Podcast appearances and mentions of Tim Hortons

Multinational quick service restaurant chain

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Locked On Phillies - Daily Podcast On The Philadelphia Phillies
Who Is The Face Of The Philadelphia Phillies' Free Agent Recruitment Process??

Locked On Phillies - Daily Podcast On The Philadelphia Phillies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 28:40


In today's episode, Connor discusses Rob Thomson's interesting recruitment tactics by making zoom calls from a Tim Horton's parking lot to talk to a potential Philadelphia Phillies free agent signing, and asks who the head of the Phillies free agent recruitment process is! Next, there was an interesting Aaron Judge free agency report this morning that could mean some upcoming news for the Philadelphia Phillies. Finally, it's time for Day 1 of the Philadelphia Phillies Holiday Advent Calendar clues! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

TheMummichogBlog - Malta In Italiano
"Why Investors Are Eating Up Restaurant Brands International Key Points Restaurant Brands International has been one of the hottest large cap names on the NYSE. The company has the kind of multi-c

TheMummichogBlog - Malta In Italiano

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 10:28


"Why Investors Are Eating Up Restaurant Brands International Key Points Restaurant Brands International has been one of the hottest large cap names on the NYSE. The company has the kind of multi-channel growth you'd like to see as an investor. J. Patrick Doyle, former Domino's Pizza CEO, was recentl" "--START AD- #TheMummichogblogOfMalta Amazon Top and Flash Deals(Affiliate Link - You will support our translations if you purchase through the following link) - https://amzn.to/3CqsdJH Compare all the top travel sites in just one search to find the best hotel deals at HotelsCombined - awarded world's best hotel price comparison site. (Affiliate Link - You will support our translations if you purchase through the following link) - https://www.hotelscombined.com/?a_aid=20558 “So whatever you wish that others would do to you, do also to them, for this is the Law and the Prophets."""" #Jesus #Catholic. Smooth Radio Malta is Malta's number one digital radio station, playing Your Relaxing Favourites - Smooth provides a ‘clutter free' mix, appealing to a core 35-59 audience offering soft adult contemporary classics. We operate a playlist of popular tracks which is updated on a regular basis. https://smooth.com.mt/listen/ Follow on Telegram: https://t.me/themummichogblogdotcom END AD---" "y announced as the company's new executive chairman. Wall Street has been raising its earnings estimates for the current quarter and 2023. Why Investors Are Eating Up Restaurant Brands International This summer, few investors were ordering shares of fast food chain operator Restaurant Brands International Inc. (NYSE: QSR). With gasoline prices soaring, fewer road trips meant fewer stops at Burger King, Tim Hortons, Popeyes, and Firehouse Subs. Toss in a side of increased food and labor costs and the company's earnings suffered. By June 2022, french fries and chicken strips weren't the only things getting dipped as the stock dipped below $50. Since then, Restaurant Brands International has been one of the hottest large-cap names on the NYSE. A better-than-expected third quarter performance and a super-sized leadership announcement have traders bidding the stock back up toward its post-pandemic peak. With a few trading days left, this month's volume is already at its highest level in two and a half years. And with many Americans cutting back on expensive sit-down meals, fast food businesses like Restaurant Brands International may continue to be appealing to consumers and investors alike. How Did Restaurant Brands International Do in Q3? Earlier this month, Restaurant Brands International posted adjusted earnings per share (EPS) of $0.96 which crushed the consensus estimate of $0.80. The 23% year-over-year improvement marked the company's best profit growth of 2022 and helped alleviate concerns about cost inflation. The result was driven by higher same-store sales at all restaurants except the recently acquired Firehouse Subs. Overall revenue growth of 15% reflected increased demand for takeout, drive-thru and delivery — exactly the kind of multi-channel growth you'd like to see as an investor. Growth was particularly strong at Burger King where the Royal Perks loyalty program attracted eaters with free food and upsizes. Loosened restrictions at the Canadian border also helped boost Burger King and Tim Hortons sales. The two restaurants are often housed under one roof along key travel corridors. Even with higher menu prices, consumers appear to be finding relative value at Burger King, Popeyes and Tim Horton's. And with gas prices elevated and many people working from home these days, fast food deliveries are up significantly this year. What Leadership Change Did Restaurant Brands Announce? On November 16th, Restaurant Brands International announced that J. Patrick Doyle will be the company's new executive chairman. This was perceived as a big deal because Mr. Doyle is the former CEO of Domino's Pizza where he had a solid track rec

Inside Curling
The Future Of Curling Broadcasts

Inside Curling

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 53:25


The guys kick things off with a major announcement regarding the Brier (3:30), provide an update from the European Championships (6:30), Kevin and Jim talk about their experience at the Everest Canadian Curling Championship at West Edmonton Mall (10:15), chat about the upcoming Pinty's Grand Slam event in Oakville (14:00) and Kevin explains why the mixed doubles rankings could change a lot before the Olympics (20:15).Rylan Hartley from Curling Live joins the guys (27:00) to discuss their plans to help the growth of curling in Canada and around the world with their live streaming (28:05), how they can help add some consistency to streaming events over the season (33:30), the challenges of placing commercials and product placement while streaming as opposed to traditional linear television broadcasts (36:20), they talk about the relationship between Curling Live, Sportsnet, and Sportsnet Now (39:45) and they discuss ways in which we can get more youth involved in the game (46:05).Plus, the guys welcome a new show to the feed!This podcast is produced by Warren Hansen, recorded and mixed by Mike Rogerson, and hosted by Kevin Martin, Warren Hansen and Jim Jerome. Social support by Griffin Porter.Contact the podcast -- insidecurling@gmail.comThe views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the hosts and guests and do not necessarily reflect the position of Rogers Sports & Media or any affiliates.

The Clean Energy Show
When Electric Cars Aren't Reliable; The Benefits of Processed Foods

The Clean Energy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 53:49


Brian talks about Wired.com's story on the benefits of processed foods. James is depressed because his beloved Nissan LEAF needs a new PTC cabin heater with a hefty price tag. The city of Houston has a boil water advisory because of a blip in their power grid. The Tesla Semi seems to be for real. Musk says it completed a 500 mile journey pulling an 81,000 pound load. The upcoming Sizewell C nuclear power plant in the UK was in need of public funding. Why the Saudis have electric buses.  There's a new record size for off-shore wind turbines and it's 16 megawatts. Ebike subsidies expand across the United States. GM dealerships are repairing Teslas. Will they also fix James's LEAF? Buy us a cup of coffee with PayPal Donate! Thanks for listening to our show! Consider rating The Clean Energy Show on iTunes, Spotify or wherever you listen to our show. Follow us on TikTok! @cleanenergypod Check out our YouTube Channel! @CleanEnergyShow Follow us on Twitter! @CleanEnergyPod Your hosts: James Whittingham https://twitter.com/jewhittingham Brian Stockton: https://twitter.com/brianstockton Email us at cleanenergyshow@gmail.com Leave us an online voicemail at http://speakpipe.com/cleanenergyshow   Transcript Hello, and welcome to episode 141 of the Clean Energy Show. I'm Brian Stockton. I'm James Whittingham. I finally come clean this week about a secret I've been keeping for two months. And, no, I'm not pregnant. And, yes, I would make an excellent mother. The city of Houston is under a boil water advisory. Because of power outages. Everything is bigger in Texas, including grid problems. The Tesla semi completed a 500 miles journey with a load weighing 81 £0, or roughly half the weight of Elon Musk's eagle. The upcoming Sewell Sea nuclear power plant in the UK was in need of funding. Ultrawealthy prime Minister Rishi Sunak has stepped in with a cash infusion. Oh, wait, I'm being told it's taxpayer money. He's not an idiot. All that and hopefully borrow this edition of the Clean Energy Show. Brian I'm sweating like a hog and I'll tell you why. Yes, I'm not a sick. I was shoveling the driveway because it blew in. And before the show, I frantically tracked down a plug in electric snow blower. My partner was coming home for lunch and I said, can you swing by the Walmart because there's one left. It was like $100 less than if I made this decision a few days ago. I would have had all the Cyber Monday Friday deals, but I missed out on that. But I found one with specs that was really good. Now, I've got a battery operated snow shovel. Not cutting it. What's going to happen now is we're going to get trace amounts of snow for the next five years, but I say, fine, it's worth spending the money for that to happen, because it's worth it. We've been snowed in and my partner had to park on the street and the driveway was daunting. So I quickly assembled it at lunchtime. While you were having your happy nap. Yeah. And I went out there with a short extension cord and did what I could. And now I'm sweating like a crazy. I'm soaked in sweat because my heart was going maximum, which doesn't take much these days, but when you're doing anything clearing snow, it gets the heart rate going, unfortunately. So, like a plug in kind rather than battery operated, I guess, is a lot cheaper. It is cheaper. I did splurge, though, and get pretty much the most powerful one you can get. It's about 14 amps. You can get a 15 amp one, but then you have problems with your extension cords overheating and blowing breakers and things. It's kind of the maximum that it will handle on an ongoing basis. But I went out there with, I would say, a 15 inch drift and went right through it like it does a foot of snow. But it will go under the drift and it will still keep going under the drift and you just go over it a second time. So, yeah, I'm happy with it. Those are a pain in the ass. I've had them before because the extension cord but I knew that I wanted power, and this was a bigger unit, and it was a couple of couldn't really afford it, but I said, man, because we got to clean the sidewalks this year by city by law. By city by law. Yeah. Well, just a quick update. Last week I was complaining about GoComics.com, this website I go to every day to read daily comic strip. It was down for a full five days and finally came back online. They offered no explanation of exactly what happened. It was supposedly a cyber security issue, which I had read on another website. But anyway, our long nightmare is over. It's back. And coincidentally, this week on Saturday, it was Charles Schultz's, what would have been his 100th birthday, the creator of the Peanuts comic strip, the legend of newspaper comic strips. It was his 100th birthday, so a lot of the comic strips had special tributes to him on Saturday. So that was a lot of fun to read. All the cartoonists got together and decided to do that. And then the last thing, comic strips do you remember the soap opera comic strips when you were a kid? There were only a couple of comic strips that were not funny. Yeah. Give me an example of one, can you? Well, there's two main ones. Mary worth. Okay. And Rex Morgan, MD. And these trips have both been around for, like, 100 years by this point. Anyway, I started reading them a couple of months ago because I was looking for new, exciting things to follow, and I'd always avoided them like the plague when I was a kid because it's like, this is ridiculous. There's no joke here. What's the point of this anyway? I've been reading for a couple of months now, and I'm starting to get into it. It's kind of fun. A bit speechless here. You're reading soap opera comic strips after resisting them your whole life. My whole life. I mean, I thought, is it a gossipy? Pleasure, man, what's going on here? Yes. I don't know. I just like comic strips, and there's not enough good ones, so I just been looking to expand my horizons. What happened to the creators? Did their kids take over? I mean, if these are 100 years old yeah, often that is the case. I don't think that's the case with Mary. We are Rex Morgan, but yeah, often it's passed on to a son or a daughter or a nephew or a niece or something. I don't know. They've all been around now, a lot of them, for 100 years. I don't know. It's a weird thing. All right, Brian, I've got an announcement to make. I've been hiding something from you for two months. Wow. You and the listeners. Wow. And it is regarding my leaf. Oh, yeah. My leaf has major problems. It happened just before we recorded a show about two months ago, and I was so distraught, I couldn't bring it up, and I couldn't bring it up for two months. I was just so unhappy about it. That's terrible. I don't know how the hell I made it through that episode. But if you could find a very glum James about two months ago trying to struggle through an episode, I guess it's all muscle memory. That's how we've done so many of these shows already. Yeah. And also, it doesn't have to be that good. No, I mean, well, we try. We do try for our listeners, don't we? Every week a good show. Come on. Okay. Now, I know that we have a lot of long time listeners, but we also have a lot of new listeners. And I wanted to just talk about electric cars with you for a little while, about the reliability. And I don't want to just jump into it without talking about what model I have, because it's going to probably be different than what you are considering. Although a friend of ours texted me the other night and was asking me about the Leaf, wanting to buy one. And I said, well, here's what happened, and you can make up your own mind. What had happened is my 2013 Nissan Leaf. Now, remember, this is the first mass produced allelectric car by a car company. They started making them at the end of 2010, and they made them for a couple of years in Japan, and then they opened up a Tennessee factory, and one in the UK as well. Mine comes from Tennessee, and it comes from the United States and was imported into Canada. So there's a few little things like daytime running lights that had to be added, and a bigger washer tank for some reason. It's just one of those weird things just to get up to Canadian standards. So it was imported already. And Quebec, the problems with Quebec, they had just terminated at that time, but they had incentives for used vehicles that lowered the used market for Leafs. And that's how I got one as cheap as I did. It was about $10,000 in change, and that was a pretty good price at the time. But it was a base model, so it was the base model S. It had no cruise control. And just when I started making those models, they put a heat pump in them in the upper trim levels. They had three trim levels. I had the low one, so I didn't even have a fast charger on mine, or a reverse camera. Or there was some things I gave up to get a really cheap one, because everyone was designing the other ones. Had I gotten one that was one of the other trim levels, I would have had a heat pump and a PTC heater. PTC heater is basically like a toaster. Now, these suckers and electric cars heat up fast. They connect rate to the high voltage battery, and it's a heater that gets red hot and air blows through it. So you have instant heat in your car, which is wonderful. And when I preheat my car in the winter time even -40 I'll get into it and it feels like a toaster oven. It just feels hot and dry and completely warm and habitable in there. It's wonderful feeling. If you leave it long enough, it'll melt all the snow that's on the car. Right. And that's what I do. So in the leaf it will preprogram itself. You just give it a departure time and based on the weather and how long it took to get to temperature and previous days, it will add more time. I think up to 2 hours. I'm not sure about that. So I probably abused it and I lost my PTC heater. So I have no heater in the car for two months now. A month ago you were talking about getting your heater replaced under warranty, which I did. Went up to Saskatoon and yeah, they replaced that under warranty and it was the same thing. Your car and I and mine are the same in that sense. That they just have a PTC heater. Later models may have had both or at least a heat pump and yours for more efficiency. Heat pump is like reverse air conditioner if you're new to the show. And it works a lot more because a great deal of power goes into these. I think 5000 watts goes into mine. That's more than the car driving. So your range goes down. So since my heater broke, my winter range is excellent, by the way. It only goes down based on denser or cold air. Do you have a little bonfire going in there or something? No, I eat some beans sometimes before. It's not a great experience. And what I've done, we have an SUV that I thought initially I thought I would just place the SUV for the winter and it's going to be expensive and it'll heat up and it will be, you know, but then even without the damn heater, Brian, I just love that bloody car. Like, I just love it. I just love driving it. I hate getting into the Prius, which is a combustion engine in the wintertime, it's cold anyway, unless your destination is a long ways away or you've warmed it up. That thing takes a while to warm up too. And it's not like an electric car and it just doesn't feel the same as an electric car. And I finally got the wheel bearings fixed, so it was nice and quiet. And I've decided that one of the great things about electric cars is after I had my wheel bearing fixed, because they were very loud, is when you get up to speed in the city, it's almost like you can feel the wind in your hair. Like you could just feel and hear the wind and nothing else. And it's just such an exhilarating feeling to just hear that. And there's something I don't know, just beyond anything a gas car can do. When I looked at yours, was covered under warranty. I found somebody who spent $1200 in Canada, basically, to do it. And the part was about six or $700, $700 for the part. And then they did some labor. Now, in the Leaf, I looked at doing it myself, but it's very complicated. Basically, the whole inside of the car has to be taken apart. And it's a $4,000 job in most cases. Oh, no. I spent ten on the car. I just spent 2100 that I didn't have, fixing the front wheel hubs, which cost way more than they should have because I got screwed by a local shop because there's no Nissan dealer here to fix it. I also need some front suspension work. Now, the car is one month short of ten years old. This is something important because we're talking about electric cars not needing maintenance. And that is true for the most part. And people say, well, it's electric car. Something weird can go wrong in it. Well, I guess this is it. Aside from the battery, which are covered under eight year warranties. Always. Always. You know, there's the charger, I suppose, could go in the car, that there's a built in charger that can wear out over time. I would have to worry about that. I could have some bad battery cells, so you might have to replace some modules at some point. But the cars would have been great. But some people put in diesel heaters. Like, there's a guy in Swift Current who bought a brand new F 150 pickup truck, and he put in a diesel heater so that he wouldn't lose any range. Like, you have a diesel heater in an electric truck? That's right. It's basically this unit that you have to exhaust, and it just kind of burns away. It is crazy. And it's got electronic controls. This is what people are doing. And I don't know, did you ever know somebody who had a really old Volkswagen Beetle? Because I think, like, some of those had a propane heater because the Volkswagen Beetles were air cooled. So you don't get that circulating fluid that you normally use for your heater in your car. So old Beetles had a propane heater, which often apparently also did not work. So, yeah, I knew a guy who had to drive around in the winter and a Beetle scraping the inside of the window because there was no heat. Well, here's what I've done. Okay, first of all, the part, it wouldn't be so bad if I was a Tesla out of warranty. Twelve hundred dollars to go from an unusable car to a usable car. Great. I actually put in a space heater, like the one you have with a cottage into my car on a timer. Like it's a plug into the lighter? No, it plugs into an extension cord. Okay, so you just run an extension cord in there because when I was a kid, my parents had in their car a block heater. A lot of people listening don't know what a block heater is. That is a heater that heats the oil in a car in a very cold climate so that it will turn over, that it's viscous enough to turn over. And we have them in all of our cars here. But yes, my parents also had an interior warmer as well. And you plugged it in with the block heater. Yes, that's what my parents did. Yeah. And so same thing like, you can have your car warm in the morning. I seem to remember it running overnight. Do you remember my parents did that too? Just left both the heater and the interior one plugged in overnight. Yeah, different times. Because it would have been like a thousand watts, probably. Yes, it would have been extremely wasteful. And for what? I don't remember the snow being melted on the windows. That's not something that I remember. Yeah, no, I know somebody who used to do that, lived in an apartment building where the plugins in the parking lot were free. Like you didn't have to pay for the electricity. So I know somebody who did that kept it plugged in all night and all the snow melted on the car just because he didn't have to pay for the electricity. It is warming up to the interior and at least getting it usable. The problem is you have to run some air on the window to defog it at the lowest setting. And if it's cold out, that feels really bad because we're talking what temperatures have we had here? Minus ten celsius -20, and it's going to get colder. It's going to be high -20 in a few days. I was hoping for a naturally warm winter and a lottery ticket win. A couple of things that I was hoping for. And if I got it fixed, I would have to ship the car all the way up to a city called Prince Albert, which is the closest Nissan dealer that is certified to do electrical work. So basically when people do these fixes, they take out the front car seats and all the dash and they have to unplug the high voltage system underneath the car. And there's also this fuse that is hard to get at, that always blows. I confirmed it because I have sort of the computer connection to my phone app and it has the right error codes on there so that the heater is seen on the phone. Now, I knew this was something that I worried about because I've seen it with other people. I've seen it online a few times, but now that I'm really looking, I haven't seen it that much at all. Like, there's a few references to it and there's people saying, well, it was bad welding and there should be a class action suit but there really isn't that many people. I think a lot of people actually had them done under warranty because I'm only a couple of years off the warranty actually. Well that's not true. I don't know if this would have qualified for that, but a lot of the high voltage stuff did and the battery and stuff like that. So I'm very depressed Brian, because and I haven't even told my partner yet. My kids know, my partner does not. She just thinks I spilled something in the car and I've got a heater going in there. I'm just so ashamed of myself because I'm an electric car advocate. I've been telling everybody they don't break down and I put my family at risk of this and now we don't have a car that's working. So I drive my kid to school, it's a ten minute drive. She doesn't complain. Well, I don't know if this makes you feel any better and you've certainly told me this as well, like you crunched the numbers when you bought that car and it's basically probably already paid for itself. If you think of all the fuel that you've saved, that was on all numbers, that was before gas went up. Before gas went up. So first of all, the car has been free so far? Basically, yes. Another way I could look at it is that these things are selling for 6000 more than I paid for it. Yeah, prices are up since when you bought it, so there's that incentive to fix it and not feel so bad about it or sell it to somebody in the summer. No, well, I would never do that. Never. That would be awful. Well, now that the evidence is out there by the way, you can't here's a tip for your kids out there. If you buy an electric car in the summer that's used check the heater just because you want to make sure it works. Now, if I had one of those models that wasn't the base model I would have had in my case a heat pump and a PTC heater. Yeah. So the heat pump, I don't know what they work efficiently at in a leaf. It might only be -15, or something like that. And it gets much colder where we are. But I would have had some heat and I could've preheated it for a couple of hours and it would have got somewhat comfortable in there, you know, and that would have been fine. Maybe not on every day, but most of our winter days aren't necessarily brutal. Hopefully it would work out, I don't know. Warm days are only five months away. Shut up, shut up, shut up. It can't be that long. There's heated seats and front and back in the Prius or in the Prius and the leaf that helps. There's a heated steering wheel. That's great. Now I've ordered off of Amazon for $30 a dinky little electric cigarette lighter, heated defroster. So I will see how that works. Is going to come in a couple of days. I'll tell you next week if it does anything. I had one many years ago when I was a teenager because my rear defrost didn't work my $300 car. So I bought one at the hardware store, and I think it sort of did something. So it's a little portable heater, like just 100 watts or something. Just a cheap yes, about 100 watts. But hopefully it will be better than just blowing cold air as far as the feeling of it. But we'll see how I survive. Actual really cold temperatures that are coming up this week, I may not you know how teenage girls dress for school? My daughter doesn't dress very warm to get her into school and even with the car, not have producing heat and try to convince her to put things on so she doesn't get hypothermia. But on the bright side, Brian, I'm feeling better. Yeah, well, like we were talking about last week, we sometimes don't dress for the climate anymore because we're just used to going from one warm environment to another warm environment. I don't have a lot of stuff this week because Twitter has gone haywire, and I get a lot of my information from climate people and various activists on Twitter. They've all left for mastodon and other places. Like, they're all completely gone, and I hope they come back. But there's talk of Tesla shareholders getting upset with Musk doing what he's doing because that seems to be affecting the Tesla stock. Just the fact that he had to sell a bunch to buy that social media platform is a little crazy. Anyway, I'm on the Chevy Voltage group. I thought it was interesting. Every now and again I see an interesting story that really talks about the economics of electric cars. We talked about how mine for $10,000 covered the gas and my SUV. That would have been five years of gas. And that's just incredible. And plus, you're saving the environment a little bit too. Obviously, it's a lot more pleasurable too, but so somebody's paying $520 for a Chevy bolt. This is one of the cheapest EVs. You can buy the monthly payment for five years with no money down or anything like that. And he's saying that he saved 175 gallons of gas, and at $4 a gallon, minus $60 a month increase in electricity, he's saving $580 a month. Both has over two months. Over two months. It's like getting a car for very little money, and it will basically pay for itself in eight to ten years. So in his case, he's buying a brand new car and getting it free after eight to ten years. The more you drive, the better deal it is. Yeah, that's for sure. And as they come down in price, this is going to be more and more things especially if you're dealing with fleets that do a lot of driving. And free is one thing, but you're still saving you're still saving over a gas car. So that's something. The New York Times had an interesting piece about how the Saudis are trying to keep gas alive. And one of the ways that they're doing it is they're buying a whole bunch of EVs and Ebuses for Saudi Arabia so that they can get this burn less gas. They want to sell the gas to other people. They don't want to waste any of it using it themselves. That's a really good point, doing that. That just struck my craw, like it's stuck in there. Well, there's going to be sort of EV have countries and EV have not countries and yeah, that's keep selling them your oil, I guess. So the Texas grid, what's going on there? Yeah, we talked about that occasionally. Texas in the US. Has its own electricity grid that tends to be cut off from the rest of the country. And they've had problems lately and I just thought this was an interesting problem there's currently, and it should be ending today, but a boil watery advisory in the city of Houston, which is a massive city for the whole city. For the whole city. And so school has been canceled. Yeah, that's first nation reserve up north kind of territory, or small town at least. And it's because they had power outages at their water filtration system when the power goes out and they were supposed to have power backup and for some reason it didn't work. But the water pressure drops within the filtration plant and once the water pressure drops down past a certain amount, they basically have to put out a boil water advisory so it's entirely possible the water is still safe to drink. It's a precautionary thing. It's a precautionary thing. And they need to let it go for a couple of days, test the water again. And they will probably lift the boil water advisory today. But I just thought it was interesting because it's just one of those things where we don't think about necessarily in terms of the grid, why it's important to have a reliable grid. And this is just one of those instances where a bad grid with frequent power outages can lead to things like a boil water advisory for a massive city like Houston. These are things that I worry about with armageddon scenarios. If there's some sort of war or something, we really need to have our water because we don't have a well in our backyard. And I'm not currently collecting rainwater. You're talking about doing that at the new cottage. But I guess we could melt some snow during the winter. Oh, yeah, not the yellow. I'll just blow it into a big pile of my new snow blower and melt it. Melt it with what, though, right? I have to collect firewood on the prairies. That's no fun. Burned gopher carcasses or something like that, I thought. I would also mention these two Chinese companies announced that the production of the largest offshore wind turbine to date has been announced. Because this is something we talked about before, so I thought I'd bring it up again. You love a big turbine. I do love my turbines to be setting records, Brian. And we knew that this would be broken because there was rumors of it. The previous record is 14 MW. This is something that can power a house for two days with one rotation of the blade. One little rotation can power your home and your family for two days, and now they've gone up to 16. There's two companies in China that have developed 16 MW. It's interesting to watch when professionals have discussions online about what the theoretical limit is. But a lot of times in the clean energy space, people think that nothing can go any further, and it does. There's always some sort of development or some sort of technique. Some of it is just a placement where you place it. They have better modeling now than they used to 20 years ago. The groups on November 24 showed off the turbine factory in Fujian Province. And the turbine has a 252 meters rotor diameter with 50,000 meters sweep area. That is a large sweep area. If you want to compare sweep areas, it's a large 146 meters. The hub of it, the middle, the turning point, 146 meters. One and a half football fields off the ground. And I saw another wind turbine blade on the highway the other day, which is always an amazing sight to see. Those checks right here. Blades? Yeah, it was heading towards Moose Jaw. That's interesting. I wonder where from, because that's kind of where it was going. Not sure. That is actually the biggest restriction on this wind turbine size, is that you physically can't turn corners on any sort of roads with those wind turbines. It was right here you saw when I saw one of Colorado was amazing. It was just blocks long, and it's just, you know, the largest man made item I think I've ever seen up close. It was like looking at a massive rocket or something. Okay, so I've got a great story here from Hannah Ritchie, who is the head of research at Our World in Data. And she is still on Twitter, and I would recommend following her. She's a great follow on Twitter, amazing information. So she's the head of research at Our World in Data. Fabulous website that just collects all kinds of data and presents it in website form. A lot of people have been going there through the COVID pandemic because it's a great place to go for sort of COVID statistics and stuff like that. So she wrote this amazing article at Wired magazine, and it's about processed foods. Every once in a while, people stop me on the street. And they say, hey, are you the guy from the Clean energy show? Why are you promoting processed foods all the time? Go on. The idea of processed food, it just has a really bad rap. We all know, I think, that we should eat raw vegetables from the garden or whatever, and processed foods can be bad. It turns out that there's sort of two categories. There's processed foods and then there's ultraprocessed foods. There's literally two categories to describe them based on how much processing. It's just a massive oversimplification. And this fantastic article summarizes everything, and it's things that we basically kind of talked about on the show before, but I just thought the article was great because it really explains it really nicely. One example of a good instance of processed food would be iodised salt. So iodine is a thing that we all need in our bodies. And iodine deficiencies used to be a really common problem around the world, and increased risk of stillbirth and miscarriages reductions in IQ from lack of iodine. That's why I'm so smart. All the processed foods I've been eating, all that. Yeah. So reduce cognitive development. But many years ago, we started adding iodine to salt. So most salt is iodized, and this kind of fixes that problem. But it's really the ultra processed foods that tend to be the problems, like, you know, snack foods like Twinkies and stuff like that. So where would we get iodised salt in nature to keep us healthy before? I'm not sure where that even comes from. Yeah, presumably our meat paleolithic cells were eating the right roots and vegetables or whatever. I'm not sure it's the ultra processed foods that we really should be railing against. Technically, something like Beyond Meat is ultra processed, but it's not that simple. It's just an oversimplification to say it's bad because it's processed well. So when I think of processed foods, Brian, I think of losing the nutritional value because of the way it's processed. I think of added salts, and I think of added sugars. That's a very common thing, too. And spaghetti sauce. And practically everything has sugar that doesn't need it. No. And as you said on the show many times before, it's not intended to be health food. Like Beyond Meat is not intended to be health food. It's intended to be a substitute for meat. So ground beef. So what you really need to compare it against is ground beef. So when you do that, meat substitutes tend to be lower in calories, lower in saturated fat, and higher fat fiber. Yes. Really? Because I thought some of the criticism of these Beyond Meat and what's the other one called? What's the other one called? Yes. Impossible Burger. Impossible Burger. That they were worse than regular meat. Or maybe that's the beef industry saying that it could all be tweaked. I mean, it can be whatever you want it to be. We're still early stages here, right? I mean, we're still developing stages. If people are saying, oh, this tastes like crap, well, then they can add in more fat. They can add in more sugar or whatever. So meat substitutes lower in calories and saturated fat and higher in fiber, which is good to their detriment. Some are lower in protein and often contain lower quality protein, meaning they contain less of the essential amino acids that we need. I didn't know there were different levels of protein. That's something new for me. Yeah. When it comes to sodium, it's sort of a mixed bag substitute. Burgers tend to be comparable to meat. When it comes to sodium, the substitute sausages have less salt than their pork equivalents. A lot of these substitute products are now fortified with B Twelve, iron and calcium, which is something you're not necessarily going to get from the meat. The Impossible burger has more B Twelve and iron than beef does. Really many plant based milks are fortified as well. So on balance, they're probably a bit better for your health than the meat equivalent. And I see this as just the beginning because we talk about the concept of food software that you can program the food that you're going to be making with precision. Fermentation in the future will be inventing new foods that have protein in them and different tastes and different flavors that don't necessarily come from an animal or plant. Or we can just tweak the things that are mimicking what we already eat, but to our taste, to what we like. And chefs, I think a chef 20 years from now could be a bit of a computer programmer and just experimenting with different things, and it could be an interesting world. Well, I've always been fascinated by that. I think I saw, like, a documentary one time about somebody who was a chef at a fast food restaurant, and it's just the idea of that I find interesting. Like somebody has to do, even if it's just regular meat, and somebody has to design that stuff to be then replicated literally billions of times. It's a fascinating sort of thing. It is. And you go to the McDonald's campus and you see they've got all these chefs making a lot of money there. And every time they come up with a new product, I always think of them and I think, you stupid buggers, you really screwed up. You know, I'm very disappointed in this rap that you made. This rap so that teenagers can put it together when they're hungover and use basic ingredients, and it's just crap. All these chefs are making these things that are disappointing and everything that you eat. I was talking to my family about Tim Hortons. What a compromise of a restaurant that is. Yes, everything is bad. Even the donut. It's a donut shop, and they can't even make a decent donut. I don't want to be the old man here, but when I was a kid donuts were pretty damn good. They're a lot better than they are. There no. And even Tim Hortons. It was about 20 years ago, they switched, and they forced all of their franchises to buy basically frozen dough or frozen donuts. Well, they make them in a factory. I've seen the news stories on them. They make them in a centralized factory, and they have baked them. They just finished the baking process and specialized ovens here, which make them somewhat fresh. But they're not a good product, which is not. No, but up until that point, they were made in the restaurants, and they were slightly better. So there's a couple more issues raised from this article. First, the idea that food processing could alleviate malnutrition for billions of people. So meat substitutes are mostly targeted at wealthy consumers. But the implications of a backlash to process food are just as harmful for people with less money. More food processing, not less, could improve health and nutrition in developing countries. So there's a lot of countries that can't afford to eat a lot of meat, and in some ways, that's good. In other ways, it's bad. There are certain things that you lack in your diet, perhaps if you're not eating meat. And some of those things could be added, like iodine to salt could be added into the thing. And plus, there's an appetite for people that they may want to eat more meat in countries where they can't afford it, and this gives them an option that is like that that's similar to meat. If you're new to the podcast, I should tell you that we talk about food on the show because it affects the climate. The new technologies and food are lower. Carbon, like, Impossible Burger is 25 times less carbon per gram than the hamburger. No, the final point from the article is the carbon footprint. I mean, it's absolutely insane how much lower the carbon footprint is from the substitute food than regular meat. The environmental toll can be ten to 100 times lower than beef or lamb, beef being the most carbon intensive. I came across another one the other day. People often complain about almond milk. Milk substitute made of almond because it uses a lot of water, you need tons of water. It's growing in places that doesn't have water. It doesn't have a lot of water. And this is true of the milk substitutes. Almond is the one that uses the most water, but it's like a 10th or 100th of the water needed if you get the milk from a cow. Like, the water needed for the beef industry is insane. So I would have assumed the opposite. Wow. It's not even close. You're saying it's not even close? Well, because I've driven by those almond farms, and you see all the irrigation, and you see the outside the border, it's a desert. So to join them in the desert and you think, wow, this is not a good idea. No, but you see the chart for the carbon footprints, and beef is the most carbon intensive of all of the meats. And one last thing here and again, it's from our World in Data. There was a really nice graph of meat consumption per person around the world. And so, quick quiz. What country do you think eats the most meat per person? My initial response would be the United Kingdom or the United States. It is the United States. Yeah, that's kind of almost a stereotype. It's a stereotype that appears to be true. Argentina eats a lot of meat. Australia eats a lot of meat. So in the US. It's 124 year per person, which is a lot. Canada is now at 82. Lot less in Canada. That was surprising to me. Now, why would that be? We have a lot of agriculture here. We have a lot of land. Why would we I don't know, except I know that anytime I've been to the States and you go to a restaurant and you order a meal in a restaurant, it always seems to be a very large portion of meat. Yeah. Yeah. But there's a wonderful graph there on our World in Data, meats applied per person. This is 2017, so the data is a bit out of date, perhaps. Well, the article is on wired.com and it's called The World Needs Processed Food. I'll put a link to it in our show notes, and you can check it out there. So the Tesla semi, according to a tweet by the CEO of Tesla, did its 500 miles trip with a full load. Now, Tesla a few years ago announced that it was making a semi allelectric semitruck. The CEO of Nicola, who is now, like, in prison, I remember reading his tweets. He was really upset that this was against the law of physics. There's no way you could carry an 18,000 pound load, which is kind of like the load that you want to carry. The Tesla semi carry this 18,000 pound load 81,000 pardon me, 81,000 for 500 miles, which is, Bill Gates said, not possible. I don't know why these people say these things, Brian. Why do they doubt us? Why do they put themselves on the record saying it's not possible? Now, lots of people said that at the time that the Tesla announcement was suspicious because people didn't think it was possible. But it's been so long since they made that announcement that battery density, the energy density, the more you can get more energy in the same weight of battery and volume than you could back then, it tends to improve by something like 18% a year. But we're kind of there now, and it sounds well, we'll know in a couple of days, right? Because on December 1 of having an event. Yeah, but apparently they've done it, and they've decided that he's invited Bill Gates to come have a ride. And, you know, I was thinking that would be a fun thing to own. And I know a lot of Tesla fanatics are actually got orders in for the semi just to have other driveway, some YouTube channels, which will be fun. Yeah, definitely fun if they buy one and drive it around because they're fast without a load. They're just really fast and quiet and tall and just such a weird thing for somebody to own. And probably not that much more expensive than some of the highly spec pickup trucks that are out there for $120,000, be a couple of hundred thousand dollars, it sounds like. But yeah, we'll learn more on December 1. And looking to learn more about the charging speeds and the infrastructure and stuff. Yeah, we'll learn how they plan to do it. But it sounds like this is for real now. If it is for real, this is a big deal because there's lots of people making electric semis, but they're making them for shorter scenarios, okay? They don't have the battery technology or the efficiency that Tesla has with their motors, their inverters, and the way that they have their batteries. And plus they've just done pretty serious design with the aerodynamics and everything and maximize everything they can get and wait. So we'll see. But this is a game changer. A lot of people are saying the cost per mile is going to be significantly lower enough that it will pull triggers on a lot of people will pull triggers on it right away once they see the difference in the cost per mile. So it's very interesting. Just as your Nissan Leaf basically paid for itself with the gasoline savings, these will pay for themselves with the diesel savings. I'd love to have one to pull. You could pull an RV right? There's people talking about that. And I'm sure somebody will make an RV based off the platform. That will probably take a while, but they'll turn one of these units into just a kickass RV, which will it'll have a massive battery, which you can power off the grid and do all kinds of amazing things. Plaster the RV part with the solar panels and charge it up as well. It just seems like a great way to RV because towing is such a pain in the butt. And a Tesla semi or pickup truck, I guess, would do a great job too. Yeah, so from Power Magazine, the UK government steps up as a 50% owner of the 3.2 gigawatt sizewell C nuclear reactors. So they've been building this nuclear reactor for a while, planning it, and guess what? It turned out to be more expensive than they expected. So they really needed the government to step in. And the government has stepped in with a 679,000,000 pound investment that's $815,000,000. So yeah, they're going to own half of it from that. But as we've discussed many times, government really has to own these because they are not profitable for any private industry there, especially by the time these get built. And I hate to go on about nuclear. We tend to bash nuclear every episode or so, but especially by the time this is finished, it will be years from now. Years, as we all know, the cost of solar and batteries, my cars will be cold and dust like so it's already a bad monetary investment now, but that's just going to get worse as time goes on. And we have a story coming up in the lightning round that says that the cost of uranium is really going up. So that's making the economics of all this very it's getting worse, I'm afraid. But yeah, private ownership and investment pardon me, in nuclear, it's not happening because governments have to do it. Then when governments do it, that makes you and I the investor. We're suffering. We're going to waste money because they don't listen to our podcast. If they only listen to our podcast, everyone would be the world would be a better place. And there was a story from Japan, too, on Bloomberg. They're looking to extend the life of their 60 year old nuclear plants, which they were planning to phase out at age 60. And keeping nuclear running that we already have is probably a good idea, but 60 seems a bit pushy. It's kind of pushing it, but they're studying it now to see if it's going to be worthwhile. Okay, well, I have no problem, as long as it's safe of extending nuclear, if that's what it takes. So Electric says that there are more electric bike subsidies coming to the United States. I guess it was in the Inflation Reduction Act, but then it got taken out like there was going to be a killer ebike subsidy that everyone would have got in the states, but that's not there anymore. So individual cities and states have since picked up the slack. They say. Vermont launched the first state incentive program in the US. Denver, Colorado, also launched the very popular ebike rebate program that repeatedly sold out and they had to renew it. New York is now considering its own ebike rebate, and now we can add Oregon to the list. It could become the latest date. They're talking about $200 off an ebike that costs, well, at least $950. But Brian, that would be free. I mean, my math isn't so good, but if all you have to spend is 950 and you get up to 1200 off, I assume if you spent 950, they'd give you 950. Yes, I know, but still, that's a free. That's free. That's what I'm saying. It goes to zero. Free bike. That's crazy. I mean, who wouldn't buy one? I mean, even if you didn't want one, it would be sitting around the house and then the bikes are going to be sold. I don't know. They have to do something about that. They can't do 100% of the purchase, but maybe it's prorated. Maybe somebody in Colorado can tell me the details. But also they would go right up to $700 if it's an electric cargo bike. I think I forgot a friend in Vancouver has an electric cargo bike. Yeah, basically, it's a cargo bike not because you're a courier, but because you're living your life off the thing. So you're getting all your groceries and your snow blowers from Walmart. And by the way, it's going to snow in Vancouver. If you're in Vancouver look good for the snow. It doesn't usually snow there. Electric cargo bikes are going to be huge. Okay, so Ireland and France are going to connect their electricity grids. How is that possible, Brian? Physically, it's with a giant extension cord. Really? Does it go underwater? It goes underwater. So it is a massive cable that is 575 km long. And so this is the first time that France has been connected to a grid in the UK. And it's for sharing power back and forth between Ireland and France. They're just beginning it now, so it will be operational by 2026. It'll be 700. MW can go through the cable, which is enough to power 450,000 households. So, yeah, I'm just always interested in these kind of stories. We need to make our grids smarter and more interconnected to share the power. Ireland and France seems like an odd combination. How did these two hook up? What's going on there? What would their accent be like? No, I'm not sure, but I'm just glad to hear it. Well, it's time for the Tweet of the Week. Well, the Tweet of the week comes from Said Razuk this week, and he says building new solar is three to ten times cheaper than operating existing gas fired power. So you have a gas fired power in a lot of places in the world. It is cheaper, like the United States, southern United States, three to ten times cheaper to build new solar than just to operate the gas. Yes. We're not talking gas this building solar, we're talking building a whole new thing is three to ten times cheaper just than existing gas. So if gas funds were invested in renewables like they're not right at the moment, europe would get rid of gas by 2028. And this is via PV magazine that he quotes data from. Well, it is time for the lighting round. Short one for you this week, Brian. General Motors dealerships have repaired thousands of Tesla electric cars, says GM, and it's annual Investor Day presentation. I have not heard this before, but apparently people are taking their Teslas to GM dealership. Maybe I could take my Leaf to the GM because they fixed. Screw you, Nissan. I'll just take it to the GM dealership. Yeah, that might work. I mean, if you could take a Tesla, why couldn't you take a Nissan? Yeah, no, that's the first time I've heard of this. First booked on Barons. A slide in the presentation simply reads eleven 180 repairs and Teslas, but they did not elaborate. So GM Volvo say that EVs won't cost more than gas vehicles by 2025. Both automakers see the Inflation Reduction Act as a key for achieving price parity by middecade, despite recent supply chain challenges. So that's good news. If true, the UK government will bolster a proposed OK, that's something we already talked about, so I'm going to skip that. It's time for what is it time for? A CES, a clean energy show. Fast fact. The International Atomic Energy Agency said 437 nuclear power reactors were operational throughout the world at the end of 2021. And that has a total net capacity of 389 gigawatts. So it's less than a gigawatt per reactor on average. The agency said 56 additional units were under construction. Some of those are in China, most of those are not other places. And as I said before, uranium prices are on the rise, thus making nuclear even less competitive. And Russia is partially the thing for that. They're raising the prices of gas and oil and also uranium. So we screwed everything up. The Department of Energy is to test rapidly deployable portable wind turbines for military use. I remember once we had on the show a story about the military with rapid deployment of solar panels that would sort of be like a transformer and unfold on a portable truck that would give energy into the field. Well, this is good for disaster relief and military use. So disaster relief and military use. A team of three labs will use remote communities to study the efficacy of turbines designed to fit into 20 foot shipping containers, perhaps towed by a Tesla. Semi clean energy jobs now outnumber jobs in fossil fuels, according to a new IEA report. Now, I'm going to continue to keep my eye open for reports like this and studies, because it seems like we are at the point now where the transition is happening, where the clean energy jobs are way overtaking fossil fuel jobs. So, by the way, France's first offshore wind farm, which is about half a gigawatt, is now fully online. So France has never had an offshore wind farm before. And speaking of offshore wind, our final story this week, before we go, is Denmark is helping India identify 15 offshore wind zones. And apparently India has some sweet wind zones, Brian, and they need electricity. We talked about huge solar developments in India, while offshore wind is next up on the list, and that will be a huge boon for them. Nice. That is our time for this week. It's more than our time. We'd like to hear from you. Please, for God's sake, contact us. Cleanenergy Show@gmail.com. That is our email address. Cleanenergyhow@gmail.com. Anything that's on your mind. Some criticism, some doubts, some things you like, some things that you're doing. Some questions about EV purchases. Let us know. We are on social media at the handle at Clean Energy Pod. And we have a YouTube channel which we have special features on. You can see me looking a bit more sweaty than usual this week. You can leave us a voicemail at speakfight. Comcleenergyow. And now, Brian, you can actually donate to the clean energy show. Buy us a coffee or PTC heater using the PayPal link on our website or in the show notes. If you're new to the show, remember to subscribe. Subscribe on your podcast app. Because our new shows, they come every week. Because we're machines. We're clean Energy machines, and we're here every week. We'll see you next time, Brian. you.

The Dean Blundell Show
Giving Tuesday, Elon vs Apple, Convoy Implosion, McDonalds Drive Thru Fights

The Dean Blundell Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 113:02


We're back for #GIVINGTUESDAY!!! We've partnered with Blue Door, our official Charity of choice, to raise money for men and women looking for clothing, food, a job, and purpose. Ceo Michael Braithwaite stops by to talk about what $25 can do for someone trying to get back on their feet again!! Elon Musk's Twitter tantrum is shaping up to be an epic fight with Apple, and Elon will LOSE. Apple has threatened to pull Twitter from the app store because Elon's Free speech is more hate speech, and Apple's Objectionable content rules are hard and fast. We break down what might happen if Tim Cook gets tired of Elon's nonstop whining and what it means for the future of Twitter and the ELON brand. Tis the season FOR DRIVE THRU FIGHTS! McDonald's and Tim Horton's have seen a HUGE uptick in Drive-Thru violence this year. Reports of violence in the fast food sector were up 200% in 2022, and Christmas is when they spike for some reason! We have two mind-blowing examples of what NOT to do if you get angry in a fast-food restaurant after a long day of shopping this holiday season! Elon Musk went anti-Semite/death con three on Apple CEO Tim Cook, and it's on! You see, Elon is pissed at Apple for giving him until Friday to adhere to Apple's universal Objectional content policy (every app in the app store has to agree to it). Elon wants to be the guy who makes the Rules, but Apple never fucks around. Google might pull Twitter from their Play store, too, but I think that;'s because Elon fucked the google founder's wife. It's the adage: "be careful who you fuck on the way up; they might fuck you on the way down." And "The Butt Doctor says human beings we not meant to use toilet paper and wants you to stop wiping your ass with it. We discuss.

Mix Mornings and More
Mix Mornings & More - November 29, 2022

Mix Mornings and More

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 10:53


On today's recap: It's #givingtuesday, Steph heads to Tim Hortons to hand out 103 cups of coffee, Shawn's internal clock is all messed up and together they discuss the meet and greet initiative.

What's Cooking With Chef Noel
EP: 050 SE: 03 with Top Chef Canada SzN 9 Winner Erica Karbelnik

What's Cooking With Chef Noel

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 80:27


Welcome to episode 50 of What's Cooking with Chef Noel. In this week's Episode chef Noel is joined by Top Chef Erica Karbelnik to share all the deets from her recent trip to Spain for the sixth World Tapas Competition against 15 of the world's best chefs in Valladolid Held on Nov 9th. Chef Erica created a " Winter Solstice" tapa inspired by the nostalgic Tim Horton's Timbit. Chef Erica also dishes on what it's like being a new mom, her favourite kitchen tool, what skills you need to enter a competition, and so much more. About Chef Erica Chef Erica Karbelnik began cooking at a young age with her mom by her side, hosting weekly dinner parties and recipe testing. It was there, in her home kitchen, that sparked her passion for culinary arts. At 17, chef Erica started cooking professionally. She worked as an apprentice under chef Mark McEwan at ONE Restaurant, which led to a full-time position. Since, chef Erica has travelled across the globe, bringing flavours from each country into her cooking. She has gone back and forth from Toronto to Vancouver, working alongside some of Canada's most recognized chefs, training in French Italian cuisine and specializing in handmade pasta. Recently, chef Erica competed alongside her husband and fellow chef, Josh Karbelnik, in Food Network Canada's Top Chef Canada, where she took home the title and grand prize. During this competition, she honed into her Moroccan Israeli background bringing those flavours to the table and finding her stride in her cooking style. Chef Erica is currently working on many projects, including opening a new restaurant in 2023. Follow us on Social media https://www.facebook.com/iamchefnoel/ https://www.instagram.com/whatscookingwithchefnoel --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/whatscookingwithchefnoel/message

5THWAVE - The Business of Coffee
The road ahead for drive-thru coffee

5THWAVE - The Business of Coffee

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 36:03


On the podcast today we're exploring the business case for drive-thru coffee and the potential for this highly-profitable format to expand across new market segments and geographies.In conversation with Kevin Hydes, Chief Commercial Officer, Tim Hortons, UK&I, Brett Bolwell, CEO, Barista Technology, and coffee historian Amanda Whitt, we explore the historical rise of drive-thru coffee in the US, the gravitation towards convenience post-Covid, and the format's growing popularity in the UK, Australia and beyond.Credits music: "The Great Outdoors" by Richard James aka HOLNE in collaboration with The Coffee Music ProjectSign up for our newsletter to receive the latest coffee news at worldcoffeeportal.comSubscribe to 5THWAVE on Instagram @5thWaveCoffee and tell us what topics you'd like to hear

House of Crouse
BRYAN TROTTIER + ERIC MCCORMACK

House of Crouse

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 36:37


On this episode of the Richard Crouse Show we'll meet Bryan Trottier. He is a Canadian former professional ice hockey centre who played 18 seasons in the National Hockey League for the New York Islanders and Pittsburgh Penguins. He won four Stanley Cups with the Islanders, two with the Penguins and one as an assistant coach with the Colorado Avalanche. His new memoir, ‘All Roads Home: A Life On and Off the Ice,' is a poignant and inspiring memoir of the people and challenges that shaped his life and career. In this interview we talk about growing up in a town of 500 people and how he celebrated his first Stanley Cup win. Then, we'll meet Eric McCormack. You know Eric McCormack as Will Truman in the NBC sitcom “Will & Grace,” or maybe as Grant MacLaren in Netflix's “Travelers” or Dr. Daniel Pierce in the TNT crime drama “Perception.” In the new coming-of-age movie, “Drinkwater,” he plays Hank, a small-town dad who didn't live up to his potential. With its subplot about a Wayne Gretzky rookie card some physical comedy in a Tim Hortons drive-thru and a great Zamboni scene, it's the most Canadian movie to come out so far this year.

Ottawa’s Morning Pick Up with Sophie & Jeff Podcast
FML Friday! What's Going On In Ottawa This Weekend, Luke Combs, Riley Green + Chayce Beckham Lit Up The CTC + More

Ottawa’s Morning Pick Up with Sophie & Jeff Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 34:35


Subscribe now (00:20) What's going on in Ottawa this weekend (01:15) Tim Horton's has announced it's 2022 Holiday options (01:34) Cody Johnson is a Pandora Billionaire (02:18) Dear Ottawa: Please give this holiday season (04:25) Asking for a high salary? Think again (06:34) Useless Question -65% of people feel too much pressure to actually enjoy THIS (10:50) FML Friday – what was your FML moment of the week? (16:45) Thousand Dollar Minute (20:09) 109th Grey Cup on this weekend – Josh Ross, Tyler Hubbard + Jordan Davis performing at the Twisted Tea Halftime Show (20:40) The average person expects to gain 5.5 pounds over the holidays (22:06) What happened with the Taylor Swift tickets?! (23:07) FML Friday continues (24:13) Win Kane Brown tickets (26:31) Pure Country Payroll winner (27:11) We're joined by Sparty! There's a flash sale on tix for Sparty's Party tomorrow -www.senators.com/flashsale (CODE: Sens25) (30:31) What we learned today

Legally Blunt
Release the Peen Cut, Hanny Devito, & Bong Rips Or Eyeliner?

Legally Blunt

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 24:56


-The conclusion to OAT-GATE: Hannah's fiance strikes back! -Wither Report I: Getting clothes from celebs, Jay Leno update, Sexiest Man advice -Hacking Darts while running a marathon -What to Watch: The Santa Clause(S), Natalie Portman drinks Bear Grylls' undies water, New Xmas movie & Drag Race -The tap limit doesn't exist! -Wither Report II: Is Reba McEntire Judge Judy? Is Hannah Danny Devito? Is Harry Styles being harassed by Gordon Ramsay? Did Swifties ruin Ticketmaster? -Ranch on a Branch, Gramma in the Slamma, Jonny on the...Potty -Watch out A-holes, there's some new Scrabble terms -GIVE NAMOR HIS PENIS BACK! -Basic Bupdate: Something FREE from Starbucks, Tim Hortons has...food and drinks -What's Appening: Streaming service price increase(!) IG is hiding more likes, Elon Musk gets HARDCOREEEE

Nighttime
KEEP CANADA WEIRD - Nov 13, 2022 - a collection of weird Tim Hortons news stories

Nighttime

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 66:46


In Keep Canada Weird Jordan and his pal Aaron Airport typically seek out and explore offbeat Canadian news stories from the past week. In this episode, your hosts ignore the many weird and wonderful things that happened in Canada last week and instead look in horror at a collection of weird stories that had played out in Tim Horton's restaurants. The result is a discussion that will keep Tim Horton's share holders up at night and leave Justin Bieber seeking a new licensing agreement. Links: Keep Canada Weird Series: https://www.nighttimepodcast.com/keep-canada-weird Join the Keep Canada Weird Discussion Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/keepcanadaweird Send a weird news tip: https://www.nighttimepodcast.com/contact Provide feedback and comments on the episode: nighttimepodcast.com/contact Subscribe to the show: premium feed: https://www.patreon.com/Nighttimepodcast apple podcasts: https://applepodcasts.com/nighttime Musical Theme: Noir Toyko by Monty Datta Contact: Website: https://www.nighttimepodcast.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/NightTimePod Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NightTimePod Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nighttimepod Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/nighttimepodcast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Media People Podcast
EP72 - Empathy Inc. President - Mo Dezyanian

Media People Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 75:20


Mo Dezyanian describes himself as the “kid who skipped cartoons to watch the commercials.” But if you look at his early years, you'd be hard pressed to see a future ad agency founder. A somewhat nomadic childhood, Mo was born in Iran, but spent much of his youth living in Germany. His family eventually moved to Canada, and Mo would go on to study computer Science at York University. The original goal was to work for Microsoft, but Mo decided to enroll in McMaster University's MBA program. While there, he won an inter-university business case competition. The prize? Admission to a CFO conference. And it had a big impact on his future. He met a member of the Tim Horton's board who also owned a boutique ad agency. He converted that meeting into his first media job before moving over to Trojan One. Mo shifted into freelancing before founding Empathy Inc.—an agency priding itself on providing expertise in media, but also showcasing what media can do for business. Mo Dezyanian stops by to chat about growing up in Iran and Germany, starting Empathy Inc., his love for classic kung fu films, and how the Iranian authorities confiscated and erased his entire kung. fu movie collection. www.mediapeople.ca www.instagram.com/vicgenova/

Legally Blunt
Tim's New Holiday Menu, The Nude Spiderman, And The Downfall Of Editing Your iMessages

Legally Blunt

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 16:07


 - The worst school band of all time is 1000x more traumatizing than you think it is  - Jay Leno is going to get the Pete Davidson  - This Michigan couple got married WHERE???  - #ToxicTuesday: the downside of the new iMessage editing software  - Tim Horton's Holiday Menu drops tomorrow, and there are some brand new food & drinks on it!

Un peu de crime dans ton café
Épisode 61 : Guillaume Gélinas, la preuve est dans le container

Un peu de crime dans ton café

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 78:54


Le 13 février 2014, Luc Gélinas et sa nouvelle conjointe, Julie Lemieux, sont retrouvés sans vie dans leur demeure cossue de Terrebonne. Grâce à des sacs poubelles trouvés dans un conteneur à déchets situé à l'arrière d'un Tim Horton's de l'avenue Moody à proximité de la scène de crime, les enquêteurs de la SQ parviennent à identifier un principal suspect dans cette affaire sordide: Guillaume Gélinas, 22 ans, fils de Luc, vétéran des forces armées canadiennes et aspirant pompier. Simple blague ayant dégénéré ou homicide soigneusement planifié? Va falloir écouter pour vous faire une idée. (La qualité sonore de cet épisode n'est pas optimale, on tient à s'en excuser) Thème: Guillaume Purenne. Jingle des Deux minutes de Babine : zapslat.com.

Leaders in Customer Loyalty, Powered by Loyalty360
Loyalty360 Interview with Loyalty Expo Award Winner – Tim Hortons

Leaders in Customer Loyalty, Powered by Loyalty360

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 17:30


Markus Sturm is the Senior Vice President and Head of Digital Loyalty and Consumer Goods at Tim Hortons, quick-service restaurant featuring coffee, donuts, breakfast favorites and sandwiches, and endearingly deemed the “most Canadian brand in Canada.” The brand recently brought home the Platinum Award for Social Impact and CSR at the 2022 Loyalty Expo hosted by Loyalty360.Mark Johnson, Loyalty360 CEO, met with Markus Sturm to discuss the brand's award-winning CSR strategy and the way it differentiates itself in the realm of customer loyalty.

What's Cooking With Chef Noel
SE: 03 EP: 46 A Sweet and Nice Conversation with Latisha.

What's Cooking With Chef Noel

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 49:52


In this episode listen as chef Noel chats up a storm with Sweet and Nice Ice cream's Director of Production Management on her culinary journey, her role with Sweet and Nice, the dish she loves now, and what she would make on the perfect date. This episode was definitely witty and real. What's on Elles Plate? Well, it depends on what passion she's pursuing! Elle is a Food and Beverage consultant and Hospitality Expert working with Neale's Sweet N Nice (a Premium Caribbean Ice Cream company in Canada) as the Senior Director of Product Management & Innovation. After graduating from the school of culinary arts, George Brown College, in Toronto Canada from Restaurant Management, Latisha pursued opportunities to open new locations & manage prominent restaurant chain locations like Milestones & Tim Horton's before establishing her own business in Events & Catering. Now Latisha works primarily as a consultant assisting brands in the menu and product development, creating new & innovative ways for us to enjoy food. Working as the Senior Director for Black-owned company, Neale's Sweet N Nice, Latisha is working towards sharing her newest innovation, Authentic Caribbean Black Cake, Rum Cakes in stores across Canada & the US but you can enjoy them now when you order online at Sweetnniceicecream.ca www.facebook.com/Iamchefnoel www.instagram.com/whatscookingwithchefnoel --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/whatscookingwithchefnoel/message

iHeartRadio Presents: The Filter
Charlie Puth on The Power of Individuality, Tim Hortons, Celebrating and Deconstructing "Charlie"

iHeartRadio Presents: The Filter

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 8:24


Charlie Puth sits down with iHeartRadio's Myles Galloway to talk about his love of his Canadian Fans, deconstructing each song, and putting together a setlist! Charlie Puth talks about his love of Tim Hortons, and gives us some TikTok Tips!

Center Ice Card Cast — Hockey Card Podcast
Center Ice Card Cast — Ep. 67: 2022-23 UD Tim Hortons Review and Break

Center Ice Card Cast — Hockey Card Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022


The CICC crew breaks down 2022-23 UD Tim Hortons before opening up 20 packs. Episode topics: — Discussion about NHL jersey advertising — Recent collection pickups — 2022-23 UD Tim Hortons review and break Please be sure to subscribe to make sure you do not miss any future episodes of Center Ice Card Cast! Additionally, please follow our social media accounts to stay updated on all things Center Ice Card Cast! Facebook: Center Ice Card Cast Twitter: @CenterIceCC Instagram: CenterIceCardCast YouTube: Center Ice Card Cast Email: centericecardcast@gmail.com

OHNE AKTIEN WIRD SCHWER - Tägliche Börsen-News
“Tim Hortons - das Starbucks Kanadas” - China-Crash und Dermapharm mit Cannabis

OHNE AKTIEN WIRD SCHWER - Tägliche Börsen-News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 10:39


Politik pusht die Börsen: Hedgefondsmanager wird britischer Premierminister und Zentralbanker wollen Zinsen stoppen. Politik crasht die Börsen: Xi Jinping zementiert seine Macht und Alibaba fühlt's. Außerdem holt Binance das FBI und Tesla rabattiert in China. Erst der BioNTech-Impfstoff, jetzt Cannabis. Dermapharm (WKN: A2GS5D) ist der Hype-Jäger der deutschen Börsen. Das Starbucks Kanadas heißt Tim Hortons und bringt der Firma dahinter mehr Umsatz als Burger King. Die Firma dahinter? Restaurant Brands International (WKN: A12GMA)! Diesen Podcast der Podstars GmbH (Noah Leidinger) vom 25.10.2022, 3:00 Uhr stellt Dir die Trade Republic Bank GmbH zur Verfügung. Die Trade Republic Bank GmbH wird von der Bundesanstalt für Finanzaufsicht beaufsichtigt.

Bag of Pucks
Episode 175: Packs are BACK (October 22, 2022)

Bag of Pucks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 44:54


In this week's episode, the boys open some Tim Horton's packs (0:00), talk about winner and losers of reverse retro jerseys (if there are any...) (12:08), our early season surprises and disappointments (22:06) and final thoughts/packs (39:52). Follow us on Twitter here: https://www.twitter.com/BOP_pod Follow us on Spotify here: https://open.spotify.com/show/2ib3yq4quqK62RAC6465e --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bag-of-pucks/support

The Focus Group
Production Reduction in America

The Focus Group

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 53:55 Very Popular


Shop Talk discusses the decline in productivity in America for the first time since such indices have been tracked. Is it real or perceived? Caught My Eye exposes a loophole that same-sex Chinese nationals have found to obtain marriage licenses in Utah. Also, look for the latest Halloween decoration—Empty Soul Girl on a Swing. Ron Joyce, co-founder of Tim Hortons, is our Business Birthday.We're all business. Except when we're not.Apple Podcasts: apple.co/1WwDBrCSpotify: spoti.fi/2pC19B1iHeart Radio: bit.ly/2n0Z7H1Tunein: bit.ly/1SE3NMbStitcher: bit.ly/1N97ZquGoogle Podcasts: bit.ly/1pQTcVWPandora: pdora.co/2pEfctjYouTube: bit.ly/1spAF5aAlso follow Tim and John on:Facebook: www.facebook.com/focusgroupradioTwitter: www.twitter.com/focusgroupradioInstagram: www.instagram.com/focusgroupradio

The Chad & Cheese Podcast
Amazon Ain't FairyGodBoss of Me

The Chad & Cheese Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 51:28


After a weeklong hiatus, thanks to a little trek to Unleash in Paris, the boys are back and badder than ever. On this episode, they dissect the recent acquisition of Paycor and Talenya, the investment in Ten Thousand Coffees - which has nothing to do with actual coffee, by the way - and then play a little thumbs-up / thumbs-down with The Muse acquiring Fairygodboss, CareerBeacon buying Ruutly (a Canadian double-double, Tim Hortons-style), Glassdoor filters and TaTiO grabbin' that paper. Amazon is in a pickle again and Robot Baristas take on San Francisco (boycott THIS! workers).

Breaking the Curtain
Ep82 - All Revved Up with TRAVIS CORMIER

Breaking the Curtain

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 20:38


After a wide search in Los Angeles, Las Vegas and New York over the course of several months, the team behind Jim Steinman's Bat Out of Hell The Musical finally found their lead - Canadian artist, Travis Cormier! We are so thrilled to be joined by Travis Cormier on this episode of Breaking the Curtain where we discuss everything from his Strat audition process to his Tim Horton's order!

Roy Green Show
Oct 16: Allison Forsyth, Fmr Olympic Skier & Safe Sport Advocate on Hockey Canada

Roy Green Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 13:14


Retired Supreme Court of Canada Justice Thomas Cromwell tasked with reviewing Hockey Canada urged HC's next board of directors be engaged with only a one-year term, so to come to terms with the need to reform the organization. In a letter to then Hockey Canada CEO Scott Smith, Justice Cromwell on October 10 wrote, "there can be no serious debate that the level of confidence in Hockey Canada on the part of the government, sponsors, some members and the broader public has sunk to dangerously low levels." Former sponsors of Hockey Canada including Tim Hortons, Telus, Scotiabank are calling for a culture change. But it's not just Hockey Canada, as our guest has experienced. Guest: Allison Forsyth. Fmr. Olympic skiier, sexually assaulted by her coach and urged to keep quiet by the coach and Alpine Canada in order for the organization to not lose sponsorships. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Roy Green Show
Roy Green Show Podcast, Oct, 16: Challenging invoking of E.A. – Police Association of Ontario president. ON police officer deaths. – Fmr Olympic skier & safe sport advocate on Hockey Canada. – Brother of Calgary police Sgt Andrew Harnett, killed

Roy Green Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 43:26


Today's podcast: Rouleau Commission on Emergencies Act. Guest: Christine van Geyn. Litigation director, Canadian Constitution Foundation. Cowrote above op ed. Four deaths of police officers in Ontario in the past month. Three were shot and killed and one was the victim of a hit and run. How are police reacting to these deadly assaults on fellow officers? Guest: Mark Baxter, president, Police Association of Ontario and board member of the Canadian Police Association. Police officer in Brantford, Ontario. (I am an honourary member of both the Police Association of Ontario and the Hamilton Police Association). Retired Supreme Court of Canada Justice Thomas Cromwell tasked with reviewing Hockey Canada urged HC's next board of directors be engaged with only a one-year term, so to come to terms with the need to reform the organization. In a letter to then Hockey Canada CEO Scott Smith, Justice Cromwell on October 10 wrote, "there can be no serious debate that the level of confidence in Hockey Canada on the part of the government, sponsors, some members and the broader public has sunk to dangerously low levels." Former sponsors of Hockey Canada including Tim Hortons, Telus, Scotiabank are calling for a culture change. But it's not just Hockey Canada, as our guest has experienced. Guest: Allison Forsyth. Fmr. Olympic skiier, sexually assaulted by her coach and urged to keep quiet by the coach and Alpine Canada in order for the organization to not lose sponsorships. Calgary Police Service Sergeant Andrew Harnett was dragged to his death by a fleeing vehicle following a routine New Year's Eve traffic stop in 2020. The young offender driving the car is awaiting sentencing. - We speak with Sgt Harnett's brother. Guest: Jason Harnett, of Ontario, brother of Calgary Police Sergeant Andrew Harnett. --------------------------------------------- Host/Content Producer – Roy Green Technical/Podcast Producer – Tom McKay Podcast Co-Producer – Matt Taylor If you enjoyed the podcast, tell a friend! For more of the Roy Green Show, subscribe to the podcast! https://globalnews.ca/roygreen/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Real Gud Pros
S05E01: Last Off the Ice, Last Out of Tim Horton's

Real Gud Pros

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 111:28


We're baaaaaack! Welcome to season 5 of RGP! Join us as we breakdown the preseason, discuss the importance of part-time jobs for NHL players, and make our predictions for the season.

Scott and Kat After 9
Relationship Scams and The Jays Blew It

Scott and Kat After 9

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 52:34


Today: Kat is back. An update on Scott's daughter's visit. The Jays blew it. The season is over. A strange relationship scam. Fast food drive-thru times have improved believe it or not. How to fix the drive-thru at Tim Hortons. Kayne West has lost it. Tom Cruise is making a movie in space. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Talkin' Hockey - The Hockey Talkin' Show
Talkin' Hockey - Season 5 Episode 2 - THE TIM HORTON with RUSS RANKIN

Talkin' Hockey - The Hockey Talkin' Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 58:00


On this week's episode we sat down to talk hock­ey at the Trav­elodge with Russ Rankin. We chat about the NJ Dev­ils, scout­ing for Tri-City Amer­i­cans, Good Rid­dance, solo stuff, and more! We also take some time to talk about Tim Hor­ton, the new cards are out, and a lit­tle bit of Jets talk! KEEP YOUR STICK ON THE ICE!

The Valley Today
NW Works: Hiring People with Disabilities

The Valley Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 34:42


We recorded part of today's conversation on Thursday, September 22, 2022, with Ellie Williams Tahmaseb, Marketing and Public Relations Manager at NW Works, and Mark Wafer, a disability advocate and former owner of 14 Tim Horton restaurants. Mark was slated to be the keynote speaker for a disability employment conference on Monday, October 17, 2022, hosted by NW Works. The conference was canceled on Tuesday, September 27, 2022. The conversation we originally had is full of great information, so we decided to keep as much of it as we could. Today's show is a combination of that conversation as well as an additional chat that took place with Ellie on Wednesday, October 5, 2022. In addition, I've included the entire transcript of our conversation below as well. Reach out to NW Works via their website: https://nwworks.com/ and follow them on Facebook. janet: Hello and welcome to the Valley today. I am your host, Janet Michael, before we jump into the weeds with our conversation today, I wanna give everyone who's listening a little bit of background, so we recorded part of today's conversation a couple of weeks ago. I'm on the screen for a second time because she's so gracious to give me more of her time. Ellie Williams Tahmaseb is here with me. She's the marketing and public relations manager at NW Works. We talked a couple of weeks ago, Ellie, you joined me on the screen along with Mark Wafer. And Mark is a disability advocate and one of my favorite things, former owner of 14 Tim Horton restaurants, which makes him very near and dear to my heart. We were talking because he was going to be coming to town for a conference, a disability employment conference that NW Works was putting together that was supposed to happen in a couple of weeks. That has changed, but I felt like this information was still valid, good information that we needed to get out to employers and to the community. So thank you for coming and talking about it. Outside of conference terms, I appreciate your time. ellie: Very happy to be here, Janet. Thanks for being flexible as we kind of figure out this, new path forward. janet: and you were telling me before we just started recording that October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month. So of course we had to make sure we were able to use this conversation in some way shape or form.   ellie: very timely. That's what we strive for. janet: you're not having the conference now, but that doesn't really change anything from the perspective of the services that you offer and the need for employees that are available through NW works through a whole host of other types of organizations that offer employment opportunities for people with disabilities? ellie: Definitely. Even with the conference being canceled, we still see a huge need in our community, both on the employer side, so many people are hiring right now, and on the adults with disabilities side, we have, One in four Americans practically has a disability of some sort. In Virginia that's a little bit lower in West Virginia, that's a little bit higher. but really, so many of us know adults with disabilities, children with disabilities, adolescents with disabilities, and the services that we offer at NW works really focus around employment, community engagement, and ensuring that adults with disabilities have an opportunity to build a meaningful community-based life, whether that's through employment and working for local businesses, or that's through community engagement, volunteering with local nonprofits and things like that. But really just making sure that folks are integrated and have as many opportunities as they want because. Just like anyone else, adults with disabilities deserve to have as many opportunities as possible. janet: It was a really good conversation that we had with Mark, and that's gonna be interspersed throughout the conversation that we're having now. But there were a lot of things that he said that I knew, but coming from him. It made so much more sense. It really was an eye-opening conversation that we had with him. ellie: Absolutely. I think there are a lot of myths around disability employment, right? People think that adults with disabilities might not be as productive, attendance will be an issue, transportation, and also just people are sometimes uncomfortable around disability. They don't know how to talk to folks with disabilities. They might feel afraid, they might feel shameful about the fact that they feel uncomfortable. And so these were all things that we were going to be addressing in our conference. And we still want to make that available to folks. So we're sort of figuring out a path forward in terms of getting that information out to folks. But, our agency does this year-round, We don't just do it in October. Although we would love for more folks to get involved in National Disability Employment Awareness Month, there is such a need in our community. And like I said, these services are available year round. We offer information for employers. We offer information for families. We offer information for individuals with disabilities. We offer job coaching, which is a no-cost solution for employers who perhaps don't know how to interact with folks with disabilities or for individuals who need a little bit of extra support on the job. And so that's something that we offer, and again, it's no cost to the employers. So really there's nothing but benefits when they choose to hire folks through our agency or agencies like ours. janet: Mark, we won't keep you, I promise you can get back to your conference. mark: Oh no. I'd rather stay here. Trust me. I love your background there with all the coffee. janet: Thank you. I thought with your background at Tim Horton's, you of all people would appreciate my coffee background. mark: Actually, coffee has been a topic of discussion all day today because in the morning break, the hotel forgot to put coffee out. So we got 450 delegates, who really did need caffeinating and, no coffee, so that didn't go over too well. So it has been a topic all day. janet: I catch a fair amount of grief from people for the amount of coffee I drink, and when I go to things that are all day, they get a little annoyed with me that I have to leave to go get more coffee if they don't provide it throughout the day. So Ellie, let's start with NW Works. For someone who isn't familiar with the organization here in Winchester, tell me a little bit about NW Works and the services that you provide. ellie: NW Works as a nonprofit organization here in Winchester. We've been around since 1970 and our goal all along has been to help adults with disabilities to gain and maintain meaningful employment. That has shifted over the years from in-house work here at our location to now most of the folks that we serve actually work in the community at what we call competitive integrated employment, which is a fancy term for just employment that anybody else would hold. Working in the community alongside disabled and non-disabled individuals with no barriers, no stigma, and being paid fairly just like everybody. So that's really our focus and we've been doing that, like I said, since 1970 all over Winchester, but also more broadly through Virginia, West Virginia, and Maryland. janet: And you serve a wide range of people with disabilities, Male, female, young, old, it runs the gamut. ellie: We serve folks predominantly with intellectual and developmental disabilities, but we also work with individuals who have physical disabilities. Folks who may be blind or vision impaired, folks who may have spinal injuries. If you have a disability, we wanna find a way to help you. janet: Tell me why this conference, the disability employment making the business case, was something you felt like NW Works needed to bring to the public. ellie: We've been doing this since 1970, we really have seen the whole range of responses from society about disability, employment, and really disability inclusion in our society. We know that about one in four Americans has a disability and really we're sort of all on the path to, at some point in time, having a disability of some form, as we age, accidents happen, things like that. So this is a huge portion of the population that's being left out of the workforce, whether that's intentionally or unintentionally. And a lot of these folks want to work just like anybody else. So we really recognize that there is a huge barrier and part of that barrier is that employers may feel uncomfortable or may not know how to interact with individuals with disabilities. They may be nervous about interviewing a candidate. They don't know how to act, they don't know how to talk about disability. and we really want them to understand that those fears, concerns, can be alleviated. We also want them to know that there are so many different incentives to hire individuals with disabilities, from tax incentives, from the government to, job coaching and free vocational rehabilitation services. Again, through the government, through agencies like NW Works. So there are plenty of ways that folks can actually make those hires and include folks with disabilities and they don't have to be huge, costly endeavor. janet: Mark, when you participate in conferences and meetings like this, what are some of the big misconceptions that people ask you about over and over again that you wish you could just address and they wouldn't keep coming back up again? mark: That's a great question because we do see the same concerns come up, the same questions, based on fear. It's all based on fear. So Ellie, very eloquently, spoke about the fears that business owners have. It's real. 25% of the population, globally is disabled. And you look at the unemployment rates it's as high as 70%. Most countries have statistics around 50% but that doesn't include anybody who has not had marketplace attachment. So if you've never worked, if you've never paid taxes, you can't be counted in unemployment numbers. So that number anecdotally is probably closer to 70%. You put that into perspective, the highest that the unemployment rate went through North America was 1933 during a Great Depression, and it was 24. So here we are, people with disabilities. One in every four people in North America living a perpetual depression because they can't find work. And that comes down to stereotypes, the myths and misperceptions that business owners largely believe in wholesale. People with disabilities, they are gonna be slower, take more time off, they're gonna be sick more often. Expensive accommodations. Businesses believe that it costs 15 to $20,000 to accommodate somebody with disability. No, it doesn't. Most people with disabilities don't even require an accommodation, and the average cost is somewhere between four and 500 if they actually need it. What we need to teach employers is that you're already accommodating everybody. Everybody, every person who worked for you, accommodating them in some way. So its not this big mystery, but what we have to do is we have to change the approach. Up until recently, the approach, especially for people with intellectual disabilities has been one of charity. You approach an employer, you target their heart strings and they find a job for person. That's not a sustainable plan. In some jurisdictions, like where I live here in Ontario, we have an accessibility act. And so sometimes we look at policy and say to employees, Oh, by law you have to hire people with disabilities, that doesn't work. But if we can appeal to employers into something that they understand, which is profitability, which is bottom line, if we can appeal to them on that, then you've got a chance of opening the door. And what I mean by that is appealing to the cost cutting. Ellie mentioned incentives. There are some incentives, but those are American centric. You won't see that elsewhere in the world. But use the statistics from my business, statistics from companies in the United States like Pepsi, DuPont the paint maker, who have built capacity of people with disabilities. And so they have these statistics now. For example, absenteeism rates are much lower if you have workers with disabilities, they're sick less often. They take less time off. They're late less often. The reason for that is because it takes so long for them to get a job. The job is now precious and they'll do everything they can to make sure that the boss doesn't think I'm coming in late every day. mark: The safety rating increases. If you take a person like me, deaf, I've been deaf since birth. I'm more aware of my surroundings. Of course in the workplace, that means I'm a safer worker. So when you build capacity, safety ratings, get better. And of course there's a cost associated with that. Innovation factor. You got an innovation factor. People with disabilities like myself, I do things differently every day. You probably wouldn't even notice it, but there's certain nuances of what I do that's different and it's different problem solving skills that creates innovation, not just hiring smart people. People who have different problem solving skills. mark: So if you built capacity in your business with that, then you have a more innovative workforce. And then for some employers, especially retail, who want to get a big savings is employee turnover. If you built capacity with people with disabilities, you typically have a much lower turnover than somebody in the same business who hasn't. For us, it was a difference. So 100% in a typical, coffee shop to 40% in our coffee shops, and you can imagine, $4,000 to replace one entry level person and how much money I saved by having an inclusive workforce. And it's infectious too because, I've employed 250 workers with disabilities in 25 years, but at any given time, about 50 of my 250 workers had a disability. The 200 who didn't have a disability, they're turnover rate was 55%. So still half the norm because people, even people who are not disabled, wanna be included. They wanna be working in an inclusive environment, so it has a huge overall, improvement all around. So when we speak to employers like that, we say to them, Hey, you wanna make some more money today. Have you made enough money this week? Of course they're gonna say, tell me more. That's how you get them interested in, inclusivity. janet: I've had several conversations in the last few months with many of the economic development directors in and around our area talking about workforce development, talking about labor shortages, and a lot of things that they're hearing from employees and employers is not always about the paycheck, but it's some of the things that you're talking about here. Inclusivity. They wanna work for an employer that they feel like includes everyone. This checks so many boxes that could eliminate other problems down the road. mark: We also have to eliminate the myths and misperceptions in the stereotypes. one of the things we did about 10 years ago is that – this is before everybody got a smartphone - we sent out a survey to 40 CEOs, and we asked them a series of questions. One of the questions was how large is the disability community in Canada? The real answer is 23.4%, the average number that came back from those 40 CEOs, the average number that came back was 1%. Here are people who set the tone and set the intent within a corporation who believe that only one in a hundred people in the community has a disability. So we've gotta knock down those misperceptions. It's the same with the one I told you about with accommodation. $15,000 when the reality is about 400 bucks if they actually need that. Touching on the labor shortage, most developed nations in the world have a very serious labor shortage. Some countries more than others. mark: In Canada, we were heading for this for the last 15 years, so the pandemic has just made it worse, but it was inevitable. We've got an aging population. We have a small population. Population of Canada is about the same as the population of California, for example. We have a vast country. We don't have very many people in it. The infrastructure to bring people from other countries – immigration - we can't go beyond 275,000 people year yet we have almost a million and half jobs that can't be filled. So we've got an untapped labor force. We've got 5.6 million Canadians who are disabled. At least 70 to 75% of them can work, but they're not working only because they have a disability. So we've gotta change those attitudes. janet: Ellie, I think here in our area, it would really kind of have a snowball effect. When you have three or four businesses like Trex for example, that brings in a group of disabled workers and talk about it. I think that's where we sometimes fall down. They're doing it, but they're not telling anybody about it and how easy it was and busting some of those misconceptions. You need more people to do it, and then more people to talk about how seamless it was. ellie: Absolutely Janet, Trex is already doing this work and are able to talk about this. Because we know that our business leaders, our hiring managers, our HR professionals, they wanna hear from their peers. Mark is one of their peers. He is a former business owner. He gets it. He understands the turnover rates and the needs and the cost of hiring and things like that. His case is gonna always carry a little bit more than ours as a nonprofit will. And I totally understand that. And Janet, one thing I do wanna add is that when Mark and I talk about disability in this context, we're talking about it in the Americans with Disabilities Act framework as opposed to the Social Security framework. So these are not necessarily folks that are receiving disability benefits from the government, but who have a documented disability by a medical professional. So that's just a little clarification. janet: I think that's one of the confusing parts as well when you're talking to employers is they're not even sure what the actual definition of a disability is and who they can and cannot hire if they were willing to do so. mark: Employers learn. Employers learn. You learn by making mistakes and that's okay. In Canada, you're not allowed to ask if they have a disability. It's against the law. If you're doing an interview and a person has not self-identified as having a disability, by law, you can't ask them. But what we used do, we used to say in the first interview, we used to say, “You are going to be working with a large group of disabled workers. How do you feel about that?” So the response, typically, the response typically is, “Oh, that's great. my brother's in a wheelchair, my aunt's blind, my sister, my, my cousins …” And so you really get a sense of whether that person is gonna fit, be part of the family in the restaurant. We do the same again when we're promoting because we normally promote from within. And most of my managers started off as entry level positions, “You are going to be managing people with a disability. How do you feel about that?” And it's so rare that we would have a negative response. We did, but it was very rare that somebody would give you a negative response. That's the tone and that's the intent. I'm setting it. I'm the owner of the business. I'm setting that tone of intent so everybody in that management team knows this is how we operate. To your point about a snowball effect, we had a tremendous amount of success even by the late nineties. We had a tremendous amount of success and we were getting quite a bit of media attention for what we were doing. And I received a phone call from a gentleman who owned an independent grocery store in a small town, about an hour away from me, and he says, “Mark, I saw what you're doing. I can't get staff. The town he lives in is sort of a resort town, and so people only came in the summer or Christmas, and so he couldn't find workers for this store. He says, “How do I go about hiring somebody with disabilities?” So I put him in touch with a local agency similar to what Ellie and her people do. mark: He hired one person. After a couple months, that person was his best employee. He started hiring more people with disabilities. It became so important to him that he started talking about it. He's a golfer and every time he played golf with local business people, he would say, “You need to do this.” So the hardware store, the liquor store … so that's what happens. The other point that's important, and Ellie touched on this, my voice carries more than Ellie's does on this subject at the business level because businesses speak to each other. They speak the same language, peer to peer. I'm just a small business owner, but I could sit in a room with the CEO of General Motors, for example, and we could have a conversation that would make sense where with the social service sector, that's really not gonna happen. Businesses like mine are scared of people like Ellie. Not really Ellie. But yes, we're scared of people like you. Cause we don't know. We don't understand. We don't know what makes you tick. And when you come to meet with us and you've got these ideas - which are brilliant – we're just thinking what's this gonna cost me? I don't trust this person. But when it comes from me, oh, this makes sense. Mark's talking about making more money. Wow. I really have to listen to this. So that's why it's so important that when Ellie put this conference together, that she's bringing in someone like myself or others who have done this and talk about it from a business point of view. janet: And this isn't something that is only meant for large companies and large industries. I know Trex was going to be someone who spoke on one of the panels that you were intending to have, but it's not just companies the size of Trex. There are a wide range of businesses in our community right now that are employing people with disabilities. ellie: Absolutely. We have everything from Acorn Behavioral Health has our folks there. We have folks with Martins. They have been a great partner for us. Monoflo Melnor, Oak Stone Pizzeria has a young gentleman working there. Pho Bistro in Creekside, which actually used to be Firefly, so it's a perfect pairing; they've had a gentleman who worked at Firefly working at their location since they opened practically, so really it's not just the big names, but everything from small mom and pop shops to large organizations can benefit from employees with disabilities. janet: Do you find, Mark, that you have to talk to your smaller businesses in a different way than you would some of your larger businesses and industries like Trex? If you are talking to a mom and pop place that maybe only has 10 employees or even five or six, do you have to come at that from a different angle or with different information? mark: Not really. The conversation is the same. The conversation about the value that a person with a disability brings to the workplace is the same. But the changes they can make much quicker in a mom and pop. For example, I can have a meeting with my manager and say “You know what? Monday morning we're gonna start this. This is what we're gonna do Monday morning.” And on Monday morning it happens. When the General Motors CEO says “We're gonna start this Monday morning.” That's not gonna happen, right? So the conversation doesn't necessarily change, but the speed in which you can see change. What we're looking for here is a culture shift, looking for a culture shift within the workplace. And we're seeing it already. mark: When you go back 20 years, 30 years to when I first started my business, and I hired the first person with a disability - someone with Down Syndrome - I was a franchise business. The franchise, my area manager, they said “What are you doing? What are you doing? The customers are gonna, the customers are not gonna like this. This is crazy. And you hire somebody with Down Syndrome, how could he possibly sweep the floor and do it right?” and I said “Watch. Watch. Think about who you're talking to. Cause I'm disabled.” But they hadn't thought about that. And that young man that I hired, Clint Spurling, the first one was the first day I was in business. He was by far my best employee by far. He came to work early, he wouldn't take a break and we couldn't get him to go home. He always had his uniform on on the bus so that everybody knew he worked at Tim Horton. Those are very valuable stories. But then when I tell people that, when I tell employers, “Hey, I made more money too.” Wow. Okay, now we've got an audience. janet: And Mark brings up a good point. Ellie, when you talk about the public facing part of this. For several years, NW Works, operated the Firefly Cafe, in Creekside. I can't ever remember in all of the times that I was there for breakfast or lunch or to grab a coffee, anybody ever being uncomfortable with the staff that you had there. I think that's a misconception that is way blown out of proportion on the public side to an employer side. ellie: Absolutely. I think that the Firefly Cafe is a perfect example, Janet. We had folks there with all manner of disabilities, visible and invisible. And the folks that were coming, our customers, they knew that about us. So they were sort of, in a sense, self-selecting, right? They were comfortable. They supported the work we were doing. But my favorite time was when people who had absolutely no idea who we were would stop in. Probably because they were looking for something to eat, they'd just gotten off of Interstate 81, and they just happened to walk into the restaurant. Those were the folks that really would contact us, leave reviews saying, I'm so grateful you're doing this. I had no idea. but I think that gives us a really good indicator that the public is comfortable with this or is more comfortable than employers perhaps think that they are. They want to support businesses that are diverse and inclusive. I think there's a huge cultural shift going on right now with a focus on diversity, equity, inclusion and belonging - these buzzwords that are going around so many major companies - and disability is diversity and it's not something we always think of. But it really is, I think a societal attitude. There are certain facets of disability that we have societally deemed acceptable, right? You're wearing glasses, Mark is wearing glasses. I'm wearing contacts. I can't really see without my contacts - that impacts my daily living. That could be in the grand scheme of things, a disability, but we socially don't consider it. We've made it acceptable to wear glasses, even people who don't need glasses wear glasses. So really it just takes that cultural shift and I think that what companies will see is more consumers are happy to hear about these things. They're happy to know that the companies they support are inclusive and are giving back to the community and are giving people an opportunity who absolutely deserve it. janet: Mark, you were talking about bottom line and decreased cost. Marketing is a huge piece of some businesses' bottom line. And when you are making a shift like this and people want to see it, and they're behind you a hundred percent, you're gonna get more customers, you're gonna get more sales, you're gonna have more people frequent your business if it's retail or food service because you are doing something they believe in. So it's a whole ‘nother dollar sign when you're looking at that pros and cons list. mark: Absolutely. Marketing and merchandising is huge. When I'm speaking, in my presentation to business owners in that room, they would say, Well, you know what, my, my restaurant, I don't see disabled people. I don't think I need to spend the time with this.” Even though it's one in five, heading to one in four, you still have those business owners and I see them reaching for their phone before I'm finished and all that. And I hit them with this statistic. If you take the 23% of Americans, that have a disability, and you add in a direct family member, so mom, dad, brother, sister, a son, daughter, you're at 68% of the American population. 68% of Americans either have a disability or they have a loved one at home with a disability, and that's a number that no business can ignore. You see them in the room pick up their phone. I'm just finishing up and they go, “Hey, wait, what? Wait, hold on. Ok. This changes everything,” because they realize when it comes to sales and transactions that seven out of 10 people coming into my store are either disabled or to have a loved one at home that's disabled, this is impactful, maybe I really should have a ramp into my restaurant. I make more money. yeah, it's important. janet: And that statistic doesn't even include people who have friends who went to high school with somebody. All of the ancillary connections that we have that are not in our immediate family, you're probably pushing that statistic closer to maybe 80 or 90%. mark: probably a hundred. Yeah, probably a hundred. I mean, who, who amongst us doesn't know somebody unless you've been living in a cave for the last 25 years, we all know somebody. Even famous people, you know somebody on TV who has a disability. Everybody knows somebody. janet: Ellie, in a perfect world, give me a list. You don't have to call out specific business names, but tell me who you would love to fill a room. ellie: Anybody who's making a hiring decision, whether that is a hiring manager or somebody in HR. Because if you are in HR and you are screening individuals, if you're not reaching candidates who have disabilities. If you're not intentionally saying that in your job applications - that you are a company that values diversity and includes and invites individuals with disabilities to apply - you're missing a huge portion of the population. So really anyone who's involved in hiring we want to give you the training. We wanna give you the tools to be successful ultimately. We're just one agency. There are competitors of ours that serve other folks in our area. I don't care. I want you to come to us or go to Blue Ridge Opportunities or to go to Echo or First Choice or any of these other agencies in the Commonwealth because the ultimate goal here is to get more meaningful employment for folks with disabilities. janet: Mark thank you for taking some time out of your day to have this conversation with me. I do appreciate it. mark: My pleasure. Thank you. Thank you, Janet. Take care Ellie. janet: So for someone who's listening and is thinking that a lot of what they've heard today makes a lot of sense. What is the next step? How do they start the process? ellie: If they are in the Winchester area, they can contact us and we would be happy to talk to them about what their needs are as a business and who we might have available to partner with them. If they're not in our area - you've got listeners further down in the valley - there are other organizations similar to us. So really what you want to look for is an employment service organization. You can also search for things like disability, employment organizations. Those terms will really help you find an agency. ellie: If you still can't find anything, you can always reach out to the Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services, DARS, because they are one of the agencies that we work very closely with. They're all over Virginia, so no matter where you are, they can help you out. janet: it's an easy process. I don't think we can say enough how simple it is. It's probably more simple than it is to actually hire someone that doesn't have a disability. ellie: Absolutely. You think about how much money you spend in the hiring process, between interviews, the amount of time it takes to get that position filled, how much you spend when the position isn't filled. And then how much it costs when you make a bad hire and you have to do it all over again. The benefit of working with an organization like NW Works is that we know the skill level of the individual. We do assessments ahead of time to make sure that they are able to do the work that you need them to do. And then again, we provide that job coach. So if you as a hiring manager are saying, I need this person to have skill A, B, and C. One, we can make sure that they have those skills. And two, we can make sure that they are doing the job the way you want it to be done. And we can make those adjustments in real time instead of saying, okay, I've got this employee now that I'm stuck with that doesn't know how to do this, doesn't have training. And we can even give training to companies to make sure that their hiring managers, their employees understand how to work with these individuals. Because really this is a relationship that we wanna build with our partners. It's not just that we're gonna drop in somebody and you're gonna be stuck with an employee that doesn't know what they're doing. They're gonna get training and we're gonna give you training as well. janet: I think the other part of that training is invaluable because like you mentioned earlier, so many times we all have our own preconceived notions or we are uncomfortable. I've talked to several guests when they've come from Blue Ridge Hospice. For me, it's talking about death. I don't know how to do it. I don't know if I'm being disrespectful. It just ties me up in knots when I used to have to talk to somebody from Blue Ridge Hospice and I have managed to get over that now, but they had to help me figure out how to talk and what to talk about and put those fears aside. It is exactly the same thing and the fact that you're willing to do that on the other end I think is just incredible. ellie: Absolutely. And we know that this is a barrier in place for people. And I think, when we talk about disability inclusion, it's not that different than any other form of diversity, equity, and inclusion work, in the same vein that you might need education and training about how to talk about and with members of the L G B T Q I A population, it's the same thing. Do I say this person is disabled? Do I say they have a disability? Do I say they're living with a disability? There's all these different kinds of interesting terms. And like any community, the disability community is incredibly diverse. Different parts of the community are gonna have different preferences around person first language, identity, first language, things like that. So really the training from our end is making sure that you as the employer know and feel comfortable in those situations - what information might be needed, what kind of accommodations might be needed. And so really that's what we want is that education for folks, because whether you hire through us or you hire a different person with a disability that doesn't go through an agency like NW Works, it's a win. That's success either way. There's a need for inclusive, competitive employment. ellie: That's the goal. So whether you go through us, you go through a competitor, I'm happy because now somebody is getting an opportunity for real work, real wages. janet: How do they get in touch with you? How do they reach out to NW Works? ellie: So Janet, if somebody wants to reach out to us, they can reach out via our website, which is NWWorks.com. They can send us an email through that or reach out to us on social media to get involved. That's gonna be the best way to contact us. janet: Thank you for meeting up with me a second time to fill in the blanks for what, hopefully now is a completed radio show! ellie: Absolutely. Thanks so much for your patience, Janet. I know it's been a, an interesting trip with us. janet: And it's a good opportunity for me to also remind everyone who's listening now that what you hear on the radio isn't always all of the conversation. So a lot of times, I have to edit because the radio has a limited amount of time that I am allowed to have on the air. The podcast doesn't have that limitation, so sometimes I don't always remember to mention because when I'm recording, I don't always know at the end of it whether I'm gonna run short on time. So this is a great opportunity to be able to remind people the entire conversation is on the podcast at thevalleytodaypodcast.com. You could go there and hear all kinds of things. There's probably stuff this past last week that didn't make it on air that you'll be giggling about because I thought, ah, maybe I shouldn't say that on the radio. That happens a lot, a lot more than people might think. I will be back, tomorrow. It is Tourism Tuesday, Old Town Winchester edition. So Alex Flanigan is gonna join me and give me a rundown on all of the really cool things that are happening in downtown Winchester. So meet me back here for that, just a few minutes after noon.  

Talkin' Hockey - The Hockey Talkin' Show
Talkin' Hockey - Season 5 Episode 2 - THE TIM HORTON with RUSS RANKIN

Talkin' Hockey - The Hockey Talkin' Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 58:00


On this week's episode we sat down to talk hock­ey at the Trav­elodge with Russ Rankin. We chat about the NJ Dev­ils, scout­ing for Tri-City Amer­i­cans, Good Rid­dance, solo stuff, and more! We also take some time to talk about Tim Hor­ton, the new cards are out, and a lit­tle bit of Jets talk! KEEP YOUR STICK ON THE ICE!

The Lynda Steele Show
The Wrap - Do food establishments like Tim Hortons really need a clothing line & What's your favourite Thanksgiving tradition?

The Lynda Steele Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 15:18


GUEST:  Leah Holiove, TV Reporter and Radio Host Sarah Daniels, real estate agent in South Surrey; author and broadcaster

The Lynda Steele Show
BC Ferries cancels some long weekend sailings, Using psychedelics to help with drug and alcohol abuse & The Wrap!

The Lynda Steele Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 64:35


BC Ferries cancels some long weekend sailings due to a staff shortage  GUEST: Deborah Marshall, Executive Director of Public Affairs for BC Ferries Juno Beach has been saved!  GUEST: Cindy Clegg, spokesperson for Save Juno Beach Mark Marissen and PROGRESS Vancouver GUEST: Mark Marrissen, mayoral candidate for Progress Vancouver PM Trudeau declares Iran's IRGC as a terrorist entity GUEST: Tamineh Sadeghi, “Iranian Women Lives Matter” protest organizer The showdown for the Chilliwack School Board GUEST: Grace Kennedy, Reporter for the Fraser Valley Current Using psychedelics to help with drug and alcohol abuse GUEST: Dr. Ian Rabb, Chief Clinics Officer at Universal Ibogaine NHL, MLB and NFL games to bet on during Thanksgiving weekend GUEST: Jawn Jang, The Jas Johal Show Contributor GUEST:Matt Lee, Senior Communications Specialist for BCLC The Wrap - Do food establishments like Tim Hortons really need a clothing line & What's your favourite Thanksgiving tradition? GUEST: Leah Holiove, TV Reporter and Radio Host GUEST: Sarah Daniels, real estate agent in South Surrey; author and broadcaster

This Matters
The Hockey Canada scandal and the culture of sport

This Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 23:38


Guest: Bruce Arthur, columnist Developments with Hockey Canada have sparked a national conversation after revelations the organization spent millions in settlements following sexual misconduct claims that go back decades. There has been a push for change as the government amplifies its probe into Hockey Canada's top leadership and big name sponsors like Tim Hortons, Scotiabank, Telus and Canadian Tire have been falling like dominoes. There are dire questions about the future of the game's governing body and a larger conversation about sexual violence and misogyny in Canada's hockey culture. Columnist Bruce Arthur joins “This Matters” to share his opinion. This episode was produced by Saba Eitizaz, Paulo Marques and Brian Bradley

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 64 – Unstoppable Adapter to Unexpected Life Change with Lisa Wilson

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 65:02


Lisa Wilson's life started out as a pretty normal one. She went to school. As she graduated college she chose a career path and she was successful with her choice.   After 17 years working in the human resources field working mostly as an HR manager, she finally decided to leave the field after working for three years for a company that didn't value what a good HR manager could do to help the company succeed. Lisa always wanted to go into life and leadership coaching and so she finally did.   Then, due to a surgical procedure that should never have taken place, she lost half her thyroid gland. While the doctors acknowledged that the operation should have not taken place they assured her that she would resume the kind of active lifestyle she had before the procedure. Nothing could be further from the truth.   Listen this week to Lisa's story and see how she adapted to all the changes in her life and how she adapted and thrived. I am sure you will find Lisa Wilson's story engaging and inspiring.   About the Guest:   The best part of having a Human Resources (HR) department is that you have a management expert at your disposal. As a leader, when an issue comes up that you aren't sure how to deal with, you walk into the HR department and they walk you through it. Not all companies have this. Lisa has taken her success as an HR leader in large corporations and brought the opportunity to small to medium-sized companies. Offering training and coaching before and during those particularly sticky situations. Lisa is a Leadership/Corporate Coach, a Certified Human Resources Leader, and a trained Mediator. She had an HR career spanning 15 years, her drive had her in a manager's role 5 years into her career at 28 years old. While that drive helped her in her career, and volunteer roles with Rotary, the Human Resources Professionals Association, and Toastmasters, it was not helpful at all when she had her thyroid removed by mistake. What followed that surgery was 5 years of frustration and exhaustion. Lisa had to learn to rest. Not something that came to her easily. In this episode, she shares the lessons she learned that took her from days at a time on the couch to feeling like herself again.    Social media links:   https://www.linkedin.com/in/lisamaywilson/ https://www.facebook.com/LMWConsultation https://www.instagram.com/lmwconsultation/   About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is an Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:20 Welcome to another edition of unstoppable mindset wherever you may be, we hope you're having a good day. And we hope that we can make it a little bit better. We have an interesting guest who has had some surprises in her life. Lisa Wilson has done a lot of work in the HR world. She's now a coach, and thought leader in a variety of subjects. She has also happened to be a person who has been listed and put in chapters in several books and is now writing her own. So there you go, another author. Lisa, welcome to unstoppable mindset. How are you?   Lisa Wilson  02:00 I'm great. Thanks, Michael.   Michael Hingson  02:02 And there's nothing wrong with being another author. Authors are good people to have around. They are. And he says, you know, but   Lisa Wilson  02:09 then you realize, yeah, well, it is,   Michael Hingson  02:11 you know, everyone has a story to tell. And the problem is we just don't get enough people thinking that they can tell the stories.   Lisa Wilson  02:19 Agreed. And I think people are so interesting. They have so many interesting stories, and we kind of put them off as things. Well, I did that. So no big deal. But it is yeah. Yeah, yeah.   Michael Hingson  02:32 I remember when we started writing for underdog I, I thought people would be interested in it. Someone said you should make it a business book. And I thought that it needed to be something of a more general nature than that. And it ended up being of a more general nature than that and people are interested. So it's, it's great to be able to share information.   Lisa Wilson  02:54 Well, you can always write to write just take the lessons from Thunder dog and make it a business book.   Michael Hingson  03:02 Well in there is always that. Yeah. Well tell us a little bit about you growing up and stuff like that.   Lisa Wilson  03:08 Hi, sure. So I grew up in a small town in northern Ontario, Canada. And I'm a very driven person. I don't know if I was when I was growing up. But when I got into university, I knew exactly what I wanted to do. It took love. I didn't know exactly what I wanted to do to go into school. I started in psychology. And after first year, I saw a lot of my friends were in business. And I really liked what they were taking. So I switched over. And my way to hold on to the psychology and I did hold on to the psychology that was kind of my backup courses that so all those electives that you get to take. Yes. And so I kept them on as electives. And when I took my first Organizational Behavior course, which is the first human resources course, I realized that it was almost a repeat of first year psychology. And so that was my way to meld the two. And I came out and that's really when I talked about it. That's the kind of drive I had my mom used to say to me, I don't even know where that comes from in you. I decided that when I left school, I was getting a job in HR. And that wasn't easy. People don't want you in HR. If you have no experience. It's a bit of a double edged sword you they don't want you if you have no experience and I get it after having been there for a while you it's really hard to step into that role. You really do need some experience. So for the first two years, I would take six month contracts. And I decided that I got my first full time role. So did for six month contracts for two years finally got a full time role and decided I was going to be an HR manager before I turned 30 And I was I at 28 I had been offered a job as a manager in my hometown when I was 27. But I knew I wasn't ready to take it so I turned it down. And I was working for a really awesome company at the time and a really great manager and I went to the manager and I said, I just turned down a management role. And I don't want to have to do that again. I know I'm not ready, can you tell me what I need to do to be ready. And so she said a couple of things. One was business writing. Oddly, they don't teach you proper business writing in university. So I took a course. And the other was public speaking, nobody believes me anymore. But I was a terrible public speaker, I was afraid. I spoke really quietly, and I like ran off the stage, I did one employee meeting, and my general manager had gone to her and said, Lisa can't do those anymore. So either she gets way better at it, or you're not allowed to put her up there in your place anymore. So I went to Toastmasters and learn how to do that. And within the year, the same job came back up. So I, I was offered the job. And this time I took it, there was no interview or anything. They just called me said, are you ready now? And I said, Yep, I went back. And so I had my HR managers role by the time I was 30.   Michael Hingson  06:00 That's pretty cool. So what do you like about or what did you like about being an HR manager and working in HR?   Lisa Wilson  06:07 I like lots of different things. And HR is never the same. And I remember having a woman come in to talk to we had like an HR club at university, and I said, Can you give us a day in the life? And she said, No. And that is the reality, there is no day in the life of an HR person. It's really, there's so many different things that you're dealing with, on any given day that it's really hard to say, Okay, I come in, and I do this, because I used to come in with a plan for the day, and then something would happen, and it was all gone. Yeah, hope I was gone. And, you know, I'd be dealing with that instead for that day. So I really liked the variety of it. Plus, having that ability to connect with people. So I got to connect with leaders and help them in their role, I got to connect with people who were, I worked in manufacturing type environment, so I got to work with people who are working on the floor. And then you know, I got to be at meetings with the CEOs. So it was I got such a variety of everything in what I did all day in the people I worked with. And so I think that was a huge thing for me, I really enjoyed it.   Michael Hingson  07:14 What exactly does an HR person or will take you an HR manager do what what is the job.   Lisa Wilson  07:22 So this changes all the time. So they I've noticed now when I am not looking for a job, but they pop up in LinkedIn and stuff to let you know, and they've changed the name to like people and culture or engagement officers, things like that. So the role has, I don't think the role itself has changed from what I know, but they just changed the name to in the hopes of making it sound a little bit better. My definition was this, we have in all companies that that grow like that you have people working for you, that's the humans and and you're they are a resource to the company. So you need those humans, they're doing what they're doing. And I say the the reason it's called Human Resources is we need to recognize that the people working for us our resource, they are getting us to where we need to in the company, but we still need to treat them like human beings. And so HR makes sure that that happens. So there's a constant balance when you're working in HR of taking care of the business and making sure the business is moving forward. Because at the end of the day, if the business isn't making money, all those people are gonna lose their job anyway, eventually, so you need that needs to happen. But then you also have to take care of your people, if you can't take care of your people so well that you know, you don't make any money that you can't make that you can't sort of treat them so badly, that you're making a ton of money, but they're not going to stay. So there's it was a constant balance I say that you're looking at so probably the other reason I liked it is is there was that constant. Okay, how do we make sure the business runs, but still take care of our staff.   Michael Hingson  08:54 One of the things about society that still very much exists today, when we talk about diversity in, in the workforce and so on, is a disabilities tend to be left out, we just still don't see the same level. And I specifically deal of course with blindness, but it goes beyond that. And and I have found in a lot of us have found that HR people tend to be a reflection of society. How are you going to do this job or we we just aren't convinced that you could could possibly do the work. And some of us have the view that HR was supposed to be kind of a little bit more open than that. But it doesn't always work that   Lisa Wilson  09:42 way. So I think that it's like anything else. Some of us are different than others. And while some are better at it, some are, you know, terrible at it. And I think it's that whole balance of we still have to take care of the company but we also need to take care of our people. So And where does that balance fit in? I heard a really great presentation about this. And, and the reality is, if there's like for you, you can't see the world isn't set up for you. And so you are, for lack of a better term smarter than the rest of us. Because every day you have to make tougher decisions than we do. And you've learned to be adaptive. And so this the presentation was basically that and it was actually a person who I believe he was hard of hearing. I don't think he was deaf. I think he was hard of hearing. Because he came in he spoke to us. And, and we were able to ask questions, but I don't I'm not I can't remember exactly how they got the questions to him. And he ran a Tim Hortons. And he talked about that, that, you know, he was he really worked really hard to make sure he hired people with with disabilities. And he told us the story of a woman who was was also deaf, and she was completely deaf and was working at Tim Hortons. Really smart woman, like had a really great education, but couldn't get a job anywhere, for exactly the reasons you're saying is that they that the HR people or the company themselves, sometimes the HR, people are fighting for it, just so you know. But sometimes it's an uphill battle, and we have to pick our battles. And so she I can't remember what Her background was, but like science based kind of thing. She was working at Tim Hortons, and she had been helping in the front, I think. And then she said, Well, I'd like to be a baker. And he kind of said, What you said was, okay, great. We use audible tones to tell us when everything's done. So go in the kitchen and take a look around and see how you might figure that out. She came back within two minutes. And she said, what's the numbers on the on the ovens? And he said, Oh, it's a countdown timer. And she said, so the audible noises are for the lazy bakers. He said, yep. And he moved her in because there he forgot that that was there. She didn't she didn't even need anything special. The numbers were there, she could see them.   Michael Hingson  12:03 There's a television show here in the United States. That wasn't on last year. And I don't know whether it will return. It's called What will you What would you do? Have you heard of that? Yes, I have. Yeah. So it's a show where they create situations. And there is an actor who comes in and, and plays a part. And maybe there's more than one actor. And then the idea is to see how people around them react. And in the first year of the show, to deaf people went to a coffee shop. And this was all created by what would you do? And John can Jonas and also the Rochester is this too for the deaf. And so the the scenario was there was a guy behind the counter of barista who was an actor in this case. And there were there were two people who are deaf and one was applying for a job at the at the coffee place. And so they went in and they, this person went to the counter and said, I want to apply for a job. And of course, the whole idea was to put every roadblock in her way that he could. And so she said I want to apply for a job, but well, but you know, I'm not sure that you'd be a good fit here. Well, well, why not? Well, you can't hear and well, this is a kitchen job, right? Well, it is. And sometimes I need to give orders and I need you to be able to hear them well be you could write them down, but I don't have time to write them down. And this went on for a while. And there were some people who just ignored it and some people who paid attention. And finally, and this was kind of I think the interesting part of the segment, three people pulled the barista aside. They were HR people for a company. And what they said to him was, look, you're handling this all wrong, these people have more rights than anyone else. If it's not a fit, you just take the application, you don't argue and you're right, not a good fit on the application, and then you let them go. And that happens in one way or another all too often. And, of course they it showed up they didn't reveal those people's names. And there was there was another woman in the shop who really hit the roof over the whole thing. And of course John King Jonas came in and explained who he was and what was going on. And so it was addressed, but but the reality is that what most people don't understand is hiring persons with disabilities ought to be and making reasonable accommodations should be part of the cost of doing business. And it's just as much a part of the cost of doing business as somebody's paying for the electric bill. So there can be lights for all of you like dependent sighted people to be able to see in a building, or providing computer monitors or providing that fancy Do coffee machines so that people can go to the lunchroom and get coffee. providing reasonable accommodations should be just as much a part of the cost of doing businesses that, but we're not there yet. And that's unfortunate.   Lisa Wilson  15:14 We are. I mean, we're getting there. I know in Canada, we have rules around that. So if you if your building is not, I'm not coming up with the right word, but if your building doesn't have say, a ramp and things like that, so it's not accessible, there's the word. So if your buildings not accessible, and you do a bunch of renovations, you are required now to make it accessible while you're renovating. There are some buildings still that, you know, aren't there, but we actually had, I'm loving the new generation, the generation that's coming up, they're just so so thoughtful. We had a school in our town build ramps for all the the downtown businesses that don't have ramps, and, and they just built wooden ramps, they're simple wooden ramps. And so that that made their buildings accessible.   Michael Hingson  16:05 well made, it made the interesting building accessible, of course, yes, yeah, who knows about the doorways and who knows about counters and other things like that? And then, of course, who knows about whether, you know, other things were but but yeah, I hear what you're saying.   Lisa Wilson  16:19 But it's, but it's a start. Right. So and there's a start? And where I see is that it came from the next generation? It was high school kids. Yeah. So So for me, I'm like, Okay, that's good. We're coming around. I think the I think there's a lot of education needed. And I think that's, that's the piece that needs to come as there's we there's are so there is also a requirement to accommodate. And the problem is how we get there, right? So it's, you have to get in the door. And that's the problem is when we can't get in the door, then then the the next issue comes up. Once someone's there, so say someone works for us, something happens, they go blind, we're required, then to make sure that their workplace is accessible. We can't just fire, it's not a thing. In some cases, in Canada, in some cases, that does happen, it's not they don't get fired, they get retrained, we have systems in Canada, that will retrain you for certain things. If the job really, you can't do that job anymore, because the reality where I worked, like I said, I was in working in manufacturing type places. So they were very dependent that you could see there was moving equipment, things like that. So was it would have been safe to have someone. But what happened is say they something happened and they had something come up, then we were required to accommodate them, which meant either move them around in the company, and at the last resort was they would be retrained to work, possibly somewhere else or possibly with us.   Michael Hingson  17:52 So of course, the idea behind the idea behind moving equipment and so on not being safe is also still relative, there may very well be ways to address that issue, just like there were ways for the person at Tim Hortons to be able to, you know, and the problem is that sometimes none of us know the ways. So it doesn't mean that they're not there. And it doesn't mean that they are. But we need to be open. And I agree with you that our next generation is tending to be more open, at least while they're in high school and college. And then I guess we'll see what happens once they move beyond that. And that could be   Lisa Wilson  18:33 louder about it, though, to be louder about it. They really do. I really, they they've done a lot of really good things. And they seem to be louder about it. So I do hope that they hold on to that. And I think because they are changing the adults mind. Great. So how do we change a society? One of the one of one of the big tricks we use is change the kids. Because then like when we wanted recycling, where it was it sold as much was sold to the kids. And then the kids came home and guilt their parents into   Michael Hingson  19:07 recycling. Right. Yeah.   Lisa Wilson  19:09 And so the parents because the kids are learning the parents are learning.   Michael Hingson  19:13 Did this. Go ahead?   Lisa Wilson  19:15 Oh, no, I was just gonna say so it's, it's starting. And then but you're right. I think that that imagination so. So like I said, anyone who's living with a disability, they're they're already more creative. The reality is because you have to be because because we built the world for the light. I love that term, the light dependent. The world is built for the light dependent. And, and we can't imagine the problem is we can imagine how does it work? How does it work then? Like I'm thinking about so when you said that, you know, maybe there were ways so I was starting to think about okay, so how did that how would I have? How would I have protected someone out on the shop floor when? When there's you know Like forklifts moving around quite a bit and things like that. And, and we had lots of protections. So there's probably some of the jobs maybe we needed to protect them getting to and from, because we couldn't put up barriers because it would get in the way of the forklift. But we could protect them getting to and from, like, have someone take them out to their job, but then we had so many protections, you're right, they could have done it.   Michael Hingson  20:21 But the issue is, why do we, why do we need protections it's all about listening to. And yeah, the fact is that, that that people do work in manufacturing environments and forklift situations and so on. The other part about it is learning how those things work. And I know of a number of manufacturing facilities, where there are people who are blind, who are part of the, the everyday work, and forklifts drive around and don't run over people. It's all about listening to Yeah, it is true that most people can't imagine that unfortunately, in the case of light dependency, reasonable accommodation has been taken to the max. I mean, the reality is 160 years ago, or whenever it was, was done, Thomas Edison invented the electric light bulb, to give you guys light in what otherwise might have been dark situations. And now everyone has lights, but it doesn't change the fact that the disability of needing to have those lights is still there. And so you, you deal with being able to drive forklifts because you have lights in the building, and you have other lights on the forklift and so on. But that's still a reasonable accommodation, in one sense for a disability. And I and I've sometimes talk about that in a in a facetious way, but the reality is, it is true. And we need to learn to become more inclusive in some way. Yes, yeah, we do. Know what I was gonna gonna say earlier when you're trying to buy kids and change society by changing the children. The dates me but the old joke. Yeah, the problem is that the only ones who could ever run VCRs were kids, no adults could never figure out how to do this. That's true. So so there you go. So you know, maybe there is some things adults will never learn. So what did we do? We came up with different technology. We don't use VCRs anymore, but I don't know whether they're whether all the new technologies are all that much easier in some senses, but people figure them out. Yeah.   Lisa Wilson  22:25 We all eventually figure it out. Yeah, one way or another. But yeah, I agree. I think I think some of it I just can't even imagine, right, we had dumb, we did have someone who was losing their hearing in where I was working. There's lots of really awesome tools. Now. I found the coolest headphones that so so he couldn't wear his the so we all work ear protection. So the rest of us wear ear protection so that we didn't lose our hearing. And so for him, he needed something. But as soon as we then protected his hearing, he went completely deaf. So that didn't help. Right. So now we're protecting him and making it worse. So we found these really neat headsets that instead of it being like something blocking inside your ear, it was a you know, something went over your head, and they had a microphone in it and the microphone in it would take away all of the other sound. And so I went out and try them, they unfortunately didn't end up working for him. They just didn't they couldn't make the the sound loud enough for him. So we figured out other things, we had some lights for him and things like that, where he was he was very, he was very well protected. So it wasn't, you know, he wasn't going to be in the way of, of, of anything of forklifts or anything like that, that he might not have heard the noise. Like the whole building itself was very loud. But I was like, there's so many things and until you are in the situation, you have to look it up. And that's why I say the problem is getting people in the door. Because if I never if that gentleman hadn't been losing his hearing, I I would never sent my nurse to do the research.   Michael Hingson  24:01 Right along. How long ago was this? Oh, it   Lisa Wilson  24:04 was I left that company in 2008.   Michael Hingson  24:08 Okay, so but if Yeah, there are there are so many advances that are that are coming up their bone conduction headphones so that it completely bypasses the ear. And that may be some of what you were you were talking about. But and those have even gotten better. That fact is what what a number of people have discovered is that rather than having bone conduction headphones, and in fact I'm using them now it's they're much less visible, but they actually sit right in front of your ear. And it completely goes through the bone and doesn't even go into the ear at all. But what we also know is that you can even get better sound and better bone conduction by having something that sits behind the ear because then you're not going through so much of the bone, you're going through more of the soft tissue. And the audio from those kinds of technologies is incredible. And the reality is, in both cases, what it does is it bypasses what is usually the problem for a person who is deaf or hearing impaired they they bypass the ears and go straight into the the eardrum or pass the eardrum to the central part of the nerves for hearing.   Lisa Wilson  25:26 So cool. And see, it's all there. We just like I said, unaware, just unaware, and it's until we learn, right? So like I said it now, I don't I've never had anyone who has tried to come and work there who had a disability like that, like it just it wasn't a thing. Because most people just, I don't know, it just didn't come up. And maybe because our whole town, it's a smaller town wasn't as adaptable. But I've Well, I don't know that that's the case we had, we had a physio who was blind to and he was fine. He's, he's able to go through the, you know, the town was okay for him. But yeah, I think what happens is, there's more supports in larger cities, and so that we don't see it as much in the smaller places. But we also   Michael Hingson  26:13 oftentimes try to create more fixes than we need to. You know, we don't we don't need every traffic signal in a town to make a noise so that you know, when the light is changed, the reality is you can listen to the traffic. And unfortunately, sometimes people rely too much on the traffic signals. And so Oh, it's beeping, so it must be safe to go. No, it doesn't mean it is safe to go. It only means it's supposed to be your turn. You still have to listen to the traffic just as well, I would have to listen to the traffic, just as you would have to watch the traffic.   Lisa Wilson  26:52 Yes. Yeah. And I think I don't think that's a thing for just people who have who are hard of hearing or can't see, I think that's a problem for drivers as well. You know, we don't pay attention, you don't look for everything.   Michael Hingson  27:07 I think the time is coming when autonomous vehicles will basically take over and will take driving out of the hands of drivers, which may not be such a bad thing the way people drive today.   Lisa Wilson  27:16 Yes, true. We had a friend of mine was hit by a car for exactly that reason that you're saying is is she was walking at when the thing said walk and someone had an opportunity to turn left and he turned left and didn't pay attention to the fact that she was walking. And that's exactly it an end for us. What I say is it's it's it's not lazy. It's that we're not used to it. There's not a ton of pedestrians in our downtown getting a little bit more so now but so we we don't think to do it. Whereas like I go downtown Toronto and I am on high alert the whole time I'm there because there's pedestrians, there's people driving, there's, you know, there's so many things happening that you're on high alert, whereas here, we sort of get complacent because there isn't that high traffic and people,   Michael Hingson  28:02 which is a good thing. Yeah. The thing is in like where I live in Victorville drivers are becoming more and more aggressive every day, if you're not moving fast enough, even if you're driving, you're not going fast enough for them, they honk at you, they're just impatient. They're aggressive. And that leads to problems we are we are not what we used to call defensive drivers anymore, which is unfortunate because we weirs in such a hurry. We miss out on a lot of things anyway. But we also make life less safe for everyone when we do that.   Lisa Wilson  28:35 Yeah. And I think well, I was hopeful that kind of people having to slow down a little bit in the last couple of years, because we weren't going as many places that it might, it might help some of that to keep people but I don't know that it has.   Michael Hingson  28:50 Well, so how long did you stay in the HR world?   Lisa Wilson  28:54 I think officially like I think it was 17 years.   Michael Hingson  29:00 And then what caused you to switch.   Lisa Wilson  29:02 So I had a couple of really good experiences, I worked for some really good companies. And then I once I took the management role, I sort of had a series of less than stellar companies to work for, we'll call it and the last one was the absolute worst for me. And it just got to a point I was only there three years. But I how I put it as I was a terrible hire for them. They should never have hired me. And the reality was I think they were desperate at the time they had been searching for someone for a while. And probably I should have known better too. So it's not all and then but when I was in the interview, they said things to me like we were discussing different things I'd done because I'd worked for lots of different companies by this point. And so I had some really good tips and tools and ways to organize things because I'd learned from all these different companies. And when I was in the interview, the woman kept saying, Oh, that's great. We need someone like he was ideas. We need to change some things. We need all those ideas. And then once I got there, what they would say to me Is assimilate, Lisa. So IE don't give us your ideas. We don't care about your ideas, just do what you're told. And that's not me. That's not who I am. And that's not what made me great at HR will get made me great at HR was that ability to go in and go, Okay, how do we fix this? And this isn't working, right, let's make it better. And they were just such a large organization that that wasn't what they were looking for. And it really took its toll on me. Really, initially, when I left, I was not a leadership coach, I walked away from HR completely on had nothing to do with businesses, it was just going to life coach, just just like coaching, which is not my passion. And it took me quite a while to come back from that note took about about three years. And then thankfully, I was paid really well. So thankfully, they they did a reorganization. And then that reorg i was i My position was let go, which I have never been more grateful for anything. It's not a normal reaction to a layoff.   Michael Hingson  31:03 Right? Yeah. Well, what what does a life coach do? So? Well? How's that for an open ended question? Yeah.   Lisa Wilson  31:16 So the reality is each, most of the time coaches will have a niche that they they go for, like, they want to work with people who are struggling with a particular thing. And it usually comes from our life, right? So something in our life that we've overcome, and we help others walk through the same thing, so that they don't have to necessarily walk through it alone. Many of people who are in coaching are part because they found a coach that helped them through something. And so now they're doing the same. And really, that's where mine came from, as well. One of the jobs I was working out as I was getting really frustrated, and I met a coach and I ended up going and getting some coaching and then taking her coaching course. So that's where this came from. And I always had the goal. So when I left that job, I always knew I was going to start a coaching company, I just My intention was always to be a leadership coach. So we working more with CEOs. And that was always my goal. But after having been there for three years, it just rocked my confidence so much that I stepped completely away from anything to do with HR.   Michael Hingson  32:19 And then you eventually went back to what your your passion lunch, which was leadership coaching,   Lisa Wilson  32:24 exactly I did. And I do some HR consulting as well. But what I see I focus more on the culture. And I have to be careful how I say that. Because when people hear that they think I talk about help people working with different cultures come together, right? But that's not the idea. Every company culture, yeah, every company has its own culture. And if you're not paying attention to what that is, the culture creates itself. And then it becomes a really difficult thing to change.   Michael Hingson  32:50 Well along the way, then we haven't really referred to it, but you had an unexpected life change. And so why don't you tell us a little bit about that? Because I think that that will make that will make for interesting thought provoking discussions here.   Lisa Wilson  33:07 Yes. So the after just after coming out of that job, so I don't know if this is part of the reason is the stress at that job was quite high. And I often had odd illnesses while I was working there. So just different things would come up. I'm not the type of person that gets like a flu and just lies down I might get like a skin rash, or something that actually comes from a virus because my body is tired, and I'm so stressed. So I had lots of those little things. And I got to a point a doctor had said to me, Look, if you can't, if you can't take like, can you take a vacation? And I said, Yes, I can actually I was looking at vacations as as I was sitting waiting to come in here and he said, Okay, he said, because if you can't, I'm I'm, I'm putting you off on sick leave. And so I did, I went away, but very shortly after working there, they discovered they had been watching they discovered a lump on my thyroid, and they've been watching it. Now, I need to clarify this right at the beginning is that women typically have lumps on our thyroid. If you're into the spiritual side, it's a heart chakra or it's your throat chakra. And so you know not to be using our voices is part of what comes that comes from this, but that's the sort of spiritual side of it. But women typically have them they can be cancerous, they can be non cancerous, they're just lumps on our thigh, right? They show up and they are not harmful. They grow really, really slowly. So even if they are cancerous, it takes them a really long time to grow. So I did have one they were watching. And six months after I left this place, they thought that that lump had grown for some reason from 2.4 centimeters to 4.2 centimeters and six months. And that's unheard of. They didn't understand why that was happening. They that that didn't make any sense for it to grow that quickly. Was was ridiculous. So they said to me, Look, we think we need to take it out. It's growing too fast, that's it's very bizarre, best thing to do is just take it out, it will harm you, you'll be fine, you'll come back to full, you know, you'll be fine. The rest of the other half will, will pick up, and it'll do what it needs to do and your body will be fine. So I have, I said, Okay, you can put me on the list. And I had a panic attack sometime shortly after that. And it was one of those moments where I just there was this voice in my head that said, do not have the surgery, don't have the surgery. And I thought, and I pushed it away. I went, No, Lisa, don't be ridiculous. You don't like it's he's a great doctor. He is a great doctor, the man that took care of me as a wonderful doctor. So I have nothing bad to say about him.   Lisa Wilson  35:44 I just pushed it away. But I think I told my mom. And so we went and got a second opinion. And I went to the second opinion, the second time I didn't do what I needed to do was I had a disk with all of my scans on it. And I didn't give it to the second opinion doctor, he just felt my throat, he felt the lump. And he said, Look, there's a lump there, don't be afraid, it's not going to be a big deal. You know, go get the surgery. And I had that that disc and I didn't give it to him. I did have the surgery that took out half my thyroid, he the doctor is wonderful. He's he learns. So he made a mistake once where he got in and found out that a woman had was cancerous, because he can tell by looking he's done so many. And he needed to take the whole thyroid out. So he made us sign he made me sign before he went into the surgery that if he finds cancer on either on the other side that he can do take the whole thing out. So he's so he's that's why I say I have just really high thoughts to this doctor. So we did it was fine. No, I didn't need to take the other one out. When he took it out. He said it's fine. The lump wasn't cancerous. You're okay. You know, you'll heal, it'll be fine. I didn't though, for for years after I went from the person who did p90x and CrossFit, and mountain biking, and kayaking, and I could you know, spend a whole day running or doing whatever I've done, I've actually done a half marathon as well. Not my favorite thing. But I went from that person to a person who could do 10 minutes of exercise. And if I do any more, I burned myself out. And worse than that was when the doctor so right after the surgery, he said, you're good to go. It wasn't cancerous, you'll be okay. And that was the other piece I forgot to mention is they don't even even if it's cancerous, they don't even look at the, at your thyroid until it's at least four centimeters. And then they start to watch more closely. So anything under that they just leave because it's healthier for you to keep it there than it is to have it taken out. So he when I went back for the follow up after the surgery, he said to me, he sat and he had his his hands over his face. So he was kind of like all of his fingers were splayed at the top of his forehead and he had his hands on his knees, elbows on his knees, and was holding himself up. And he just and I thought why does he look like that? Like he looked distressed? I thought okay, why does he look like that? He told me it wasn't cancerous. Why? Why does he look like that. And the reason he looked like that is because it was a mistake. That lump had not grown. We think it was a typo. So they took out half my thyroid on a typo. And it was obviously very shocking and upsetting because I was also supposed to come back to full energy and I never did. So for quite some time I spoke someone else who had her phone had the full thing taken out. She said Lisa, it'll take you about a year. So don't don't push it for the first year, just accept that you're going to be a little less energy, but after a year, but I never came back. So now I can do. I walk my dog for 20 minutes in the morning, which I never considered walking exercise before now. That was just something you did to get from place A to place B. But now it's I fully that's like I can walk the dog and then do 10 minutes of some other form of exercise that includes like yoga or the or Pilates or something that's a little bit what I would refer to as easier when when you're doing p90x And CrossFit. I'm used to doing like pull ups and really big things like that. So doing Pilates and stuff was fairly easy for me or used to be. Now it's just does the same thing and burns me right out. I could so initially I could get through the workouts, but then I would spend the next two days on the couch because my my adrenals would be so Bert.   Michael Hingson  39:36 There were not medications that you could take to kind of offset some of the lack of what the thyroid produces.   Lisa Wilson  39:45 Yes, so there is something called Synthroid they we tried it twice so they put me on what they would normally start someone on, which I think is like point five, I can remember what the measurement is but they put me on whatever it was point five. And I What happened is it made me really hyper. And I realized about a month in, I was like, I was walking the dog. And I was like, I want to run, like my heart wanted me to run. And I started to run up the road. And then I was like, this isn't a good idea, I haven't run in a year, I shouldn't I need to be careful, I'm going to, like, I'm gonna hurt my muscles like, this isn't a good idea, right? You shouldn't just start from a sprint, that's not a good choice for your body. And, and then I became really agitated. So it wasn't a very nice person. I had a friend over one day, and she said something to me. And I snapped at her. And that's totally not my personality. I thought, okay, that's bizarre. And so I went off of it, I told him when it happened, and I went off of it. So then we left it for a month or so. And I tried it again, but now at a lower dose. So now 2.25. And all that happened is it took me two months to get there. So they my doctor didn't really want to put me on it. He said that my my thyroid numbers are fine. So according to Western medicine, I'm completely healthy. And it took me a really long time. Even I switched doctors after a while it took me a long time to convince the next doctor that there was a problem and get her to start sending me to different specialists to try and figure out what was going on. It took like two or three years actually to get her to pay attention. She just assumed which is a thing in in medical worlds that if a woman is tired, She's depressed. And so I was the first thing she said to me, are you depressed? And I said, Well, no, I didn't. I gave her the benefit of the doubt because she was a new doctor. I said, look, okay, maybe I am depressed. What would we do? I won't go on medication right away. That's not something I want to do. If I were depressed, what would we do? And she said, Well, cognitive behavioral therapy. I said, Okay, is that me sitting on the couch on those days that I can't move saying, It's okay. Your life is good. You're just tired. And she I said, repeating that to myself? She goes, Oh, yeah, that's exactly what that is. And I said, Okay, so I'm a life coach. So I know those two those tips. And she was like, Oh, okay. But even that she didn't, you know, she didn't move on. She didn't send me to any student look it up. She didn't send me anything. And I then But then what started to happen is, I have the propensity for high cholesterol and diabetes, both runs in my family, and I know this, I've known it for years, I don't believe that it's a something that's going to happen to you. You can fight it with how you live your life. So I had known this and I always thought it was my diet and exercise. But because the exercise was gone. I wasn't able to I was starting to have high a one a one C or H. I can't remember what it is. But anyway, the the blood sugar basically was my blood. I want to see how anyone see. Yeah. So my blood sugar was going up. And with the cholesterol numbers were starting to go up. And it was when she came to me with the with the cholesterol numbers. She said, you're just at the point where you need medication when you take medication. I said absolutely not. She said, Okay. And I said, Look, I've been telling you for years, I can't exercise. I can't do more than 10 minutes or a burnout. My cholesterol is going up because I can't exercise. And she said she was like, okay, and even that didn't get to her because I was annoyed with her. So then the next time I went in, I said to her look, I'm gonna give you an example of what's going on in my life. My grandmother at the time, had dementia and lived close to me. My parents were about an hour away. She fell and broke her hip and was in the hospital. So my parents called and said, Can you go to the hospital? I said, Absolutely. So I went straight to the hospital. My dad got in the car. He met with me about two hours later. So my 77 year old father, and I was in my early 40s. Drove the hour we both stayed in the hospital till midnight. At that time, they decided to keep my grandmother so we both came home. I made up a bed who got to bed about one in the morning. He got up the next morning at seven I got up with him. He had breakfast, did what he needed. And he went back to the hospital to be with my grandmother. I had worked that day. But I thankfully didn't have any clients till the afternoon because he got up. He went to take care of my grandmother got her settled and then drove home. I on the other hand, couldn't handle the day and went back to bed. So that and I said, you know when my 75 year old father can handle less sleep than I can. There's a problem. And that was when she finally went Oh, and she heard me. But it took years   Michael Hingson  44:30 who was awful. And and then what happened.   Lisa Wilson  44:33 So she did start sending me to different specialists. But still according to Western medicine, I am completely healthy. There are no numbers that are off there are no as far as they're concerned. I've seen several different specialists that don't have any thyroid illnesses. So they've checked different things. They've checked for fibromyalgia, they've checked for all of these different things and I don't meet any of them. So as according to Western medicine, I'm completely healthy. So what? So what I started to do was go off of Western medicine. And I've been seeing naturopaths actually, the the first big step for me was, I eventually did get to a point where I actually was starting to get depressed. Depression, for me doesn't look like what people pictured in depression, which is like you're sitting in the bed and you can't move and, and that kind of things. That's not what it looks like for me. For me, depression looks like a overwhelm, and I get angry faster. So I have very little patience. And I'm still getting up and doing what I need to do, because I'm so action oriented and so driven, that I'm still getting up and doing what I need to do. But I'm not a very kind person in that. I'm just grumpy and overwhelmed and tired. And I just got to a point where when I recognized it was I the word the thought went through my head that I just wanted to die at this point, I'm done, I'm done fighting this, I can't get any help I need. And my mom told me about a woman that some friends of ours had been working with, and she's what they call a medical intuitive. And so you just go on a call with her, and she sort of reads what's going on with you. And so she gave me a couple of things. One was that my body was full of Candida, we all have Candida, but if you get an overgrowth, you you'll get pains in your muscles and different things. So that was the first one. So she she suggested a cleanse to clean that up. And then a diet a big diet change. And so she that was my first step. And then after doing the cleanse, I just felt so much better. I literally had pain in all over my body all the time. And I thought it was because I couldn't do exercise anymore where I couldn't stretch and couldn't do that stuff. But it really it was this overgrowth of Candida.   Michael Hingson  46:40 So yeah, go ahead. What did you do?   Lisa Wilson  46:44 So that was the first step was, was really big change in my diet. I also started then seeing naturopaths, who helped me through a few other things. So what how the naturopath there's no really tests for this. But what they describe is that my adrenals burn out really quickly. So I use adrenaline when I was so when I was tired, my body was using adrenaline to push me forward, and then my adrenaline burns out. And I've got no natural energy to keep going. We don't normally use our adrenaline to keep going. But that's what I was doing every day just to be able to move through the day. And so when I was doing that, that heavy exercising, that's what was happening is I was just I my body would shoot a whole pile that pile of adrenaline in my system. And then it had nothing left for two days. So I've learned that and I've sort of accepted now that I won't ever be able to do the p90x or CrossFit or any of those things anymore. I do my little 10 minute workouts, when I have the energy for it. If I don't have the energy for it, I walked the dog and I stopped. And that's the end of the exercise of just sort of had to accept a new way. And then I have to be prepared if I'm doing anything. So for example, It's summer now I like to go kayaking. So I'll go kayaking for maybe a half hour but then I have to recognize that then the following day. I shouldn't have anything big plant   Michael Hingson  48:02 or get a kayak with a motor. Yeah.   Lisa Wilson  48:06 Yeah, it's not it's not really the same but yes. Yeah.   Michael Hingson  48:10 Just just an alternative you know? Or, or just save money and take a big cruise.   Lisa Wilson  48:18 Yes, that too. But we do need some exercise. Regardless, I need some kind of exercise. Yeah.   Michael Hingson  48:26 But are you are you able to do things for any longer period of time are there things from Eastern medicine, other kinds of alternatives that helped me be bring back some of that stamina or nothing that you've discovered yet.   Lisa Wilson  48:41 So the one thing that did get better is when I when I do the cleanse, and then I eat clean for a long time and so clean, I wanted to just be clear that clean looks different for everyone. For me, it means something savory instead of sweet for breakfast. And it doesn't matter if I'm using like non sugary breakfast, like even just an apple. If I have too much sugar in the morning, I'll crave it all day. Even a carb so if I'm I pretty close to keto. It's, I say close but I don't some of the things I don't like in keto or how much fat and that is in there. So I'm I'm basically I'm a meat and veg person now. Even breakfast like breakfast is all fry up a bunch of vegetables and whatever meat we eat that night kind of thing. Or the night before whatever's whatever's available or just through some ground beef in it if we don't have anything reasonable. So that's helpful for me if and then staying off sugar and carbs. My body can handle them, but it will it will send me again into a slump. So really learn what to   Michael Hingson  49:44 eat or stay away from it. So your life your life has changed significantly. How long ago was the surgery?   Lisa Wilson  49:53 So in 2014, it was it was literally the year I got laid off and was trying to start my business I started to have no energy, maybe the worst possible time to have no energy. So 2014 It's almost been 10 years. It's been. It's been a long, 10 years. And I'm recognizing recently, how much I've changed in it. Because when it was first happening, I like I was fighting it, right. I just kept trying, I was like, No, I can build back up to this exercise. So I would do 10 minutes, and the next week, I would do 20. And then I would, you know, try and build up, and then I would fall apart again. So no, it never worked. And, and that was frustrating. For me, for a very driven person who's very action oriented, it was really, really frustrating. So my mental health wasn't good. And the state of my mind wasn't good, I'll say. So there was just a chi was like, literally in a constant battle with my own body. And how I say I've come around now is that haven't been as careful recently, we were doing some remodeling in the house. So we weren't planning meals as well and things. And just, you know, life took over. And so I started eating things that I probably shouldn't be eating, but they were quick, and they were easy. So I started to see the problems come around again. And there were so many like, it would take me hours to tell you all the things, but some of the things were like pain in my body from for no reason. I had trouble sleeping, I had a really hard time sleeping. And on those nights, and it would be that my adrenaline kicked in at the wrong time. So so I'd be tired all afternoon. And then when it's time to go to bed at you know, 910 o'clock, the adrenaline would kick back in. So, so then I'd be wide awake. And when in those moments, I was angry, because I was stressing about the following day, how am I gonna run a business if I can get to sleep at night, and you know, I would stress through it. And over the last little while where I watched my watch some of this come back where I'm lying in bed and I can't sleep. It's been maybe the last two or three years where that'll happen again, sometimes when I'm just you know, life happens, and I'm just not paying attention as well, or I go somewhere that you don't have as much control over food, you know, you're eating whatever is available to you. And I discovered now that instead of, you know, freaking out or, or getting upset or stressing about what's going to happen, the next day is my mind just goes okay, go read a book. And I'll get up and I'll go read a book, I've now bought an e reader. So you don't actually have to get out of bed and turn on the light, I can just use the e reader. So I'm not waking up my boyfriend. But I just read the book until I actually want to sleep. And then I sleep when I sleep. And I I never booked my days so full that I can't have a nap in the middle of the day or have a rest somewhere in the middle of the day. So I just have allowed that to happen. And then if I need a nap, I take a nap. So what   Michael Hingson  52:50 are you doing now for work?   Lisa Wilson  52:52 So I work, I work for myself. I work I do the life coaching or not the life coaching, the leadership coaching, and I work from home. So that's why I say I've never booked my days so much that I have like one thing after another, there's always at least a half an hour between things. So worst case, I can have a 10 minute nap. And that helps. It's partly planning in my life. But it's also just where my mindset is gone. So that even if I knew I had that time the following day. Previously, I was so angry that my body wasn't doing what it was supposed to do that I couldn't get through it. And now I just go, Oh, well can't sleep Mazal read my book.   Michael Hingson  53:30 So you progressed a lot, you certainly could have become very bitter over all this that have happened to you. And you don't sound like you're a very bitter person.   Lisa Wilson  53:39 No, I'm talking. I think. I think there have been times I mean, I work lots with us, you know, the like you said the Eastern medicine and things. So I've done can't think of what it's called the little needles in it. The names that. Yeah, I've done acupuncture, and I do a lot of meditating. And I do lots of things like that. And I spoke to a woman one time who does a modality we'll call them where she works through things that are going on in your body. And basically our bodies Hold on, because we're not very good at dealing with our emotions, our bodies will hold emotions. And so her thing was, it was very an interesting process. It was just on Zoom, and she works through with me. And the she doesn't know me. She doesn't know my story. She said around this time, and she gave me the age that I had the surgery sent around this age in your life. You have horror stuck in your body. That's like horror. She said yeah. And I was like, that makes sense. I mean, someone telling you they took out a piece of your body on a on a typo. That's horrifying, really is. And so I've done lots of work with those kinds of things as well. But I also hold the belief that really, we can work through anything that we Anything that the that the world hands us, right? Like we can we can work it through, we can figure it out. But but the, the grief that comes with that, in some cases is is worse than what we realize. So the grief for me was it took me that long to grieve, who I used to be and come into acceptance of, okay, I'm not the p90x person anymore. That's not who I am. But letting go of like, it was a huge part of my personality. I'm strong. I'm strong, I'm strong in a lot of ways. And I'm strong physically it was. So it was such an important part of how I defined myself that I that that time when I was angry and frustrated, and not, you know, angry with the fact that my body wouldn't do what it was doing it. That's grief. That was grief, I wasn't moving through the   Michael Hingson  55:50 grief. And now you have, yeah,   Lisa Wilson  55:53 I have come to accept it, it's still there are moments when it frustrates me or I get angry with myself because I haven't paid close enough attention. And I've gone back to the, you know, the carbs and the things that that don't make me feel good. But they're, they're more fleeting moments now than the overarching, you know, kind of life view all the time.   Michael Hingson  56:12 And what do you do as a leadership coach, so now you're doing that as work and you obviously get hired by companies and teams and people and so on?   Lisa Wilson  56:23 I do. So the premise that I started with this is, and strangely, I had hoped that it would have gotten better now, and I think it has in some companies, but not all, what we do is in a company, we take the best, whatever. So if it's counselors, we take the best counselor, and we make them the executive director, if it's, you know, mechanics, we take the best mechanics, we make them the lead hand, and then the supervisor and then the manager. So whatever the role is, we just take the best of that, and we put them into the leadership role. And that's not really the best way to choose it. Just because they're really good at the role does not mean they'll be able to come up with the skills to be a leader, the skills to be a leader, very different. And so the reason I do what I do is that while some companies are good at sending you on training, what happens when you go on training, and I have tons of examples of this, there's behind me, I have just binders and binders. And that's like the cold version of all the training I've done. But what a company will do is they'll say, Okay, we're gonna send you to leadership training. But that leadership training is four days on one aspect of leadership. And so you, you go, and you go away for four days. And then you come back and your email is full, and everything is full, and you don't have time to integrate the learning. So it's there, but you like to come, you come back, and you put the binder for the shelf and see you later. So So I started, I have a course that I created that goes over, I generally do it over eight weeks, so that people have the time to integrate it. So we meet for an hour a week. And that's it. We I teach a lesson, they go practice it, and then we coach on it. And then when I'm working with leaders, it's more about okay, what is it that you need right now, we'll work through what that is. And then we'll and then you can go and basically practice it we'll work through because we like I said, we just throw leaders into the role, and they might get the training eventually. But it's slowly but surely, and they get it and the binder goes straight up on the shelf, because they don't have time to integrate it.   Michael Hingson  58:23 And sometimes, and sometimes we're lucky and the people we throw into those roles can do it because they're very intelligent people. But all too often they can't, because they don't have the training. And it's not really their style.   Lisa Wilson  58:40 And its end it is our goal. And I recognize this too, because I was there in the HR roles, we think, Okay, we're gonna put that person in, but it's okay, it's good. They've got Lisa, she's in the HR managers role, she can check in on them. But then life hits the fan, and I don't have time as the HR manager to go and support that person, nor does their manager right. Like they want the the heart is there to do it. They just they can't,   Michael Hingson  59:04 which is why what you do is so important today.   Lisa Wilson  59:07 Yeah, yeah. So I can step in from the outside. I'm that person that's there. You know, I'm not the the HR manager who's trying to to, you know, balance everything else that's going on in the company and coach this person, I come in from the outside, when work with the leader. And hopefully, like the goal is is that we then fast track that right? So instead of going to six or seven training courses, though, I still say go to the training courses and get a more in depth but it's now okay, what are you dealing with today? And how are we handling that and then working on giving them the foundations that they need so that when the next problem comes up, they're ready to handle that one too, or they at least know where to pull to make the decision.   59:50 If people want to learn more about you and reach out to you how can they do that?   Lisa Wilson  59:56 Probably best way is my website. It's LMW. So Just my initials Lisa May Wilson coaching.ca.   1:00:04 So LMW coaching.ca, you haven't even had a chance to talk about the fact that you're, you're in three books and you're writing your own book now?   Lisa Wilson  1:00:13 Yes, I am. Yeah. So the course I just briefly mentioned that where I take peo

The Voice of Retail
Wes Hall, the "King of Bay Street" and CBC Dragon, on his new book "No Bootstraps When You're Barefoot"

The Voice of Retail

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 31:33


Welcome to The Voice of Retail. I'm your host Michael LeBlanc. This podcast is brought to you in conjunction with Retail Council of Canada.In an exclusive interview, the one and only Wes Hall join the podcast to talk about his new book "No Bootstraps When You're Barefoot: My rise from a Jamaican plantation shack to the boardrooms of Bay Street." Wes shares his story and advice for retailers on how they can genuinely help black entrepreneurs and adds hints for anyone who winds up in front of him on CBC's Dragon's DenThanks for tuning into this special episode of The Voice of Retail.  If you haven't already, be sure and click subscribe on your favourite podcast platform so new episodes will land automatically twice a week, and check out my other retail industry media properties; the Remarkable Retail podcast, the Conversations with CommerceNext podcast, and the Food Professor podcast.  Last but not least, if you are into BBQ, check out my all new YouTube barbecue show, Last Request Barbeque, with new episodes each and every week!I'm your host Michael LeBlanc, President of M.E. LeBlanc & Company & Maven Media, and if you're looking for more content, or want to chat  follow me on LinkedIn, or visit my website meleblanc.co!  Have a safe week everyone! About WesAs the executive chairman and founder of Kingsdale Advisors, Wes Hall is one of North America's most influential powerbrokers and Canada's preeminent leader in shareholder advisory services, playing pivotal roles on multi-million and billion-dollar transactions for Air Canada, Xstrata, Citigroup, Tim Horton's, PetroCanada and many others. Hall is also the owner of QM Environmental, a leading national environmental and industrial services provider with over 450 employees, among other businesses. An instructor at the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto, he teaches Black Entrepreneurship & Leadership, a first-of-its-kind course in North America; he is the founder of the anti-Black racism initiative, BlackNorth; and in October 2021 became one of the investors on the hit series Dragons' Den.  About MichaelMichael is the Founder & President of M.E. LeBlanc & Company Inc and a Senior Advisor to Retail Council of Canada as part of his advisory and consulting practice. He brings 25+ years of brand/retail/marketing & eCommerce leadership experience and has been on the front lines of retail industry change for his entire career. He has delivered keynotes, hosted fire-side discussions with C-level executives and participated on thought leadership panels worldwide.  Michael was recently added to ReThink Retail's prestigious Top 100 Global Retail Influencers for a second year in  2022. Michael is also the producer and host of a network of leading podcasts, including Canada's top retail industry podcast, The Voice of Retail, plus the Remarkable Retail with author Steve Dennis, Global E-Commerce Tech Talks and The Food Professor with Dr. Sylvain Charlebois.  Most recently, Michael launched Conversations with CommerceNext, a podcast focussed on retail eCommerce, digital marketing and retail careers - all available on Apple, Spotify, Amazon Music and all major podcast platforms.   Michael is also the producer and host of the “Last Request Barbeque” channel on YouTube where he cooks meals to die for and influencer riches.

The Clean Energy Show
Rejecting and Embracing EV Charging in Rural North America

The Clean Energy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 69:12


A small town in Alberta thinks solar panels give off radiation and won't allow an important fast charger be built. But a small Saskatchewan Co-op embraces electrifcation and kindness! Link to video version of the commercial we made for the Riverbend Co-op in Davidson, Saskatchewan to thank them for support electric vehicles. Small modular nuclear reactors will not solve climate change. Loblaws has deployed fully driverless trucks on city streets in Toronto. The upcoming Tesla Cybertruck will work as a boat for short periods of time. My first repair to my 10 year old Nissan LEAF The green community that survived Hurricane Ian and kept the lights on India's home-grown ten thousand dollar EV And in spite of supply chain constraints, EV sales are on track to where they need to by by their 2030 benchmark for global warming Brian and I welcome the long-awaited 3rd party charging to a much needed location where we live. And it has soft serve ice cream! Thanks for listening to our show! Consider rating The Clean Energy Show on iTunes, Spotify or wherever you listen to our show. Follow us on TikTok! Check out our YouTube Channel! Follow us on Twitter! Your hosts: James Whittingham https://twitter.com/jewhittingham Brian Stockton: https://twitter.com/brianstockton Email us at cleanenergyshow@gmail.com Leave us an online voicemail at http://speakpipe.com/cleanenergyshow Transcript Yesterday, the governor announced that all new cars purchased in New York State will be zero emission cars, which is what lawmakers in California mandated in our state last month. This will take effect starting in 2035, if we make it to 2035. And while it's never going to be the same when a cabbie's yelling you to go F yourself from a Nissan Leaf, it's definitely for the best. Hello, and welcome to episode 133 of the Clean Energy Show. I'm Brian Stockton. I'm James Woodtingham. This week, small modular nuclear reactors will not solve climate change. This in spite of the fact one powers Brian's $1700 expression machine. It was only 1400. Loblaws has deployed fully driverless trucks on city streets. In Toronto, there is still a human in the passenger seat. Just as a courtesy so other drivers have someone to give the finger to. We reveal the stupidest place in North America, and it's not wherever Donald Trump is. The upcoming Tesla Cyber truck will work as a boat for short periods of time. If it floats, maybe it can toss a lifeline to the Tesla stock price. Oh, all that admora this edition of the a Clean Energy Show. Brian, we also have this week my first repair. My knees are leaf. It's ten years old. And in spite of supply chain constraints, EV sales are back on track where they need to be by their 2030 benchmark for global warming targets. And Brian and I welcomed the long awaited third party charging to a much needed location where we live. And it has soft serve ice cream. Wow. I can give it the charging long charging sessions with lots of ice cream. All right, so update on my house. We spray foam the ceiling in our kitchen, and it was, like, super messy and dusty for about a week, but the drywallers have finished, so that's now all sealed up, well, drywallers. They have to keep coming back and back over and over again, don't they? Yeah. They don't have to spend a whole day. They come, they do some mudding, they have to let it dry, and they come back and sand do a bit more mudding. So the whole thing took about eight days, which wasn't too bad, but the kitchen was kind of closed off with sheets of plastic, and so we had kind of limited access to our kitchen, which was annoying, but that's now all done. And then next week, they're going to do the other half where the living room is, and so it continues. So we'll have a very wellinsulated ceiling, which is great. Did you eat out a lot? We did a lot of door dashing and that kind of thing. What's your favorite during that time period? Bar burrito. I'm a big fan of bar burrito. What kind of food is that? Mexican burritos and tacos. So what specifically did you eat? I need to know. Ground beef burrito. Ground beef burrito. Classic. Nothing too fancy. Nothing too unusual. But you're Taco Time fan, but you like that. Tell me about that. Yeah, I think, Barbara, it's a little bit more like real food, really. TacoTime is very fast foody kind of thing. But how much more expensive would you say it was? Not 20%. Maybe I should try it. They have multiple locations or just one? No, multiple locations. Let's do it. Barbaros well, we could use a sponsorship on the show, too. Please reach out. Barbarito. Oh, I have another one. Milu. Vietnamese place. It's been here a while, but I just discovered it. Fantastic. Vietnamese vermicelli, noodle bowls. Love it. Amazing. I guess we both got the Bivalent vaccine. Is that what's yeah, I had a lot of side effects. I might still be feeling that after a week. It was mainly one day, but I kind of felt good the second day. But then when I actually did something and then when I mean did something, I mean, go to the fridge or something, I didn't have a lot of stamina. Like, it wore down fairly quickly. It's a good thing I wasn't employed or something. Yeah. So yesterday we had wonderful news because we've talked about the two cities in the province where we live is Regina and Saskatoon. They're two and a half hours away. My son is up there now, coming back on Friday, and he's going to school there. We make lots of trips. You make lots of trips. You make more trips than most people do out there. And it's a great, stupidly great city. It's just I don't know if I've told this story before, but the ones I was doing a madly off in All Directions, a CBC radio comedy series, a one off where I was guesting on stage at the Broadway Theater in front of 500 people with my comedy partner. And we naively. We both grew up in Regina, the sister city kind of, to that city. And we said, we're from Regina, and the whole place booed us. Why? Why would they do that? I had no idea that they hated us just because we have the center of government here. I mean, they have everything else. And my assessment of the situation is the people in Saskatoon have a rivalry with Vagina, but the Regina people don't care. I've always considered them superior. Why would they care? Why would they not just pity us now? They're much bigger. When I was a kid, they were smaller than us. That's right. So the halfway point is a town called Davidson, Saskatchewan, and it got a Tesla V, three supercharger stalls a few years ago, right? Two or three years ago. Yeah, about three years ago, which changed life for Tesla's. People like you could easily go to Saskatoon and top up for the hell of it, or use it in very cold weather when your range is reduced and give you security. It was one of the reasons I bought my Tesla. Was it made that trip by there was no third party charger there for three years. And we've been begging everyone online. I've been Tweeting A and W who says there's these cluster of different businesses. There Tim Hortons, the Esso station, which is one thing at a Dairy Queen, and then there's a across the street there's an ANW, which I sometimes go to. You've gone to the and w, sure you've gone. You've probably done everything there. But up the road there's a Coop gas station, and that's where the supercharger is. That's kind of the Prairie Gas Station, one of the brands that also run grocery stores. So they have that. But they just announced yesterday that they're getting the flow charges, which are 100 kilowatt. Before, these gas stations had different branded chargers, which are 50 kilowatt. And they were always broken, like always. Yeah, the Coop branded ones, yeah. So apparently these flow chargers are, I'm told by the EV Association, a lot more rock solid because it's something we talk about on the show all the time, is the reliability of charging non Teslas like non Tesla charging networks are terrible. And I hear that all the time, especially in the States. It's no different. So I naively expressed regret online yesterday that I wished it was at the place where I go, which is the AEW, and I don't go to the Tim Hortons, but it seems like I might because I enjoy the Tim Hortons donut shop in return. And I found out that the EV people have been trying really hard for years behind the scenes to do something, and I'm not supposed to talk about what went on, but I'm very happy that the co op is in charge. Right, but I also made a joke online when I said that. Why isn't that this other place? They said, Are you disappointed? I said, I'm not disappointed. The Coop responded to me and said, Are you disappointed? I said, no, but I will be reviewing your pizza. Clearly they said they welcomed it. Then they offered to give me free pizza. But is it a review if they give you a free pizza? I mean, is it an honest review if you get something for free? I mean, as a clean energy food critic, I should be going in there in disguise or something. That's just the way it is. Yeah. Okay, well, this is great. I should add, too. So Tesla has finally made the CCS adapter available for tesla vehicles in north America. So 99% of the time, if you've got a Tesla, you're going to charge. It a Tesla station, and there's lots of them, but other cars use the CCS connector, and the adapter is finally available in North America. So if I were stuck some time and the Tesla supercharger wasn't working, I could get this adapter and charge at the flow or charge at the co op or whatever. Anyway, I went to order one online and it said, oh, sorry, your car can't use this yet. We're going to do a retrofit next year. So cars built before a certain date are missing something that the CCS adapter doesn't work. So my car was built just before that date. So sometime next year there'll be a retrofit available and then I'll be able to buy one. So they didn't sell it to me. They're probably trying to control the number of these that go out, and since they know that my car can't use it, they wouldn't sell it. How old is your model? Three? It's about two and a half years old. Two and a half years. Wow. Time flies. It's a quarter of a decade, Brian. Yeah, it really has. Yeah, I guess we had just started the podcast, I think. Oh, right, that's true. There was a couple of months into the pandemic and they did a touchless delivery to you. But I'm not done with the Riverband co op in Davidson because I asked them. I was in a discussion with my son who's going through there on Friday. As I said, if they have fresh donuts, because the co ops are known for great donuts at grocery stores, especially in small towns, they're somehow better in small towns like that. Yeah, for sure. My wife's not right is maybe the best owner sake one outside of the gourmet shop. So anyway, I asked them if they did and they said no. But for you, though, I can say we are discussing it. We are discussing it at the highest levels in the boardroom of the Davidson coop, whether to bring in fresh baking from the grocery store inside town. And I said, well, give us a heads up when you're passing through. At least we could do is get some donors to the grass bar for you. And everyone is just so happy that because without the co op, we would not have charging in Davidson, there was no other possibility to do it. No one willing to do it. So this is incredibly important to EV adoption for people who not only live near there, but live anywhere else, or you're traveling through the province in that direction. And so I'm incredibly grateful to them. And Matthew Pointer from the Sask EV association says this is arguably one of the most important charging locations in the province. So, Brian, what I did, I made them a commercial. Okay? I made the Riverband coop in Davidson a commercial because they deserve it. And here it is. Come to the Riverband Coop gas bar in beautiful Davidson, Saskatchewan, conveniently located on scenic highway eleven. Enjoy our pristine citrus, citrus washrooms as you stop to charge your Tesla, one of our lightning fast superchargers. And for our nontech industry friends, we are pleased to announce 100 kilowatt flow chargers coming in January. If you're still driving a gasguzzler, be assure that we here at coop sell only talk to your gasoline made to the highest Canadian standards. While you're here, satisfy your cravings with fresh cut veggies and sandwiches lovingly made at our grocery store just for you. Or twist it up with a smoothie by mixing a slushy soft drink of your choice with ice cream. Why pee anywhere else? The River Band. Coop in Davidson. More than a gas bar to heavenly oasis on a long road home. This commercials have improved by riverbank Coop flow charges 23 no responsible price screen trips on your floor of the seats. Very nice. So there you go. Free commercial for the Riverband Coop. Put that online, too, in video form. Thank you, Riverband Coop, for being good people. Yeah. And Davidson, Saskatchewan, they still have a newspaper as of a couple of years ago, and they were having a contest to give away the newspaper. I don't know if you remember that I considered, yeah, and you're supposed to write a letter and whoever writes the best letter would get the newspaper. I don't know what ever happened with that. Maybe somebody knows. We'll have to Google. We have a lot of local people listening. Okay, another personal news. The Leaf I had to take in to get fixed because I determined for a long time now, almost a year, that I had this tire noise. And I thought it was because my original tires were wearing out, they were becoming bald, and I thought, okay, no trad, they're becoming noisy, bought new tires, but they were cheap. They were half the price of the tires that you're supposed to buy. And so I thought, okay, well, it's a bit better, but it's still pretty noisy, and then I get noisier noiser. So I determined through online sleuthing that it's my bearings, my wheel bearings on my front left wheel, and because it gets noisier when you steer in one direction than the other. So I did that. But there's no place my Nissan dealership doesn't service EVs. And I looked up on how to do this repair, and you do have to kind of take one of the EV motor drive components out of the wheel hub, because it's a whole not just the actual little tiny bearing, but whole hub of bearings that has to be replaced, any specialized torque tools in order to do this. And I considered it, but then I thought, no. And anyway, I got the price from a place called okay Tire on Park Street in Regina. Because they are certified, they actually sent their people away to the United States to get training in servicing EVs and hybrids. Whereas the one Nissan dealership we have here and even several around us don't do they're not certified to do TVs. Even though Nissan sells the Leaf for well, minecar is ten years old, and twelve years ago they started selling them. So it was frustrating, but I took it there on the advice of others, and I wasn't happy with how it went because it's $1,400 for the front two hubs. And I thought it was just one hub, but they say, oh, no, the other one's going to be making noise as well. And also they charge you, like, $200 just to diagnose things. Okay. Right. It could be $200 to diagnose it. But then they diagnose everything on your car and get a big print out to make sure that everything else is okay. And they don't need to spend money fixing it out of your money. So that's complimentary. But the diagnose the problem is up to $200. So it's just BS. And I hate dealerships, and I can't afford it. So I'm in a pickle because my kid, my youngest, is going on a trip, a school trip to Quebec because we sent the first one. And as soon as we send the first one somewhere and my wife, by the way, wanted to set up the Uruguay was it Ecuador or Ecuador? To the ecological things out there. And I said, we do this. It's twice as much as you think it is because we have to send the other kid. There's no way of not sending the other kid. It doesn't work that way. So whatever you do for one, you do for the other. And so we're doing that for her now, and we have to get her to raise money. But they don't raise very much. And it's got to be a hard, economical year. Bad timing. That's too bad. And I'm giving away free commercials to cooperate anyhow that's that the car is supposed to be done. The beautiful thing is I've lost the EV joy because it's noisy. It's not giving me the luxury. And I can't wait. I can't wait, Brian, to get that back. But I also have to get more work done on the later. It's all related to tie rods and ball joints and stuff like that. And they send you a little video clips, part of their app to do that, to show you the wiggle. It's always great when you can spend money and really notice a difference. Like, that at least makes you feel better about it. Like our ceiling in the kitchen, it costs a fortune to do that. And all it does is look like it's supposed to. All it does is look like a ceiling. You don't get any satisfaction of it suddenly somehow being better. Right. It just doesn't lease. Now, this is hopefully something that I will just fall in love with again. But I started to fall out of love with car ownership because it's been a long time since I had to deal with car repairs because we've bought new cars. And the Leaf I've had for five years, and I haven't done anything to it. Like, it's just there's no oil to change. There's nothing to break down. I did buy the new tires a year ago, but other than that, I haven't done anything. How many kilometers on it? About 115 or something like that. It doesn't have fast charging. It was a rock bottom price. So it's only been a city car for anyone. But my family has been asking me, how long do I think it's going to go? And I don't see it not going indefinitely. Like I said, I don't have any reason to believe it won't go indefinitely. But if you don't do the tie rods or something, then maybe the tires are going to wear out. Well, the car could crash, things like that. One of the wheels could go. I've seen people do this on the roads. The wheel just goes all the way to one way and you get it towed. I won't be using it on the highway, let's put it that way. So, yeah, it's frustrating. And I can see the joy of maybe a subscription service to a robot taxi one day where you pay $20 a month and you never have to worry about car repairs because that is the biggest pain in the butt. That's why people buy newer cars. No, that's the future for sure. I mean, yeah, that's so much simpler. I've been talking about the pipeline plane that flies over my house. And then we got into it and I mentioned that there was a crash 13, 2013. And then there was one between our last two episodes of our podcast. Well, curiously, there's been no pipeline plane since that crash. So I got to feel weird about that because I feel like I have a connection with them because I'm in the mespeedo floating in the pool. God knows we've had some intimate contact. You've never seen me in my Speedo. These people have, and now they're gone. They're perished. So I just feel or maybe they've rounded pipeline planes or I don't know. But on the other hand, on the flip side, who's looking at my pipeline to see if it's not being inspected? Yeah. So that's kind of concerning for me as well. So here's a bit of trivia for you. In the year my Leaf was made, 2013, 130,000 EVs were sold globally that whole year. Brian yeah. Now more than that are being sold every week in the world. And that road, of course, is expanding rapidly. That's fantastic. That's great to hear. So my Leaf is like almost I've seen it referred to in videos on YouTube now by car reviewers as kind of like the Model T of EVs because it was the first mass produced it was produced even before Tesla's Model S. It was really the first mass produced EV in the world. So it's iconic, maybe worse, something someday. And I wanted to get to some updates to some stories that we've covered in the past. And we were talking about hurricanes in Florida and Will Walker in Florida. He was happily charging his allelectric Chevy bolt at a gas station charger while all the gas pumps were roped off, not because of electricity. The gas station was on a gas? Yes. And you can't just snap your fingers and get more gas in when there's a hurricane. So these places and we found this in the maritimes of Canada when Hurricane Fiona went through a couple of weeks ago. Gas stations are out of gas because everybody wants their generator running and everything. Right. Well, this is another reason gas stations don't operate with electricity during these situations, but they often don't operate when they do have electricity because they are out of gas. But he had electricity there and he was happily charging away. So he says, I can't count all the times that people ask me about what do you do when the power goes out? So it's just a joke to people who own TVs. Yeah. The New York Times, Florida, the post hurricane here, Jerry Jewelsk waited for about 6 hours to fill up for cans of gas. He was frustrated. Where is all the fuel? He asked. Every gas station or filling station was supposed to, under Florida law, have a generator prepared to go at all times. But that did not happen. Wow. In a news conference a couple of Saturdays ago, mr. DeSantis, or Satan, as I like to call him, said 1.6 million gallons of fuel had been removed pardon me? Had been moved to southwest Florida. But he acknowledged that some stations may not have had the electricity to operate their pumps. I'm laughing if you're in Florida, I'm not laughing at you. I'm laughing at the whole freaking idea and stupid things that happen. You need both. You need the fuel and you need the electricity. And on the electric car side, you just need the electricity. We've been talking about India a lot over the course of our podcast episodes, and we have concerns over the air quality and how great it would be for EVs to move in there. Well, Tata Motors, one of India's largest vehicle manufacturers, has announced a new Made in China pardon me, a new Made in India electric five door hatchback starting around $10,000 US. And it only has a 19.2 kilowatt hour battery with only 3.2 charging. That's kind of what my car is now. Started at 24. That's kind of your leaf range and charging speed. Look at this. It's supposed to have a range of 250 km. Yeah, well, I've made improvements since your car was made. Well, I'm thinking A is pretty darn light and it may not have an airbag and seatbelts or high tension steel or anything to protect the person. I don't know. I'm being kind of cynical about it. Yeah, but as we talked about, there's a lot of, like, two stroke engine vehicles in India. Small mopeds and motorcycles and stuff like that. And those things cause extra pollution. So if those kind of small vehicles, which is what this is going to sort of replace, can go electric, this will go a long way to improving the air quality in India. So for around 14, 500, US. Drivers can upgrade to a 24 kilowatt hour battery. That is what my car wasn't doing. But 315 range and 7.2 kilowatt charging, which is twice my car now. So that's I don't know, man. Maybe I should go to Indian, buy a car. Parts will be hard to get. Yeah. So driverless trucks in Toronto, we have reported on this before, but there's sort of more updates for it. So there are level four autonomous trucks, which began in August after the Ministry of Transportation approved them after a big audit. So this is Lablaws, the grocery chain from Canada, and they've got five routes going between Labs retail stores and a micro fulfillment center. So you can order your groceries online, go to this place, and pick them up. And this appears to be moving the groceries from the stores to this pickup center. So they've got five routes and five trucks. They are now driving fully autonomously. They do still have a human driver in the passenger seat. I'm not sure why he doesn't just sit in the driver's seat just in case they're showing off, but they say they have a safety record so far. This has been going on for quite a while now. And the person in the passenger seat is just there kind of as a courtesy. And also from feedback from the police department and the fire department, who said in case they need to pull the truck over, they wanted a human to interact with. And that does make sense. And of course, these are electric, and they can charge at sort of both ends of their trip, and that's what they do. And they're planning to expand this to something like 15 trucks in the near future. So, yeah, level four autonomous trucks. So this is Geofenced. They can only go on these specific routes. They couldn't just snap their fingers and expand this to other markets or other cities. They've carefully mapped out these routes. And the trucks take the same routes every day, but still quite remarkable that it is totally working. And they've driven tons of miles with these things, and 100% safe so far. Teller me surprised. I'm actually quite surprised by that, especially if you told me it was Los Angeles docks or something, I would believe you. But I'm surprised it's Toronto. Yes, Toronto streets can be kind of busy and crazy. That's an understatement. And some of the worst streets, worst traffic in North America. But you just start thinking about the math for this in terms of business. So not only are you saving on fuel because it's electric instead of gasoline or diesel, and then saving on the driver. And just imagine, as this slowly rolls out and expands, the amount of money that can be saved by so many businesses. Expect your grocery prices to go down, thanks to freedom of energy in the world like that. And I do use their service in our city. It's PC Express. How's that work? It works well. You order online, you pick up. We have had it delivered one time. All right. I have an update from the International Energy Agency and EVs are now at 13% of all new car sales globally this year. That's world market share. That's fantastic. I didn't know we were there yet. That is an inflection point, Mr. Stockton. We are toying with inflection rates here. It's doubled since last year, so that has not been happening. It's taken more than two years to double. A little bit more than two years. But now doubling in a year is not two years. So it's like 1718 months or something. Something weird like that. Like a year and a half. But now it's a year and we are on track. According to the IEA of reaching when they did the Paris Climate Accord, we need to do this, this and this to reach our climate targets. While the number of EVs on the road by 2030 was a checkpoint goal and they have saying that we are on track for it, in fact, we're better than on track. Areas not on track include improving the energy efficiency of building designs, developing clean and efficient district heating. That's when you hit like a heat. A neighborhood with one heating system phasing out coal powered generation. That's a little behind. Eliminating methane flaring, shifting aviation and shipping to cleaner fuels and making cement, chemical and steel production cleaner. That's from CNBC. Yes. So the transportation sector doing well. These other sectors, not so well. Yeah, but it's encouraging because we live in a place where there's so much cynicism about EVs that it's always good to see these stories. Yeah, that's great. All right, we have several Tesla stories this week. The first was, of course, they had AI day 2022, where they had a big presentation, basically a recruitment event. They're trying to convince people to come work for Tesla and work on their artificial intelligence stuff. They demonstrated the prototype of the Tesla bot. I didn't watch the whole thing because it was like three or 4 hours long. I watched a condensed 20 minutes version. So the robot doesn't do that much. So the stock market and casual observers were not for you. Was the robot more human than Elon Musk? Yes, it was okay. But I don't know if you had any thoughts about the Tesla bought. I do, and I did watch a lot of it. And I came away feeling pretty negative about Tesla and Musk and AI because there was nothing major announced. The robots didn't impress a lot of people because who's the company? I can't remember. The Boston Dynamics. Boston Dynamics. Who's been making those robots that flip and dance and they seem like years ahead. They're not humanoid, but do we need what is the need of having a humanoid robot rather than. Being creepy. I don't care what the thing looks like that does my dishes. It can look like a scorpion for all I care. Just do my dishes, you stupid robot, and answer my door and brush my teeth. Well, I think it's the same principle behind, like, what they're doing with selfdriving in the car. Like, the idea behind the Tesla selfdriving car is to replicate the humans. So humans drive with eyes in a brain. So Tesla's taking that approach with their car cameras and a computer eyes and a brain in the car. So my feeling would be that since the world is designed for humanoid form, that that's the most useful form for somebody who's going to do work. Well, are you going to test an FSD Beta Tesla robot in your home and hope it doesn't break your dishwasher handle? Sure, if they want to send me one, I'll take the interesting thing is they think that one day they'll sell them for $20,000. Seems low. I don't know. Does it? Brian, does the $35,000 model three seem low to you? That never happened. It was sold for, like, a couple of weeks, I think. Yeah, and very frustrating. Why announce these things? You have to have faith in their AI software for cars. We're not at that point yet. We're having a lot of faith because things are dragging on so slowly. It's just a super long process. So this stuff is potentially decades away. So what bothered me about the event was they invited all their Internet fanboys to it, so it became like a Tesla event. Oh, you're God, present your genitals. I wish to photograph them. This is stupid. I just hate that stuff. But the whole point of the event was to recruit because they want to bring on people to recruit. They need the best and AI people to develop this product. It's a recruiting day, so why invite all the fanboys? I guess you get some free advertising that way. But it just seemed I don't know, I'm pretty cynical about this, and I'm pretty cynical about Mr. Musk, who has decided, apparently, to buy Twitter. Yeah, it sounds like that's going through. Yeah, and I'm not happy about that. I'm not. I'm not happy at all. I mean, Twitter's not golden, but I need somewhere to go, Brian. I can't go on Facebook. It's not safe. It's killing the world. And now he's got to put what's his name back on there, the former POTUS. And why am I going to hurricane have killed him? Why is it killing his people? See him floating away on a piece of rock anyway? I don't understand. I'm worried. I'm worried about the world. And the world was quieter. It was quieter without him on it, and now he's going to be on it and all these horrible voices of conspiracy and BS. I don't know. I'm not happy with Musk. I mean, Musk is the guy I doubt for saving the world because he puts a cyber truck on stage, smashes the window, and suddenly Ford is releasing electric trucks a couple of years later. Right. I mean, they're in dealerships say they're at dealerships around our province, even a lot of them have moved here, I'm told. But kudos to Ford for actually making some vehicles because the Amaqui is like, I think, the number two selling electric vehicle in North America. No, there's actually some EVs in stock around us, and it's mostly like the Mustang and the F 150. So, yeah, the needle has moved. And I guess we're at 13%. We're at a near time where they say they have the stock and they don't actually have it. It's coming in. It's like it's coming into somebody who's ordered it. So unless somebody canceled their order and somebody did cancel their order for Chevy Bolt, but it was an older one and I didn't want to take it, people were pointing me towards that. But yeah, I'm told there's a year wait list, but I mean, even that's not bad for a truck. But I don't know. Megapack is arriving in Hawaii, and I just wanted to mention this, mostly because we had reported on the final shipment of coal going to Hawaii a few weeks ago. The last shipment of coal for their coal fired electricity plant, which they're going to close down. Well, it turns out at pretty much the same time, a whole whack of Tesla Megapack batteries were delivered to Hawaii. Hawaii's got an aggressive goal to get off fossil fuels. I think they've got some time. I think it was like 2045. They're going to be 100% green. I have a feeling they might be able to do it sooner than that. But they have tons of solar. Hawaii has the highest amount of solar deployed per capita, and they just need more batteries. And they are on their way to 100% clean energy, which is great. Yeah. You don't hear about non Tesla companies making power packs. I know they exist because they do exist. Yeah, they're putting some up around us. I don't know who's making them, though. We don't hear about who's making them. I don't know. I mean, the main battery makers are probably making them, like LG and what's the other one? Panasonic? Yeah. Or CATL. Yeah. I have heard other brands and their storage solutions, I just don't know off the top of my head. Well, that's something to look forward to. It's pretty cool that Hawaii can do that. And most people disregard batteries. I say this all the time. They poopoo them like you can't power. I know it seems far fetched because there's like thousands and tens of thousands and millions of little AA sized almost batteries, right? That power a grid. Come on. That's science fiction. But they are doing it and it works. And it meets the power fluctuations and saves them money. Instantly saves the money. If you're a casual observer, it probably seems absurd, but to the casual observer, I often hear hydrogen as the solution. But solar wind and batteries, as we often say, that's all you need. It is all you need. Not for maybe airliners and stuff like that, but for a lot of things. And the cybertruck musk has been talking about the cyber truck as well. Yeah, I guess, prompted by the recent hurricanes and flooding in Florida, that the cyber truck will travel temporarily as a boat for approximately 1100ft. Really? Yeah, it'll operate as a boat tweeted that's enough to get through a flooded underpass. Yeah. So we have seen this before, like with regular teslas and flooded underpasses that they can do fairly well getting through. We did a guy in the EV association who flooded his car in saskatoon and other claims, big fat insurance claim, battery gone, ruined his battery. So it's certainly and it's not an advertised feature, but this is now technically an advertised feature of the cyber truck that it can operate as a boat for a short period of time. So presumably they're just thinking about this more. I don't imagine they were thinking about it too much with the cars. But now that they know that the cars are fairly waterproof, they've, I guess, done a little bit of extra work and, you know, cyber truck will float for a while. Well, the rivian r 150 pickup truck, the all electric pickup truck from them, it was supposed to do a meter and a half of water, and they didn't say for how long, but they said anymore, and it floats. So they didn't want it to float floating back. Yeah, because then you lose control there. Yeah. Well, what do you do in the cyber truck? Do you take out a paddle? I mean, what do you do? I'm not sure, but they often show it with those big knobby tires. So it's possible the big knobby tires would give you a little bit of traction and steering. Give me the aqua tread when you're ordering tires, like summer all season and water. Well, there was that water aqua car. Somebody in town owns one from, like, in the 50s. Somebody made a car that works in the car? Yes. It's a convertible, right? Yeah, it's a convertible. Somebody in town owns one and every once in a while drives it in our local lake, which is saying a lot. You go down there, you're a dead person. Because it's nasty water. Yeah. So it has technically been done before. I don't know. Maybe they could add a little propeller on the back of that because that's what the aqua car has, like the one from the 50s. It has a little propeller at the back for one. Floating in the car. That would be an option, I suppose. Maybe you could outboard it to your trailer hitch or something and just sort of put a propeller on back there. Yeah, that would be great. Well, I wanted to talk about it over small nuclear reactors because CBC had an article on it and there's been well, there's always lots of stuff, and I'm always reading from people. I'm not against it. It's just not realistic. People love the new solutions. We'll solve climate change with this. This is great. I saw a video on it. I saw six videos on it. It's great. It's not great because they don't exist. You can't go to Walmart and buy one. You can go to Walmart and buy a solar panel. You can go to Walmart and buy a battery. You can go to Walmart and even buy a wind turbine in some stores. Come on. What we have is all we need. And I'm not saying other things aren't good, but if they cost ten times as much for one unit of electricity, and if you don't need them, then why are you wasting your time on it? Because our government, another government, and the Ontario government as well, are investing, and they're going to waste all our money in these damn things, putting money into it, and it's also just delaying climate action. Yeah. So here's something. This is Suzanne O'Donnell. She is an adjunct professor at the University of New Brunswick and St. Thomas University also works with a coalition for responsible energy development. And she has been researching SMR specifically during the last two years. And she was asked, what do you think of Saskatchewan and your province looking at building a small modular nuclear reactor? She says there's a huge leap she says diplomatically, there's a huge leap between having a design for an SMR and then getting to the point of having an engineer design where you can actually apply for a license to build one. The most advanced design for an SMR in the US is called New Scale, and they've spent almost a billion dollars on the engineered design, and they just got a license to build it. It's another huge leap between building a prototype that might actually work in a laboratory to getting one that actually commercially works in the real world. Why then, she was asked, with four provinces be looking at them? And she says, I'd have to say that the decisions around SMRs, at the federal level and certainly at the provincial level, where they're all conservative provinces, are political decisions rather than based on science. From reading peerreviewed science in three different countries, canada, the US. And the UK. It really doesn't make any economic sense. However, what we have happening here is very, very powerful industry, the nuclear industry, that has a long history in Canada, and they have been lobbying like crazy to get these things off the ground, because unfortunately, nuclear power hasn't been very successful financially, especially lately. So in New Brunswick, the Point La Puerto reactor has been a financial disaster for the province, has put US $3.6 billion in debt. And that's what we have to look forward to in our province because of idiots. I don't want any more debt. I don't want to know we got enough debt. My God. But making stupid decisions because you want to put off the climate action and not make the woke left happy, then you gotta do what you gotta do and waste all taxpayers money and then you drive the provinces of the ground. So I'm mad about that. Mad, mad, mad. So it's just bad. I don't like it. Okay, so I've got a story here from CP 24, which is a news outlet in the Toronto area of Canada. I thought this, it reminded me of the Apple story that we mentioned a couple of days ago that Apple is working on software for their phones that will sort of calculate the cleanest time of the day to charge your phones. I don't know, there's just a lot of activity around smartening up the grid. And so what they're going to do in Ontario is pay some customers to run their air conditioning less as part of an investment in energy efficiency program. So they're going to have networked smart thermostats in people's homes that can literally be controlled remotely by the power utility. So when they have these days when the grid is strained and everybody's air conditioning is cranked up, if you've agreed to be part of this program, you have one of these smart meters, they're going to creep up the temperature in your house, take away some of your nice cooling airflow from your air conditioner. And if you've got enough homes in this program and enough people willing to do it, and they will pay you to do it, like there's an incentive to do it, they'll give you some money for this. They will just turn up your thermostat a couple of degrees and you'll use less electricity for your air conditioning. And the more of these kind of smart grid strategies we can come up with, the more we can weather these coming storms of power supply as we kind of transition over into all clean energy. Well, again, I'm surprised. I'm surprised that Ontario is doing that. And it's very interesting. It would be interesting to see how it goes, what they learned from that. It reminds me of the summer heat wave in California where they texted people or an emergency alert and they responded, and they responded in times when they turned down the power because they said, if you don't, then we're going to have a power outage. I would rather have some power and maybe a couple of degrees warmer in my house than no power at all. And that's another great tool to have. But just imagine if somebody at the California Power Commission just has a switch where they can just turn up everybody's air conditioning. Like just imagine how that would drop the power going to the grid, like instantly. I'm not sure what some people would like the government coming to their homes. But you get paid for it. But you get paid for it, so you're compensated for it, that's the thing. But this is kind of the future that when we talk about smart grids, we are also talking about homes where we can suck a little bit of juice out of your EV for ten minutes just to balance the grid. And you get paid for that more than what it costs you to put it in. So, yeah, there's all kinds of different things and if this is one of those methods, then cool. No, and there was some progress on that in the US. They introduced the Bidirectional Act, it was introduced in the US Senate to promote electric school buses feeding into the grid. So I don't think this is all kind of fully plat passed or anything, but as they expand to electric school busses, they're trying to work this into the infrastructure where all of these school buses can feed into the grid. So it's nice to have some actual legislation to support that. Coming up in the show is the lightning Round, where we speed through the week's headlines in fast format. Brian, I've got a surprise new segment for you this week. What it's called? The Tweet of the week. Oftentimes I see a great tweet that I'd like to highlight on the show. Yeah. This is until I leave Twitter next week, so it could be a very shortlived segment. Here it is. It says, you know, who isn't in denial about climate change? The entire insurance industry. There will be entirely uninsurable areas of the populous places near coast sooner than you think. This is from MMA, who works in the real estate industry and was reteeded by many of my climate follows on Twitter. It's something I think about a lot in Florida, of course, top of mind because of the recent hurricane, but Florida, so many low lying areas in Florida and you just got to wonder when the real estate prices are going to hit the wall and people are going to have to retreat it. That hasn't happened yet, as far as I know. But, yeah, certainly I think there is already some places that are uninsurable in flood prone areas and the insurance industry doesn't mess around. I know because my life insurance just went up last week, tripled for some reason, because they saw you eating a box of donuts and they're like, damn it, they heard me talking about Davidson Gas Station donuts and just bingo. So my other tweet that I was considering has something to do with a politician down there saying, well, we will rebuild. And the other person said, Why? Yeah, why would you rebuild a place that's destroyed by a hurricane? You think it's not going to happen again? I mean, these happening, they're happening more frequently and more importantly, more powerfully and slower moving and more damaging. The same hurricanes because of climate change. Brian, we got a whole host of feedback this week. Sometimes the mailbag empty, dust bunnies fall out, nothing there, you know? And then sometimes it just rains, rains feedback. So I wanted to dip into it. Here's an email, says, hey, guys, big fan of the show from Martinsburg, West Virginia, USA. Not all of us in mumf, Egypt, are as narrow minded as our former commander in Cheeto when it comes to the environment. I can't swear on the show. You see, if I swear on the show, I have to change it to explicit. That's a whole lot of paperwork. I can't do that. So I just got an email from my power company asking if I was interested in enrolling in a new program they are starting up, which seems to be a solar collective. Do you think these types of programs the page is very vague. Have a place in the future for those who can't afford or non solar friendly areas like us? Cheers to here in Mendez. Now, I looked at it and basically, if your household uses X amount of kilowatts per month, you pay extra to have solar, to have clean power. Now, this is something that we did here 1215 years ago in my old house. Yeah, I would pay for extra money for clean energy credits. And we had wind back then and only when basically still do for the most part, and a small amount of wind. And of course, they sold out. So they stopped the program. They couldn't do it anymore, or that was their excuse. But you could pay a little bit extra on your power bill every month and know that you were getting clean power. Right, but here's my point. Clean power is cheaper than regular power. Yeah, right. And they want to charge you. Shitloads, sir, I swore crap loads of money more. It's like $40 a month extra just to have clean power, which is cheaper to them than it is the coal power or whatever. Like in West Virginia, solar is going to be incredibly cheaper than coal. It's displaced coal as the cheapest form of electricity by far. So my question is, where will the solar facilities be located? So they plan to build, own and operate five solar facilities located within West Virginia on property owned by the power company or its affiliates. They include a 26 acre reclaimed ash disposal site, a 51 acre adjacent to the power substation, 27 acres of retired ash disposal site. This is all coal terminology that I'm not familiar with, even though we do have coal mines here. So, yeah, they're reclaiming all this land from coal and putting solar panels on it and then charging people extra. Do you have any thoughts on this? My thought is the typical. It says for little $2 a month, but nobody uses 50 month. And my garden shed used more than that. You're more likely to spend over $40 a month to have clean electricity for that money. I think there's places that will. Sometimes if they let you put solar on your roof, you can lease solar for your roof and for like the same price as electricity, you're not paying anything extra. And then eventually, I think you make extra money. Yeah, it's going to be different. In every province, state, every city, it's going to be different. I know around here there is one or two solar cooperatives, and that's mainly for people who live in apartment buildings. So you don't necessarily have access to a roof that you can put solar panels on. So a bunch of people can get together and spend like, $100,000 on a solar farm somewhere. And basically, you live in an apartment. You can buy a share in that, and just everybody owns a piece of the action, and it feeds into the grid, and you get your benefit from your share of the thing. Whether this particular one makes any sense, I don't know. But certainly people should look into this wherever they live. Well, shout out to Mornsburg, West Virginia. And Mr. Mendez. Thanks for writing us. We really appreciate it. So here's another one. Good evening, gentlemen. My name is Landon Yereski, and I discovered your show earlier this year as listening material while taking our newborn for walks to fall asleep, which is interesting, Brian, because I always wonder what people do when they listen to our shows. I remember my first podcast in the very early days of podcasting in the early 2000s. Somebody said that they listened to me on the subway in Australia, and it blew my mind. It's like, wow, there's somebody doing that to my little show. Like, wow. Yeah. Community and of course is a popular thing, but taking your newborn out for walks to fall asleep, hadn't thought of that one, you know? By the way, I listen to podcasts to fall asleep when I want to have a nap sometimes. Ours, it's not that they're boring. The more interesting they are, the more I can focus my mind on something and then drift off. Right. They can't be too boring. That works for me, too. Yeah, it's got to be something to focus my mind. So I have been listening weekly ever since. He says the content is fantastic. And given I also live in the same city you do, I find all the commentary very relatable. Now he says I'm a business owner, and that piqued my interest, Brian. So I Googled his name, and it came up with his LinkedIn page and found out that he owns my favorite pot shop, Wid w I ID it's actually on the other end of the city from me. They have a great online portal, okay. And they have a whole craft load of inventory of all kinds of different things. And you can order it and pick it up in your leaf you're cartastic. And little did I know that the pot shop that I've been supporting supports green energy. That's great. And we're always looking for sponsors. Remember, everyone got free beer. The first plug is free. Brian made a joke. Okay, so he's also a board member of the Saskatchewan Electric Vehicle Association, something I reference here a lot. And he says, I love to use the insight on your show to help align my business with sustainable goals and get insight for the association. A fellow board member recently sent me this article I thought would be a great discussion point on your show, and it is, from Airdry today. Now, Airdri is a little city north of Calgary, the big mega city of Calgary, Alberta. I wouldn't call it a mega city, but it's a big city. Millions of people, he says a Rocky Mountain. I think it's a great discussion that could be had regarding NIMBYism, which is I had to look that up. Not in my backyard ism and fudd. You want to explain what fudd is again? Fear, uncertainty and doubt. That is things that people put around misinformation and bad information about new technologies to discourage either investment or adoption. And especially in this changing world that people are uncomfortable with how fast things are changing. The fact that that municipality rejected tens of millions in investment and permanent jobs due to false information is astounding. Keep up the good work. Now, the story is about somebody who wanted to pull up a charging station, much like we were talking about, because it's between two major cities, calgary and Emmetton. Just like that corridor needs lots of charging with people going back and forth. Ours does between Regina and Saskatoon. And this town also ran into problems because they didn't want anything to do with the charging station. Now they claim the problem with the charging station. I'll read you an excerpt. Okay, this is from the story objections raised because they wanted to put a solar installation with it, which is a business decision for them, because you supply electricity for someone, you want the cheapest electricity wholesale, right? That is what it is. So you build a little solar farm for your charging station, for your highway supercharging station. But the objections raised were more to do with the solar than the EV chargers. Apparently. He says objections raised included potential noise concerns with the cooling plant associated with the proposed solar farm, which is absurd. A person's air conditioner in their home is less noisy than that, and it's certainly closer to people than that would be increased vehicular traffic on highway 72. The solar farm would have increased traffic. I guess people going to see the solar farm or people going to charge their EVs next one taking farmland out of production. This is something that is coming up a lot lately, which is of course, crap. If the farmer wants to take his damn farmland out of production, he can, or she can. But you could also do mixed use. Farmers don't use every square inch of their land. Sometimes they have little bits of land that they mold with garden tractors that they could put up a huge installation on. And some more speculative complaints about the potential radiation hazards of building such a facility in close proximity to people living in the area. Rocky View, County Alberta you are officially the stupidest place on earth. So is that like solar radiation? Like everyone's going to get a suntan? Is that what they're saying? If I knew, I'd be in pain. You think you've heard it all? You think you've heard all the stupidest things that were people get passed around on Facebook. It's just utter BS. And by the way, whenever there's somebody like this, whenever there's people like this, they're always racist. You know, if you're stupid in one way, you're probably a racist too. So screw you. Rocky View, County Alberta. Get off the planet. Go somewhere else. Elon's, got a place for you on Mars. Lots of radiation up there. And Brian, I hope you're sitting down because we've got a rare voicemail click from our speak pipe page. Can you believe it? What? I cannot believe it. I thought that we should stop doing the speak pipe because nobody was calling. Well, I crossed my mind too, but this is Sean in Ireland. Hi. It's Sean from Ireland. Dublin, Ireland. Just want to say we love the show, love listening to it every Wednesday when it comes out. There is two big announcements in Ireland in the last few weeks regarding solar. Is no planning permission needed. Now, if you have solar panels on your roof before, if you wanted solar panels on your roof, you have to get planning permission. And there's been houses where people put up solar panels didn't get planned permission. The government made them take them down. So now you don't need plan permission. And also they've announced that they are going to give schools free solar panels so school supplies, and if they're suitable, they will get the price of the solar panels covered 100% by the government. Thanks, that's fantastic. I mean, that's crazy, right? Why isn't everybody doing that? We often ask questions like that. Schools, perfect place for solar panels, but giving them to them and then what do they do with the savings? They can put more money to music programs and educating your damn children. Yeah. I will say the high school right next to me where I went to high school, they've actually had solar panels on their roof for about 20 years now. And it was because I think some students and maybe a teacher or two were interested in the technology and they realized it was a good learning experience. So it was about 20 years ago, so they would have been much lower powered solar panels. But still, they've been generating power over there for 20 years and educating kids, and they could probably. Look up the doohickies to see what the sun is doing and probably be aware that solar panels generate electricity and cloudy days, for example. Yeah. And so also, the other thing Sean brought up is we got to get rid of the red tape involved in installing solar clean energy of all kinds. This is a climate emergency. We got to move fast. We got to make all this stuff as easy as possible. Now, Sean, we're so thankful that we said that. We would wish you a happy birthday on your birthday. So let us know when your birthday is, and if not, happy birthday in advance. Thank you, Sean. Yeah. I appreciate it. It's lovely to hear your voice and we'd love to hear from you. Contact us at cleanenergy show@gmail.com or on Twitter. We're on TikTok for now. Clean energy pod. Is our handle there? Don't forget to check out our YouTube channel for special features. Leave us a voicemail like Sean did@speakpipe.com. Cleanenergyshow. It's time for the lightning round, Brian. We have to whizz through this one quickly and it's a fat one, so it's going to be a challenge to get through. This is a fast paced look at the week and clean energy news. California becomes the first state to commit to ending the sale of polluting heaters. All fossil fuel heaters are gone by 2030, not far from now. Right, that's fantastic. And California often sets the tone for the rest of the US on clean energy things, so hopefully other states follow suit. Clean Energy canada predicts 1840 people will be employed in the Canadian EV industry by 20, 30, 26 times what there was in 2020. And, you know, I think that number is more than the number of people in oil and gas. So that's just EVs. That's not clean energy in total. Yeah, that's just EVs. Time for a fast fact. According to the IEA, the International Energy Agency the International Energy Agency, only 50% of the worldwide market is now using Led bulbs. Outraged, are you? Wow. Yeah, I mean, I guess that makes sense. It does take a hell of a long time to change all the how many humans does it take to change all the light bulbs in the water? I could do them all. I'll start tonight. Come on, people. Unscrew those stupid incandescent bulbs and put in an Led from your local dollar store because they're cheap. And imagine how much energy will be saved once we do that. Well, you know, those old bulbs don't last very long, so it's not going to take that long. Would it last a year at best or something like that? It's not good. The Nordstream Pipeline, which is the one that they claimed was bombed or sabotaged, it stopped leaking, but not before emitting the equivalent of what UK cars consume in a year. And there are 1.8 million oil pipelines in the world, some of them apparently leak. Yeah. So this is the pipeline between Russia and Germany, which has been the site of much discussion and problems in the UK world. But, yeah, this is a leaking and even just in your home, right? Like if you have a gas cooktop that can leak and release pollutants and ruin the air quality in your house and contribute to all these problems. From Bloomberg. The United States utility scale solar is now about one third cheaper than gas fired power. Wow. Well, onshore wind is 44% less expensive than gas fired. This is onshore wind, which is notoriously more expensive than offshore wind. So solar and wind now present a deflationary opportunity for electric supply costs. Deflation something I like to hear. Let's hope the inflation rates come down. You know, I watched this video by an engineer, a wind engineer, talking about how big can wind turbines get offline? I love that topic. It's very in depth, but apparently there's a cost of the machine returns. But I might get to that in a bit. We'll see. Another fast fact in 2022 and 600 million people in Africa still don't have access to electricity. And I can go to the hardware store and buy a solar panel and power my camper and lights and stuff and phones. Much of those without power are in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The DRC, Ethiopia, Nigeria, Tanzania and Uganda. Research suggests that covering all of California's canals, which span roughly 4000 miles with solar panels could save up to 63 billion gallons of water. That's just putting them people say there's no place to put solar panels. You take up farmland, put them on the damn canals, safe water, billions of gallons of water. And I believe they have started at least one pilot project. So that's what it would look like if they did it all. That's amazing. Yes. And there's even some going on in Europe. And they said if you did that, you'd have like 13 nuclear reactors worth of peak output. So that's pretty cool. The two Chevy bulk variants set a quarterly sales record at 14, 700. GM says it will increase global production. This is interesting to me. So I'm following it to more than 70,000 units for the 2023 calendar year, which is almost double if it's 44,000 this year. So they're selling all the damn things and they've got to make more. Yeah, and presumably they've ramped up their battery supply, which is the other thing. So they presumably have enough batteries to do that, which is great. And for the regional leader, Post, our local newspaper, we have an oil ban. New York follows California in banning the sale of gas cars by 2035. That legislation is moving forward. So good to hear. World's largest wind solar hybrid complex. This is wind and solar in one piece of land is now 600. It goes online in India. It's the largest hybrid complex. Fairly big. Toyota president calls meeting California zero mission requirements difficult, even though in 2035, you can still have 20% of your new car sales from your company be long range PHEVs plug in hybrids. Yeah, well, it's not like Toyota is like a world leader in making cars or anything. No, I don't know how they could possibly do it. They don't want to. Tesla Giga, Nevada to receive recycled battery materials from Redwoods closed loop campus. That means, Brian, you could buy a Tesla and people say, oh, where did that battery come from? It was mine. While some of it might be recycled now already, and that's going to weigh go up in the future as more that's great. Yes, redwood is one of the big players in battery recycling started by one of the founders of Tesla. But, yeah, we were always worried about not having enough supply of batteries to recycle. But it's slow, but sure it'll come. It'll be a closed loop system one day. The Harris Ranch Tesla supercharger in California, that is the big one, the first one actually ever, and it's between San Francisco and Los Angeles, will have a 25 megawatt of solar installed. That is two, five times the solar farms they're putting in Saskatchewan. Okay, just for reference, at a very rural part of the I 500 stalls, that's 100 stalls, including some for towing. They're going to have some stalls. People are calling for that now that the trucks are out. So it's a halfway mark between La. And the Bay Area. So, yeah, cool. The EPA is doubling money for electric school buses, which you mentioned earlier due to overwhelming demand from all 50 states. Yeah, so the 50 states asked for money, and it was way more than they expected them to ask for. The state, the people, the school boards, the people, they want electric school buses, and they should because diesel bad for kids. Currently, only 1% of the country school buses are at electric. And you know what? I'm a little surprised that it's even 1% more than maybe I would have thought. And Brian, finally this week I'm going to end on good news from Asad Razuk, which I sometimes do, and good news on the climate fight that we could all use this week, ireland to put solar panels on every school. Okay, our caller already covered that. James, you didn't need to put that there, but we broke that news. India to go 50% renewables by 2030. Some more Indian news. We have listeners in India, so they're going to go 50% renewables. That's not bad for a country that said that maybe we can't because we want the middle class to expand and you guys have already had for 100 years, and we're a huge country, but, you know, things may be starting to move along there. That's great. That's our time for this week. Remember, clean energy show@gmail.com. We really appreciate you listening. Please subscribe to the show. So you get our shows every week. And we'll see you again next time. Next week. See you next week. Close Video.