Podcast appearances and mentions of Willie Nelson

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American country music singer-songwriter

  • 1,583PODCASTS
  • 2,645EPISODES
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  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jan 14, 2022LATEST
Willie Nelson

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Latest podcast episodes about Willie Nelson

Hard Rain & Slow Trains: Bob Dylan & Fellow Travelers
1/13/2022: "Ride, Willie, Ride": Willie Nelson

Hard Rain & Slow Trains: Bob Dylan & Fellow Travelers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 65:07


This year marks the 60th anniversary of Nelson's first studio album, so why not now to feature one of the most prolific and poetic song craftsmen and singers to be included as one of Dylan's fellow travelers: Willie Hugh Nelson? This episode focuses on Nelson's collaborations with Dylan. In "20 Pounds of Headlines," we round up news from the world of Bob Dylan, which includes news on the James Mangold film in development tentatively titled GOING ELECTRIC and news about the passing of two musicians and a concert promoter. In "Who Did It Better?" ask you to vote this week to tell us who did "Young at Heart" better: Bob Dylan or Willie Nelson. Listen to the episode, then go to our Twitter page @RainTrains to vote!

a ModelersLife
ScaleTrains Road Trip

a ModelersLife

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 89:20


Not much is known about ScaleTrains fearless leader Shane Wilson, other than both he and Willie Nelson have a lot in common, because neither one of them can wait to get on the road again. Travelling the highways and byways of America along with is wife and trusty sidekick Bear the dog they're spreading the word of this great hobby to anyone that will listen. This podcast reveals some stops at some great clubs, museums, inspection stations and camping spots. So sit back and relax with a big bowl of shredded road maps, a tall cool glass of windshield washer fluid and enjoy!!!

Stereo Embers: The Podcast
Stereo Embers The Podcast: Christopher Turpin and Stephanie Jean (Ida Mae)

Stereo Embers: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 74:56


"Click Click Domino" Christopher Turpin and Stephanie Jean were in the Bath-based alternative rock band Kill It Kid who put out three fabulous albums. With a sonic attack that fell somewhere between Nirvana and The White Stripes, Kill It Kid were a ferocious live act that radiated intensity and heart. After the band called it a day Turpin and Jean formed the duo Ida Mae. Influenced by Delta Blues, JJ Cale, John Martyn and obscure British Folk, the band hit the ground running with their 2019 debut Chasing Lights. Having left their native England for the rich musical soil of Nashville, the band dug in and got to work, playing shows all over the world, including the Newport Folk Festival and opening slots for Willie Nelson, Greta Van Fleet and Blackberry Smoke. They've recored with M. Ward and T Bone Burnett, been hailed by everyone from American Songwriter to Rolling Stone and the release of their sophomore album Click Click Domino has cemented them as one of the most exciting bands around. A wicked blend of bluesy howl, folky finesse and affecting harmonies, the husband and wife team of Ida Mae bring to mind everyone from Fleetwood Mac to The Record Company. In this intimate chat, the two talk to Alex about their record collections, family support and how to do a Meet and Greet in a COVID world…. www.idamaemusic.com www.bombshellradio.com www.alexgreenonline.com Stereo Embers The Podcast Twitter: @emberseditor Instagram: @emberspodcast Email: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

Beyond Picket Fences
Episode #79: My Nomadic Life, w/ Milo Stephens

Beyond Picket Fences

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 41:20


Milo has been working and living full-time in her class B van with her dog Willie Nelson for just about two years now. She and Willie are nomadic, meaning they have no permanent residence. . Wanting to see what's around the next corner, and at the next exit, exploration is what drives this lifestyle for Milo. The post Episode #79: My Nomadic Life, w/ Milo Stephens appeared first on Beyond Picket Fences.

Devin Talks
SPEAKING SPORADICALLY #41 - Our Colossal Idea

Devin Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 70:21


In the 41st installment of Speaking Sporadically the guys talk about their ideas for future episodes and begin to implement some of those ideas into this episode. They also talk about Willie Nelson and his famous guitar trigger, along with some other ideas of the importance of music. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/speakingsporadically/support

Art Bell Back in Time
Ep79-Art Bell-Willie Nelson

Art Bell Back in Time

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 133:50


If you'd like access to lots more episodes without limits- support us at https://www.patreon.com/ArtBell from only $5 per month. Thank you! 1997-05-09 - Coast to Coast AM with Art Bell - Willie Nelson ##Note## The episodes will only remain in this free feed for the current month. If you'd like access to lots more episodes without limits- support us at https://www.patreon.com/ArtBell from only $5 per month. Thank you!

Making a Scene Presents
Mike Peterson is Making a Scene

Making a Scene Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 81:57


Making a Scene Presents an Interview with Michael PetersonThis is more than an interview this is a Masterclass in Songwriting and how to negotiate the Nashville Music Industry!Though Michael Peterson is an Arizona boy who got into the music business through a college football teammate, he wound up with one of the most popular country hits of 1997. Born in Tucson, Peterson grew up in Washington state, listening to his grandmother's wide-ranging music collection, overloaded with classic American songwriters, including Cole Porter and Harold Arlen, as well as obvious choices like Roger Miller and Willie Nelson. After earning a football scholarship to Pacific Lutheran University (and winning a national championship), he hooked up with former teammate Brad Westering, who was working as a producer for Deniece Williams and others. Peterson wrote several songs for potential use by Westering, and began traveling occasionally to Nashville.

The Danny Diess Show
Episode 205 - Wednesday Mix

The Danny Diess Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 115:12


Now Hear This Entertainment
NHTE 412 Fred Mollin

Now Hear This Entertainment

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 56:51


A record producer, film and TV composer, songwriter, arranger, musical director, and bandleader. He first came into international prominence as a record producer in the late ‘70s, producing numerous albums and singles, including the GRAMMY-nominated "Sometimes When We Touch" by Dan Hill. He also worked on two GRAMMY-nominated Johnny Mathis albums. Growing a reputation as a duet producer, he has spent the past five years producing duets with such artists as Billy Joel, Willie Nelson, Vince Gill, Natalie Cole, Gloria Estefan, and more. As an artist he released a 15-song album this past March and his top five songs on Spotify have a combined 22 MILLION streams! His projects include “Disney's Lullaby Album,” which went gold, and more than 30 album projects for Disney over the last 20 years. He had been Vice President of A&R for Walt Disney Records in 2007 and 2008.

Wheels Off with Rhett Miller

Musician, actor, and record producer Jesse Dayton joins Rhett fresh off of the road to talk about his recent acoustic tour, revisiting his life through writing a memoir, and playing music with his heroes. You'll also hear the two friends discuss Chuck Berry's lyricism, lifestyle changes that Jesse made in order to improve his health, and the importance of loving yourself. Jesse Dayton is best known for his guitar contributions to albums by country musicians including Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings, and Willie Nelson. He is also notable for his collaborations with horror film director Rob Zombie, who has commissioned Dayton to record music for his films. Jesse just released his memoir, Beaumonster, and you can check it out here. Wheels Off is brought to you by Osiris Media. Hosted and produced by Rhett Miller. Co-produced by Kirsten Cluthe in partnership with Nick Ruffini (Revoice Media). Editing by Justin Thomas. Production Assistance by Matt Bavuso. Music by OLD97's. Episode artwork by Katherine Boils. Show logo by Tim Skirven. This podcast is available on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts. You can also ask Alexa to play it. Please leave us a rating or review on iTunes. Revisit previous episodes of Wheels Off with Rosanne Cash, Rob Thomas, Will Forte, Lydia Loveless, Allison Moorer, Ted Leo, Paul F. Tompkins, Jen Kirkman, and more. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Border Crossings - Voice of America
Border Crossings: Jake Shimabukuro - December 27, 2021

Border Crossings - Voice of America

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 30:02


Ukulele superstar Jake Shimabukuro is back touring in support of his last studio album, “Trio” and his new studio album, “Jake and Friends.” This is his most creatively ambitious album to-date, featuring a who's who of music royalty which includes Willie Nelson, Bette Midler, Jimmy Buffett, Kenny Loggins, Moon Taxi, Michael McDonald, Vince Gill and Amy Grant, Jon Anderson, Ziggy Marley, Warren Haynes, Jack Johnson, Billy Strings, and many more.

the artisan podcast
ep25 | the artisan podcast | keith roberts | creator of the oak journal

the artisan podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 35:38


Check out our episode with Keith Roberts, Entrepreneur | Author & Keynote Speaker | Creator of the Oak Journal.   We chat about creativity, mentorship, entrepreneurship and so much more/----more---- Katty: I'm so excited to interview a good friend, Keith Roberts, an incredible creative and the creator of The Oak Journal, for this session of the Artisan Podcast. Hello, Keith, welcome. Keith: It's an honor to be here, thanks for having me. Katty: I'd love to start the conversation, Keith about you as a creative and how you got your start and then we'll make that move into where you are today with The Oak Journal. Keith: Great. So my start, I actually went to Brooks Institute of Photography in Santa Barbara, California, where I got a degree in Industrial Scientific Photography with a minor in Undersea Photography, so really applicable to the real world….sarcasm there!   I think one of the many gifts that I took away that was a life changer for me with Brooks was the level of presentation and professionalism that was required. It was easy to get into Brooks Institute of Photography, it was incredibly hard to graduate. There were 58 students in my class and 12 graduated. If you got to C you failed, you had to retake the class. A second C you were expelled.  So they were really about making exceptional artists and not about just making money, which I really appreciate, and being somebody that's owned an agency for 25 years and seeing what a lot of the schools turn out now that are based on profit versus not, really instilling what the students need to have a successful career as a creative. That was enormous for me. The other thing that I took away from that was, you know, a very special relationship with the founder of the school, Ernest Brooks. I minored in Undersea Photography and I got to spend several months living on a boat diving every day with a gentleman who has, you know, an exhibit in the Smithsonian Institute for his underwater photography. We had Jean-Michel Cousteau, Jacques Cousteau's son, dove with us for several expeditions. So the taste for once-in-a-lifetime experiences, I got at a very early age. Katty: Oh my gosh I got goosebumps. That's incredible to have that opportunity at such a young age, that just opened up the whole world for you to be able to look at everything through their eyes too. Keith: Yeah, and I would say it also set an expectation that I did not want to have an ordinary life. I remember to this day at my grandmother's trailer in rural Indiana she had a poster of the poem, The Road Less Traveled. And I always remember that last verse “Two roads diverged in a road and I took the road less traveled by and that has made all the difference” and that was an early opportunity to see when everybody else is sitting in a classroom or working on being an engineer, which was the safe job in the 90s you know, and my dad was an engineer, and that was the safe route to go..what was possible if you really followed your passion. Katty: Beautiful. And I know that, unfortunately, Ernest Brooks passed away recently. And you wrote a beautiful tribute about him. Can you talk a little bit about mentorship and just kind of what that meant for you to be under the tutelage of this incredible person? Keith: Absolutely, and thank you for giving me the opportunity to continue to honor Ernie. He was one of the many mentors that I've continued to work with. It was a gift and I think, realizing as a Buddhist, I believe that there is no such thing as a coincidence, but when the student is ready to teach her presents itself and I think there are so many lost opportunities when people don't realize that there's this synchronicity happening all around them.  And so, with Ernie Brooks, I remember something specifically said that the boat we lived on was “Just Love.” and he said, “The time we spend upon just love is not deducted from our lives.” And it still chokes me up to this day, and I think that's why he lived to be as long as he did is because he spent so much time on that gorgeous boat.  But mentorship is essential and it's not something that ends with the first. Ernie sent me on a path, but at Brooks, I met Lapsom, who was somebody that worked with the Dalai Lama, and he put me on a path from being a devout atheist to finding Buddhism and changing the entire path of my life. Even though Lapsom was very briefly, in my life. And then there was a gentleman, Dave Larsen. I assisted a couple photographers Vic Huber and Bob Carey, those were also mentors that helped me continue to push what I wanted to be as a professional, but when I broke out and started working as a photographer, stock photography was really decimating the market and a lot of established photographers were closing and so I spent a year as a starving artist, and then had to get a real job. And that's how I got into doing design, where I met my next mentor, a gentleman named Dave Larsen. He saw me as a designer that, head down when things weren't going to get accomplished by my peers, I would jump in and make sure that we hit our deadlines, and he was the one that actually gave me the opportunity to move to Denver, he promoted me within that organization that was acquired by Equifax. And then the next step was EO and the mentors like Warren Rustand and having those people that continue to inspire you to tears. Katty: Well said. EO for the audience is the Entrepreneurs Organization, a network of about 16,000 members entrepreneurs across the globe, and that's how Keith and I know each other. We're both members of EO, and have a lot of people, a lot of mentors in common. Warren Rustand is the gentleman that Keith just talked about. So, obviously, the influence of all of these incredible people has created an indelible impact on you, one that you carry with you still today. When and who kind of lit that spark of entrepreneurship for you?  Keith: That's a really good question. I don't know. Actually, I do. I remember in seventh grade. The funny thing is it wasn't really inspirational, it was my accounting teacher or some class that I had and I remember he explained a definition of an entrepreneur, and it was horrible. It was somebody that was going to have many failures before they have a success, probably have, you know, one or multiple bankruptcies. I mean he really described an entrepreneur as an atrocious choice to make in your life, and I remember sitting in that class and being like, “Huh, I think that's me”. Going against the grain, not following the rules, and facing insurmountable odds with optimism. So it was sort of an adverse inspiration. Katty: I love that. I absolutely love that. You can see this on my wall, it says “dwell in possibilities.” It's my absolute favorite quote, and that's what entrepreneurship is all about. There is a possibility out there so let's go and do it. Katty: I love that. At what point in your career after you were working and obviously studying photography, making the move to design and working for Dave Larsen. At what point did you say okay now I'm ready to start my own agency? Keith: It was actually serendipity, so I had been doing some stuff as Zenman, as a freelancer, while I was working at Equifax, which is where I worked for Dave Larsen. And then they had moved me from California to Denver when the merger happened. Like with most acquisitions they within six months realize the redundancies that they'd acquired and they'd also moved us out here. So, I always had the goal that before I was 30 I wanted to be my own boss, to have my own business, to be an entrepreneur. And I actually was given a freeroll, I had a six-month runway, it was pre-September 11, the economy was great. Based on my management level, I had a half-year runway. I looked at that opportunity like once in a lifetime, I'm never going to be given this gift again. I took my severance package I tore up my resume, never to be edited or used again, and formed Zenman as official business. Katty: It's one thing though to go from being a solopreneur, and to running and creating one. Having employees, having that responsibility for other people, beyond just yourself. When did you make that transition? Keith: That was a couple of years later. So for the first three years, it was just me, it was called Zenman because I was the Buddhist creative guy I was the Zenman. But then as we started adding employees and scaling, you're absolutely right, two things happened; my stress level increased exponentially and my personal income decreased catastrophically. And it probably took five years to get back to where I was after adding that overhead and that did not alleviate the peaks and valleys that came with a service-based industry.  We weren't doing a lot of recurring revenue at the time, so each month it was eat what you kill, and it was feast or famine, many times. And I would even say past that, so that was eight years into the business. It was another five years before I joined EO, that I really learned how to be an entrepreneur. The first decade was stubbornness, willingness to work 100 plus hours a week, which led to, you know, illness and all sorts of issues. But it was actually learning how to run a business, learning how to be a leader, even learning what EBITA meant, which I didn't know the first 10 years. These things are essential, but we don't know them all right out of the bat. We weren't taught those and you know photography school or, you know, wherever we go.  Katty: I think you bring up a really good point, in terms of kind of what, what has been taught currently in art schools. For artists and creatives, as a whole really putting their practice and their expertise in the various programs that they use, you know, whether it be Adobe Creative Cloud or Figma or whatever it may be, but not to forget the business side of them because so many of them are solopreneurs and are running their own freelance business; to really have a good understanding of what the accounting side of it needs to be. Either to outsource it to an accountant and or do it themselves, whichever they want, but to really look at that business as a business. I think it's really important to be able to have that full-scale picture of it. Keith: It's a really good point Katty because I learned the presentation skills and that's one of the things I learned at Brooks was a well-put-together portfolio that's perfectly mounted and everything is top-notch is going to get more jobs and better photography with a sloppy presentation. The one thing we didn't learn was the business part of running a studio, photography business, freelance business.  So for the first 15 years of my company or longer. I saw the business's checking account like Monopoly money, it wasn't real money to me until it came to me. I mean millions of dollars were wasted by not having that clarity and understanding and business education, which is essential. And I think you know the tables have turned, and now the most secure opportunity is to be your own boss to be an entrepreneur versus trusting your career into some other company hitching your wagon to that star and hoping that they not only are successful but that they continue to value your contribution and reciprocate that with job security. Katty: Very very true and very well said thank you for that. Now you've recently transitioned out of your business. Is that correct? Am I saying that correctly?  Keith: No, that's correct. Yes, I sold Zenman to a SaaS company called Mblue in Latin America. It has been an amazing transition. I was really nervous. I know so many people sell their business and they lose their identity. They make a bunch of money and then they become miserable. I feel very very fortunate that it's been a serendipitous partnership that maintains a legacy in the business and I'm helping them grow and accomplish their goals. I think the mindset of win-win, it wasn't I'm tapping out the last day, it's that I'm committed to it and that the people on the other side have the trust and respect to let us continue to run our practice as we do. Katty: Fantastic. And obviously, I know this from having known you the past few years, you've embarked on this passion that is now your sole focus in your business, which is an incredibly beautiful journal that you've created for others to use, and I can see the experience for having put a great presentation together that you learned so many years ago, really manifests itself in the Oak Journal, it's absolutely beautiful. Can you talk about what that spark was and why did you decide to go into this business? Keith: Yes, it is a combination of two things, it is my Ikigai but I didn't know it when I started down that journey. Ikigai is a Japanese term that means life's purpose. But one of the things that I really wanted to do was stop trading my time for money. I realized when I had kids that time was the one finite resource we had. As an agency owner and a top paid creative, I make a lot of money per hour and it's still not a good exchange. So, my goal was to come up with a product-based business that would fulfill my needs of financial independence without trading my time for money, and in finding the right product that's how I came up with the Oak Journal. I wanted something that I could use my knowledge to create and do a better job than anybody that was currently doing this with the skills I built over the two decades of running Zenman. So being able to design something-- I've designed many many books over the years, but being able to take the life experience, skills, you know even Warren Rustand's 10 10 10 and weave that into a paint by numbers roadmap that anybody can use to live their best life has been transformational and it really made me want, with intention, transition out of the Zenman which was 100% my identity, it's my nickname, it's what people call me, to helping others and being a bodhisattva. Katty: Fantastic. So, as a practice as a mindfulness practice and gratitude practice. Is that something that you were doing anyway before you put the journal together? Keith: Yes, I've been meditating for 20 plus years and about 10 years ago I started practicing Transcendental Meditation, and it has had as big of an impact on me as the Entrepreneurs Organization has. Meditation is a superpower. If somebody doesn't think that they have enough time in their day to meditate, you need meditation, more than anyone, and you will find if you start a simple practice, it gives you time in the day because you're more productive, you're more clear, you're more creative, you're more focused. I wish people would look at meditation like a free pill that would give them superpowers like that movie with Bradley Cooper, Limitless, you know, it's not quite that but it's pretty amazing how much, just having a 10-minute meditation can change your day. Katty: I love that. Can you talk about that and creativity and where you see the through-line between the two because we talked about being quiet for a few minutes, that's what we're talking about here. Keith: Yeah I mean that's a really good question Katty thanks for asking. I mean the most amazing ideas if you look at, you know songwriters or inventors they happen in the shower or while they're driving down the highway and the reason that is they're not thinking about other thoughts, they're not thinking about their problems, their mortgage their issues with their partner, they're just washing their hair and at peace with their mind, their mind itself and so we're able to come up with those really, really creative ideas. So I am intentional with creating those moments from meditation, to start my day to even having core hours where I turn off all devices not just my email, my phone is in airplane mode there's no you know Twitter open. I don't do that ever anyways, but you know there's all distractions are turned off so you can focus on writing your book, working on that creative project, or whatever it is that needs to be accomplished. You can really get into those that state of theta brainwaves with intention. Willie Nelson actually does it by just driving his truck; he writes his best songs when he's driving down the highway. So once he figured that out when he wants to be creative, gets in his truck and he starts driving. So there are all different ways you can get into that state. Katty: Yeah it's interesting because creativity doesn't necessarily happen nine to five staring at a screen. It happens when you're out in nature and happens when you're just, you allow your mind to get creative. To go inward I think it's just so important to be able to do that. Keith: 100% I agree. Katty: I've done meditation for years. I only can do it if it's a guided meditation. I have not gotten to a place where I can do it on my own. But even in the guided practice, I find that so impactful and so helpful to be able to do that. Keith: Yeah, I agree. Try TM it's just a mantra I think that one will--And there's nothing wrong with guided meditations. I still do those as well and I practice those with my boys, but I have struggled with contemplated meditations that weren't guided until I found TM. Katty: Okay, I will look into it. There's also a couple of other friends who embark upon TM. You're the third person I'm hearing this from, so I think maybe the universe is talking. So you've started your boys on meditation? Keith: Yes, now we make that part of their day. In fact, when they were very very young, we had them in three different preschools before we found a school called Morningstar that was a yoga and meditation-based preschool. So the boys started every day with yoga, they did guided meditations. It was a very Eastern hippy Boulder-esque type of preschool, but it really resonated with our boys. Now, they don't embrace it with the same joy that I do, but they understand the value of it. It's almost like a joke in our house that we'll all talk about the benefits of meditation and be like “I know Dad, you talk about this dad, I know that you wrote an article about this, dad.” So I'm hoping one day, they'll listen with the same attentiveness that somebody to keynote does. Katty: Fantastic. I know that the Oak Journal you just came out with a new version of it, can you talk a little bit about the differences between this and what you were doing? In addition to the different sizes, but what's that creative process for you, because clearly you're still a very creative person and you've just channeled that creativity into this. Keith: Yeah, I love making things. So the main changes that we made, the biggest one is we move production to the US, and now it is being produced with environmentally friendly materials. The factory that we were using in China, didn't have the same standards and so that was the biggest one to us to have something that was made with our core value of environmentally friendly alignment, and also, it helped with just production delays and shipping and everything we're dealing with right now around the world.  The other piece is, each week has a positive psychology exercise, and we had people that have been doing it for over a year and so they were repeating the same, let's create our bucket list every nine weeks and so they were getting diminishing returns. So the next version is to 2.0, we're going to make four versions total so that you can have 48 different positive psychology exercises. I'm sorry, 54 different exercises that you would do in a year in two weeks, and then you could repeat it. We're also working on two other products. One is called the Sequoia, so that's your 10-year journal you set your BHAG and your moonshot. And then you're incrementally working towards that. With the series of 120 Oak Journals and then our passion project right now is the Acorn. So this is for children, and this is actually something that we're intending just to give away. We'll definitely print it and have them for sale. But anybody that wants an Acorn Journal anywhere on the planet will have a free. Katty: How beautiful and I love all the tree references and all the nature references. Keith: Thank you. Going back to our roots, beautiful. And thank you for connecting me to your resources for my journal too. You've been so gracious, I have to say that Keith, talking about mentorship, early on. You've just been so gracious with sharing your knowledge and all the trials and tribulations of bringing this journal to market and sharing that with me and with others who are interested in that. So definitely a mentor, so thank you for that. Keith: Thank you very much Katty, I appreciate it. I truly believe all ships rise with the tide. And, the more we can help each other, it just benefits everyone. And I know more people having your book and your journal is going to help them. I think one of the things I'm blessed with here in Colorado is the creative community was very symbiotic. We do compete with people but at the same time, my competitors would reach out to me and say hey there's jobs out of our league, this is more in your wheelhouse, could you take it. I think when you have that mindset of collaboration, then it's reciprocated. Katty: And it's beautifully said because so many freelancers are so siloed and the importance of community can't be overemphasized, to be part of that community, whether it's Creative Mornings or AIGA or whatever it may be, but to find a community of other creatives to be able to collaborate with is so critical. Keith: Yeah, you said it perfectly, not being on an island, not being in a silo. You know just leaning on somebody, I mean, EO was great during COVID. I don't know how many people in our chapter wouldn't have gotten their PPP, if it hadn't been for other members that say hey I have this connection at a community branch we can help you, don't worry about going through the big bank you've had for 20 years, you need to call Mary at Mbank and she'll submit your proposal at three in the morning to get you taken care of. Mentorship, and also the peers that you just have, in a connected, trusting, and vulnerable way when people don't have their guards up when they're honest with what's going on. It's amazing how we come to each other's aid. When we just raise our hand and say hey I need help.  Katty: Yeah, very very true. It's been an interesting year for sure. And we're still in it, by all means, it's not a done deal. What would you say is one of the biggest lessons that you've learned for yourself during this pandemic year and a half? Keith: The importance of community and connection. You know I've seen other people that don't have the network, that really struggled that sort of went inside and dealt with everything personally, versus just like we mentioned having that community that you can reach out to. I mean one of the blessings of EO is that it's a global community. So, I took it as an opportunity because I could go have a coffee with a friend in Denver every day, to have a zoom call with a friend in Melbourne or you know just other ways to connect with people around the planet. I actually feel like, for me, it broadened my global connections, even though I wasn't able to travel and I am chomping at the bit to go travel to meet these friends. Katty: Yeah I agree 100% We did that on the family side. And I don't know if I told you this when we saw each other last week, but since March 20th we started a family zoom, and we've had one every single Sunday since then. So March 20th of 2020, and my family is all over the world, nobody lives here in Los Angeles, so to be able to have this very intentional focused one-hour zoom call with one another. This is with grandparents and grandkids and aunts and uncles and the brothers and the sisters, that I think the max point we had 18 people on our zoom. And it still happens today, every Sunday at 10am. It's the Douraghy family zoom call, and it's similar to a forum exercise. So everything starts with an icebreaker: everybody talks about a win, everyone does a one-word open, and it's been transformational because we're actually learning things about each other that we wouldn't otherwise because we're not asking these very intentional questions of each other when we're physically together. So it's been phenomenal in terms of how close we've become as a family. Keith: That is really cool, that's such a cool gift. I think it's also a perspective, right? I mean you could look at it that “hey I haven't been able to be in the same room with these people.” But the flip side of that coin is you just created a tradition that hopefully will go on for generations. And we were blessed to have the technology to be able to do that, I mean even 10 years ago it would have been a different world we were in and I think so much more challenging to face this isolation. Katty: Oh, I agree 100% 100% agree, and look, the future of work has changed. And without the technology that we have today wouldn't have been possible to continue. Katty: What is getting you excited and inspired these days? Keith: You know what gets me excited is actually, I think, something that's really messed up right now. And that's the changes that I think are inevitable with social media. You know what's coming out about algorithms intentionally presenting inflammatory content. I'm actually excited that there will be action taken to hold these people accountable. It's going to turn the world on its head as far as advertising, e-commerce. But that's already happening with iOS changes and privacy, which is not a bad thing. Personally, I am quite happy having the exact product that I want presented to me in a way that makes it easy to purchase it. But I am excited about the change that's going to help remove the wedge that's dividing this country apart because the truth of the matter is on 95% of the issues were exactly the same. And I think there are some toxic influences that are exasperating our divide, and I am for the first time in years, optimistic that we're going to start taking that wedge out and coming back together. Keith: Whatever we can do to make that happen. Katty: Yes. And one final question for you, something to leave behind for our audience, especially those who are embarking on their creative career, and/or because of COVID have had to pivot their freelance business or if they've lost their jobs. What are some lessons learned that you want to leave them with in terms of determination to just continue, continue the task? Keith: Two tools that I will leave one; I'm a big fan of Dr. Joe Dispenza, and he has a tool on manifesting what you want. So if you're struggling right now, maybe you lost your job during COVID or your business failed or something. Set your intentions with a tool he created where you take a piece of paper out, you write emotions on one side and intentions on the other. So if your goal is a new job, what is the intention? I get to travel three months out of the year and see the world. I'm making enough money that I'm financially independent. What are all the intentions that you have? And then on the other side under the emotions, what are the feelings that you have? Actually, try to feel those emotions so you can manifest it. And that is a great tool. I love that tool but it is the first step.  The second step is doing the work. The thing that I hate about the book The Secret is it's all about having the right mindset and everything's just gonna appear in your life. The mindset is critical. It's essential, but it's the first step, you've got to make continuous daily progress, you can't just wish upon a star, that you're going to have your dream job. What did you do today to actually accomplish that goal? What incremental progress, even if it was just five new connections on LinkedIn that you sent out. What was the incremental progress you made today towards living your best life? Katty: Beautiful. Thank you, Keith, thank you for joining us here. Where can people find you and where can they find that your beautiful journal? Keith: Oakjournal.com you can connect with me on social. Look for Zenman, you will find me or anything Oak Journal related, you will definitely find me and you can direct message me, you can even email me at keith@oakjournal.com if you have any questions. Katty: Thank you. Before I let you go, I forgot to ask this, you also do a lot of sessions where you teach people how to journal and meditate and so forth. Correct? Keith: Absolutely. Yep. I do it, I literally just got off one right before we started. I was doing one for EO Cape Town, but I also do them for individual forums, for companies and I have a masterclass that's a six-week class people can do, it's an Oak masterclass. Keith: oakmasterclass.com or Oak Journal. They all are pretty good at all the SEO interlinking web thing having owned an agency. So if you get to one of my properties you can find everything that you need and will guide you through that journey.  The master class is a six-week intensive that we work on in small groups and then individually. And it's a requirement I do a little bit of coaching but I'm really really particular with working with people that have the growth mindset that you know are going to be a good fit. So everybody has to do the masterclass first to make sure we're both on the same path. Katty: Got it.  I'll put all the links in the show notes so that everybody knows how to find you and where to find you.   Thank you for listening to the artisan podcast, brought to you by Artisan Creative.  

LagunaPalooza: Fantasy Concert
Music For The Season 2021 "Merry Christmas"

LagunaPalooza: Fantasy Concert

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 60:15


Celebrate with Dan & Shay, Faith Hill, Robert Ward, Leona Lewis, Little River Band, Pink Martini, Michael Buble, Andrea Bocelli with & Katherine McPhee, Kenny Loggins, Willie Nelson with Norah Jones, Kristin Chambers, The Isley Brother with Snoop Dog, Wham, and Luther Vandross.

The Chris & Sandy Show
The Chris & Sandy Show With Sterling Drake

The Chris & Sandy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 51:23


We had a great conversation with Sterling Drake on The Chris & Sandy Show. We talked about everything from family, music, sacrifices, life in general and a ton about Nashville. He told some great stories plus a whole lot more! He also performed a song fir us too!American recording artist and songwriter, Sterling Drake, has his roots planted in the tradition of Country and Western music, from the Mission Mountains of western Montana, all the way to Music City, USA. Reminiscent of iconic mid- century country artists such Ray Price, Bob Wills, and Willie Nelson, Sterling has honed in on his "country crooner" sound touring with his dancehall band in honky-tonks across the continent. Drake is a three time Billboard charting songwriter with work released via publishing powerhouse Extreme Music (Sony ATV) and Superpop Co. and has written with several Grammy award winning writers. Working closely in coordination with Copperline Music, Emley Entertainment, and Soul Step Records, he released his debut EP in fall of 2021.

Nakedly Examined Music Podcast
NEM#162: Ray Benson (Asleep at the Wheel): Texas Swing for Half a Hundred Years

Nakedly Examined Music Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 59:23


Ray started Asleep at the Wheel in 1969 and has put out 26 albums of original tunes and classic covers while touring constantly. We discuss the title track from Half a Hundred Years (2021), "Pedernales Stroll" from Keepin' Me Up Nights (1990), and "Am I High" from The Wheel (1977). Intro: "The Letter (That Johnny Walker Read)" from Texas Gold (1975). Closer: "The Road Will Hold Me Tonight" feat. Emmylou Harris and Willie Nelson, recorded in the early 80s but only released now on the new album. Learn more at asleepatthewheel.com. Hear more Nakedly Examined Music. Like our Facebook page. Support us on Patreon. Sponsors: Gift one annual membership and g Gift one annual membership and get one free at MasterClass.com/examined. Get 3 months free of Amazon Music Unlimited at Amazon.com/nempod.

The Partially Examined Life Philosophy Podcast
PEL Presents NEM#162: Ray Benson (Asleep at the Wheel): Texas Swing for Half a Hundred Years

The Partially Examined Life Philosophy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 59:24


Ray started Asleep at the Wheel in 1969 and has put out 26 albums of original tunes and classic covers while touring constantly. We discuss the title track from Half a Hundred Years (2021), "Pedernales Stroll" from Keepin' Me Up Nights (1990), and "Am I High" from The Wheel (1977). Intro: "The Letter (That Johnny Walker Read)" from Texas Gold (1975). Closer: "The Road Will Hold Me Tonight" feat. Emmylou Harris and Willie Nelson, recorded in the early 80s but only released now on the new album. Learn more at asleepatthewheel.com. Hear more Nakedly Examined Music. Like our Facebook page. Support us on Patreon. Sponsors: Gift one annual membership and g Gift one annual membership and get one free at MasterClass.com/examined. Get 3 months free of Amazon Music Unlimited at Amazon.com/nempod.

Rock N Roll Pantheon
AllMusicPodcasts 82: "Leonard Cohen and 'Hallelujah.'"

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 11:50


Leonard Cohen's “Hallelujah” has been covered by more than 300 other artists in virtually every genre, including Willie Nelson, k.d. lang, Justin Timberlake, Bono, Brandi Carlile, and Bon Jovi, to name a few. Hell...the song was even in “Shrek”! But the song was originally stuck on side two of 1984's Various Positions, an album that Cohen's record label deemed unfit for release. In fact, Walter Yetnikoff, the head honcho at CBS Records told Cohen “Leonard, we know you're great but we don't know if you're any good.”  “Hallelujah” is arguably Cohen's biggest and most beloved song, as well as one of the most covered songs in history. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Public Affairs on KZMU
The Artist Speaks: The Raelyn Nelson Band

Public Affairs on KZMU

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 17:14


SPIN magazine recently released an article titled, "I Have Seen The Future, and It's Willie Nelson's Granddaughter". Crystal Bunch, Music Director at KZMU, recently came across that article and was hooked. Crystal reached out to Raelyn asking about the possibility of doing an interview herself and Raelyn quickly agreed. Take a moment to listen to why Raelyn chose the ukulele over the guitar, what her future plans are for the Raelyn Nelson Band, and much more.

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Tunes & Tumblers: Ida Mae and an Old Avalon (feat. Ida Mae)

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 68:56


Get ready to take the "Road to Avalon" by way of UK fog. Blues rock duo and husband and wife Chris Turpin and Stephanie Jean -- better known to the world as Ida Mae -- join us in the TnT studio for the penultimate episode of Season 3. Dive deep as we discuss their smashing sophomore record Click Click Domino, what it was like touring with Willie Nelson, and what made them fall in love with the blues. As always, Pedro prepares libations for the journey with a sweet, smoky cocktail to sip down by the Mississippi delta. LIKE, SUBSCRIBE, SHARE and as always, cheers! **Please enjoy responsibly*** Listen to Click Click Domino by Ida Mae Old Avalon 2oz Gin 2oz Apple Whiskey Angostura Bitters Pear Cider Cinnamon Stick Dried Pear Slice Garnish Light one end of a cinnamon stick so it starks to smoke and place the smoking stick under a tumbler to smoke the inside of the glass. In a separate glass, stir together gin, apple whiskey, and bitters with ice. Strain into smoked tumbler with ice. Fill with pear cider. Add an unburnt cinnamon stick and dried pear slices for garnish. USE CAUTION when lighting the cinnamon. Fire hot. Fire burn. Enjoy! Ida Mae on Instagram Ida Mae on Twitter Ida Mae on Facebook Episode Playlist: Theme Music by New New Girlfriend #Mood Jingle by Jacob Jeffries & Jesse McGinty Tunes & Tumblers on Instagram Tunes & Tumblers on Twitter Tunes & Tumblers on Facebook Tunes & Tumblers on Spotify  Call or Text the Tunes & Tumblers Hotline: (626) 604-6477 Cover art by Pedro Isaac Chairez Get 15% off your first order of Tiesta Tea with the code TUMBLERS15: https://bit.ly/3EWGlcx Tunes & Tumblers is a member of the Pantheon Media family of podcasts --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tunes--tumblers/support Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

レアジョブ英会話 Daily News Article Podcast

Billie Eilish to headline Glastonbury outdoor music festival in UK next year Grammy Award winner Billie Eilish will perform at Glastonbury next June, becoming the British music festival's youngest ever solo headliner, organizers said on Oct. 4. The 19-year-old hitmaker, who sings the theme tune for the latest James Bond movie No Time To Die, performed at the festival's Other Stage in 2019, the last time the major outdoors music event was held. It was canceled last year and this year due to the COVID-19 pandemic, although a virtual event was organized in May. Eilish, known for songs like Bad Guy and Bury a Friend, put up a poster on Instagram for the festival at Worthy Farm in southwest England, along with the comment “Glastonbury 2022.” (Reuters) Bieber teams up with marijuana company to launch 'Peaches Pre-rolls' in 4 states Pop star Justin Bieber has teamed up with Palms Premium to launch cannabis-based products, the California-based company said on Oct. 4. The limited-edition marijuana cigarettes, or joints, called “Peaches Pre-rolls” are named after a song from Bieber's newest studio album and will be available in California, Nevada, Massachusetts and Florida, the company said. An increasing number of celebrities including Academy Award winning actress Nicole Kidman, Rapper Jay-Z, lifestyle guru Martha Stewart and singer Willie Nelson have partnered with or launched their own lines of cannabis products. Palms Premium did not disclose the financial terms of the partnership.  (Reuters) These articles were provided by The Japan Times Alpha.

Deep Dive: An AllMusicBooks Podcast
Episode 82: "Leonard Cohen and 'Hallelujah.'"

Deep Dive: An AllMusicBooks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 11:20


Leonard Cohen's “Hallelujah” has been covered by more than 300 other artists in virtually every genre, including Willie Nelson, k.d. lang, Justin Timberlake, Bono, Brandi Carlile, and Bon Jovi, to name a few. Hell...the song was even in “Shrek”! But the song was originally stuck on side two of 1984's Various Positions, an album that Cohen's record label deemed unfit for release. In fact, Walter Yetnikoff, the head honcho at CBS Records told Cohen “Leonard, we know you're great but we don't know if you're any good.”  “Hallelujah” is arguably Cohen's biggest and most beloved song, as well as one of the most covered songs in history. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Tunes & Tumblers
Ida Mae and an Old Avalon (feat. Ida Mae)

Tunes & Tumblers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 68:56


Get ready to take the "Road to Avalon" by way of UK fog. Blues rock duo and husband and wife Chris Turpin and Stephanie Jean -- better known to the world as Ida Mae -- join us in the TnT studio for the penultimate episode of Season 3. Dive deep as we discuss their smashing sophomore record Click Click Domino, what it was like touring with Willie Nelson, and what made them fall in love with the blues. As always, Pedro prepares libations for the journey with a sweet, smoky cocktail to sip down by the Mississippi delta. LIKE, SUBSCRIBE, SHARE and as always, cheers! **Please enjoy responsibly*** Listen to Click Click Domino by Ida Mae Old Avalon 2oz Gin 2oz Apple Whiskey Angostura Bitters Pear Cider Cinnamon Stick Dried Pear Slice Garnish Light one end of a cinnamon stick so it starks to smoke and place the smoking stick under a tumbler to smoke the inside of the glass. In a separate glass, stir together gin, apple whiskey, and bitters with ice. Strain into smoked tumbler with ice. Fill with pear cider. Add an unburnt cinnamon stick and dried pear slices for garnish. USE CAUTION when lighting the cinnamon. Fire hot. Fire burn. Enjoy! Ida Mae on Instagram Ida Mae on Twitter Ida Mae on Facebook Episode Playlist: https://spoti.fi/3FySjt3 Theme Music by New New Girlfriend #Mood Jingle by Jacob Jeffries & Jesse McGinty Tunes & Tumblers on Instagram Tunes & Tumblers on Twitter Tunes & Tumblers on Facebook Tunes & Tumblers on Spotify  Call or Text the Tunes & Tumblers Hotline: (626) 604-6477 Cover art by Pedro Isaac Chairez Get 15% off your first order of Tiesta Tea with the code TUMBLERS15: https://bit.ly/3EWGlcx Tunes & Tumblers is a member of the Pantheon Media family of podcasts --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tunes--tumblers/support Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Old Fashioned Radio
Roots & Fruits - Выпуск 49

Old Fashioned Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 68:10


Предпоследний выпуск программы в 2021 году. Предлагаем послушать альбомы от кантри исполнителей, которых у Артура Ямпольского насобиралось немало. Leslie Jordan - "Company's Comin'" Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real - "A Few Stars Apart" Elijah Ocean - "Born Blue" Grayson Jenkins - "Turning Tides" Charley Crockett - "Music City USA" Jackson Melnick - "Abilene" Joshua Ray Walker - "See You Next Time" Emily Scott Robinson - "American Siren" Margo Cilker - "Pohorylle" Willie Nelson - "The Willie Nelson Family"

Detours and Outliers
Sinead O'Connor's “Throw Down Your Arms”

Detours and Outliers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 123:12


SINEAD GOES REGGAE! We’ve got island fever this week on "Detours and Outliers", but which island is it, Jamaica or Ireland? Where does Sinead fit on the Enya-to-Ani DiFranco spectrum? Is this a Sly and Robbie album? Where is our Britney Spears/Burning Spear mashup? Can you do a religious album without a religion? Does this album foreshadow Sinead's conversion to Islam? Can you get excommunicated from the Catholic church just by tweeting the pope? What other '90s women do we as a society owe an apology to? Are there any other reggae albums besides Bob Marley’s "Legend"? Who recorded the most authentic reggae album, Snoop Dogg, Willie Nelson, or Sinead? Throw down your arms and throw your hands in the air on this episode of "Detours and Outliers".

Crispy Coated Robots
CRISPY COATED ROBOTS LISTEN TO...WILLIE NELSON "PRETTY PAPER"

Crispy Coated Robots

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 28:05


(ORIGINAL AIR DATE 12-19-21)https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=klD8E4fu1ao&list=PLCF48421DBB979DAC

Diplomacy Games
Interview with Matt Calkins

Diplomacy Games

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 87:00


The guys interview game designer, World Boardgaming Champion and CEO Matt Calkins about his love of Diplomacy. Intro The guys introduce the show, their drinks and tonight's venue (0 mins 15 secs) Interview with Matt Calkins The guys introduce today's interview (6 mins 30 secs) Amby asks when Matt first got into Diplomacy and which aspects of the game's design he likes (7 mins) They discuss some of the board games Matt has commercially published and their relationship with the game. Matt's games include the award winning Sekigahara (the most similar to Diplomacy), Tin Goose and Magnet (10 mins) Matt talks about the World Boardgaming Championships (12 mins) Amby asks about the cross-overs between gaming and the business world (15 mins) Photo credit: Forbes Magazine Kaner asks about creating board games and Matt's favorite country to play in Diplomacy (16 mins) Amby asks about Matt's favorite board games in his library in the photo taken in Forbes magazine (23 mins) Amby asks how Matt uses board gaming in his life before discussing how others connect with him now though games (25 mins) They discuss board games and skills before wrapping up the interview (30 mins) The guys are back at the bar chatting about their thoughts on the interview with Matt. Kaner talks Power Grid and Tigris & Euphrates (32 mins) Diplomacy news The guys discuss trying unsuccessfully to get a face to face game going in Brisbane and what to do from here (42 mins 20 secs) They talk about vDip being back up and running again (44 mins 20 secs) Kaner discusses AI and Diplomacy (45 mins 20 secs) After some new drinks they talk about a cool new board promoted in the Diplomacy Briefing just in time for Christmas made by Matt Crill (51 mins 30 secs) Around the grounds Kaner has bowed out of the Dawn of the Enlightenment game and Amby has been stabbed again (1 hr) Amby discusses his Cloak and Dagger Mongolian empire game as he moves towards being removed before talking about his Europa Renovatio game before they get to 1800 Empires and Coalitions which Amby bought into and end on his last anonymous Europa Renovatio game (1 hr 4 mins 15 secs) They then get to Kaner's 36-4-All Europa Renovatio game (1 hr 15 mins) Next is his other Europa Renovation game, This is Madness II (1 hr 18 mins 50 secs) The guys start wrapping up the show (1 hr 26 mins 30 secs) Venues: The Scratch Bar, Brisbane Drinks of choice: Kaner: Willie Smith cider (although Kaner calls it a Willie Nelson's cider) from Tasmania and Helios Cyclops Indian pale ale from Brisbane Amby: Helios Poseidon West Coast pale ale from Brisbane and Trop Big Red syrah from South Australia Just a reminder you can support the show by giving it 5 stars on iTunes or Stitcher. And don't forget if you want to help pay off the audio equipment... or get the guys more drunk, you can also donate at Patreon, plus you get extra podcast episodes! Lastly, don't forget to subscribe so you get the latest Diplomacy Games episodes straight to your phone. Thanks as always to Dr Dan aka "The General" for his rockin' intro tune.  

Screaming in the Cloud
“Liqui”fying the Database Bottleneck with Robert Reeves

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 50:45


About RobertR2 advocates for Liquibase customers and provides technical architecture leadership. Prior to co-founding Datical (now Liquibase), Robert was a Director at the Austin Technology Incubator. Robert co-founded Phurnace Software in 2005. He invented and created the flagship product, Phurnace Deliver, which provides middleware infrastructure management to multiple Fortune 500 companies.Links: Liquibase: https://www.liquibase.com Liquibase Community: https://www.liquibase.org Liquibase AWS Marketplace: https://aws.amazon.com/marketplace/seller-profile?id=7e70900d-dcb2-4ef6-adab-f64590f4a967 Github: https://github.com/liquibase Twitter: https://twitter.com/liquibase TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers—and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com. Corey: You know how Git works right?Announcer: Sorta, kinda, not really. Please ask someone else.Corey: That's all of us. Git is how we build things, and Netlify is one of the best ways I've found to build those things quickly for the web. Netlify's Git-based workflows mean you don't have to play slap-and-tickle with integrating arcane nonsense and web hooks, which are themselves about as well understood as Git. Give them a try and see what folks ranging from my fake Twitter for Pets startup, to global Fortune 2000 companies are raving about. If you end up talking to them—because you don't have to; they get why self-service is important—but if you do, be sure to tell them that I sent you and watch all of the blood drain from their faces instantly. You can find them in the AWS marketplace or at www.netlify.com. N-E-T-L-I-F-Y dot com.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. This is a promoted episode. What does that mean in practice? Well, it means the company who provides the guest has paid to turn this into a discussion that's much more aligned with the company than it is the individual.Sometimes it works, Sometimes it doesn't, but the key part of that story is I get paid. Why am I bringing this up? Because today's guest is someone I met in person at Monktoberfest, which is the RedMonk conference in Portland, Maine, one of the only reasons to go to Maine, speaking as someone who grew up there. And I spoke there, I met my guest today, and eventually it turned into this, proving that I am the envy of developer advocates everywhere because now I can directly tie me attending one conference to making a fixed sum of money, and right now they're all screaming and tearing off their headphones and closing this episode. But for those of you who are sticking around, thank you. My guest today is the CTO and co-founder of Liquibase. Please welcome Robert Reeves. Robert, thank you for joining me, and suffering the slings and arrows I'm about to hurled directly into your arse, as a warning shot.Robert: [laugh]. Man. Thanks for having me. Corey, I've been looking forward to this for a while. I love hanging out with you.Corey: One of the things I love about the Monktoberfest conference, and frankly, anything that RedMonk gets up to is, forget what's on stage, which is uniformly excellent; forget the people at RedMonk who are wonderful and I aspire to do more work with them in different ways; they're great, but the people that they attract are invariably interesting, they are invariably incredibly diverse in terms of not just demographics, but interests and proclivities. It's just a wonderful group of people, and every time I get the opportunity to spend time with those folks I do, and I've never once regretted it because I get to meet people like you. Snark and cynicism about sponsoring this nonsense aside—for which I do thank you—you've been a fascinating person to talk to you because you're better at a lot of the database-facing things than I am, so I shortcut to instead of forming my own opinions, I just skate off of yours in some cases. You're going to get letters now.Robert: Well, look, it's an occupational hazard, right? Releasing software, it's hard so you have to learn these platforms, and part of it includes the database. But I tell you, you're spot on about Monktoberfest. I left that conference so motivated. Really opened my eyes, certainly injecting empathy into what I do on a day-to-day basis, but it spurred me to action.And there's a lot of programs that we've started at Liquibase that the germination for that seed came from Monktoberfest. And certainly, you know, we were bummed out that it's been canceled two years in a row, but we can't wait to get back and sponsor it. No end of love and affection for that team. They're also really smart and right about a hundred percent of the time.Corey: That's the most amazing part is that they have opinions that generally tend to mirror my own—which, you know—Robert: [laugh].Corey: —confirmation bias is awesome, but they almost never get it wrong. And that is one of the impressive things is when I do it, I'm shooting from the hip and I already have an apology half-written and ready to go, whereas when dealing with them, they do research on this and they don't have the ‘I'm a loud, abrasive shitpostter on Twitter' defense to fall back on to defend opinions. And if they do, I've never seen them do it. They're right, and the fact that I am as aligned with them as I am, you'd think that one of us was cribbing from the other. I assure you that's not the case.But every time Steve O'Grady or Rachel Stephens, or Kelly—I forget her last name; my apologies is all Twitter, but she studied medieval history, I remember that—or James Governor writes something, I'm uniformly looking at this and I feel a sense of dismay, been, “Dammit. I should have written this. It's so well written and it makes such a salient point.” I really envy their ability to be so consistently on point.Robert: Well, they're the only analysts we pay money to. So, we vote with our dollars with that one. [laugh].Corey: Yeah. I'm only an analyst when people have analyst budget. Other than that, I'm whatever the hell you describe me. So, let's talk about that thing you're here to show. You know, that little side project thing you found and are the CTO of.I wasn't super familiar with what Liquibase does until I looked into it and then had this—I got to say, it really pissed me off because I'm looking at it, and it's how did I not know that this existed back when the exact problems that you solve are the things I was careening headlong into? I was actively annoyed. You're also an open-source project, which means that you're effectively making all of your money by giving things away and hoping for gratitude to come back on you in the fullness of time, right?Robert: Well, yeah. There's two things there. They're open-source component, but also, where was this when I was struggling with this problem? So, for the folks that don't know, what Liquibase does is automate database schema change. So, if you need to update a database—I don't care what it is—as part of your application deployment, we can help.Instead of writing a ticket or manually executing a SQL script, or generating a bunch of docs in a NoSQL database, you can have Liquibase help you out with that. And so I was at a conference years ago, at the booth, doing my booth thing, and a managing director of a very large bank came to me, like, “Hey, what do you do?” And saw what we did and got angry, started yelling at me. “Where were you three years ago when I was struggling with this problem?” Like, spitting mad. [laugh]. And I was like, “Dude, we just started”—this was a while ago—it was like, “We just started the company two years ago. We got here as soon as we could.”But I struggled with this problem when I was a release manager. And so I've been doing this for years and years and years—I don't even want to talk about how long—getting bits from dev to test to production, and the database was always, always, always the bottleneck, whether it was things didn't run the same in test as they did, eventually in production, environments weren't in sync. It's just really hard. And we've automated so much stuff, we've automated application deployment, lowercase a compiled bits; we're building things with containers, so everything's in that container. It's not a J2EE app anymore—yay—but we haven't done a damn thing for the database.And what this means is that we have a whole part of our industry, all of our database professionals, that are frankly struggling. I always say we don't sell software Liquibase. We sell piano recitals, date nights, happy hours, all the stuff you want to do but you can't because you're stuck dealing with the database. And that's what we do at Liquibase.Corey: Well, you're talking about database people. That's not how I even do it. I would never call myself that, for very good reason because you know, Route 53 remains the only database I use. But the problem I always had was that, “Great. I'm doing a deployment. Oh, I'm going to put out some changes to some web servers. Okay, what's my rollback?” “Well, we have this other commit we can use.” “Oh, we're going to be making a database schema change. What's your rollback strategy,” “Oh, I've updated my resume and made sure that any personal files I had on my work laptop been backed up somewhere else when I immediately leave the company when we can't roll back.” Because there's not really going to be a company anymore at that point.It's one of those everyone sort of holds their breath and winces when it comes to anything that resembles a schema change—or an ALTER TABLE as we used to call it—because that is the mistakes will show territory and you can hope and plan for things in pre-prod environments, but it's always scary. It's always terrifying because production is not like other things. That's why I always call my staging environment ‘theory' because things work in theory but not in production. So, it's how do you avoid the mess of winding up just creating disasters when you're dealing with the reality of your production environments? So, let's back up here. How do you do it? Because it sounds like something people would love to sell me but doesn't exist.Robert: [laugh]. Well, it's real simple. We have a file, we call it the change log. And this is a ledger. So, databases need to be evolved. You can't drop everything and recreate it from scratch, so you have to apply changes sequentially.And so what Liquibase will do is it connects to the database, and it says, “Hey, what version are you?” It looks at the change log, and we'll see, ehh, “There's ten change sets”—that's what components of a change log, we call them change sets—“There's ten change sets in there and the database is telling me that only five had been executed.” “Oh, great. Well, I'll execute these other five.” Or it asks the database, “Hey, how many have been executed?” And it says, “Ten.”And we've got a couple of meta tables that we have in the database, real simple, ANSI SQL compliant, that store the changes that happen to the database. So, if it's a net new database, say you're running a Docker container with the database in it on your local machine, it's empty, you would run Liquibase, and it says, “Oh, hey. It's got that, you know, new database smell. I can run everything.”And so the interesting thing happens when you start pointing it at an environment that you haven't updated in a while. So, dev and test typically are going to have a lot of releases. And so there's going to be little tiny incremental changes, but when it's time to go to production, Liquibase will catch it up. And so we speak SQL to the database, if it's a NoSQL database, we'll speak their API and make the changes requested. And that's it. It's very simple in how it works.The real complex stuff is when we go a couple of inches deeper, when we start doing things like, well, reverse engineering of your database. How can I get a change log of an existing database? Because nobody starts out using Liquibase for a project. You always do it later.Corey: No, no. It's one of those things where when you're doing a project to see if it works, it's one of those, “Great, I'll run a database in some local Docker container or something just to prove that it works.” And, “Todo: fix this later.” And yeah, that todo becomes load-bearing.Robert: [laugh]. That's scary. And so, you know, we can help, like, reverse engineering an entire database schema, no problem. We also have things called quality checks. So sure, you can test your Liquibase change against an empty database and it will tell you if it's syntactically correct—you'll get an error if you need to fix something—but it doesn't enforce things like corporate standards. “Tables start with T underscore.” “Do not create a foreign key unless those columns have an ID already applied.” And that's what our quality checks does. We used to call it rules, but nobody likes rules, so we call it quality checks now.Corey: How do you avoid the trap of enumerating all the bad things you've seen happen because at some point, it feels like that's what leads to process ossification at large companies where, “Oh, we had this bad thing happen once, like, a disk filled up, so now we have a check that makes sure that all the disks are at least 20, empty.” Et cetera. Great. But you keep stacking those you have thousands and thousands and thousands of those, and even a one-line code change then has to pass through so many different tests to validate that this isn't going to cause the failure mode that happened that one time in a unicorn circumstance. How do you avoid the bloat and the creep of stuff like that?Robert: Well, let's look at what we've learned from automated testing. We certainly want more and more tests. Look, DevOp's algorithm is, “All right, we had a problem here.” [laugh]. Or SRE algorithm, I should say. “We had a problem here. What happened? What are we going to change in the future to make sure this doesn't happen?” Typically, that involves a new standard.Now, ossification occurs when a person has to enforce that standard. And what we should do is seek to have automation, have the machine do it for us. Have the humans come up and identify the problem, find a creative way to look for the issue, and then let the machine enforce it. Ossification happens in large organizations when it's people that are responsible, not the machine. The machines are great at running these things over and over again, and they're never hung over, day after Super Bowl Sunday, their kid doesn't get sick, they don't get sick. But we want humans to look at the things that we need that creative energy, that brain power on. And then the rote drudgery, hand that off to the machine.Corey: Drudgery seems like sort of a job description for a lot of us who spend time doing operation stuff.Robert: [laugh].Corey: It's drudgery and it's boring, punctuated by moments of sheer terror. On some level, you're more or less taking some of the adrenaline high of this job away from people. And you know, when it comes to databases, I'm kind of okay with that as it turns out.Robert: Yeah. Oh, yeah, we want no surprises in database-land. And that is why over the past several decades—can I say several decades since 1979?Corey: Oh, you can s—it's many decades, I'm sorry to burst your bubble on that.Robert: [laugh]. Thank you, Corey. Thank you.Corey: Five, if we're being honest. Go ahead.Robert: So, it has evolved over these many decades where change is the enemy of stability. And so we don't want change, and we want to lock these things down. And our database professionals have become changed from sentinels of data into traffic cops and TSA. And as we all know, some things slip through those. Sometimes we speed, sometimes things get snuck through TSA.And so what we need to do is create a system where it's not the people that are in charge of that; that we can set these policies and have our database professionals do more valuable things, instead of that adrenaline rush of, “Oh, my God,” how about we get the rush of solving a problem and saving the company millions of dollars? How about that rush? How about the rush of taking our old, busted on-prem databases and figure out a way to scale these up in the cloud, and also provide quick dev and test environments for our developer and test friends? These are exciting things. These are more fun, I would argue.Corey: You have a list of reference customers on your website that are awesome. In fact, we share a reference customer in the form of Ticketmaster. And I don't think that they will get too upset if I mention that based upon my work with them, at no point was I left with the impression that they played fast and loose with databases. This was something that they take very seriously because for any company that, you know, sells tickets to things you kind of need an authoritative record of who's bought what, or suddenly you don't really have a ticket-selling business anymore. You also reference customers in the form of UPS, which is important; banks in a variety of different places.Yeah, this is stuff that matters. And you support—from the looks of it—every database people can name except for Route 53. You've got RDS, you've got Redshift, you've got Postgres-squeal, you've got Oracle, Snowflake, Google's Cloud Spanner—lest people think that it winds up being just something from a legacy perspective—Cassandra, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera, CockroachDB. I could go on because you have multiple pages of these things, SAP HANA—whatever the hell that's supposed to be—Yugabyte, and so on, and so forth. And it's like, some of these, like, ‘now you're just making up animals' territory.Robert: Well, that goes back to open-source, you know, you were talking about that earlier. There is no way in hell we could have brought out support for all these database platforms without us being open-source. That is where the community aligns their goals and works to a common end. So, I'll give you an example. So, case in point, recently, let me see Yugabyte, CockroachDB, AWS Redshift, and Google Cloud Spanner.So, these are four folks that reached out to us and said, either A) “Hey, we want Liquibase to support our database,” or B) “We want you to improve the support that's already there.” And so we have what we call—which is a super creative name—the Liquibase test harness, which is just genius because it's an automated way of running a whole suite of tests against an arbitrary database. And that helped us partner with these database vendors very quickly and to identify gaps. And so there's certain things that AWS Redshift—certain objects—that AWS Redshift doesn't support, for all the right reasons. Because it's data warehouse.Okay, great. And so we didn't have to run those tests. But there were other tests that we had to run, so we create a new test for them. They actually wrote some of those tests. Our friends at Yugabyte, CockroachDB, Cloud Spanner, they wrote these extensions and they came to us and partnered with us.The only way this works is with open-source, by being open, by being transparent, and aligning what we want out of life. And so what our friends—our database friends—wanted was they wanted more tooling for their platform. We wanted to support their platform. So, by teaming up, we help the most important person, [laugh] the most important person, and that's the customer. That's it. It was not about, “Oh, money,” and all this other stuff. It was, “This makes our customers' lives easier. So, let's do it. Oop, no brainer.”Corey: There's something to be said for making people's lives easier. I do want to talk about that open-source versus commercial divide. If I Google Liquibase—which, you know, I don't know how typing addresses in browsers works anymore because search engines are so fast—I just type in Liquibase. And the first thing it spits me out to is liquibase.org, which is the Community open-source version. And there's a link there to the Pro paid version and whatnot. And I was just scrolling idly through the comparison chart to see, “Oh, so ‘Community' is just code for shitty and you're holding back advanced features.” But it really doesn't look that way. What's the deal here?Robert: Oh, no. So, Liquibase open-source project started in 2006 and Liquibase the company, the commercial entity, started after that, 2012; 2014, first deal. And so, for—Nathan Voxland started this, and Nathan was struggling. He was working at a company, and he had to have his application—of course—you know, early 2000s, J2EE—support SQL Server and Oracle and he was struggling with it. And so he open-sourced it and added more and more databases.Certainly, as open-source databases grew, obviously he added those: MySQL, Postgres. But we're never going to undo that stuff. There's rollback for free in Liquibase, we're not going to be [laugh] we're not going to be jerks and either A) pull features out or, B) even worse, make Stephen O'Grady's life awful by changing the license [laugh] so he has to write about it. He loves writing about open-source license changes. We're Apache 2.0 and so you can do whatever you want with it.And we believe that the things that make sense for a paying customer, which is database-specific objects, that makes sense. But Liquibase Community, the open-source stuff, that is built so you can go to any database. So, if you have a change log that runs against Oracle, it should be able to run against SQL Server, or MySQL, or Postgres, as long as you don't use platform-specific data types and those sorts of things. And so that's what Community is about. Community is about being able to support any database with the same change log. Pro is about helping you get to that next level of DevOps Nirvana, of reaching those four metrics that Dr. Forsgren tells us are really important.Corey: Oh, yes. You can argue with Nicole Forsgren, but then you're wrong. So, why would you ever do that?Robert: Yeah. Yeah. [laugh]. It's just—it's a sucker's bet. Don't do it. There's a reason why she's got a PhD in CS.Corey: She has been a recurring guest on this show, and I only wish she would come back more often. You and I are fun to talk to, don't get me wrong. We want unbridled intellect that is couched in just a scintillating wit, and someone is great to talk to. Sorry, we're both outclassed.Robert: Yeah, you get entertained with us; you learn with her.Corey: Exactly. And you're still entertained while doing it is the best part.Robert: [laugh]. That's the difference between Community and Pro. Look, at the end of the day, if you're an individual developer just trying to solve a problem and get done and away from the computer and go spend time with your friends and family, yeah, go use Liquibase Community. If it's something that you think can improve the rest of the organization by teaming up and taking advantage of the collaboration features? Yes, sure, let us know. We're happy to help.Corey: Now, if people wanted to become an attorney, but law school was too expensive, out of reach, too much time, et cetera, but they did have a Twitter account, very often, they'll find that they can scratch that itch by arguing online about open-source licenses. So, I want to be very clear—because those people are odious when they email me—that you are licensed under the Apache License. That is a bonafide OSI approved open-source license. It is not everyone except big cloud companies, or service providers, which basically are people dancing around—they mean Amazon. So, let's be clear. One, are you worried about Amazon launching a competitive service with a dumb name? And/or have you really been validated as a product if AWS hasn't attempted and failed to launch a competitor?Robert: [laugh]. Well, I mean, we do have a very large corporation that has embedded Liquibase into one of their flagship products, and that is Oracle. They have embedded Liquibase in SQLcl. We're tickled pink because that means that, one, yes, it does validate Liquibase is the right way to do it, but it also means more people are getting help. Now, for Oracle users, if you're just an Oracle shop, great, have fun. We think it's a great solution. But there's not a lot of those.And so we believe that if you have Liquibase, whether it's open-source or the Pro version, then you're going to be able to support all the databases, and I think that's more important than being tied to a single cloud. Also—this is just my opinion and take it for what it's worth—but if Amazon wanted to do this, well, they're not the only game in town. So, somebody else is going to want to do it, too. And, you know, I would argue even with Amazon's backing that Liquibase is a little stronger brand than anything they would come out with.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense. Corey: So, I want to call out though, that on some level, they have already competed with you because one of database that you do not support is DynamoDB. Let's ignore the Route 53 stuff because, okay. But the reason behind that, having worked with it myself, is that, “Oh, how do you do a schema change in DynamoDB?” The answer is that you don't because it doesn't do schemas for one—it is schemaless, which is kind of the point of it—as well as oh, you want to change the primary, or the partition, or the sort key index? Great. You need a new table because those things are immutable.So, they've solved this Gordian Knot just like Alexander the Great did by cutting through it. Like, “Oh, how do you wind up doing this?” “You don't do this. The end.” And that is certainly an approach, but there are scenarios where those were first, NoSQL is not a acceptable answer for some workloads.I know Rick [Horahan 00:26:16] is going to yell at me for that as soon as he hears me, but okay. But there are some for which a relational database is kind of a thing, and you need that. So, Dynamo isn't fit for everything. But there are other workloads where, okay, I'm going to just switch over. I'm going to basically dump all the data and add it to a new table. I can't necessarily afford to do that with anything less than maybe, you know, 20 milliseconds of downtime between table one and table two. And they're obnoxious and difficult ways to do it, but for everything else, you do kind of need to make ALTER TABLE changes from time to time as you go through the build and release process.Robert: Yeah. Well, we certainly have plans for DynamoDB support. We are working our way through all the NoSQLs. Started with Mongo, and—Corey: Well, back that out a second then for me because there's something I'm clearly not grasping because it's my understanding, DynamoDB is schemaless. You can put whatever you want into various arbitrary fields. How would Liquibase work with something like that?Robert: Well, that's something I struggled with. I had the same question. Like, “Dude, really, we're a schema change tool. Why would we work with a schemaless database?” And so what happened was a soon-to-be friend of ours in Europe had reached out to me and said, “I built an extension for MongoDB in Liquibase. Can we open-source this, and can y'all take care of the care and feeding of this?” And I said, “Absolutely. What does it do?” [laugh].And so I looked at it and it turns out that it focuses on collections and generating data for test. So, you're right about schemaless because these are just documents and we're not going to go through every single document and change the structure, we're just going to have the application create a new doc and the new format. Maybe there's a conversion log logic built into the app, who knows. But it's the database professionals that have to apply these collections—you know, indices; that's what they call them in Mongo-land: collections. And so being able to apply these across all environments—dev, test, production—and have consistency, that's important.Now, what was really interesting is that this came from MasterCard. So, this engineer had a consulting business and worked for MasterCard. And they had a problem, and they said, “Hey, can you fix this with Liquibase?” And he said, “Sure, no problem.” And he built it.So, that's why if you go to the MongoDB—the liquibase-mongodb repository in our Liquibase org, you'll see that MasterCard has the copyright on all that code. Still Apache 2.0. But for me, that was the validation we needed to start expanding to other things: Dynamo, Couch. And same—Corey: Oh, yeah. For a lot of contributors, there's a contributor license process you can go through, assign copyright. For everything else, there's MasterCard.Robert: Yeah. Well, we don't do that. Look, you know, we certainly have a code of conduct with our community, but we don't have a signing copyright and that kind of stuff. Because that's baked into Apache 2.0. So, why would I want to take somebody's ability to get credit and magical internet points and increase the rep by taking that away? That's just rude.Corey: The problem I keep smacking myself into is just looking at how the entire database space across the board goes, it feels like it's built on lock-in, it's built on it is super finicky to work with, and it generally feels like, okay, great. You take something like Postgres-squeal or whatever it is you want to run your database on, yeah, you could theoretically move it a bunch of other places, but moving databases is really hard. Back when I was at my last, “Real job,” quote-unquote, years ago, we were late to the game; we migrated the entire site from EC2 Classic into a VPC, and the biggest pain in the ass with all of that was the RDS instance. Because we had to quiesce the database so it would stop taking writes; we would then do snapshot it, shut it down, and then restore a new database from that RDS snapshot.How long does it take, at least in those days? That is left as an experiment for the reader. So, we booked a four hour maintenance window under the fear that would not be enough. It completed in 45 minutes. So okay, there's that. Sparked the thing up and everything else was tested and good to go. And yay. Okay.It took a tremendous amount of planning, a tremendous amount of work, and that wasn't moving it very far. It is the only time I've done a late-night deploy, where not a single thing went wrong. Until I was on the way home and the Uber driver sideswiped a city vehicle. So, there we go—Robert: [laugh].Corey: —that's the one. But everything else was flawless on this because we planned these things out. But imagine moving to a different provider. Oh, forget it. Or imagine moving to a different database engine? That's good. Tell another one.Robert: Well, those are the problems that we want our database professionals to solve. We do not want them to be like janitors at an elementary school, cleaning up developer throw-up with sawdust. The issue that you're describing, that's a one time event. This is something that doesn't happen very often. You need hands on the keyboard, you want people there to look for problems.If you can take these database releases away from those folks and automate them safely—you can have safety and speed—then that frees up their time to do these other herculean tasks, these other feats of strength that they're far better at. There is no silver bullet panacea for database issues. All we're trying to do is take about 70% of DBAs time and free it up to do the fun stuff that you described. There are people that really enjoy that, and we want to free up their time so they can do that. Moving to another platform, going from the data center to the cloud, these sorts of things, this is what we want a human on; we don't want them updating a column three times in a row because dev couldn't get it right. Let's just give them the keys and make sure they stay in their lane.Corey: There's something glorious about being able to do that. I wish that there were more commonly appreciated ways of addressing those pains, rather than, “Oh, we're going to sell you something big and enterprise-y and it's going to add a bunch of process and not work out super well for you.” You integrate with existing CI/CD systems reasonably well, as best I can tell because the nice thing about CI/CD—and by nice I mean awful—is that there is no consensus. Every pipeline you see, in a release engineering process inherently becomes this beautiful bespoke unicorn.Robert: Mm-hm. Yeah. And we have to. We have to integrate with whatever CI/CD they have in place. And we do not want customers to just run Liquibase by itself. We want them to integrate it with whatever is driving that application deployment.We're Switzerland when it comes to databases, and CI/CD. And I certainly have my favorite of those, and it's primarily based on who bought me drinks at the last conference, but we cannot go into somebody's house and start rearranging the furniture. That's just rude. If they're deploying the app a certain way, what we tell that customer is, “Hey, we're just going to have that CI/CD tool call Liquibase to update the database. This should be an atomic unit of deployment.” And it should be hidden from the person that pushes that shiny button or the automation that does it.Corey: I wish that one day that you could automate all of the button pushing, but the thing that always annoyed me in release engineering was the, “Oh, and here's where we stop to have a human press the button.” And I get it. That stuff's scary for some folks, but at the same time, this is the nature of reality. So, you're not going to be able to technology your way around people. At least not successfully and not for very long.Robert: It's about trust. You have to earn that database professional's trust because if something goes wrong, blaming Liquibase doesn't go very far. In that company, they're going to want a person [laugh] who has a badge to—with a throat to choke. And so I've seen this pattern over and over again.And this happened at our first customer. Major, major, big, big, big bank, and this was on the consumer side. They were doing their first production push, and they wanted us ready. Not on the call, but ready if there was an issue they needed to escalate and get us to help them out. And so my VP of Engineering and me, we took it. Great. Got VP of engineering and CTO. Right on.And so Kevin and I, we stayed home, stayed sober [laugh], you know—a lot of places to party in Austin; we fought that temptation—and so we stayed and I'm texting with Kevin, back and forth. “Did you get a call?” “No, I didn't get a call.” It was Friday night. Saturday rolls around. Sunday. “Did you get a—what's going on?” [laugh].Monday, we're like, “Hey. Everything, okay? Did you push to the next weekend?” They're like, “Oh, no. We did. It went great. We forgot to tell you.” [laugh]. But here's what happened. The DBAs push the Liquibase ‘make it go' button, and then they said, “Uh-Oh.” And we're like, “What do you mean, uh-oh?” They said, “Well, something went wrong.” “Well, what went wrong?” “Well, it was too fast.” [laugh]. Something—no way. And so they went through the whole thing—Corey: That was my downtime when I supposed to be compiling.Robert: Yeah. So, they went through the whole thing to verify every single change set. Okay, so that was weekend one. And then they go to weekend two, they do it the same thing. All right, all right. Building trust.By week four, they called a meeting with the release team. And they said, “Hey, process change. We're no longer going to be on these calls. You are going to push the Liquibase button. Now, if you want to integrate it with your CI/CD, go right ahead, but that's not my problem.” Dev—or, the release team is tier one; dev is tier two; we—DBAs—are tier three support, but we'll call you because we'll know something went wrong. And to this day, it's all automated.And so you have to earn trust to get people to give that up. Once they have trust and you really—it's based on empathy. You have to understand how terrible [laugh] they are sometimes treated, and to actively take care of them, realize the problems they're struggling with, and when you earn that trust, then and only then will they allow automation. But it's hard, but it's something you got to do.Corey: You mentioned something a minute ago that I want to focus on a little bit more closely, specifically that you're in Austin. Seems like that's a popular choice lately. You've got companies that are relocating their headquarters there, presumably for tax purposes. Oracle's there, Tesla's there. Great. I mean, from my perspective, terrific because it gets a number of notably annoying CEOs out of my backyard. But what's going on? Why is Austin on this meteoric rise and how'd it get there?Robert: Well, a lot of folks—overnight success, 40 years in the making, I guess. But what a lot of people don't realize is that, one, we had a pretty vibrant tech hub prior to all this. It all started with MCC, Microcomputer Consortium, which in the '80s, we were afraid of the Japanese taking over and so we decided to get a bunch of companies together, and Admiral Bobby Inman who was director planted it in Austin. And that's where it started. You certainly have other folks that have a huge impact, obviously, Michael Dell, Austin Ventures, a whole host of folks that have really leaned in on tech in Austin, but it actually started before that.So, there was a time where Willie Nelson was in Nashville and was just fed up with RCA Records. They would not release his albums because he wanted to change his sound. And so he had some nice friends at Atlantic Records that said, “Willie, we got this. Go to New York, use our studio, cut an album, we'll fix it up.” And so he cut an album called Shotgun Willie, famous for having “Whiskey River” which is what he uses to open and close every show.But that album sucked as far as sales. It's a good album, I like it. But it didn't sell except for one place in America: in Austin, Texas. It sold more copies in Austin than anywhere else. And so Willie was like, “I need to go check this out.”And so he shows up in Austin and sees a bunch of rednecks and hippies hanging out together, really geeking out on music. It was a great vibe. And then he calls, you know, Kris, and Waylon, and Merle, and say, “Come on down.” And so what happened here was a bunch of people really wanted to geek out on this new type of country music, outlaw country. And it started a pattern where people just geek out on stuff they really like.So, same thing with Austin film. You got Robert Rodriguez, you got Richard Linklater, and Slackers, his first movie, that's why I moved to Austin. And I got a job at Les Amis—a coffee shop that's closed—because it had three scenes in that. There was a whole scene of people that just really wanted to make different types of films. And we see that with software, we see that with film, we see it with fashion.And it just seems that Austin is the place where if you're really into something, you're going to find somebody here that really wants to get into it with you, whether it's board gaming, D&D, noise punk, whatever. And that's really comforting. I think it's the community that's just welcoming. And I just hope that we can continue that creativity, that sense of community, and that we don't have large corporations that are coming in and just taking from the system. I hope they inject more.I think Oracle's done a really good job; their new headquarters is gorgeous, they've done some really good things with the city, doing a land swap, I think it was forty acres for nine acres. They coughed up forty for nine. And it was nine acres the city wasn't even using. Great. So, I think they're being good citizens. I think Tesla's been pretty cool with building that factory where it is. I hope more come. I hope they catch what is ever in the water and the breakfast tacos in Austin.Corey: [laugh]. I certainly look forward to this pandemic ending; I can come over and find out for myself. I'm looking forward to it. I always enjoyed my time there, I just wish I got to spend more of it.Robert: How many folks from Duckbill Group are in Austin now?Corey: One at the moment. Tim Banks. And the challenge, of course, is that if you look across the board, there really aren't that many places that have more than one employee. For example, our operations person, Megan, is here in San Francisco and so is Jesse DeRose, our manager of cloud economics. But my business partner is in Portland; we have people scattered all over the country.It's kind of fun having a fully-distributed company. We started this way, back when that was easy. And because all right, travel is easy; we'll just go and visit whenever we need to. But there's no central office, which I think is sort of the dangerous part of full remote because then you have this idea of second-class citizens hanging out in one part of the country and then they go out to lunch together and that's where the real decisions get made. And then you get caught up to speed. It definitely fosters a writing culture.Robert: Yeah. When we went to remote work, our lease was up. We just didn't renew. And now we have expanded hiring outside of Austin, we have folks in the Ukraine, Poland, Brazil, more and more coming. We even have folks that are moving out of Austin to places like Minnesota and Virginia, moving back home where their family is located.And that is wonderful. But we are getting together as a company in January. We're also going to, instead of having an office, we're calling it a ‘Liquibase Lounge.' So, there's a number of retail places that didn't survive, and so we're going to take one of those spots and just make a little hangout place so that people can come in. And we also want to open it up for the community as well.But it's very important—and we learned this from our friends at GitLab and their culture. We really studied how they do it, how they've been successful, and it is an awareness of those lunch meetings where the decisions are made. And it is saying, “Nope, this is great we've had this conversation. We need to have this conversation again. Let's bring other people in.” And that's how we're doing at Liquibase, and so far it seems to work.Corey: I'm looking forward to seeing what happens, once this whole pandemic ends, and how things continue to thrive. We're long past due for a startup center that isn't San Francisco. The whole thing is based on the idea of disruption. “Oh, we're disruptive.” “Yes, we're so disruptive, we've taken a job that can be done from literally anywhere with internet access and created a land crunch in eight square miles, located in an earthquake zone.” Genius, simply genius.Robert: It's a shame that we had to have such a tragedy to happen to fix that.Corey: Isn't that the truth?Robert: It really is. But the toothpaste is out of the tube. You ain't putting that back in. But my bet on the next Tech Hub: Kansas City. That town is cool, it has one hundred percent Google Fiber all throughout, great university. Kauffman Fellows, I believe, is based there, so VC folks are trained there. I believe so; I hope I'm not wrong with that. I know Kauffman Foundation is there. But look, there's something happening in that town. And so if you're a buy low, sell high kind of person, come check us out in Austin. I'm not trying to dissuade anybody from moving to Austin; I'm not one of those people. But if the housing prices [laugh] you don't like them, check out Kansas City, and get that two-gig fiber for peanuts. Well, $75 worth of peanuts.Corey: Robert, I want to thank you for taking the time to speak with me so extensively about Liquibase, about how awesome RedMonk is, about Austin and so many other topics. If people want to learn more, where can they find you?Robert: Well, I think the best place to find us right now is in AWS Marketplace. So—Corey: Now, hand on a second. When you say the best place for anything being the AWS Marketplace, I'm naturally a little suspicious. Tell me more.Robert: [laugh]. Well, best is, you know, it's—[laugh].Corey: It is a place that is there and people can find you through it. All right, then.Robert: I have a list. I have a list. But the first one I'm going to mention is AWS Marketplace. And so that's a really easy way, especially if you're taking advantage of the EDP, Enterprise Discount Program. That's helpful. Burn down those dollars, get a discount, et cetera, et cetera. Now, of course, you can go to liquibase.com, download a trial. Or you can find us on Github, github.com/liquibase. Of course, talking smack to us on Twitter is always appreciated.Corey: And we will, of course, include links to that in the [show notes 00:46:37]. Robert Reeves, CTO and co-founder of Liquibase. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment complaining about how Liquibase doesn't support your database engine of choice, which will quickly be rendered obsolete by the open-source community.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Rockin' the Suburbs
1265: November New Music - Idles, Gov't Mule, Type Two Error, Willie Nelson Family

Rockin' the Suburbs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 14:05


More listener new music picks. Liam McIndoe like Type Two Error and Idles. Jason Goebel digs Gov't Mule and a George Harrison cover by the Willie Nelson Family. Episode editor: Samantha Reed Become a Rockin' the Suburbs patron - support the show and get bonus content - at Patreon.com/suburbspod Subscribe to Rockin' the Suburbs on Apple Podcasts/iTunes or other podcast platforms, including audioBoom, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon, iHeart, Stitcher and TuneIn. Or listen at SuburbsPod.com. Please rate/review the show on Apple Podcasts and share it with your friends. Visit our website at SuburbsPod.com Email Jim & Patrick at rock@suburbspod.com Follow us on the Twitter, Facebook or Instagram @suburbspod If you're glad or sad or high, call the Suburban Party Line — 612-440-1984. Theme music: "Ascension," originally by Quartjar, covered by Frank Muffin. Visit quartjar.bandcamp.com and frankmuffin.bandcamp.com (c) Artie S. Industries LLC

Shuttlecock Podcast
In My Headache 009: Tyler, The Creator, Willie Nelson, Harry Nilsson

Shuttlecock Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 71:20


In My Headache is a podcast hosted by Kansas City based music critics Bill Brownlee and Aaron Rhodes. On each episode, Brownlee (the youngest baby boomer) and Rhodes (the oldest member of Gen Z) discuss the merits of two new albums and one throwback. This episode includes talk on Tyler, The Creator's Call Me If You Get Lost, Willie Nelson's The Willie Nelson Family, and Harry Nilsson's The Point (1970). Theme music: Intro by Sorry Excuse Podcast artwork: Andres Hedrick The Shuttlecock Podcast is sponsored by The Vinyl Underground at 7th Heaven, located at 76th & Troost in Kansas City. Visit www.7thHeavenKC.com for more info. You can find Bill's writing at ThereStandsTheGlass.com and PlasticSax.com, follow him on Twitter at @HappyInBag, and on Instagram at @Bill.Brownlee. Make sure to subscribe wherever you listen, follow @ShuttlecockMag on social media, and visit ShuttlecockMusic.com. Support the podcast by sharing your favorite episodes with friends and buying merch at ShuttlecockMag.BigCartel.com.

KUCI: Film School
The Mustangs: America's Wild Horses - Film School Radio interview with Co-directors Steven Latham and Conrad Stanley

KUCI: Film School

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021


THE MUSTANGS: AMERICA'S WILD HORSES takes audiences on an odyssey throughout America to places few people have seen or even know about. There are more than 80,000 wild horses on our public lands and more than 50,000 in government corrals. THE MUSTANGS also shines a spotlight on the work of Operation Wild Horse, an organization, that pairs mustangs and veterans with PTSD. Centered around the history and current situation of these American icons, the film's soundtrack features American musical stars including Bruce Springsteen, Willie Nelson and Emmylou Harris. The original song “Never Gonna Tame You,” is performed by Platinum-selling artist Blanco Brown and written by legendary songwriter Diane Warren, a 12-time Oscar® nominee and GRAMMY®, Emmy® and two-time Golden Globe® award winner. THE MUSTANGS: AMERICA'S WILD HORSES is an amazing story about America's wild horses from their turbulent history to their uncertain future. Co-directors Steven Latham and Conrad Stanley join us for a conversation on these iconic American animals, how close they came to extinction, the heroic efforts of a housewife / farmer from Nevada literally changed the fate of these magnificent creatures and the amazing production team that includes Robert Redford, Patti Scialfa Springsteen and USA Olympic Equestrian Silver Medalist Jessica Springsteen. For news and updates go to: themustangsfilm.com Ways to watch: VUDU - Amazon Prime - Apple TV - Google Play - vimeo

LifeMinute Podcast: Entertainment
Ukulelist Jake Shimabukuro Collabs with Bette Midler, Willie Nelson, Jimmy Buffett, and More on Star Packed New Album, Jake & Friends

LifeMinute Podcast: Entertainment

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 5:30


The musician stopped by the LifeMinute studio to play some of his favorite tracks from the new record

LifeMinute Podcast
Ukulelist Jake Shimabukuro Collabs with Bette Midler, Willie Nelson, Jimmy Buffett, and More on Star Packed New Album, Jake & Friends

LifeMinute Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 5:30


The musician stopped by the LifeMinute studio to play some of his favorite tracks from the new record

Ajax Diner Book Club
Ajax Diner Book Club Episode 187

Ajax Diner Book Club

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 176:46


Willie Nelson "Phases and Stages / Pick Up the Tempo / Phases and Stages (Theme)"Eilen Jewell "It's Your Voodoo Working"Lucero "Went Looking for Warren Zevon's Los Angeles"Warren Zevon "Keep Me In Your Heart"Steve Earle "Little Rock 'N' Roller"Justin Townes Earle "Memphis in the Rain"Patterson Hood "Come Back Little Star"Vic Chesnutt "Panic Pure"Valerie June "Summer's End"St. Louis Jimmy "Trying To Change My Ways"Sunnyland Slim "Orphan Boy Blues"Otis Redding "Let Me Come On Home"Margo Price "Sweet Revenge"Slobberbone "Trust Jesus"The Black Keys "Crawling Kingsnake"Brandi Carlile "Broken Horses"Dolly Parton "After the Gold Rush"Doc & Merle Watson "Milk Cow Blues"Willie Nelson & Wynton Marsalis "My Bucket's Got A Hole In It"Kid Thomas & The Original Algiers Stompers "I Believe I Can Make It By Myself"Memphis Minnie "Killer Diller Blues"Kitty Wells "Queen Of Honky Tonk Street"Big Mama Thornton "Born Under A Bad Sign"Marie/Lepanto "Gramps And Grandma"Ernest Tubb "My Hillbilly Baby"Curtis Harding "Explore"Buffalo Nichols "Living Hell"Ry Cooder "Nitty Gritty Mississippi"Leon Russell "Jesus On My Side"Old 97's "Murder (Or a Heart Attack)"Gillian Welch "Tear My Stillhouse Down"Patsy Cline "Ain't No Wheels On This Ship"Drag the River "Embrace the Sound"Hayes Carll "Help Me Remember"Ray Wylie Hubbard "Cooler-N-Hell"Jolie Holland "Old Fashioned Morphine"Carla Thomas "Gee Whiz (Look at His Eyes)"Sly & The Family Stone "Sing a Simple Song "Nina Simone "Break Down And Let It All Out"Lucinda Williams "Pineola"Al Green "I Can't Stop"Funkadelic "One Nation Under A Groove"The Mynabirds "Numbers Don't Lie"Aretha Franklin "See Saw"

Música
Willie Nelson i fam

Música

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 60:02


El gran mestre del country combatiu presenta "The Willie Nelson family", que serveix per presentar-nos la seva fam

Good Company
Kyle Sanders, Mikey Carvajal, and Nathan Mowery (Christmas Songs/Albums) - Ep064

Good Company

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 44:31


This week Scott is joined by Kyle Sanders, Mikey Carvajal, and Nathan Mowery to exchange gifts, pick their favorite Christmas songs/albums, and spread lots of holiday cheer!There are some interesting song/album/artist choices in this episode including the Die Hard DVD menu (huh?), Starflyer 59, Willie Nelson, Chris Jericho, The Kinks, Family Force 5, Fold Zandura, The Ventures, Joey Ramone, My Chemical Romance, and more!The guys also exchange some awesome presents! No hints; you gotta listen.Other topics covered include Islander's cover of R.E.M.'s 'It's the End of the World As We Know It (And I Feel Fine),' awesome holiday movies, Christmas traditions for the guys, and a whole lot more!We hope you enjoy the Good Company Christmas special and have a great holiday!

Sportradio360
Daily Nuggets – 05.12.2021 – musikradio360

Sportradio360

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 68:18


Nuggets, Episode 1.372, 05.12.2021: Ja, es ist wieder diese Zeit des Jahres - Andreas Renner (DAZN) lädt zum Musik-Jahresrückblick ein. Diesmal hat Autor Frank Fligge Coldplay, Alannis Morissette und Willie Nelson, die Foo Fighters und noch ein paar mehr mitgebracht.

Spot Lyte On...
Best of Spot Lyte On - Ida Mae

Spot Lyte On...

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 22:08


Ida Mae moved to the USA with nothing but Chris' National Steel guitar, a tin tambourine, a broken major record deal and their debut record under our arms.It was at huge personal risk they made this decision. After years of sleepless nights on the road, saying yes to every show offer we had, driving ourselves 15 hours to the next show after 6.5 weeks on the road, sleeping in dilapidated Motel's, playing in Casino bars, falling asleep in hotel lobby's, losing guitars across Europe, writing songs in the backs of cars swamped with our equipment, traveling 100,000's of miles to play shows we'll make a loss on, to then eventually meeting and playing with some of their musical heroes and being invited to play some incredible venues with artists such as Greta Van Fleet, Willie Nelson, Blackberry Smoke and Marcus King. On their upcoming album Click Click Domino  the pair have pushed themselves to break new ground both as artists and producers, leaning on everything they'd learned collaborating with producer Ethan Johns on Chasing Lights as well as other top-shelf producers over the years likeT Bone Burnett (Elvis Costello, Robert Plant & Alison Krauss), M. Ward, Ryan Hadlock (The Lumineers, Brandi Carlile), Jake Gosling (Ed Sheeran, Shawn Mendes), and Mike Crossey (The 1975, Arctic Monkeys). Purchase or stream Click Click Domino here.Learn more about Lyte here. 

Dueling Decades
Classic Dueling Decades rewind with guest Vernon Wells judging between 1984 & 1985!

Dueling Decades

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 100:48


This week on everyone's favorite adult-only retro game show, we look back to one of our favorite episodes. In this head-to-head Week Experience showdown, Mancrush steps up the plate with April 21st through the 27th of 1985 to face off against The Professor Drew Zackin. Drew comes prepared to drop the knowledge as he gears up with April 17th through the 23rd of 1994! As usual, we need someone to hold down law and order, so why not a 1980s & 1990s movie villain? That's right, who knows the law better than an outlaw?! This man trashes teenage house parties for fun, battles Mad Max in the apocalypse with assless chaps, kidnaps John Matrix's daughter, and gets cozy inside Martin Short's body! He had no limits, and he's here to decide which decade did it better. Welcome, the nicest bad guy we ever got to meet, Vernon Wells!    In this episode, we got all kinds of nostalgia that you didn't know, you didn't need to know. A huge company flinched to its competitor's advances, Dan Akyroyd sings with Willie Nelson, an iconic album gets a followup, Teri dresses like Elvis Costello, an ER doctor has sex with a spy, obscure TV shows down under, prostitutes unionize and become dangerous, a movie you probably don't remember, an album that changed the game, a bizarre concert pairing upsets teeny boppers, lots of videotapes, Peg Bundy, Madonna's a genius, Drew gives a history lesson, someone died, Drew gives another history lesson, Vernon didn't care, opinionated comedians, a janitor goes to the Tennessee State Penitentiary, Vernon drops all kinds of gems, and where the hell do rich people hang their paintings anyway? Do you agree with the judicial rulings of Mr. Vernon Wells? How did you score it? Let us know!` Please don't forget to subscribe and review! Want to share some of your own 1980s & 1990s memories? Join the other thousands of people in our Facebook group and get more original nostalgic content every day! If you're into the 1960s & 1970s, join our other group! Links below: https://www.duelingdecades.com/ (https://www.duelingdecades.com) https://www.facebook.com/duelingdecades (https://www.facebook.com/duelingdecades) https://www.youtube.com/c/duelingdecades (https://www.youtube.com/c/duelingdecades) https://www.twitter.com/duelingdecades (https://www.twitter.com/duelingdecades) https://www.instagram.com/duelingdecades (https://www.instagram.com/duelingdecades) https://www.facebook.com/groups/duelingdecades/ (https://www.facebook.com/groups/duelingdecades/) https://www.patreon.com/duelingdecades (https://www.patreon.com/duelingdecades) Support this podcast

TotemTalks
Season 3 Episode 21: TotemTalks Travels Through Stardust!

TotemTalks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 82:37


Welcome to another episode of TotemTalks, our quest for the best! In today's episode, we find Gold on the Ceiling with The Black Keys, we Shoot the Moon with Norah Jones, and we see the Blue Skies with Willie Nelson! Enjoy! TotemTalks is a music podcast dedicated to breaking down a variety of musical artists in fun and educational ways. If that sounds interesting to you, please check it out! And if you enjoy listening, be sure to let us know by using #totemtalks, and following us on our Social Media! Peace and Love! Facebook: facebook.com/lowtotemband Instagram: low_totem Twitter: low_totem Website: lowtotemband.com Become a Member of Team Totem here: https://anchor.fm/lowtotem/support --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/lowtotem/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/lowtotem/support

Drinks with Johnny Podcast
Brantley Gilbert

Drinks with Johnny Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 68:50


Johnny's face is bleeding, so that can only mean one thing - we've reluctantly reached the end to Season 3 of Drinks With Johnny. To help put a bow on this windy road that was 2021, we're joined by country superstar Brantley Gilbert! Johnny and Brantley get into the differences and similarities between the rock and country music landscapes. Brantley compares his time on Willie Nelson's Country Throwdown Tour to that of Johnny's experience on the Van's Warped Tour.  We get into Brantley's personal life and find out what makes him tick. Brantley shares the story of how he met his wife. We discover what Brantley has been up to during the pandemic to stay sane, and experience a bit of “mancave-envy” as we discuss Brantley's 7000+ square foot monster mancave. Become a FILTHY ANIMAL and get access to exclusive content: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2qKyxOwoa_Uz5d5xCZEUPw/join Explore more Drinks With Johnny: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/drinkswithjohnny Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drinkswithjohnny Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drinkswithjohnny Twitter: https://twitter.com/drinkswjohnny​​​​ Shop: https://www.drinkswithjohnny.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Todd and Don Show on News Radio KLBJ 2019
T&D 11-24-21 HOUR 2: Well Which One is it?

The Todd and Don Show on News Radio KLBJ 2019

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 30:37


ERCOT and Greg Abbott have conflicting opinions on whether there could be power outages this winter, Willie Nelson gets his 50th Grammy nomination, and Don tells the tale of his wife's high school reunion. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Austin Daily Drop
Austin Daily Drop - Wednesday November 24, 2021

The Austin Daily Drop

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 7:38


COVID hospitalizations remain at a low ebb, but new cases and our local community transmission rate are both rising, indicating a likely winter spike on the way. Holiday travel for a great many Austinites - give yourself as much time as you can, and give your fellow travelers lots and lots of patience. Austin Grammy nominees include Willie Nelson, Black Pumas, Jack Ingram, Conspirare, and Sarah and Shawna Dodds. Texas faces Kansas State on Friday morning, desperate to turn around a disastrous season, while local high school football teams representing Lake Travis, Bowie, Vandegrift, Westlake, Cedar Park, Leander, Liberty Hill, LBJ Austin, Wimberley and Lago Vista head into the third Regional round of this year's playoffs. And Thanksgiving rain starts tonight and should wrap up by late Thursday morning.

OncLive® On Air
S6 Ep11: Marvels in Medicine: Allison Talks Everything from Advances in Immunotherapy to Jamming With Willie Nelson

OncLive® On Air

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 25:57


Dr. Allison highlights everything from his proudest professional moments, to MD Anderson's Moon Shot program, to his musical talents, to next steps he's taking in cancer research.

School of Podcasting
Learn How You Can Help Others by Sharing Your Abilities with Glenn Hebert

School of Podcasting

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 46:02


Today we look at how two entertainment icons had MORE success AFTER they quit trying to be something they weren't and decided to be themselves.  Glenn Hebert runs the Horse Radio Network. When he started his podcast he had 12 downloads. He didn't quit, and 2800 episodes later he shares some powerful feedback from his audience. Glenn had no idea he would have this effect on people, and you can do the same thing.  Let me help you start a podcast.  QUESTION OF THE MONTH II need your answer by 10/26/21. How long does it take you to go from idea to clicking publish on an episode? Be sure to mention the name of your show, the website, and a little bit about your show.  Go to www.schoolofpodcasting.com/question Sponsor: Novel Marketing Podcast A lot of podcasters plan to write a book but they don't know where to start. Our sponsor the Novel Marketing Podcast is here to help. Thomas Umstattd Jr is a wealth of knowledge and he can get you going in the right direction. Today we talk about the 10 commandments of book publishing. Check out https://www.schoolofpodcasting.com/author MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE Horse Radio Network Headline Studio (Here is a quick Headline Studio Overview Video) Dave's Podcast Editing Service Sure SM7B on Sale! Shure MV7 and MV7X "Joe Rogan Video" Profit From Your Podcast Book Dave's Newsletter With Bonus Content Descript Editing Software George Carlin Occupation Foole Toggle Time Tracking Software Ask the Podcast Coach The Average Guy Network Speak Life Church Podcast Grammar Girl Podcast Ready To Start Your Podcast You may think nobody would listen to you, but I'm here to tell you they will. I have proven strategies to help you identify exactly what your audience wants. You will sound professional, and won't have to spend a million dollars to sound great. Learn through our online tutorials, live group coaching and a private Facebook Group filled with brilliant podcasters. Join worry-free with a 40-day money-back guarantee. See schoolofpodcasting.com/start   TOPICS 01:39  Question of the Month Reminder 03:36  Headline Studio Tool 05:15  BE YOURSELF 07:07  Celebrity Pivots 15:56  Sponsor: Novel Marketing Podcast 17:12  What is this 800? 17:43  Glenn Got Some Feedback 18:44  Real, Raw, Don't Hold Back 19:32  Holy Cow You're In My House 20:50  Laying it Out There 21:27  Life Changing 22:08  Glenn's Prep Time 23:43  The Importance of Community 25:06  Putting YOU Intro an Interview 27:56  Glenn's Audience Gives Back 29:09  Inspiring Life Instead of Death 30:01  Did You See This Coming 30:58  Podcasting Gold 31:29  Two Types of Listeners 35:34  The Birth of Grammar Girl 37:06  Jerry Springer 39:24  Podcast Rodeo Show Promo 40:43  SM7B is ON SALE! 42:07  Join the School of Podcasting! 44:46  Bloopers 45:15  Bad Edits

Place to Be Nation Wrestling
NWA Crock & Roll #29: Superstars on the Superstation, 2/7/86

Place to Be Nation Wrestling

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 63:17


On episode 29 of NWA Crock and Roll, once again it's a 3-man team as they kick off February '86 discussing Superstars on the Superstation from 2/7/86. Topics include Magnum TA hosting the show with an interesting co-host, a hot tag title opener, announcement of first Jim Crockett Memorial Cup, a disappointing Warriors/Russians tag, Dusty and Willie Nelson being best friends, a long Dusty/Tully National Title match and close with a Flair/Garvin World Title Banger!

Rock N Roll Pantheon
The Story Song Podcast: Red Headed Stranger by Willie Nelson

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 95:46


Somebody bet on the bay! It's time for the 75th episode of THE STORY SONG PODCAST. Join your hosts for their review of the 1975 classic, “Red Headed Stranger” by country music legend, Willie Nelson. In this episode, we'll talk about traveling town criers, equine-based legal loopholes, and somebody named “Guitar Boogie.” Don't be wild in your sorrow! Ride on again with THE STORY SONG PODCAST. Continue the conversation; follow THE STORY SONG PODCAST on social media. Follow us on Twitter (@Story_Song), Instagram (storysongpodcast), and Facebook (thestorysongpodcast). THE STORY SONG PODCAST is a member of the Pantheon Podcast Network. “Red Headed Stranger” by Willie Nelson (from the album Red Headed Stranger) is available on Apple Music, Amazon Music, YouTube Music, Tidal, Pandora, Spotify, or wherever you listen to music. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Story Song Podcast
Red Headed Stranger by Willie Nelson

The Story Song Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 95:16


Somebody bet on the bay! It's time for the 75th episode of THE STORY SONG PODCAST. Join your hosts for their review of the 1975 classic, “Red Headed Stranger” by country music legend, Willie Nelson. In this episode, we'll talk about traveling town criers, equine-based legal loopholes, and somebody named “Guitar Boogie.” Don't be wild in your sorrow! Ride on again with THE STORY SONG PODCAST. Continue the conversation; follow THE STORY SONG PODCAST on social media. Follow us on Twitter (@Story_Song), Instagram (storysongpodcast), and Facebook (thestorysongpodcast). THE STORY SONG PODCAST is a member of the Pantheon Podcast Network. “Red Headed Stranger” by Willie Nelson (from the album Red Headed Stranger) is available on Apple Music, Amazon Music, YouTube Music, Tidal, Pandora, Spotify, or wherever you listen to music. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

TODAY with Hoda & Jenna
November 11: Meet a US Marine veteran fighting food insecurity. Jenna Bush Hager's one-on-one with Willie Nelson. Charlamagne tha God on his new show, “Tha God's Honest Truth.”

TODAY with Hoda & Jenna

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 35:00


Meet a US Marine veteran who is helping fight food insecurity in his community. Jenna Bush Hager sits down with Willie Nelson — what he is doing to spread his love of music to a new generation. Also ahead, Charlamagne tha God stops by to chat about his new Comedy Central show, “Tha God's Honest Truth.”

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis
Biden Pressed Over Falling Approval Numbers, Court Pauses Biden's Vaccine Mandate and Free Payments To The Poor

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 46:43


Tonight's rundown: Network news ignore Biden's cratering approval numbers, but local outlets make sure to push the story to the forefront  The Biden administration is stockpiling records on over 54 million U.S. gun owners  The White House tells businesses to forge ahead with vaccine mandate for workers despite a court-ordered pause  Chicago plans to give its citizens below the poverty line no strings attached, direct payments as part of a new pilot program  This Day In History, 1990: Willie Nelson's assets are seized by the IRS Final Thought: The horror of going to the doctor's office  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rock N Roll Pantheon
The Rock Podcast with Denny Somach: The Doors

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 49:31


Who doesn't love The Doors? Ray Manzarek talks about the first time the shy Jim Morrison showed him the words he'd written and how that became the beginning of the band, courtesy of Denny Somach's epic legacy interview archive. Robbie Krieger weighs in, "I'd never written a song before and Jim told me to go and write some, so I went home and wrote Light My Fire," and, in a brand new interview, Rock & Roll Hall of Famer John Densmore reveals everything from his relationship with Jim to getting high with Willie Nelson to his friendship with Tom Petty at the time of his death, to his take on a question he's never been asked before. Denny can ask it, only because, as a music industry veteran, he was there. You won't want to miss these one of a kind stories on this week's episode of The Rock Podcast! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices