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American freight and package delivery company

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Latest podcast episodes about FedEx

Wake Up Legendary
5-17-22 - Andy Reynolds - How Networking At Mastermind Led To Massive Growth! (Here's The Inside Scoop)

Wake Up Legendary

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 67:12


On this Tuesday edition of WUL, I talk with Andy Reynolds. Andy is a full time manager within FedEx and has been building his online business on the side since December. Today he shares what he's been up to since attending our Mastermind in December, how your everyday life is your best source for stories how he reposts content from Tiktok to other social media platforms, and A LOT more. Follow Andy on Tiktok | Instagram | Facebook | Facebook Group

The Next Trip - An Aviation and Travel Podcast
Boarding Pass 129: EuroBiz

The Next Trip - An Aviation and Travel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 60:46


What's better, having a middle seat open, lounge access, and high quality meals, or a bigger seat? We discuss Eurobiz vs US domestic First. Other topics on this episode:Non-pairwise widebodies…what are they?Japan may open to tourists Fedex gets it's first SkyCourier - weird but functional Republic Airways asks for minimum new pilots hours of 750 vs 1,500WN improves inflight productAvianca and GOL try to team upJoin the conversation!https://www.nexttripnetwork.com/

Leadership and Loyalty™
1/2: Own it. Love it. Make it Work. Carson Tate

Leadership and Loyalty™

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 34:23


Think about it, we're all here at the moment in time that has rattled our work-life reality. As employees and employers, we are in the middle of what's become known as The Great Resignation. However, is resigning the answer, or could there be other opportunities you never even considered?  In many of my articles, I've spoken about how the Great Resignation is in fact, The Great Pause. We've all been given an extraordinary moment to examine what matters most to us. But does that always mean walking away from the job you are in? Or might there be an opportunity to co-create your dream job? You might be amazed. Our guest for the next two episodes is Carson Tate. Carson serves as a consultant and coach to executives at Fortune 500 companies including Deloitte, FedEx, Johnson & Johnson, Kraft, Heinz, Synchrony, Wells Fargo, and many others. Her work has been featured in top-tier business media including Bloomberg, Businessweek, Business Insider, CBS Money Watch, Fast Company, Forbes, Harvard Business Review Blog, The New York Times, USA Today, Working Mother, and more.  Carson Tate knows that when employees thrive, business thrives. She is the author of two books, Work Simply, and Own It. Love It. Make it Work. How to Make Any Job Your Dream Job. Carson's practical, tactical, science-backed strategies and methodologies have enabled Fortune 500 companies to amplify team performance, engage their employees, and increase workforce productivity. Website   http://www.workingsimply.com Social media  https://www.linkedin.com/in/carsontate Part 1) Make Any Job Your Dream Job It all starts with Self-Awareness The Pause and Ask Strategy! The Right Reason to Divorce or Stay December 26th - The Moment of No Return The Universal Need All Employers MUST meet Employees and Employers Pretending to be Psychics.  What's the Framework for Healthy Negotiation?  Curious to discover how tapping into the Anatomy of Meaning can #actualize your #business, #culture, #Leadership and #tribe DovBaron.com "Those Who Control Meaning for The Tribe, Also Control The Movement of The Tribe" Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast
The Smart Warehouse With Dan Gilmore

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 64:35


Want to know how you can deploy a smart warehouse for your business? Today's guest is Dan Gilmore of Softeon, a company that provides a full suite of flexible and robust end-to-end supply chain software solutions to deliver success. He joins Joe Lynch to talk about the idea and technology behind their system. They discuss some of the big trends impacting warehouses, e-commerce, and retail. From labor shortages to automation, Dan enlightens on the benefits of WMS and WES for any business. Tune in to better understand the perks of this new smart technology for optimizing your business! The Smart Warehouse With Dan Gilmore Our topic is the smart warehouse with my friend Dan Gilmore. How's it going, Dan? It's great. I'm happy to be here. I'm glad I'm finally getting to interview you. Please introduce yourself, your company, and where you are calling from. I'm a Chief Marketing Officer of a supply chain software company called Softeon. Our company is headquartered in Reston, Virginia, outside of Dallas Airport. I happen to be in the Dayton/Cincinnati, Ohio area. What does Softeon do? It's a supply chain software company, primarily a supply chain execution. The company was founded in 1999. Our first customer all the way back then was the L'Oreal, and we proceeded to build out a suite of solutions that were brought in deep capability. That includes warehouse management systems, and all the stuff that goes around warehouse management systems including labor and resource management, slotting optimization, and yard management. A newer thing which we will get into because it's critical to what's happening in terms of the smart warehouse is something called warehouse execution systems, which have been around for a while but gained prominence in the last couple of years as a way to optimize and orchestrate order fulfillment level at a capability that's beyond even very good tier ones. This category of stuff is called distributed order management, which has to do with the optimal sourcing of products based on customer commitments as well as network capacities constraints in how do I get the lowest cost alternative that meets the customer needs? It's a very prominent in omnichannel commerce. It is almost essential in retail but we are having a lot of B2B type of successes in distributed order management as well. There are some other things that could give a flavor to what we do. You started well before eCommerce was a thing. Do you still support stores and that kind of warehousing? Traditional WMS type of capabilities for retailers, would largely be store replenishment. Now, we are moving into eCommerce fulfillment. Many retailers are also looking to have a lot of activity at the store level, whether that's buying online, pick up in-store, curbside pickup or store fulfillment. We've got some solutions there, both in terms of the distributed order management that I referenced. It is the tool going that says, “The best place to fulfill this order from based on the time commitments as well as inventory availability, labor availability, etc. is store 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,” and then have the ability to first identify where it's the right location. That could be obviously a DC, a third-party facility or something like that. The first word is the best place to source it from, and if it's a store, we have a store module that facilitates the inventory transactions, picking transactions, and shipping at a store level. That became a thing. Target is one of those companies that if you buy something online from them, they are more likely to ship from their stores these days. I have seen and the figure keeps rising. The whole market has changed. The more high-tech feel and touch, the less back-breaking work and less bending over and lifting heavy cases. It's like 80% or 90%. Let's say 90%. That's the number I had in my mind too. They are doing them from the store, which is incredible. Before we get into all that, tell us a little bit about you. Where did you grow up and go to school? Give us some career highlights and bullet points before you join Softeon. I'm an Ohio guy. My whole life, I grew up in Akron, Cleveland area, and then got a job with NCR after grad school. I got an MBA from the University of Akron. I got a job at NCR that was here in Dayton. I was a Product Manager in charge of barcode and data collection. The way serendipity works, I moved from barcode data collection systems to wireless systems and then got into WMS. I was into consulting for a while. I have done a lot of marketing in the space. I was also Chief Marketing Officer at the Red Prairie before it got acquired by JDA and became ultimately Blue Yonder. Earlier in my life, I spent a couple of years implementing WMS, a couple of major projects down here in the Cincinnati area that helped me learn a lot about how the technology works and what's good and less good. Notably, in 2003, I started a publication called Supply Chain Digest, which changed the face of online supply chain and logistics, news, and coverage. I still keep a light hand on it. I still write a column once a week still for Supply Chain Digest. I have read that. I wrote a lot of blog posts in the past. When you are a writer, I have joked that “My research is a little different than a professor's research, I Google.” You start to realize which publications have good content when you are a blogger. The bar is a little lower for a blogger than it is for somebody who is writing in a publication. I would say, “Supply Chain Digest always had good stuff.” When and why did you join Softeon? It has been a few years now. I had done a little bit of side consulting with Softeon before joining, and I was impressed with the breadth and depth of the software and the number of innovative capabilities, but as important as that is, lots of companies have good software. We think we've got leading-edge software but the approach to customers and success - I have never seen a company that consistently puts its own interests behind its customers on a regular basis. We are not going to let anything get in the way of a successful implementation. That's a direct record that's unequal in the marketplace. It's the care and concern for success at the customer level and not looking at everything through a lens of only professional services hours if I can sell or something like that. It was a different attitude. It intrigued me, and plus, the company needed some help in the marketing area to get that message out. The combination of those factors led me to join Softeon. Our topic is the smart warehouse. Obviously, things have changed quite a bit in this business. Talk about some of the big trends that are out there that are impacting warehousing, eCommerce, and retail. It impacts everybody. Most of the audience is going to say they are living this or these are big surprises but it's nice to still put it all in context, the growing distribution labor shortage and there's a shortage of manufacturing. It's very acute. Everywhere you go, that's what you hear about the turnover levels, retention, and even with the greatest rising substantially. That's everyone's concern. After about a decade of very flat wage growth in warehousing and distribution until a few years ago, now, all of a sudden, the costs are taken off. Amazon has over $20 an hour with attractive signing bonuses in many parts of the country. They now offer parental leave for twenty weeks. I saw it on TV. That would be a very attractive benefit. That's the advantage. Target announced that they were raising their wage in both stores and distribution centers, not all markets but in some markets, by $24 an hour. That's $48,000 a year, and assume there's probably some overtime in there, whatever husband and wife are making up, for example. They are working at a Target DC in those markets, you could be pulling in $100,000 a year for a family, which is not bad money. [caption id="attachment_7940" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: With the e-commerce-driven cycle time pressure, it's unbelievable how fast you can get products these days.[/caption]   This has come up on my show a few times. I'm getting too old for that kind of work, and I can't walk 10 miles a day but if I had a choice, we need to make that job easier. We are going to get to that because this is what technology does. It also makes the job more attractive when they can say, “I go to that job, and I'm learning all this cool technology.” If you can bring somebody in, there's a different feeling when I get to wear all that high-tech gear and use high-tech systems and say, “I'm part of the supply chain,” as opposed to, “I'm a strong back, walk 5 miles a day and nobody gives a crap about me.” There are no questions about that. It's going to be both in terms of the shortage of labor and, second, building to attract people into this career. Now the whole market has changed, that more high-tech feel and touch, less back-breaking work, less bending over and lifting heavy cases, and all the kinds of things to go on and work for a long time. You are spot-on on that dynamic. If we have a shortage, that means the people we do have to be more efficient. The way they can be more efficient is with tech. That's one big trend going on. What's another big trend? There's a bunch in there that interrelated as well. Obviously, the eCommerce-driven cycle time pressure. If you look ay Amazon over your tablet, it's unbelievable how fast you can get products these days, even somewhat obscure products not that long ago, I need a new power cord for my HP computer. Somehow Amazon was able to deliver that the next day. I'm like, “Probably, they have this cable in someplace that they can get it to me one day.” Think of all the thousands of cables that are out there, and they've got mine. The cycle time pressure in that both are in terms of getting the order process from when it drops into the DC and out the door. Obviously, companies are also moving distribution facilities closer to the customer, so the transportation part of the journey is cut down as well. They will remember the specific numbers. It's Home Depot that is building 170 or 180 different local fulfillment centers that are being the largely cross-dock type of facilities that bring bulky items in and get them right to the customer in addition to the big giant warehouses that they already have. It's a fact of life. Eventually, we will teleport or whatever the product from the warehouse because it seems like we are reaching the Laws of Physics there that it can't be here any faster but maybe we will find a way. I remember, many years ago, I was working on a digital marketing project. I was helping this distribution center, nice, concise in Chicago land Peoria. They said we are one-day shipping to 65% of the population of the US. That was always what Indiana, Illinois, and there are so many DCs down in Ohio can always make that claim, and that was good enough. If you said, “I have a DC in the Midwest that can get me to the Eastern Coast, and I have one out West, that was good enough.” We are not seeing that anymore. We are going to get increasingly where same-day delivery becomes a fact of life rather incredible. Amazon and others talk about getting it down to 2 hours or 30 minutes. That's what Target is doing, not with those DCs. We think we will get to Walmart doing some of the same. What's another trend? Obviously, because we are calling the session, we are going to talk about the smart and also the future but it's largely here nowadays. We've got smart everything. We've got smart houses, cars, refrigerators, and toothbrushes even. I saw that a couple of years ago. I'm not sure if it's exactly taken off the map but to monitor how often you brush your teeth. What does it mean? Primarily, it's talked about internet connectivity and some analytics around that. The least examples are John Deere, Caterpillar or companies of that kind, putting sensors and other IoT types of devices on their equipment out in the field so they can get a sense of how people are actually using it. They can do predictive maintenance on it. They could say, “Your guys aren't using the equipment as effectively as they could if they changed their techniques.” It's certainly timely. If we are going to almost start things where it's time for the smart warehouse too but we will get into for the rest of the broadcast era left different than more internet connectivity, sensors, and things like that. That can be part of it but it is a small part of it. The bottom line of it is we are entering a new era of where all soccer technologies that are, in fact, much smarter than we have ever had before. I have argued publicly for a couple of years now that we had about twenty years of relatively incremental progress in WMS technology. I used this in speeches before but a few years ago, I was cleaning up my office and running the holidays as I often do when I found an RFP from a major food company for a WMS circuit in 2003. I looked through that and I thought, “This doesn't look all that different than the RFPs we are seeing in 2019, 2020 or whatever year we are looking at that.” I looked at it and said, “The big difference is not in the functionality being asked for. It's that now, a lot of that functionality is, in fact, core product, configurable product than maybe a lot of it had to be achieved through customizations.” That's probably true. Same-day delivery has just become a fact of life. The fundamental way of where WMS operates didn't change all that much give or take from 2000 to 2020 or somewhere in that range. Now, with the smart technologies that we are talking about, they are brought by the world's execution systems in working with WMS, I talked about before. This is a new ball game, and it was going to be fun for the rest of the people here to talk about this. You throw in a new term there. You said warehouse execution system. Those have been around for a while but they are now becoming the norm. It's becoming very prominent, and then the value is starting to be recognized. What is it? A couple of three companies had the belief and correctly, for most of the WMS systems did not care enough about equipment throughput and utilization. We wound up with big peaks and valleys, and anybody have been in a district distribution center, even a busy one. You have seen it where there are all kinds of activity at the beginning and the middle of the wave, then as the wave starts to dissipate even on a big, expensive, huge sortation system, you've got a relatively small number of boxes moving around, waiting for that wave and everything to close out. You said wave. Does that mean the orders come in waves? Yeah. The work is released in what is called pick waves. That's based on any number of different attributes. It could be the carrier schedule, value-added processing that needs to be done or workload balancing across the different pick areas of the company. You organize the work against various attributes that constitute a block of work that's typically referred to as a wave. I know I've got all these trucks that are going to show up and they are taking different orders, so maybe I'm working to that order that's going to fill up that truck. The problem, to your point, is we've got already may be a shortage of headcount in there. Now when we have waves, I'm not being efficient because I've got too much work at one moment and then not enough at another. The whole goal of WMS of what we're talking about with the smart warehouse is overcoming, I mean, obviously, you've got to plan and execute based on the workforce that you have here, and we will talk about that. Having a warehouse management system that gives me stuff was great in the past but you are saying, “I will help you with a WES or Warehouse Execution System. I'm going to help you manage the flow.” Manage the flow work and the resource utilization, and then new ways. Part of that still ties into that interest in level loading or making the flow of goods across an automation system more smooth and consistent because if you can do that, there are a couple of things. First off, the total throughput of the system is likely to be better. Second, if it's a new facility, you could probably get by with a smaller sorter because you are going to be able to utilize it more consistently over a block of time, a shift or over what you want to look at it there. The other breakthrough that Softeon said is that the WES tends its roots and level loading of the automation and better utilization there. The WES works extremely well, even in non-automated facilities or lightly automated facilities. [caption id="attachment_7941" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: The fundamental way a warehouse operates didn't change all that much from 2000 to 2020. But now, with smart technologies, this is a new ball game.[/caption]   As a matter of fact, one of our leading customers did a press release a couple of years back that talked about 50% productivity gain from implementing WES or Warehouse Execution Systems on top of existing Softeon WMS, and doing that in a totally manual environment. Everything is part of a system. You can have a sortation system, goods to person system or put wall system or whatever. It's got a certain capacity, throughputs, inputs, and outputs. Twenty workers walked around on a three-level case pick module. There are systems too. They have inputs, outputs, throughput, and expectations. The one big difference is that with a more manual system, you can throw more bodies at it up to the point of diminishing returns and gain through the port from that area, whereas a heavily automated system is rate as its rating. You are not going to do a whole lot to affect that. Throughput is everything, whether you are a plant, a freight broker or a warehouse. The stuff that goes out the door and that we can charge for is what we want to do. Having a warehouse management system is great. I know there are certain warehouses. Probably the old ones still don't even have that. You are saying to be as efficient and effective as you need to be in the market, you need a warehouse execution system that gets me the flow and that throughput. It may not be for everybody, and there are certain things you can do. We could take your core WMS and add some select capabilities from a full-blown WES if a modest level of that kind of automation is necessary. It's not necessarily for one, and I don't want to position it that way but it's certainly something that you want to take a look at as you get to where you've got a significant number of workers. Even smaller operations, things like the automated release of work to the floor without the human being need needing to be involved, that's going to be attractive even for a mid-size operation. The first thing we need is we need to get into this. WMS is given. You said that there was an incremental improvement for many years. Now, you are starting to see big improvements that may be driven by the market that needed big improvements in recent years. Part of that is this WES. What else is there that's part of that smart warehouse? There's a whole bunch of stuff. First, as a reminder, the automation because automation is tied to the labor shortage. Even a couple of years ago, it was very common to talk to DC managers or logistics executives, and automation wasn't necessarily very high on the radar. Nowadays, almost close to 100% of the companies we talked to, even smaller companies, are looking at automation of some kind. That could be big automation where you've got traditional sortation systems but can be very large, goods to person systems, those kinds of things. There's also a lot of interest in lighter, more flexible, and less expensive technology things like what are called put walls. What's a put wall? In great simplicity, it is a technique or a structure, which is a module with a series of cubby holes or slots. In one of these modules, we have 1 customer that has 80 of these modules. What you do is you pick the orders, then when you come to the put wall, you distribute the order to the different orders that need that product. I batch pick the product. I bring it either mechanically or manually to the put wall. Typically, a series of lights says, “This company wall number 3 here and needs 1 of the skews. Put wall in. This one needs 2 that skew you put two in. This one needs 1 put 1 in.” That process repeats itself until all of the items for a given order are complete within that cubbyhole. That's called putting. That's why it's called a put wall because you are taking the order in back, and then you are putting it into the put wall. Around the backside, lights will turn on that indicate, “This cubbyhole is now complete.” The operator comes up and touches a button typically. That starts the printing of the label in any shipping documentation that's required in the orders packed, shipped, and off you go. It provides a tremendous amount of productivity. It's very flexible. You can start small. We had one customer that started with a 1-foot wall module, then added 8 or 9 more because they liked it, then they added 20 more because they really liked it, and did this all over a couple of three-year types of the period there. For any kind of piece picking, especially of soft goods but other types of products as well but often driven not only by eCommerce with any kind of heavy piece picking operation can be a great solution but you've got to have the right software to do it. You've got that big like almost a shelf you said like cubbies on that I'm putting a product through it. Maybe I walked over, and I got 10 different sweaters, 10 sweaters that are all the same, and this cubby gets one. As I do that, I'm scanning it or it recognizes that it's in there. It's informing the other side of the cubby when the order is complete. It needs two sweaters and a pair of shoes. That's just one more way. What do you call this? Technology is only part of it. The other piece of the cubby that walking up to that, I could be putting those in bins in the old days but this is putting that on steroids. The bottom line is we are entering a new era where all technologies are, in fact, much smarter than we've ever had before. It was just a new way of doing it. There are a lot of people who talk about this in terms of optimizing materials and handling systems because getting this right is not a trivial task. I don't want to steal all my thunder from later on but the ability to rapidly turn these put walls and cubbyholes are the whole key to the success. If it's taking you a long time to do that, you are not getting the throughput that you required and probably wasting your time and money but if you can rapidly turn those by making sure the inventory gets there on time and efficient execution on both sides of the wall, then you've got something that can drive a lot of productivity. I don't know what the number is. There are quite a few customers now that are using put walls. When we would go out to some new customers, we've got some videos to show them an operation, and they are interested in seeing how this works. It's the technology along with mobile robots that you are going to see, any eCommerce but any kind of piece picking as well, you are going to see a lot of adoption. I'm an automotive guy originally. When you used to go through a plant, you would see people doing lifting heavy things when I first started, crouching down and doing functions that were hard on the body. Maybe it's not hard on 1 day, 1 week or 1 month but over 1 year, you are going to have a bad back, shoulders or knees. The same thing happens in these DCS or the warehousing. This automation you are talking about is making it easier on the workers, which means, “Hopefully, I will be able to keep my workers healthy and make that job again more attractive.” One time, I talked to a VP of logistics at Sherwin-Williams, the paint company. He noted that on the manufacturing side of the operation, they were always having people retire, and during retirement, little parties were almost taken. He said, “There was no one that ever retired from the distribution side.” That's because the heavy worker is picking cases of paint as a young man's job. As people got older, they couldn't do that work anymore. People are obviously rethinking that for the aging factor, and then there's another factor, “How do I make the work easier so I can have somebody in their 50s and 60s continuing to do this at distribution center job?” If you gave me a choice to go work in an old school warehouse, go deliver food or deliver groceries, I'm going to do the grocery delivery. I can make decent money, sit in my car, and I don't have to hurt my back, or knees or walk 5 miles a day. We have to make these jobs more attractive or we are not going to be able to keep and get good people. This automation is of such interest to the jobs now that we become more technicians and less of an order pickers. Besides a put wall, what's some other automation you are seeing out there? The automated mobile robots, economists mobile robots or AMRs. There's a huge interest in that. One of the interesting things is that in both put walls and mobile robots, you are seeing a lot of adoption and interest by a third-party logistics companies. This makes the point. In the past, 3PLs were very reluctant to do any kind of heavy automation because they couldn't sync the return on investment with the contracts that they had from the shipper. If the shipper can pay off that equipment, it's going to take 5, 7 or whatever years, and the shippers only keep you where 2 or 3-year contract, the risk of automation is too great in these other kinds of systems. It includes things like voice, picks the lights, and smart cards. They are all connected in some ways. Those kinds of systems can be put in for much less expense, much lower risk, and be incrementally adapted. You can start with three mobile robots and see how you like it, then we have seven more later on or whatever until you get to the optimal point for your operation. The fact that 3PLs are making this kind of investment as a whole new phenomenon and it speaks to the way you can incrementally get into the technology and the high level of payback that they are seeing because we were very strong in the third-party logistics arena, as an aside, so we are seeing it very closely. The number of 3PLs that are interested in this mid-range of lighter picking systems, not heavy automation but it's often somewhat newer technologies. It speaks to the changes we are seeing out there in the marketplace. Those are robots. Depending on the facility, they are not necessarily always replacing people. I talked to the CEO or president of DHL. He says, “We thought we would be replacing people with robots. The more robots we add to a facility, the more work we end up getting for that facility. We ended up hiring more people.” Everyone has a shortage. Job is going unfilled. If the robots are taking some of that slack but very few case studies of people that are adopting these technologies, they are still looking for people who have been able to be on. [caption id="attachment_7942" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: WES (Warehouse Execution System) will help manage the flow of work and resource utilization.[/caption]   What's another thing we need for that smart warehouse? Let's get into it in some more detail. We talked about some of the core software components, things like warehouse management systems and warehouse execution systems. A platform for integrating this automation with both heavy and/or traditional and newer age capabilities. There are some enabling technologies, things like rules engines, simulation and some other things. The core world's operations excellence is still the foundation. How do I get that right? That typically involves traditional WMS-type capabilities. What does that mean? What defines a warehouse management system versus an inventory system is the pervasive use of mobile terminals, barcode scanning, wireless RF devices or whatever term you want to use there, and then a lot of system directed activity, this whole notion of task management and task monitoring, where the system is orchestrating the different traditional paths of put away, receiving put away, picking replenishment, etc., and support for multiple strategies around that. We have lots of different picking method options, different replenishment strategies that I can use, and things that have been around for a while like slotting optimization, detailed labor management, labor reporting, and things like that. The foundation is core operations excellence. That's what everyone should strive to get to but nowadays, there's no ability to take that even further in terms of different types of capabilities that we think are defining what we are calling the smart warehouse. You used a term there that was an integration platform. What am I integrating? You were integrating primarily different materials handling technologies. That can be things we have had for a wall that conveyor transport and sortation. It can be some of these newer technologies like robots and put walls. The key is, “How do I optimize the flow so I don't have these islands of automation that are all doing their own thing.” I talked to somebody in the apparel industry. They have a very large and highly automated facility somewhere down in the Atlanta area. It's 1 million or 2 million square feet. They are seeing their throughput from that building after huge investments over the years and over time. They are seeing the throughput decline. What's happening, he believed, is that the business keeps changing. They keep having all these new requirements in terms of how an order needs to be processed. What they do is they keep building new wave types. We talked about wave planning before. Now they are up to like 70 or 80 different wave types. Every time there's another problem, wave fight number 82 if that solves our problem, it's not solving the problem. Part of the reason is that the system is not looking holistically across the facility and seeing how I can optimize the flow of work as a whole, not as an individual subsystem. That's part of what we are talking about here with the smart warehouse. That's the thing that traditional WMS has not done. That integration platform means I can connect all the tools and all the different systems I'm using all connect easily through that integration as opposed to the old way, which is a standalone $100,000 integration with expensive people who have to code. That's certainly part of it. It's managing the flow of work across that. I'm getting hit myself again but for example, you can have some scenarios where I have different paths for an order to be fulfilled. One of the paths and the most efficient for certain orders is maybe a group of put wall models. Let's say put wall area, for whatever reason, starts to be congested. All of a sudden, there's a big backup on the conveyor feeding into the put wall area. The system is going to automatically recognize that. For some time, route orders away from the put wall into manual cart picking, which takes them to the packing station, the same packing area where the put wall automotive leads. When the congestion is clear, then the system automatically reroutes that work back to the put walls again. Now you are looking at only the plain integration but in monitoring the flow of work that's happening and making real-time decisions accordingly. I'm an automotive guy, and we had all of those years. We used the term smart factories, and it was the same thing. How do we increase throughput? What can happen is you can end up with a local optimum where some guys are building a big stack of inventory and does nobody any good? What does all that excess inventory doing for me? What makes more sense is to say, “We are going to get this, so there's a flow to it. We are not building up too much inventory. There are no bottlenecks.” This is the same thing. What you are talking about here is, “How do I arrange my people so I don't have these guys sitting around because they already finished while these guys are in a congested area?” The core world's operations excellence is still the foundation. The term flow manufacturing came out of exactly what you are talking about there and was largely developed initially in the automotive industry. We are talking about the same thing. Now we are talking about flow distribution instead of flow manufacturing but the fundamental concepts, more of a pull-based system were being worked on capacities and constraints, more concerned with the total flow of goods and not what's happening in one individual area. All those are very consistent, whether you're looking at the principles that were established earlier in manufacturing or what's being applied here in distribution. I'm going to assume that at one time, the WMS, a big selling point would be, “We will tell you where your inventory is at,” That was probably a big step up. You go, “It does that. Now I'm going to tell you how that inventory moves off of your shelves and out the door and how you bring new inventory.” It's amazing. We still see quite a few every week, we see somebody that's a calling or emailing in, and then we talked to him. It turns out they don't have that real-time visibility of the inventory because they are using some kind of paper-based system or something, and sometimes these are even good size companies. In general, anybody that's implemented a tier-1 or tier-2 level, even WMS shouldn't have that real-time inventory visibility in doing that. It gets into that operations excellence and problem but that's the foundation, “I got to know what I got and where it is by lot, batch, serial number or whatever attribute is important for your operation or combination of attributes.” That's the foundation, but now, we are saying, “How do we optimize on top of that and get more product out the door and lower cost?” It requires investment. Having a WMS tell me, “Here is the information but it's not enough anymore.” To your point, we need all of this to get there. You asked me about some of the components of the smart warehouse, and I talked about it from a product category perspective, but now, I'm talking about it more from a philosophical or a functional view. One of the key foundations is constraining condition awareness, “What's happening in my building? What's happening with the flow of goods?” One of the things that first got me to understand WES in a deeper way is this notion that it's always-on listening and monitoring the environment. If you think about a traditional WMS, it's more sequential-oriented, “I receive the product. I put it away. I replenished pick sites. I do the picking. I take it to pack or evaluated services. I put it in this receiving staging. I get it shipping staging. I get it out the door all very good then the delivered.” A lot of companies don't have that. Organizing and automating all of that are big steps forward but we need to take it to the next level. If you think about this notion, the system is always on monitoring throughput and flow. There are certain rates and throughput that I'm expecting. I need to be able to have a flexible set of dashboards supported by event alerts and notifications. If there's a problem that says, “Here's what's happening across.” However, I wanted to find it in the area, I can define an area as a case picking module or as a whole three-level case pick module. I see that as one unit, and I want to know what the throughput is there. Maybe I want to see it at each level of that pick module. I can see it more gradually. What's nifty about this is that new level of visibility, the activity, throughput, bottlenecks, alerts, and corrective action automated, increasingly automated, if there are bottlenecks. That provides a nice set of real-time dashboards of looking stuff where people can see what's happening, “I have these many orders pending here that's already been completed. Here's how many are in picking,” or all of that level of detail. To understand what's going on here with the smart warehouse is, the system is using that same data that's being exposed to managers and supervisors that's what it's using to make decisions as well. I decided that example of being aware of the backup that's happening in the put wall and automatically, for some time, routing work around that until the congestion is cleared. That's what's different now about this visibility and activity monitoring. Being able to flexibly do that however you want to define a processing area could be evaluated services. It could be peace picking and all these things. Obviously, now the design is at these different flows throughout the facility are in sync. I'm not getting old backed up and packing, which is causing problems way back, picking and replenishment because I haven't automated the visibility and the flow, release in a way that's going to be cognizant and aware that I've got a problem here and, “Here's what I need to do about it for some time until we are adjusting. We are just taking action to solve the problem.” You sent me a PowerPoint and I have this here. It's got that real-time configurable dashboard. It's been a while since I have seen somebody had me a piece of paper but somebody handed me a piece of paper that had 40 columns. It was like an Excel spreadsheet or something, maybe a spin out of a system. It had so much, I looked at it and I was like, “What am I supposed to do with this?” I liked the idea of being able to configure it for those KPIs that I care about. [caption id="attachment_7943" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: One of the things that got me to understand WES in a deeper way is this notion that it's always on, listening and monitoring the environment.[/caption]   I don't want to measure everything. That's just me. Tell me the 4, 5 or 7 things that matter that tells me my warehouse is moving in the right direction, and that things are working well. It says, “Orders with issues.” I also love the idea that I don't find out about the issues in next week's report. I find out about them in real-time. The point that you made is a nice transition to this notion of another component. We talked about the real-time visibility of capacities, constraints, the conditions up there, and the always-on nature of the WES. Now, we have talked about looking at a table of 40 rows of information or whatever. It's all in the past. It brings up a point there, which is even with higher-end WMS, this is one of the learnings and insights that we have. There's still a tremendous amount of decision-making that is being done by human beings. As the manager, whoever you were talking about there in your example, staring at a 40-row spreadsheet or whatever, you see the same thing nowadays of managers and supervisors staring at computer screens, trying to figure out what the right thing to do next. Here's the reality. Every time you do that, first off, you introduce some latency into the system because it takes time to look at those different screens, think about it, make decisions, and scribble some things down on a piece of paper to remind you this needs to be taken care of or whatever. In most cases, there's no way a human being can make the optimal decision in the same way that a computer can. Even if you are a smart guy or girl, there's just too much data and too much to try to process at one time. Part of the capabilities of the smart WMS is the much more advanced software-based decision-making. Things like order batch optimization, given block of orders, “What's the best way to most effectively execute that on the software floor?” What we think is absolutely huge is this notion of the autonomous warehouse, as a term of Gartner is used, and others have used it as well but it talks about being able to automatically release work without the need for a wave planner, inventory expediters or all the kind of people that you see often involved in these decisions about what work to do when. Work relation on a variety of attributes, things like the order of priority, the inventory and resource availability, what kind of optimization opportunities are there? The bigger the order pool and more optimization opportunities you have because they are more data or conditions to be optimized but you can't hold on so long. You are not getting the throughput out through your cutoff time. This is a huge one. It's sophisticated. Whereas now, at 4:00 or 5:00, when the UPS, FedEx or whatever truck is leaving, you often see, and we have made commitments to the eCommerce is going to ship, you see a certain amount of chaos going around, trying to figure out all the orders that need to go on that truck, have been on the trucking and what to do about it. What we are talking about here is we are saying, “This is the work. We know how long it's going to take to pick and transport those orders to the shipping dock.” The work is going to automatically release itself. At the beginning of the day, we are more concerned about optimization. We still got a lot of decent amount of time, so we can focus on doing it the most efficient we can but as you go throughout the day, that needle starts to change from the focus on efficiency and cost to efficiency on customer service and making sure that those items are on there. The system does that automatically. It's configured to take those into consideration. Now those orders are getting on the trucks automatically without the chaos and the difficulty that's going on out there. This is a step-change capability here. We are talking about a system that is self-learning and in optimal how releases work. This is another concept we have had in distribution software before, and this is what defines what works on the smart warehouse. I had a boss in the past when I was young, I remember I sent an Excel spreadsheet to him, and it told a story. He's pulled me into his office and said, “This is a great Excel spreadsheet. I have to go through here and come to the same conclusion you did.” I go, “It's easy.” He goes, “No. When you send me this Excel spreadsheet, send me a recommendation. I don't want to have to come to a conclusion. That's your job. Show me that you attach the data back up but give me a recommendation.” I feel the same take way about running a warehouse, “Don't make me figure it out myself. Give me an alert that says, ‘This is a problem. This is how many orders are at risk. This is how many orders need to get on that truck that isn't done yet.'” To show you a simple example. Still, a lot of people, especially for eCommerce, are doing manual cart picking. I may have a cart that's got a certain configuration 3x3 or 4x4. What I mean by a 3x3 would be 3 shelves that each have room for 3 cartons each. I have nine total orders that I'm working on there. Most companies that we see do that are doing it with paper picking or pick by label or something. There's some attempt to do that more efficiently but something as simple as cart picking. The smart warehouse can take it to a whole new level. First off, you've got to get this order pool that's out there and at any one period. I'm probably going to have done some cartonization logic there to determine what should go in what box, especially with a multi carton order. In most cases, there's no way a human being can make the optimal decision in the same way that a computer can. Even if you're really smart, there's just too much data to process at one time. If you are shipping, for example, you don't want to put perfume in the same carton as payroll because of the obvious contamination that can happen there. When a picker comes up and scans a barcode on that cart, the system is going to automatically know it's this configuration, 3x3, 4x4 or whatever. It will have done some optimization typically in terms of what's called cluster picking were, “I'm going to take that cart to one location. I will put as many orders as I can on the cart that is signed to that cart that has the same set of skews so I can minimize my travel distance. Hopefully, I'm being clear on what that means.” Now I get to that location that can be done with lights or it can be done with barcode scanning. It says, “Take one of these from this location, put it in the carton slot 3'1, which is the 3rd shelf and the first location. The next one is 3'2. 2'3, 2'1 or whatever that sequence. I'm doing that in a way that makes it very efficient but we can take it even still beyond that. What if a high-priority order comes on? The pickers walk along as long as there's a location on that cart, whether it's a carton or a tote they are picking into. If it hasn't been started, we can remove automatically a lower priority order and insert a higher priority order that has come down onto that card as long as we would typically do it. The picker doesn't have to turn around and go backward as long as it picks for the new order or ahead of that picker. We do that without the picker, even being aware that it happened. You can expedite automatically like, “I got a truck that's going to be here one hour. We haven't even started yet. Let's get this going.” We say, “If you get an order in by 2:00, we will ship it that day. If it's 1: 58, all of a sudden, an order drops. I got two minutes.” This isn't going to automatically insert a higher priority order possible. I like something you said in there that we talked about the labor problem with these guys walking around maybe 5 or 10 miles in a day. One of the reasons we are going to quit, especially if you are me, is I don't want that many steps. When I walk over there, all my orders are in the same area, then I walk over here, and all my orders are there, as opposed to one side of the warehouse, and another order on the other side or I'm walking and go, “What has my life become where I walk back and like this?” Order pool optimization as well because the bigger the batch that I'm working with, the more opportunities I have to gain those picks together. On a given card, I'm maybe walking a very few feet. To your point, and this is where you get into the whole notion of mobile robots because now, perhaps that, “I go to the pick location, I pick the order but I'm putting it on a pick card. I'm putting it on a mobile robot, and the mobile robots can move on to the next location or on the packing of the orders completed. I'm walking very little at that point or comparatively little, which is one of the attractiveness of mobile robot technology.” Hopefully, it's becoming clearer. The nature of the warehouse is changing, and a part of that's going to have to be to not only be more cost-efficient and get more out the door with the staff that I've got but it's making sure that people have a less miserable work experience and hence hopefully going to stay with this a lot longer. This is not your grandpa's warehouse anymore. To be competitive, it used to be like, “These guys are high tech because they have a WMS.” Now we are starting to spin out the automation, the warehouse execution, and the integration platform. This is all getting really high-tech. Do you think this is probably the lowest-tech business there was many years ago? House is all going to play out. It's going to be interesting to see but the lighter automation techniques, including the robots and the put walls, are so attractive in terms of their flexibility and expandability. There are machine learning, artificial intelligence, and all kinds of things going to be involved here. The warehouses are becoming technology centers. If you see the private equity money that's flowing into robotics firms, AI firms, and others, in a lot of the smart money, it's the work that they do. Companies, retailers, and other eCommerce companies are starting to realize the importance of a well-run warehouse. Was this guy's quiet logistics? They've got bought by American Eagle. That was American Eagle recognizing the traditional retailer, the same thing we're going to buy ourselves a warehousing company because that's how important this business is. The force behind what has become locus robots. We will move our vendors that happened because Amazon had bought key assist systems right before that and left a quiet without a partner for automation they were building the business on. They invented their own robot. [caption id="attachment_7944" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: What's really different now about this kind of visibility and activity monitoring is being able to flexibly do that however you want to define a processing area.[/caption]   Bruce Welty was at my show. He's the Founder of Quiet. He said he got a phone call saying, “Are you guys using those Locus robots?” He says, “Yeah, how do you like them?” “We like them a lot. Can we come to visit?” “Sure.” It was Amazon. Amazon looked around and said, “We love this.” They bought Locus. A couple of other things I would like to bring up. First, broader use of some automation ideas or IoT type devices. RFID is starting to make something of a comeback years after Walmart tried back in 2003 or 2004. Generally, you are going to see many manual scanning activities that are going to disappear or if I need to move this way back now from being implemented at the store level by customers concerned with the eCommerce fulfillment for inventory equity purposes, you are going to see a move back up into the distribution operations. That will certainly be a big part of it. We were already doing things like, for example, we are a broker with a pick cart. Picker with a pick cart can walk up to a fixed zone. The IoT automatically recognizes that this person is on. It automatically turns on the pick lights that are on those four pick locations. It's a minor thing there but that's an advancement we are going to see. We have even done some stuff with congestion management and COVID, where we can tell exactly where somebody is in the I or using IoT and being able to assign work based on real-time visibility to who's closest to that work, but also when the COVID area being able to space people apart so that they don't get to say within 8 feet of each other, whatever that happens to be, whatever your metric you want to use, therefore that group constraint. There are some various things that can happen there. This is still slow going. It hasn't taken off as fast as many people think but you are going to see RFID and IoT start to make some mural inroads over the next years. We have this follow the notion of Gartner and what's considered to be called a conversational voice. The transactional voice is doing the picking, pallet build or something using voice technologies. Typically, reading in a location check digit and doing a hands-free pick, replenishment or whatever the task might be but we're starting to get now into more of a dialogue. We are all ready to the point now where we can have a supervisor take a smartphone and say, “Show me how I'm doing on wave number 235,” over a smartphone. That's going to bring back exactly what's happening now or, “Where's the replenishment for location on 3652?” We are still early in this game here but certainly, we will move to more of a dialogue going on with the WMS and WES than just playing transactional voice-type of technology. We ended with a very exciting where the future interface of the software is going to had. This is where that integration platform you talked about comes in handy. I can connect to all this stuff. The new killer app that comes out, I can get it. We have been left there. Automation and optimization of materials handling systems is certainly a key part of this. We refer to it, not just as a smart warehouse's the future but as the smart automated across to the future due to the interest in the technologies we have talked about several times already. We can directly connect with these picking assistance, like walls, pick the light or voice without the need for third-party software. Everyone else uses some kind of software from the put wall vendor, pixelate vendor or voice vendor, which adds another layer of integration and costs. It often results in people operating silos. We can directly control a lot of these materials handling technologies. It allows you to operate and optimize those in the context of everything that's happening in the world and all the information that's available, which provides you a lot of benefits over time because you are not just trying to operate in silos. I talked to somebody that was using a pick-to-light system. They talked about how at the end of every week, they've got to go in and clean up all these pics that some of them never were executed in the pick-to-light system. I'm not quite sure why that is but it wouldn't happen with the way we are approaching things because we would be aware of that. It probably has to wait on a real punishment. The problem is the pixelate vendor doesn't do replenishment the documents. You've got these silos going on here and there are a lot of opportunities. In terms of that integration platform, we think this is especially true for mobile robots, people are using the mobile software of the mobile robots. What that does is it limits the total optimization that can be achieved but more importantly, you are now totally dependent on that robot software. What if you want to add different robots or change horses three years from now? There's a better mousetrap that works faster or whatever that happens to be. Now you have become locked in. We refer to it not just as smart but the smart automated across to the future. We think the market needs a mobile robot and a broader automation integration platform. It's almost like an operating system for automation in the warehouse that's going to allow you to have visibility to optimization of robots of different kinds from the same manufacturer of different types for different manufacturers. You are not locked in. It's like a plug-and-play type of environment here three years from now. You can keep the robots or keep dependent you bought, but now, you want to add five more from a different vendor, plug them into this operating system, and have instant connectivity and the ability to optimize the performance. We think that's a much more low-risk approach going forward than locking yourself into a vendor that's coming to the software that's coming from the robot vendor. Get back to the idea of a smart warehouse. It's all about throughput. If I have different systems that are connecting, that are doing local optimums, that's a problem because it's not supporting throughput. I always need that one source of truth. That's the main system that says, “This is all about getting stuff out the door here.” I wanted to bring up one. Earlier, I talked about wanting to give an example of what the put wall. I referenced that as the cubbyholes in put walls. Here's the scenario we are seeing. Let's say there are three line items eCommerce order. Two of those line items in the order come from a carton flow rec area, that's very close to packing. I mean those orders are efficient to pick, in short distance to transport. The third line item is actually coming from a slow-moving mezzanine pick area that's farther away and is less efficient to pick. If you don't do anything, otherwise what's going to happen in those first two items from that order are going to show up rather quickly, then they are going to sit and wait for 10, 15, 20, 45 minutes or whatever it happens to be for that third item on the pick, the order to finally show up. The cubbyhole has been tied up that entire time. What's the smarter warehouse way of doing it? What's the WES way of doing it? Let's say it's 25% slower to go through the mezzanine or whatever the number you want to use it. We would release that third line item in effect 25% or 30% earlier. After the time it takes to pick and transport that as it's on its way to the pack station, now we release the other two orders line items in the carton flow rack. They show up at the put wall for processing at relatively the same time, and now I'm able to turn that wall without the latency that would occur if you didn't have smart software to do that. Hopefully, that's an example that makes it somewhat clearer as to how the optimization can affect operational performance. You would never be able to get that done manually. It doesn't happen. This is like drinking from a fire hose. There is so much going on in this. Put a bow on this. Give us your final thoughts on this. What do I need to get to have that smart warehouse? First of all, the benefit is it is going to reduce labor costs, have higher and more consistent DC throughput, you are going to reduce your need for automation in terms of things like the number of diverse or get more throughput out of the automation you have there. We didn't talk much about labor planning but that's a big part of it. We can dynamically assign workers throughout the course of a shift from 1 to 8 to 9, 9 to 10, or 10 to 11 hours where are they needed motion and in what quantities, improved automated decision-making. It's an assessment. Certainly, if you are heavily automated, there are a lot of opportunities for you. As I tried to make the point earlier, even if you're only modestly automated or not automated at all, these capabilities can have some real benefit for your operations there. The important thing to note with Softeon is these can be implemented very incrementally. I could implement a traditional WMS. Let's say I want the labor planning and allocation part of it. We can take that capability from WES and attach it to the WMS. To give you a solution, conversely, if you want to implement WES and leave your existing WMS in place, we didn't talk too much about that but that's a key dynamic. You need cartonization, which is a warehouse management function and even attach cartonization to that WES implementation. Flexibility is key. That's what we try to design. We call it a shirt component library, where the applications can borrow components, functionality, and services from each other. We are pretty confident that it gives us a chance to understand what you are trying to accomplish, what your operations are like or whatever that some combination of these technologies is going to have a pretty good fit and take your world to a whole new level than we have seen over the last many years. What's new over at Softeon?. What conferences do you go into? We have done with the motor show, and it was a big success for us. We not only showed the smart warehouse, we presented the smart warehouse capabilities. We had a lot of equipment pick the light, other packing stations, etc., right on our routes. At the bottom of every hour, we did a presentation. We had consistently good traffic the whole time. We did a bit of an educational track and a session on the smart warehouse of the future available on Softeon. It was very well attended. That was good. We will be at the Gartner Supply Chain Symposium down in Orlando and then break after that. [caption id="attachment_7945" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: Even if you're just modestly automated, these capabilities can have some real benefits on your operations. These can be implemented very incrementally.[/caption]   We finished up a series of educational broadcasts called the WMS Bootcamp, six different sessions on everything from building the business case to how to implement it successfully. It was a huge success, but all of that's now available on-demand. If they go up to Softeon.com. You will be able to find some links to that. If you have any interest in WMS, they're not commercial, educational sessions. You will find they have a lot of value. The feedback we got on it was outstanding. I would like to watch myself because we went over this and it is gone from simple to more complex over time. I know you are simplifying it but to understand what's required requires a Bootcamp. We learned a lot of lessons. I brought in some consultants and people that I knew and knew what they were talking about in terms of building the business case. We had some folks from Invista that came on and did that. I had some experience or exposure. I knew they knew what they were talking about. Some of that applies to some other consultants as well. It's a real nice series. It's non-commercial. If you want to learn some tips about how to get WMS selection and implementation, you'll find the Bootcamp serves you well. How do we reach out and talk to you over at Softeon? The way to get me is via email. My email address is DGilmore@TheSofteon.com. You can also use Contact@Softeon.com for the general inquiry box. I love to hear from you. Hopefully, we came across, so at least you know a little bit about what I'm talking about and discuss your problems as well. Anyone who wants to reach out can reach out and talk to you about the smart warehouse. Thanks, Joe. I enjoyed it. It was a great conversation. Thank you so much, Dan. Thank all of you for reading. Your supports are very much appreciated, until next time and more network.   Important Links Softeon Supply Chain Digest WMS Bootcamp DGilmore@TheSofteon.com Contact@Softeon.com https://www.linkedin.com/company/softeon The Logistics of Logistics Podcast If you enjoy the podcast, please leave a positive review, subscribe, and share it with your friends and colleagues. The Logistics of Logistics Podcast: Google, Apple, Castbox, Spotify, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Tunein, Podbean, Owltail, Libsyn, Overcast Check out The Logistics of Logistics on Youtube

Carlos Tonight
Ep. 19: Abiud Sando

Carlos Tonight

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 35:19


This week's episode features FedEx driver and TikTok star Abiud Sando, who has more than 3 million followers, and has been featured on ABC News and Univision. He uses his dance moves and creative collaborations to spread positivity around the world. Find out about the history of his Sando Twist and the nationwide tour he launched earlier this year. Plus, I'll tell you what city he'll be in next so you can meet him in person. Join us! -- Connect with Sando:www.tiktok.com/@abiud_sando www.instagram.com/abiud_sando -- Carlos TonightWritten and Produced by Carlos CorreaTheme by Sken Galis-- Sign Up for Carlos Tonight Express, the podcast newsletter:https://www.getrevue.co/profile/CarlosTonight -- Email me: carlostonightpodcast@gmail.com-- www.carlostonight.com

Super U Podcast
Rihanna

Super U Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 12:23


Robyn Rihanna Fenty NH (born February 20, 1988) is a Barbadian singer, actress, fashion designer, and businesswoman. Born in Saint Michael and raised in Bridgetown, Barbados, Rihanna was discovered by American record producer Evan Rogers who invited her to the United States to record demo tapes. With sales of over 250 million records worldwide, Rihanna is one of the best-selling music artists of all time. She has earned 14 number-ones and 31 top-ten singles in the US and 30 top-ten entries in the UK. Her accolades include nine Grammy Awards, 13 American Music Awards, 12 Billboard Music Awards, six Guinness World Records, and the NAACP's President's Award. Time named her one of the 100 most influential people in the world in 2012 and 2018. Forbes ranked her among the top ten highest-paid celebrities in 2012 and 2014. As of 2021, she is the wealthiest female musician, with an estimated net worth of $1.7 billion. Aside from music, Rihanna is known for her involvement in humanitarian causes, entrepreneurial ventures, and the fashion industry.   5x #1 Bestselling Author and Motivational Speaker Erik Qualman has performed in over 55 countries and reached over 50 million people this past decade. He was voted the 2nd Most Likable Author in the World behind Harry Potter's J.K. Rowling.   Have Erik speak at your conference: eq@equalman.com   Motivational Speaker | Erik Qualman has inspired audiences at FedEx, Chase, ADP, Huawei, Starbucks, Godiva, FBI, Google, and many more on Digital Leadership.   Learn more at https://equalman.com

Acquisitions Anonymous
Deal talk with first-time searcher Brock Briggs - Acquisitions Anonymous Episode 93

Acquisitions Anonymous

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 65:22


Mills Snell (@thegeneralmills) is joined by Brock Briggs (@BrockHBriggs), first-time searcher, to talk about 2 deals: A Florist company and a FedEx P&D Routes one. We talk about: operational aspects, financial modeling considerations, the trade-off of bringing a Limited Partner in, separating real estate from a business: when should you do it and how to limit your exposure as a buyer, and much more. -----Thanks to our sponsors!MicroAcquire is the #1 startup acquisition marketplace. It is simply the most efficient way to buy and sell startups when you're ready to make your next move.-----* Do you love Acquanon and want to see our smiling faces? Subscribe to our Youtube channel.* Do you enjoy our content? Rate our show!* Follow us on Twitter @acquanon Learnings about small business acquisitions and operations.-----Show Notes:1:27 Microacquire3:20 Brock's background5:08 What are you searching for Brock? Where are you in your search process?6:48 Deal 1: A massive Florist for sale in CT10:00 What do we think about this one?12:14 What's the potential upside from this deal? Where's the ceiling? How does size relate to growth opportunities?15:40 How should we think about the Customer Acquisition funnel? What should we consider from an operational side? 18:01 Don't assume growth opportunities to be low-hanging fruits20:07 How do we think about weddings as a revenue segment? What should we consider on the operational side?24:40 Thoughts on seasonality and part-time labor hiring28:28 Let's talk about financing: How do we think about bringing a Limited Partner to your first deal? What collateral could you consider lending against? 34:27 Real estate and business. Should you keep them together or separate them? What other options are there for the buyer?42:02 Deal 2: FedEx P&D Routes46:45 What did you like about this one?49:34 Operational considerations, what should we ask the seller? What debt are we assuming in this deal? What is the impact on the listing price?54:17 Is it an owner-operator kind of business? What should we dig into from an operational perspective? What are growth opportunities?56:56 Macro perspective thoughts? Why would I take on a business that FedEx refuses to operate?1:00:25 How do first-time buyers can get comfortable with the risk of things going south?-----Links:* Scuttlebuck Podcast* http://Twitter.com/BrockHBriggs-----Past guests on Acquanon include Nick Huber, Brent Beshore, Aaron Rubin, Mike Botkin, Ari Ozick, Mitchell Baldridge, Xavier Helgelsen, Mike Loftus, Steve Divitkos, Dzmitry Miranovich, Morgan Tate and more.-----Additional episodes you might enjoy:#90 Move over Elon - Here's what we'd do if we acquired Twitter#87 Yelp is not evil! Building a business using digital CAC - Featuring Johnny Robinson from Orange Window Cleaning#86 Rocketship your business with... Twitter?! - JK Molina joins for a Twitter Masterclass

AppleInsider Daily
05/10/2022: Customer trapped in Apple & FedEx blame game over lost Apple Watch... and more news

AppleInsider Daily

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 4:47


Tune in to our HomeKit Insider podcast covering the latest news, products, apps and everything you need for a smart home. Subscribe in Apple Podcasts, Overcast, or just search for HomeKit Insider wherever you get your podcasts. Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/homekit-insider/id1515834398 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/6NdU3vOKmP6pMpViTfM2ij Overcast: https://overcast.fm/itunes1515834398/homekit-insider Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5maXJlc2lkZS5mbS9ob21la2l0aW5zaWRlci9yc

Smackin' It Raw
FedEx Always Delivers - Smackin' It Raw Ep. 243

Smackin' It Raw

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 134:41


"The Warden" Matt Ridder and Vince "Daddy" Delgado have a weekly discussion about the WWE and pro wrestling in general.

Everyday MBA
How to Win with Risk

Everyday MBA

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 20:10


New York Times bestselling author Angie Morgan discusses the book "Bet On You" and how to win with risk. When Angie and her co-author Courtney Lynch signed up for the Marines, little did they know that they were about to get the master how to take risks. Now they mentor clients like Facebook, Google, Walmart, and FedEx. Listen for three action items to turn risk into opportunity. Host, Kevin Craine Do you want to be a guest?    

Field Posts
E99: Soybeans are Crushing It, Literally

Field Posts

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 33:17


From state-level adoption of low carbon fuel standards to companies like FedEx and Amazon making emission-reduction commitments to global conflicts putting petroleum-based fuel supplies in doubt, just about everything seems to be trending in favor of biodiesel at the moment. And soybean crush rates reflect that enthusiasm, with crush levels at historic highs and promising to go even higher as many new plants come online in the coming months. To discuss what all of this means for producers, we're sitting down this week with Progressive Farmer Crops Editor Matt Wilde. He's been working on a deep dive into the biodiesel and soybean crush space, and brings us the latest on the issue, including the increased competition for acres, likely impacts on feed and exports, and what all of this could mean for farm revenue, income, and even basis. We'll dig into all of this, and hear what experts and farmers think the future might look like.

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast
REPOST: 5 Trends Shaping Logistics with Ben Gordon

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 44:42


5 Trends Shaping Logistics with Ben Gordon Ben Gordon and Joe Lynch discuss 5 trends shaping logistics and supply chain. In the interview, Ben reviews and discussed trends and interesting companies in ecommerce, final mile, cold chain, reverse logistics, and fulfillment. About Ben Gordon Benjamin Gordon is the Founder and Managing Partner of Cambridge Capital. He draws on a career building, advising, and investing in supply chain companies. Benjamin has led investments in outstanding firms including XPO, Grand Junction, Bringg, Liftit, and others. As CEO of BGSA Holdings, Benjamin has spent his career investing in and helping to build supply chain and technology companies. Benjamin led the firm's efforts, advising on over $1 billion worth of supply chain transactions. Benjamin has worked with firms such as UPS, DHL, Kuehne & Nagel, Agility Logistics, NFI Logistics, GENCO, Nations Express, Raytrans, Echo Global, Dixie, Wilpak, and others. Prior to BGSA Holdings, Ben founded 3PLex, the Internet solution enabling third-party logistics companies to automate their business. Benjamin raised $28 million from blue-chip investors including Morgan Stanley, Goldman Sachs, BancBoston Ventures, CNF, and Ionian. 3PLex was then purchased by Maersk. Prior to 3PLex, Benjamin advised transportation and logistics clients at Mercer Management Consulting. Prior to Mercer, Benjamin worked in his family's transportation business, AMI, where he helped the company expand its logistics operations. Benjamin received a Master's in Business Administration from Harvard Business School and a Bachelor of Arts degree from Yale College. About Cambridge Capital Cambridge Capital is a private equity firm investing in the applied supply chain. The firm provides private equity to finance the expansion, recapitalization or acquisition of growth companies in our sectors. Our philosophy is to invest in companies where our operating expertise and in-depth supply chain knowledge can help our portfolio companies achieve outstanding value. Cambridge Capital was founded in 2009 as the investment affiliate of BG Strategic Advisors (www.bgsa.com), the advisor of choice for a large, growing number of supply chain CEOs. Cambridge Capital leverages BGSA's unique approach to strategy-led investment banking for the supply chain. BGSA is known for its work helping companies achieve outsized returns via targeted acquisitions and premium sales processes, and has worked with category leaders such as UPS, DHL, Agility Logistics, New Breed, NFI, Genco, Nations Express, Raytrans, and others. Our relationship with BGSA gives us deep market expertise, access to outstanding deal flow and people flow, transactional capabilities, additional resources, and a powerful core competency in the supply chain sector. The Partners and Advisory Board members of Cambridge Capital have diverse backgrounds with complementary technical, operating and financial expertise. The Cambridge Capital team has spent their careers building, growing, and advising outstanding companies in the supply chain sector. They include former leaders of UPS Logistics, Ryder Logistics, ATC Logistics, APL Logistics, Kuehne + Nagel, and other globally recognized firms. Cambridge Capital's professionals know what it takes to build great companies. Key Takeaways: 5 Trends Shaping Logistics with Ben Gordon In the podcast, Ben reviewed the following 5 trends shaping logistics:  Ecommerce Ecommerce has not only reshaped logistics, but it is also has reshaped the entire economy. According to McKinsey, 10 years of e-commerce adoption was compressed into three months. Because of explosive growth of ecommerce, small parcel companies, UPS, FedEx and DHL experienced exceptional growth. The U.S. Postal Service and Amazon have also seen huge growth in shipments due to the growth of ecommerce. Returns and reverse logistics Traditional retailers experience 6-8% of sales to be returned. Ecommerce sellers have returns of approximately 30%. Returned items are a major pain point for both sellers and logistics providers because they are unplanned, very expensive, and difficult to manage. To address the returns and reverse logistics challenge, companies like ReverseLogix have created reverse logistics technology that reduces costs and enhances the customer's experience, while increasing inventory recovery and visibility into the reverse logistics life-cycle. Last mile Last mile or final mile is perhaps the most important and difficult part of direct-to-consumer (DTC) shipping. Last mile accounts for 41% of the cost of business-to-consumer shipping. Amazon has raised customer expectations with a superior DTC experience that many companies will fail to replicate. In response, firms like Bringg are helping their clients deliver a last-mile experience that is comparable to the Amazon experience. Delivery software and service companies like Delivery Circle are helping companies leverage technology to make local delivery service more efficient and profitable. Ecommerce fulfillment Ecommerce fulfillment is the backbone of the direct-to-consumer supply chain and to successful, fulfillment companies must excel at both technology and warehousing & logistics. Many companies entering the fulfillment space from a technology background struggle with warehousing, logistics, and operations, while traditional warehousing & logistics companies may initially lack the technical expertise. Medical logistics and cold chain During COVID, the importance of the medical logistics and supply chain was highlighted especially in the areas of the cold chain. The lack of adequate cold chain infrastructure is proving to be a problem in the developing world. Cold chain monitoring and compliance is an area primed for growth. Learn More About the 5 Trends Shaping Logistics Ben Gordon Cambridge Capital 2021 BGSA Holdings Supply Chain Conference 2021 BGSA Holdings Supply Chain Conference – Welcome Remarks from Ben Gordon Related Podcasts Faster, Better Freight Quotes with Dawn Salvucci-Favier Alternatives to UPS and FedEx The Logistics of Logistics Podcast If you enjoy the podcast, please leave a positive review, subscribe, and share it with your friends and colleagues. The Logistics of Logistics Podcast: Google, Apple, Castbox, Spotify, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Tunein, Podbean, Owltail, Libsyn, Overcast Check out The Logistics of Logistics on Youtube

GeekWire
Robots, automation, AI, and the Pirate Parrot: Insights from our return to the epicenter of robotics

GeekWire

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 28:52


It's going to be a long time before robots replace sports mascots, but it might be better for one of our GeekWire colleagues when they do. That's one of the more lighthearted takeaways from our return trip to Pittsburgh, where GeekWire co-founder John Cook somehow managed to make enemies with yet another pro sports mascot, but we also came away with some more fundamental insights into the state of robots, automation and artificial intelligence: Supply chain challenges and labor shortages are changing the national conversation about automation, and accelerating adoption of robotics especially in manufacturing and distribution. Amazon's ambitions for rapid delivery are boosting robotics and automation across the e-commerce industry by prompting competitors to follow suit with their own solutions to increase logistics efficiencies. Robotics startups and autonomous driving companies are finding success in business and enterprise markets, as evidenced by Aurora Innovation's work with Paccar and FedEx on a self-driving truck. Many consumer robotics companies are still trying to do too much in making multi-purpose robots, rather than focusing on doing one thing well, as illustrated by the initial reception to Amazon's Astro home robot.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Startupeable
067. Alexis Patjane, 99 Minutos | La Montaña Rusa de Emprender y Cómo Transformar la Logística

Startupeable

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 54:14


En los últimos años, nos hemos acostumbrado a ver las noticias sobre rondas de capital millonarias y los anuncios de unicornios. Si bien contar estas historias es importante para inspirar a más latinoamericanos a participar en la industria de tecnología, a veces parece que se nos olvida que emprender es difícil, y que detrás de las historias de éxito, hay historias de mucho trabajo y resiliencia.En el episodio de hoy, nos acompañó Alexis Patjane, CEO y fundador de 99minutos, una de las startups de logística más grande en Latinoamérica que, a la fecha, ha levantado más de 100 millones de dólares de fondos de capital internacionales como Oak y Prosus, y fondos locales como Kaszek Ventures y 500 Startups.Alexis nos contó sobre los momentos más difíciles en la historia de 99minutos, y cómo él y su equipo se sobrepusieron a ellos. También, hablamos sobre las dificultades de la industria logística y cómo 99minutos ha sido capaz, con tecnología, de competir con grandes compañías como DHL y Fedex.* Este episodio es auspiciado por Jeeves, la plataforma de crédito corporativo sin costo y con hasta 3% de cashback. Aplica y accede en https://bit.ly/3EsYcZfPara revisar las notas del episodio, visita https://startupeable.com/99minutos/Además, si te gusta nuestro Podcast, la manera más sencilla de ayudarnos es dejando una reseña en Apple Podcasts: https://ratethispodcast.com/startupeable y siguiéndonos en:- Web: https://startupeable.com/ - LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/startupeable/ - Twitter: https://twitter.com/startupeable - Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/startupeable/ - YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/Startupeable

Super U Podcast
Tracy Gorham

Super U Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 34:05


In today's episode, Erik speaks with Tracy Gorham. We talk a lot about superhero's on this podcast and Tracy is the telecommunications and education sector's Wonder Woman. Tracy is the Founder and CEO of ConexED. Tracy's experiences in the foster home community inspired her to build a company that ensures the successful enrollment to graduation for all students regardless of ability or location.The first all-in-one success platform, ConexED makes it possible for students to connect with the right person, at the exact time they need help, in the way that works best for them. ConexED removes roadblocks, and simplifies success. Thank you Tracy, we want to be like you when we grow up.   5x #1 Bestselling Author and Motivational Speaker Erik Qualman has performed in over 55 countries and reached over 50 million people this past decade. He was voted the 2nd Most Likable Author in the World behind Harry Potter's J.K. Rowling.   Have Erik speak at your conference: eq@equalman.com   Motivational Speaker | Erik Qualman has inspired audiences at FedEx, Chase, ADP, Huawei, Starbucks, Godiva, FBI, Google, and many more on Digital Leadership.   Learn more at https://equalman.com

Check Your Balances
Wrong Decisions, Right Outcomes

Check Your Balances

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 20:32


Inspired by the story of Fred Smith gambling to save FedEx early on, Ross and Dan explore scenarios where wrong financial decisions may have positive outcomes.Send questions for the show to checkyourbalances@outlook.com to be featured on the show.

Leadership Next
A Conversation With the Incoming CEO of FedEx

Leadership Next

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 27:57


Fred Smith envisioned FedEx during his time as an undergrad at Yale. By 1973 his school project had become a functioning business. He's been a part of the organization ever since. But on June 1st he'll step down from the role of CEO and transition to FedEx Executive Chairman. Taking the reins at the Fortune 500 giant is current President and COO, Raj Subramaniam. In his first interview with a major media outlet, Raj tells Leadership Next how he came to FedEx, and how he's thinking about filling the shoes of a legendary CEO. Also in today's conversation: why the company stopped delivering packages for Amazon, the role FedEx played in delivering crucial COVID-19 supplies, and how technology will impact FedEx operations in the future.

The Andy Pollin Hour Podcast
05-02-22 Andy's draft review

The Andy Pollin Hour Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 47:21


Andy starts the show with a recap of the NFL draft including some comments from Ron Rivera on Sam Howell. Andy has thoughts on the Commanders picks. Bram Weinstein joins the show to discuss the draft party at Fed Ex field and gives his thoughts on the draft. A unique talent.... For more sports coverage, download the ESPN630 AM app, visit https://www.sportscapitoldc.com, or tune in live from 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Monday-Friday. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Barron's Streetwise
The Case for FedEx Stock. Plus, Data Driven Investing.

Barron's Streetwise

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 21:44


Hear from Barron's all-star Andrew Bary and Nick Maggiulli, author of Just Keep Buying: Proven Ways to Save Money and Build Your Wealth. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

NIGHT DEMON HEAVY METAL PODCAST
Episode #92 - Vysteria - Part 2

NIGHT DEMON HEAVY METAL PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 53:49


This week we conclude our examination of "Vysteria," the fourth 7" single released by Night Demon in 2020. The band discusses the track's lyrical themes, and explains how the lyrics came along as a collaborative process after the music had already been written and recorded. Jarvis takes you line by line through the lyrics to dispel some of the myths and misunderstandings about "Vysteria." Then each member reflects on his parts, and specifically the inspirations behind them and challenges they create in the performance context. They talk about why (as of the taping of this episode in early April 2022) the song had never been played live, but how they expect it to feature prominently in the setlist in the future. You will learn about the different mixes of the song, the cover art, the case of the missing 7" vinyl, the video, and the misguided reactions by certain quarters of the Internet. Become a subscriber today at nightdemon.net/subscriber. This week, subscribers have access to the bonus content below:Full art and packagingUnused music video clipsMusic video treatment sheetKurt Ballou alternate mixes Metallica "Disposable Heroes" - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jtNrx1c3Xh8Randy Burns - https://www.facebook.com/randyburnsproducer/Kurt Ballou - https://www.facebook.com/KurtBallou/Ross Sewage - https://www.doktorsewage.com/"Vysteria" video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vlfe92gdcs0 Listen at nightdemon.net/podcast or anywhere you listen to podcasts! 

Coach Class Podcast
Ep. 210 Fakin the Wealth!

Coach Class Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 61:58


The coaches are back! Of course, Rich forgot but this is 4 years people! Thank you for the support. Was this the best slap ever recorded (01:18). The new Batman got Mike bumping Nirvana this week (11:18). Rich's YT Misery this week: Netflix's John Wayne Gacy Tapes (19:40). Mike feels FedEx owes him some bread after his most recent purchase (42:30). Rich can only rap in the shower (49:25). With Much More!!!

Adam Carolla Show
Part 1: Indy Ball Puller + High School Football Drills (ACS Apr 29)

Adam Carolla Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 69:27


Adam opens the show with a clip of Biden being interrupted by the Easter Bunny and a Los Angeles car chase that ended because of all the trash. Adam then talks about when The Man Show staff use to get gifts for each other. They turn to the phones and speak to a FedEx aircraft mechanic wanting to pull balls for the upcoming ‘Adam Carolla Is Unprepared' show in Indianapolis. Chris reads a story about an LA man who got killed while trying to steal a catalytic converter. Gina brings in a picture of a urinal sink, and the gang discuss Tanya Tucker. Adam shows some pictures of a mysterious concrete structure being built on PCH. Before the break, Adam and Bryan talk about high school football drills. THANKS FOR SUPPORTING TODAY'S SPONSORS: JBweld.com Apartments.com Geico.com Pluto.TV

The DotCom Magazine Entrepreneur Spotlight
Thomas Budinick, Co-Founder and President of All That Ship, A DotCom Magazine Interview

The DotCom Magazine Entrepreneur Spotlight

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 25:04


About Thomas Budinick and All That Ship: Tom is a serial entrepreneur and has founded, built and sold a number of different companies in varying industries. Currently, he is the CEO of Budinick & Associates, LLC, which provides expert supply chain consulting services including global retained talent acquisition. Tom possesses deep domain expertise in end-to-end supply-chain management solutions. His clients have included each of the Big Four consulting firms, numerous private equity clients along with many Fortune 500 companies. Most recently, Tom helped scale a consulting firm from a startup to over $100 Million in revenue and helped position it for a recent sale. Prior, Tom served as the Managing Partner of Austin Henley and Company where he led the firm's supply chain practice and served as the Chair of the firm's supply chain management Center of Excellence. All That Ship is the multicarrier platform designed to simplify your business and Save You Money in the Process. Ship anything, anywhere, for less. All the Carriers You Know including FedEx. UPS, USPS, DHL & more! We partner with dozens of global carriers and platforms, which means you can get started immediately. No integration work necessary. Let us show you how we can streamline your shipping and save you money with our discounted rates!

Super U Podcast
7 Super Tips From 7 Avengers

Super U Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 21:27


Avengers... Assemble. This being the Super U Podcast, it's only fitting that we hear from a few of our favorite superheroes. In this episode, we're joined by Chris Evans (Captain America), Elizabeth Olsen (Wanda Maximoff), Chris Hemsworth (Thor), Scarlett Johansson (Black Widow), Tom Holland (Spiderman), Robert Downey Jr. (Ironman), and the late Chadwick Boseman (Black Panther).   5x #1 Bestselling Author and Motivational Speaker Erik Qualman has performed in over 55 countries and reached over 50 million people this past decade. He was voted the 2nd Most Likable Author in the World behind Harry Potter's J.K. Rowling.   Have Erik speak at your conference: eq@equalman.com   Motivational Speaker | Erik Qualman has inspired audiences at FedEx, Chase, ADP, Huawei, Starbucks, Godiva, FBI, Google, and many more on Digital Leadership.   Learn more at https://equalman.com

The Strategy Skills Podcast: Management Consulting | Strategy, Operations & Implementation | Critical Thinking
237: Ryan Jenkins & Steven Van Cohen, How to Defeat Loneliness Through Connection

The Strategy Skills Podcast: Management Consulting | Strategy, Operations & Implementation | Critical Thinking

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 51:45


Welcome to Strategy Skills episode 237, an episode with workplace loneliness experts and thought leaders, Ryan Jenkins and Steven Van Cohen. In this episode, Ryan and Steven discuss a vital, sensitive, and very interesting topic: loneliness. Oftentimes, loneliness and emotional pain is taken lightly compared to physical pain. But physiologically, the effect is nearly the same. The conversation revolved around answering why do we feel lonely and how we can battle and address this issue. Ryan and Steven talked about the significance of awareness, connection, a sense of safety and belonging, and mental health, which largely contributes to resolving loneliness and is the key to developing a healthy personal and professional environment. Ryan Jenkins CSP® (Certified Speaking Professional™) is an internationally recognized keynote speaker and three-time published author. He speaks all over the world to companies such as State Farm, Salesforce, Wells Fargo, FedEx, Liberty Mutual, and John Deere. For a decade, he has been helping organizations create engaged, inclusive, and high-performing teams by lessening worker loneliness and closing generational gaps. Ryan's top-ranked insights have been featured in Forbes, Fast Company, and The Wall Street Journal. He is also co-founder of LessLonely.com, the world's first resource fully dedicated to reducing worker isolation and strengthening team connections. Ryan lives in Atlanta, GA with his wife, three children, and yellow Labrador. Steven Van Cohen is a global leadership consultant, author, and executive coach. Steven has spent 12 years working with hundreds of leaders from organizations like Salesforce, The Home Depot, Komatsu, and Bridgestone, helping them improve worker well-being, reduce employee isolation, and boost team belonging. Dubbed "The Leadership Whisperer," Steven has inspired thousands through his workshops, keynotes, and virtual events. He is co-founder of LessLonely.com (the world's first resource for addressing loneliness at work) and CEO of SyncLX (a consultancy that works with many Fortune 500 companies.) Steven holds a Master of Science in Organizational Development from Pepperdine University and a BA from The University of Illinois Champaign-Urbana. Steven lives in San Juan Capistrano, CA with his wife and two daughters. Get Ryan & Steven's book here: Connectable: How Leaders Can Move Teams From Isolated to All In. Ryan Jenkins & Steven Van Cohen Enjoying this episode? Get access to sample advanced training episodes here: www.firmsconsulting.com/promo

Predictable B2B Success
4 stage demand generation marketing strategies to drive pipeline growth

Predictable B2B Success

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 53:45


Matthew Hunt is the founder of Automation Wolf, a company that supports B2B founders and CEOs to develop snackable content that keeps them top of mind and stay consistent in prospects' newsfeeds; while also bridging the gap between short and long-form content. Matthew Hunt was an ashamed introverted dyslexic but has turned himself into a successful extroverted dyslexic entrepreneur. He built 3 B2B profitable companies in the last 13 years all built on the back of smart marketing & sales. Matthew has worked with 100s of companies (large & small) to help them implement marketing & sales strategies. To name a few, he has worked with RE/MAX, Valvoline, FedEx, Chef's Plate, League & TouchBistro. Matthew knows that no one likes to be marketed to, or sold to, especially prospects. In this episode, he shares his 4 stage demand generation marketing strategies to drive pipeline growth. Insights he shares include: Commonly held beliefs that do not help demand generation marketing strategiesWhy you need to own the relationships more than great marketing and copywritingHow Matthew defines demand generation marketingHow to get personal with people in the post-pandemic world we live inHow demand generation and creating community works better than inbound or outbound marketingWhat could community look like for a businessWhy Matthew recommends every business consider hosting a virtual summitDoes demand generation work for all types of businessesWhat do demand generation marketing strategies hinge on and what does it entailWhat metrics to use for demand generation marketing strategiesand much much more ....

The Road to Autonomy
Episode 85 | Decarbonizing Last Mile Delivery

The Road to Autonomy

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 36:28


Rachad Youssef, Chief Product Officer, BrightDrop joined Grayson Brulte on The Road To Autonomy Podcast to discuss decarbonizing last mile delivery.The conversation begins with Rachad discussing why January 2021 was the right time to launch BrightDrop.January 2021 was a great opportunity to announce what BrightDrop was going to do, because it was a real date in terms of our ability to deliver. – Rachad YoussefWith delivery traffic projected to grow 78% by 2030 and the global commitment to decarbonization, BrightDrop created the right product at the right time. One year after announcing the BrightDrop vans, their customers vans are out in the field currently delivering goods to homes and business in the LA region. The first vans were delivered to FedEx in December 2021, less than one year after launching the company.It took 14 months to put a vehicle on the road. During that time you have to incorporate a tremendous amount of learnings from studies in the field as well as the ability to find a vehicle platform that can accommodate those needs, and truly tailor it for the use case. – Rachad YoussefBrightDrop vans are utilizing GM's Ultium battery platform providing range of 250 miles on a single charge. As the Ultium battery platform becomes more dense, those new longer range batteries will find their way into the vans. The ability for us to incorporate new chemistries and new technologies with regards to the battery itself is a commitment from BrightDrop from Day 1. – Rachad YoussefBrightDrop is focused on fully integrating software and hardware together to deliver an experience for the delivery driver that is easier than today's traditional vans. An example of this commitment is the Trace vehicle concept which is integrated into the van's design. The Trace vehicle allows delivery drivers to move goods quicker and easier. It's really about ease of doing business. It's really about showing our customers that we get it and that we are with them through their deployments. – Rachad YoussefOne of those customers is Walmart. Walmart is using both the Zevo 400 and Zevo 600 vans as part of their decarbonization strategy for delivery. The decarbonization of last mile delivery using electric vans is only going to accelerate as more companies adopt and implement an ESG strategy.Wrapping up the conversation, Rachad discusses how his time at Zoox influenced how he approaches design.Good design for me in this space comes with purpose. In other words, you are really looking for elegant ways to bring simplicity to complex situations. – Rachad YoussefRecorded on Tuesday, April 12, 2021.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Dogs Are Smarter Than People via Anchor

Every Day The puppy galloped through the garden While the Fed-Ex guy told me about how His brain was fried. People keep offering Me beer, he says. They say they'll hide it in my water bottle, but one accident and I'll lose my job. God, I need it though. The tourists make everything harder as they walk Down the center of the streets. Cruise ships Anchor in the harbor. One has a giant slide That goes all the way around the ship, even on the outside. I feel like I'm on that every day, just going down. Hey. Is that your puppy eating something? I tell him, She chews at the roots of things, too. Every day. Hey, thanks for listening to Carrie Does Poems. These podcasts and more writing tips are at Carrie's website, carriejonesbooks.blog. There's also a donation button there. Even a dollar inspires a happy dance in Carrie, so thank you for your support. The music you hear is made available through the creative commons and it's a bit of a shortened track from the fantastic Eric Van der Westen and the track is called “A Feather” and off the album The Crown Lobster Trilogy. While Carrie only posts poems weekly here, she has them (in written form) almost every other weekday over on Medium. You should check it out! https://freemusicarchive.org/music/eric-van-der-westen/the-crown-lobster-trilogy-selection --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/carriejonesbooks/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/carriejonesbooks/support

The Near Memo
Amazon's Buy with Prime; AI content & the future of the internet, What content drives SMB research?

The Near Memo

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2022 25:16


Amazon's bold play to push Prime benefits across all of e-commerce is not only a direct threat to Shopify but UPS and FedEx as well. While it will bring trust and convenience to small and local websites,  which types of businesses will actually benefit from Buy Prime on their site?Google's has stated that AI generated content is against their guidelines. But their guidelines are not so clear as they seem to imply that human edited content will be ok. What is the future of on-line content? Will Google be able to moderate the coming tsunami of AI generated content?Very small businesses want to do their own research when buying SAAS products but which sorts of content do they use to do that? There isn't really a single content source that drives uptake. Perhaps AI driven content might be able to allow content to be more easily repurposed across content types. The Near Memo is a weekly conversation about Search, Social, and Commerce: What happened, why it matters, and the implications for local businesses and national brands.Near Memo Ep 61

Insight On Business the News Hour
The Business News Headlines 21 April 2022

Insight On Business the News Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 10:58


Welcome to the business news headlines and make sure you click through for a conversation about the acquisition of Iowa Watch by the Midwest Center for Investitive Reporting and what that means for the two non-profits.  My guests are Lyle Muller and Pam Dempsey.  But, first the news: Higher Interest Rates; Netflix and Password Sharing; Debt Collection of Debt...not owed; Amazon taking on UPS and FedEx; That KitKat Bar...gonna cost you more; The company lost money but the stock goes up; The Wall Street Report; That didn't take long as CNN+ bites the dust. For the interview you'll meet returning guest Lyle Muller from Iowa Watch which was just acquired by the Midwest Center for Investigative Reporting or Investigate Midwest. The Executive Director of the news agency is Pam Dempsey who joins us on this call. To listen to that conversation click here. Thanks for coming by! The award winning Insight on Business the News Hour with Michael Libbie is the only weekday business news podcast in the Midwest. The national, regional and some local business news along with long-form business interviews can be heard Monday - Friday. You can subscribe on PlayerFM, Podbean, iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher or TuneIn Radio. And you can catch The Business News Hour Week in Review each Sunday Noon on News/Talk 1540 KXEL. The Business News Hour is a production of Insight Advertising, Marketing & Communications. You can follow us on Twitter @IoB_NewsHour. 

DSO Secrets
143: Overcoming Overthinking - An Interview with NYT Bestselling Author & DEO Summit Keynote, Jon Acuff

DSO Secrets

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 29:58


In this episode, Emmet is joined by Jon Acuff, a New York Times bestselling author of seven books, including his most recent, “Soundtracks, The Surprising Solution To Overthinking”. Jon is a keynote speaker for the upcoming DEO Growth Summit 2022 in June. Known for his insights wrapped in humor, he is one of INC's Top 100 Leadership Speakers, having spoken to hundreds of thousands of people including employees of FedEx, Nissan, Microsoft, and more. Referencing his latest book, “Soundtracks”, Jon shares insights on what he's learned about overthinking; the surprising solution to and how to break down overthinking; adopting a mindset that leads to growth; adapting to change; and more. With Emmet, Jon discusses his experience growing up around dental offices, sharing his practical wisdom with dental entrepreneurs, leadership in this complex time, and more, all giving a sneak peek into his keynote presentation for the Growth Summit in June. Learn more about Jon here: https://acuff.me/. To hear him as well as many stellar group dentistry speakers, register now for DEO Growth Summit 2022, June 9-11 in Scottsdale: https://deodentalgroup.com/events/.

Total Information AM
Replace Your Pear Tree with Native Flowering Tree

Total Information AM

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 4:28


KMOX's Debbie Monterrey talks to Forest Relief's Executive Director, Meredith Perkins, about the invasive pear tree and their efforts to remove them from communities, and how the Missouri Invasive Plant Task Force is teaming up with FedEx to give away native trees to those who remove their pear trees. 

INspired INsider with Dr. Jeremy Weisz
How a Business Grew to $100 Million Using Direct Mail With Kevin Donlin, Founder of Client Cloning Systems

INspired INsider with Dr. Jeremy Weisz

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 47:43


Kevin Donlin is the Founder of Client Cloning Systems, a company that helps executives leverage the power of direct mail, email, and warm calls. Kevin has been involved in marketing since 1994 and sold one of the first ebooks online, which was the beginning of his e-commerce journey. By the late 90s, he was a Webmaster for FedEx, where he worked with some of the pioneers of online marketing. Since 1998, Kevin has been a copywriter and marketing advisor, delivering sales gains of more than $1 million on multiple occasions through direct mail and online marketing. He's been interviewed by ABC, CBS, NBC, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Fortune magazine, and many more. He's a co-author and author of five marketing books.  In this episode… Is your business or product helping your customers avoid immense pain? If yes, why aren't they rushing to do business with you and grow your revenue? One reason: you're marketing like everyone else. What if there was a way to break people's patterns, trigger their emotional hot buttons, and get them to buy?  Paper mail and direct response marketing are how to do it. Why? Because anything in print will be more believable and valuable than what you read online. But the secret is knowing how to unlock your customers' hidden desires, communicating in their language, and solving their pain. Ready to roll?  Listen to this episode of the Inspired Insider Podcast with Dr. Jeremy Weisz featuring the Founder of Client Cloning Systems, Kevin Donlin. They discuss what the Client Cloning Kit is, why the value of paper mail outweighs the cost, how to write copy that pushes people's emotional buttons to take action, and generating millions in revenue through direct mail. Stay tuned.

The FORT with Chris Powers
#210: Robin Sharma - Global Leader of Leaders and Personal Mastery Expert

The FORT with Chris Powers

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 60:35


Robin Sharma is a humanitarian who has devoted his life to helping people express their highest natural gifts. He is widely regarded as one of the top leadership and personal-mastery experts in the world. His clients include NASA, Microsoft, NIKE, Unilever, GE, FedEx, HP, Starbucks, Oracle, Yale University, PwC, IBM Watson, and the Young Presidents' Organization. His #1 international bestsellers, such as The 5 AM Club, The Greatness Guide, and Who Will Cry When You Die?, have sold millions of copies in over ninety-two languages, making him one of the most widely read authors on the planet. On this episode, Robin and Chris discuss the characteristics of the top leaders in the world - good and bad. They uncover excerpts from Robin's latest book - Everyday Hero Manifesto and how to apply them daily. Robin also shares the 20/20/20 rule of getting your day started and how you can parent in a way that inspires kids to become leaders and much more. Follow Chris on Twitter: www.Twitter.com/FortWorthChris  Follow Chris on LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/chrispowersjr/  Subscribe to The Fort on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuJ32shRt8Od3MxMY-keTSQ Follow The Fort on Instagram: www.Instagram.com/TheFortPodcast   (01:17) - Robins Career & Background (03:07) - Feeling Angst and Unfulfilled (06:58) - Experiencing Trauma & Understanding our Feelings The Power of Positive Thinking by Norman Vincent Peale (11:09) - Why does everyone say mindset is the only way to succeed? (12:56) - Optimizing Your Morning: The 20-20-20 Routine The 5AM Club by Robin Sharma (17:59) - How does drinking affect the 20-20-20 opportunity? (19:05) - Can you teach curiosity? (22:02) - Hidden Traits of Billionaires (25:41) - Seeking Validation from a Very Young Age (28:41) - What's your process when you get negativity on social media? (33:10) - What brings down the largest public figures in society? (37:07) - How do you help the most successful people grow their businesses even more? (42:15) - How much of your life outside of work impacts your business? (44:29) - Legacy is a Waste of Time Who Will Cry When You Die? by Robin Sharma Meditations by Marcus Aurelius (47:35) - The Anti-Hustle Culture (52:18) - Do you have an opinion on WFH? (54:20) - Do you have a childhood experience that shaped you? (55:37) - Advice to Young Parents (58:46) - How can people contact you and read your book? The Everyday Hero Manifesto by Robin Sharma Robin on Instagram The Mastery Sessions Podcast RobinSharma.com The Fort is produced by Johnny Podcasts

Super U Podcast
Gordon Ramsay Podcast

Super U Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 16:17


Gordon Ramsay is a British chef, restaurateur, television personality, and writer. His global restaurant group, Gordon Ramsay Restaurants, was founded in 1997 and has been awarded 16 Michelin stars overall; it currently holds a total of seven. After rising to fame on the British television miniseries Boiling Point in 1999, Ramsay became one of the best-known and most influential chefs in the United Kingdom. On today's podcast learn the one piece of advice that Ramsey gives every aspiring chef and entrepreneur.   5x #1 Bestselling Author and Motivational Speaker Erik Qualman has performed in over 55 countries and reached over 50 million people this past decade. He was voted the 2nd Most Likable Author in the World behind Harry Potter's J.K. Rowling.   Have Erik speak at your conference: eq@equalman.com   Motivational Speaker | Erik Qualman has inspired audiences at FedEx, Chase, ADP, Huawei, Starbucks, Godiva, FBI, Google, and many more on Digital Leadership.   Learn more at https://equalman.com

The Rants And Raves Podcast
Lizards, Snakes and Ants

The Rants And Raves Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 81:09


The fact that Jessica said "You need to buckle up for this episode" at the end of the show tells you all you need to know as Dana has to rein her in throughout. A rant gone wrong has Jess fed up with Fed Ex. Dana shares a listener's dismay and disgust for what is required to maintain male pet lizards.  Weirdo of the Week is a guy who is the living proof that karma will come back and bite you in the ass.  Animal Instincts explores ants and what scientists are now learning is possible with these tiny creatures and their ability to sniff things out.  Rave #1 is Lego Replay, a recycling program to put legos in to the hand of new users who otherwise don't have them.  Rave #2 is Pysanky for Peace, the old tradition of creating beautiful art and pattern on eggs by way of beeswax and dyes being taught at workshops who are donating funds back to Ukraine.   Lego - https://www.lego.com/en-us/sustainability/environment/replay/ Pysanky for Peace - https://pysankyforpeace.com/ 

Underdog Empowerment
EP: 326 - Dominate Business and Personal Life with Shannel Venegas

Underdog Empowerment

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 71:18


Shannel wants you to know that the universe is on your side. It's never conspiring against you–only conspiring for you, so that you can fulfill your ultimate purpose and become completely empowered. Shannel Venegas is the founder of Beauty & Hustle, a women's empowerment brand that started as a Facebook group and has since grown far beyond that. Her corporate job at FedEx taught her about the lack of empowerment in the industry, but also taught her about her own power as a leader. It was this combination that led her to found Beauty & Hustle and to start a business in direct selling with LulaRoe. No matter what she does, she always comes out on top–that's just who she is. On this episode of Underdog Empowerment, Shannel is here to prove that what other people think of you should never slow you down. Her own inner fire is what took her from feeling isolated at her FedEx job to launching her own apparel brand that has now sold over seven figures. She has tons of good advice for you today, from building a brand culture to finding the lesson hiding in every experience. Tune in to bring a new perspective to your hustle! Show Notes: https://underdogempowerment.com/shannel-venegas   Get More Involved:  Leave A Review & Subscribe On iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/underdog-empowerment/id1373572178 Free A-to-Z roadmap on launching a top-shelf podcast: https://underdogempowerment.com/roadmap Access Our Top Resource Recommendations: https://underdogempowerment.com/resources/ Subscribe On YouTube: https://underdogempowerment.com/youtube  

The Journal.
Red-Flag Laws, Their Application and One Mother's Experience

The Journal.

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 18:52


A year ago, Brandon Hole killed eight people at a FedEx facility in Indianapolis. His mother, Sheila, had tried to get law enforcement to take away his firearms. WSJ's Zusha Elinson explains the red-flag laws that could have helped stop this mass shooting. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Dave Lukas, The Misfit Entrepreneur_Breakthrough Entrepreneurship
297: Work Simply to Be more Productive with Carson Tate

Dave Lukas, The Misfit Entrepreneur_Breakthrough Entrepreneurship

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 47:40


This week's Misfit Entrepreneur is Carson Tate. Carson is the best-selling author of Work Simply: Embracing the Power of Your Personal Productivity and founder of the business with the same name which helps clients amplify team performance, better engage their workforce, and increase productivity. Carson and the principles of Working Simply have been featured everywhere from Fast Company to Forbes to the Harvard Business Review. And Working Simply has helped some of the largest organization including FEDEX, J&J, Chick-Fil-A, and Lowes, just to name a few, improve their performance. I bet you can guess why I asked her on the show. What entrepreneur wouldn't want to improve team performance, better engage, and increase productivity? ​ www.WorkingSimply.com https://www.workingsimply.com/work-style-assessment/ Carson started her career in corporate America in HR/Training. She then went into outside sales for Big Pharma and that is where the light bulb went off for her and where she realized she wanted to be an entrepreneur. It was like having her own business, until they changed her compensation which require her and her team to change how they did things. They had to become more productive, so Carson developed a system that got great results to a point where it became a model for the company. Carson saw that there was a good opportunity for a business to help companies in this area, so she left and launched her business. What does it mean to work simply? What are the principles? Can you re-orient from output to impact and results only work? What are the principles? It starts with identifying what is not working well Where are team members burned out? Do you have a communication or meeting issue? Depending on the root cause, that is where you go to work. For example, if there are too many meetings and they are ineffective – then the focus would be on optimizing meetings for results and time. You also have to look at how they team gets work done most effectively and make sure everyone understands it. Where do you see challenges in productivity consistently? Execution is one area that is consistent. It is also looking at conflicts between individuals and teams. People need to learn how their personal dynamics can work better together. Meetings and email management are two other areas where a lot of productivity and time are lost. Explain why email management is so important? It's the primary communication tool in most businesses. Most people don't know how to use platforms like Outlook most effectively. People are also connected to it 24/7 which means it makes it easier to get burned out. At the 14 min mark, Carson and I have a great conversation on being productive in training people to be respectful of your time. Thoughts on running a team to be most productive? Dedicate time to each of your direct reports to ask questions and get updates. A leader's focus should be on coaching and development during focused time. Leaders should stack 1 on 1's and do them in the same day if possible. This will help with focusing on the same activities which helps you to be more productive. The data on multi-tasking proves it does not work. Multi-tasking is an illusion and goes against your biological design of voluntary vs. involuntary focus. You are much less productive when you multi-task. Any other productivity tips that people should know about? The most important practice is the recognition that people don't think and process information the same way, so there is not a one-size fits all solution to productivity. Many companies think everyone can function the same way in the same structure for productivity. Some will do well, others will not. Ultimate productivity comes when you are able to personalize productivity based on work style. Carson developed an assessment to help people understand how they process information and how to maximize productivity around it. Just go to https://www.workingsimply.com/work-style-assessment/ What do you see as the most important thing a leader can do each day to help their team's success? Coach! Transform from manager to coach. A coach invites the individual team member to co-create and problem solve. It is asking questions vs. telling. What have you learned along your journey about how to consistently perform and succeed? It starts with you. Exercise, rest, and meditation are essential for your ability to navigate entrepreneurship thoughtfully and intentionally. Self-care is essential. Best advice to an entrepreneur just starting out? Radical self-awareness is needed to succeed. Get clarity around why and what your best way to contribute is. Once you start building a team – the self-awareness allows you to know where it is best for you to focus and work with your team. There is a difference between being a leader and a CEO. What are your thoughts on how to maximize your success as a CEO? Having an information and eventually more formal advisory board with diversity is helpful. It is important for leaders to engage an executive coach at different stages to help them. Your thoughts on how to select the right coaches? First, there are credentials for coached. There are processes, methods, etc. that coaches can be certified in. Another important thing is if they have experience in the area you are looking for help in. Above all, it needs to be a good fit. You have to be able to trust them and be open with them. ​ Anything else you feel is important for us to understand for success? Engagement and engaging your team. You must create and engaging environment for your team and your clients.   Best Quote: The most important practice is the recognition that people don't think and process information the same way, so there is not a one-size fits all solution to productivity   Carson's Misfit 3: Know thyself... Take care of thyself... Serve others...   Show Sponsors Ecom Automation Gurus (Save 15%) www.EcomAutomationGurus.com   Five Minute Journal www.MisfitEntrepreneur.com/Journal  

Hammer Lane Legends
109: Mutant Swans Attack

Hammer Lane Legends

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 80:52


In episode 109: Mutant Swans Attack; the guys chat with Brian, a new truck driver who has just recently started driving big rigs. Though Brian is new to driving an 18-wheeler, he has plenty of experience on the road. Before he got his Class A, Brian had spent years with FedEx, UPS, and was even an air delivery driver. In that time he  had an innumerable amount of wild experiences while driving. From seeing a woman hit a semi, and then hitting his semi while training, to being chased by a mutant swan, he's seen some crazy things. Sit back, relax and enjoy the show! KEEP US FUELED: buymeacoffee.com/hammerlane EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS FOOD: www.preparewithhll.com LEAVE A VOICEMAIL: 515-585-MERK(6375) EMAIL US YOUR STORIES: hllpodcast@protonmail.com Website: www.hammerlanelegends.com Gear: https://www.hammerlanelegends.com/gear YouTube: www.youtube.com/channel/UC5TWlB5Yqx8JlQr3p3bkkMg Facebook: www.facebook.com/hammerlanelegends Instagram Desktop: www.instagram.com/hammerlanelegends Instagram Mobile: @hammerlanelegends Twitter Desktop: www.twitter.com/HLLPodcast Twitter Mobile: @HLLpodcast Produced by: Jack Merkel Follow Jack on Instagram @jack_theproducer

iOS Today (Video HI)
iOS 597: Awesome Apple Arcade Games - The Oregon Trail, SpellTower, Bridge Constructor

iOS Today (Video HI)

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 87:22


Mikah Sargent and Rosemary Orchard dive back into Apple Aracde, sharing some awesome games worth your time and attention. Bridge Constructor+ Sneaky Sasquatch SpellTower+ Pocket Build+ Mahjong Titan+ The Oregon Trail Sonic Dash+ Gibbon: Beyond the Trees News Deliveries package tracking app loses FedEx access, says blame shipping companies Apple to rebrand iTunes Pass in Wallet app with iOS 15.5 PSA: Watch out for phishing emails from genuine mailing lists, following Mailchimp hack Apple support doc reveals unreleased dual USB-C 35W power adapter – releasing soon? Shortcuts Corner Apple brings modern automation to iWork for Mac with Shortcuts Victor is looking for a shortcut to help create and publish a new post to a Jekyll blog Doug wants a shortcut to put an iPhone into silent mode Feedback Keith is wondering if iOS Today can do a session on IoT devices, HomeKit, and useability.  Jayne is looking for iPad Pro mounting solutions and lighting for video calls. App Caps Rosemary's: Soro - For Sonos Mikah's: DuckDuckGo Privacy Browser Hosts: Mikah Sargent and Rosemary Orchard Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/ios-today. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit You can contribute to iOS Today by leaving us a voicemail at 757-504-iPad (757-504-4723) or sending an email to iOSToday@TWiT.tv. Sponsors: ue.com/fits promo code IOS BuckMason.com/ios

iOS Today (MP3)
iOS 597: Awesome Apple Arcade Games - The Oregon Trail, SpellTower, Bridge Constructor

iOS Today (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 86:57


Mikah Sargent and Rosemary Orchard dive back into Apple Aracde, sharing some awesome games worth your time and attention. Bridge Constructor+ Sneaky Sasquatch SpellTower+ Pocket Build+ Mahjong Titan+ The Oregon Trail Sonic Dash+ Gibbon: Beyond the Trees News Deliveries package tracking app loses FedEx access, says blame shipping companies Apple to rebrand iTunes Pass in Wallet app with iOS 15.5 PSA: Watch out for phishing emails from genuine mailing lists, following Mailchimp hack Apple support doc reveals unreleased dual USB-C 35W power adapter – releasing soon? Shortcuts Corner Apple brings modern automation to iWork for Mac with Shortcuts Victor is looking for a shortcut to help create and publish a new post to a Jekyll blog Doug wants a shortcut to put an iPhone into silent mode Feedback Keith is wondering if iOS Today can do a session on IoT devices, HomeKit, and useability.  Jayne is looking for iPad Pro mounting solutions and lighting for video calls. App Caps Rosemary's: Soro - For Sonos Mikah's: DuckDuckGo Privacy Browser Hosts: Mikah Sargent and Rosemary Orchard Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/ios-today. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit You can contribute to iOS Today by leaving us a voicemail at 757-504-iPad (757-504-4723) or sending an email to iOSToday@TWiT.tv. Sponsors: ue.com/fits promo code IOS BuckMason.com/ios

iOS Today (Video)
iOS 597: Awesome Apple Arcade Games - The Oregon Trail, SpellTower, Bridge Constructor

iOS Today (Video)

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 87:22


Mikah Sargent and Rosemary Orchard dive back into Apple Aracde, sharing some awesome games worth your time and attention. Bridge Constructor+ Sneaky Sasquatch SpellTower+ Pocket Build+ Mahjong Titan+ The Oregon Trail Sonic Dash+ Gibbon: Beyond the Trees News Deliveries package tracking app loses FedEx access, says blame shipping companies Apple to rebrand iTunes Pass in Wallet app with iOS 15.5 PSA: Watch out for phishing emails from genuine mailing lists, following Mailchimp hack Apple support doc reveals unreleased dual USB-C 35W power adapter – releasing soon? Shortcuts Corner Apple brings modern automation to iWork for Mac with Shortcuts Victor is looking for a shortcut to help create and publish a new post to a Jekyll blog Doug wants a shortcut to put an iPhone into silent mode Feedback Keith is wondering if iOS Today can do a session on IoT devices, HomeKit, and useability.  Jayne is looking for iPad Pro mounting solutions and lighting for video calls. App Caps Rosemary's: Soro - For Sonos Mikah's: DuckDuckGo Privacy Browser Hosts: Mikah Sargent and Rosemary Orchard Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/ios-today. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit You can contribute to iOS Today by leaving us a voicemail at 757-504-iPad (757-504-4723) or sending an email to iOSToday@TWiT.tv. Sponsors: ue.com/fits promo code IOS BuckMason.com/ios

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
iOS Today 597: Awesome Apple Arcade Games

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 86:57


Mikah Sargent and Rosemary Orchard dive back into Apple Aracde, sharing some awesome games worth your time and attention. Bridge Constructor+ Sneaky Sasquatch SpellTower+ Pocket Build+ Mahjong Titan+ The Oregon Trail Sonic Dash+ Gibbon: Beyond the Trees News Deliveries package tracking app loses FedEx access, says blame shipping companies Apple to rebrand iTunes Pass in Wallet app with iOS 15.5 PSA: Watch out for phishing emails from genuine mailing lists, following Mailchimp hack Apple support doc reveals unreleased dual USB-C 35W power adapter – releasing soon? Shortcuts Corner Apple brings modern automation to iWork for Mac with Shortcuts Victor is looking for a shortcut to help create and publish a new post to a Jekyll blog Doug wants a shortcut to put an iPhone into silent mode Feedback Keith is wondering if iOS Today can do a session on IoT devices, HomeKit, and useability.  Jayne is looking for iPad Pro mounting solutions and lighting for video calls. App Caps Rosemary's: Soro - For Sonos Mikah's: DuckDuckGo Privacy Browser Hosts: Mikah Sargent and Rosemary Orchard Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/ios-today. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit You can contribute to iOS Today by leaving us a voicemail at 757-504-iPad (757-504-4723) or sending an email to iOSToday@TWiT.tv. Sponsors: ue.com/fits promo code IOS BuckMason.com/ios

I Survived Theatre School

Intro: Crypto bros, missing the great economic bubbles of the early 2000s. We may as well have cotton candy furniture, Severance on Apple TV, Bad Vegan. Let Me Run This By You: Stage Moms, kindergarten theatre.Interview: We talk to Joe Basile about Long Island accents, NYU Tisch, Bradley Walker, Ensemble Studio Theatre, Liz Lerman's Critical Response Process, Mary Zimmerman's Metamorphoses, the Neo-Futurists Too Much Light Makes the Baby Go Blind (The Infinite Wrench), perfectionism,  Roundabout Theatre Company,  A Bright Room Called Day, Suzan Lori Parks, Go Humphrey, sock puppet Showgirls, keeping the thread of community after college ends.FULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited):3 (10s):And I'm Gina Kalichi.1 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it.3 (15s):20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of it all.1 (21s):We survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet?2 (32s):Okay. I'm getting, I'm getting it together. I, Yeah, I woke up with this really interesting idea that I wanted to run by you, which was, cause I was really tired when I woke up and I thought, okay, everyone's tired when they wake up. And then I thought, well, and they always say like, Americans, you know, never get enough sleep. We're always tired. But like nobody ever investigates why really? Why that is that our system is really fucked up. So like, I don't know. I just was like, yeah, we always do all these like expos A's on like sleep or wellness. Right? Like Americans are the fattest and the most unhealthy. And I'm only speaking about Americans because that's where we live. I don't know shit about Madrid.2 (1m 13s):You know, I'm sure they're they have their own plethora of fucking problems. But I'm just saying like, we don't actually do the work to like, figure out what is wrong. We're just like, Americans are, this Americans are that nobody's getting enough sleep. And like, there's all these, you know, sort of headlines. Right. And we're not just like, well, why is nobody getting enough sleep? Like what is actually happening? So that was my grand thought upon waking up was like, yeah, like, I don't know. We just never dig deep in this case. We're not big on digging.4 (1m 46s):Probably not. I mean, I think our lifestyle overall is pretty unhealthy and it's because of our economic model.2 (1m 58s):What I was gonna say, it all boils down to see the thing is the more you talk to people, the more I do the angrier I get, especially like in my office, like slash co-working, like I gravitate towards the ladies and a lot of ladies of color. And we end up sitting around talking about how like capitalism and systematic racism and sexism are all tied together and how, and by the end, we're just so angry. We're like, okay, what can we do? And we're like, okay, well we need to stop putting money in the pockets of this old white man who owns the coworking. But like we have nowhere else to go. So we're like, now we're screwed. So anyway, it's interesting. It's like it all, every conversation I have of meaning with you or with my cousin and it all boils down to the same thing.2 (2m 43s):And then you end up thinking, I ended up thinking the really, the only way is mass extinction and starting over with a new species, fresh slate, fresh or revolution, right. Or some kind of bloody revolution, it's going to be bloody because you know, the, the, the, the people in power aren't going to let go as we see. So like, we're not, it's not good is all, but I don't feel necessarily like, and maybe it's because I took MTMA, but like, I don't necessarily feel terrible about it. I feel just like, oh yeah, like we're, we're headed towards this way, unless something drastic happens. And I'm not sure that's a terrible thing. Now I don't have children.2 (3m 23s):So I might feel totally different about my children and my children's children and their children, but I just don't, that's not my frame of mind. So anyway, that's what I was thinking as I was so tired, waking up.4 (3m 35s):Is there any world in which you and the other women in coworking can just put your, just rent and office?2 (3m 44s):So we're starting to organize to like, be like, okay, you know, like who would want to go in on a lease