Podcasts about Wolof

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  • 63PODCASTS
  • 284EPISODES
  • 23mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 7, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Wolof

Latest podcast episodes about Wolof

Tangentially Speaking with Christopher Ryan
497 - Andrew Gold (Filmmaker/Journalist)

Tangentially Speaking with Christopher Ryan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 97:17


Andrew is the host of the On the Edge with Andrew Gold podcast. A journalist and TV presenter who speaks 5 languages & lived in 6 countries, Andrew has produced docs on bizarre and controversial subcultures. He has battled an abusive exorcist, dueled with the Crazy Baby Lady and hunted UFOs. He's currently working on a book and TV doc on pedophilia in Berlin. Andrew on Twitter and Instagram. Find me on Instagram or Twitter. Please consider supporting this podcast. This Amazon affiliate link kicks a few bucks back my way. Intro music: “Brightside of the Sun,” by Basin and Range; "Bul Ma Miin," by Orchestra Baobab; "Smoke Alarm," by Carsie Blanton.  About the song: " “Bul Ma Miin” was originally sung by the wife of longtime Baobab singer, Ndiouga Dieng, whose background was as a traditional Wolof singer set the arrangement for the group. Rudy Gomis told us “Bul Ma Miin” is a sort of advice about not just getting used to someone and forgetting who they are or take their presence simply for granted. The lyrics state that “showing affection doesn't equate with being weak.” “You know, when you're together for a long time, it can come to an end when you forget the other person,” Rudy said. “Like couples where they run into these huge problems because they just forget the other person.”

SBS French - SBS en français
Pour Lamine Sonko le Covid a été l'occasion de prendre du recul et de se ressourcer

SBS French - SBS en français

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 7:51


Pour Lamine Sonko, musicien, conteur griot et enseignant de culture Mandingue et Wolof dans plusieurs universités australiennes, le coup d'arrêt du fait de la pandémie a permis de se ressourcer ; de se lancer dans des nouveaux modes d'expression (notamment le cinéma) et de les peaufiner. La crise lui a aussi permis de réfléchir sur la façon de soutenir non seulement sa communauté mais aussi ses confrères artistes.

Jews Talk Racial Justice with April and Tracie
Ep 54: Yom Kippur and the Importance of Process

Jews Talk Racial Justice with April and Tracie

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 33:02


In this week's episode, as we mark Yom Kippur, April and Tracie discuss the big concepts and ideas that can frame Yom Kippur and give some practical tips for how to work through our collective and individual yearly accounting of our souls by finding the joy in the process. Check out our discussion/reflection questions for this episode:  www.joyousjustice.com/blog/jews-talk-racial-justice-ep-54Find April and Tracie's full bios and submit topic suggestions for the show at www.JewsTalkRacialJustice.comLearn more about Joyous Justice where April is the founding and fabulous (!) director, and Tracie is a senior partner.: https://joyousjustice.com/Read more of Tracie's thoughts at her blog, bmoreincremental.comLearn more about Yom Kippur and its meaning here: https://www.myjewishlearning.com/article/yom-kippur-101/Listen to last week's episode here: www.joyousjustice.com/blog/jews-talk-racial-justice-ep-53Reflect on the Al Chet here: https://www.sefaria.org/sheets/255454?lang=biLearn more about the “4 I's of Oppression (Love, Change, Power, etc)”:  https://www.grcc.edu/sites/default/files/docs/diversity/the_four_is_of_oppression.pdfRead more about Alan Morinis and the book Everyday Holiness here: https://mussarinstitute.org/books-by-alan-morinis-faculty/Learn more about Ronnie Coleman here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ronnie_ColemanLearn more about Rabbi Yosef Yozel Horwitz, the Alter of Novardok here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yosef_Yozel_HorwitzWatch Verna Myers's TedTalk here:  https://www.ted.com/talks/verna_myers_how_to_overcome_our_biases_walk_boldly_toward_themCheck out the book No Sweat by Michelle Segar here: https://michellesegar.com/book/Learn more about Wolof here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolof_languageCheck out Atomic Habits by James Clear here: https://jamesclear.com/atomic-habits

Le Livre du Prophète Kacou Philippe Version audio)

KACOU 72 VERSION WOLOF by Prophète Kacou Philippe

Le Livre du Prophète Kacou Philippe Version audio)

KACOU 71 VERSION WOLOF by Prophète Kacou Philippe

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KACOU 70 VERSION WOLOF by Prophète Kacou Philippe

Le Livre du Prophète Kacou Philippe Version audio)

KACOU 69 VERSION WOLOF by Prophète Kacou Philippe

Le Livre du Prophète Kacou Philippe Version audio)

KACOU 68 VERSION WOLOF by Prophète Kacou Philippe

Le Livre du Prophète Kacou Philippe Version audio)

KACOU 67 VERSION WOLOF by Prophète Kacou Philippe

Le Livre du Prophète Kacou Philippe Version audio)

KACOU 66 VERSION WOLOF by Prophète Kacou Philippe

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KACOU 65 VERSION WOLOF by Prophète Kacou Philippe

KEXP Song of the Day
Wau Wau Collectif - Thiante

KEXP Song of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 3:14


Wau Wau Collectif - "Thiante" from the 2021 album Yaral Sa Doom on Sahel Sounds. The Wau Wau Collectif was formed in 2018 by Swedish musician/producer Karl Jonas Winqvist and Senegal-based studio engineer Arouna Kane. Utilizing over 20 musicians from both hometowns, the two traded recordings via WhatsApp. carefully constructing the album Yaral Sa Doom. “It's like diving into the sea,” explains Kane in an album statement. “There are all different species of fish swimming around, but together they make the ocean.” The phrase "Yaral Sa Doom" is a Wolof expression that means “educating young people,” and the theme of education can be heard amongst the traditional West African music. Contributing musician Djiby Ly offers, "Today you must educate children with an instrument and art, when you teach them an instrument you teach them to use their spirit."  Read the full post on KEXP.org Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Le Livre du Prophète Kacou Philippe Version audio)

KACOU 64 VERSION WOLOF by Prophète Kacou Philippe

Le Livre du Prophète Kacou Philippe Version audio)

KACOU 63 VERSION WOLOF by Prophète Kacou Philippe

Le Livre du Prophète Kacou Philippe Version audio)

KACOU 62 VERSION WOLOF by Prophète Kacou Philippe

Le Livre du Prophète Kacou Philippe Version audio)

KACOU 61 VERSION WOLOF by Prophète Kacou Philippe

志賀十五の壺【言語学ラジオ】
#350 朝活、やってますか? from Radiotalk

志賀十五の壺【言語学ラジオ】

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 7:55


マルタ語のウィキ https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maltese_language ウォロフ語のウィキ https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolof_language 僕の人工言語の文法書はこちら https://drive.google.com/file/d/1qHNOd0lIlTTD8diS-Z4FGwEnx1m-9JCN/view Twitter https://mobile.twitter.com/sigajugo LINEオープンチャット https://line.me/ti/g2/1-H1J1-BG2v9VTOvbipREA?utm_source=invitation&utm_medium=link_copy&utm_campaign=default オリジナルグッズ https://suzuri.jp/sigajugo おたより https://radiotalk.jp/profile/165482/questions/create BGM: MusMus http://musmus.main.jp/ #落ち着きある #ひとり語り #豆知識 #雑学 #教育 #朝活

Le Livre du Prophète Kacou Philippe Version audio)

KACOU 60 VERSION WOLOF by Prophète Kacou Philippe

Le Livre du Prophète Kacou Philippe Version audio)

KACOU 59 VERSION WOLOF by Prophète Kacou Philippe

Le Livre du Prophète Kacou Philippe Version audio)

KACOU 58 VERSION WOLOF by Prophète Kacou Philippe

Le Livre du Prophète Kacou Philippe Version audio)

KACOU 57 VERSION WOLOF by Prophète Kacou Philippe

Wolof Tech
S6E8 - Apprendre le wolof avec une application mobile

Wolof Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 48:14


Dans cet épisode nous découvrons l'application mobile JangWolof qui nous aide à lire, écrire et bien parler le wolof. Invités: Bachir SARR (Responsable à WAX) Moustapha NDIAYE (Software engineer & Data scientist) Programme : Q1 : Comment est née votre structure et quels sont vos objectifs ? Q2 : Comment vous avez eu l'idee de créer une application pour l'apprentissage de la langue wolof ? Q3 : Quel est l'objectif de l'application Jangwolof Q4 : Quelles sont les fonctionnalités que l'on peut retrouver dans l'application et comment elles marchent ? Q5 : Comment est-ce que vous faites pour avoir tous c'est contenu en wolof ? Est-ce que vous travaillez avec des spécialistes de la langue wolof ? Q6 : Dans le domaine de la science et des nouvelles technologies il y a toujours de nouveaux mots et de nouvelles expressions ? comment vous faites pour la traduction ? Q7 : Comment est-ce que vous avez réussi à allier image et audio et texte et comment vous gérer ces medias pour avoir une application rapide à l'exécution ? Q8 : Qu'est-ce qu'on peut attendre comme fonctionnalités dans les nouvelles versions à venir ? Q9 : Est-ce que l'application pourrait s'ouvrir aux touristes et à d'autres communautés pour permettre au monde entier de mieux comprendre la langue wolof? Q10 : Est-ce que les Sénégalais utilisent bien l'application et si le nombre n'est pas si important quels sont les blocages ? Q11 : Ou est-ce que les utilisateurs peuvent télécharger l'application et comment ils peuvent vous contacter ? Q12 : Quel est le message que vous souhaitez lancer à tous les Sénégalais sur l'importance de la langue wolof Pour contacter Wax : Twitter Site web : https://jangwolof.com/ Wolof Tech sur les réseaux sociaux : Twitter Twitter Facebook LinkedIn Instagram whatsapp sur le +221 76 374 12 91 Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/woloftech)

UNbiased Label
West African Mud Cloth Fashion Design

UNbiased Label

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 36:57


This episode is a conversation with Milcos Badji who is a Senegalese fashion designer from Dakar. His eponymous brand Nio Far by Milcos means "We are together" in Wolof.   The design ethos of Milcos is deeply connected to heritage with research at the center of his artistic process. He uses a mud based fabric known as ‘Bògòlanfini' (often referred to as Bògòlan) or mud cloth that gives his fashion designs cultural depth, rich in meaning and "the quintessence of authenticity".  The latest hand made collection of Nio Far by Milcos is named "Po Tolo" inspired by the Dogon tribe central to Malin in West Africa. The legends of the Dogon tribe lies in their unique ability to give precise locations of astronomical bodies and phenomena for centuries pre-dating modern science.  Nio Far by Milcos is unisex and handmade.  Orders can be placed on-line at https://www.niofarbymilcos.com/ .  --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/zara-korutz/message

Readin' With Phines
Njaajaan Njaay and The Wolof

Readin' With Phines

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2021 9:27


African Myths of Origin, Njaajaan Njaay and The Wolof. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/phines-jackson-jr7/support

3news
BEATS AFRICA SENEGAL

3news

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2021 121:28


Senegalese takes pride in one of Africans best cuisines Jollof as it originated from the Wolof tribe. Explore Senegal with Dela Michel and her guests as they share their experiences with her.

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KACOU 55 VERSION WOLOF by Prophète Kacou Philippe

Le Livre du Prophète Kacou Philippe Version audio)

KACOU 56 VERSION WOLOF by Prophète Kacou Philippe

Unreached of the Day
Pray for the Wolof in Senegal

Unreached of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2021 1:01


People Group Summary: https://joshuaproject.net/people_groups/15414 Join us for the International Day for the Unreached on May 23, 2021 as thousands experience #AThirdofUs https://athirdofus.com/ Listen to "A Third of Us" podcast with Greg Kelley, produced by the Alliance for the Unreached: https://alliancefortheunreached.org/podcast/ Watch "Stories of Courageous Christians" w/ Mark Kordic https://storiesofcourageouschristians.com/stories-of-courageous-christians God's Best to You!  

Les Francs Comtois sont formidables - FB Belfort
Un espoir pour mon Sénégal avec Lucie

Les Francs Comtois sont formidables - FB Belfort

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2021 2:41


durée : 00:02:41 - Les Francs Comtois sont formidables France Bleu Belfort Montbéliard - Le Sénégal c’est le pays de la Téranga qui signifie l’hospitalité en Wolof. Quand vous débarquez là-bas, les locaux sont plus accueillants que jamais et très chaleureux. Une bienveillance qui ne vous laissera certainement pas indifférent.

Wolof Tech
S5E3 - Un robot vocal qui parle wolof au Sénégal

Wolof Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2021 62:32


Dans cet épisode nous allons à la découverte d'un voicebot qui parle wolof créé par le sénégalais Papa Séga Wade. Programme : Qui est papa Sega Wade C’est quoi un bot informatique, un chatbot et un voicebot Comment est née l’idée de création d’un voicebot en wolof Quels sont les objectifs de ce voicebot et comment peut-il aider les entreprises et la population sénégalaise Comment votre voicebot fait pour comprendre la voix humaine pour ensuite répondre ? Comment vous avez fait la modélisation et qu’elles ont été les difficultés Aujourd’hui comment vous faites pour mesurer l’efficacité de votre voicebot Quelles sont les connaissances et compétences nécessaires pour accomplir un tel travail ? Pouvez-vous nous parler des différents domaines dans lesquels ce genre de bot peut être utilisé. Pensez-vous que les bots peuvent être une menace pour l’emploi de jeunes Pensez-vous élargir votre projet pour intégrer d’autres langues africaines Que pensez-vous de la recherche dans le domaine des sciences au Sénégal Invités : Papa Séga WADE (Data scientist) Twitter LinkeIn Blog : https://vu.fr/8HF5 Page Facebook : https://vu.fr/OWJ6 Instagram : https://vu.fr/XFCY Site Web : triangletude.jimdofree.com Vocalcast : Participez a la rubrique volcalcast et partager votre expérience avec les auditeurs. Envoyer votre vocal de présentation via whatsapp sur le +221 76 374 12 91

Le Livre du Prophète Kacou Philippe Version audio)

KACOU 53 VERSION WOLOF by Prophète Kacou Philippe

40 for Tea
Senegal & Leading as an Elder - 2020 Reflection & Wisdom for 2021 - Molly Melching A Quick Cuppa with Rach Allan

40 for Tea

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 4, 2021 19:41


Award winning human rights activist Molly Melching from episode 15 of 40 for Tea, and Rach Allan explore her experience of 2020, answering: What did it smell, taste & sound like?  What did you learn & let go? What wisdom are you taking into 2021. 02.22  - dressing up for zoom calls 02.54 - the smells 05.45 - COVID in Senegal & Tostan work on translation to 15 languages 09.15 - Letting go:  CEO transition years, Colouring hair 11.09 - Accepting status as an Elder at 71 13.01 - The gold with a beautiful Wolof proverb - “it’s better to find a path out, than stand and shout at the forest.” Welcome to this new set of bonus episodes!  They are unedited, rough, ready and real talking, real stories & reflections from 2020.   We’ve all been in the same storm, in different boats, having different experiences. We explore perspectives and the wisdom we can borrow from someone else's story.  Gold nuggets to journey into 2021 with.  This is an invitation to listen with curiosity and an open heart. Being human has come to a new level of vulnerability, it is time for us to come together and connect to ourselves and each other in new ways.  We need each other. Who are we becoming and what do we want for ourselves and our lives moving forward. You can contact Rach & apply to work with her on rach at talkagency.co Join the mailing list here:  /  Instagram @40fortea Here are the Tostan booklets on COVID19 now available open source in 15 languages.

10:02
Wow Wow

10:02

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2021 10:19


On today's episode of 10:02, Mike Baker will pray for the Wolof people of Senegal and speak from Leviticus 19:18.

En sol majeur
En sol majeur - Esprit de famille: l’écrivaine sénégalaise Ken Bugul et son petit-fils séné-gambien Modou N’diaye

En sol majeur

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 6, 2021 48:30


Souvenez-vous de cette boîte à biscuits que nous avons ouverte il y a 1 an en écoutant, cachés derrière le poste, plusieurs conversations entre grand-mères et petites-filles.... Avec toujours cette question: comment se fait la transmission entre génération Baobab et génération 2.0? Aujourd’hui, Esprit de famille (c’est le nom que nous donnons à cette série que vous retrouverez au gré de nos tricotages), pousse les meubles et fait de la place, toute la place à un tandem beau comme une visite improvisée. D’un côté, Modou N’diaye, 24 ans, petit fils très village global (il est né au Sénégal, a grandi en Gambie et sillonné le monde) De l’autre, une mamie romancière, qu’on a croquéeEn Sol Majeur récemment, Grand Prix Littéraire d’Afrique noire 1999 pour sa trilogie Le Baobab fou, Cendres et braises et Riwan ou le chemin de sable, j’ai nommé: Ken Bugul. Surnom terrible qui en Wolof veut dire personne n’en veut. Voyez ça... Bâtir sa vie sur ce surnom (qui exclut) ça en dit long déjà sur cette très grande personne, éprise de liberté, d’anticonformisme et de transmission... Les musiques de l'émission  Faada Freddy Letter To The Lord Ismaël Lo Jammu Africa Grand Kalle Independance Cha Cha       

Grace or Grit
From Atheist to Missionary

Grace or Grit

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2021 44:30


How in the world does a man go from a God-denying atheist to a devoted missionary, passionate about taking the good news of the saving grace of Jesus Christ to the Wolof people of The Gambia in Africa? Well, his wife's prayer certainly played a part. And the preaching of the Word was helpful. But ultimately it is nothing more nor less that the providential purposes and plans of the Almighty that produce such transformations. God is patient. But He is also persistent. In this episode Dave mostly listens as Patrick shares the story of his journey from being a young atheist to where he is now, a evangel of the Christ!

Amulette Podcast, le podcast qui met de la magie dans votre vie
S02EP08 : L'ancrage des racines de nos cheveux avec Sephora Joannes | Amulette Podcast

Amulette Podcast, le podcast qui met de la magie dans votre vie

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2020 58:21


Dans ce nouvel épisode, j'ai la chance de recevoir la magicienne sculptrice capillaire, Sephora Joannes. Pendant près d'une heure, Sephora nous partage les secrets du pouvoir de nos cheveux qu'elle a récolté au fil de ses recherches et de ses œuvres. Un épisode puissant pour nos porteur.ses de cheveux crépus, mais pas que. Sephora nous rappelle que nos cheveux sont des antennes qui nous servent à capter le monde. Merci de ton mon coeur Sephora pour cette bulle initiatique et le travail magnifique que tu fais avec nos cheveux. ***Découvrez Sephora Joannes*** Séphora Joannes est une artiste plasticienne et capillaire née en 1985 à la Martinique. Diplomée de l'institut régional d'Arts Visuels de la Martinique et de la faculté des lettres de Toulon. C'est loin de la terre de ses ancêtres qu'elle vit son premier électrochoc capillaire alors qu'elle se défrisait encore les cheveux. Bien que les femmes noires aux cheveux crépus soient très soucieuses de leur coiffure et de leur apparence générale. Le constat était sans appel. Il valait mieux arborer une texture lisse ou ondulée plutôt que de se montrer au grand jour avec sa texture originelle. "Nul n'a le monopole de la beauté" écrivait Césaire et pourtant... Du choc est né le questionnement et du questionnement est né Haarâ. Un projet artistique et culturel qui a pour but de distiller un autre type d'iconographie avec des femmes aux textures "grennen" crépus, frisés et bouclés. Il s'agit de mettre en scène des sculptures / structures capillaires, coiffes et bijoux tressés en esprit avec plusieurs peuples qui ont foulés le sol de la Martinique. Dahomey, Kongo, Senoufo, Wolof, Yoruba , Kikongo. D'autres inspirations telles que les arawaks, Taînos et d'autres plus éloignées telles que les coiffes divines thaïlandaises et japonaises. Les créations se veulent alors vertigineuses ,jeux de vide et de plein locksé, antennes paraboliques et cercles omniprésents. L'artiste questionne également la sculpture contemporaine et la question du socle en plaçant ses pièces sur des humains ou les suspendant dans l'espace. Les coiffures sont également imprégnées des coiffes masques ancestraux africains devenus trésors de guerre logés dans les musées occidentaux. L'oeuvre est le retour à la source intarissable, elle est balbutiement , elle est offrande aux matrimoines et aux patrimoines humains. Pas tout moun sé moun... Elle est la recherche d'adn en puisant en soi , elle est l'invitation à se regarder nous mêmes et à tourner autour de nous mêmes. L'artiste vit et travaille à Paris et en Martinique. Réseaux sociaux de Sephora ****************** https://www.instagram.com/sephorajoannes/ https://www.instagram.com/kapilhaarium/ Suivez-moi sur les réseaux: *************************** https://www.instagram.com/valeriedjms/ https://www.instagram.com/lesdjoums/ Découvrez mon émission dédiée à la Créativité: ************************************************* https://www.upgradeshow.paris/amulart Amulart est une production Upgrade Show by Les Djoums Découvrez nos activités sur le site http://upgrade.paris/

The Dictionary
#B322 (buttonhole stitch to butylene)

The Dictionary

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2020 10:59


I read from buttonhole stitch to butylene.   The Wolof language! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolof_language   The word of the episode is "butty".   dictionarypod@gmail.com https://www.facebook.com/thedictionarypod/ https://twitter.com/dictionarypod https://www.instagram.com/dictionarypod/ https://www.patreon.com/spejampar 917-727-5757

An Even Bigger Fly On The Wall
395. Welcome in Gambia,(Nagadef...Wolof) 10/03/20

An Even Bigger Fly On The Wall

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2020 0:25


"Nagadef" Gambia!!, (Hello in Wolof). Welcome in brothers and sisters in Gambia! Check out "Get your last chat on with Sooyang" show and "The Do Better" show with Tiger 180 podcasting on Anchor, Spotify & other streaming platforms. (Anchor.fm/r-turpin)

my fluent podcast
E75 - Ahmad's language learning methods - become fluent and sound like a native!

my fluent podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2020 45:28


Ahmad is sharing his language learning story with us! If you want to share your story, send us an E-mail to myfluentpodcast@gmail.com Podcasts mentioned in this show: Football Daily podcast: https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/p08qt66t Luke's English podcast: teacherluke.co.uk Interview with Luke on my fluent podcast: https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/myfluentpodcast/E28_-_interview_Luke_Thompson.mp3 Tik Tok trailer to the interview on my fluent podcast:  https://www.tiktok.com/@myfluentpodcast/video/6835683333477846278?lang=en Zdenek's English podcast https://zdeneksenglishpodcast.podbean.com/ Transcript:  Thank you very much, mr. Daniel. My name is Ahmed Djago and I live in Senegal. Senegal is a country of a 16 million habitats in West Africa. And when it comes to learning a language, a second language or a third language, for me is, I mean, I have a very interesting story because when I tell somebody that I live in a country where the official language is not English and I've never attended an English school or an English institution and yet speak English the way I am speaking it this day it might amaze him, you know, You have a flawless accent it seems to me, Thank you, but thank you very much , the story is quite interesting for me because Senegal is a country where the official language is French because it has been colonized by the French. But here in Africa, when we say official language, mostly we don't mean that the official language is the language that is spoken by the vast majority or the whole population of the country. French is the official language but we have other national language, which is the language that is named Wolof. And that is actually the the most widely spoken language here, I can say something like 95% of the country's population is speak the same language but only those people who went to school for studying French, all those people who live in an area where the French speakers are to be found are actually able to speak French. But for me, when I was about 14 years old, my father took me to Gambia. Gambia is our neighboring country. I went there merely (synonym `= only, purely, solely, simply) for learning Arabic. So I went there to learn Arabic but Gambia and Senegal are quite similar. They have lots in common. For example, our national languages are the same and I've been able to survive while there, but they have one different thing. And it is Gambia's official language is English. So, the people that go to school for learning English but their national language is still the same as our country, which is Wolof but I was surrounding (surrounded?) by some of my friends, some boys who were going to school to learn English and they were having some conversation around me in English, even though English was not the language that they were speaking in their daily lives, but I've been, I mean, I became fascinated with the way they use language sometimes around me. And I asked one boy, one of my friends there to teach me how to read English because before you can teach yourself. You have to, somebody has to guide you to do the basics. Something like being able to read the language first before you go for yourself. By the time I was learning Arabic, but this boy, this particular way helped me to teach me the English alphabet until I became able to read English myself. And that was it. I was still speaking up some expression, some words in English, something like breakfast, brother, sister, school, things like that. Basic things. I spent the next four years there in Gambia. Then I returned, I came back to my home country, which is Senegal to continue learning Arabic in Arabic schools in Senegal, around the year 2013. I have this desire to continue learning English because I realized that English is the most widely spoken language in the world. It is the most popular language in the world. And just by being able to speak it, it will open, you know, lots of opportunities for you. And then by that time, I was able to use Arabic and English dictionary properly. I have been quite almost fluent in Arabic. And then I stumbled upon one day, one application in the form of, I mean, it was, I think the audio book but it was made, it was built up in a form of application. I downloaded it from Apple store. And then I download the on English and Arabic dictionary, this particular application or the audio book, as you might call it's actually built in several sections. That was the beginner section, intermediate and advanced section, but in the form of stories, For example, they will pick up a small story something like breakfast, and a write a text, a very short text about it. So when I downloaded this application, I thought, wait a minute. Now I can teach myself English without needing any teacher or going to school. So I found a notebook and began writing those stories in my notebook. One story a day. This is how I did it. I will pick a story. You wrote it down the whole story you've made kind of a dictation out of it. You'd listen to it. And then you wrote it down. I will open the application and write down the story in my notebook and then download the voice file and listened to it several times until I became convinced that I can read it myself without listening to the voice. And then I would use the dictionary, Arabic English dictionary to translate the new word for me and write down the meaning in Arabic beside the words. And then by the time I was in Arabic school, but I have some free times during the day I I would use those free times to learn these stories. Learn. repeating them for the rest of the day until you know, this is the way I use to gain so many vocabularies for the next, let's say five years. Okay. That means you were very focused on particular stories. It says, right? So you just stick to one story until you could learn it by heart ? yes, the stories are not that long. You know, it is built in a way that's usually 10 to 11 lines. I see. For example, let me give you an example, a breakfast. He will write a about breakfast about 10 lines, just 10 lines, for example. I am Ahmad. I will wake up early in the morning. I take my breakfast. My breakfast is made out of bread and things and these and these and that I will write down that story, short story and learn it by heart. And the next day I will take the next story. Yeah, that sounds great to me. So so this is the most effective way of gaining new vocabularies, because you will learn the vocabulary in context. There, you will have the grammatical construction, and the words are being used in sentences. And you will learn how to use them yourself. If you need them in the future. Yeah, I think today the danger lies in being overwhelmed by the vast resources out there. So that it seems to me that we can't stick to one resource, you know, you want to consume more and more and more, and maybe that's dangerous because we can't remember things we just want to consume. it makes it hard in a way to just stick with one book, for example, and to learn it by heart. Yes. But the learners should be very careful about being bugged down with lots of research, lots of resources, lots of materials. When it comes to learning a language, because today the internet is making the things, you know, it is a huge field. If you are not being careful enough you might get yourself in a difficult situation. You have to focus. You have to choose wisely. What do you believe that it's going to take you to the next level and stick to it! So, somebody might wonder how can you become able to speak the language by just writing stories and things like that because that is just input just by me, but by making just input one cannot become able to use the language by speaking or by writing, you know? By that time, my pronunciation by the way was not good at all. So, there was videos that was produced by BBC six minutes English. And I was downloading those videos which teaches the English Letters that people should learn when they want to pronounce English properly. And I think is, is about 44 letters, isn't it? Yeah, I think I, I know this show they also had, or have a podcast which is still going on. I think. Yes. This is the videos that are downloaded too polish and to brush up my pronunciation pads (`?) and I was writing them down as well in a notebook, something like a "schwa" sound, things like that, by the way, I prefer British English. And that's why I focused on those videos until I became satisfied with the way I pronounced words in English. By that time I was also listening to some podcasts as well. I discovered a guy an English teacher who lives in the UK by the name of Luke I discovered this particular podcast around the year 2014. Yes. And I was listening to it. Yeah. Like a mad person, every single time. Yeah, he's really great luke Thompson and I have conducted an interview with him about two or three years ago. So he was also on my fluent podcast. Maybe you noticed. Yeah, I noticed I listened to the episodes in which he featured on. I listened to, Zdenek Lukas also, who is actually another guy who's producing very, very interesting topic, by the way, I am a big fan of Zdenek. am listening to his podcasts, especially if he's livestreaming these days. It is quite interesting. These are the guys. That I was listening dearly listening every single time. And by listening to them, I see the progress in my listening ability. Yeah, I totally agree with you. I am also a fan of Zdenek's English podcast of course his live shows are just amazing. Yeah, they are amazing. And did you listen to other podcasts as well? Can you recommend other podcasts? Yes, I am a big football fan and I listened to some football podcasts football related podcasts, like the football daily from the BBC Firefly and six Oh six also that this might be not the cup of tea of some listeners out there, because there are so many people who don't like football at all, but this is the thing that interested me and when you're listening to something that you love, you're more likely to gain, you know, to reap the rewards by the way, to gain a lot from it. So something that is enjoyable. I'm listening to lots of podcasts. I'm listening to, some news podcasts but these two are my prime podcasts, my prime ones, Luke's English podcast. And it's Zdenek and of course your podcast, which I discovered during the lockdown. Thank you I love the way you pronounce words and it is quite clear and your vocab man podcast, it is actually very amazing. Thank you very much. It's really kind of you . Have you ever considered or contemplated to make your own podcast maybe because you have a lot of knowledge you could share it to other learners as well. Well, actually, maybe I'm not sure at the moment, because by the way, I'm a teacher right now. I teach Arabic in our government elementary schools here in Senegal. And, we only have three months a year, three months over summer occasions every single year. But the school activities are quite hectic. That's why I'm not sure, but I, you know, you make me feel that maybe I will follow you on your footsteps one day because you know, inspire me a lot. You may you make me feel like, yeah, it is possible for me as well, because yeah absolutely inspired by you. Maybe one day my English.   So you were listening to a lot of podcasts and then your journey went on, I guess. Yes, it's going on at the moment. I consider myself as a beginner and I'm talking to you now but I have a problem here. Until I listened to one episode of your podcast recently about the guy who was from Quora on who lives in India. I forgot the name of him. because until recently I. I was this mad vocabulary hungry man. Somebody who writing down every single word vocabulary that he come across. But then I realized that I have so many passive vocabularies in my bank. As I'm talking to you there, I have some notebooks that I used to write down some vocabularies. And I barely use those vocabularies because they are so passive. You know, when I listened to that guy, he made me relaxed and sit down once again, because he was saying about when you have about 5,000 to 10,000 vocabulary in your bank, you have to focus on how to use them rather than getting related thing, some new vocabulary that you don't need it. So a wise man, and I, yay. real with you because it's the same here that I used to learn a lot of as you mentioned, passive vocabulary, which I wouldn't never use . just for the pleasure of learning but. Yeah, I should also focus more on the vocabulary I want to use. Yeah. Yeah, this is a thing. Again, the language is actually a vast, vast thing. A very huge, gigantic thing that. There are some areas that you can master and talk about fluently, and they have some specific vocabulary that you are going to need when you want to talk about them. But there are some areas where you will have no knowledge about, for example, I cannot talk about doctors related, vocabularies, hospitals, things like that, medical English, I mean, so, this is my opinion about learning second language or third language. First of all, you know, you have to love the language. You have to love the language that you're learning. You have to have the passion and the determination and you have to dedicate, you have to find a time to do it because without love and but the determination of learning the language, nobody can teach you. No, even if you have the most skilled teachers, they still cannot feed you, spoonfeed you the language unless you have the determination to learn it. I have this determination to learn the language to this level. That's why I am here today. There are some people around me here who have the opportunity and they've already mastered the first language that they can use to learn a second language, but maybe they don't have the determination they didn't find a way of, I mean, to do it because they don't love it. listened to some people talking about find Enjoyable way of learning the language. I mean, let's not lull ourselves into a false sense of security. We have to realize that when you're learning a language, you have to put some extreme effort. If you want to reach your goal, you don't have to just do some little things at day unexpecting to reap the rewards. I mean, For me, you have to put a lot of work, Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. And this is what I believe. Yeah, and I think it is crucial to be consistent. Consistency is key. And I think even if you'll learn, let's say 20 minutes a day, if you can keep up with this for a very long period of time, then you will reach your goal. One day, well, maybe Yes. every three years, but you have to be determined yes. To just go your journey and make your things. That consistency that you said? When I, when I was learning the language throughout the last five years, some friends of mine, you know, sometimes tease me, you know, about me carrying this notebook everywhere I go and reading, they will use it. Tell me to tell me that I'm. You are a mad person. What are you doing here? This, this is not our official language wasting your time. And they considered me as somebody who's doing absolutely nothing, but, you know, they don't see. I mean, I don't see either way is seeing things then. Yeah, because while it's your passion, see that. And I find this is just great. you are serious about this and that's why you carry your notebook with you. And it's similar here in Switzerland because. English is not the, it's not one of the official languages here. We we have Italian, we have French, we have German and retro romantic, but English is not one of the official languages. So, but for me, that's not important because it's just a passion of mine and I like to learn English. Yeah. Yes. Yes. This is a case as well. So in Switzerland you have so many languages as well. Yeah, exactly. Yeah. Okay. And yeah. In Senegal we have about six Oh seven languages, but those languages are not popular the most popular one, as I told you his Walof and then a French you on there is a language that is called, Polar? French is the official language I chose the different way. So some people, by the way, I was, I belong to so many WhatsApp groups that I join every now and then to practice my English. Some people used to ask me why, how can you speak English while living in a French speaking country? But my use by my usual and my most frequent answer is, you know, this is my passion and I want to learn several languages. It's not just French. And Wolof by the way, I learned Arabic to the fluency level and I learned English. Maybe I'm not that good in English. I'm learning French as well. And my mother tongue language. Uh, so these four languages are acutally the lanugages I'm working on at the moment. So you mentioned what's up groups before, and I'm wondering, how did you find this groups and do your, recommend it as a method to improve in our target languages? Yes, I would definitely recommend WhatsApp groups for those English learners to join and practice their languages. It is one of the things that I used to practice. Especially my speaking part around the year 2016 a friend of mine introduced me to his other friend who was administrating an English group and I think the guy lives in Afghanistan. And I joined the group and I was this very passionate learner. And I was joining every single day. And I was sending about nearly a hundred messages a day. And I will speak about nearly everything and then I became familiar with lots of English. I mean, the guys keep passing my numbers to some other groups and until I become widely known among English groups and this is very, very interesting because by joining these WhatsApp English clubs, you can practice at any time you want, because maybe I don't have appropriate time to schedule some lessons on Italki because I don't know. I can schedule a speaking session and then missed it. That's why I I'm very careful about maybe about that maybe in my summer vacations, but when I'm in the school year when I'm going to school, I only use WhatsApp, English groups to practice my English because I can use them anytime in the morning and evening and the nights. Okay. I see. But are there people who are correcting you or is it just that you get your practice with WhatsApp or how can I imagine this? Or is it topic related or can you just talk about anything? I didn't understand it works. I mean, it's just a bunch of people who want to practice together? Yeah. Yeah, it is how it works, sometimes there are some topic related groups. I mean, some groups that are providing topics every single day. So every member on the. Have their say about the given topic to answer the questions, but there was always some expert in English. Some people who are very good at English, some futures by the way, sometimes correct us and you know, make things up for us basically. Because when you, when you begin speaking practice, you're speaking, but you don't have the time to think because they're speaking, writing are quite different. I didn't even think correctly before you pin it down. But when you're speaking, you don't have the time to maybe think, Oh, you going to make so many mistakes. And those people will use to correct mistakes. And sometimes we will give some grammatical topics and people would discuss it.     So, there are very skilled persons on the WhatsApp group it's like everyone is helping each other out in a way and together people can improve. It's great. Everyone will help each other. There was always some different levels in WhatsApp, some intermediate learners, some advanced learners and the beginning learners and will help each other. For example, if I am an intermediate learner and I see some people, I listened to message of one of my friends or one of the groups member, and he made a mistake, I will send another message, I will send the message to this particular person and correct his mistakes and telling him how to say and how to say it correctly. Things like that. This is how we used to do it though. you have to listen to your own voice message and correct yourself if it's possible. If you cannot correct yourself, you will ask some of the admins or. Some people out there to listen to your audio and to give you some feedbacks. Okay. I understand. Yeah. In my opinion, recording yourself and listening to it. It's really a great way to improve yourself because. If you have reached a certain level of English, you can analyze, you will be able to analyze your own speech up to a certain point, and can become even better by repeating the process, I guess. Yes, this is the part of recording yourself. Although it is not always enjoyable to listen to your own voice. Sometimes I listen to my voice and feel unhappy about the way I speak. And yes it is. I also used to, I forget to tell you this. I used to record myself on my cell phone. I scheduled , three or four months ago. No, six months ago that I'm going to record myself talking. In English for about 10 minutes a day and then listen to it. And I was doing it for about two months, allthough I feel guilty now because enough, but if I continue doing this particular activity I'll be, you know, it is, it is crucial. It is very, very good. Yeah. that's why I don't like that much attending classes. let's say if you have one class or one lesson a week. That's just not enough. And on top of that, if there are, let's say 20 pupils attending and then maybe you get three minutes of speaking time of speaking practice, then that's just not enough. and that's why I like the idea to record yourself or to attend in this WhatsApp groups. That you mentioned before. I think it's, it's crucial to maintain, make like , a ritual or yeah. To set up your daily practice. Yes I did understand, you know, this is the problem of the traditional way of teaching the language at school, because you will attend the school for several years, without being able to construct correct sentence in the language that you're learning. People are going to school to have. A paper. Uh, and then I achieved my bachelor degree and this and that. But when you ask them to write or to speak about the language in which they have that degree, they are going to struggle to do. For example, I can give you an example. I can give you an example here in my country. Some students went to the university in Senegal out when they have a bachelor degree, will go to the university and some of them will go to the English department. And some people here have their master's degree in English, but when I speak to them, I mean, I feel like these people are actually beginners. They cannot speak English at all. It amazes me. because they just know the theoretical way or the theory behind it but they didn't put it into practice I guess or Yeah, That is correct. When they listen to you speaking, they can spot their mistakes and the good and the bad things about the way you speak, but when they themselves, trying to speak, they have, I mean, they will struggle to make a correct sentence. And is why I love self studying because when a particular person decide to study a language by himself or herself, It means that he had the passion, because it is your own decision. you take your own decision to learn the language. And primarily it means that you love what you're doing. That's why you take it independently by in your own hands. So in, in that particular case, you're going, you're definitely going to see some progress. Yeah, I agree with you and you will have the responsibility if you don't be consistent then you really need to keep moving. That is consistently. If you, if you are determined enough, you'll go into how to be consistent in my opinion, because you will love what you're doing. And you're going to definitely unless you give up in the early stages, because at the beginning it might be very tough and you might see no progress at all in those particular common. So many people have given up learning because, Maybe it is not pleasant. It is not enjoyable for them but sometimes I think you need to have some inspiration. Some people who inspire you to continue. That's why listening to podcasts are very, very, very good. Because in listening to podcasts you're going to find someone who inspires you. Particularly when you are living in a country where the language that you're learning is in, I mean, it's not spoken there. You will not come and seeing people around you speaking the language. So you need to be inspired every now and then. So listening to some podcasts and linking up with people like mr. Daniel, is, is that going to, we'll be inspired and want to do more. Yeah, absolutely. And it's kind of funny because I mean I got my inspiration by other podcasters as well. For example, maybe, you know him, Kris Broholm, who also have a podcast called actual fluency. And while he me a lot and he was a reason why I started out with my podcast. And it goes on one inspires another person and then me, I inspire someone else and it's like a living thing it's so beautiful. I don't make any money out of this. this is my hobby. I just like it. But when I hear messages this that I inspire other people that makes it worth for me. you can't pay money to give the same fealing because I just want to help other people. it's, it's a great thing. And I absolutely recommend to everyone to start their own podcast or maybe to be creative in another way it must not be podcasting. They may be other things that are also good and creative in a way. Yeah, it's a, that's very kind of you I'm amazed about how far you've gone to help people, you know, giving people a helping hand always makes you feel happy. yeah. I know Chris. I listened to actual fluency by the way. I think he's a polyglot, isn't it? Yeah. he comes from Denmark. And we live in, denmark. Yes. And Chris invites lots of polyglots and language enthusiasts and he talks about different aspects related to language learning. Yes, I do. Listen. I do listen to him every now and then. Yeah. I mean, Chris is a great man as well. Yeah. And actually with everyone that I had an interview or a conversation, it was just so great to make this connection and in a way to learn about different people from different countries. And I think that language learning connects people in a way. And even if we don't know the person in flesh but in a way we are like connected and the it's just a great, it's so beautiful. yeah. It is the thing. The thing that makes the world a small city, people will connecting together even though they are living in a far away places they know if they feel they live. So I know for example, I'm talking with you. I live in Senegal in a farm in West Africa, and this is the magic of language. This is the only thing that can do it is a language that. That is the only thing that help being able to connect together and understand each other and share our knowledge and our feelings. You know, I mean, nothing is like that. Nothing is actually bigger than that for me. So textbooks are, or take a great part in your language learning. And can you recommend specific books or would you rather say that every learner is different has to choose a different book? Or I don't know if you can share something about that. Yeah, it's a text book is a, actually the thing that helped me to get here today but two people are different, you know, some people might be, I mean, might prefer to go another way. Some people. learn language in a different way, but for me, I can only recommend what I've gone through and what I, what I knew. I learned it via textbooks and by the way, everybody can download this particular application. It's called English speaking and listening English and speaking and listening. And it is actually. Built in six sections, I think. And there are some basic topics that everybody can write down and read just to make your input quite impressive. It will help you to gain so many vocabulary words at the beginning. And then if you've already have a first language like English or another language that you can use to translate the unknown words. I am not recommending people to just reading it once or twice and then leave it there. You'll have to put, you have to give it a time and effort. Write them down in a notebook. Yeah. And study them, review them several times. And by doing this, you'll see a progress fast, very, very fast. So, why I prefer this textbook way of learning a language, because as I told you, at the beginning, you will gain the vocabularies. Construction of the sentences and the grammatical way of saying things and writing things. I mean, it is a complete package for me. That's why I recommend it rather than, you know, learning a language by acquiring some vocabularies, some lonely vocabularies. I mean, that is not the purpose of learning language. If you're learning a language by just learning just one vocabulary, go on, you know, see things like that. Maybe you will struggle to use them later. Yeah. Yeah. So I'm not recommending anybody, just one particular textbook. You can find any textbook that you can find in a topic that interests you. For example, if you're a football fan, try to find a basic textbook that speaks or talks about football. If you're a drama or musician person, find something related to that field, that particular aspect. And Read it put some efforts on it. you will see how fast will go. what do you think? About watching series or movies to improve in your target language. Yeah. I believe this is also a very interesting thing. When it comes to learning language, I think it can help, but for me, it's not my cup of tea. Maybe I don't have time to do it, but I don't deny that it is very, very interesting and it can help you to improve you're listening ability but you know, for me, when it comes to listening, I prefer podcasts. Because , it is sort of all, you can do it while you can listening to podcasts while doing some other things. Yeah. while running , it is something very convenient when it comes to listening. By watching movies, you only have to sit down and being focused on the television or the internet, to do it. But when you are somebody like me who moves around, you know, very often I prefer podcasts. Yeah. But if somebody actually prefer watching movies, series and documentaries for practicing the English, if that particular thing interests them, I would recommend them to do that because doing something that you love. It's crucial when it comes to learning language. Absolutely. I agree with that a hundred percent, so, okay. I think I wanna thank you very much for your time and your story. I don't know. Maybe you have a question or something you want to add. Okay, well I just want to thank you. You know, you are the first person who gave me this opportunity to express myself. I've never conducted a, conducted an interview before, by the way. , I, have very interesting story when it comes to learning language and I wanted to get it out of my system to help out, to help others, people like me who want to learn second language you are the person who give me the opportunity to make it happen. And I, I thank you. I'm thinking you deeply in my heart and I wish you all the best. And I have to thank you. Thank you very much for tuning in, on my fluent podcast and also the vocab man. And I mean, without you, it not be possible, or I would not see any reason to record these podcasts, you know, so I am really thankful for that. And for all of your knowledge, Which you shared with us, and maybe we can catch up, on another day. Yeah, it's very kind of you. It's my pleasure. I'm very happy. And I'm looking forward to do that in the future.   Hey, thank you. Thank you. Thank you very much. Have a nice day. bye. Thank you. Bye. Okay. Music: Scott Holmes https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Scott_Holmes Senegal Flag https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?cirrusUserTesting=control&search=Senegal+flag&title=Special%3ASearch&go=Go&ns0=1&ns6=1&ns12=1&ns14=1&ns100=1&ns106=1#/media/File:Senegal_Flag.jpg  

Automation Unplugged Podcast
Automation Unplugged Episode #134 feat. Taylor Whipple, Vice President of Operations and Finance of One Firefly

Automation Unplugged Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2020 57:18


Here are some of the topics Ron had the opportunity to discuss with Taylor Whipple:His rewarding time as a Peace Corps Volunteer in West Africa - he even spoke to us in Wolof!Taylor’s start in the music industry where he spent some time working for Madonna’s music label before he decided to go back to school to pursue his MBA in Finance.How an analytical approach to brainstorming ideas has helped further empower One Firefly’s growthOne Firefly receiving a placement on the 2020 Inc. 5000 listTo get transcripts, resources of what was mentioned in the show, and more visit: onefirefly.com/au134SHOW NOTESTaylor Whipple is Vice President of Operations & Finance. Having just celebrated his 7 year anniversary with One Firefly, Taylor has been responsible for overseeing the organization's financial and production management.Ron Callis is the CEO of One Firefly, LLC, a digital marketing agency based out of South Florida and creator of Automation Unplugged. Founded in 2007, One Firefly has quickly became the leading marketing firm specializing within the integrated technology and security space. The One Firefly team work hard to create innovative solutions to help Integrators boost their online presence, such as the elite website solution, Mercury Pro.About One FireflyOne Firefly, LLC is an award-winning marketing agency that caters to technology professionals in the custom integration, security and solar energy markets. One Firefly is headquartered in Davie, Florida with staff located throughout North America and has been operating since 2007.

StoryLearning Spanish
Capítulo 30. Los viajes virtuales de Bianca

StoryLearning Spanish

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2020 7:48


Welcome to StoryLearning Spanish! Follow the transcript below as you listen. Ready to take your Spanish to the next level? Register for our next StoryLearning Challenge at: http://www.storylearning.com —Entonces, ¿eres de Senegal? —preguntó Bianca a Djiby, mientras todos comían. —Sí… Perdón, no nos hemos presentado. Soy Djiby —le dijo, extendiendo su mano. Se dieron un apretón de manos y Bianca se presentó. —Yo soy Bianca, soy de Inglaterra. Entonces, ¿de dónde eres en Senegal? Djiby parecía algo sorprendido por la pregunta. —Soy de un pequeño pueblo llamado Saint Louis. —Oh, sí, claro, en el norte, en la frontera con Mauritania —dijo Bianca. Djiby estaba muy sorprendido. —¡Exacto! ¿Acaso has ido a Senegal? —le preguntó. —Bianca se pasa todos los días durante horas recorriendo el mundo por Google Earth —explicó Nora—. Conoce todos los rincones del planeta. —¡Guau! —dijo Djiby—. ¿Pero has viajado? —No —dijo Bianca—. Esta es mi primera vez fuera de Inglaterra. —En mi cultura, viajar es muy importante —explicó Djiby—. Muchos piensan que los senegaleses que viajamos por el mundo somos todos refugiados, ¡pero no es así! Generalmente, viajamos porque está en nuestra cultura viajar, porque creemos que así es como te haces hombre… o mujer. Después de pasar algunos años en otro país, siempre regresamos a Senegal, con más experiencias, con más conocimiento. Por ejemplo, aprendes un nuevo idioma. Yo estudié español cuando vivía con mi primo Jawara, en Argentina. —¿Entonces hablas dos idiomas? —preguntó Sandra. Djiby lanzó una carcajada: —¿Dos idiomas? No, no, yo hablo cinco idiomas: wólof, árabe, francés, inglés y español. Glossary mano: hand. apretón de manos: handshake. presentarse: to introduce oneself. pueblo: town, small town. sorprendido, sorprendida: surprised. acaso: perhaps, perchance. rincón: corner. refugiado, refugiada: refugee. conocimiento: knowledge. wólof: Wolof (an African language spoken in Senegal, the Gambia and Mauritania). Follow this link to give us a review: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/storylearning-spanish/id1527159764

Jigeenu Diaspora
Trailer

Jigeenu Diaspora

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2020 0:55


Jigeenu Diaspora Podcast a pour but de donner une voix à toutes les femmes sénégalaises de la diaspora, quel que soit leur âge. Le podcast se concentrera sur des conversations hebdomadaires qui permettront à nos Jigeen (femme en langue Wolof) de se connecter les unes aux autres. Jigeenu Diaspora est une conversation hebdomadaire couvrant des sujets divers : les finances, le développement personnel, la santé, l’entrepreneuriat etc.Rejoignez notre communauté:InstagramFacebookNotre site web

Late Confirmation by CoinDesk
LEIGH: Meet a Freelance Cypherpunk Developer in Africa

Late Confirmation by CoinDesk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2020 29:04


In this audio interview, CoinDesk’s Leigh Cuen and Fodé Diop, founder of the Dakar Bitcoin Developers meetup in Senegal, talk about bitcoin in Africa. This episode is sponsored by Crypto.com, Bitstamp and Nexo.io.From how mobile devices offer the primary point of access and social media groups offer local liquidity, Cuen and Diop explore what cryptocurrency adoption actually looks like in emerging markets like Senegal. Like many bitcoiners, Diop got his start in the crypto industry working for token projects in 2017. From there, he got involved with the Oakland Blockchain Developers Meetup, and eventually took that experience back to Senegal when he moved back to his hometown to be with family during the COVID-19 crisis. “I started with Ethereum because it was easier to have access to...Philosophically, I no longer align with the Ethereum ethos,” Diop said. “The first thing I did when I started here [Dakar] with the meetups was I gave away about $1,000 in bitcoin.”As a dual citizen of the U.S. and Senegal, with an American bank account, Diop can use mainstream bitcoin wallets like Cash App to use bitcoin as a currency anywhere in the world. This came in handy when Diop unexpectedly needed to stay in Senegal throughout 2020. For people with only Senegalese accounts, he recommends the Lightning-friendly Wallet of Satoshi.Now, with the support of organizations like Chaincode Labs, he freelances from Senegal teaches aspiring bitcoiners like Bineta Ngom, who have a high level of technical understanding yet aren’t fluent in English. As such, she struggled to find the right materials to learn about bitcoin. “I’m super happy to find out there was a bitcoin community here in Senegal. I never heard of it spoken of before here. I didn’t have anyone to talk to, exchange (ideas) on the subject. This was a chance for me to meet enthusiasts,” Ngom said. Ngom, who studied computer science and now works at a local university, said she hopes to use bitcoin to buy something someday. In the meantime, Diop is focused on translating information from English into local languages like French and Wolof. Plus, he said most people in Senegal only access the internet through their Android mobile devices. So they need information about how to use mobile apps and understand whether something is a scam. “We also have peer-to-peer trading through WhatsApp and Telegram,” Diop said. Until Diop started the local bitcoin meetup, Ngom said the only other sources she knew for cryptocurrency projects were a few “scams” her friends invested in during the 2017 token boom.“Places that are English-speaking are moving way faster than their French counterparts,” Diop said, comparing English-speaking Ghana and Nigeria to French-speaking countries in West Africa. “I don’t understand how the bitcoin community doesn’t target more (African) universities and do more hackathons.”He added the small yet highly curious community in Senegal now uses bitcoin for speculative trading and remittances. “I have people who are highly, highly technical when it comes to cryptography, per say, but they don’t understand how bitcoin works,” Diop said. “I believe this technology is groundbreaking. It could help a lot of people.”

40 for Tea
Women's Human Rights reclaimed - Informed choice with Molly Melching

40 for Tea

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2020 66:01


A powerful conversation on social norm change and the power of human rights education.  Rach talks with award winner Molly Melching, founder of Tostan, shares her personal journey to address the taboo of female genital cutting in West Africa and transform the lives of thousands of communities across the globe.  We are called to explore the power of culture, dialogue and informed choice.  Eye opening, heart opening and an inspiring call to action.  Join us again for another cuppa next Tuesday.   In this podcast you will hear of: How Women found their voice through human rights conversations and social norms exploration in Senegal Molly's personal story and perspectives on culture in West Africa & Wolof language. How female genital cutting was eradicated in communities in West Africa The power of perspectives - when we learn about others we learn about ourselves. Tea drinking in Senegal,  Moringa tea & Diabetes. If you enjoyed the podcast, do subscribe, share, like, rate and review and help us spread all the good stuff.     Find all the inside info on 40 for tea:  More on Molly:  Find Tostan Find Rach Allan  LinkedIn:  Website:  For show notes and past guests, please visit https://40fortea.libsyn.com/   Molly Melching has lived in Senegal since 1974 and founded the international NGO, Tostan, in 1991. Tostan, meaning “breakthrough” in Wolof, implements a holistic, three-year empowering education program that has engaged over 3,000 rural African communities in themes of democracy, human rights, health, literacy and project management skills. The program has led to thousands of women holding leadership posts and over 8,800 communities in eight African countries publicly declaring their commitment to abandon harmful traditional practices. Molly and Tostan have received international recognition for their work in the areas of social norm change and human rights education including: The Conrad Hilton Humanitarian Prize, The Skoll Award for Social Entrepreneurship and UNESCO’s King Sejong Literacy Prize. A New York Times best-selling book by Aimee Molloy, However Long the Night, vividly relates Molly and Tostan's story and they are also featured in Melinda Gates's 2019 book, Moment of Lift. Articles Gillespie, Diane & Melching, Molly (2010), “The Transformative Power of Democracy and Human Rights in Nonformal Education: The Case of Tostan”, Adult Education Quarterly, 60 (4), 477-498. (Attached to this email) Ashoka, (2013) “The Crucial Role Of Empathy In Development: Q&A With Social Entrepreneur Molly Melching" https://www.ashoka.org/en-kr/story/crucial-role-empathy-development-qa-social-entrepreneur-molly-melching Melching, Molly (2013), “To Change Society, First Change Minds”, CNN. https://edition.cnn.com/2013/10/31/opinion/melching-africa-social-change/index.html Martin, Courtney (2013), “However Long the Night: Q&A with Molly Melching”, Stanford Social Innovation Review. https://ssir.org/articles/entry/however_long_the_night_a_qa_with_molly_melching Q&A:: A Senegal-based humanitarian group helps African communities reject harmful practices against women https://www.latimes.com/world/africa/la-fg-global-molly-melching-qa-20171106-story.html  Dugger, Celia (2011) “Senegal Curbs a Bloody Rite for Girls and Women” New York Times Video and Article. Books where Tostan is featured prominently: However Long the Night by Aimee Molloy (Molly and Tostan's story) (2013) HarperOne Gates, Melinda. Moment of Lift (2019) Flatiron books. Clinton, Hillary, The Book of Gutsy Women.  (2019) Simon and Schuster publishers. Martin, Roger. & Osberg, Sally. (2015), Getting Beyond Better: How Social Entrepreneurship Works, Published by Harvard Business Review Press. Carter, President Jimmy. (2014) A Call to Action: Women, Religion, Violence, and Power. Simon & Schuster. Kristof, Nicholas (2009), Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide. Knopf (Tostan featured in Chapter 13)  

Timestorm
Episode 12: Naming

Timestorm

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2020 19:17


In 1810, the Ventura twins search for the beat of three motherlands in a Wolof village in the Saint-Louis region of Senegal in West Africa. The twins meet Idrissa who invites them to a baby-naming ceremony for his nephew. EPISODE CREDITS Written and directed by Dania Ramos Audio engineering, sound design, and music by Michael Aquino Episode art layout: M. Aquino; original image: shutterstock/design36 Leilany Figueroa as Alexa Ventura Claudio Venancio as Beni Ventura Orlando Segarra as Lt. Horacio Méndez Alicias Rivas as Atabey Darin F. Earl II as Idrissa Rachel Faison as Fatou Gary Kayi Fletcher as Malik Daria M. Sullivan as Aminata Additional voices: Moutarou Diallo, Amanda Faison, Jane Mandel Culture/Language Consultants: Aida Guisse, Arame Niang History/Regional/Language Consultant: Moutarou Diallo Additional research source: Ousmane Traore, Assistant Professor of African History, Pomona college Thanks for the Share-out, Blythe! Blythe can be heard on the podcast Unspookable. Timestorm is produced by Cocotazo Media and is a proud member of TRAX from PRX. TimestormSeries.com | TRAX.fm Mailing list sign-ups: Timestorm | TRAX Twitter & Instagram: @CocotazoMedia Facebook: facebook.com/CocotazoM Equipment sponsor: 3DioSound Series art: Hispanic Legacy Studio Proud members of Kids Listen Timestorm is produced in Essex County, New Jersey, which is situated on the traditional territory of the Leni Lenape people. Patreon: patreon.com/Timestorm Episode Resources: cocotazomedia.com/timestorm-resources Submit a Listener Share-out: cocotazomedia.com/listener-participation More About Puerto Rico: cocotazomedia.com/puerto-rico

Révolution Bilingue
Episode 16: Mbacké Diagne : "Sans une révolution bilingue, comment l'Afrique peut-elle vraiment se développer?"

Révolution Bilingue

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2020 27:54


Passage par le Sénégal et l'Université Cheick Anta Diop de Dakar pour une discussion sur l'éducation plurilingue avec le professeur Mbacké Diagne, Directeur de recherche au laboratoire Linguistique et Grammaire anglaises et africaines .La situation des langues au Sénégal est représentative du bain linguistique dans lequel les nations africaines évoluent. La place des langues nationales dans les systèmes scolaires, comme le Wolof et le Pulaar entre autres dans ce cas-ci, est encore inégale vis-à-vis de la place qu'occupent les langues internationales telle que le français, l'anglais ou l'arabe. Cette situation est au cœur des débats actuels tant elle est liée à la réussite scolaire des élèves, aux questions identitaires et au développement économique du pays.

The World Fusion Show
Ep #76 Gokh-Bi System - World Fusion hip hop

The World Fusion Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2020 29:17


Ep #76 with Gokh-Bi System, World Fusion hip hop. Gokh-Bi System began in Senegal, arrived in the US twenty years ago and have gone through a number of personnel changes but Mamadou Ndaiye and Sana Ndaiye have been leading the group all along. Sana plays the ekonting (a West African banjo) that has a long history in the culture of the Casamance from southern Senegal. They mix a wide range of styles in their music and sing and rap in many languages including Wolof, Jola, French, English and Spanish. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/109866072979176/videos/262419678242616/ Podcast: https://soundcloud.com/hilljoy/ep-76-gokh-bi-system-world-fusion-hip-hop A Worldsoul Records production derrikjordan.com Winner of the national award for Best Entertainment and Arts Series 2019 in public access TV.

The World Fusion Show
Ep #72 Barou Sall, master hoddu player

The World Fusion Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 27, 2020 29:48


Ep #72 with Barou Sall, master hoddu player. Barou Sall has been performing with Baaba Maal for decades. He plays the hoddu, a special type of ngoni from the northern part of Senegal. In this episode he talks about its importance to the Fulani culture. The interview was done by Tony Vacca and recorded in Senegal by Paul Richmond. I recorded and performed with Barou when I was in Senegal and he is featured at the end of the show on a track from my CD "SuperString Theory Goes To Senegal" called "Nyo Ko Bok" which means "We share it" in Wolof. Translation for the interview was done by Mamadou Ndiaye. A Worldsoul Records production derrikjordan.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/The-World-Fusion-Show-109866072979176/ YouTube: https://youtu.be/urTOvFrzwcY Podcast: https://soundcloud.com/hilljoy/ Winner of the national award for Best Entertainment and Arts Series 2019 in public access TV

Radio Maarif - Le podcast marocain
#87 - Podcast Histoire : Vus du Sud

Radio Maarif - Le podcast marocain

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 26, 2020 32:01


Conversation éclairante avec Abdarahmane Ngaide, historien mauritano-sénégalais, qui nous offre une autre perspective sur notre passé. Produit avec le soutien de Maroc Telecom

Nada Que Ver
Episodio 39: Atlantique, No te metas con los gatos, y Nisman: el fiscal, la presidenta y el espía.

Nada Que Ver

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2020 37:35


En un episodio de obsesiones u obsesivos: Luis Pablo Beauregard, Mariana Linares y Trino Camacho se adentran en tres títulos: una ficción y dos documentales. Para empezar en Senegal, hablan de ‘Atlantique’, la ópera prima de Mati Diop, quien con esta película se convirtió en la primera mujer negra en competir, y ganar,  el Gran Premio del Jurado en el Festival de Cannes. Co-escrita por Olivier Dernangel. Fotografiada por Claire Mathon. Musicalizada por Fatima Al Quadri. Protagonizada por Abdou Balde, Aminata Kane, Ibrahima Mbaye, Ibrahima Traoré y Mama Sane en idioma original Wolof. Para profundizar sobre su directora, Ricardo López platica con Michel Lipkes, productor, director y programador artístico de FICUNAM.En Canadá, ‘Don’t F*ck With Cats’ Miniserie documental con 3 episodios de una hora cada uno creada y dirigida por Mark Lewis. Retoma la historia del asesino Luka Magnotta y los civiles que lo buscaron por años a través de redes sociales antes siquiera de que la policía interviniera. Y por último, ‘Nisman: El fiscal, la presidenta y el espía’, una docuserie de 6 episodios de una hora cada uno. Dirigida por el periodista inglés Justin Webster que nos ayuda a entender la Argentina de hoy en día a través de una de las muertes más politizadas de los últimos años… el supuesto suicidio (¿o asesinato?) del fiscal Alberto Nisman.