usenet and then early web pages for ourselves, no one really had a presence. And these social apps like MySpace and Twitter and LinkedIn and Facebook show up and they start to give people a presence. And we felt that initially there would be a clear problem around trying to discover people because at the time the internet was an open network. You could look at anyone's page on Facebook. There weren't these walled gardens. And we looked down on them. So we thought initially that there would be a an opportunity to build some kind of expertise system where I could say, "Listen, find me something that someone who knows something about, you know, sushi restaurants in Berlin." And it would help me find that person. I could connect their profile and talk to them because it was the really early, naive days before Facebook or LinkedIn had advertising on them. And we could we kind of got the technology to work, but actually the market was moving and we couldn't land that.Azeem Azhar: And so we had to kind of pivot, as you do several times, ultimately, until we became this kind of influence analytics for marketers. But the few things that I learned. So the first one was how quickly new players in a market will go from being open to being closed. So it was 2011 when Facebook started to put the shutters down on its data and become a closed garden. And they realized that the network effect and data is what drove them forward. And the second thing was the speed with which what we did changed. So when we were getting going and doing all of this kind of analytics on Twitter and Facebook. They didn't really have data science teams. In fact, Twitter's first data scientists couldn't get a US visa and ended up helping, working with us for several months. And I think back to the fact that we used five or six different core technologies for our data stores in a seven-year period. And in that time, what we did became so much more powerful. So when we started, we had maybe like 50,000 people in this thing, it was really hard to get it to work. The entire company's resources went on it. At one point we were we had about 100 million people in the data in our dataset, or 100 million profiles in the data.Azeem Azhar: They were all public, by the way. I should say this is all public data and it was just like a search engine in a way. And in order to update the index, we would need to run processes on thousands of computers and it would take a big, big, big servers, right? And it would take a day. Yeah. By the time we sold the company, a couple more iterations of Moore's Law, some improvements in software architecture, we were updating 400 million user profiles in real time on a couple of computers. Yep, so not only do we quadrupled the dataset, we had increased its, sort of decreased its latency. It was pretty much real time and we had reduced the amount of computers we needed by a factor of about 400. And it was a really remarkable evolution. And that gets me to the third lesson. So the second lesson is really all about that pace of change in the power of Moore's law. And then the third lesson was really that my engineers learned by doing. They figured out how to do this themselves. And whereas I was sort of roughly involved in the first design, by the time we got to the fifth iteration this was something of a process that was entirely run by some brilliant young members of the team.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, you've got to actually cook something to understand how to do it and taste it and understand how it's going to come out. So your new book, The Exponential Age, came out this fall. You know, in the first chapter, you sort of identify two main problems, right? One is how do we perceive technology and then or the way we relate to technology and. Can you describe the two problems as you see them and maybe, maybe even hint a little? I don't want I don't want if people want to buy the book, I want them to buy it, but maybe hint that the solution?Azeem Azhar: Yeah. Well, I mean, there are there are a couple of issues here, right, in the Exponential Age. The first is that technology creates all sorts of new potentials and we live them. We're doing this over Zoom, for example. Right. And there are. But the arrival of new potentials always means that there's an old system that is going to be partially or entirely replaced. And so I describe that process as the exponential gap. It is the gap between the potentials of the new and the way in which most of us live our lives. And the thing is, the reason I say "the way most of us live our lives" is because our lives, even in America, which doesn't like its sort of government, are governed by institutions and by regulations. You know, when you when you start to cook, you wash your hands, right? There's no law. That's just an institution, its common habit. If you have teenage kids like I do, you're battling with the fact that people are meant to talk over dinner, not stare at their phones. In the UK there is an institution that says on a red light traffic signal, you never turn. You wait. It's not like the US where you can do that. Now some of these institutions are codified like our traffic laws, and some are not.Azeem Azhar: There are then more formal institutions of different types like, you know, the Fed or NATO or the Supreme Court. And the purpose of institutions, social, formal, legal, informal is to make life easier to live, right? Right, you don't have to remember to put our pants on. I will read a rule that says, put your pants on before you leave the house. It's like you just put them on and everybody kind of knows it. And there's no law that says you should or shouldn't, right. So they become very valuable. But the thing is that the institutions in general, by their nature, don't adapt to at the speed with which these new technologies do adapt. And even slower moving technologies like the printing press really upended institutions. I mean, Europe went into centuries of war just after the printing press emerged. So, so the central heart of the challenge is, on the one hand, we have these slightly magical technologies that do amazing things, but they somewhat break our institutions and we have to figure out how we get our institutions to adapt better. But there's a second complication to all of this, which is that which is, I think, more one that's about historical context. And that complication is that the way we have talked about technology, especially in the West in the last 40 or 50 years, has been to suggest that technology is deterministic.Azeem Azhar: We're a bit like people in a pre-med, pre-science era who just say the child got the pox and the child died. We say the technology arrived and now we must use it. The iPhone arrived and we must use it. TheFacebook arrived, and we must use it. We've gotten into this worldview that technology is this sort of unceasing deterministic force that arrives from nowhere and that a few men and women in Silicon Valley control, can harness it. We've lost sight of the fact that technology is something that we as members of society, as business people, as innovators, as academics, as parents get to shape because it is something that we build ourselves. And that for me was a second challenge. And what I sought to do in the book, as I was describing, the Exponential Age is not only persuade people that we are in the Exponential Age, but also describe how it confuses our institutions broadly defined and also explain why our response has sometimes been a bit poor. Some a large part of which I think is connected to putting technology on a particular pedestal where we don't ask questions of it. And then hopefully at the end of this, I do give some suggestions.Harry Glorikian: Well, it's interesting, right, I've had the pleasure of giving talks to different policy makers, and I always tell them like, you need to move faster, you need to implement policy. It's good to be a little wrong and then fix it. But don't be so far behind the curve that you, you know, some of these things need corralling otherwise, they do get a lot of, you know, get out of hand. Now in health care, we have almost the opposite. We're trying to break the silos of data so that we can improve health care, improve diagnosis, improve outcomes for patients, find new drugs. Harry Glorikian: So I'm going to, I'm going to pivot there a little bit and sort of dive a little deeper into life sciences and health care, right, which is the focus of the show, right? And in the book, you you say that our age is defined by the emergence of several general-purpose technologies, which I'm totally aligned with, and that they are all advancing exponentially. And you actually say biology is one of them. So first, what are the most dramatic examples in your mind of exponential change in life sciences? And how do you believe they're affecting people's health?Azeem Azhar: Well, I mean, if you got the Moderna or BioNTech vaccination, you're a lucky recipient of that technology and it's affecting people's health because it's putting a little nanobots controlled by Bill Gates in your bloodstream to get you to hand over all your bitcoin to him, is the other side of the problem. But I mean, you know, I mean, more seriously, the Moderna vaccine is an example that I give at the at the end of the book comes about so remarkably quickly by a combination of these exponential technologies. I'm just going to look up the dates. So on the 6th of January 2020, there's a release of the sequence of a coronavirus genome from from a respiratory disease in Wuhan. Yeah, and the the genome is just a string of letters, and it's put on GenBank, which is a bit like an open-source story storage for gene sequences. People started to download it, and synthetic genes were rapidly led to more than 200 different vaccines being developed. Moderna, by February the 7th, had its first vials of its vaccine. That was 31 days after the initial release of the sequence and another six days they finalized the sequence of the vaccine and 25 more days to manufacture it. And within a year of the virus sequence being made public, 24 million people had had one dose of it.Azeem Azhar: Now that's really remarkable because in the old days, by which I mean February 2020, experts were telling us it would take at least 18 months to figure out what a vaccine might even look like, let alone tested and in place. So you see this dramatic time compression. Now what were the aspects at play? So one aspect at play was a declining cost of genome sequencing, which the machines are much cheaper. It's much cheaper to sequence these samples. That means that the entire supply chain of RNA amplifiers and so on a more widely available. This then gets shared on a website that can be run at very few dollars. It can get access to millions of people. The companies who are doing the work are using synthetic genes, which means basically writing out new bases, which is another core technology that's going through an exponential cost decline. And they're using a lot of machine learning and big data in order to explore the phenomenally complex biological space to zero in on potential candidates. So that the whole thing knits together a set of these different technologies in a very, very powerful and quite distributed combination.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you like the interviews we do here on the show I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer. It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is now available in Kindle format. Just go to Amazon and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian.And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's step back here for just a minute. So I wonder if you have a thesis—from a fundamental technology perspective, what's really driving the exponential technological change, right? Do you think that that, is there a force maybe outside of semiconductors that are driving biology forward? What's your view? I mean, if you took the computational tools away from life sciences and drug developers, would we still see the same rapid advances in that area, and the answer could be no, because I can tell you my thoughts after you tell me yours.Azeem Azhar: Well, we wouldn't see the same advances, but we would still see significant advances and it's hard to unpack one from another. But if you look at the I mean, you worked on the genome sequencing stuff. So you know that there's a lot of interesting aspects to do with the reagents that are used the electrochemistry, the arrays and making little ongoing improvements in those areas. There are also key improvements in the actual kind of automation of the processes between each to each step, and some of those automations are not, they're not kind of generalized robots, soft robots, they are trays that are being moved at the right time from one spot to another, stop on a kind of lab bench. So you'd still see the improvements, but you wouldn't see the same pace that we have seen from computing. And for two reasons. So one is that kind of the core ability to store lots of this data, which runs into the exabytes and then sift through it, is closely connected to storage capacity and computation capability. But also even the CAD package that the person used to redraw the designs for the new laboratory bench to handle the new vials of reagents required a computer. But yes, but you know, so what? What's your understanding as someone who is on the inside and, note to listener, that was a bit cruel because Harry is the expert on this one!Harry Glorikian: And oh no, no, no, no. I, you know, it's interesting, right… I believe that now that information is more readily available, which again drives back to sensors, technology, computation, speed as well as storage is changing what we do. Because the information feeds our ability to generate that next idea. And most of this was really hard to get. I mean, back in the day, I mean, if you know, now I wear a medical device on my on my wrist. I mean, you know this, I look as a as a data storage device, right? Data aggregation device. And this I look at it more as a coach, right? And but the information that it's getting, you know, from me on a momentary basis is, I mean, one of the companies I helped start, I mean, we have trillions of heartbeats, trillions. Can you imagine the analytics from a machine learning and, you know, A.I. perspective that I can do on that to look for? Is there a signal of a disease? Can I see sleep apnea or one of the I could never have done that 10 years ago.Azeem Azhar: I mean, even 10, how about I mean, five maybe, right? I mean, the thing that I find remarkable about about all of this is what it's told me. So I went from I used to check my bloods every year and so I would get a glucose reading or an insulin reading every year. I then put a CGM on continuous glucose monitor and I wore it for 16 to 18 weeks and it gave me a reading every 15 months minutes. So I literally went from once a year, which is 365 times 96, 15 minute intervals. So it's like a 40,000-fold improvement. I went to from to that every 15 minutes, and it was incredible and amazing and changed my life in so many good ways, which I'm happy to go into later. But the moment I put the 15 minute on, I kid you not, within an hour I was looking for the streaming cGMPs that give you real time feed. No 15-minute delay. And there is one that Abbott makes through a company, sells through a company called Super Sapiens. But because suddenly I was like a pilot whose altimeter doesn't just tell them you're in the air or you've hit the ground, which is what happened when I used to go once a year, I've gone to getting an altitude reading every minute, which is great, but still not brilliant for landing the plane to where I could get this every second. And this would be incredible. And I find that really amazing. I just I just and what we can then do with that across longitudinal data is just something else.Harry Glorikian: We're totally aligned. And, you know, jumping back to the deflationary force of all this. Is. What we can do near-patient, what we can do at home, what we can do at, you know, I'll call it CVS, I think by you, it would be Boots. But what these technologies bring to us and how it helps a person manage themselves more accurately or, you know, more insightfully, I think, brings us not to chronic health, but we will be able to keep people healthier, longer and at a much, much lower cost than we did before because. As you know, every time we go to the hospital, it's usually big machines, very expensive, somebody to do the interpretation. And now if we can get that information to the patient themselves and AI and machine learning can make that information easier for them to interpret. They can actually do something actionable that that that makes a difference.Azeem Azhar: I mean, I think it's a really remarkable opportunity with a big caveat that where we can look at look historically, so you know, we're big fans of the Hamilton musical in my household. And if you go back to that time, which is only a couple of hundred years ago and you said to them, this is the kind of magic medicine they'll have in the US by 2020. I mean, it's space tech. It's alien space tech. You know, you can go in and we measure things they didn't even know could be measured, right, like the level of antibodies in the bloodstream. And you can get that done in an hour almost anywhere, right? Yeah. And it's really quite cheap because GDP per capita in the per head in the US is like $60,000 a year. And I can go and get my blood run. A full panel run for $300 in London, one of the most expensive cities in the world. 60 grand a year. $300. Well, surely everybody's getting that done. And yet and you know this better than me. Right. You know this better than me that despite that, we don't have everyone getting their bloods done because it's just so cheap, right, there are other structural things that go on about who gets access, and I think America is a great example of this because for all the people who read, we are aware of Whoop, and have, you know, biological ages that are 10 years younger than their chronological age, you've also got like a much, much larger incidence of deaths by drug overdose and chronic obesity and sort of diseases of inflammation and so on. And that's despite having magical the magical space technology of the 2020s. So the question I think we have to have is why would we feel that next year's optoelectronic sensors from Rockly or the Series 7 or Series 8 Apple Watch will make the blindest bit of difference to health outcomes for the average American.Harry Glorikian: Now, I totally agree with you, I mean, I think half of it is education, communication. You know, there's a lot of social and political and policy and communication issues that exist, and actually that was going to be my next, one of my next questions for you, which is: What are some of the ways that exponential change challenges our existing social and political structures? And you know, do you see any—based on all the people that you've talked to, you know, writing the book, et cetera—insights of how we're going, what those are and maybe some ideas about how we can move beyond them.Azeem Azhar: Hmm. Well, I mean, on the health care side, I think one of the most important issues is and this is I mean, look, you've got an American audience and your health system is very different to, let's just say everyone.Harry Glorikian: Actually, the audience is global. So everybody, I have people that all over the world that listen to this.Azeem Azhar: Fair enough. Okay. Even better, so the rest of the world will understand this point, perhaps more, which is that, you know, in many place parts of the world, health care is treated as not, you know, it's treated differently to I take a vacation or a mutual bond that you buy, right or a car, it's not seen purely as a kind of profit vehicle. It's seen as something that serves the individual and serves a community and public health and so on matters. And I think one of the opportunities that we have is to think out for it, look out for is how do we get the benefits of aggregated health data, which is what you need. You need aggregate population wide data that connects a genotype to a phenotype. In other words, what the gene says to how it gets expressed to me physically to my biomarkers, you know, my, what's in my microbiota, what my blood pressure is on a minute by minute basis and my glucose levels and so on. And to whatever illnesses and diseases and conditions I seem to have, right, the more of that that we have, the more we can build predictive models that allow for the right kind of interventions and pre-habilitation right rather than rehabilitation. But in order to do that at the heart of that, yes, there's some technology. But at the heart of that is how do we get people's data in such a way that they are willing to provide that in a way that is not forced on them through the duress of the state or the duress of our sort of financial servitude? And so that, I think, is something that we really, really need to think about the trouble that we've had as the companies have done really well out of consumer data recently.Azeem Azhar: And I don't just mean Google and Facebook, but even all the marketing companies before that did so through a kind of abusive use of that data where it wasn't really done for our benefit. You know, I used to get a lot of spam letters through my front door. Physical ones. I was never delighted for it, ever. And so I think that one of the things we have to think, think about is how are we going to be able to build common structures that protect our data but still create the opportunities to develop new and novel therapeutic diagnosis, early warning systems? And that's not to say there shouldn't be profit making companies on there that absolutely should be. But the trouble is, the moment that you allow the data resource to be impinged upon, then you either head down this way of kind of the sort of dominance that Facebook has, or you head down away the root of that kind of abuse of spam, junk email and so on, and junk physical mail.Azeem Azhar: So I think there is this one idea that that emerges as an answer, which is the idea of the data commons or the data collective. Yeah. We actually have a couple of them working in health care in in the U.K., roughly. So there's one around CT scans of COVID patients. So there's lots and lots of CT scans and other kind of lung imaging of COVID patients. And that's maintained in a repository, the sort of national COVID lung imaging databank or something. And if you're if you're an approved researcher, you can get access to that and it's done on a non-commercial basis, but you could build something commercially over the top of it. Now the question is why would I give that scan over? Well, I gave give it over because I've been given a cast-iron guarantee about how it's going to be used and how my personal data will be, may or may not be used within that. I would never consider giving that kind of data to a company run by Mark Zuckerberg or, you know, anyone else. And that, I think, is the the cross-over point, which is in order to access this, the benefits of this aggregate data from all these sensors, we need to have a sort of human-centric approach to ensure that the exploitation can happen profitably, but for our benefit in the long run.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, I'm looking at some interesting encryption technologies where nothing is ever unencrypted, but you can, you know, the algorithm can learn from the data, right? And you're not opening it up. And so there, I believe that there are some solutions that can make give the side that needs the data what they need, but protect the other side. I still think we need to policymakers and regulators to step up. That would cause that shift to happen faster. But you know, I think some of those people that are making those policies don't even understand the phone they're holding in their hands most of the time and the power that they're holding. So. You know, last set of questions is. Do you think it's possible for society to adapt to exponential change and learn how to manage it productively?Azeem Azhar: It's a really hard question. I'm sure we will muddle through. We will muddle through because we're good at muddling through, you know? But the question is, does that muddling through look more like the depression years. Or does that muddling through look like a kind of directed Marshall Plan. Because they both get through. One comes through with sort of more productive, generative vigor? What I hoped to do in the book was to be able to express to a wider audience some underlying understanding about how the technologies work, so they can identify the right questions to to ask. And what I wanted to do for people to work in the technology field is draw some threads together because a lot of this will be familiar to them, but take those threads to their consequences. And in a way, you know, if I if I tell you, Harry, don't think of an elephant. What are you thinking about right  now?Harry Glorikian: Yeah. Yeah, of course it's not, you know, suggestive.Azeem Azhar: And by laying out these things for these different audiences in different ways, I'm hoping that they will remember them and bear those in mind when they go out and think about how they influence the world, whether it's decisions they make from a product they might buy or not buy, or how they talk influence their elected officials or how they steer their corporate strategy or the products they choose to build. I mean, that's what you would you would hope to do. And then hopefully you create a more streamlined approach to it to the change that needs to happen. Now here's the sort of fascinating thing here, is that over the summer of 2021, the Chinese authorities across a wide range of areas went in using a number of different regulators and stamped on a whole set of Exponential Age companies, whether it was online gaming or online education. The big, multi sided social networks, a lot of fintech, a lot of crypto. And they essentially had been observing the experiment to learn, and they had figured out what things didn't align with their perceived obligations as a government to the state and to the people. Now, you know, I'm using that language because I don't want this to become a kind of polarized sort of argument.Azeem Azhar: I'm just saying, here's a state where you may not agree with its objectives and the way it's accountable, but in its own conception, it's accountable to its people and has to look out for their benefit. And it took action on these companies in really, really abrupt ways. And. If you assume that their actions were rational and they were smart people and I've met some of them and they're super smart people, it tells you something about what one group of clever people think is needed at these times. This sort of time. And I'm not I'm not advocating for that kind of response in the US or in Western Europe, but rather than to say, you know, when your next-door neighbor, and you live in an apartment block and your next-door neighbor you don't like much runs out and says the whole building is on fire. The fact that you don't like him shouldn't mean that you should ignore the fact that there's a fire. And I think that some sometimes there is some real value in looking at how other countries are contending with this and trying to understand the rationale for it, because the Chinese were for all the strength of their state, were really struggling with the power of the exponential hedge funds in their in their domain within Europe.Azeem Azhar: The European Union has recognized that these companies, the technologies provide a lot of benefit. But the way the companies are structured has a really challenging impact on the way in which European citizens lives operate, and they are making taking their own moves. And I'll give you a simple example, that the right to repair movement has been a very important one, and there's been a lot of legislative pressure in the in Europe that is that we should be have the right to repair our iPhones and smartphones. And having told us for years it wasn't possible suddenly, Apple in the last few days has announced all these repair kits self-repair kits. So it turns out that what is impossible means may mean what's politically expedient rather than anything else. And so my sense is that that by engaging in the conversation and being more active, we can get ultimately get better outcomes. And we don't have to go the route of China in order to achieve those, which is an incredibly sort of…Harry Glorikian: A draconian way. Yes.Azeem Azhar: Yeah. Very, very draconian. But equally, you can't you know where that where I hear the U.S. debate running around, which is an ultimately about Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, and not much beyond that, I think is problematic because it's missing a lot of opportunities to sort of write the stuff and foster some amazing innovation and some amazing new businesses in this space.Harry Glorikian: Oh yeah, that's, again, that's why, whenever I get a chance to talk to policymakers, I'm like, “You guys need to get ahead of this because you just don't understand how quickly it's moving and how much it's going to impact what's there, and what's going to happen next.” And if you think about the business model shifts by some of these... I mean, what I always tell people is like, okay, if you can now sequence a whole genome for $50 think about all the new business models and all the new opportunities that will open up versus when it was $1000. It sort of changes the paradigm, but most people don't think that we're going to see that stepwise change. Or, you know, Google was, DeepMind was doing the optical analysis, and they announced, you know, they could do one analysis and everybody was like, Oh, that's great, but it's just one. And a year later, they announced we could do 50. Right? And I'm like, you're not seeing how quickly this is changing, right? One to 50 in 12 months is, that's a huge shift, and if you consider what the next one is going to be, it changes the whole field. It could change the entire field of ophthalmology, especially when you combine it with something like telemedicine. So we could talk for hours about this. I look forward to continuing this conversation. I think that we would, you know, there's a lot of common ground, although you're I'm in health care and you're almost everywhere else.Azeem Azhar: I mean, I have to say that the opportunity in in health care is so global as well because, you know, if you think about how long and how much it costs to train a doctor and you think about the kind of margin that live that sits on current medical devices and how fragile, they might be in certain operating environments and the thought that you could start to do more and more of this with a $40 sensor inside a $250 smartwatch is a really, really appealing and exciting, exciting one. Yeah.Harry Glorikian: Excellent. Well, thank you so much for the time and look forward to staying in touch and I wish you great success with the book and everything else.Azeem Azhar: Thank you so much, Harry. Appreciate it.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode. You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and the MoneyBall Medicine show at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show. You can also find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview.

FactSet U.S. Daily Market Preview
Financial Market Preview - Wednesday 12-Jan

FactSet U.S. Daily Market Preview

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 4:48


US futures are indicating a slightly higher open as of 05:00 ET. European equity markets are higher, following broad strength in Asia overnight.  The World Bank cut global growth forecasts for 2022. Global attention will be on US inflation later today. Companies mentioned: Lockheed Martin, Aerojet, Dish Network, AT&T, Exxon Mobil, Biogen

Environmental Integrity Project
The Civil Rights Fight Against Deadly Air Pollution

Environmental Integrity Project

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 23:37


John Beard is a former Exxon Mobil oil refinery operator and firefighter from Port Arthur, Texas. Like his father before him, he labored his whole life in the refineries that surround this struggling city on the Gulf Coast east of Houston. When Beard finally retired after 38 years in 2017, he decided to make a radical change. He devoted himself, full time, to fighting against the air pollution, chemical threats, climate change and coastal flooding caused by the fossil fuel industry that he saw devastating the lower-income, mostly African-American community where he grew up. Working with the Environmental Integrity Project and Lone Star Legal Aid, he recently succeeded in petitioning the Biden EPA to launch an investigation of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality for allegedly violating the civil rights of Port Arthur residents by allowing a petroleum processing plant owned by billionaire William Koch to release tons of potentially deadly sulfur dioxide air pollution every year without any modern pollution control equipment.

BBC Indonesia
Dunia Pagi Ini BBC Indonesia, 05 Januari 2022

BBC Indonesia

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 15:00


Setelah 20 tahun, gugatan warga Aceh terhadap salah satu perusahaan minyak dan gas terbesar di dunia, ExxonMobil, akan digelar di pengadilan di Amerika Serikat.

The Shepherdcast
EXTRA – 12.23.2021: A Small Gift (Christmas Eve-Eve Candlelight Service 2021, Special Prayers Following Baytown, TX Refinery Accident)

The Shepherdcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 27:13


On this special episode of the Shepherdcast, we celebrate Christ's birth on “Christmas Eve-Eve.” We will be taking a look at Micah 5: 2-5a, Isaiah 7: 13-14, Isaiah 9: 2-6, and the Gospel of Luke 2: 5-14, our choir will be performing special renditions of “Away in a Manger” and, and the Reverend Scott J. Anderson will be discussing how a small gift can have a massive impact on us all. Today's episode came from our worship service on Thursday, December 23, 2021. At the beginning of our Christmas Eve-Eve Candlelight Service, Pastor Scott asked for prayers for the city of Baytown, Texas following reports by national media outlets of a large explosion at the town's ExxonMobil refinery. That prayer is the opening of today's episode. In case you are reading along with a Bible and our readings don't necessarily match up with yours, we use the NRSV translation of the Holy Bible. Special music heard in this episode of the Shepherdcast includes (by order of appearance): Silent Night Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ “Away in a Manger” setting by Emily Lund Copyright © 2001 Hope Publishing Company, Carol Stream, Illinois 60188 CCLI License # 11421954 CCLI Streaming License # CSPL153044 “The Angel Song” words and music by Mary Kay Beall Copyright © 2010 Hope Publishing Company, Carol Stream, Illinois 60188 CCLI License # 11421954 CCLI Streaming License # CSPL153044 O Holy Night by Podington Bear Licensed under Creative Commons: Attribution-Non Commercial 3.0 International License. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ Our sermon and readings are delivered by the Reverend Scott J. Anderson. Our church choir is under the direction of Susan Kaschak. Our sound room technician for this service was Jacob Schandel. This podcast was hosted and produced by Jacob H. Schandel for Shepherd of the Valley Evangelical Lutheran Church. To learn more about our church, please visit www.sotvchurch.com, or follow us on social media @sotvsandyville. Our church is a member congregation of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. You can learn more about the ELCA at www.elca.org, and you can learn about our local Northeastern Ohio Synod at www.neos-elca.org.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
News Wrap: Biden administration to invest $241M to improve ports, ease inflation

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 6:16


In our news wrap Thursday, Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg announced more than $241 million in grants to improve U.S. ports. Low mortgage rates and high demand during the pandemic have caused new home sales in the U.S. to jump 12.4 percent in November, compared to last month. At least four people were injured in Texas after a "major industrial accident" at the ExxonMobil plant in Baytown. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Economic Ninja
Fire at Exxon Mobil Plant in Baytown Texas Injures Four (Gas Prices To Go Higher)

Economic Ninja

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 2:29


A major fire erupted at an Exxon plant in Baytown, Texas https://www.masslive.com/police-fire/2021/12/fire-at-exxon-mobil-plant-in-texas-injures-at-least-four-emergency-response-teams-still-trying-to-extinguish-flames.html https://twitter.com/search?q=mobil&src=typed_query Subscribe to #NinjaNation: https://economicninja.org

Houston's Morning News w/ Shara & Jim
Fire at a Baytown ExxonMobil Plant

Houston's Morning News w/ Shara & Jim

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 136:37


Shara Fryer and Cliff Saunders take you through the stories that matter the most on the morning of 12/23/21.

Designdrives
#61 | Josh Clark | Driving digital AI product experiences.

Designdrives

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021


“It doesn't necessarily take advanced technology to have a great impactful project. I think sometimes as technologists we forget that”— JOSH CLARKWe are thrilled to launch our EP61 featuring Josh Clark founder of Big Medium in New York.Josh is a vivid speaker, a brilliant author, and an expert on UX design for AI.With Josh, we jump into how AI could influence creative decision-making and how it's already influencing our day-to-day activities and decision-making.We also discuss what's his perspective on why AI as a complementary aspect to human decision making should give, signals, recommendations but also what level of confidence the AI actually has in the signal to make it transparent to humans.He also shares his experiences working with AI projects, making it a super inspiring conversation on the future of AI. During the episode we explore:The impact of technology on human decision-makingOne of the biggest challenges in designing AI experiencesWhy questions are more important than answers when designing for AIWhat are the challenges in “probabilistic design”?How much "AI/Data" do you need to prototype an experience? How can design foster development in AI?The Dark side of AI (Optimism and Practical Skeptmism)Thanks a lot for your time and for learning Josh!———The GuestJosh Clark is a UX design leader who helps organizations to build products for what's next.He is the founder of Big Medium, a New York based design studio specializing in future-friendly interfaces for artificial intelligence, connected devices, and responsive websites. His client's list includes Samsung, Time Inc, ExxonMobil, About.com, TechCrunch, Entertainment Weekly, eBay, O'Reilly Media, and many others. Josh has written several books, including "Designing for Touch" and "Tapworthy: Designing Great iPhone Apps." He is also an Editorial Board Member at Rosenfeld Media and an Advisory Board Member at Third Wave Fashion. In 1996, he created the popular “Couch-to-5K” (C25K) running schedule, which has helped millions of skeptical would-be exercisers take up jogging. (His motto is the same for fitness as it is for software user experience: no pain, no pain.)He speaks around the world about what's next for digital interfaces.

Jim Hightower's Radio Lowdown
The Problem With Plastic… Is Plastic

Jim Hightower's Radio Lowdown

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 2:10


In a world that's clogged and choking with a massive overdose of plastic trash, you'll be heartened to learn that governments and industries are teaming up to respond forcefully to this planetary crisis. Unfortunately, their response has been to engage in a global race to make more plastic stuff and to force poor countries to become dumping grounds for plastic garbage. Leading this Kafkaesque greedfest are such infamous plunderers and polluters as Exxon Mobil, Chevron, Shell, and other petrochemical profiteers. With fossil fuel profits crashing, the giants are rushing to convert more of their over-supply of oil into plastic. But where to send the monstrous volumes of waste that will result? The industry's chief lobbyist outfit, the American Chemistry Council, looked around last year and suddenly shouted: “Eureka, there's Africa!” In particular, they're targeting Kenya to become “a plastics hub” for global trade in waste. However, Kenyans have an influential community of environmental activists who've enacted some of the world's toughest bans on plastic pollution. To bypass this inconvenient local opposition, the dumpers are resorting to an old corporate power play: “Free Trade.” Their lobbyists are pushing an autocratic trade agreement that would ban Kenyan officials from passing their own laws or rules that interfere with trade in plastic waste. Trying to hide their ugliness, the plastic profiteers created a PR front group called “Alliance to End Public Waste.” But – hello – it's not “public” waste. Exxon and other funders of the alliance make, promote, and profit from the mountains of destructive trash they now demand we clean up. The real problem is not waste, but plastic itself. From production to disposal, it's destructive to people and the planet. Rather than subsidizing petrochemical behemoths to make more of the stuff, policymakers should seek out and encourage people who are developing real solutions and alternatives.

On Boards Podcast
32. Impact investing: Capitalism created this mess. Capitalism has to fix it!

On Boards Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 41:00


Bob Rosenfield was the CEO of the second largest company in the $4 billion US auto glass repair replacement and claims services market, and during that time he learned that “it isn't as hard as you think to do the right thing and doing the right thing can be very good for business if you do it right.”   He has since founded and is managing director of Cape Vista Capital, a family office investment entity focused on renewable energy, sustainability and broadening the availability of housing, healthcare, and a healthy food supply chain.  The goal: to realize excellent returns on investment and to use the leverage of Cape Vista's investments to change the shape the environmental issues that we have created.   Thanks for listening! We love our listeners! Drop us a line or give us guest suggestions here.   Links The Energy Switch Global Impact Investing Network. Global Impact Investing Principles Cape Vista Capital Quotes   Capitalism messed this up, capitalism can fix it.   My first experience with impact investing (while a CEO in the auto glass industry) was a tremendous learning experience in two ways: number one, it isn't as hard as you think to do the right thing, and number two, doing the right thing can be very good for business if you do it right.   What we see now are vast billions of capital being deployed in an effort to fix problems created by the prior model, which considered all this stuff in externality.   Our public equity investments are really segment investments in renewable energy, for the most part, in companies that we think have been and will continue to be more committed to going from fossil fuel energy generation to renewable sources. It's kind of that simple in the public equity space. We have found that companies that are engaged in combating climate change are finding the cost of capital in issuing private bonds to be desirable for 5% and we've made several investments in solar and other combating climate change items or initiatives that help us generate a solid present income and yield.     Big Ideas/Thoughts   Bob  Some people are still going to believe they could get better than market returns in non-impact, so I think we still need to label it as such, but least in my opinion regular impact investing and non-impact investing are truly converging.  Companies that do not pay attention to what were previously called “externalities” will be outcompeted in the marketplace, so in that way, it's fundamentally capitalist driven.   Raza I think, as you have said earlier, the externalities are realities, and I hope that the two worlds keep converging and I think that you're rightly pointing out that that's the fix of the capitalism, that capitalism actually needs to do.   Joe The “holy grail” is to be able to do the best thing for the economy, for the environment - for whatever area in which you're involved - and also have it be good for your business, because the financial incentive is going to drive people to do “the right thing.”   Engine No. 1 The whole Engine No. 1 issue is: "ExxonMobil might be paying a 9 or 10% yield now, but if I hold this stock for 30 years, as opposed to another energy company that is paying attention to the future and doing better things, I'm better off with an investment elsewhere.”   There are three things that Engine No. 1 did.  First, in general point out that having a carbon-based, fossil fuel-based strategy might just be a losing strategy as an economic argument. But they did two other things to sort of turn that viewpoint into action, and I thought they were really valuable and important lessons in both.   They engaged with the Wall Street analyst community because there were institutional investors in there that couldn't decide, do I go left, or do I go right? They helped quantify in the financial analyst community, how do you run the numbers? I mean, every securities firm that has an analyst that follows a company is going to do a 5-year projection or 10-year projection, discount it back, the stocks are undervalued the stocks are overvalued, so they engaged with the analyst in the meantime and pushed them, "What are you doing with these numbers? How could you project that up? That's not likely. Here's why." They also partnered with another firm, and the business proposition of their partner basically says: "Come to our website, and instead of giving us 100 bucks to support the cause of environmentalism, spend a $100 to buy a share of ExxonMobil and let us vote this year for you." It's democratizing the voice of stockholder constituency. I thought that was really, really, really smart tactics.

Detrás del Volante con Leslie
E78 Exxon Mobil apuesta por la digitalización de talleres automotrices en México, con la aplicación CarKer para conectarte sin costo con todo tipo de talleres

Detrás del Volante con Leslie

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 22:37


Ya casi estamos cerrando este 2021, y en este episodio platicamos con el director de la nueva aplicación CarKer, la primera startup mexicana impulsada por Mobil, que tiene como objetivo conectar sin costo a automovilistas con todo tipo de talleres automotrices (mecánicos, eléctricos, hojalatería, pintura, lubricación, afinación, entre otras especialidades) para ofrecer soluciones on demand. ExxonMobil decidió diversificar e impulsar nuevos modelos de negocio en México y lanzó CarKer. Es muy importante contar con buenos talleres y sobre todo avalados y certificados, en esta aplicación encontrarás el que más se adapte a tus necesidades y sobre todo podrás saber que servicios ofrece, costos, ubicación y estar conectado por completo con el taller que elijas. Muy interesante conocer sobre la digitalización de este tipo de negocios tanto para los usuarios de autos como para motocicletas. Gracias por escuchar Detrás del volante cada semana con un episodio diferente con temas que siempre serán útiles para todos los usuarios de los diferentes vehículos automotores. 

Linch With A Leader
Episode 123: The 7 Perspectives of Effective Leaders with Daniel Harkavy

Linch With A Leader

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 61:21


In this episode of Linch with a Leader, Mike sits down with leader Daniel Harkavy who not only leads his company, Building Champions, but coaches some of the greatest leaders in the world! Mike & Daniel not only talk about his spiritual journey but also spend time unpacking his newest book The 7 Perspectives of Effective Leaders!  Here is more on the WHO Daniel is: Daniel Harkavy has been coaching business leaders to peak levels of performance, efficacy, and fulfillment for more than twenty-five years. In 1996 he harnessed his passion for coaching leaders and teams to found Building Champions, where he serves as CEO and Executive Coach. Daniel and his team of coaches have worked with thousands of clients and organizations to improve the way they lead and live. Daniel is a sought-after author and speaker, most recently authoring “The 7 Perspectives of Effective Leaders” which released in October 2020. His book “Living Forward,” a national best seller, was published in March 2016. Daniel also authored “Becoming A Coaching Leader: The Proven Strategy for Building Your Own Team of Champions” in 2007. As an executive coach and trusted confidant, Daniel works with high profile leaders to improve their leadership, decision making, influence, and overall effectiveness. Daniel's emphatic belief is that self-leadership precedes team leadership, and his goal is to help his clients optimize how they lead themselves first, then focusing on how to best work with their executive teams and all key constituents in their organizations. He engages with clients in many forms including one-on-one executive coaching sessions, executive retreats, speaking engagements and custom experiences. Some of the clients he has worked with include: Daimler, Nike, Chick-fil-A, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Pfizer, Infineum (an ExxonMobil and Shell company), Bank of America, Wells Fargo, MetLife, PrimeLending, US Bank, Northwestern Mutual, Morgan Stanley, Prudential, Merrill Lynch and many others. Daniel lives just outside Portland, Oregon, where he and his wife and family enjoy a little space for gardening and play. Daniel actively serves his community as a member of nonprofit boards and a mentor to those seeking his guidance. His other passions include surfing, snowboarding, and spending time with his family.

You Can Do It Too
Episode 48: Conversation with Abdou Ndiaye (Engineer @Exxonmobil)

You Can Do It Too

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 92:30


In this episode, I sat down with a friend and brother Abdou Djaye, born in Senegal, and came to the United States to pursue a new life. Driven by the spirit of his ancestor, the wisdom of his culture, he managed to defy the odds, climb his won mountain and build a life, driven per growth and pushing limits.

The Greek Current
Is Bosnia on the brink of collapse?

The Greek Current

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 14:26


Separatist rhetoric among Bosnian Serb leadership is raising concerns about the dissolution of Bosnia-Herzegovina, with Milorad Dodik, the leader of Republika Srpska, recently ramping up talk of withdrawing from Bosnia's military, intelligence, judicial, and tax institutions—effectively threatening secession. On Friday, a day after this interview took place, the parliament of the Serb part of Bosnia-Herzegovina voted to take that step. The vote amounted to a non-binding agreement that fell short of a final decision to quit the institutions, but this decision and Dodik's rhetoric have sparked warnings from the international community about new conflict in the region. Expert Charles Kupchan joins The Greek Current to explain the current situation in Bosnia, look at the rise of nationalism in the broader Balkan region, and discuss how the US and the EU should respond to this crisis. Charles Kupchan is a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) and professor of international affairs at Georgetown University in the Walsh School of Foreign Service and Department of Government. From 2014 to 2017, Kupchan served as special assistant to the president and senior director for European affairs on the staff of the National Security Council (NSC) in the Barack Obama administration. He is the author of the recent book Isolationism: A History of America's Efforts to Shield Itself From the World, where he explores the enduring connection between the isolationist impulse and the American experience.Read Charles Kupchan's analysis for the Council on Foreign Relations here: Is Bosnia on the Verge of Conflict?You can read the articles we discuss on our podcast here:Bosnia: Serbs vote to leave key institutions in secession moveWest Struggles to Counter Secessionist Threat in BosniaState Department approves potential frigate sale to Greece, despite agreement with FranceUS State Dept approves potential warship sale to Greece, Pentagon saysCyprus issues 2nd offshore drilling license to ExxonMobil and Qatar Energy

Rigged
S1 Ep6 | How a Standard Oil PR Guy Shaped Post-War America

Rigged

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 33:04


In 1944 the greatest threat to American industry wasn't World War II, it was convincing Americans to fall back in love with free-market capitalism after having experienced government systems that actually worked for the greater good. In the season finale of Rigged, we lay out the strategy contained in a never-before-published confidential document from the archive of Earl Newsom, Standard Oil of New Jersey's (today ExxonMobil) top PR guy from the late '30s to the late '60s.

Wolfe Admin Podcast
TVoL: Let Go So You Can Grow w/ Danielle Brooks

Wolfe Admin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 56:19


Show Sponsor: CooperVision Get the exact code every time and protect against and audits with AutoCoder at https://eyecodeeducation.com/pages/autocoder Ever since Danielle Brooks can remember, her parents had always been the best example of hard work in all areas of their life.  While growing up, she saw my mom and dad devote their time to their corporate jobs, their network marketing companies, and their small businesses - all at the same time! She wanted to be just like them.  While in college, she had the opportunity to work for the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) in Washington D.C. starting in the summer of her sophomore year and any subsequent winter or summer break. While she enjoyed the opportunity and the work she was doing, she knew that was not the place for me long term. One of the many things that she learned while working for the CIA was the fact that she enjoyed working with people. She knew her future career was going to involve helping people in some capacity. Upon graduation, she made the career move to ExxonMobil, as they were looking for engineers that enjoyed sales and working with people.  Danielle accepted the role to be an Automotive Sales Engineer. In the three years that she worked for ExxonMobil, she learned a lot about business, people and life! When she left the company, her territory was #1 in the nation for the highest percentage of national account customers buying on our program. No matter how successful she was in corporate America, she couldn't help but to think: “Who is helping the small business owner?” That became her rallying cry. To connect with Danielle go to:   https://pearlbusinessconsulting.com/ Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/daniellebrooks_cfo/ Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/daniellebrookscfo

Squawk on the Street
Markets Rebound After Tuesday's Sell-off, An Exclusive With Exxon Mobil's Chairman & CEO, Salesforce Slumps and Names a Co-CEO, and An FDA Panel Endorses Merck's COVID-19 Pill.

Squawk on the Street

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 46:31


On the first trading day of December, Carl Quintanilla, Jim Cramer and David Faber discussed the rebound in stocks after Tuesday's sell-off was sparked by COVID and inflation fears. In a CNBC Exclusive, David Faber interviewed Exxon Mobil Chairman & CEO Darren Woods about the company's capital spending plan. The energy giant says it expects to double earnings and cash flow by 2027 from 2019's levels -- while also reducing emissions. The anchors reacted to shares of Salesforce declining sharply as guidance overshadowed better-than-expected quarterly results. The company also promoted Bret Taylor to the role of Co-CEO alongside Marc Benioff -- this after Taylor was named chairman of Twitter earlier in the week. Also in focus: Merck's oral COVID-19 treatment was narrowly endorsed by an FDA panel, EV stocks join the rally, plus Phil LeBeau's interview with the CEO of GE Aviation.

Agency Dealmasters podcast
Kevin Sugrue discusses commercial strategy & consumer behaviour

Agency Dealmasters podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 36:12


Kevin Sugrue is currently a consultant for Similarweb, he helps Agencies to differentiate their client's brands, build attention and preference using Paid, Owned & Earned media. Kevin works across both strategy and insight; guiding more effective marketing. At IPG Mediabrands he worked with clients such as Amazon, ExxonMobil, Lego, Lockheed Martin, Spotify, Tata Communications, Unilever and UPS.  He has also worked at Dentsu, Millward Brown and Bates Worldwide. His experience includes work for No.10 Downing Street,  BBC Worldwide, Vodafone, Courvoisier Cognac, Kellogg's, Microsoft and Peugeot to name a few. We talk about:

Design Systems Podcast
39. Stephen Gates from WW: Culture, design methodology, and design system ROI

Design Systems Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 61:58


Sit tight—this is a long one! Stephen Gates and Chris discuss the real value of design systems, what designers and football players have in common, and how to apply design methodology to day-to-day work.Guest: Stephen Gates is Senior Vice President of Omni-channel Product Design for WW. In this role, he is responsible for the design of WW's end-to-end member experience across all digital, virtual, and physical touchpoints, to create a cohesive wellness experience and help unify members' needs across channels.With over 20 years of experience, Stephen is a global design leader who has built world-class teams at organizations that integrate research and data with human-centered design methods to drive business impact. Prior to joining WW in February 2021, Stephen was the Head Design Evangelist at InVision, where he developed award-winning global advertising campaigns and innovative digital experiences for clients such as American Airlines, W Hotels, Disney, ExxonMobil, Acura, Old Navy, Nationwide Insurance, Verizon, Subaru, and many more. He has also held key design leadership roles at Citi, Starwood Hotels, and McCann Erickson. Stephen's work has received recognition at over 150 international award shows including honors for Cannes Cyber Lions, Webby Awards, and the Web Awards. His work has also been featured in 10 Apple keynotes.Stephen is also the host of the award-winning podcast, The Crazy One, which features in-depth explorations of issues that matter to creatives, including leadership, creativity, and career development and innovation. He has also been named one of the most talented and influential creatives working today by HOW Magazine.Host: Chris Strahl is co-founder and CEO of Knapsack, host of @TheDSPod, DnD DM, and occasional river guide. You can find Chris on Twitter as @chrisstrahl and on LinkedIn.Sponsor: Knapsack is a design system platform rooted in code for shipping consistent apps in half the time. Design once, build once, use everywhere. Learn more at knapsack.cloud.View the transcript for this episode.Check out Stephen's first episode on the Design System Podcast.

Tripping Over the Barrel
Zack on the Attack on Tripping Over the Barrel

Tripping Over the Barrel

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 48:56


When it comes to Oil and Gas Data and Operational Efficiency, Zack Warren aka Z-Dubz is THAT dude. Zack has a "traditional" background for an Oil and Gas guy - Dallas-born and raised, and smart enough to get a job at ExxonMobil right out of college, and then migrating to Denver to start a family. But now...a Warrening...Zack has extreme velocity in the Oil & Gas consulting world. Fun listen with an emerging CEO live from Dr. Funkenstein's basement. The post Zack on the Attack on Tripping Over the Barrel appeared first on Digital Wildcatters.

Spaghetti For Brains
32: BRU-PILLED

Spaghetti For Brains

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 65:42


COP26 sponsored by Chevron, Exxon-Mobil and Shell Oil and brought to you by Morgan Freeman. World leaders throw pennies into a wishing well for COP26. Sleepy Joe lives up to his name in Glass Cow. Militarism is the biggest threat to the climate but capitalist omertà keeps it out of the conversation. It's the imperialism, stupid! The Cold War is alive and well and structuring our thinking around carbon. Being forced to defend China. Housing justice is climate justice, even if it's boring to talk about. Ben introduces Norm to the King of Juice—THE BRU. MR Online: ‘COP26: Military pollution is the skeleton in the West's climate closet' https://mronline.org/2021/11/10/cop26-military-pollution-is-the-skeleton-in-the-wests-climate-closet/ GlasgowLive: ‘Glaswegians rally in George Square to demand free public transport for locals when COP26 ends' https://www.glasgowlive.co.uk/news/glasgow-news/glaswegians-demand-free-public-transport-22126892 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/spaghetti-for-brains/message

Business Wars Daily
BP Said It Wants to Be a Climate Champion. What Happened?

Business Wars Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 4:00


Today is Thursday, November 11, and we're looking at BP vs. ExxonMobil.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Diary of an Apartment Investor
Deal Review Episode with Joseph Bramante and Heshel Mangel

Diary of an Apartment Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 56:57


Guidance on deal presentation for active investors and what to look for in a deal for passive investor with Joseph Bramante and Heshel Mangel.  Follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and TwitterFor more educational content, visit our website at www.diaryofanapartmentinvestor.comInterested in investing with Four Oaks Capital?  First step is to schedule a call with us.This episode originally aired on November 8, 2021----Joseph BramanteJoseph Bramante is co-founder and CEO of Houston based TriArc Real Estate Partners, a wholly integrated multifamily investment company. He purchased his first multifamily property in 2011, sight unseen, while working as a business team lead for ExxonMobil in Papua New Guinea. Today, working with business partners Carrie Breneman and Deborah Newsome, he has grown a portfolio of over 1600 units, increasing NOI by over 80% on average within 48 months post acquisition.Email Joseph at info@triarcrep.comCheck out Joseph's website at www.triarcrep.comLinkedIn profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/josephbramante/----Heshel Mangel Heshel Mangel came into this industry with absolutely zero background or knowledge – he had heard about it from a friend who's family was in the industry. At the same time, was really struggling with 9-5 job, working as an employee at a desk and knew change needed to happen, both for himself and my family. He moved back to his hometown Cincinnati, and within 12 months, he was an owner and manager of 52 units with two full-time staff - all in the affordable housing space.  He's now working with local social services to ensure safe, secure, and affordable housing for his residents.LinkedIn profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/heshelmangel/----Your host, Brian Briscoe, is a co-founder and principal in the real estate investing firm Four Oaks Capital.  He and his team currently have 629 units worth $36 million in assets under management and are continuing to grow.  He will retire as a Lieutenant Colonel in the United States Marine Corps in 2021. Learn more about him and the Four Oaks team at www.fouroakscapital.com  or contact him at brianbriscoe@fouroakscapital.com - be sure to let him know where you found him.Connect with him on LinkedIn or Facebook.vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv> Check out our multifamily investing community!> The Tribe of Titans> Get exclusive access to the Four Oaks Team!> Find it at https://www.thetribeoftitans.info^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Two for Tea with Iona Italia and Helen Pluckrose
109 - Jamie Milton Freestone - The Meaning of Science [Public Limited Version]

Two for Tea with Iona Italia and Helen Pluckrose

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 38:18


Jamie's academic profile: https://iash.uq.edu.au/profile/2151/jamie-freestone Jamie and Matthew McGann's joint website/blog: http://www.mcgannfreestone.com.au/ Jamie's Areo articles: https://areomagazine.com/author/jamiemiltonfreestone/ References Jamie's ‘The meaning of science' blog post (about his upcoming book): http://www.mcgannfreestone.com.au/?p=1984 Jamie's paper ‘Contemporary Darwinism as a worldview': https://www.academia.edu/56111417/Contemporary_Darwinism_as_a_worldview Jamie's paper ‘Narrative: Agents Acting at a Distance': https://www.academia.edu/44253572/Narrative_Agents_Acting_at_a_Distance Jamie's Areo article ‘Climate Change: A Very Simple Story': https://areomagazine.com/2021/06/24/climate-change-a-very-simple-story/ R. Scott Bakker's article ‘What is the Semantic Apocalypse?': https://rsbakker.wordpress.com/2011/06/21/what-is-the-semantic-apocalypse/ Timestamps 3:30 Iona reads an excerpt from a blog post by Jamie about ‘the meaning of science': how it fundamentally challenges everyone's view of the world. 7:08 Jamie discusses his approach to science, how it differs from other approaches, and his upcoming book on the meaning of science in/for our lives. How his literature background and interest in science are strongly linked. 10:51 Jamie's (and others') outlook versus the ought-is rule and the gatekeeping philosophers. Jamie on now being out and proud about science's applicability to all aspects of life: is-ought and fact/value as false dichotomies and red herrings. 16:28 The twin dangers of projecting morals onto the world and using science to justify eugenics, for example, and how these differ from Jamie's approach of using science to inform morality. 20:22 Narrative in fiction and how it is understood by cognitive science and what it tells us about the evolution of cognition: the evolution of narrative and narratives of evolution. Jamie's ‘grand theory' of what narrative actually is and where the previous study of this has gone wrong. The importance of coherence in narrative and our use of ‘mental time travel' when following narratives. 29:08 Theory of mind and mental time travel together give us our ability to comprehend narrative and explain the two key ingredients of a satisfying narrative (coherence and agent- led actions). 30:04 Foreshadowing and the accretion of meaning: earlier parts of a narrative illuminate later parts and, crucially, vice versa. The nature of skilfully constructed narratives: re-readability, a different story on each reading. 35:30 The difference between whodunnits (and other ‘popular' genres) and ‘great literature'. 41:03 Jamie's views on how narrative evolved. Jamie's speculative views on the evolution of consciousness as being late-arriving: theory of mind is primitive and more widespread among species, whereas full consciousness with mental time travel is unique or rare. And: extrapolation in narrative. 50:48 The failure of scientists to create a compelling narrative on climate change (and Exxon Mobil's and other ‘bad guys'' spectacular successes in the opposite direction). Why we need to change this and how. 57:12 A digressive discussion of individual vs. national/corporate responsibilities to combat climate change. Plus: techno/Deutschian-optimism and resurrecting extinct species. 1:09:08 Jamie argues that even seemingly-abstract ideas like the many-worlds interpretation of quantum physics have huge impacts on our lives and our ideas of meaning and purpose and morality. Could all fiction that doesn't contravene the laws of physics be literally true somewhere in the multiverse? 1:19:48 Jamie on being at bottom a literary theorist and his advice on what and how to read. His ‘reading experiments' and most controversial literary opinion. Plus: should we read translated works? 1:29:40 Why podcast hosts should always read the work of their guests. 1:31:53 Jamie's recommendation on who Iona should interview.

Oil and Gas This Week Podcast
Oil and Gas This Week – Nov 1 2021, ep 248

Oil and Gas This Week Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 25:49


Welcome to the Oil and Gas This Week podcast — brought to you by IBM on the Oil and Gas Global Network, the largest and most listened to podcast network for the oil and energy industry. This week Mark and Paige cover ...   Exxon, Chevron target billions in share buybacks as cash flow surges https://www.worldoil.com/news/2021/10/29/exxon-chevron-target-billions-in-share-buybacks-as-cash-flow-surges U.S. lawmakers pressure oil companies to quit trade group over climate policies https://www.worldoil.com/news/2021/10/28/us-lawmakers-pressure-oil-companies-to-quit-trade-group-over-climate-policies Al Gore: 'Time to say goodbye to coal, oil and gas worldwide https://www.foxnews.com/politics/al-gore-say-goodbye-coal-oil-gas-worldwide U.S. House Democrats to subpoena Big Oil in climate deception probe https://www.reuters.com/business/cop/us-congress-puts-big-oil-hot-seat-climate-deception-probe-2021-10-28/ Shell CEO Defends Strategy Against Loeb Bid to Split Company https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-10-28/shell-ceo-says-activist-investors-make-energy-transition-harder Endress+Hauser invests in modern campus https://www.hydrocarbonengineering.com/gas-processing/28102021/endresshauser-invests-in-modern-campus/ Linde starts up hydrogen facility https://www.hydrocarbonengineering.com/clean-fuels/27102021/linde-starts-up-hydrogen-facility/ ExxonMobil plans to increase carbon capture at LaBarge facility https://www.hydrocarbonengineering.com/the-environment/25102021/exxonmobil-plans-to-increase-carbon-capture-at-labarge-facility/ From paints to plastics, a chemical shortage ignites prices https://apnews.com/article/coronavirus-pandemic-technology-business-health-hurricanes-46bce9cc36dab2b330309dae0354cf53 BP wins over Greenpeace in North Sea oil court case https://www.reuters.com/business/energy/bp-wins-over-greenpeace-north-sea-oil-court-case-2021-10-07/ Don't forget to ask a question for our next First Friday Q&A. You ask the questions and we answer them.  Have a question? Click here to ask. The Weekly Rig Count by Baker Hughes https://rigcount.bakerhughes.com/rig-count-overview  IBM Giveaway — Enter to Win Here! Sign-up for your chance to win a T-shirt with a unique serial number. This means each shirt is different making it an awesome collector's item! Plus it comes inside an official OGGN insulated tumbler. At the end of the year we will have a drawing to win our grand prize! This will be a pool of all of the serial numbers on the t-shirts! The grand prize will be announced a bit later in the year! More Oil and Gas Global Network Podcasts OGGN.com – https://oggn.com/podcasts OGGN Street Team LinkedIn Group – https://www.linkedin.com/groups/12458373/ OGGN on Social LinkedIn Group | LinkedIn Company Page | Facebook | modalpoint | OGGN OGGN Events Get notified each month Paige Wilson LinkedIn Mark LaCour Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn

Me, Myself, and AI
Developing an Appetite for AI: ExxonMobil's Sarah Karthigan

Me, Myself, and AI

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 29:06


ExxonMobil is an energy company that's existed since 1870, well before artificial intelligence. So, what does an AI manager at ExxonMobil do? In the latest episode of the Me, Myself, and AI podcast, hosts Sam Ransbotham and Shervin Khodabandeh interview Sarah Karthigan, AI operations manager for IT, to find out. Sarah leads a data science team tasked with making use of large volumes of data, with the goal of offering reliable and affordable energy to a variety of populations. A major focus of Sarah's efforts has been around self-healing, a method for internal process improvement. Listen in to learn how her group secures buy-in for various technology initiatives and works to continually improve human-machine collaboration for the organization. Me, Myself, and AI is a collaborative podcast from MIT Sloan Management Review and Boston Consulting Group and is hosted by Sam Ransbotham and Shervin Khodabandeh. Our engineer is David Lishansky, and the coordinating producers are Allison Ryder and Sophie Rüdinger. Stay in touch with us by joining our LinkedIn group, AI for Leaders at mitsmr.com/AIforLeaders. Read more about our show and follow along with the series at https://sloanreview.mit.edu/ai. Guest bio: Sarah Karthigan is a reputed leader with a demonstrated history of leading digital transformation initiatives in the energy industry. She was named one of 2021's 25 Influential Women in Energy in recognition of her outstanding work to accelerate the adoption of data science to enable data-driven decision-making across the integrated oil and gas value chain. Karthigan started her career at ExxonMobil over a decade ago and has since held various roles of increasing responsibility in the areas of strategic planning, project management, scientific computing, and data science. She currently leads the AI operations practice, which is focused on realizing self-healing strategies, and is also responsible for managing external relationships with multiple technical business partners.

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast
1262: EV Cannonball Record Beaten By Tesla Model S Long Range | 31 Oct 2021

EV News Daily - Electric Car Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 20:37


Show #1262 If you get any value from this podcast please consider supporting my work on Patreon. Plus all Patreon supporters get their own unique ad-free podcast feed. Good morning, good afternoon and good evening wherever you are in the world, welcome to EV News Daily for Sunday 31st October. It's Martyn Lee here and I go through every EV story so you don't have to. Thank you to MYEV.com for helping make this show, they've built the first marketplace specifically for Electric Vehicles. It's a totally free marketplace that simplifies the buying and selling process, and help you learn about EVs along the way too. HOW EARLY FSD ADOPTERS WERE LEFT BEHIND IN LIMBO - Elon Musk, for his part, has assured FSD buyers that their vehicles would have the necessary hardware when Tesla achieves full autonomy. And to some degree, Musk has stayed true to his word. Owners of older vehicles that purchased FSD were provided a free upgrade to Hardware 3.0. Tesla, however, has introduced its MCU1 to MCU2 retrofit as a paid upgrade. Quite unsurprisingly, some early FSD adopters opted out of the optional infotainment system update. This has proven to be problematic. - One prevalent theme among the early FSD adopters who contacted Teslarati with their stories was the lack of communication on Tesla's part. This is something that has been reported by longtime Tesla owners for some time now. And while it is understandable that Tesla is juggling a lot of balls in the air as it expands its business to other countries and other segments, having a responsive communications team, or at least investing some of its funds into the creation of one, would definitely not hurt. Original Source : https://www.teslarati.com/tesla-fsd-beta-missing-feaures-mcu1-limbo/ EV CANNONBALL RECORD SHATTERED BY DUO IN RENTED TESLA MODEL S - Doing so required a Herculean effort. Levenson, founder of EV promotion and rental company The Kilowatts, planned the run as part of his broader mission to demonstrate the capability and excitement of modern EVs. He'd partially accomplished that back in 2017, but because he was an employee of Tesla at the time, he did it mostly on the down-low. Now, he can share his story - His official record, set with friend and co-driver Josh Allen on October 22, 2021 in a 2021 Tesla Model S Long Range, would be 42 hours and 17 minutes. That beats the previous coast-to-coast electric vehicle record of 44 hours and 26—set in a Porsche Taycan—by over 2 hours. - He'd usually arrive with less than 10 percent charge and leave with around 50 percent. Those took an average of 18 minutes across his 24 stops, a total of just over seven hours sitting still. - Levenson swapped the wheels for the run, ditching the less efficient 21-inch wheels in favor of Tesla's more aerodynamic 19-inch "Tempest" ones. Original Source : https://www.roadandtrack.com/news/a38095522/ev-cannonball-record-tesla-model-s/ TESLA MODEL S PLAID COMPLETE 0-100% SUPERCHARGING ANALYSIS - Earlier in the week, we conducted the InsideEVs 70-mph range test on a 2021 Tesla Model S Plaid, in which the vehicle went 300 miles from 100% to 0% state of charge. Since we began and ended the range test at a supercharger, at the conclusion of the range test we had the opportunity to record a full 0% to 100% charging session on a V3 supercharger station. - Upon plugging in, the Plaid immediately shot up to 147 kW and then gradually crept up to the 250 kW maximum charge rate. That happened after two and a half minutes when the Plaid was at 5% state of charge. It then held the 250 kW maximum charge rate for 7 minutes, and at that point, the state of charge was 33%. - The new Model S will charge from 0 to 78% in 30 minutes, and it then takes another 30 minutes to add the final ~22%, further proving that if you really don't need the extra range, it's much better to unplug and move on after 20 to 30 minutes of charging. - The Plaid reaches 80% SOC in 31.5 minutes and the charge rate is down to 70kW. Original Source : https://insideevs.com/news/544379/tesla-model-s-plaid-supercharging/ WHEN ASKED TO STOP LOBBYIST EFFORTS AGAINST ELECTRIC VEHICLES, BIG OIL STAYS SILENT - The CEOs of BP, Chevron, ExxonMobil and Shell appeared before the Committee on Oversight and Reform on Thursday to answer questions about their alleged part in the spread of disinformation about the role of fossil fuels in global warming. - Also in attendance was the president of the American Petroleum Institute (API), a nonprofit lobbying entity for the oil industry - One of the API's recent efforts includes a campaign against electric vehicles. - California Congressman Ro Khanna pressed Shell President Gretchen Watkins on whether she would agree to tell API President Mike Sommers to cease his agency's campaign against electric vehicles. Watkins stopped short of making that declaration, saying, "There are several places where we are not fully aligned with the API." - The CEOs of BP, Exxon, and Chevron also declined to outright ask the API to pull its campaign funding. Khanna asked them if they would leave the API if it continued its lobbying against electric vehicles. They all remained silent. - The API boasts revenue of over $238 million, according to its most recent tax filing. The Guardian reported in July that Shell gave the agency $10 million, noting that BP, Chevron and Exxon were also major contributors, despite their contribution sums remaining private. Original Source : https://www.newsweek.com/when-asked-stop-lobbyist-efforts-against-electric-vehicles-big-oil-stays-silent-1643644 SK INNOVATION TO DEVELOP ALL-SOLID-STATE BATTERIES WITH US FIRM - SK Innovation Co., a South Korean battery maker, said Thursday it will develop and produce all-solid-state batteries with a US firm, in a bid to expand its foothold in the next-generation battery market. - Under the joint venture deal with Solid Power, a Colorado-based solid-state battery developer, SK Innovation will invest $30 million to acquire a stake in the American company - If the target energy density is achieved, it will mean higher performance by about 33 percent than that of lithium-ion batteries, the company said. Original Source : http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20211028000655&np=7&mp=1 CHINESE ELECTRIC VEHICLE MAKER BYD LAUNCHES $1.8 BILLION RAISE Original Source : https://kfgo.com/2021/10/29/chinese-electric-vehicle-maker-byd-launches-1-8-billion-capital-raising-term-sheet/ CHINA CLAIMS TITLE OF HAVING WORLD'S LARGEST EV CHARGING NETWORK Original Source : https://electrek.co/2021/10/29/china-claims-title-of-having-worlds-largest-ev-charging-network/ 5 CHARTS EXPLAINING THE FUTURE OF EV BATTERIES Original Source : https://www.morningbrew.com/emerging-tech/stories/2021/10/28/5-charts-explaining-the-future-of-ev-batteries-the-backbone-of-the-electric-transition BUILDING OUT EV CHARGING INFRASTRUCTURE: Q&A WITH NYC'S ELECTRIC VEHICLE POLICY DIRECTOR Original Source : https://www.forbes.com/sites/stacynoblet/2021/10/28/qa-with-mark-simon-director-electric-vehicle-policy-nyc-dot-on-building-ev-charging-infrastructure/ NEW QUESTION OF THE WEEK WITH EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM With the COP26 climate summit now underway in Scotland, what would you like to tell the politicians or the rule makers about electric cars? Email me your thoughts and I'll read them out on Sunday – hello@evnewsdaily.com It would mean a lot if you could take 2mins to leave a quick review on whichever platform you download the podcast. And  if you have an Amazon Echo, download our Alexa Skill, search for EV News Daily and add it as a flash briefing. Come and say hi on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter just search EV News Daily, have a wonderful day, I'll catch you tomorrow and remember…there's no such thing as a self-charging hybrid. PREMIUM PARTNERS PHIL ROBERTS / ELECTRIC FUTURE BRAD CROSBY PORSCHE OF THE VILLAGE CINCINNATI AUDI CINCINNATI EAST VOLVO CARS CINCINNATI EAST NATIONAL CAR CHARGING ON THE US MAINLAND AND ALOHA CHARGE IN HAWAII DEREK REILLY FROM THE EV REVIEW IRELAND YOUTUBE CHANNEL RICHARD AT RSEV.CO.UK – FOR BUYING AND SELLING EVS IN THE UK EMOBILITYNORWAY.COM/ 

ESG Insider: A podcast from S&P Global
2021 proxy season marked “new era” of shareholder support for ESG issues

ESG Insider: A podcast from S&P Global

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 17:09


The 2021 proxy season brought a new level of shareholder support for key ESG-related themes ranging from climate change to diversity disclosures. In this episode of ESG Insider, we talk to Sustainable Investments Institute founding executive director Heidi Welsh. “We've entered a whole new era” of shareholder support for ESG issues, Heidi tells us. “Investors want more information on climate change, on diversity and inclusion, on corporate political influence,” she says. For additional information about the 2021 proxy season, listen to our episode on the implications of shareholders' ouster of several Exxon Mobil board members: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/exxon-board-ouster-over-climate-change-has-big-implications/id1475521006?i=1000524283710 And you can also find all our coverage of COP26 at http://spglobal.com/cop26 Photo credit: Getty Images

WSJ Minute Briefing
Consumers Pulled Back on Spending in September

WSJ Minute Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 1:59


Plus: Lawmakers aim for a Medicare negotiation provision to be in President Biden's $1.85 trillion spending bill. Exxon Mobil and Chevron report their most profitable quarterly earnings since the pandemic's onset. J.R. Whalen reports. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

WSJ Minute Briefing
Progressive Democrats Thwart Planned Vote on Infrastructure Bill

WSJ Minute Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 2:18


Satellite maker Terran Orbital says it will go public through a SPAC merger deal. Chinese property developer Evergrande again averts default by making an overdue bond interest payment. Exxon Mobil and Chevron are set to report earnings today. Keith Collins hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Here & Now
'Orpheus In The Underworld'; Big oil's disinformation campaign

Here & Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 41:22


Music opinionator Fran Hoepfner talks about why the 19th-century French comic opera "Orpheus in the Underworld" and its famous can-can music is perfect music for Halloween 2021. And, for years, companies like ExxonMobil and Shell have fudged scientific and economic data to protect business interests. Historian Ben Franta tells us more about the industry's disinformation.

Subvert
Big Oil's Big Tobacco moment

Subvert

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 19:58


In this episode, Lena interviews Geoffrey Supran. He's one of the researchers who brought to light that ExxonMobil and others knew about the climate impacts of fossil fuel extraction and covered it up. We discuss the implications of today's Big Oil hearings.

Be Better with Michael Kurland
How to Live and Work Authentically with Mike Horne

Be Better with Michael Kurland

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 27:39


Integrity begins when you align your words and actions. Mike Horne, Ph.D. is an executive coach who works with leaders to design authentic workplaces where employees can thrive. In today's show, Mike discusses his definition of happiness and how making continual progress is more important than achieving goals. Key Takeaways: 0:00 Intro 1:54 Mike briefly talks about his ideas of what being better means and the three roles he has 3:43 Mike talks about what progress means to different people in different areas of life and work and the sense of accomplishment people take from it 5:28 Michael talks about his ideas of progress and how it includes setting goals and current goals he has for himself 7:37 Mike talks about the different approaches you can have in goal setting, and how not necessarily every step of progress has to be defined as a goal 9:34 Mike breaks down his approach and how he coaches leaders to set their goals and make progress towards achieving them 13:02 Mike talks about happiness, the elimination of suffering, and self-awareness 16:21 Michael Kurland talks about how people can become authentic, and the series of events in his life that made him realize his own self worth 19:15 Mike gives his three tips on how to live authentically 21:27 Mike talks about the importance of how a simple hello to somebody can go a long way 23:07 Michael Kurland talks about the reason he left his old job and the changes the new CEO made that pushed him to do so 26:03 Mike gives the various ways you can contact him   Resources Mentioned: Mikes Book "Integrity By Design" - If you or your organization lacks integrity, you're out of alignment with what's important. When work and life are out of alignment, it's increasingly difficult to lead, improve, and drive positive change in teams and organizations.  Gallup - Gallup, Inc. is an American analytics and advisory company based in Washington, D.C. Founded by George Gallup in 1935, the company became known for its public opinion polls conducted worldwide. HP - The Hewlett-Packard Company, commonly shortened to Hewlett-Packard or HP, was an American multinational information technology company headquartered in Palo Alto, California. ExxonMobil - Exxon Mobil Corporation, stylized as ExxonMobil, is an American multinational oil and gas corporation headquartered in Irving, Texas. It is the largest direct descendant of John D. Rockefeller's Standard Oil, and was formed on November 30, 1999, by the merger of Exxon and Mobil.   Quotes Mentioned: "It's nice to say hello to a stranger and I'd say yes at work. You should work in the moment, work in the present, and I don't know what happened to you five minutes before we started or what's going to happen in the five minutes after we are finished. But I know that we have this moment in time together and that when managers show an interest in people, when they create a sense of being in on things, work gets done a lot more easily than it does, you know, tell me about the digit you missed." "Wisdom is always someone else's experience. There are a lot of people, I believe who are not goal directed, who fail to recognize as that the greatest purpose of life time is becoming the person you are. That is our greatest privilege." "As you make progress, as you develop your interests, then you become better, you become more knowledgeable, you have greater depth or breath in that field."   Guests Social Media Links:  Website: https://mike-horne.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mikehorne1/detail/recent-activity/posts/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/mikehorneauthor Mike's Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/id1557124313 Buy Mike's Book: https://www.amazon.com/Integrity-Design-Working-Living-Authentically/dp/0975307312

Energy Policy Now
Who Pays the Price for Stranded Energy Assets?

Energy Policy Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 32:32


A climate economist looks at the impact that the stranding of fossil fuel assets may have on communities, and at policies that might mitigate economic hardship. ---As pressure builds to decarbonize the global energy system, much of today's energy infrastructure is becoming obsolete. Over the past decade more than half of the coal fired power plants in the United States have closed as coal generation has been replaced by natural gas and renewables, while coal plants elsewhere, such as in China, increasingly operate at a financial loss.  The value of certain fossil energy reserves has fallen too. The stock market decline of major energy companies such as ExxonMobil, once the most valuable company in the world, has come as expectations for future oil demand have fallen, making these companies' vast underground oil reserves look less valuable today. And the natural gas industry faces an uncertain future as the role that gas can, and should play in tomorrow's clean system is debated.  What all of this means is that some portion of fossil fuel companies' investments in reserves and infrastructure will lose its value, and become what economists call stranded assets. The prospect of stranded energy assets raises concern among investors, and policymakers who must juggle near term economic interests with essential climate goals. University of Southern California economist Matthew Kahn discusses the growing concern over stranded energy assets, and looks at some of the people and places that may suffer when the value of assets drops. He also explores policy solutions to address the problem of stranded assets while taking vulnerable communities into account.Matthew Kahn is the Provost Professor of Economics and Spatial Sciences at the University of Southern California.Related Content The Carbon Shock: Investor Response to the British Columbia Carbon Tax https://kleinmanenergy.upenn.edu/research/publications/the-carbon-shock-investor-response-to-the-british-columbia-carbon-tax/Balancing Act: Can Petrochemicals Be Both Emissions Free and Zero-Waste? https://kleinmanenergy.upenn.edu/research/publications/balancing-act-can-petrochemicals-be-both-emissions-free-and-zero-waste/Electricity Storage and Renewables: How Investments Change as Technology Improves https://kleinmanenergy.upenn.edu/research/publications/electricity-storage-and-renewables-how-investments-change-as-technology-improves/ 

Kingdom Capitalists : For Christians Called to Start and Scale Successful Businesses
How to Accomplish Massive Goals Through Faith with Ellis Hammond and Pete Vanderveen Part 2

Kingdom Capitalists : For Christians Called to Start and Scale Successful Businesses

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 38:03


How to increase your faith through real estate investing?How do you set goals, overcome setbacks, and overcome mental blocks?How to break through the strongholds and negative beliefs? Kingdom Real Estate Investors! Learn more about our community and join the #1 real estate investing mastermind for Kingdom Leaders at thekingdomrei.com/coaching Short Bio:Ellis Hammond is the founder of Kingdom REI. He started his career as a missionary on the college campuses of San Diego. His investing journey began in San Diego in 2018 with a duplex and nine months later Ellis co-GP'd on a 144 unit complex in Memphis, TN. Today, Ellis is the co-principal of Symphony Capital Group, an investment firm currently focused on acquiring value-add multifamily real estate across the U.S. most recently in San Diego, CA, and Kansas City, MO.  EllisHammond.com Pete Vanderveen has a passion for continuous process improvement, operations management, strategic planning, change management, and executive leadership are all areas in which he is interested. This has led him to launch several businesses, including EatTheFrogFitness.com, and refining businesses such as ExxonMobil. He worked in the real estate industry for ten years, spanning land development, commercial and single-family development, and commercial franchise real estate development. His passion to achieve what others say is unachievable has resulted in over $50MM in commercial and residential development. He is also driven to empower those around him and to be a blessing to those who are overlooked by others. His desire to have a Kingdom impact is to be a rising tide that lifts others.thekingdomrei.com/coaching

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
How Many Times Per Week Are You Being Cyber Attacked? From Where? How? Why?

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 84:46


How Many Times Per Week Are You Being Cyber Attacked? From Where? How? Why? We've got a new study out showing that North American organizations, businesses, and others, are being hit with an average of 497 cyber attacks per week, right here in the good old USA. [Following is an automated transcript] This is a study by checkpoint software technologies. Checkpoint, I used, oh my gosh. It would have been back in the nineties back then. They were one of the very first genuine firewall companies. And it was a system that I was putting in place for my friends over at troopers. I think it was New England telephone. It might've been Verizon by then. I can't even remember, man. [00:00:41] It's been a little while, but it was, a system we were using in front of this massive system that I designed, I made the largest internet property in the world. At that time called big yellow. It morphed into super pages. It might be familiar with. But it was me and my team that did everything. We built the data center out. [00:01:05] We wrote all of the software. Of course they provided all of the yellow pages type listing so we can put it all in. And we brought it up online and we were concerned. Well, first of all, You know, I've been doing cyber security now for over 30 years. And at this point in time, they wanted something a little more than my home grown firewall. [00:01:29] Cause I had designed and written one in order to protect this huge asset that was bringing in tens of millions of dollars a year to the phone company. So they said, Hey, listen, let's go ahead and we'll use checkpoint and get things going. We did, it was on a little, I remember it was a sun workstation. If you remember those back in the. [00:01:52] And it worked pretty well. I learned how to use it and played with it. And that was my first foray into kind of what the rest of the world had started doing, this checkpoint software, but they've continued on, they make some great firewalls and other intrusions type stuff, detection and blocking, you know, already that I am a big fan, at least on the bigger end. [00:02:17] You know, today in this day and age, I would absolutely use. The Cisco stuff and the higher end Cisco stuff that all ties together. It doesn't just have the fire power firewall, but it has everything in behind, because in this day and age, you've got to look at everything that's happening, even if you're a home user. [00:02:37] And this number really gets everybody concerned. Home users and business users is. Businesses are definitely under bigger attacks than home users are. And particularly when we're talking about businesses, particularly the bigger businesses, the ones that have a huge budget that are going to be able to go out and pay up, you know, a million, $10 million ransom. [00:03:05] Those are the ones that they're after and this analysis. Point software who does see some of those attacks coming in, showed some very disturbing changes. First of all, huge increases in the number of cyber attacks and the number of successful ransoms that have been going on. And we're going to talk a little bit later, too, about where some of those attacks are coming from, and the reason behind those attack. [00:03:36] According to them right now, the average number of weekly attacks on organizations globally. So far, this year is 40% higher than the average before March, 2020. And of course that's when the first lockdowns went into effect and people started working from home in the U S the. Increase in the number of attacks on an organizations is even higher at 53%. [00:04:07] Now you might ask yourself why, why would the U S be attacked more? I know you guys are the best and brightest, and I bet it, I don't even need to say this because you can figure this out yourself, but the us is where the money is. And so that's why they're doing it. And we had president Biden come out and say, Hey, don't attack the. [00:04:27] well, some of those sectors are under khaki for more after he said that then before, right. It's like giving a list to a bad guy. Yeah. I'm going to be gone for a month in June and yeah, there won't be anybody there. And the here's the code to my alarm. Right. You're you're just inviting disaster checkpoints. [00:04:49] Also showing that there were more. Average weekly attacks in September 21. That's this September than any time since January, 2020. In fact, they're saying 870 attacks per organization globally per week. The checkpoint counted in September was double the average in March, 2020. It's kind of funny, right? [00:05:14] It's kind of like a before COVID after COVID or before the Wu Han virus and after the Wu Han virus, however, we might want to know. So there are a lot of attacks going on. Volume is pretty high in a lot of different countries. You've heard me say before some of my clients I've seen attack multiple times a second, so let's take a second and define the attack because being scanned. [00:05:40] I kind of an attack, the looking to see, oh, where is there a device? Oh, okay. Here's a device. So there might be a home router. It might be your firewall or your router at the business. And then what it'll do is, okay, I've got an address now I know is responding, which by the way is a reason. The, we always configure these devices to not respond to these types of things. [00:06:04] And then what they'll do is they will try and identify it. So they'll try and go into the control page, which is why you should never have when. Configuration enabled on any of your routers or firewalls, because they're going to come in and identify you just on that because all of a sudden them brag about what version of the software you're running. [00:06:26] And then if it's responding to that, they will try and use a password. That is known to be the default for that device. So in a lot of these devices, the username is admin and the password is admin. So they try it and now off they go, they're running. Some of these guys will even go the next step and we'll replace the software. [00:06:52] In your router or firewall, they will replace it so that it now directs you through them, everything you are doing through them. So they can start to gather information. And that's why you want to make sure that the SSL slash TLS. That encryption is in place on the website. You're going to, so if you go to Craig peterson.com right now, my website, I'm going to go there myself. [00:07:22] So if you go to Craig peterson.com, you're going to notice that first of all, it's going to redirect you to my secure site and it doesn't really matter. You won't see it. Okay. But you are there because if he. Typically at the left side of that URL bar where it says, Craig peterson.com. You'll see, there's a little lock. [00:07:44] So if you click that lock, it says connection is secure. Now there's a lot more we could go into here. But the main idea is even if your data is being routed through China or. Both of which have happened before many tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of time times. I'm not even sure of the number now. [00:08:06] It's huge. Even if your data is being routed through them, the odds are, they're not going to see anything. That you are doing on the Craig Peterson site. Now, of course you go into my site, you're going to be reading up on some of the cybersecurity stuff you can do. Right. The outages what's happened in the news. [00:08:27] You can do all of that sort of thing on my side, kind of, who cares, right? Um, but really what you care about is the bank, but it's the same thing with the bank. And I knew mine was going to be up there. And when everybody just check it out anyway, so. So the bad guys, then do this scan. They find a web page log in. [00:08:47] They try the default log in. If it works, the Le the least they will do is change. What are called your DNS settings. That's bad because changing your DNS settings now opens you up to another type of attack, which is they can go ahead. And when your browser says, I want to go to bank of america.com. It is in fact, going to go out to the internet, say is bank of America, the bad guys. [00:09:18] Did, and they will give you their bank of America site that looks like bank of America feels like bank of America. And all they're doing is waiting for you to type into your bank of America, username and password, and then they might redirect you to the. But at that point, they've got you. So there are some solutions to that one as well, and Firefox has some good solutions. [00:09:44] There are others out there and you had to have those that are in the works, but this is just an incredible number. So here's what I'm doing, right. I have been working for weeks on trying to figure out how can I help the most people. And obviously I needed to keep the lights on, right? I've got to pay for my food and gas and stuff, but what I'm planning on doing and what we've sketched out. [00:10:10] In fact, just this week, we got kind of our final sketch out of it is we're going to go ahead and have a success path for cyber security. All of the basic steps on that success path will be. Okay. So it will be training that is absolutely 100% free. And I'll do a deeper dive into some of these things that I'm doing that I'm doing right now here on the radio, because you can't see my desktop. [00:10:40] It's hard to do a deep dive and it's open to anybody, right? If you're a home user or if you're a business user, all of the stuff on that free. Is going to help you out dramatically. And then after that, then there'll be some paid stuff like a membership site. And then obviously done for you. If the cybersecurity stuff is just stuff that you don't want to deal with, you don't have the time to deal with. [00:11:05] You don't want to learn, because believe me, this is something that's taken me decades to learn and it's changing almost every day. So I understand if you don't want to learn it to. That is the other option. I'll give you, which is done for you, which we've been doing now for over 20, 30 years. Stick around. [00:11:25] We'll [00:11:25] So which sectors are economy are being hacked? I mentioned that in the last segment, but yeah, there are some problems and the sectors that president Biden lined out laid out are, are the ones that are under, even more attack after his message. [00:11:42] 497 cyber attacks per week. On average here in the US, that is a lot of attacks. And we started explaining what that meant so that we talked about the scan attacks that are automated and some person may get involved at some point, but the automated attacks can be pretty darn automated. Many of them are just trying to figure out who you are. [00:12:09] So, if it shows up, when they do that little scan that you're using a router that was provided by your ISP, that's a big hint that you are just a small guy of some sort, although I'm shocked at how many bigger businesses that should have their own router, a good router, right. A good Cisco router and a really good next generation firewall. [00:12:34] I'm shocked at how many don't have those things in place, but when they do this, That's the first cut. So if you're a little guy, they'll probably just try and reflash your router. In other words, reprogram it and change it so that they can start monitoring what you're doing and maybe grab some information from. [00:12:56] Pretty simple. If you are someone that looks like you're more of a target, so they connect to your router and let's say, it's a great one. Let's say it's a Cisco router firewall or Palo Alto, or one of those other big companies out there that have some really good products. Uh, at that point, they're going to look at it and say, oh, well, okay. [00:13:18] So this might be a good organization, but when they get. To it again, if when access has turned on wide area, access has turned down, that router is likely to say, this is the property of, uh, Covina hospital or whatever it might be, you know? And any access is disallowed authorized access only. Well, now they know. [00:13:42] Who it is. And it's easy enough just to do a reverse lookup on that address. Give me an address anywhere on the internet. And I can tell you pretty much where it is, whose it is and what it's being used for. So if that's what they do say they have these automated systems looking for this stuff it's found. [00:14:02] So now they'll try a few things. One of the first things they try nowadays is what's called an RDP attack. This is a remote attack. Are you using RDP to connect to your business? Right? A lot of people are, especially after the lockdown, this Microsoft. Desktop protocol has some serious bugs that have been known for years. [00:14:25] Surprisingly to me, some 60% of businesses have not applied those patches that have been available for going on two years. So what then button bad guys will do next. They say, oh, is there a remote desktop access? Cause there probably is most smaller businesses particularly use that the big businesses have a little bit more expensive, not really much more expensive, but much better stuff. [00:14:51] You know, like the Cisco AnyConnect or there's a few other good products out there. So they're going to say, oh, well, okay. Let's try and hack in again. Automate. It's automated. No one has to do anything. So it says, okay, let's see if they patch, let's try and break in a ha I can get in and I can get into this particular machine. [00:15:14] Now there's another way that they can get into their moat desktop. And this apparently has been used for some of the bigger hacks you've heard about recently. So the other way they get in is through credential stuff. What that is is Hey, uh, there are right now some 10 billion records out on the dark web of people's names, email addresses, passwords, and other information. [00:15:43] So, what they'll do is they'll say, oh, well this is Covina hospital and it looks it up backwards and it says, okay, so that's Covina hospital.org. I have no idea if there even is a Gavino hospital, by the way, and will come back and say, okay, great. So now let's look at our database of hacked accounts. Oh, okay. [00:16:04] I see this Covina hospital.org email address with a password. So at that point they just try and stuff. Can we get in using that username and password that we stole off of another website. So you see why it's so important to be using something like one password, a password generator, different passwords on every site, different usernames on every site, et cetera, et cetera. [00:16:29] Right. It gets pretty important per te darn quickly. So now that they're in, they're going to start going sideways and we call that east west in the biz. And so they're on a machine. They will see what they can find on that machine. This is where usually a person gets some. And it depends in historically it's been about six days on average that they spend looking around inside your network. [00:17:00] So they look around and they find, oh yeah, great. Here we go. Yep. Uh, we found this, we found that. Oh, and there's these file server mounts. Yeah. These SMB shares the, you know, the Y drive the G drive, whatever you might call it. So they start gaining through those and then they start looking for our other machines on the network that are compromised. [00:17:23] It gets to be really bad, very, very fast. And then they'll often leave behind some form of ransomware and also extortion, where that extort you additionally, for the threat of releasing your data. So there, there are many other ways they're not going to get into them all today, but that's what we're talking about. [00:17:43] Mirman, we're talking about the 500 cyber attacks per week against the average. North American company. So we have seen some industry sectors that are more heavily targeted than others. Education and research saw an 60% increase in attacks. So their education and I've tried to help out some of the schools, but because of the way the budgets work and the lowest bidder and everything else, they, they end up with equipment. [00:18:17] That's just totally misconfigured. It's just shocking to me. Right. They buy them from one of these big box online places. Yeah. I need a, a Cisco 10, 10. And I need some help in configuring it and all, yeah, no problems or we'll help you. And then they sell it to the school, the school installs it, and it is so misconfigured. [00:18:38] It provides zero protection, uh, almost zero, right. It provides almost no protection at all. And doesn't even use the advanced features that they paid for. Right. That's why, again, don't buy from these big box. Guys just don't do it. You need more value than they can possibly provide you with. So schools, 1500 attacks per week research companies, again, 1500 attacks per week, government and military. [00:19:10] Entities about 1100 weekly attacks. Okay. That's the next, most highest attacked. Okay. Uh, health care organizations, 752 attacks per week on average. Or in this case, it's a 55% increase from last year. So it isn't just checkpoints data that I've been quoting here. That, that gives us that picture. There are a lot of others out there IBM's has Verizon's has all of these main guys, and of course in the end, They've got these huge ransoms to deal with. [00:19:50] Hey, in New Hampshire, one of the small towns just got nailed. They had millions of dollars stolen, and that was just through an email trick that they played in. K again. I T people, um, I I've been thinking about maybe I should put together some sort of coaching for them and coaching for the cybersecurity people, even because there's so much more that you need to know, then you might know, anyways, if you're interested in any of this. [00:20:22] Visit me online. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. You will get my weekly newsletter, all of my show notes, and you'll find out about these various trainings and I keep holding. In fact, there's one in most of the newsletters. Craig peterson.com. Craig Peterson, S O n.com. Stick around. [00:20:43] We've been talking about the types of attacks that are coming against us. Most organizations here in north America are seeing 500 cyber attacks a week, some as many as 1500. Now, where are they coming from? [00:21:00] Whether they're scanning attacks, whether they're going deeper into our networks and into our systems who are the bad guys and what are they doing? Microsoft also has a report that they've been generating, looking at what they consider to be the source of the attacks. Now we know a lot of the reasons I'm going to talk about that too, but the source is an interesting way to look at. [00:21:29] Because the source can also help you understand the reason for the attacks. So according to dark reading, this is kind of an insider, a website you're welcome to go to, but it gets pretty darn deep sometimes, but they are showing this stats from Microsoft, which you can find online that in the last year rush. [00:21:53] Has been the source of 58% of the cyber cat tax. Isn't that amazing now it's not just the cyber attacks. I, I need to clarify this. It's the nation state cyber tech. So what's a nature's nation state cyber attack versus I don't know, a regular cyber attack. Well, the bottom line is a nation state cyber attack is an attack that's occurring and is actually coordinated and run by and on behalf of a nation state. [00:22:31] Uh, So Russia at 58% of all nation state attacks is followed by North Korea, 23% Iran, 11% China, 8%. Now you probably would have thought that China would be. Right up there on that list, but Russia has 50% more of the nation state cyber attacks coming from them than from China. And then after China is south Vietnam, Viet, or I should say South Korea, Vietnam, and Turkey, and they all have less than 1%. [00:23:14] Now, this is this new pool of data that Microsoft has been analyzing. And it's part of this year's Microsoft digital defense report, and they're highlighting the trends in the nation state threat cyber activity hybrid workforce security. Disinformation and your internet of things, operational technology and supply chain security. [00:23:35] In other words, the whole gambit before, before all of this, now the data is also showing that the Russian nation state attacks are increasingly effective, calming from about a 21% successful compromise rate last year to 32%. So basically 50% better this year at effectiveness there, Russians are also targeting more government agencies for intelligence gathering. [00:24:10] So that jumped from 3% of their victims last year to 53%. This. And the Russian nation state actors are primarily targeting guests who us, right? The United States, Ukraine and the United Kingdom. Now this is all according to the Microsoft data. So why has Russia been attacking us? Why is China been attacking us and why the change this. [00:24:38] Well, Russia has been attacking us primarily to rent some us it's a cash cow for them just like oil and gas. They are making crazy money. Now that president Biden has made us dependent on foreign oil supplies. It's just insanity and even dependent on. Gas coming from other places. Well guess where the number one source of gases now for Europe and oil it's Russia. [00:25:08] So we are no longer going to be selling to Europe. Russia is so they're going to be making a lot of money off of. But before then they were actually counted on ransomware to help fund the Russian federal government, as well as of course, these Russian oligarchs, these people who are incredibly rich that have a substantial influence on the government. [00:25:33] Don't if you're wondering who they might be, just think of people like, oh, I don't know. Bill gates and, uh, w who are on the, some of the other big guys, you know, Tim cook, uh, Amazon's Jeff bayzos Elon Musk, right? Those are by my definition and looking it up in the dictionary, they are all a. They get exemptions to laws. [00:25:58] They get laws passed that, protect them. In fact, most of regulations actually protect these big companies and hurt small companies. So I would call them oligarchs and that's the same sort of thing in Russia in Russia. Okay. They probably have a little bit more underhanded stuff than these guys here do, but that's what Russia has been. [00:26:21] China has been continually going after our national secrets, national defense, the largest database of DNA of Americans DNA, of course, is that unique key. If you will building block for all of us, that's what DNA is. And the largest database of all of that uniquely identifying information is in. China stole from the office of personnel management records of a federal employees, their secret clearance, all of their background check information who was spoken with, what did they have to say? [00:27:03] And on and on. So China has been interested in infiltrating our businesses that provide things to the military and the military themselves and the federal state, and even the local governments that's who they've been targeting. And that's why there's 8% number might seem small. Although, as I just mentioned this year, Russia moved, moved dramatically. [00:27:30] They used to be about 3% of their attacks or against the government agencies. And now it's 53%. So Russia. And China are going after our national secrets and they can use them in a cold war, which as I've said, I think the first shots of the third world war have been fired. And frankly, they're all cyber, it's all online and Russia. [00:27:57] Isn't the only nation state actor who's changing its approaches here as espionage is the most common goal amongst all nation state groups as of this year. Tivity of hackers reveals different motivations in Iran, which quadrupled its targeting of Israel. Surprise, surprise. Over the last year. And Iran has been launching destructive attacks, things that will destroy power, power plants, et cetera, and North Korea, which is targeting cryptocurrency companies for profit. [00:28:29] So they're stealing these various crypto coins again, funding their government. So it's, it's a problem. Absolute problem. Government sectors are some of the most targeted 48%. These NGOs non-government organizations that act kind of a quasi government functions and think tanks are 31%. Uh, and Microsoft, by the way, has been alerting customers of nation, state attack, attack attempts. [00:29:01] Guess how many this year that they had to warn about 20,500 times in the past three years. So that's a lot and Microsoft is not a company that's been out there at the front lines. It never has been it's in behind. So to have them come out and say, this is. And okay, by the way, your stolen username and password run for a buck per thousand, and it's only gonna take you hundreds of hours to get it all cleared up. [00:29:32] Isn't that nice spear fishing for a hire can cost a hundred to a thousand dollars per successful account takeover and denial of service attacks are cheap from protected sites, roughly $300. Per month. And if you want to be ransomware king, it's only going to cost you 66 bucks upfront 30% of the profit. [00:29:54] Okay. Craziness. Hey, visit me online. Sign up Craig, peter.com/subscribe. [00:30:03] I had an interesting mastermind meeting this week. There's six of us. We're all business owners and it opened my eyes pretty dramatically because one of the members got hacked, but that's not what I really want to emphasize. [00:30:20] This whole cybersecurity thing gets pretty complicated, pretty quickly. And a friend of mine who is in one of my mastermind groups had a real problem. And the here's here's what went on. We'll call him Walt for back of a letter, lack of a better name since that is his name. [00:30:40] And he doesn't mind me sharing this with you. Walt has a very small business that he and his wife run, and they have a couple of contractors that help out with some things, but his business is very reliant on advertising and primarily what he does is Facebook advertising. Now I've been talking for two years, I think in this mastermind group about cyber security and the fact that everyone needs good cyber security. [00:31:13] And he always just kind of pole hum to, uh, wow. You know, and it's just too complicated for me. I got to thinking for a, you know, a bit, really a few weeks, what does he mean to complicated? Cause there's some basic things you can do. So this week on Tuesday, I was on our mastermind groups meeting and I explained, okay, so here's what happened to Walt. [00:31:42] He had $40,000 stolen, which by the way, it's a lot of money for a teeny tiny husband wife company. And. Uh, well, here's what we did. He, we helped them. We got the FBI involved and, you know, with our direct ties, cause we work with them on certain types of cases and he got back every dime, which is just totally unheard of. [00:32:06] But um, without going into all of the details there, I spent a problem. 1520 minutes with the whole group and the mastermind explaining the basics of cyber security. And that really kind of woke me up, frankly, because of their responses. Now these are all small business owners and so they're making pretty decent money. [00:32:31] In fact, every one of them and they all have some contractors and some employees all except for Walt and his wife, they had just have contractors and. I had two completely different responses from two members of this group that no. Let me tell you this was really eye opening for me. And this is why you might've heard me in the first segment talking about this, but this is why I have really changed my view of this stuff, this cybersecurity stuff, because I explained. [00:33:08] If you're using things like Norton antivirus or McAfee, antivirus, or really any of them, even the built-in Microsoft defender this year, those standard antivirus system. I have only been able to catch about 30% of the malware out there, 30%, you know, that's like having a house and you've got a security guard posted out front. [00:33:39] He's armed, he's ready to fight. And yet all of your windows are open and all of your doors are unlocked. And all someone has to do is crawl in the side window because that guy that's posted up front, he's not going to be able to stop. So 30% effectiveness. And of course, Walt had all of the basic stuff. [00:33:59] He thought he was good enough. It's not worth spending time or money doing any of this. And of course it turned out to be well worth the time and money if he had done it. But he has a friend who has contacts and, and made things happen for him. So I guess he's kind of, kind of lucky in that regard, but I explained that and I said, do you know the, the way you. [00:34:21] To go. If you're a small business, it's about $997 a month for a small business, with a handful of employees to get the type of security you really need. There's going to catch. 90 something 98%. Maybe if, if things go well of the stuff going on, in other words, you don't just have an armed guard at the front door. [00:34:46] You've got all the windows closed and blocked and the doors closed and locked as well. So yeah, somebody can still get in, but they got to really want to get in and risk getting caught. So that's kind of the analogy that I used now. One of the members of my. Of my mastermind thought, well, okay. Cause you're just being Frank with me. [00:35:09] Right? We're all friends. She said, well, initially I thought, oh Craig, I'm going to have to have you help out with stuff here. Cause my, you know, I'm concerned about my security. I make some good money. Uh, she's the one that has employee. She has a million dollar plus a year business and she wants to keep it safe. [00:35:26] But then she. Uh, you know, but, but you know, you were talking about all of this Norton and stuff and that it doesn't work. So I, I just, I don't have any hope. And that's when the another member jumped in and this other member said, well, Uh, oh, that's not what I got at all. I got the, the normal off the shelf stuff that you buy that you're going to get from Amazon, or you're going to get from PC connection or wherever that stuff is not going to work, but there is stuff that does, but it's only professional stuff. [00:36:02] You can only get it from professionals that are trained in certified. Which is the right message. Right. That was the message I was trying to relay. Yeah. Don't try and do it yourself because you can't even get the right tools that you need. That is frankly a problem. So that really got me to think. In, in a very big way, because here are two people that have heard me talk about cybersecurity and their eyes probably glazed over, but now their eyes, I know at least one of these ladies definitely glazed over. [00:36:36] So I've come to the realization that sometimes I. A little too deep into things. And although I can explain it quite well to many people, sometimes people glaze over and I get emails from you guys saying kind of the same thing. I really appreciate it. I don't understand a lot of what you're saying, Craig, but thanks for being there. [00:36:59] Listen to you every week here on the radio. Uh, then that's good. That's reassuring, but now I've come to realize a few things. One is. The I've got to be a lot clearer in my messaging, because even when talking to my friends, it is a little bit overwhelming for them sometimes. Right. And then the next thing is everybody needs help because you're being lied to. [00:37:29] Right. How are people getting ransomware? If the stuff that they're buying work. Maybe it's just me, but I think there's a disconnect there. So a lot of you guys have gone out and you've hired people and I want to spend just a few minutes right now, going through some red flags that you need to be looking out for in vendor security assessment. [00:37:56] Now I'm putting one together. As well, right yet another one. Uh, and what I'm trying to do is help you out, right? This is not as sales tool. It is trying to help you figure out where you're at. I'm putting together a webinar that I'm going to be holding these what I'm calling bootcamps, where I go through and show you exactly how to do the basic steps that you need to do in order to be safe on. [00:38:25] Okay. If an online, all that means is your, is plugged in, right. Okay. It doesn't mean you're going out and doing a lot of stuff out there on the internet just means it's connected. So those are going to be coming out. I will send an email out as soon as all of that. Stuff's ready. Cause. Absolutely free. And these assessments, I have the basic one that you can do yourself. [00:38:47] It's a self-assessment. And then I have the more advanced ones that I do that are five grand. Okay. So you've got to be a decent sized business for this to make sense where we look for all of the security problem. On all of your computers and your networks, and then give you a list of things you need to do and how to do them. [00:39:10] Okay. So it's well worth it for them, but if you're a very small company and you're trying to do some of this yourself, I want to help you. So that's what these boot camps are going to be all over. And also what the scorecard is going to be all about. So that's coming up, but here are some good red flags and an assessment. [00:39:30] I found this again on dark reading. This is kind of an insider website for those of us in the cybersecurity business, but, um, How can you verify the information that vendors are giving you about their own cybersecurity posture? We've heard in the news and I've talked about them all year, this year, and for years past. [00:39:56] That are we're vendors can be our worst nightmare because some of these hacks come in through our vendors. So you've got yourself, a cybersecurity company. How do you know if they are really telling you the truth? And man, is that hard for you to know? Right. You're going to ask him questions and the salesmen are going to say, oh yeah, yeah, yeah. [00:40:21] That's why we don't have salesmen. Right. We have engineers. You talk to me, you might talk to my son or my daughter, people who have been doing this with me, who I have trained and helped out. So this guy who wrote the article and there's this on attributed, I don't see an attribution on here on this page. [00:40:41] I definitely want to give him, probably I heard is John Babinec wrote this thing and he is a principle threat hunters. What he calls himself over at net and rich. So he says, here's what you got to do. And if you're trying to be cost-effective, he puts it in. What I call an ed month clause. And one of these days I'll tell you that story, but he calls it a validity check question so that an honest vendor would tell you, no, they don't do X and give you a good reason why they don't like it's not cost effective. [00:41:17] It's outside of a reasonable risk model. Does that make sense to you? So when you're trying to evaluate a vendor, who's going to be doing your cyber security put in one of these validity checks put in one of these questions. It doesn't really matter to you, but it's something that would be very hard for one of these cybersecurity companies to do. [00:41:42] And maybe it doesn't fit the risk model that you have. I think it's just absolutely brilliant. Probably one of the better ways when you're trying to evaluate an MSSP as cybersecurity managed or otherwise provider stick in something like that. So you have a red flag that just stands out for you. All right. [00:42:04] Make sure you are registered online. Craig Peter sohn.com/subscribe. So you can find out about all of these trainings coming up. [00:42:17] If you've never heard of the Carrington event, I really hope, frankly, I really, really do hope we never have to live through one of these. Again, there is a warning out there right now about an internet apocalypse that could happen because of the Sun. [00:42:34] Solar storms are something that happens really kind of all of the time. The sun goes through solar cycles. About every seven years, there are longer cycles as well. You might know. I have an advanced class amateur radio license I've had for a long time, and we rely a lot when we're dealing with short wave on the solar cycle. [00:42:59] You see what happens is that the sun charges, the atmosphere. You see that if you've ever seen the Northern light, that is. Part of the Sunzi missions, hitting our magnetic field and kind of getting sucked into the core of the earth, if you will, as they get caught in that field. And the more charged the atmosphere is, the more bounce you get. [00:43:24] That's what we call it bounce. And the reason us hams have all these different frequencies to use is because of the battle. We can go different frequencies with different distances, I should say, using different frequencies. So think about it right now. You've got the earth and I want to talk from Boston to Chicago. [00:43:47] For instance, I know about how many miles it is, and I have to figure out in the ionosphere up in the higher levels of the atmosphere, what frequency. To use in order to go up into the atmosphere, bounce back, and then hit Chicago. That's the idea. It's not quite as simple or as complex in some ways, as it sounds, a lot of people just try different frequencies and a lot of hams just sit there, waiting for anybody anywhere to talk to, particularly if they are. [00:44:20] It's really quite fun. Now what we're worried about, isn't so much just the regular solar activity. We get worried when the sun spots increase. Now, the solar cycle is what has primary image. On the temperature on earth. So no matter what, you might've heard that isn't your gas, guzzling car or a diesel truck that causes the Earth's temperature to change. [00:44:49] Remember the only constant when it comes to the Earth's temperature has been changed over the millions of years. We had periods where the earth was much warmer than it is now had more common that carbon dioxide in the atmosphere than it does now had less. In fact, right now we are at one of the lowest levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere in earth, long, long. [00:45:15] So the sun, if you might remember, comes up in the morning, warms things up, right? And then it cools down. When the sun disappears at nighttime, it has a huge impact. It's almost exclusively the impact for our temperatures. If there's other things too, for instance, eruption can spew all to hold a lot of carbon dioxide. [00:45:40] In fact, just one, just Mount St. Helens wanted erupted, put more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere than man has throughout our entire existence. Just to give you an idea, right? So these alarms that are out there, uh, you know, come on, people. Really, and now we're seeing that in, uh, this last year we had a 30% increase in the ice cap up in the, in, up in the north, up in Northern Canada, around the polls. [00:46:12] Uh, we also had some of these glaciers growing. It was so funny. I saw an article this year, or excuse me, this week that was showing a sign that was at one of our national parks. And it said this glacier will have disappeared by 2020. Of course it hasn't disappeared. In fact, it has grown now and it's past 2020. [00:46:34] Anyhow, the sun has a huge impact on us in so many ways. And one of the ways is. Well, something called a coronal mass ejection. This is seriously charged particles. That tend to be very, very directional. So when, when it happens, when there's one of these CMS coronal, mass ejections, it's not just sending it out all the way around the sun everywhere. [00:47:02] It's really rather concentrated in one. One particular spot. Now we just missed one not too long ago. And let me see if I can find it here. Just mast, a cm E near miss. Here we go. There a solar super storm in July, 2012, and it was a very, very close shave that we had most newspapers didn't mention it, but this could have been. [00:47:33] AB absolutely incredible. We'd be picking up the pieces for the next 50 years. Yeah. Five, zero years from this one particular storm. And what happens is these, these solar flares, if you will, are very, very extreme, they CME. You're talking about x-rays extreme UV, ultraviolet radiation, reaching the earth at the speed of light ionizes, the upper layers of atmosphere. [00:48:02] When that happens, by the way, it hurts our communications, but it can also have these massive effects where it burns out saddle. And then causes radio blackouts, GPS, navigation problems. Think about what happened up in Quebec. So let me just look at this call back, uh, hit with an E and yeah, here we go. And March 13th, 1989. [00:48:33] Here we go. Here's another one. Now I remembered. And this is where Quill back got nailed. I'm looking at a picture here, which is, uh, looking at the United States and Canada from the sky and where the light is. And you can see Quebec is just completely black, but they have this massive electrical blackout and it's becomes. [00:48:57] Of this solar storm. Now they, these storms that I said are quite directional, depending on where it hits and when it hits things can get very, very bad. This particular storm back in 1989 was so strong. We got to see their Rora Borealis, the Northern lights as far south, as Florida and cue. Isn't that something, when we go back further in time to this Carrington event that I mentioned, you could see the Northern lights at the equals. [00:49:35] Absolutely amazing. Now the problem with all of this is we've never really had an internet up online. Like we have today when we had one of the storms hit. And guess what we're about to go into right now, we're going into an area or a time where the sun's going to be more active, certainly on this, this 11 year cycle and possibly another bigger cycle too, that we don't really know much about. [00:50:07] But when this hit us back in the 1850s, what we saw was a, uh, a. Telegraph system that was brought to its knees. Our telegraphs were burned out. Some of the Telegraph buildings were lit. They caught on fire because of the charges coming in, people who were working the telegraphs, who are near them at the time, got electric shocks or worse than that. [00:50:34] Okay. 1859 massive Carrington event compass needles were swinging wildly. The Aurora Borealis was visible in Columbia. It's just amazing. So that was a severe storm. A moderate severity storm was the one that hit in Quebec here, knocked out Quebec, uh, electric. Nine hour blackout on Northeast Canada. What we think would happen if we had another Carrington event, something that happened to 150 years ago is that we would lose power on a massive scale. [00:51:13] So that's one thing that would happen. And these massive transformers that would likely get burned out are only made in China and they're made on demand. Nobody has an inventory. So it would be at least six months before most of the country would get power back. Can you believe that that would be just terrible and we would also lose internet connectivity. [00:51:39] In fact, the thinking that we could lose internet connectivity with something much less than a severe storm, maybe if the Quebec power grid solar, a massive objection here. Maybe if that had happened, when. The internet was up. They might have burned out internet in the area and maybe further. So what we're worried about is if it hits us, we're going to lose power. [00:52:07] We're going to lose transformers on the transmission lines and other places we're going to lose satellites and that's going to affect our GPS communication. We're going to lose radio communication, and even the undersea cables, even though they're now no longer. Regular copper cables. It's now being carried of course, by light in pieces of glass. [00:52:32] The, those cables need to have repeaters about every 15 miles or so under underwater. So the power is provided by. Copper cables or maybe some other sort of power. So these undersea cables, they're only grounded at extensive intervals, like hundreds or thousands of kilometers apart. So there's going to be a lot of vulnerable components. [00:52:59] This is all a major problem. We don't know when the next massive. Solar storm is going to happen. These coronal mass ejections. We do know they do happen from time to time. And we do know it's the luck of the draw and we are starting to enter another solar cycle. So be prepared, everything. Of course, you're listening to Craig Peterson, cybersecurity strategist. [00:53:28] If you'd like to find out more and what you can do, just visit Craig peterson.com and subscribe to my weekly show notes. [00:53:39] Google's got a new admission and Forbes magazine has an article by Zach Dorfman about it. And he's saying you should delete Google Chrome now after Google's newest tracking admission. So here we go. [00:53:55] Google's web browser. Right? It's been the thing for people to use Google Chrome for many years, it's been the fastest. Yeah, not always people kind of leapfrog it every once in a while, but it has become quite a standard. Initially Microsoft is trying to be the standard with their terrible browser and yeah, I to Exploder, which was really, really bad and they have finally completely and totally shot it in the head. [00:54:29] Good move there on their part. In fact, they even got rid of their own browser, Microsoft edge. They shot that one in. They had to, I know I can hear you right now saying, oh, Craig, I don't know. I just use edge browser earlier today. Yeah. But guess what? It isn't edge browser. It's actually Google Chrome. The Microsoft has rebranded. [00:54:52] You see the guts to Google Chrome are available as what's called an open source project. It's called chromium. And that allows you to take it and then build whatever you want on top of. No, that's really great. And by the way, Apple's web kit, Kat is another thing that many people build browsers on top of and is part of many of these browsers we're talking about right now, the biggest problem with the Google Chrome. [00:55:22] Is they released it so they could track you, how does Google make its money? Well, it makes us money through selling advertising primarily. And how does it sell advertising if it doesn't know much or anything about you? So they came out with the Google Chrome browser is kind of a standard browser, which is a great. [00:55:43] Because Microsoft, of course, is very well known for not bothering to follow standards and say what they have is the actual standard and ignoring everybody else. Yeah. Yeah. I'm picking on Microsoft. They definitely deserve it. Well, there is what is being called here in Forbes magazine, a shocking new tracking admission from. [00:56:05] One that has not yet made headlines. And there are about what 2.6 billion users of Google's Chrome worldwide. And this is probably going to surprise you and it's frankly, Pretty nasty and it's, I think a genuine reason to stop using it. Now, as you probably know, I have stopped using Chrome almost entirely. [00:56:31] I use it when I have to train people on Chrome. I use it when I'm testing software. There's a number of times I use it, but I don't use. The reality is the Chrome is an absolute terror. When it comes to privacy and security, it has fallen way behind its rivals in doing that. If you have an iPhone or an iPad or a Mac, and you're using safari, apple has gone a long ways to help secure your. [00:57:09] Well, that's not true with Chrome. In fact, it's not protecting you from tracking and Dave up data harvesting. And what Google has done is they've said, okay, well, we're going to get these nasty third party cookies out of the whole equation. We're not going to do that anymore. And what they were planning on doing is instead of knowing everything specifically. [00:57:34] You they'd be able to put you in a bucket. So they'd say, okay, well you are a 40 year old female and you are like driving fast cars and you have some kids with a grandkid on the way, and you like dogs, not cats, right? So that's a bucket of people that may be a few hundred or maybe up to a thousand. As opposed to right now where they can tell everything about you. [00:58:04] And so they were selling that as a real advantage because they're not tracking you individually anymore. No, we're putting you in a bucket. Well, it's the same thing. Right. And in fact, it's easier for Google to put you in a bucket then to track everything about you and try and make assumptions. And it's easier for people who are trying to buy ads to place in front of you. [00:58:28] It's easier for them to not have to kind of reverse engineer all of the data the Google has gathered in instead of. To send this ad to people that are in this bucket and then that bucket. Okay. It makes sense to you, but I, as it turns out here, Google has even postponed of that. All right. They really have, they're the Google's kind of hiding. [00:58:54] It's really what's going on out there. Uh, they are trying to figure out what they should do, why they should do it, how they should do it, but it's, it's going to be a problem. This is a bad habit. The Google has to break and just like any, anybody that's been addicted to something it's going to take a long time. [00:59:16] They're going to go through some serious jitters. So Firefox is one of the alternatives and to Google Chrome. And it's actually a very good one. It is a browser that I use. I don't agree with some of the stuff that Mozilla and Firefox does, but again, right. Nobody agrees on everything. Here's a quote from them. [00:59:38] Ubiquitous surveillance harms individually. And society Chrome is the only major browser that does not offer meaningful protection against cross cross site tracking and Chrome will continue to leave users unprotected. And then it goes on here because. Uh, Google response to that. And they admit that this massive web tracking out of hand and it's resulted in, this is a quote from Google and erosion of trust, where 72% of people feel that almost all of what they do online is being. [01:00:19] By advertisers, technology firms or others, 81% say the potential risks from data collection outweigh the benefit by the way, the people are wrong. 72% that feel almost all of what they do on online is being tracked. No, no. The answer is 100% of what you do is probably being tracked in some way online. [01:00:41] Even these VPN servers and systems that say that they don't do log. Do track you take a look at proton mail just last week. Proton mail it's in Switzerland. Their servers are in Switzerland. A whole claim to fame is, Hey, it's all encrypted. We keep it safe. We don't do logging. We don't do tracking, uh, guess what they handed over the IP addresses of some of the users to a foreign government. [01:01:10] So how can you do that? If you're not logging, if you're not tracking. Yeah, right. They are. And the same thing is true for every paid VPN service I can think of. Right. So how can Google openly admit that their tracking is in place tracking everything they can, and also admit that it's undermining our privacy and. [01:01:38] Their flagship browser is totally into it. Right? Well, it's really, it's gotta be the money. And Google does not have a plan B this anonymized tracking thing that they've been talking about, you know, the buckets that I mentioned, isn't realistic, frankly. Uh, Google's privacy sandbox is supposed to Fitbit fix it. [01:02:00] I should say. The, the whole idea and the way it's being implemented and the way they've talked about it, the advertisers on happy. So Google's not happy. The users are unhappy. So there you go. That's the bottom line here from the Forbes article by Zach Dorfman, delete Google Chrome. And I said that for a long time, I do use some others. [01:02:27] I do use Firefox and I use. Which is a fast web browser, that some pretty good shape. Hey, if you sign up for my show's weekly newsletter, not only will you get all of my weekly tips that I send to the radio hosts, but you will get some of my special reports that go into detail on things like which browser you shouldn't be using. [01:02:52] Sign up right now. Craig peterson.com. [01:02:57] Many businesses have gone to the cloud, but the cloud is just another word for someone else's computer. And many of the benefits of the cloud just haven't materialized. A lot of businesses have pulled back and are building data centers again. [01:03:14] The reason I mentioned this thing about Microsoft again, and the cloud is Microsoft has a cloud offering. [01:03:23] It's called Microsoft Azure. Many people, many businesses use it. We have used it with some of our clients in the past. Now we have some special software that sits in front of it that helps to secure. And we do the same thing for Amazon web services. I think it's important to do that. And we also use IBM's cloud services, but Microsoft is been pitching for a long time. [01:03:51] Come use our cloud services and we're expecting here probably within the next month, a big announcement from Microsoft. They're planning on making it so that you can have your desktop reside in Microsoft's cloud, in the Azure cloud. And they're selling really the feature of it doesn't matter where you are. [01:04:17] You have your desktop and it doesn't matter what kind of computer you're on. As long as you can connect to your desktop, using some just reasonable software, you will be able to be just like you're in front of a computer. So if you have a Chromebook or a Mac, Or a windows or tablet, whatever, and you're at the grocery store or the coffee shop or the office, you'll be able to get it, everything, all of your programs, all your files. [01:04:47] And we, Microsoft will keep the operating system up to date for you automatically a lot of great selling points. And we're actually looking into that. Not too heavily yet. We'll give them a year before we really delve into it at all. Cause it takes them a while to get things right. And Microsoft has always been one that adds all kinds of features, but most of the time, most of them don't work and we can, we can document that pretty easily, even in things like Microsoft. [01:05:18] Well, the verge is now reporting that Microsoft has warned users of its as your cloud computing service, that their data has been exposed online for the last two years. Yeah, let me repeat that in case you missed it, you, uh, yeah. I'm I'm I might've misspoken. Right. Uh, let me see, what does it say? It says, um, users of Azure cloud competing service. [01:05:48] So that's their cloud. Microsoft's big cloud. Okay. Um, their data has been. Exposed online. Okay. So that means that people could get the data, maybe manipulate the data that sort of exposed means for the last two years. Are you kidding me? Microsoft is again, the verge. Microsoft recently revealed that an error in its Azure cosmos database product left more than 3,300 as your customers data. [01:06:24] Completely exposed. Okay guys. So this, this, this is not a big thing, right? It can't possibly be big thing because you know who uses Azure, right. Nobody uses a zer and nobody uses hosted databases. Come on, give me a break. Let me see, what else does this have to say? Oh, okay. It says that the vulnerability was reported, reportedly introduced into Microsoft systems in 2019, when the company added a data visualization feature called Jupiter notebook to cosmos DB. [01:06:59] Okay. Well, I'm actually familiar with that one and let's see what small companies let's see here. Um, some Azure cosmos DB clients include Coca Cola. Liberty mutual insurance, Exxon mobile Walgreens. Hmm. Let me see. Could any of these people like maybe, maybe Liberty mutual insurance and Walgreens, maybe they'd have information about us, right. [01:07:26] About our health and social security numbers and account numbers and credit cards. Names addresses. Right, right. That's again, why I got so upset when these places absolutely insist on taking my social security number, right? It, it, first of all, when it was put in place, the federal government guaranteed, it would never be used for anything other than social security. [01:07:53] And the law even said it could not be used for anything other than social security. And then the government started expanding it. Right. And the IRS started using it. To track all of our income and you know, that's one thing right there, the government computers, they gotta be secure. Right. All of these breaches we hear about that. [01:08:12] Can't be true. Uh, so how about when the insurance company wants your personal information? Like your social security number? What business is it of? There's really no. Why do they have to have my social security number? It's a social security number. It's not some number that's tattooed on my forehead. [01:08:36] That's being used to track me. Is it this isn't a socialist country like China is, or the Soviet union was right. It's not socially. So why are they tracking us like that? Walgreens? Why do they need some of that information? Why does the doctor that you go to that made the prescription for Walgreens? Why do they need that information? [01:09:00] And I've been all over this because they don't. Really need it. They want, it makes their life easier, but they don't really need it. However, it exposes us. Now, if you missed the email, I sent out a week ago, two weeks ago now, I guess. You missed something big because I, in my weekly newsletter went through and described exactly what you could do in order to keep your information private. [01:09:35] So in those cases where websites asking for information that they don't really need, right? You don't want to lie, but if they don't really need your real name, why you're giving them your real name? Why do you use a single email address? Why don't you have multiple addresses? Does that start make sense to you guys? [01:09:54] And now we find out that Microsoft Azure, their cloud services, where they're selling cloud services, including a database that can be used online, a big database, uh, 3,300 customers looks like some of them are actually kind of big. I don't know. ExxonMobil pretty big. Yeah. I think so. Walgreens, you think that that might be yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. [01:10:22] Y. Why are we trusting these companies? You know it, if you have a lot of data, a lot of customers, you are going to be a major target of nation states to hack you and bat just general hackers, bad guys. But you're also, if, if you've got all this information, you've also got to have a much higher level of security than somebody that doesn't have all of that information. [01:10:52] Does that make sense too? Did I say that right? You don't need the information and, and I've got to warn anybody that's in a business, whether you're a business owner or you're an employee, do not keep more data than you need the new absolutely need to run your company. And that includes data about your customers. [01:11:16] And maybe, maybe it's even more specifically data about your customer. Because what can happen is that data can be stolen and we just found. That? Yes, indeed. It could have been, it was exposed Microsoft the same. We don't know how much it was stolen. If anything was stolen. Um, yeah, Walgreens. Hey, I wonder if anyone's going to try and get some pain pills illegally through, uh, this database hack or a vulnerability anyways. [01:11:47] All right, everyone. Stick around. We'll be back. Of course, you listening to Craig Peterson. I am a cybersecurity strategist for business, and I'm here to help you as well. You can ask any question any time, uh, consumers are the people I help the most, you know, I wish I got a dime for every time I answered a question. [01:12:09] Just email me@craigpeterson.com me@craigpeterson.com and stick around. [01:12:18] Whether or not, you agree with the lockdown orders that were put in place over this COVID pandemic that we had. Uh, there are some other parts of the world that are doing a lot more. [01:12:34] Australia has, I don't know. I think that they went over the deep end. The much, the same thing is true right next door to them. [01:12:45] And I am looking at a report of what they are doing with this new app. Uh, you might be aware that both apple and Google came out with an application programming interface. That could be used for contract tack tracking, contact tracking. There you go. Uh, it wasn't terribly successful. Some states put some things in place. [01:13:13] Of course you get countries like China. I love the idea because heaven forbid you get people getting together to talk about a Tannen square remembrance. Now you want to know who all of those people were, who were in close proximity, right? So, you know, good for China a while, as it turns out, Australia is putting something in place they have yet another COVID lockdown. [01:13:39] They have COVID quarantine orders. Now I think if you are sick, you should stay on. I've always felt that I, you know, I had 50 employees at one point and I would say, Hey, if you're sick, just stay home. Never required a doctor's note or any of that other silliness, come on. People. If someone's sick, they're sick and let them stay home. [01:14:04] You don't want to get everybody else in the office, sick and spread things around. Right. Doesn't that just kind of make sense. Well, they now in Australia, don't trust people to stay home, to get moving. Remember China, they were, they were taking welders and we're going into apartments in anybody that tested positive. [01:14:22] They were welding them into their apartment for minimum of two weeks. And so hopefully they had food in there and they had a way to get fresh water. Australia is not going quite that far, but some of the states down under. Using facial recognition and geolocation in order to enforce quarantine orders and Canada. [01:14:47] One of the things they've been doing for very long time is if you come into the country from out of the country, even if you're a Canadian citizen, you have to quarantine and they'll send people by your house or you have to pay to stay for 10 days in a quarantine hope. So you're paying the course now inflated prices for the hotel, because they're a special quarantine hotel. [01:15:14] You have to pay inflated prices to have food delivered outside your door. And that you're stuck there for the 10 days, or if you're at home though, they, you know, you're stuck there and they'll send people by to check up on you. They'll make phone calls to check up on you and. They have pretty hefty find. [01:15:36] Well, what Australia has decided to do is in Australia is Charlene's even going from one state to another state are required to prove that they're obeying a 14 day quarantine. And what they have to do is have this little app on their phone and they, the app will ping them saying, prove it. And then they have to take a photo of themselves with geo location tag on it and send it up via the app to prove their location. [01:16:15] And they have to do all of that within 15 minutes of getting the notification. Now the premier of the state of south Australia, Steven Marshall said we don't tell them how often or when on a random basis, they have to reply within 15 minutes. And if you don't then a police, officer's going to show up at the address you're supposed to be at to conduct an in-person check. [01:16:43] Very very intrusive. Okay. Here's another one. This is a, an unnamed government spokesperson who was apparently speaking with Fox news quote. The home quarantine app is for a selected cohort of returning self Australians who have applied to be part of a trial. If successful, it will help safely ease the burden of travel restrictions associated with the pandemic. [01:17:10] So there you go. People nothing to worry about. It's just a trial. Uh, it will go away. Uh, just like, uh, for instance, income tax, as soon as rule, number one is over, it will be removed and it will never be more than 3% and it will only apply to the top 1% of wage-earners. So there you go. Right. And we all know that world war one isn't over yet. [01:17:34] Right. So that's why they still have it in somehow. Yeah, some of the middle class pays the most income tax. I don't know. Interesting. Interesting. So there you go. Little news from down under, we'll see if that ends up happening up here. News from China, China has, uh, China and Russia have some interesting things going on. [01:17:55] First of all, Russia is no longer saw. Country, they kind of are. They kind of aren't, they are a lot freer in many ways than we are here in the United States. Of course, China, very heavily socialist. In fact, they're so socialists, they are communist and China. And Russia both want their kids to have a very good education in science, engineering, and mathematics. [01:18:23] Not so much on history, not so much on, on politics. Right. But definitely heavy on the, on the sciences, which I can see that makes all the sense. I think everybody should be pretty heavily on the science. Well, according to the wall street journal this week, gamers under the age of 18 will not be allowed to play online games between 8:00 PM and 9:00 PM on Friday, Saturdays and Sundays. [01:1

Diary of an Apartment Investor
ATE-Interacting with Investors with Nathalie de Vos Burchart and Zachary Bryan

Diary of an Apartment Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 46:15


How to make personal connections with investors and excel in asset management with Nathalie de Vos Burchart and Zachary Bryan.Follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and TwitterFor more educational content, visit our website at www.diaryofanapartmentinvestor.comInterested in investing with Four Oaks Capital?  First step is to schedule a call with us. ----Nathalie de Vos BurchartSince 2009, Nathalie is an active residential real estate investor in the Houston market and still owns 10 single family rentals (down from 30). She serves as HOA Board President of a condo complex in Houston since 2013. Her company is a private lender on 6 properties in NY and on a development of townhomes north of Austin. With over 13 years of experience in Oil & Gas, Nathalie started her career at ExxonMobil on the refined products trading floor before working as an engineer in crude distillation at the flagship Baytown, TX refinery. She left ExxonMobil in 2006 to co-found BioUrja Trading, LLC, a successful physical commodity trading company ranked among the top 5 privately held companies in Houston, where she served as Vice President through 2017. Email her ndevosburchart@gmail.comOr add her on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/nathalie.dvb----Zachary BryanZach Bryan is a highly motivated commercial real estate investor focused on the Southern Indiana and Western Kentucky markets. ​His current real estate portfolio consists of 68 doors totaling over $5.2M AUM. Focusing on a value-add business plan, Zach seeks to stabilize properties by lowering expenses and increasing income.  He is an active and contributing member of the Active Duty Passive Income (ADPI) team and a graduate of the ADPI Multi-Family course and mastermind. https://www.linkedin.com/in/zachary-bryan-239722137/https://www.titancapgroup.org/zacharybryan@titancapgroup.org----Your host, Brian Briscoe, is a co-founder and principal in the real estate investing firm Four Oaks Capital.  He and his team currently have 629 units worth $36 million in assets under management and are continuing to grow.  He will retire as a Lieutenant Colonel in the United States Marine Corps in 2021. Learn more about him and the Four Oaks team at www.fouroakscapital.com  or contact him at brianbriscoe@fouroakscapital.com - be sure to let him know where you found him.Connect with him on LinkedIn or Facebook.vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv> Check out our multifamily investing community!> The Tribe of Titans> Get exclusive access to the Four Oaks Team!> Find it at https://www.thetribeoftitans.info^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Unprofessional Engineering
Companies that Built the World: ExxonMobil - Episode 269

Unprofessional Engineering

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 35:27


As we continue our series on companies that built the world, we look at the history of one of the most valuable companies in the world: ExxonMobil. Known as part of "Big Oil" along with Chevron, Royal Dutch Shell, Total SE, and BP, ExxonMobil makes up a large percentage of the oil industry around the world. In addition to the long history of Exxon, started way back with John D. Rockefeller, we also explore how Exxon has used engineering and technology to improve their techniques and keep costs down (or profits up?). Sit back and enjoy this quick look at ExxonMobil, and learn how they grew into one of the most valuable companies in the world.

Kingdom Capitalists : For Christians Called to Start and Scale Successful Businesses
How to Accomplish Massive Goals Through Faith with Ellis Hammond and Pete Vanderveen Part 1

Kingdom Capitalists : For Christians Called to Start and Scale Successful Businesses

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 38:03


Why is faith essential to your entrepreneurial journey?How to grow, scale, and have a bigger impact with God?How to accomplish bigger things before the end of the year? Kingdom Real Estate Investors! Learn more about our community and join the #1 real estate investing mastermind for Kingdom Leaders at www.thekingdomrei.com/coaching Short Bio:Ellis Hammond is the founder of Kingdom REI. He started his career as a missionary on the college campuses of San Diego. His investing journey began in San Diego in 2018 with a duplex and nine months later Ellis co-GP'd on a 144 unit complex in Memphis, TN. Today, Ellis is the co-principal of Symphony Capital Group, an investment firm currently focused on acquiring value-add multifamily real estate across the U.S. most recently in San Diego, CA, and Kansas City, MO.  EllisHammond.com Pete Vanderveen has a passion for continuous process improvement, operations management, strategic planning, change management, and executive leadership are all areas in which he is interested. This has led him to launch several businesses, including EatTheFrogFitness.com, and refining businesses such as ExxonMobil. He worked in the real estate industry for ten years, spanning land development, commercial and single-family development, and commercial franchise real estate development. His passion to achieve what others say is unachievable has resulted in over $50MM in commercial and residential development. He is also driven to empower those around him and to be a blessing to those who are overlooked by others. His desire to have a Kingdom impact is to be a rising tide that lifts others.  www.thekingdomrei.com/coaching

FT News Briefing
Introducing Behind the Money, Inside ESG: The tiny fund that took on a US giant and won

FT News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 20:55


The story of how a tiny, unknown hedge fund took on a giant of corporate America over climate change - and won. Charlie Penner of Engine No 1 talks about the very public proxy campaign he launched against Exxon Mobil, forcing the oil major to prepare for a future free of fossil fuels. In the third episode of our special five-part series on sustainable or ESG investing, produced in partnership with the FT's Moral Money team, Derek Brower, US energy editor, and Attracta Mooney, the FT's investment correspondent, reflect on whether the battle between Engine No 1 and Exxon marks the beginning of a new kind of activist investor.Engine No 1, the giant-killing hedge fund, has big plansDWS probes spark fears of greenwashing claims across investment industryCheck out stories and up-to-the-minute news from the Moral Money team here. Get 30 days of the premium Moral Money newsletter free, together with complimentary access to FT.com for the same period, visit www.ft.com/insideesgReview clips: The Sun, Channel 4 News, Euronews, PBS Newshour, GMA, CNN, CNBC, ExxonMobil See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Behind the Money with the Financial Times
3 - Inside ESG: The tiny fund that took on a US giant and won

Behind the Money with the Financial Times

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 19:27


The story of how a tiny, unknown hedge fund took on a giant of corporate America over climate change - and won. Charlie Penner of Engine No 1 talks about the very public proxy campaign he launched against Exxon Mobil, forcing the oil major to prepare for a future free of fossil fuels. In the third episode of our special five-part series on sustainable or ESG investing, produced in partnership with the FT's Moral Money team, Derek Brower, US energy editor, and Attracta Mooney, the FT's investment correspondent, reflect on whether the battle between Engine No 1 and Exxon marks the beginning of a new kind of activist investor.Engine No 1, the giant-killing hedge fund, has big plansDWS probes spark fears of greenwashing claims across investment industryCheck out stories and up-to-the-minute news from the Moral Money team here. Get 30 days of the premium Moral Money newsletter free, together with complimentary access to FT.com for the same period, visit www.ft.com/insideesgReview clips: The Sun, Channel 4 News, Euronews, PBS Newshour, GMA, CNN, CNBC, ExxonMobil See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Water Values Podcast
Why ESG Needs to Guide Corporate Decision-Making with Claudia Toussaint

Water Values Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 34:00


Claudia Toussaint, General Counsel of Xylem, provides a terrific discussion of ESG issues from the perspective of a publicly traded corporation's general counsel. In a nutshell, Claudia describes how little acorns of ESG can grow into mighty oaks when corporate boards use ESG to guide their business strategies. In this session, you'll learn about: Claudia's unique backgroundWhat ESG is from a publicly traded company's perspectiveWhy the water sector is so central to ESG issuesHow sustainability has morphed from primarily being an environmental concept to a business and social conceptWhy an entity's business strategy needs to align with its sustainability strategyThe ESG issues involved in the Exxon Mobil proxy fightWhy ESG needs to be front and center for publicly traded companies (guess what – the logic applies to all businesses!)Why it is critical for corporate boards to have an ESG strategyHow ESG supports a corporation's access to capital and lowers the cost of capitalHow ESG supports a corporation's workforce and the corporation's strategic directionHow businesses measure ESGWhy Claudia thinks the water sector can lead on ESG Resources and links mentioned in or relevant to this session include: Claudia's LinkedIn PageXylem's websiteDOJ press release indicating South Bend's new Consent Decree will cost less than half of its original consent decree ($276 million versus $700 million)

The Daily
The Sunday Read: ‘The Little Hedge Fund Taking Down Big Oil'

The Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2021 37:30


An activist investment firm won a shocking victory at Exxon Mobil. But can new directors really put the oil giant on a cleaner path?This story was written by Jessica Camille Aguirre and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.