Podcasts about Moroccan

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Best podcasts about Moroccan

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Latest podcast episodes about Moroccan

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Bennett cries victory on Iran guard & Turkey FM flies in

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 13:05


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Diplomatic correspondent Lazar Berman and Tech Israel editor Ricky Ben-David from Morocco join host Amanda Borschel-Dan. Prime Minister Naftali Bennett revealed yesterday that US President Joe Biden updated him last month on his final decision to keep Iran's Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps on the State Department's Foreign Terrorist Organizations list. Why is this important and considered a win for Bennett? Turkey's Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu is currently in Israel and the Palestinian Authority. But what is perhaps more telling is who didn't join the entourage. Israeli and Moroccan organizations signed a number of business and tech agreements on Monday, as part of the inaugural “Connect to Innovate” conference. What's going on here? Ben-David shares a personal side to her trip, including what she's hearing from her hotel window. Discussed articles include: Bennett mourns ‘horrific murder of innocent children and teachers' in Texas massacre Bennett: Biden notified me last month of decision to keep Iran Guards on terror list FM's visit shows Turkey eager to accelerate reconciliation, but Israel more cautious In Casablanca, Morocco and Israel see the beginning of a beautiful tech friendship Moroccan Jews return to their roots with pilgrimage to Meknes ILLUSTRATIVE IMAGE: A demonstrator holds an anti-Israeli placard in a pro-Palestinians gathering in Tehran, Iran, May 19, 2021. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Beyond the Mic with Sean Dillon
Author Of Far Side Of The Moon Liisa Jorgensen Goes Beyond The Mic

Beyond the Mic with Sean Dillon

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 22:37


Loves random peonies, would like to visit the moon, and loves cooking Moroccan food but she's not good at it yet. Liisa Jorgensen's book is “Far Side of the Moon”. Time to go Beyond the Mic. Beyond the Mic with Sean Dillon is the conversation series where actors, artists, authors, and more go deeper than a traditional interview. They go “Beyond the Mic”.

Running Reprot
Ep.87 || Zouhair Talbi | A Dream to be the World's Best | Moroccan Olympian | 6th at 2022 World Indoors

Running Reprot

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 44:14


This week on the 2 Black Runners Podcast, Aaron & Joshua Potts are joined by Zouhair Talbi to hear his story from a small NAIA school in Oklahoma to the Olympics in 2021. Talbi is a Moroccan distance runner who broke onto the U.S. distance scene last year at the Trials of Miles and Sound Running Meets where ihe earned a place on the Morocco Olympic team. His story didn't just start last year though, so your favorite 2 Black Runners talk to Talbi about how he got to this point and where he's going. Thank you to World Athletics 22 for sponsoring this episode with their #NextStopOregon Segment!! Go get your tickets now for the first World Athletics Championships ever on U.S. soil at WorldChampsOregon22.com

Clearing the FOG with co-hosts Margaret Flowers and Kevin Zeese
The United States Is Supporting A Brutal Occupation In Western Sahara

Clearing the FOG with co-hosts Margaret Flowers and Kevin Zeese

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 60:01


Immediately following the expulsion of the Spanish colonizers in the mid 1970's, Western Sahara was occupied by Moroccan forces. With support from the United States, those occupiers, who treat the indigenous Sahrawi People very similarly to the way the Israeli occupiers treat the Palestinians, have been committing human rights abuses. Clearing the FOG speaks with Ruth McDonough and Tim Pluta, who have been staying with the family of a human rights defender, Sultana Khaya, since March 15. Ruth began a hunger strike on May 4 to demand an end to the violence against the Khaya's and an investigation into the crimes committed against them. Ruth and Tim describe what people can do to show solidarity with the struggle of the Sahrawi People. For more information, visit PopularResistance.org.

Vectis Radio
42: Exotic Emporium Episode 42 - Moroccan Uromastyx Part 2

Vectis Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 5:27


The Moroccan Uromastyx (Uromastyx nigriventris) is an Agamid Lizard found in Africa and has gained popularity over the years for it's ease of care and simple diet. It is no wonder the Uromastyx have gained so much attention. But the question is: Is the Moroccan Uromastyx the best pet lizard for you? 

Planet Sport Football Africa
13 May - CAF Champions League - Victor Osimhen - City close on EPL title - FA Cup Final

Planet Sport Football Africa

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 29:28


On this week's show we look at Caf's decision to let Morocco host the final of the African Champions League, with a Moroccan side likely to play in the final. Also we speak to Nigeria forward Victor Osimhen, who's had a good season with Napoli in Italy and is a transfer target for several EPL clubs.And we have Stuart on the EPL, with Man City in a commanding position, and a look-ahead to Saturday's FA Cup final.

What's The Matter With Me? Podcast

i had a birthday dinner and didn't wear a mask Shout outs to the ceramicist brian R. Jones who likes the longer episodes- he makes the stuff at brianrjones.comhe hangs out in a ceramics studio. i attended Alfred University for a single semester and I got him and Steve theretry to calm down and go slowerI revisited the last night for dinner journal, it had been 13 months. Last night For dinner we had left over meatloaf and martini's made with cheap gin but at least there was plenty of it5 oz gin to 1.5oz dry vermouth, garnished with banana peppers. it wasn't very goodme & my wife: Ronin commonsense media sounds like the answer is, sounds fine/ nobunch of ex-govt spies fighting over a briefcasewent over it last time: Elon musk is named after a smell, On the other hand John Hoppin is the name of a less wealthy and less popular smell that doesnt own twitterI'm riding the exercise bike 2-3x per weekI got asked by another parent in San Leandro if it had happened to me recently and for a moment i wasnt sure if they meant the wheelchair or MSi told them that i had the wheelchair almost a full year before i would ride it around in publicit was recommended to me by an occupational therapist at the stanford neuroscience a couple years before thatshe told me it would help me get there- not spend my energy to get therei'm tired of falling and hitting my head and having to get staples in my headReading foreign cuisine cookbooks- Ethiopian smoked milk or waterGoing to dinner at a Moroccan restaurant on SaturdayMy wife wanted to support the idea of journeying to EthiopiaRoger Maris visited JFK in the white house in his capacity as MS Society's national campaign co chairman in 1962Last night for dinner and the night before i had pb&j for dinnerwent to my 2nd kfjc meeting since corona, raided the spliff binWet leg, kyle ransonTook the kids to baseball, made dinner, all by myself but i had help. The burger place closedi was afraid i would lose my licenseDmv workedHayward dmv was coolthe guy had a hat that said oldies car club and the bull was scrunched up like anthrax - he told me i should work thereso i'm afraid tommy lee jones is going to pull me out of line so he can show me some of his techniquesignoring disabled people all the way up to euthanizing them are on a spectrum together (like the way microagression and out right aggression) are both kinds of discrimination Need advice about a wheelchair lift for the car, i know there a re listeners who use wheelchairs, i need to get a machine that takes my chair out of the car bc i dont like someone doing it who is either a woman or older than me.its for the opticsHave you heard the sound of the atmosphere dragging across the EarthI went to birthday dinner in San FranciscoI had a 3 hour mriThen i had rods drilled into my jaw

Jrodconcerts: The Podcast
Singer/Songwriter: Imen Siar

Jrodconcerts: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 17:00


We welcome an artist with a heart of gold, and once in a generation talent, Imen Siar. A name that will become a staple for years to come, Imen was Born to a family with Muslim faith and Moroccan heritage, and was raised in Milan before moving to London in her late teens. It was in London where she was discovered posting videos of her singing into a mop during breaks from work. And lucky we are that she was discovered! After making a semi-final run in Britain's Got Talent, Imen just released her debut single 'Lonely People'. The song's strengths are undeniable – Imen's stunning, world class vocal gift delivers an instantly memorable song that conveys a universally relatable theme in the most direct way possible. In this special episode, Imen shares with Jamie a plethora of topics. Including traveling to America the day after the travel ban was lifted, Confidence, Old Acquaintances , Getting Discovered on YouTube and more.

Midnight Train Podcast
Creepy Portugal

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 102:58


Become a Patreon supporter at www.themidnighttrainpodcast.com   This week we're taking the train across the pond for another creepy adventure. That's right, we are doing one of our creepy episodes! It's been a while so we figured it was time. This week we are headed to what some people say is one of the top scariest countries in the world! Not only that…we know we have some awesome listeners here. This week we are headed to creepy Portugal! We are gonna try our best to find the coolest, creepiest places for you guys. I'm just going to assume there's going to be a bridge in here someplace.  So without further Ado.. Let's fucking rock and roll!!!   So first up we're gonna do a little history lesson. Will keep it somewhat sorry and sweet since if we got into the complete history of a country of the age of Portugal, it would be an entire episode on its own. To get there history of this country we went to the source, portugal.com and an article written by Goncarlo Costa.    The history of Portugal starts many ages ago, when the so-called Iberian tribes inhabited the territory of today's Portugal. Then, in the beginning of the first millennium BC, Celtic tribes invaded and intermarried with the local Iberians, creating what is now known as the Celtiberians.   The Lusitanians, who inhabited the interior region of Portugal since the Iron Age, are considered the forefathers of the Portuguese nation. This is why today we have names like Lusophone, someone who speaks Portuguese, or Luso-American, a Portuguese American person. They were known for successfully fending off the Roman armies until the death of their leader, Viriathus, known as a hero in Portugal.   The tribe was considered a worthy adversary by the Romans, so much that they named the province of the whole territory of modern Portugal (south of the Douro River) and part of western Spain after them.   The Romans left various works, such as baths, temples, bridges, roads, theaters and statues; some of them are still found in different parts of the country.   This lasted until the Barbarian invasions, when Germanic tribes migrated to various parts of the Roman Empire. In Portugal, the territory became controlled by the Germanic in the 5th century. The Kingdom of the Suebi controlled Galicia and the North and Center of Portugal, while the Visigothic Kingdom controlled the rest of the Iberian Peninsula, including the rest of Portugal, until eventually conquering the Suebi and, consequently, the whole of Iberia. This is when the rigid class structure appeared in the country, with a Nobility and Clergy getting more and more political and social power.   In the 8th century, the Islamic Umayyad Caliphate invaded the Iberian Peninsula from the North of Africa. Al-Andalus, the Islamic name for the Peninsula, became a part of the Caliphate, and Portugal with it. The Portuguese kept lots of things from their Muslim past, like many of their words, architecture and the famous ‘azulejos'.   The Christians held on in the North of the Peninsula, creating the Kingdom of the Asturias. This was until the Reconquista, when they reconquered the lands from the Moors, the Muslims.   In this Kingdom, at the end of the 9th century, a county based in the now north of Portugal was established, the County of Portugal. The county grew in power and, at the end of the 11th century, a Burgundian knight named Henry, who was fighting in the Reconquista, was crowned as ‘Count of Portugal' and merged it with the County of Coimbra.   Henry's son, Afonso Henriques, proclaimed himself King of Portugal in 1139 with Guimarães as its capital. This city remains known until this day as the “Cradle of the Nation' by the Portuguese.   However, it was only in 1179 that a papal bull officially recognized Afonso I as king. The Reconquista continued with the Algarve, the south of the country, finally being conquered in 1249, and Lisbon becoming the capital in 1255. Since then, Portugal's land borders have remained almost unchanged, being considered one of the longest standing borders in Europe.   The Kingdom of Portugal remained very important in Europe's (and especially Iberian) politics, waging several wars against Spain, creating an alliance with England (the longest standing alliance in the world, lasting until today) and starting the “Age of Discovery”.   In this Age, the country built a vast empire, having territory all over the world, from South America to Oceania. They started by exploring their coast and adventuring into the Moroccan coast, hoping to continue the Reconquista to the North of Africa. Then, the Portuguese sailors started to adventure into the open sea, when they discovered the islands of the Canaries, Madeira, Azores and Cape Verde. Subsequently, the Portuguese explored the coast of Africa, setting trading ports, and tried to discover the maritime route to India, which they did in 1498, under the explorer Vasco da Gama.   They continued to explore and look for trade around the world, from Africa, passing through Arabia, and reaching Japan, setting several outposts, many of them having developed into colonies later on. In 1500, they reached South America and started the colonization of Brazil.   The Empire started to decline, however, when the Dutch, English, and French got in the game. They started to surround or conquer the scattered Portuguese trading posts and territories, diminishing their power. On the Battle of Alcácer-Quibir, in 1578, Portugal lost its king, becoming part of a dynastic union with Spain that lasted until 1640, when it finally gained its independence again.   After that, the country never became the great power it once was. It lost several colonies (including its largest one, Brazil) and trade routes, it saw its capital being destroyed by an earthquake in 1755 and it was occupied during the Napoleonic Wars.   From then on, Portugal was a minor power in Europe, having just some colonies in Africa and Asia and never becoming an economic powerhouse.   Then, in 1910, due to corruption, dissatisfaction with the several Kings and the loss of claimed African lands to the English, the monarchy ended and a Republic was created. Fiercely secular, to the point where it was antichurch, filed with corruption, government instability and near to bankruptcy, the regime came to an end with a military coup in 1926.   A military dictatorship was installed and then, a fascist-like regime, the ‘Estado Novo' (‘New State'), headed by António de Oliveira Salazar. This period was marked by authoritarianism, lack of freedom and, from 1961, by the Portuguese Colonial War.   All of this ended when, in April 25th 1974, the Carnation Revolution happened, carried out by the Armed Forces Movement (Movimento das Forças Armadas – MFA), a movement of young left-leaning captains of the Portuguese Armed Forces. With the Revolution, democratic reforms were made and the first free elections with multiple parties happened, as well as the independence of all of Portugal's colonies.   It also started the PREC (Processo Revolucionário Em Curso – Ongoing Revolutionary Process), a period when conservative and left-leaning forces inside the MFA confronted each other, marked by political turmoil, violence, instability, and the nationalization and expropriation of private lands. It came to an end on the 25 November 1975, when the MFA moderates appeared as the main force.   Nevertheless, revolutionary achievements were not forgotten, with the Constitution pledging until this day to realize socialism, as well as declaring extensive nationalizations and land seizures as irreversible, many, however, now overturned.   Nowadays, Portugal is one of 15 most sustainable states in the world and considered the third most peaceful. It has high living standards and a good economy. It was a founding member of NATO, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the European Free Trade Association (EFTA) and the Community of Portuguese Language Countries. It entered the European Economic Community (now the European Union) in 1986 and is one of its fiercest supporters, even having produced a European Commission President.   Ok so that's a brief…incredibly brief mini history of Portugal. Really the take aways are…super old, plenty of things happened to make the place creepy over that many years. So let's see what creepy stuff Portugal has to offer!   What better way to start than with a sanatorium! Valongo Sanatorium to be exact. The construction of the Mont'Alto Sanatorium began in 1932. Due to the appearance of a large number of people who had contracted tuberculosis, there was a need to expand the facilities, and these expansion works were completed in 1958. construction of these hospital units were carried out in high altitude places, due to the purity of the air, and also because they were away from the populations to avoid the effects of contagion. The sanatorium only operated for a short period, having been inaugurated in 1958 and closed in 1975, after which it entered a profound state of disrepair. Due to its dimensions, it is considered one of the most imposing buildings of its type in Portugal.Its building is large, with an area of ​​approximately 88,000 m², having been built with a view to housing about 300 patients. The building was designed by the architect José Júlio de Brito , who was also responsible for other prominent structures in the city of Porto, such as the Coliseu or Teatro Rivoli . The sanatorium complex, which occupied nine hectares, also included a school, a laundry room, a water reservoir, and a chapel dedicated to Our Lady of the Sick.    The installation of the Sanatorium in Valongo was part of a phase in the history of health in Portugal, during which the government undertook the construction of several specialized establishments to combat tuberculosis, a disease that was ravaging the country at the time. This period began in 1899, with the foundation of the National Institute of Assistance to Tuberculosis, which began the construction of several sanatoriums in different parts of the national territory. In 1930, efforts against tuberculosis were renewed in the north of the country, with the creation of the Assistance to Tuberculosis of Northern Portugal by António Elísio Lopes Rodrigues, and at that time, planning began to build a sanatorium that would house the sick in that region, who had lower economic resources.  Serra de Santa Justa was chosen, where the air was healthier, in addition to being isolated from urban centers, in order to reduce the risk of contagion.   Shortly after, the Sá family donated a plot of land in Serra de Santa Justa, allowing the construction of the building, whose works began in 1932.  However, the works were suspended due to lack of funding, having been resumed due to the support of the local populations.  On July 5, 1940, ATNP began building the Casa de Nossa Senhora da Conceição, to support the children of the sanatorium's patients. According to the Diário Popular of 3 January 1956, the finishing works and equipping of the sanatorium were already under way, and it was expected to be completed during the following year, and that it would have a capacity for 350 beds.  However, the works were only completed in 1958.  Another reason for the delay in the work may have been the opposition by the Companhia das Minas de São Pedro da Cova to the construction of the building, because it was being installed inside an area destined for coal mining, a few kilometers away from the mines.  However, at the time of the sanatorium's inauguration, mining was already entering its final phase, ending up closing in 1970.  Some of the users of the hospital were the mine workers themselves, who suffered from occupational diseases such as tuberculosis and silicosis . The Sanatorium of Monte Alto was inaugurated on 1 November 1958,  being the last one to be opened in Portugal. The inauguration ceremony included a religious service at the Chapel of Nossa Senhora dos Enfermos, the unveiling of a commemorative tombstone, a tribute to the League of Combatants of theFirst World War, and concluded with a port of honor offered by the board of directors. of the sanatorium.  During the ceremony, the admission and accommodation process of the first clients, all veterans of the First World War, was also carried out. Although it was planned for three hundred patients,  its initial capacity was only fifty beds, and during its operation it accommodated 350 people.    In the early 1970s, there began to be greater control over the tuberculosis disease, which began to be fought in a different way, through the outpatient system.  In this way, the sanatoriums ceased to be useful, and were progressively abandoned or underwent a process of readaptation for other purposes.  In the case of the Montalto Sanatorium, the closure process began in 1972,  due to the low number of tuberculosis patients in the Porto District.  At that time, the building already had only a few patients, having been thought of its adaptation as a psychiatric hospital or for the returnees from overseas, which did not advance.  Due to the process of closing the Sanatorium, Casa Nossa Senhora da Conceição ceased to function as a boarding school, starting to support only external students. The building was abandoned after the April 25 Revolution , when the last employee left, although it was only officially closed in 1975.  Following its closure, it was completely looted, being a of the main reasons its connection to the Estado Novo, as it was mostly built and used during that regime.  This connection to the Estado Novo also had a negative impact on the collection of funds, making it impossible to carry out works on the building. It was also used as a training ground by firefighters and civil protection, who performed drills there and destroyed some walls.  Later, the sanatorium was used for paintball games and photo shoots, and various ceremonies related to the supernatural, such as rituals, were also performed there. The building was also hit by several fires, accentuating its degradation. History is awesome and fun and you know we love it but…. The reason we're here is for creepiness! There are stories abound of how haunted this place is. Given the numerous people who died there it makes sense to us! So what kind of stuff are we talking about here ? Well, let's look.    Well paranormal investigators have been spending time here for years, when there's no paintball matches going on, to try and find crazy shit! There have been numerous reports of strange noises and things moving around. There have been entities seen and apparitions spotted. It's hard to find much in English so finding pages from Portuguese websites and trying to find studies was tough but we managed to find one study where a group of friends were exploring the abandoned hospital and had some interesting things happen. They talked about how they started hearing strange noises while they were exploring. The noises seemed to be following them around the building. They talked about how they had a heavy feeling around them as they explored. The sounds seemed to keep getting closer to them. They claim that things started getting knocked over and moved on their own. At one point, one of the group claimed they saw a shadowy figure seemingly watching them. At that point they all decided it was time to go! Sounds like a pretty crazy experience!  True or not? We like to think so!   Can't go and episode without fucking tuberculosis… Teatro Lethes:   The building that today is called Teatro Lethes, began as a Jesuit College – Colégio de Santiago Maior, founded by the then Bishop of the Algarve, D. Fernando Martins Mascarenhas -, whose license was granted to them on 8 February 1599. of learning, above all of a religious nature – the “first university in the Algarve”, as someone has called it. In 1759, the Society of Jesus was banned from the country and its goods were confiscated. The College of Santiago Maior closed its doors. With the occupation of Napoleonic troops commanded by General Junot, the premises of the former College were raided and desecrated in order to enlist the soldiers there. Years later, in 1843, the College was auctioned off by Dr. Lazaro Doglioni, who had publicly expressed his intention to build a theater in Faro similar to S.   The Latin inscription on the facade of the building, monet oblectando , can be translated as “instructing, playing”, thus emphasizing the cultural concerns of the promoter of the construction of this concert hall.   The inauguration of Teatro Lethes took place on 4 April 1845, as part of the celebrations for the birthday of Queen Maria II. Later, in 1860, it was expanded by Dr. Justino Cumano, nephew of Lázaro Doglioni. On September 11, 1898, the so-called animatograph was exhibited for the first time in Faro., installed in the Lethes Theater as it is the largest and most distinguished cultural space in the city. It was restored between 1906 and 1908 to improve acoustics and comfort. The decline of the shows and, consequently, of the hall, begins in 1920, with the Theater closing in 1925, having sold the property to the Portuguese Red Cross, in whose possession it still remains. The Lethes Theater room was later ceded, by protocol, to the Algarve Regional Delegation of the Ministry of Culture. In the North wing, restored and adapted in 1991, the regional services of the Ministry of Culture operated. On October 5, 2012, by protocol between the Municipality of Faro and the Portuguese Red Cross, Teatro Lethes recovered its initial design. The Algarve Theater Company – ACTA was installed as a resident structure. ACTA, in addition to presenting shows of its own creation, also promotes hospitality at the Lethes Theater, and is also responsible for managing the equipment. this history was taken directly from the theatre website!   There are a couple stories about this place that prettier day lead to its hauntings. The first is the story of a ballerina who was in love but was not loved back. She was so distraught that she hung herself in the middle of the stage. Some versions say that she was driven to the brink by the demands of theater life. The second is that of a soldier's body that was found inside one of the walls. There isn't as much info on that story as the ballerina. Staff and visitors claim you can hear the ballerinas footsteps in the theater to this day. There are also reports of a shadowy figure moving about as well. Could this be the ballerina still performing for the people? Or the soldier patrolling the theater? Who knows but it sounds like a cool place to visit!! The Castelinho of Sao Joao, Estoril   The area between Estoril and Cascais, out on Lisbon's Atlantic coast, is rife with buildings of character. Many of them are designed to give the impression of miniature castles, indeed some of them were fortified because they were built during times of instability within the Iberian peninsula.   In the 1980s, a wealthy socialite, José Castelo Branco, was looking for just such a property and found one that seemed ideal in Sao Joao, a district on the edge of Estoril. The day he went to view the property was a beautiful sunny one and so he decided to walk along the cliff path which adjoined the property. As he was walking back to the building, he saw a young girl. She didn't speak, but simply stared at him. In his own account of the events of that day, Mr Castelo Branco said that he felt a compulsion to jump from the edge. This feeling was, he believed, coming from the young girl. He immediately elected to leave the property and ruled out buying it.   On hearing what had happened, someone from the local town hall did some research into the building and discovered that a young blind girl had fallen from the cliffs to her death in the eighteenth century and that several people had reported seeing her at the castelinho since, each claiming that they felt a strong will to jump while she looked at them.   Let's check out a cemetery now…cus those are always fun!    This one is called the cemetery of pleasures. After the city of Lisbon was hit by an outbreak of cholera in 1833, causing thousands of deaths,  it was urgent to create a large cemetery for both rich and poorer victims. It has the weird name of  Cemetery of ‘Pleasures', called after the nearby neighborhood (Prazeres) with the same name. Many of its tombs are big mausoleums, some with the size of small chapels.    Most of the Prazeres mausoleums belong to rich, old or ‘important' families, like  the Palmela family. Many of the mausoleums are richly elaborate, have fine sculptures and decorations. There are also statues of the deceased. It's like a ‘city in a city' for the dead, with well-defined lanes (70! ) and funerary chapels that were built to look like little houses.   The unusual thing about a lot of these graves is that they have little “front doors” with glass windows through which you can see the caskets and remnants of the dead and their visitors. Most of the trees are a species of cypress (Cupressus sempervirens), much used in Portuguese cemeteries.   The cemetery is one of the largest in Lisbon.    The Autopsy Room , which was in the chapel until the Morgues were created in 1899, is one of the curiosities that can be seen, as well as the Sala do Acervo , where some of the oldest funeral records can be consulted. This is another way of helping the visitor to interpret the different ways that human beings have had to culturally, socially and psychologically approach Death, throughout different times.   As with the many famous families and celebrities, another thing that adds to some people thinking there's more going on at this place is the presence of many freemason symbols and you know how that gets people talking!    At any rate, being a cemetery you can imagine the tales of hauntings surrounding this place! Everything from apparitions being seen wandering the grounds, to Disembodied voices. People have seen orbs in person and in pictures. I mean being able to see into these little houses and see the caskets and remains is creepy enough…add haunting to that…and it's definitely a place we want to go!   Next up, Quinta Das Conchas   The Quinta das Conchas (or the garden of shells) in Lisbon is best known for its expansive parkland, just to the north of the city centre. Families can be found playing here during the warmer months and countless dog walkers can be seen at any time of the year. The house at the heart of the estate though has a darker past which is lesser known. In the early part of the twentieth century, when Portugal was still a colonial power, the owner of the estate was a wealthy man called Francisco Mantero Belard. Like many of his countrymen, he was accustomed to having servants who took care of the running of his home. So, when he moved into the quinta, he acquired the services of a slave from Sao Tomé and Principe. There was nothing unusual about this at the time, other than that he elected to keep this slave woman in a small cage. She was made to live like an animal and, according to local myth, subjected to a variety of cruel treatment for several years. People working in the manor house in modern times have reported hearing wailing coming from empty rooms, as well as dramatic changes in temperature.   Let's switch it up and talk a little about Portuguese folklore! We're gonna talk about the coco or coca. There are also many other names for this guy or gal including Cucuy, Cuco, Cuca, Cucu or Cucuí. It is a mythical ghost-monster, equivalent to the bogeyman, found in many Hispanophone and Lusophone countries. It can also be considered an Iberian version of a bugbear as it is a commonly used figure of speech representing an irrational or exaggerated fear. A bugbear is described as  a legendary creature or type of hobgoblin comparable to the boogeyman and other creatures of folklore, all of which were historically used in some cultures to frighten disobedient children. The Cucuy is a male being while Cuca is a female version of the mythical monster. In Spain, Portugal, and Latin America, parents sometimes invoke the Coco or Cuca as a way of discouraging their children from misbehaving; they sing lullabies or tell rhymes warning their children that if they don't obey their parents, el Coco will come and get them and then eat them.    Continuing with the mystery surrounding this child scarer, the Coco also does not take on a specific physical form. For the Portuguese it is a dragon that is represented every year in the celebration of Corpus Christi…at least that is what I've source says.. another says: "In Portuguese côco, refers to a ghost with a pumpkin head. The male form is known as Coco, and the female form as Coca. It is said it's hard to tell the difference between the two. It seems that parents are to blame for the invocation of the Coco as a way of punishment for their wayward children. They would sing rhymes warning their children if they did not obey their parents the Coco would come and eat them.".... So a pumpkin headed goblin… Although the Coco was ghostly monster like in appearance, that wasn't the most frightening thing about them. Children would be scared out of their wits at the idea of a monster that could eat them and not leave a trace. So imagine being a child forced to sleep with a lullaby of a monster that was coming to devour them.    Duermete niño, duermete ya…que viene el cuco y te comerá (sleep child, sleep now…or else comes the coco to eat you).   Creepy, so this folk tale seems to have many different versions depending on where you look. We think that due to the fact that many Latin American countries also use this in folklore as well as there being a certain in Brazil, it's hard to actually put the facts together. Every place we looked about this tale had a little bit of a different take, hopefully we got it close as we mean no disrespect to the tales!   You know what else Portugal has…aliens, at least a few. He's a couple stories!    On September 4, 1957, four Portugal Air Force pilots claimed to have seen and chased some UFOs. They took off with their bomber aircraft from the Ota Air Base in Portugal under Captain José Lemos Ferreira leadership (the others pilots were sergeants Alberto Gomes Covas, Salvador Alberto Oliveira e Manuel Neves Marcelino). When they were heading towards the city of Portalegre, Captain Ferreira noticed a light above the horizon and warned the others. The light changed its own sizes a couple of times, first increasing, then shrinking. After several minutes the pilots noticed a small yellow circle getting out of the craft, and 3 more circles appeared later. When the UFOs were near Coruche, the bigger aircraft climbed out of the Earth as the smaller ones disappeared. The bombers landed without any problems and Captain Ferreira declared: "after this, do not come to us with that Venus, weather balloons, aircraft and similar stuff which have been being used as general explanations for almost every case of UFOs".   On September 10, 1990, around 9:30AM and for about 50 minutes, a small "balloon" was seen hovering towards a small football field, on a small village called Alfena in the outskirts of Porto. The object was described as "a small turtle with long legs" with a metallic shine. The people present got scared and a group of construction workers started throwing stones at it, and the object hovered backed away, leaving the site. An amateur photographer took several pictures of the shapeshifting object; the pictures were considered by several experts as real and the witness accounts by the simple folks were not considered hoax.    We also found this first hand account.. "My name is Cristina Marto de Pimental. I am a reporter. On New Year's Eve, December 31, 1997, my husband and I were at a seaside party in Funchal, which is on the South shore of Madeira Island, in the Atlantic Ocean, 912 kilometres East of Morocco. We were watching the New Year's festivities, all the fireworks in the sky. Then several people at the party called my attention to a red and motionless light above Funchal. The OVNI suddenly made a very tight circle, returned to its initial position, and, a few seconds later, it accelerated at great speed in a vertical direction. We were all quite amazed at the sight. A British couple at the festival videotaped the UFO as it hovered. The next day I telephoned the Fuerzas Aereas Portugeses (FAP) headquarters in Lisboa. The Portuguese air force told me that they'd had no flights, neither planes nor helicopters, and no satellites were over Madeira at that time."   Whoooooo aliens!!!   Time for some quick hitters, you beautiful bastards!   Quinta da Paulicea, Agueda:   Not far from the city center of Águeda, Quinta da Paulicea sits in the middle of large unkept plot of land surrounded by a wrought iron fence. It is the classic image of what a Hollywood haunted house should look like. It was inhabited by an Águedense family, who had moved to Brazil in the late 1800s, but returned in the early 1900s, naming the home after the city of São Paulo. Much of the family succumbed to the influenza pandemic in 1918, with the exception of Neca Carneiro. He was a patron of the community's sports and cultural programs but died childless at the young age of 37. The home has sat vacant ever since, due to legal constraints with the family back in Brazil. Although not certified as haunted, there are many reports of supernatural encounters at Quinta da Paulicea. Some have heard the neighing of horses where the stables once stood. Others have been frightened by the sound of a shotgun blast or a gentle pulling on hair. A worker in the garden suddenly experienced such an intense headache that he fled and never returned. Whether haunted or not, this beautiful home has many stories to tell.   Mines of São Pedro de Cova – Gondomar:   The village of São Pedro da Cova was largely an agricultural community until the discovery of coal in the 1802. The exhausting and dangerous industry of mining soon took over. Several generations of miners worked here until low oil prices forced the mines to shut down in the 1970's. All that's left of the mines are these ruins. Neighbors say spirits of the miners protect the ruins and the mine shafts. Others claim to hear screaming from the deep holes.   Termas de Água Radium, Sortelha:    Legend has it that this beautiful structure, in the Guarda District, was built by Spanish Count Don Rodrigo after learning that the natural “healing waters” might cure his daughter's skin disease. News of the waters quickly spread. In the 1920s, the site became a restorative spa known as the Hotel Serra da Pena. In actuality, the waters were radioactive, seeping from a uranium mine not far away. Radioactivity was all the rage in the 20's and 30's, so the site bottled the spring water and sold it under the name “Radium Water.” Of course, after radioactivity was studied further in the 40's, it became apparent that the healing qualities of radium water actually carried the opposite effect. The hotel went out of business in the 50's and has been abandoned ever since. It is said the site is haunted by the many people who drank from the contaminated spring.   Sanatório da Serra da Estrela – near Covilhã:   This massive structure was built in 1936 by Portugal's railway department as a treatment facility for its employees suffering from Tuberculosis. The building was later leased to the Portuguese Society of Sanatoriums on condition of receiving all patients needing treatment.  However it was closed in the 1980's and left to deteriorate for decades to come.  Rumors circulate that it is haunted by its many former patients.  The Sanatório has now been refurbished and transformed into the luxurious new Pousada Serra da Estrella.   Quinta da Juncosa – Penafiel, Rios de Monihos:    This old farmhouse was home to the Baron of Lages and his family.  The Baron was very jealous, and suspected his wife of infidelities.  Legends have it, the Baron tied his wife to a horse and dragged her around the farm until she died.  After discovering his wife was innocent, the Baron killed his children and committed suicide.  They say the Baron's guilt keeps him from resting in peace.  Ghosts of the Baron and his wife are said to be seen around the property.   So we did this episode in honor of our Portuguese listeners who have keep us in the top 10 in Portugal for quite some time. We thank you guys so much for that. But we have one request for you…in every creepy episodes so far until this one…we've found a haunted bridge, Texas had like 50. In all of my searching the recesses of the Internet, I could not find a single reference to a haunted bridge in Portugal, we need our Portuguese listeners to hit us up and let us know any stories about haunted bridges. It was tough to find a ton of information on a lot of these places so hopefully we did them right! If we made any mistakes or got anything wrong, you know what we say…blame the Internet!! Movie list   https://www.indiewire.com/gallery/best-body-horror-movies/

jesus christ death new year history texas movies community children culture english internet hollywood earth europe ghosts battle england japan college news british kingdom french africa society european union kings romans ministry south theater spain revolution north brazil african east league families portugal muslims ufos casa sick legends atlantic discovery dutch rumors popular south america rock and roll republic bc constitution latin america nato creepy ant coco neighbors rios islamic portuguese national institutes celtic morocco mfa pena latin american porto baron chapel roman empire assistance cradle sala lisbon lisboa cemetery arabia atlantic ocean corpus christi vasco barbarian our lady first world war serra coca minas pleasures subsequently moroccan galicia madeira gama peninsula brito clergy oceania tuberculosis guimar principe asturias ovni estrela coimbra faro algarve alc companhia canaries municipalities concei moors germanic ado nobility sanat iberia new state enfermos caliphate fiercely nossa senhora azores acta napoleonic iron age iberian cova cuca reconquista cape verde radium prazeres napoleonic wars on new year sanatorium estoril cascais cuco disembodied al andalus radioactivity economic co castelo branco iberian peninsula estado novo development oecd acervo lages combatants conchas coliseu funchal cucu burgundian oliveira salazar valongo european economic community cucuy jos j portuguese american douro river castelinho palmela iberians in portuguese suebi
Vectis Radio
41: Exotic Emporium Episode 41 - Moroccan Uromastyx

Vectis Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 5:16


The Moroccan Uromastyx (Uromastyx nigriventris) is an Agamid Lizard found in Africa and has gained popularity over the years for it's ease of care and simple diet. It is no wonder the Uromastyx have gained so much attention. But the question is: Is the Moroccan Uromastyx the best pet lizard for you? 

Status/الوضع
Samia Errazouki on Morocco's Summit with Israel

Status/الوضع

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 58:01


At the end of March 2022, in a bold and historic step backwards for the cause of peace in the Middle East, Morocco was one of four Arab countries meeting in a special summit with Israel and the US. Although distant Iran was central to the discussions held during this meeting, the central issue of Palestine never broached during this summit, which took place in the heart of historic Palestine. Khalil Bendib spoke with Samia Errazouki, a journalist formerly based in Morocco and a PhD candidate in early modern Northwest African history at UC Davis, about Morocco's participation in this summit and what might be motivating the Moroccan regime to go against the wishes of its own people. Courtesy of Voices of the Middle East and North Africa (VOMENA).

Seen Any Good Films Lately?
Morricone and Morocco

Seen Any Good Films Lately?

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 42:57


I talk to director Roland Joffe about working with Ennio Morricone on The Mission, as featured in the new documentary Ennio - Roland also recalls Saturday morning cinema, winning the Palme d'Or at Cannes, and falling in love with Julie Christie. And I meet director Nabil Ayouch, creator of lovely film Casablanca Beats about a bunch of Moroccan kids learning about hip hop as a means to express themselves and take on their parents. Plus some Nick Cave sounds from French wildlife doc The Velvet Queen, about the search for a snow leopard in Tibet.Music by Lee Rosevere. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Ian King Business Podcast
Moroccan energy link, Natwest's profits double and London's super sewer

The Ian King Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 42:10


Sky's Ian KIng speaks to the chairman of the company behind the world's longest undersea cable, bringing low-cost clean energy to the UK.He explores NatWest's profits with chief executive Alison Rose as the bank sees them double in the first quarter of the year.And tunnelling for London's 'super sewer' is finishing up - Ian talks to Sir Neville Simms from Thames Tideway about the huge project.

Culture Cult Travel Show
Travel Story Special! Culture + Therapy

Culture Cult Travel Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 54:03


In this week's special episode, we cover how therapy and culture can intertwine with Arab-American therapist, Elizabeth Shahid from Your Story Therapy LLC. We cover several topics such as:  What it is like growing up with mixed cultures, East vs West mentalities, should cancel culture be canceled, and the beauty of Arabic culture.And since it is a travel story episode ,we end on a hilarious travel story of when Elizabeth went to her first Moroccan spa. Your Story Therapy: https://yourstorytherapyllc.com/Want  secret and early episodes and to Join the Cult?  https://www.buymeacoffee.com/culturecultshowInstagram: @culturecultshowHave a good travel story you want told on the podcast? Email : culturecultshow@gmail.comA huge thanks if you can  rate, follow and comment on any platform your listening on! Cheers!Support the show (https://linktr.ee/culturecultshow)

The afikra Podcast
NARGISSE BENKABBOU | Moroccan Cuisine | Matbakh

The afikra Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 51:13


Nargisse Benkabbou talked about her approaches to Moroccan Cuisine and her chosen single ingredient: Tagine.Nargisse Benkabbou was raised in Brussels, where she grew up in a strongly food-oriented family that continually nurtured her connection with her roots and country of origin, Morocco. After living in Brussels and Paris, Nargisse moved to London to pursue her education in Politics only to realize that her love for cooking and food was a real passion. After training at Leiths School of Food and Wine, she started sharing her Moroccan recipes 'with a twist' inspired by her home country. Nargisse is currently Executive Chef at L'Mida Marrakech, her work involves recipe and menu development, cooking classes and hosting supper clubs. Each recipe that Nargisse produces is a celebration of her heritage and a care for simplicity and modernity. Created & hosted by Mikey Muhanna, afikra Edited by: Ramzi RammanTheme music by: Tarek Yamani https://www.instagram.com/tarek_yamani/About Matbakh:Matbakh is a conversation series that focuses on food and drink of the Arab world. The series will be held with food practitioners who study how food and the kitchen have evolved over time in the Arab world. The guests will be discussing the history of food and what its future might be, in addition to a specific recipe or ingredient that reveals interesting and unique information about the history of the Arab world. Guests will be chefs, food critics, food writers, historians, and academics. Following the interview, there is a moderated town-hall-style Q&A with questions coming from the live virtual audience ‎on Zoom.‎ Join the live audience: https://www.afikra.com/rsvp   FollowYoutube - Instagram (@afikra_) - Facebook - Twitter Support www.afikra.com/supportAbout afikra:‎afikra is a movement to convert passive interest in the Arab world to active intellectual curiosity. We aim to collectively reframe the dominant narrative of the region by exploring the histories and cultures of the region- past, present, and future - through conversations driven by curiosity. Read more about us on  afikra.com

Nature of My Game
Season 3, "Rock the Casbah" - Episode 3 (Night's Black Agents)

Nature of My Game

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 45:02


While Gavin deals with the Moroccan police outside, Teddy and Fabio are outnumbered inside the Riad Rouge and have to fight for their lives.Find out more about the Nature of My Game Podcast at www.NoMGPodcast.com or on Instagram and Twitter @NoMGPodcast.This podcast episode uses trademarks and/or copyrights owned by Pelgrane Press Ltd, which are used under the Pelgrane Press Ltd Community Use Policy. We are expressly prohibited from charging you to use or access this content. This podcast episode is not published, endorsed, or specifically approved by Pelgrane Press Ltd. For more information about Pelgrane Press Ltd's Community Use Policy, please visit this page. For more information about Pelgrane Press LTD, visit pelgranepress.com.Music Credit:Intro Music by Jean Luc Bouchard | www.jeanlucbouchard.comSelections from Dust and Mirrors by James Semple | Find Dust & Mirrors hereOther music courtesy of Epidemic Sound

Veterans for Peace Radio Hour
Veterans for Peace with Adrienne Kinne who is just back from occupied Western Sahara

Veterans for Peace Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 59:21


Today our special guest is former VFP President Adrienne Kinney who is just back from Western Sahara. Adrienne was part of a four-person group that went to Western Sahara to break the siege of Sultana Haya who has been confined in her home for almost a year and a half by Moroccan occupiers and repressors. Adrienne discusses the situation on the ground, the nonviolent resistance of the Western Saharan people and the brutal occupation of Morocco, and the complicity or ignorance of the western world and the UN.

Eat-o-mology
Moroccan Hummus and the Cultural Appropriation of Food

Eat-o-mology

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 16:00


Hummus has become a household staple that you'll find taking up fridge space in kitchens up and down the UK, but how many of us really know its origins? Where does hummus actually come from? And at what point does culinary appreciation turn into appropriation?

The Horror Hosts
150: Episode 149 - Kandisha

The Horror Hosts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 67:52


Hey horror fans! This week on The Horror Hosts featuring Jess and Tex we talk about the 2020 French horror film Kandisha. A young woman is assaulted by her ex and calls forth a vengeful Moroccan spirt for payback. She soon realizes that the angry ghost has more bloodlust and will kill six of the males she feels closest to in life. One by one they get brutally murdered and it's up to her and two girlfriends to finally put the demon to rest. Will the French femme finally force the female  phantasm from our finite firmament? Does Tex give tornadoes the respect they deserve? Listen and find out! This episode was also live streamed at twitch.tv/commonspacegc, join us for live Q&A!

HistoryPod
22nd April 1915: Poison gas used effectively in the First World War at the Second Battle of Ypres

HistoryPod

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022


Over five thousand French Algerian, Moroccan and territorial troops died within ten minutes of the chlorine gas being ...

Maghrib in Past & Present | Podcasts
Modern Art and Architecture in Morocco in the Aftershock of the 1960 Agadir Earthquake

Maghrib in Past & Present | Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 30:49


Episode 140: Modern Art and Architecture in Morocco in the Aftershock of the 1960 Agadir Earthquake On February 29, 1960, an earthquake leveled much of the southern Moroccan coastal city of Agadir. Over the next decade, a new Agadir would be built in an avant-garde brutalist architectural style, representing a concrete example of Morocco's newly independent future. And yet, this future is haunted by the trauma and violence of the past, by way of both the earthquake as well as colonialism. The literal and figurative aftershocks of the earthquake would go on to impact, in ways that are often obscured, various facets of life all around Morocco and beyond, especially with regards to visual and material culture. This raises the questions about the entanglements of human actors with non-human forces when it comes to histories of modernism, decolonization, and nation-building.   Riad Kherdeen studies global modern art and architecture, with a focus on the region of West Asia/Middle East and North Africa (MENA). He is working on a doctoral dissertation project on modernist art and architecture in Morocco related to the Agadir earthquake of 1960 titled “Spectral Modernisms: Decolonial Aesthetics and Haunting in the Aftershock of Morocco's Agadir Earthquake (1960)." His interests fall within three main clusters of study: the first is in comparative and planetary modernisms via postcolonial studies and critical theory; the second is in the study of perception, including aesthetics, phenomenology, psychoanalytic theory, cognitive psychology, and neuroscience; and the third is in materialisms, ranging from the micro scale with technical studies of visual and material cultural production, including techniques, processes, technologies, and materials/conservation science, to the macro scale including Marxist/historical materialism, new materialism, ecocriticism, and systems theory. Riad holds a B.A. in Art History and a minor in Chemistry from New York University (2013) and an M.A. in the History of Art and Archaeology from the Institute of Fine Arts (2016). His M.A. thesis “Masdar City: Oriental City of the Twenty-First Century,” advised by Jean-Louis Cohen, looks at the urban design and architecture of Masdar City in the United Arab Emirates as a new iteration of the “Orientalized” city within a genealogy of recent urbanism in the Arab world, one that still succumbs to the imagined representations of the region created by European imperialism yet embraces those stereotypes to construct new narratives about its people and its nascent nation. Previously, Riad has held positions at the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Art Genome Project at Artsy.   This episode was recorded on November 19th, 2021 at the Tangier American Legation Institute for Moroccan Studies (TALIM).    Posted by Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

Business with Purpose
Why Shopping Small Matters | EP 294: Stephanie Edwards, Jubilee Trading Co. & Highland Ridge Decor

Business with Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 50:10


My guest this week is my dear friend Stephanie Edwards, the founder of Jubilee Trading Company, an ethical trade brand that blends traditional Moroccan leather working with modern trends to create elevated goods that elevate lives. Jubilee partners with a small group of artisans in one rural community to create opportunity and impact that ripples out to the surrounding area. Stephanie started her journey of wanting to make high quality pieces to serve her customers while being a busy mom working from home. While she did not have much control over her day while wrangling two kids under two, she did have control over what went on her walls; and when her space was serene and inspiring, her day felt that way, too. She had a deep desire for items she sold to have a bigger purpose than being beautiful and inspiring; she wanted to impact others. 6:01 – Stephanie 101 She grew up on a multi-generational farm, and she spent her summers working on the farm driving tractors. Although she was never given an allowance, she always worked and tracked her hours to get paid. Stephanie wanted to be a journalist, traveling and telling stories. But she realized it was the people on the ground making the most difference. 14:50 – Starting a business Stephanie's parents didn't have a college fund for her. They helped her start a corn maze and pumpkin patch business so she could work and pay her way through college. 22:33 – Dreaming of an artisan business She always dreamed of having an artisan business focused on sustainability. Stephanie realized she could build something for herself slowly and not lose a lot of money. 25:19 – Tedx talk Stephanie gave a Tedx talk about the power consumers have with their purchases. Small-scale businesses and entrepreneurship can really make a difference, not just the big companies.  33:02 – Biggest challenges Aside from the pandemic, the biggest challenge Stephanie has faced is working with people across the world who speak different languages. 39:38 – Going to Morocco Stephanie loves to travel, but going to Morocco to meet people she had been working with was a dream come true. 42:08 – What's on the horizon? She's launching a new summer collection, and she's working with an interior designer to fill holes in their product offerings. They're launching pillows, among other new items. 44:06 – Get to know you Guilty pleasure? Quiet time and watching Ted Lasso Business she would start? A greenhouse FEATURED QUOTES I can build something for myself and not like really lose a lot of money by making a mistake if you start slow. Now we know what stores want, because we've got some obvious best sellers. I'm excited to be really intentional and start channeling some good business mindsets. CONNECT: https://jubileetradingco.com/ Highland Ridge Decor https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f78IE59RtWk About Stephanie: Stephanie grew up on a farm in rural Estill Springs, TN. Little did she know that the entrepreneurial spirit of her family ruined her for any traditional career path. After studying Journalism and Art at the University of Tennessee, she moved to another tiny town, Leoma, TN, where she lives with her husband and two kids and runs her handmade business online. What began as a freelance graphic design business evolved into two e-commerce brands, Highland Ridge Decor and Jubilee Trading Co. As a handmade business owner, she loves advocating for conscious consumerism. Thank you to our partner of the show! Are you looking to clean up your household cleaning products this year? MamaSuds would like to help! The best way is to simply start with one product. Every time you run out of a specific cleaning product, replace it with a non-toxic one. Another tip, purchase a product that has multiple uses. The MamaSuds Collection has many multiple use products (castile soap or the toilet bombs are just a few!). Their blog has lots of great tips and a castile soap recipe that you can print and make a lot of your own effective cleaners! Give them a try at www.mamasuds.com and don't forget to use the coupon code MOLLY for 15% off your order!

VOMENA at KPFA
April 8, 2022: Samia Errazouki on Morocco's Summit with Israel

VOMENA at KPFA

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2022 58:05


In a bold and historic step backwards for the cause of peace in the Middle East last Sunday, Morocco was one of four Arab countries meeting in a special summit with Israel and the US. Although distant Iran was central to the discussions held during this meeting, the central issue of Palestine never broached during this summit, which took place in the heart of historic Palestine. Khalil spoke with Samia Errazouki, a journalist formerly based in Morocco and a PhD candidate in early modern Northwest African history at UC Davis, about Morocco's participation in this summit and what might be motivating the Moroccan regime to go against the wishes of its own people,

The afikra Podcast
OMAR BERRADA | Moroccan Film | Conversations

The afikra Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 57:26


Omar Berrada talked about his major written works on migration and racial politics.Omar Berrada is a writer and curator, and the director of Dar al-Ma'mûn, a library and artists residency in Marrakech. His work focuses on the politics of translation and intergenerational transmission. He is the author of the poetry collection Clonal Hum (2020), and the editor or co-editor of several books, including The Africans, a volume on racial dynamics in North Africa (2016), and La Septième Porte, Ahmed Bouanani's posthumous history of Moroccan cinema (2020). His writing was published in numerous exhibition catalogs, magazines and anthologies, including Frieze, Bidoun, Asymptote, The University of California Book of North African Literature, and Poetic Justice: An Anthology of Contemporary Moroccan Poetry. Currently living in New York, he teaches at The Cooper Union where he co-organizes the IDS Lecture Series.Created & hosted by Mikey Muhanna, afikra Edited by: Ramzi RammanTheme music by: Tarek Yamani https://www.instagram.com/tarek_yamani/About the afikra Conversations:Our long-form interview series features academics, arts, ‎and media experts who are helping document and/or shape the history and culture of the Arab world through their ‎work. Our hope is that by having the guest share their expertise and story, the community still walks away with newfound curiosity - and maybe some good recommendations about new nerdy rabbit holes to dive into headfirst. ‎Following the interview, there is a moderated town-hall-style Q&A with questions coming from the live virtual audience ‎on Zoom.‎ Join the live audience: https://www.afikra.com/rsvp   FollowYoutube - Instagram (@afikra_) - Facebook - Twitter Support www.afikra.com/supportAbout afikra:‎afikra is a movement to convert passive interest in the Arab world to active intellectual curiosity. We aim to collectively reframe the dominant narrative of the region by exploring the histories and cultures of the region- past, present, and future - through conversations driven by curiosity. Read more about us on  afikra.com

The Climate Daily
Morocco's Regional Coastal Scheme, Morocco's Renewable Energy Goals, Transforming Moroccan Deserts into Gardens of Eden, Renaissance Fiber's Green Cleaning Process

The Climate Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 7:53


Morocco's Regional Coastal Scheme, plus Morocco's renewable energy goals. Transforming Moroccan deserts into gardens of Eden, and Renaissance Fiber's green cleaning process.

Maghrib in Past & Present | Podcasts
From Palestine to North Africa and Back: Transnational Solidarity in the Arts in the 1970s

Maghrib in Past & Present | Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 47:31


Episode 139: From Palestine to North Africa and Back: Transnational Solidarity in the Arts in the 1970s The International Art Exhibition for Palestine opened in Beirut in 1978 with nearly 200 artists from 30 countries. For over a decade, Rasha Salti and Kristine Khouri led a research project to uncover the history of this and other art collections/museums built in solidarity with political causes, and map networks of artists, intellectuals and activists that extended from these projects. The Moroccan chapter revealed links and practices from publications like Souffles, to proximity of the PLO's office to writers and artists, and the work and interventions by artists bringing work to public space and out of the galleries.  Kristine Khouri is a researcher whose background is in Arab cultural history and art history. Her interests began in the history of arts circulation, exhibition and infrastructure in the Middle East and North Africa as well as archives, practices in and with them, and knowledge dissemination. In the past few years, she has been focused on critical engagement with digital archives, and issues that emerge from them including rights, access, and language. She co-led, with Rasha Salti, the Past Disquiet research project unearthing the histories of exhibitions and museums in exile, and transnational solidarity in the arts in the 1970s. Kristine is currently a board member of the Arab Image Foundation in Beirut. This episode is part of the Modern Art in the Maghrib series, and was recorded on March 3, 2022, via Zoom.  This is part of a larger Council of American Overseas Research Centers program organized by the Centre d'Études Maghrébines à Tunis (CEMAT) and financed by the Andrew Mellon Foundation that seeks to collaborate with local institutions for a greater awareness of art historical research in North Africa. We thank the duo Ÿuma for use of their song, "Smek", from their album Chura for the introduction and conclusion of this podcast.   Posted by: Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).  

Magen Avot Halacha  & Parasha by Rabbi Lebhar
Why are matzot round and do Moroccans eat “gebrochts”?

Magen Avot Halacha & Parasha by Rabbi Lebhar

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 6:03


holidays moroccan daily halacha
Finding Your Summit
EP 242: Fouzia Madhouni: Launching football in Morocco and overcoming cancer to make a difference..

Finding Your Summit

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 23:57


Fouzia Madhourni Podcast In today's episode of the ‘Finding your Summit' podcast, host Mark Pattison, former NFL Player, Entrepreneur, Philanthropist, and Mountaineer who has climbed the Seven Summits, talks with guest, Fouzia Madhouni, American Football Player and Founder of ‘We can Morocco'. She is the first Moroccan being invited to the Super Bowl by the NFL. Fouzia shares her journey of playing football from being in a male-dominated country, and how she battled poverty, gender discrimination, and breast cancer while finding a new way. 

The Shmooze, The Yiddish Book Center's Podcast
Episode 0325: The Corset Maker by Annette Libeskind Berkovits

The Shmooze, The Yiddish Book Center's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 21:57


Annette Libeskind Berkovits visited with "The Shmooze" to talk about her latest book, "The Corset Maker." The novel tells the story of a Parisian count, a Moroccan arms smuggler, and an orphaned Spanish boy who test the convictions and tug at the heart of Rifka Berg, a young Jewish corsetiere from Warsaw. "The Corset Maker" is inspired by Annette Libeskind Berkovits' mother and her close friends, all women of immense courage and integrity. Rifka's personal struggles and dilemmas go to the heart of the major ethical issues and challenges of our times. Episode 325 April 10, 2022 Amherst, MA

Eat & Drink
This little Lamb went to market...

Eat & Drink

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 56:35


This little Lamb went to market...On today's episode Ali Hassan and Marco Timpano celebrate the religious fasts during Lent and Ramadan. This leads to many different wonderful conversations of the different foods that are associated with each religious celebration. The breaking of the the fasts as well as the celebration of Lamb, including what wine pairs best with various lamb dishes. Hold onto your hats and enjoy this episode. A Sneak-Peek:[00:30] Marco give Ali a compliment for his work on Canada Reads.[3:00] Marco continues the praise for Ali with his podcast Doctor vs Comedian. [9:00] Fasting for Lent and what Lent is all about.[13:20] Turkey is a thankless beast.[28:00] Ali describes some great food items to break his Ramadan fast with.[34:10] Zeppole di San Giuseppe and the importance of March 19th and how it relates to this sweet treat and Easter.[36:00] It gets fishy as Marco talks about Good Friday. [38:00] The Sad tale of the Italian Chocolate Easter Egg.[43:07] Ali explains Eid.[47:04] Marco explains Fichi di India[48:00] Lamb hits the plate and we talk about the wine to pair with it:PINOT NOIRperfect for delicate lamb dishes likerack of lamb,RIOJA Perfect for lamb schnitzel and cutlets CHIANTIPerfect for fattier cuts of lamblamb with garlic and rosemary BORDEAUXPerfect for lamb served simply with garlic.Lancashire hotpot.GRENACHE &SYRAHPerfect for robust lamb dishes braised lamb shanks,Moroccan tagineslamb curries.Resource Links: Canada ReadsDoctor vs Comedian Connect with us on:Twitter: @podisdelciousInstagram: This Podcast is DeliciousWeb: thispodcastisdelicious See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Culture and Leadership Connections  Podcast
Julien Lefort – At Home In Many Places

Culture and Leadership Connections Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 45:40


Bio for Julien LefortJulien Lefort is a diversity, inclusion, and resilience-focused business coach. He now focuses on teaching businesses how sustainability and resilience have direct ties to diversity and inclusion.Episode highlightAs a Frenchman, Julien Lefort grew up with the influence of many cultures, learning about diversity and inclusion from a young age. Listen in on how he developed resilience by embracing the differences in the people around him.LinksEmail: spencer@outlieraudio.comWebsite: https://wearefutureminds.comLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/julienl/Instagram: @wearefuturemindsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/wearefuturemindsQuotes“For me, home is where I am because I can make it home.” “When we look at the things around us, we want to feel like we are in control of our lives and we are in control of the circumstances but we can't always be.”“Resilience, for me, is the ability to prepare for and deal with and bounce back from challenges, stressors, anything that may happen to us.” TakeawaysChildhood IncidentsWith three brothers and sisters, Julien always considered himself to be “the shy and timid child” of his family, but was always told by others that he is an extrovert. Influential Groups Julien credits his Senegalese stepfather with expanding his knowledge and helping him develop better connections across cultures, which helps him in his work today.As a child, Julien observed both religious and non-religious members of his family, and was free to pick his inclination.Julien claims that the coaching community has helped him both personally and professionally. Temperament and Personality InfluencesJulien was born with an “analytical and logical mind.” He has grown into developing the creative and innovative side of his personality. Cultural EpiphaniesJulien was livid when he read in an in-flight magazine on Lufthansa that a German director thought France did not have good bakeries! He assumed one of his Moroccan friends to be comfortable with the French custom of a greeting kiss, but she was not. Advice to an Employer For Julien, the most important aspect of a working relationship is being open. He also works to create a trusting space where people can communicate and grow. More Great Insights! Julien highlights that there are some simple things to do to become resilient: connecting better with others, learning more about other cultures, and the differences amongst the people we come across.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/cultureandleadershipconnections)

Africa News Tonight  - Voice of America
Africa News Tonight: Sudanese Welcome ICC Trial of Ali Kushayb, Zambia, and Rwanda sign Economy Boost Deal, Ramadan Celebrations Continue - April 05, 2022

Africa News Tonight - Voice of America

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 24:59


Coming up on Africa News Tonight: •Sudanese Internally Displaced Persons living in the Darfur region welcome the trial of Ali Kushayb at the International Criminal Court in the Hague, describing it as a positive move towards achieving justice for loved ones who lost life due to the Darfur conflict. •Zambia and Rwanda approve seven Memorandums of Understanding which could potentially boost economic ties between the Southern African nation and the East African nation. •Moroccans who traditionally host family gatherings and large set togethers during Ramadan speak to VOA about the importance of the holiday. For this and more, stay tune to Africa News Tonight!

Cosmopod
Western Sahara: Colonialism, Settler-Colonialism and Resistance with Garazi Hach Embarek

Cosmopod

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 67:28


The Spanish government has just sided with the Moroccan government on the issue of the Western Sahara. Djamil and Rudy join Garazi Hach Embarek for an introductory discussion on the history and present of the Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic of the Western Sahara. We discuss the pre-colonial and Spanish colonial history, the context and formation of the Polisario Front liberation organization. We follow up by talking about the liberation wars against Morocco and Mauritania, the place of the Polisario in the national liberation movement, as well as the occupation and repression of the Western Sahara, and the situation of the refugee camps in western Algeria. We continue by speaking on the ongoing process to colonize and settle the Western Sahara by Morocco and the role of the UN, the African Union, as well as Algeria and Libya in the situation. We finish by analyzing the present situation, Trump's declaration in 2020 to support Moroccan colonization as quid pro quo for Moroccan recognition of Israel, as well as the Spanish governments flip from “neutrality” to a blatantly Moroccan position.

Historias
Gibraltar: A Modern Borderland

Historias

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 51:04


Sasha D. Pack, a professor of history at SUNY Buffalo and author of the recent book The Deepest Border: The Strait of Gibraltar and the Making of the Modern Hispano-African Borderland, traces the rise and fall of the Gibraltar borderland through examining some of the colorful characters and political intrigues that defined it. After getting a sense of the complicated political status of the region, we discuss tourism in the international city of Tangier and look at some examples of “slipstream potentates,” from a Moroccan bandit to a Spanish gangster.

HistoryPod
31st March 1905: Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany lands in Morocco where his speech prompts the First Moroccan Crisis

HistoryPod

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022


The Kaiser's speech in Tangier was a direct challenge to the French Foreign Minister, Théophile Delcassé, who had previously secured wide European support for control of ...

OFF THE CUFF PODCAST
FRESH SLAPS OF BEL AIR ft ASH CATCHH

OFF THE CUFF PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 138:20


A good honest conversation never hurt anyone, Fols Forever & Mr Vans are back for Episode 336 of ‘Off The Cuff Podcast'. This week they're joined by Ash Barba aka Chaashh from TopBoy (the Moroccan plug) Chrissy also chimes in!!! On the agenda this week….. - Urban foxes are getting to brave - Vans is back - Will Smith at the Oscars - Male contraceptive pill is here!!!! - Getting into acting / Ash in TopBoy - JA removing Queen as head of state - NEW MUSIC - WE'RE HAVING A PARTY 14/4/2021 - https://link.dice.fm/4D3moRafjob Please make sure you like, comment & SUBSCRIBE to the YouTube channel - https://youtube.com/channel/UCrpoaVInsRWJUGGHlehMpaw Twitter/Instagram - @offthecuffpod Fols - @folsforever Vans - @mrvans7 Ash - @ash.catchh Chrissy - @ceecce_noir

On The Scent
Episode 44 - Our Favourite Fragranced Products

On The Scent

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 44:51


Following on from our evocative scent memories episode, today we're indulging in some of our favourite fragranced products that aren't perfumes, but which we love to slather on and surround ourselves with whenever we can!Suzy's List:@letpetitmarseillais Le Petit Marseillais Extra Gentle Orange Blossom Organic Shower Cream@escentric_molecules Escentric Molecules Escentric 05 Body Wash@rogergallet Roger & Gallet Cédrat Shower Gel@aromatherapyassociates Aromatherapy Associates Deep Relax / Forest Bath & Shower Oils@modernbotany Modern Botany Deodorant@fredericmalle Frédéric Malle Portrait of a Lady Body Butter@urbanveda Urban Veda Rose + Botanics Reviving Body Lotion@officine_universelle_buly Officine Universelle Buly 1803 Huile Antique Damask Rose Dry Body Oil@e11even_fragrance e11even Multi Use Fragrance Oil@sarahchapmanlondon Sarah Chapman Overnight Facial Skin Elixir@huskandseedskincareuk Husk & Seed Overnight Replenishing Oil@penhaligons_london Penhaligon's Luna Soap@loccitane_uk_ire L'Occitane Shea Butter Hand Cream@method_uk Method All-Purpose Anti Bacterial Cleaner in Wild Rhubarb @fabulosa_cleaning Fabulosa Multi-Purpose Anti Bacterial Spray Wild Rhubarb Stone's Beeswax Furniture Cream Nicola's List:@emmahardieskincare moringa balm@nivea_uk creme moisturiser@eucerin_uk age spot correcting hand cream@thisworks stress check hand shield@aromatherapyassociates revive@loccitane_uk_ire.shea butter hand cream@loccitane_uk_ire almond shower oil@renkincare Moroccan rose Otto body oil@aurelia firm and revitalise dry body oil

Musical Theatre Radio presents
Be Our Guest with David Serero (The Ten Commandments: the Musical)

Musical Theatre Radio presents "Be Our Guest"

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 27, 2022 34:29


David Serero is a critically acclaimed and awards-winner opera singer, actor, director, and producer. He has performed more than 2,500 performances in more than 45 countries, directed and produced nearly 100 theatrical productions, starred in over 100 films and TV series, recorded and produced over 100 albums and, played more than 50 lead and title roles (in several languages) from the opera, theatre, and musical repertoire. In New York, he starred Off-Broadway in iconic roles such as Shylock, Cyrano, Othello, Barabas, Yiddish King Lear, Don Giovanni, Figaro, Romeo, Nabucco, as well as new works such as Napoleon by Kubrick, Queen Esther, Anne Frank a Musical, among others. In his native Paris, he also starred as Don Quixote (Man of La Mancha) and Happy Mac (Beggar's Holiday by Duke Ellington). He entered the prestigious Who's Who America for demonstrating outstanding achievements in the entertainment world and for the betterment of contemporary society. In 2019, he received the Albert Nelson Marquis Lifetime Achievement Award, the Morocco Day Distinguished Achievement Award, the Trophy of the Culture of Morocco, and was named among the fifteen most influential Moroccans worldwide by Morocco's airline Royal Air Maroc. David is a member of the Recording Academy and the Television Academy and a voting member of both the Grammys and Emmys. In 2020, David Serero received the UNESCO Award for Diversity in Paris and became an Honorary Member of the United Nations of Arts and Science. In 2021, he won 4 BroadwayWorld Awards for Best Performer of the decade, Best Producer of a Musical of the decade, Best Producer of a Play of the decade, Best Opera singer of the Year. He was awarded the Certificate of Recognition by the Mayor of New York, Bill de Blasio, for his contribution to the City's dynamic cultural landscape, enriching the vibrant performing arts sector, and uplifted and inspired diverse New Yorkers. www.davidserero.com www.thetencommandmentsthemusical.com

RNZ: Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan
One-Pan Herby Moroccan Chicken with Agrias & Garlic Yoghurt

RNZ: Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2022 8:39


Food stylist and chef Gretchen Lowe shares a recipe for a simple meal that's big on flavours and kind on whoever has to do the washing up. It's a tangy, rich and herbaceous chicken dish baked on a single oven tray and topped with savoury yoghurt.

Middle East Centre
The Global Merchants: The Enterprise and Extravagance of the Sassoon Dynasty

Middle East Centre

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2022 69:57


Professor Joseph Sassoon in conversation with Dr Michael Willis about his recent book, The Global Merchants: The Enterprise and Extravagance of the Sassoon Dynasty (Allen Lane, Penguin Group, 2022). Emeritus Professor Avi Shlaim joins them. Abstract: The influential merchants of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries shaped the globalization of today. The Sassoons, a Baghdadi-Jewish trading family, built a global trading enterprise by taking advantage of major historical developments during the nineteenth century. Their story is not just one of an Arab Jewish family that settled in India, traded in China, and aspired to be British. It also presents an extraordinary vista into the world in which they lived and prospered economically, politically, and socially. The Global Merchants is not only about their rise, but also about their decline: why it happened, how political and economic changes after the First World War adversely affected them, and finally, how realizing their aspirations to reach the upper echelons of British society led to their disengagement from business and prevented them from adapting to the new economic and political world order. Professor Joseph Sassoon is Director of the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies and Professor of History and Political Economy at Georgetown University. He holds the al-Sabah Chair in Politics and Political Economy of the Arab World. He is also a Senior Associate Member at St Antony's College, Oxford. In 2013, his book Saddam Hussein's Ba‘th Party: Inside an Authoritarian Regime (Cambridge University Press, 2012) won the prestigious British-Kuwait Prize for the best book on the Middle East. Professor Sassoon completed his Ph.D at St Antony's College, Oxford. He has published extensively on Iraq and its economy and on the Middle East. The Global Merchants is his fifth book. Professor Avi Shlaim is Emeritus Fellow of St Antony's College and a former Professor of International Relations at the University of Oxford. He was elected Fellow of the British Academy in 2006. His main research interest is the Arab-Israeli conflict. He is author of Collusion across the Jordan: King Abdullah, the Zionist Movement, and the Partition of Palestine (1988); The Politics of Partition (1990 and 1998); War and Peace in the Middle East: A Concise History (1995); The Iron Wall: Israel and the Arab World (2000, second edition 2014); Lion of Jordan: King Hussein's Life in War and Peace (2007); and Israel and Palestine: Reappraisals, Revisions, Refutations (2009). He is co-editor of The Cold War and the Middle East (1997); The War for Palestine: Rewriting the History of 1948 (2001, second edition 2007); and The 1967 Arab-Israeli War: Origins and Consequences (2012). Professor Shlaim is a frequent contributor to the newspapers and commentator on radio and television on Middle Eastern affairs. Dr Michael Willis is Director of the Middle East Centre at St Antony's College, University of Oxford and King Mohammed VI Fellow in Moroccan and Mediterranean Studies. His research interests focus on the politics, modern history and international relations of the central Maghreb states (Algeria, Tunisia and Morocco). He is the author of Politics and Power in the Maghreb: Algeria, Tunisia and Morocco from Independence to the Arab Spring (Hurst and Oxford University Press, 2012) and The Islamist Challenge in Algeria: A Political History (Ithaca and New York University Press, 1997) and co-editor of Civil Resistance in the Arab Spring: Triumphs and Disasters (Oxford University Press, 2015).

Cookbook Club
17: It's All Easy

Cookbook Club

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 28:49


Do we really need a recipe for avocado toast? Not really. This book is an easy weeknight cookbook (mostly!) but we aren't sure about GP's no-recipe recipes (should they even be in a cookbook?!) and general diet culture and cultural appropriation. Sara finds some gems anyway, and Renee is rushing it back to the library! Resources mentioned in this episode: Gwyneth Paltrow Thea Bauman It's All Easy It's All Good goop Recipes mentioned in this episode: Avocado toast (page 45) Blueberry granola parfait (page 4) Açai bowl (page 2) Thai curry noodle pot (page 35) Chai tea (page 54) Matcha tea (page 60) Turkey meat loaf (page 124) Tikka masala roast chicken (page 165) Indian creamed spinach (page 103) Roasted cauliflower with curry and lime (page 117) Moroccan chicken salad wrap (page 32) Miso ramen (page 113) Asian-steamed halibut with scallions and bok choy (page 186) Black bean soup (page 64) Carbonara (page 66) Grilled cheese and easy tomato soup (page 71) Chocolate mousse (page 227) Join our Cookbook Club! Our Instagram, @cookbookclubshow E-mail us: cookbookclubshow@gmail.com Find Renee and Sara on Instagram: @hipchickdigs and @realtor_saragray Cook along with us! Next cookbook episode (releasing 4/20/2022): Salt Fat Acid Heat, by Samin Nosrat

Modern Persian Food
Preserving Culture Through Food and Music with Nadia Deljou

Modern Persian Food

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 27:16


An inspiring conversation with Chef Nadia Deljou of Delle Dining on preserving culture through the sounds, smells, and tastes of Persian food and music.    Background - raised in an Iranian-American family with a father being of Jewish faith.  Family and extended family were involved in art, creation, and food with family at the foreground of everyting.  Nadia has been able to identify with her culture in a multi-faceted way.   Nadia's approach and mission:  To develop greater meaning for self (feeling empowered by culture, confident, and dominant - “wearing my Iranian-ness as loud as I can”), and then package it and expose it to the world in both a traditional and non-traditional way.   Deljou - interpretation and meaning of Nadia's chosen family name (chosen by father's side of the family):  someone who is always in search of the goodness in others The Farsi word “Del” - an extension of who she is;  two references - the heart and the stomach, heart, stomach, and soul   Nadia also has a background in music!  With concentration in independent music   The cross-over and communality among cultures Persian and Moroccan food culture, specifically with spices Hospitality and offering food in the home and for guests How one cooks and eats   Food etiquette (like a dance) Integrating fresh herbs as an integral part of the eating experience - fresh, cooked, and/or fried   Nadia is involved in many facets of integrated Persian cuisine and culture: Private dining Cooking classes Store:  pastries, breads, scented candles, apparel (shirts, aprons, hats)   Dining events - pairing food with music for an overall immersive experience “Food is so much more than food”   Nadia's candles - a tangible product that evokes place, culture and flavor through scent.  An interactive quality including aroma (taste/smell) and music to create a mood and feeling       At Mamani & Baba's: smoky citrus + earthy cedar-wood:  “Limoo Amani” (Persian dried lime), a powerful flavor which Nadia loves - each candle comes with a recipe (ghormeh sabzi) and a song pairing (referenced in podcast) for a global experience. Stay For Chai: soothing jasmine + bright bergamot - the aroma that brings people together Poetry & Perfume: warm vanilla + sweet rose - royalty and sweet comfort Black peppercorns and rose petals paired with akbar mashti, Persian ice cream, rose water, cardamom, saffron   The intuition of cooking - “Cooking is primitive and so much easier than what people think” Using fire at the end of the day is very primitive   Where to find Nadia Website:  Delle Instagram handle:  @delledining   All Modern Persian Food episodes can be found at: Episodes Co-host Beata Nazem Kelley blog: BeatsEats – Persian Girl Desperately Addicted to Food! Co-host Bita Arabian blog: Oven Hug - Healthy Persian Recipes | Modern Persian Recipes Podcast production by Alvarez Audio

The Storied Recipe
All About Baking Science with Author Dikla Frances

The Storied Recipe

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 41:02


episode 120 All About Baking Science with Author & Food Scientist Dikla Frances Introduction I have been eagerly anticipating this episode for well over a year now!!! I'm here with Dikla Frances, whom many of you already know as Dee of One Sarcastic Baker, and her first book Baking Science: Foolproof Formulas to Create the Best Cakes, Pies, Cookies, Breads and More is coming out very, very soon - April 5th, in fact!!! I've already pre-ordered 3 myself!! Here's why I'm so excited about this episode - first, Dee has been a true friend to me over the last few years, helping me from the very beginning. (See her first episode, Jewish Flavors, The World's Flavors about her family's Iranian, Moroccan, and Greek heritage, her immigration from Israel to the US, and the beginning of her food science/baking journey) . So, on a personal level I am *thrilled* to celebrate her huge, huge accomplishment today. But beyond that, I have been waiting for her book Baking Science because..... I want to be a better baker!! I don't feel I understand baking - and I know *this* book, which covers over 40 baking concepts (!!) is the one to teach me. Dee is incredibly well qualified to write this book! She first started taking baking sciences when she immigrated to the US in 2008. In 2013, she took a food science class from Harvard that she admits she had to study over and over and over again before she absorbed all the information. Now, in this accessible, clearly-written book titled Baking Science, Dee acts as a translator from the science world to the baking world. She tells us why it's even MORE important for home bakers to be scientists than commercial bakers and teaches us how to take the frustration *out* of home baking and to replace it with curiosity!!! Welcome, welcome, welcome, Dee - I am SO proud of you - and welcome to you, listeners!!! Thanks for being here!  Highlights Why Dee wrote the bookWhy understanding baking science is more important for the home bakerBaking is learnable/teachable!When Dee started taking Baking Science classes (2008!)“I started getting compliments on my baking and I felt like a cheater”“We start from a place of love, passion, self-expression, and therapy…. We just want to bake.”How she verified every single scientific principle!When Dee's camera broke after she photographer her first of 40 recipes!!The biggest lesson Dee learned in writing the book Listen Now Also listen on: APPLE GOOGLE SPOTIFY EMAIL How To Contact Dee Facebook: One Sarcastic BakerTwitter: @DiklaFrancesInstagram: @onesarcasticbakerPinterest: @onesarcasticbakerBuy her book on Amazon: Baking ScienceHer website: onesarcasticbaker.com This Episode's Storied Recipe Recipe from Dikla Frances, Author & Food Scientist Dee's Bakery Style Challah Bread Challah, a traditional Jewish bread, is baked every weekend and braided in a fancy way to welcome the beloved Shabbat (Saturday). Dee grew up in Israel and has many memories of this bread. It is soft, sweet, fluffy, and crumbly. It's great for French Toast, sandwiches, or just as is. Recipe from Baking ScienceDee's First Book Almond & Chocolate Swirl Cake This Almond Cake recipe from scratch is delicious, easy and the best homemade almond recipe I can think of. The cake is tender, moist, and beautifully decorated with an interior of dark chocolate veins. If you love almonds and almond flavor, then this simple almond cake is for you. Pin This Episode Related Episodes Bonus Episode: Dee's Baking Tips for BeginnersJewish Flavors, The World's Flavors with Dee FrancisAll About PassoverHamantaschen for...

Animation Industry Podcast
Episode 153: 3D Character Animator Ayoub Moulakhnif On Building His Career In Morocco

Animation Industry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 57:55


Check out the Hello Stop Mo Podcast: https://animationwildcard.com/hellostopmo This episode features Moroccan self-taught 3D animator, Ayoub Moulakhnif who teaches at AnimSchool and works as a character animator at Axis Studios. In their chat Moulakhnif shares what the animation industry is like in Morocco, including what opportunities exist, how to find determination to pursue your dreams even when they seem impossible, and how he ended up going from student to teacher at AnimSchool (plus everything you wanted to know about that program). You'll also learn: *How to train as an animator in Morocco *3 tips to increase your artistic self-discipline *What Moulakhnif did to get ahead of his class and become a teacher himself Social Links: *Follow Moulakhnif on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AyoubMoulakhnif *Connect with Moulaknif on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ayoubmoulakhnif

What the Riff?!?
1967 - February: Cream "Fresh Cream"

What the Riff?!?

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2022 32:40


British rock supergroup Cream debuted their first studio album entitled Fresh Cream in January 1967 in the United States, following the December 1966 British release.  Eric Clapton was on guitar and vocals, Jack Bruce was on bass, harmonica, piano, and vocals, and Ginger Baker was on percussion and vocals.  Clapton had come out of the Yardbirds, and both Baker and Bruce had been in the Graham Bond Organisation together.  Ginger Baker approached Clapton about joining a new band, and Clapton agreed with the condition that Bruce be used as the bassist.  Baker and Bruce had a tumultuous relationship, with Baker at one point threatening Bruce at knifepoint.  However, the two patched things up for the sake of the new group.The result of the collaboration was a success from the beginning.  Fresh Cream consisted of a mix of original compositions and blues covers, with Jack Bruce writing many of the original songs.  The band would cross rock, blues, and psychedelic genres.Cream would produce four studio albums before internal tensions would break up the band.Brian Dickhute takes us on our journey into this supergroup, and fan of the show Joe Davis joins us while Wayne is away. N.S.U.The starting track to the album was written by Jack Bruce, and gets its name from the medical condition "non-specific urethritis," a type of venereal disease.  Supposedly Eric Clapton was suffering from N.S.U. at the time the song was written, and Bruce was poking a little fun at him. Sweet Wine This is a deeper cut that encourages folks to slow down and enjoy life.  "Sweet wine, hay making, sunshine day breaking, we can wait till tomorrow."Rollin' and Tumblin' This fast blues number highlights Eric Clapton's guitar virtuosity.  The song was originally performed by Hambone Willie Newbern in 1929 in Atlanta, Georgia.  It was originally called "Roll and Tumble Blues."  Cream's version is largely based on a version performed by Muddy Waters.I'm So Glad This song is the most recognizable hit from the album, and continues to be played today.  Skip James originally recorded this in 1931, and the band made sure to give James credit for his work.   ENTERTAINMENT TRACK:It's Been Nice (from the television film "Jack and the Beanstalk") This mixed live action and animated film starring Gene Kelly was broadcast on NBC in February of 1967. STAFF PICKS:98.6 by KeithBruce kicks off the staff picks with a celebration of the joys of love.  Barry James Keefer was called Keif when he was in a group called The Admirations, but changed to Keith to avoid having a name that sounded like the Moroccan word for cannabis.  This song his number 7 on the Billboard chart. You Got to Me  by Neil DiamondRob brings us an early hit from Diamond's second studio album.  Diamond has sold more than 100 million records, and is one of the best selling musicians of all time.  Neil Diamond had ten number 1 singles.  He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of fame in 2011.Ruby Tuesday by the Rolling StonesJoe Davis' staff pick is a softer song from the Rolling Stones, and their fourth #1 hit in the United States.  It was supposedly written about one of Keith Richard's ex-girlfriends.  "Goodbye, Ruby Tuesday.  Who could hang a name on you?  When you change with every new day.  Still, I'm gonna miss you."Words of Love by The Mamas and The PapasBrian closes out the staff picks with a little honkytonk cabaret number sung by Mama Cass.  This song helped put The Mamas and The Papas back on the charts, and encourages boys to demonstrate love, not rely on words of love to win a girl's heart.   COMEDY TRACK:Wild Thing by Senator BobbyThis novelty song channels the distinct accent of Bobby Kennedy into the garage band hit by the Zombies for comedic effect.

Vox Pop
Food Friday 3/11/22: Aneesa Waheed of Tara Kitchen

Vox Pop

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2022 49:03


We welcome back Food Friday favorite Aneesa Waheed of Tara Kitchen. A world traveler, chef and entrepreneur, Aneesa Waheed is an expert in Moroccan cooking and can tell you about spices and flavors from all over the world. The number to call is 800-348-2551. Ray Graf hosts.

Afropop Worldwide
Afropop Women Of Note

Afropop Worldwide

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2022 59:00


In celebration of Women's Month, DJ Kix returns by taking us on a musical journey across Africa, showcasing some of the continent's formidable women who are quickly rising in the industry and making their presence known. In this episode we'll hear from: top Namibian MC, Lioness; Zimbabwean Afro-fusion artist, Gemma Griffiths; as well as Kaleo Sansaa from Zambia with her “sun-drunk” sounds and “solar-based” hip-hop; alongside Hibotep's experimental East African electro vibes and Rhita Nattah's Aissaoua-influenced Moroccan tunes. We're delving deep into what it's like being a woman in the ever-evolving and fast-paced contemporary African music scene. All this plus an incredible playlist of music by women who are breaking the mold in their own way, and inspiring all. APWW #852 Produced by Christine 'DJ Kix' Mwaturura

Spice Bags
S3 Ep10: Exploring Moroccan Cuisine with Chef Aziz Krouch

Spice Bags

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 61:43


Aziz Krouch has been a chef in La Mamounia in Marrakesh (recently featured in Netflix's show Inventing Anna), La Medina in New York, and now he is the head chef of Marrakesh By Mindo on Capel Street in Dublin. As a child, he harvested cumin and made warqa pastry with his grandmother in the Atlas mountains. He has worked in Paris and has a pash for boeuf bourguignon.  From shopping in souks, tagines, and bisteeya, to almond ghriba and honey chebakia pastries at Ramadan, Aziz takes us through a tour of his rich and storied life and his understanding of Moroccan food. Why are certain fruits paired with certain meats? Why is the number 7 considered lucky in Morocco and how does that figure into the seven spices of ras el-hanout and the vegetables of couscous? How do dishes differ if they are from Tangier, Fez, or Casablanca? We chat about chefs like Spanish-born Najat Kaanache and Moha Fedal, who are reviving the best way to cook Moroccan, which is long and slow.  Also, we talk about tea, a staple in Morocco, and which, according to Aziz, just like Moroccan food, requires patience. Mentioned in this episode: Marrakesh by Mindo https://www.marrakesh.ie/ La Mamounia https://mamounia.com/en/ Chebakia pastry https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chebakia Najat Kannache https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Najat_Kaanache Moha Fedal: https://darmoha.ma/index.php/en/chef-moha.html