Podcasts about decolonizing

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Process of leaving colonial rule, mostly occurring during the 20th century

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Best podcasts about decolonizing

Latest podcast episodes about decolonizing

Mindful Businesses
Amor Perfecto - Decolonizing Colombian Coffee

Mindful Businesses

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 50:19


In this episode, we have Luis Fernando Velez founder of Amor Perfecto with whom our host Vidhya Iyer talks about their common love for a good cup of coffee - with its perfect aroma and complex flavors. Luis shares what is entailed in producing a rich and fragrant coffee. It starts from the coffee cherry picked at the exact ripeness using high-tech refractometers to find the optimal ripeness to pick each variety of dark red for one to purple for another. At Amor Perfecto each bean is hand-picked, unlike some other brands who prefer strip harvesting by machine, an efficient, affordable, but indiscriminate practice. The beans are then expertly processed and most importantly roasted close to where they are picked. For over 200 years Colombia has been exporting green coffee beans to be roasted in consuming countries all over the world. In fact, it was illegal to roast quality coffee in Colombia until 2003. The government and the growers had been convinced that the consuming countries knew better than them how to perfectly roast coffee, robbing Colombians of additional revenues by adding value to their crop. Amor Perfecto fought to change the law and volunteered as guinea pigs to show lawmakers that their signature crop was not just for export. Grab a cup of coffee and tune in to listen to Luis' fascinating stories. https://amorperfecto.com/https://www.mindfulbusinessespodcast.com/ 

Decolonizing Sexuality
S1 EP 11: Decolonizing Sexuality Book Discussion Series #1, w/ Ben Mattson

Decolonizing Sexuality

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 55:40


Today we're getting a sneak peek at what's in the Decolonizing Sexuality book, which was written a year ago and is now--as predicted--being returned to for editing as I get in a cozy writing mood, now that North America is experiencing Winter. Atlas has a laid-back, informal and insightful conversation with phenomenal philosopher, mental health researcher and dear friend, Ben Mattson. --Our guest list for 2021 is now over! --Next month's podcast episode is our ANNIVERSARY EPISODE (!), in which I'm very much looking forward to opening up about how this all began, and how the ups and downs of my psychosexual development led me here! --We start with a new guest list in 2022! I'm currently working on building that guest list, so there are other series that are coming up in the meantime. --I'm hoping to add a Kink & Mental Health series in the future, which you'll get a taste of today in this episode :) --Got any burning questions about sexuality? A lot of people have questions about sexuality that they're afraid to ask their friends and loved ones out of fear of judgment. In the future, there will be a link where you can anonymously AMA (Ask Me Anything) about sexuality, I will answer them and put them on the podcast if I think they'd be helpful for others to hear and learn from (with your permission, of course)! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/decolonizingsexuality/message

Video Games Are The Worst Thing On Earth
The Bobonomicon (Part 2) - Decolonizing The Brainland

Video Games Are The Worst Thing On Earth

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 63:59


The book calls to you, horrified but unable to turn away you continue to turn its fetid pages, each one revealing glimpses of unnameable horrors. The JFK Assassination, 9/11, A movie about super mario brothers 3... Soon your mind and the book will be one and the same. Soon you will join us in the brainland. A podcast that reveals the truth about video games that those other video game podcasts don't want you to know. Co-hosts: Alton, Kay and Reese Intro music: Video Games by Envyneslies Envyneslies Outro music: Supermarioland (feat. M.C. Mario) (Radio Version) – Ambassadors of Funk Thank you to Angelvila for the logo! Patreon: https://patreon.com/vgatwtoe Main Account: https://twitter.com/vgatwtoe Reese: https://twitter.com/yourverygoodbud ALTON: https://twitter.com/8ALTON8 Kay: https://twitter.com/kayandskittles Find out more at https://videogamesaretheworst.pinecast.co

What's the F***ing Point?
Jill Dunkley on Being in Right Relationship with the World Inside & Outside

What's the F***ing Point?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 72:18


I am not a naturally “calm” person, and it's not often that I meet someone who instantly makes me feel calm in their presence. But when I met Jill Dunkley in 2019, that's absolutely how I felt.Jill is grounded, real, warm, kind, smart, and wise, and I'm grateful to call her a friend.In this conversation, Jill and I explore:what it means to be in right relationship both inside and outside ourselveshow trauma-informed practices and ecopsychology can support us in developing those capacitiesthe relationship between our individual healing and our commitments to the work of decolonizingLearn more about Jill's current and upcoming offerings on her website here.About Jill Dunkley (she/her)Jill Dunkley lives on unceded Algonquin Land in rural Eastern Ontario with her husband, ecopsychologist, Andy Fisher.  For most of her adult life she has explored the question “what does it mean to be in right relationship with the world inside of me and the world outside of me?”  Now in late adulthood, she currently lives with that question at the intersection of trauma-aware mindfulness, yoga that adapts to the needs of the individual, and the earth. Jill is also a certified yoga therapist and mindfulness instructor and has found many great insights about her questions in the field of radical ecopsychology.For full show notes including links to resources we mention in this episode, head to https://gaiacenter.co/blog/bodyful-12

The Thoughtful Counselor
EP218: Decolonizing Counseling Practice

The Thoughtful Counselor

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 52:13


In this episode, Dr. Jessica Tyler talks with Dr. Brandee Appling, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Counseling and Human Development Services at the University of Georgia. She is a co-author on an article published in the Journal of Counseling & Development entitled, “Using the Multicultural and Social Justice Counseling Competencies to Decolonize Counseling Practice: The Important Roles of Theory, Power, and Action.” Dr. Appling discusses how to put social justice theories into counselor action, explore privilege and oppression in session, and strategies to decolonize our therapy work. For more on Brandee, links from the conversation, and APA citation for this episode visit concep.paloaltou.edu   The Thoughtful Counselor is created in partnership with Palo Alto University's Division of Continuing & Professional Studies. Learn more at concept.paloaltou.edu

This Is Hell!
On science and colonialism / Max Liboiron

This Is Hell!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 72:08


Max Liboiron on their article "Decolonizing geoscience requires more than equity and inclusion" for Nature Geoscience. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41561-021-00861-7

First Voices Radio
12/12/21 - Dakota Yazzie, Matthew O'Neill

First Voices Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 56:36


This week, Host Tiokasin Ghosthorse talks with Dakota Yazzie of Earth Surface People, an Indigenous (Diné) led music collective whose work is based in decolonizing popular music through Indigenous storytelling and history. Earth Surface People was started in 2015 with multi-instrumentalist Dakota Yazzie and jazz saxophonist Jai Ram Rideout. The band's music melds influences from Hip Hop, Neo Soul, Psychedelic, Art Rock and Americana. Earth Surface People is: Cochise Yazzie - Synth, Ken Chavez - Bass, Vocals, Zach Dominguez - Keyboard, Drums , Dakota Lee Yazzie - Guitar, Vocals, Synth, and Jai Ram Rideout - Saxophone. Follow Earth Surface on Facebook at www.facebook.com/earthsurfacepeople/ and Instagram @earthsurfacepeople. Earth Surface People's "500 Years" EP is available on Bandcamp at earthsurfacepeople.bandcamp.com.Our second guest is Matthew O'Neill, a musical artist based in the Catskill Mountains. His music seeks to create connection and right relationship with all of our kin. Decolonizing music is a central commitment. Matthew is a lifelong advocate for Indigenous rights and justice for Mother Earth. In 2017, he created the Underwater Panther Coalition record label, with the intention of supporting Native artists and amplifying Indigenous musical ways. Look for Matthew at: www.matthew-oneill.com;; www.underwaterpanthercoalition.comProduction Credits:Tiokasin Ghosthorse (Lakota), Host and Executive ProducerLiz Hill (Red Lake Ojibwe), ProducerMalcolm Burn, Studio Engineer, Radio Kingston, WKNY 1490 AM and 107.9 FM, Kingston, NYTiokasin Ghosthorse, Audio EditorMusic Selections:1. Song Title: Tahi Roots Mix (First Voices Radio Theme Song)Artist: Moana and the Moa HuntersCD: Tahi (1993)Label: Southside Records (Australia and New Zealand)(00:00:44)2. Song Title: NaicheArtist: Earth Surface PeopleCD: 500 Years (2021)Label: Underwater Panther Coalition(00:12:15)3. Song Title: 1492Artist: Earth Surface PeopleCD: 500 Years (2021)Label: Underwater Panther Coalition(00:23:40)4. Song Title: RiverArtist: Earth Surface PeopleCD: 500 Years (2021)Label: Underwater Panther Coalition(00:35:20)5. Song Title: 500 YearsArtist: Earth Surface PeopleCD: 500 Years (2021)Label: Underwater Panther Coalition(00:46:00)5. Song Title: Silver LiningArtist: First Aid KitCD: Stay Gold (2014)Label: Columbia Records(00:53:10)

The Pakistan Experience
Rising Religious Extremism in Pakistan, TLP and Afghanistan - Tariq Ali - Author - TPE #144

The Pakistan Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 99:10


Tariq Ali comes back on The Pakistan Experience to discuss the Sialkot incident, rising religious extremism, TLP, The treatment of women, the history of violence, the War in Afghanistan and Julian Assange. We also discuss Tariq Ali's latest book, "The Forty Year War in Afghanistan: A Chronicle Foretold" Tariq Ali is a Pakistani-British political activist, writer, journalist, historian, filmmaker, and public intellectual. He is the author of many books, including Pakistan: Military Rule or People's Power (1970), Can Pakistan Survive? The Death of a State (1983), Clash of Fundamentalisms: Crusades, Jihads and Modernity (2002). Please consider supporting us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thepakistanexperience And Please stay in touch: https://twitter.com/ThePakistanExp1 https://www.facebook.com/thepakistanexperience https://instagram.com/thepakistanexpeperience The podcast is hosted by comedian and writer, Shehzad Ghias Shaikh. Shehzad is a Fulbright scholar with a Masters in Theatre from Brooklyn College. He is also one of the foremost Stand-up comedians in Pakistan and frequently writes for numerous publications. Instagram.com/shehzadghiasshaikh Facebook.com/Shehzadghias/ Twitter.com/shehzad89 Chapters: 0:00 Religious Extremism: How did we get here 19:00 Economic element in Blasphemy cases 22:30 How to deal with the TLP 28:30 Islamophobia 43:00 Treatment of Women in Pakistan 50:00 History of Extremism 1:02:00 Decolonizing 1:08:30 The Forty Year War in Afghanistan: A Chronicle Foretold 1:34:30 Julian Assange

The Wabash Center's Dialogue On Teaching
Episode 151 - Pursuing Global Knowledges: Oscar Garcia-Johnson

The Wabash Center's Dialogue On Teaching

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 31:41


Decolonizing teaching is an experiment in synergism. In developing new pedagogies, we can only guarantee crisis – crisis to reconstruct identities of the teacher and the learner, alike. What would it be to teach in a way that taboos, barriers and boundaries become meeting places? How will we learn to collaborate, build coalitions, and create partnerships for new epistemologies? 

That Music Podcast
61 | Decolonizing the Kodály Classroom with Audrey Rice

That Music Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 37:21


I often get questions about how a Kodály-influenced classroom can also be one that asks questions to allow us to be anti-racist and anti-biased. Today's episode of That Music Podcast is all about refocusing the Kodály classroom to ensure that the repertoire we choose to perpetuate is one worth teaching, while also making sure all of our students feel seen and included in our classrooms. Audrey Rice currently teaches 4th and 5th grade general music at Winchester Trail Elementary School in Canal Winchester, OH. She also co-directs the Winchester Trail 5th grade choir with her co-worker and fellow music teacher, Bobby Phillips. Audrey also co-facilitates a research-based girls empowerment program called ROX at Winchester Trail and is the Secretary of the Canal Winchester Education Association. Audrey holds a BME from The Ohio State University. She has previously taught grades 1-5 general music and grades 6-8 choir, as well as private flute, voice, piano, and ukulele. She has also previously taught with the Kodaly-based early childhood music program "We Joy Sing". She is currently pursuing a Master of Music in Music Education with a Kodaly emphasis from Capital University and is an active member of the Tri-City Kodaly Educators (TRIKE). Links and Resources: Grab your FREE copy of my guide on better serving the students with disabilities in your classroom! Decolonizing the Music Room Songs with a Questionable Past

New Books in Central Asian Studies
Timur Dadabaev, "Decolonizing Central Asian International Relations: Beyond Empires" (Routledge, 2021)

New Books in Central Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 42:10


This month we discuss the post-coloniality of Central Asia's International relations with Timur Dadabaev, the author of Decolonizing Central Asian International Relations: Beyond Empire (Routledge, 2021). This book, which brings together new writing and other material previously published by Dadabaev, re-reads the international politics of Central Asia through a very original post-colonial lens. Dadabaev, a Japan-based scholar who hails from the region himself, engages with the existing literature to depict and explain existing inter-state relations in Central Asia, to ultimately construct fairer International Relations along the Silk Road. There is plenty of empirical grounding for the alternative views illustrated by Dadabaev, who suggests that Western International Relations, when studying Central Asia, repeated the same mistakes that Russian Marxists made when they attributed a narrative of modernity along the lines of the progress made in Germany and Russia. The book does also engage critically with Uzbekistan's foreign policy and also sheds lights on the prospects of coordinated development of Central Asia and Afghanistan. A very topical reading, which we're very pleased to discuss on NBN Central Asian Studies. Timur Dadabaev is Profess of International Relation in the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences at the University of Tsukuba in Japan. His latest books include Transcontinental Silk Road Strategies. Comparing China, Japan and South Korea in Uzbekistan [Routledge 2019] and Japan in Central Asia. Strategies, Initiatives, and Neighboring Powers [Palgrave MacMillan 2016]. Luca Anceschi is Professor of Eurasian Studies at the University of Glasgow, where he is also the editor of Europe-Asia Studies. Follow him on Twitter @anceschistan Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/central-asian-studies

New Books Network
Timur Dadabaev, "Decolonizing Central Asian International Relations: Beyond Empires" (Routledge, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 42:10


This month we discuss the post-coloniality of Central Asia's International relations with Timur Dadabaev, the author of Decolonizing Central Asian International Relations: Beyond Empire (Routledge, 2021). This book, which brings together new writing and other material previously published by Dadabaev, re-reads the international politics of Central Asia through a very original post-colonial lens. Dadabaev, a Japan-based scholar who hails from the region himself, engages with the existing literature to depict and explain existing inter-state relations in Central Asia, to ultimately construct fairer International Relations along the Silk Road. There is plenty of empirical grounding for the alternative views illustrated by Dadabaev, who suggests that Western International Relations, when studying Central Asia, repeated the same mistakes that Russian Marxists made when they attributed a narrative of modernity along the lines of the progress made in Germany and Russia. The book does also engage critically with Uzbekistan's foreign policy and also sheds lights on the prospects of coordinated development of Central Asia and Afghanistan. A very topical reading, which we're very pleased to discuss on NBN Central Asian Studies. Timur Dadabaev is Profess of International Relation in the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences at the University of Tsukuba in Japan. His latest books include Transcontinental Silk Road Strategies. Comparing China, Japan and South Korea in Uzbekistan [Routledge 2019] and Japan in Central Asia. Strategies, Initiatives, and Neighboring Powers [Palgrave MacMillan 2016]. Luca Anceschi is Professor of Eurasian Studies at the University of Glasgow, where he is also the editor of Europe-Asia Studies. Follow him on Twitter @anceschistan Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in World Affairs
Timur Dadabaev, "Decolonizing Central Asian International Relations: Beyond Empires" (Routledge, 2021)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 42:10


This month we discuss the post-coloniality of Central Asia's International relations with Timur Dadabaev, the author of Decolonizing Central Asian International Relations: Beyond Empire (Routledge, 2021). This book, which brings together new writing and other material previously published by Dadabaev, re-reads the international politics of Central Asia through a very original post-colonial lens. Dadabaev, a Japan-based scholar who hails from the region himself, engages with the existing literature to depict and explain existing inter-state relations in Central Asia, to ultimately construct fairer International Relations along the Silk Road. There is plenty of empirical grounding for the alternative views illustrated by Dadabaev, who suggests that Western International Relations, when studying Central Asia, repeated the same mistakes that Russian Marxists made when they attributed a narrative of modernity along the lines of the progress made in Germany and Russia. The book does also engage critically with Uzbekistan's foreign policy and also sheds lights on the prospects of coordinated development of Central Asia and Afghanistan. A very topical reading, which we're very pleased to discuss on NBN Central Asian Studies. Timur Dadabaev is Profess of International Relation in the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences at the University of Tsukuba in Japan. His latest books include Transcontinental Silk Road Strategies. Comparing China, Japan and South Korea in Uzbekistan [Routledge 2019] and Japan in Central Asia. Strategies, Initiatives, and Neighboring Powers [Palgrave MacMillan 2016]. Luca Anceschi is Professor of Eurasian Studies at the University of Glasgow, where he is also the editor of Europe-Asia Studies. Follow him on Twitter @anceschistan Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books in Political Science
Timur Dadabaev, "Decolonizing Central Asian International Relations: Beyond Empires" (Routledge, 2021)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 42:10


This month we discuss the post-coloniality of Central Asia's International relations with Timur Dadabaev, the author of Decolonizing Central Asian International Relations: Beyond Empire (Routledge, 2021). This book, which brings together new writing and other material previously published by Dadabaev, re-reads the international politics of Central Asia through a very original post-colonial lens. Dadabaev, a Japan-based scholar who hails from the region himself, engages with the existing literature to depict and explain existing inter-state relations in Central Asia, to ultimately construct fairer International Relations along the Silk Road. There is plenty of empirical grounding for the alternative views illustrated by Dadabaev, who suggests that Western International Relations, when studying Central Asia, repeated the same mistakes that Russian Marxists made when they attributed a narrative of modernity along the lines of the progress made in Germany and Russia. The book does also engage critically with Uzbekistan's foreign policy and also sheds lights on the prospects of coordinated development of Central Asia and Afghanistan. A very topical reading, which we're very pleased to discuss on NBN Central Asian Studies. Timur Dadabaev is Profess of International Relation in the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences at the University of Tsukuba in Japan. His latest books include Transcontinental Silk Road Strategies. Comparing China, Japan and South Korea in Uzbekistan [Routledge 2019] and Japan in Central Asia. Strategies, Initiatives, and Neighboring Powers [Palgrave MacMillan 2016]. Luca Anceschi is Professor of Eurasian Studies at the University of Glasgow, where he is also the editor of Europe-Asia Studies. Follow him on Twitter @anceschistan Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies
Timur Dadabaev, "Decolonizing Central Asian International Relations: Beyond Empires" (Routledge, 2021)

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 42:10


This month we discuss the post-coloniality of Central Asia's International relations with Timur Dadabaev, the author of Decolonizing Central Asian International Relations: Beyond Empire (Routledge, 2021). This book, which brings together new writing and other material previously published by Dadabaev, re-reads the international politics of Central Asia through a very original post-colonial lens. Dadabaev, a Japan-based scholar who hails from the region himself, engages with the existing literature to depict and explain existing inter-state relations in Central Asia, to ultimately construct fairer International Relations along the Silk Road. There is plenty of empirical grounding for the alternative views illustrated by Dadabaev, who suggests that Western International Relations, when studying Central Asia, repeated the same mistakes that Russian Marxists made when they attributed a narrative of modernity along the lines of the progress made in Germany and Russia. The book does also engage critically with Uzbekistan's foreign policy and also sheds lights on the prospects of coordinated development of Central Asia and Afghanistan. A very topical reading, which we're very pleased to discuss on NBN Central Asian Studies. Timur Dadabaev is Profess of International Relation in the Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences at the University of Tsukuba in Japan. His latest books include Transcontinental Silk Road Strategies. Comparing China, Japan and South Korea in Uzbekistan [Routledge 2019] and Japan in Central Asia. Strategies, Initiatives, and Neighboring Powers [Palgrave MacMillan 2016]. Luca Anceschi is Professor of Eurasian Studies at the University of Glasgow, where he is also the editor of Europe-Asia Studies. Follow him on Twitter @anceschistan Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/russian-studies

Doin' The Work: Frontline Stories of Social Change
Decolonizing Mental Health & Supporting Indigenous Women - Tyra Wanatee-Flores, BSW

Doin' The Work: Frontline Stories of Social Change

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 51:18


Episode 48 Guest: Tyra Wanatee-Flores, BSW Host: Shimon Cohen, LCSW www.dointhework.com Listen/Subscribe on: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify Follow on Twitter & Instagram, Like on Facebook Join the mailing list Support the podcast Download transcript Check out the new Doin' The Work Collection of hoodies, tees, mugs, and tote bags! Rep the podcast you love while doin' the work. Thank you to this episode's sponsor! The University of Tennessee Knoxville College of Social Work (UTK) has a phenomenal social work program, with the opportunity to do your bachelor's master's, and doctorate of social work online. Scholarships are available. In this episode, I talk with Tyra Wanatee-Flores, who is a descendant of the Sac and Fox Nation of the Mississippi in Iowa and identifies as Two-Spirited. Tyra is an advanced standing MSW student at Washington University in St. Louis, a photographer and activist of the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Peoples Movement, an advocate for Indigenous women who have experienced violence, and a speaker about mental health in Indigenous Country. She talks about the work she is doing with the Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation in Mayetta, Kansas, to address youth suicide and substance abuse. We discuss how much of social work education and mental health interventions are Eurocentric, which makes it a challenge to find ways that will work for Indigenous communities, but how Tyra is addressing this in her work, using networking and approaches that honor community, tradition, and culture. Tyra talks about being part of the Buder Scholars program, where she and others have access to an Indigenous curriculum and how it has helped her to learn decolonizing approaches to this work. She emphasizes the importance of community in healing and getting back to pre-colonial ways. Tyra also talks about her work with Meskwaki RISE, a program supporting and empowering Indigenous survivors of domestic violence or sexual assault. She discusses Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women (MMIW), specifically the disappearance of Rita Papakee, who is from her community, and what we can all do to end this violence. Tyra also shares why she does this work. I hope this conversation inspires you to action. Instagram: tyra.w.flowers Twitter: @tyerista Tik Tok: @tyrista Meskwaki RISE Meskwaki RISE Facebook

The Current
Decolonizing museums: First Nations working to repatriate sacred stolen items, ancestral remains

The Current

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 24:56


Some First Nations are working to repatriate sacred items and ancestral remains that were stolen and put in museums around the world — and they're succeeding. We discuss decolonizing museums with Bill Cranmer, a hereditary chief of the 'Namgis First Nation and board chair of the U'mista Cultural Centre in Alert Bay, B.C.; Jisgang Nika Collison, executive director of the Haida Gwaii Museum and co-chair of the Haida Repatriation Committee; and Jordan Coble, chair of the British Columbia Museums Association's Indigenous advisory committee and a councillor for the Westbank First Nation.

Work. Shouldnt. Suck.
Liberating Workplaces (EP.50)

Work. Shouldnt. Suck.

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 39:24


This conversation was recorded as part of Work Shouldn't Suck's https://www.workshouldntsuck.co/ethical-reopening-summit-2021 (Ethical Re-Opening Summit) that took place on April 27, 2021. Co-host Lauren Ruffin facilitates a discussion with Vanessa Roanhorse and Syrus Marcus Ware on how organizations can center those most vulnerable to craft workplaces where everyone can thrive. Their discussion explores recently announced changes at Basecamp, and also the workplace re-opening survey conducted by Work Shouldn't Suck in Spring 2021. Resources mentioned during this episode:https://www.akpress.org/beyond-survival.html (Beyond Survival: Strategies and Stories from the Transformative Justice Movement), Ejeris Dixon (Editor); Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha (Editor) “https://world.hey.com/jason/changes-at-basecamp-7f32afc5 (Changes at Basecamp)” by Jason Fried “https://world.hey.com/dhh/basecamp-s-new-etiquette-regarding-societal-politics-at-work-b44bef69 (Basecamp's new etiquette regarding societal politics at work)” by David Heinemeier Hansson VANESSA ROANHORSE got her management chops working for 7 years at a Chicago-based nonprofit, the Delta Institute, focused throughout the Great Lakes region to build a resilient environment and economy through creative, sustainable, market-driven solutions. Vanessa oversaw many of Delta's on-the-ground energy efficiency, green infrastructure, community engagement programs, and workforce development training. Vanessa is a 2019 Village Capital Money Matters Advisory Board Member, 2019 SXSW Pitch Advisor, sits on the local Living Cities leadership table, is a Startup Champions Network member, is an Advisor for emerging Navajo incubator, Change Labs, Advisor for Native Entrepreneurship in Residence Program, and is a board member for Native Community Capital, a native-led CDFI. She is a co-founder of Native Women Lead, an organization dedicated to growing native women into positions of leadership and business. Her academic education is in film from the University of Arizona but her professional education is from hands-on experience leading local, regional and national initiatives. Vanessa is Navajo living in Albuquerque, New Mexico. SYRUS MARCUS WARE uses painting, installation and performance to explore social justice frameworks and black activist culture. His work has been shown widely, including in a solo show at Grunt Gallery, Vancouver (2068:Touch Change) and new work commissioned for the 2019 Toronto Biennial of Art and the Ryerson Image Centre (Antarctica and Ancestors, Do You Read Us? (Dispatches from the Future)) and in group shows at the Art Gallery of Ontario, the University of Lethbridge Art Gallery, Art Gallery of York University, the Art Gallery of Windsor and as part of the curated content at Nuit Blanche 2017 (The Stolen People; Wont Back Down). His performance works have been part of festivals across Canada, including at Cripping The Stage (Harbourfront Centre, 2016, 2019), Complex Social Change (University of Lethbridge Art Gallery, 2015) and Decolonizing and Decriminalizing Trans Genres (University of Winnipeg, 2015). // He is part of the PDA (Performance Disability Art) Collective and co-programmed Crip Your World: An Intergalactic Queer/POC Sick and Disabled Extravaganza as part of Mayworks 2014. Syrus' recent curatorial projects include That's So Gay (Gladstone Hotel, 2016-2019), Re:Purpose (Robert McLaughlin Gallery, 2014) and The Church Street Mural Project (Church-Wellesley Village, 2013). Syrus is also co-curator of The Cycle, a two-year disability arts performance initiative of the National Arts Centre. // Syrus is a core-team member of Black Lives Matter-Toronto. Syrus is a co-curator of Blackness Yes!/Blockorama. Syrus has won several awards, including the TD Diversity Award in 2017. Syrus was voted “Best Queer Activist” by NOW Magazine (2005) and was awarded the Steinert and Ferreiro Award (2012). Syrus is a facilitator/designer at the Banff Centre. Syrus is

Business as a Magical Practice
Decolonizing Marketing & Business with Lettie Sullivan of Goddess Ministry

Business as a Magical Practice

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 50:37


See the full show notes: https://thedirtyalchemy.com/blog/episode-86

Dear White Women
143: Decolonizing Wellness, with Dalia Kinsey

Dear White Women

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 72:05


Our next guest is not only the author of a book we both can't wait to read - Decolonizing Wellness - but also talks specifically to those individuals who are at the intersection of BIPOC and LGBTQ identities. When you think about bodies, beauty, and self-care, that's often a group that gets lost, not only in popular consciousness but also in media portrayals of what is considered desirable or attractive. And, when you're struggling to be seen, or fit in, or even survive - this can be devastating. This was yet again one of those conversations that we didn't want to end, and each of us walked away with different ways to think about not only our own bodies, but what we put in them, how we interact with those around us with regard to wellness - especially kids, and ways in which we can better support and understand the struggle of marginalized individuals when it comes to preconceived notions of health and beauty. Have questions, comments, or concerns? Email us at hello@dearwhitewomen.com What to listen for: How cisgender, heteronomative, Eurocentric standards of beauty that we see in mass media add to the body image concerns of queer people Additional challenges to body positivity when it comes to people who are both BIPOC and LGBTQ+ Knowing and listening to our own bodies better, including what we put into them Kids, nutrition, and diet culture About Dalia: Dalia Kinsey is a Registered Dietitian and Inclusive Wellness coach with over 10 years of experience working at the intersection of holistic wellness and social justice in public and private sectors. Dalia rejects diet culture and teaches people to use nutrition as a self-care and personal empowerment tool to counter the damage of systemic oppression. On a mission to spread joy, reduce suffering, and eliminate health disparities in the LGBTQIA+ and BIPOC community, Dalia leverages years of experience creating safer spaces for clients to help teams build communication skills that create a solid foundation for inclusion and belonging. Host of the Body Liberation for All podcast and author of Decolonizing Wellness: How to Escape the Diet Trap, Heal Your Self-Image, and Achieve Body Liberation; A QTBIPOC-Centered Guide to Self-Love, Dalia continually creates wellness tools and resources that center the most vulnerable, individuals that hold multiple marginalized identities. Dalia's work can be found at https://www.daliakinsey.com/ Connect with Dalia: Instagram    Where to order your copy of Dear White Women: Let's Get (Un)comfortable Talking About Racism: https://thecollectivebook.studio/dear-white-women Like what you hear?  Don't miss another episode and subscribe! Catch up on more commentary between episodes by following us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter – and even more opinions and resources if you join our email list.    

Public Health Epidemiology Careers
PHEC 224: Decolonizing Data With Dr. Rosalina James, Urban Indian Health Institute

Public Health Epidemiology Careers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 33:00


Public health spans all communities and cultures. However, smaller populations are being overlooked due to historical discrimination. Today we talk to Dr. Rosalina James, Director of Research and Evaluation at Urban Indian Health Institute (UIHI), about her interests in decolonizing data and the importance of getting people of American Indian and Native Alaska descent a seat at the table. We hear the challenges Dr. James faced as a woman of color in academia, and her advice on facing these issues. Find out how Dr. James moved into public health from lab work, why workforce development is so important to her, and why she feels epidemiologists are uniquely equipped to make overlooked cultures visible. Tune in to hear what the UIHI has been working on throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, and how you can get involved as an intern. We look forward to having you join us! Visit the PHEC Podcast Show Notes: https://PHECPodcast.com/  Grab Your FREE 10-Page PHEC Podcast eBook: https://mypublichealthcareer.com/ Work With Me - Business Coaching: https://www.drchhuntley.com/coaching  

Practicing Gospel Podcast
Decolonizing Worship 2 PGE 54

Practicing Gospel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 59:47


This episode is the second in a two-part interview on decolonizing worship. My guests are again Becca Whitla, Marcell Silva Steuernagel, and Brian Hehn. In the first episode we talked about the importance of decolonizing worship as beginning steps for Christians and churches to repent of the Church's complicity in creating, promoting, and perpetuating colonial imperialism and white male supremacy, and also as a means of helping the church regain its relevance in an age of post-Christendom. The focus was upon understanding how the legacy of colonial imperialism and white male supremacy influences what happens each Sunday morning in worship and upon specific practices that can and should occur in local congregations to change and decolonize their experience of worship. In this episode we discuss how thinking about and practicing decolonizing worship requires broadening the focus not just on local practices and experiences but also on ecumenical, transcultural, and transnational factors. We begin to explore some of what those factors are and why those factors bear on the local congregation. As you will learn, conversations like these are just the start of the process. Many more such conversations need to be had and a great deal more experimentation and sharing of experiences will need to occur for important changes to be made that will help bring into joyful rhythm and harmony the body of Christ. The music for this episode is from a clip of a song called 'Father Let Your Kingdom Come' which is found on The Porter's Gate Worship Project Work Songs album and is used by permission by The Porter's Gate Worship Project. You can learn more about the album and the Worship Project at theportersgate.com.

Tech Wrap Queen
Dr. Lesley Ann Noel | Decolonizing Design & Research Accountability

Tech Wrap Queen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 37:44


Wrap session 19 with Dr. Lesley Ann Noel, academic scholar, design researcher, and creator of the Designers Critical Alphabet, takes the Royal Court on a design and research critical thinking journey often embraced and discussed in academia but not as much in industry. Dr. Noel challenges UX and Design practitioners to decolonize bookshelves as well recognizing how identities play a part in design & research for both practitioners and participants. Books & resources mentioned in this podcast: Pedagogy of the Oppressed- Paulo Friere Research is Ceremony- Shawn Wilson Epistemologies of the South- Boaventura de Sousa Santos Designers Critical Alphabet- Dr. Lesley Ann Noel https://criticalalphabet.com/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/techwrapqueen/message

Healing While Black Podcast
Episode 8: Decolonizing Our Minds and Bodies

Healing While Black Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 65:12


In this episode, we welcome the beautiful, Thérèse Cator, who is a mother, healer, leadership and embodiment coach, storyteller and founder of Embodied Black Girl. Thérèse helps us engage with some of the wisdom of our ancestors through exploring inter-generational trauma and healing and what it means for Black people to decolonize ourselves in mind and body.   Engage with Thérèse: IG: @theresecator Embodied Black Girl IG: @embodiedblackgirl Website: https://embodiedblackgirl.com/  

Let's Talk Yoga
Trauma of Cultural Appropriation, decolonizing mental health from a POC viewpoint, & Compassion as a Core Value with Ekta Hattangady

Let's Talk Yoga

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 45:56


Today, we highlight 3 important topics...The trauma of cultural appropriation on Indian people What is 'decolonizing' mental health from a POC viewpoint Exploring compassion as a core valueYou might be wondering what any of this has to do with yoga? Occasionally, I take a step out of "traditional" or "more-predictable" yoga conversations to bring you topics that will influence your yoga life. This is one such conversation. Ekta Hattangady is a social worker, psychotherapist, and mindfulness coach. Who practices yoga & Buddhism. With 16 years of work experience in the US, UK & Canada. We get into learning about...What is the difference between Counselling and Psychotherapy?Ekta explains what qualifies as good mental healthWhat it means to decolonize mental health & its importanceEkta talks about yoga trauma for Indians abroadWhat is compassion?How empathy and compassion are relatedCompassion: Learned Behavior or Internal Trait?How to measure compassion?What comes first? Compassion or Mindfulness?Different types of compassionEkta's thoughts on the mental health of yoga teachers todayHow to increase your compassioYou can find all the resources mentioned in this episode in the show notes at https://letstalk.yoga/Connect with us on Instagram here: https://www.instagram.com/arundhati_baitmangalkar/Join our exclusive Facebook group here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/letstalkyogaJoin our mailing list: https://www.aham.yoga/instagram-2021 for all episodes.

New Books in Gender Studies
Nicole C. Bourbonnais, "Birth Control in the Decolonizing Caribbean: Reproductive Politics and Practice on Four Islands, 1930–1970" (Cambridge UP, 2016)

New Books in Gender Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 52:46


Over the course of the twentieth century, campaigns to increase access to modern birth control methods spread across the globe and fundamentally altered the way people thought about and mobilized around reproduction. This book explores how a variety of actors translated this movement into practice on four islands (Jamaica, Trinidad, Barbados, and Bermuda) from the 1930s-70s. The process of decolonization during this period led to heightened clashes over imperial and national policy and brought local class, race, and gender tensions to the surface, making debates over reproductive practices particularly evocative and illustrative of broader debates in the history of decolonization and international family planning. Nicole C. Bourbonnais' book Birth Control in the Decolonizing Caribbean: Reproductive Politics and Practice on Four Islands, 1930–1970 (Cambridge UP, 2016) is at once a political history, a history of activism, and a social history, exploring the challenges faced by working class women as they tried to negotiate control over their reproductive lives. Alejandra Bronfman is Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies Latin American, Caribbean & U.S. Latino Studies at SUNY, Albany. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/gender-studies

New Books in Caribbean Studies
Nicole C. Bourbonnais, "Birth Control in the Decolonizing Caribbean: Reproductive Politics and Practice on Four Islands, 1930–1970" (Cambridge UP, 2016)

New Books in Caribbean Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 52:46


Over the course of the twentieth century, campaigns to increase access to modern birth control methods spread across the globe and fundamentally altered the way people thought about and mobilized around reproduction. This book explores how a variety of actors translated this movement into practice on four islands (Jamaica, Trinidad, Barbados, and Bermuda) from the 1930s-70s. The process of decolonization during this period led to heightened clashes over imperial and national policy and brought local class, race, and gender tensions to the surface, making debates over reproductive practices particularly evocative and illustrative of broader debates in the history of decolonization and international family planning. Nicole C. Bourbonnais' book Birth Control in the Decolonizing Caribbean: Reproductive Politics and Practice on Four Islands, 1930–1970 (Cambridge UP, 2016) is at once a political history, a history of activism, and a social history, exploring the challenges faced by working class women as they tried to negotiate control over their reproductive lives. Alejandra Bronfman is Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies Latin American, Caribbean & U.S. Latino Studies at SUNY, Albany. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/caribbean-studies

New Books in Medicine
Nicole C. Bourbonnais, "Birth Control in the Decolonizing Caribbean: Reproductive Politics and Practice on Four Islands, 1930–1970" (Cambridge UP, 2016)

New Books in Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 52:46


Over the course of the twentieth century, campaigns to increase access to modern birth control methods spread across the globe and fundamentally altered the way people thought about and mobilized around reproduction. This book explores how a variety of actors translated this movement into practice on four islands (Jamaica, Trinidad, Barbados, and Bermuda) from the 1930s-70s. The process of decolonization during this period led to heightened clashes over imperial and national policy and brought local class, race, and gender tensions to the surface, making debates over reproductive practices particularly evocative and illustrative of broader debates in the history of decolonization and international family planning. Nicole C. Bourbonnais' book Birth Control in the Decolonizing Caribbean: Reproductive Politics and Practice on Four Islands, 1930–1970 (Cambridge UP, 2016) is at once a political history, a history of activism, and a social history, exploring the challenges faced by working class women as they tried to negotiate control over their reproductive lives. Alejandra Bronfman is Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies Latin American, Caribbean & U.S. Latino Studies at SUNY, Albany. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/medicine

New Books in History
Nicole C. Bourbonnais, "Birth Control in the Decolonizing Caribbean: Reproductive Politics and Practice on Four Islands, 1930–1970" (Cambridge UP, 2016)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 52:46


Over the course of the twentieth century, campaigns to increase access to modern birth control methods spread across the globe and fundamentally altered the way people thought about and mobilized around reproduction. This book explores how a variety of actors translated this movement into practice on four islands (Jamaica, Trinidad, Barbados, and Bermuda) from the 1930s-70s. The process of decolonization during this period led to heightened clashes over imperial and national policy and brought local class, race, and gender tensions to the surface, making debates over reproductive practices particularly evocative and illustrative of broader debates in the history of decolonization and international family planning. Nicole C. Bourbonnais' book Birth Control in the Decolonizing Caribbean: Reproductive Politics and Practice on Four Islands, 1930–1970 (Cambridge UP, 2016) is at once a political history, a history of activism, and a social history, exploring the challenges faced by working class women as they tried to negotiate control over their reproductive lives. Alejandra Bronfman is Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies Latin American, Caribbean & U.S. Latino Studies at SUNY, Albany. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Nicole C. Bourbonnais, "Birth Control in the Decolonizing Caribbean: Reproductive Politics and Practice on Four Islands, 1930–1970" (Cambridge UP, 2016)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 52:46


Over the course of the twentieth century, campaigns to increase access to modern birth control methods spread across the globe and fundamentally altered the way people thought about and mobilized around reproduction. This book explores how a variety of actors translated this movement into practice on four islands (Jamaica, Trinidad, Barbados, and Bermuda) from the 1930s-70s. The process of decolonization during this period led to heightened clashes over imperial and national policy and brought local class, race, and gender tensions to the surface, making debates over reproductive practices particularly evocative and illustrative of broader debates in the history of decolonization and international family planning. Nicole C. Bourbonnais' book Birth Control in the Decolonizing Caribbean: Reproductive Politics and Practice on Four Islands, 1930–1970 (Cambridge UP, 2016) is at once a political history, a history of activism, and a social history, exploring the challenges faced by working class women as they tried to negotiate control over their reproductive lives. Alejandra Bronfman is Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies Latin American, Caribbean & U.S. Latino Studies at SUNY, Albany. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Latin American Studies
Nicole C. Bourbonnais, "Birth Control in the Decolonizing Caribbean: Reproductive Politics and Practice on Four Islands, 1930–1970" (Cambridge UP, 2016)

New Books in Latin American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 52:46


Over the course of the twentieth century, campaigns to increase access to modern birth control methods spread across the globe and fundamentally altered the way people thought about and mobilized around reproduction. This book explores how a variety of actors translated this movement into practice on four islands (Jamaica, Trinidad, Barbados, and Bermuda) from the 1930s-70s. The process of decolonization during this period led to heightened clashes over imperial and national policy and brought local class, race, and gender tensions to the surface, making debates over reproductive practices particularly evocative and illustrative of broader debates in the history of decolonization and international family planning. Nicole C. Bourbonnais' book Birth Control in the Decolonizing Caribbean: Reproductive Politics and Practice on Four Islands, 1930–1970 (Cambridge UP, 2016) is at once a political history, a history of activism, and a social history, exploring the challenges faced by working class women as they tried to negotiate control over their reproductive lives. Alejandra Bronfman is Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies Latin American, Caribbean & U.S. Latino Studies at SUNY, Albany. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/latin-american-studies

Identity Talk 4 Educators LIVE
"Decolonizing International Schools" (Kevin Simpson)

Identity Talk 4 Educators LIVE

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 79:03


In this episode, I had an awesome conversation with veteran international education leader Kevin Simpson about his personal journey in education, life as an international educator, the need to diversify the international teaching force, and so much more! To learn more about Kevin's work, you can visit the Association of International Educators & Leaders of Color website at aieloc.org and/or you can follow him on Instagram (@kdslglobal) or Twitter (@GlobalKdsl). BIO: KDSL Global is an education consulting company launched by Kevin Simpson in 2016 in the USA and in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Simpson and his team have served thousands of schools, organizations, educators, and leaders worldwide in over 25 countries. The majority of this work in education has centered on American curriculum schools. Since 2008, Simpson has been focused on education in the MENA region, assisted numerous schools with accreditation, training, development, and served as a thought partner to investors on school start-up projects. Simpson is co-founder of the UAE Learning Network and leads the GCC ASCD Connected Community. In addition, he has co-authored papers on American curriculum in the MENA region with a focus on Common Core State Standards, the Next Generation Science Standards, social studies, the arts, and the history of American Education in the UAE. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Education and a Master of Education degree in Curriculum and Teaching from Michigan State University (USA). --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/identitytalk4educators/support

Simply Stories Podcast
Episode 106 :: Kat Armas :: Stories of Abuelita Faith, the Wisdom of Survival, and Jesus of the Bible

Simply Stories Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 77:19


Today I am sitting down with the incredible Kat Armas. Kat is a Cuban-American author and podcaster who is passionate about elevating the voices of women of color, asking big questions and wrestling with American culture to have a more clear view of God and how He makes Himself known through people and their experiences. She invites readers into the wrestle of our ideas about wisdom, or ideas we have developed about what makes someone a “theologian,” and perhaps how we limit who is influential in our faith development in beautiful book Abuelita Faith: What Women on the Margins Teach Us About Wisdom, Persistence and Strength. After being raised in Miami, Florida, surrounded by Cuban culture, and then moving to predominantly white evangelical world in seminary, Kat struggled to find her footing as a woman in male-dominated space, and as a woman of color, raised by women, and called by God to use her gifts for His glory. We'll talk about things like: What do you do when your life doesn't pan out into what may be described as a typical “American” family or faith? How do you really wrestle with the Christianity that has been passed down to you when that's its history? We'll define some buzzword terms and try to take the sting out of them that can keep us from actually having productive conversations about them  like patriarchal vs. matriarchal society, a colonized Jesus vs. Jesus in the context of the Bible. Decolonizing, Deconstruction, etc. We're going deep, friends. This is an opportunity for you to sit at a table where you may not be the most comfortable, but where there is such beauty to behold, things to learn about a culture unique from your own, and a fuller picture of how God makes Himself known in other communities in the world, and how He may have something to share specifically with you about who YOU were uniquely made to be in our homes, in our faith families and the body of Christ as a whole.  Reading Kat's book, and spending time with her has really stretched me. One thing that encourages me so much is that God is there in the midst of our complicated and messy stories of being a human. Jesus meets ALL of us exactly where we are, Living in the middle place, where so much of what we have known and seen, where we're from, and being willing to process a more robust view of God, and seeing Him through the eyes of our friends and neighbors in scripture has just made God all the more powerful, merciful and beautiful to me. It makes the call to go and share the Gospel with ALL nations so much more powerful and dare I say possible? When we are willing to learn about what life may look like for various nations, tribes, tongues and cultures unique from mine, then there is compassion to come together as we are, where we are, and there we can talk about Jesus. There, we can see how much all our stories matter. Your story matters, friend. You matter. Connecting with Kat: Book Facebook Instagram Podcast - “The Protagonistas” Twitter Website Episode Sponsor: Tony Crabtree of Crabtree Homes with Exit Realty  Home buyer guide: http://bit.ly/buyersguidecrabtreehomes Seller guide: http://bit.ly/sellerguidecrabtreehomes Facebook Instagram Website YouTube  References: -Dr. Michelle Reyes - the idea that white people do or don't have a culture -”Machismo” - (literally defined as sexism / dictionary defines it as “strong or aggressive masculine pride”) -Martin Luther King Jr. - discussing the concept of “class” in America -Patriarchy- “rules of the father”  -Dr. Miguel De La Torre, The Jesus of “los humildes” (the humble) -un baile divino- “a divine dance” (where we dance in the middle_ -“El mundo zurdo” - the left-handed world (on the other hand) -Rome conquered Greece (for the record lol)  -Willie James Jennings- After Whiteness: An Education in Belogning -Jemar Tisby -The AND Campaign -What is systemic racism? (What is redlining? Addressed in the video and also here) -What's happening in Canada unveiling the mass graves at residential schools (See our insta live about this and listen to my episode with Jane Kirkpatrick as well) -Holocaust History (just scratchin the surface here)  -The mass exodus from the western Church // (Also an interesting article specifically about single women leaving the Church)-Barbara Brown Taylor - The Preaching Life -The book of Habbakuk is all a minor prophet wrestling with God -The Color of Compromise: The Truth About the American Church's Complicity in Racism- Jemar Tisby -Blessing and baptisms for enslaved people during slavery, was different for them than white people because it defined your freedom and salvation under your master, not just Christ -Episode where we discuss cultural paradigms -The mantilla  -The exilic Cuban community -What happened with Fidel Castro -”subiendo” - survival day to day -John MacAruthur and “go home” -- Just a little editor thought drop here. I am not a” throw the baby out with the bathwater” person. I think this was a really unfortunate moment in JM's ministry. The Lord can use anything for good, and I've seen Him do it. What happened that day through his comments is still hurtful on so many levels to me personally and so many women that I know and love in this ministry life, and had truly astounding ripple effects I am still feeling in my own life and faith community. I left it as part of the conversation with Kat because I think it's important to hear the hurts of people, but I also don't mean to leave it in there to act as a “cancelling” of someone who I do believe is passionate about God's Word, he's just also human, and God is God in his life, and is still bringing the work in him to completion. Additionally, I don't know who Kat's hermeneutics professor was that said what he said to her, but I pray the Lord meets him and shows him the gift that the daughters of Eve offer to the Kingdom of God no matter where God leads them and regardless of their marital status. We're all being stretched. Jesus sits at the right hand of the Father and says “I will complete the work I began in them.” Further up, and further in.-xo, Em *UPDATED NEWS ON THE CUBAN CRISIS AND WAYS TO SUPPORT CUBAN PEOPLE DIRECTLY: -Monday the 15th- there was a worldwide march for Cuban freedom.-N15  // NBC's aritcle-- You can also see a lot more current updates from the instagram accounts and Twitter accounts posted below. Its honestly challenging to get updated news accounts at the moment.  -As things stand as the date of publishing this podcast, Wednesday 11/17  -NYT Article from Sunday 11/14about the food shortage, internet censoring and more that has sparked the huge planned protest for 11/15.  -Washington Post article about the lengths the Cuban government are going to in order to discourage participation in the 11/15 demonstration and the role of U.S. politics and current policies happening on the hill affecting the Cuban people. -Marissa Daniela- a Cuban creator who is passionate about connecting what's happening in Cuba to the world and to the Cuban diaspora.  -Recent footage in Cuba -The #freecuba hashtag from Twitter.  -The #N15Cuba hashtag from Twitter -SOSCuba  -Support the search for the hundreds of missing people -Human rights violations in Cuba Scripture References: Genesis 16, Genesis 38, Exodus 1:15-21, Joshua 2,  Judges 4, Ruth and Naomi, 2 Samuel 11-12, Luke 18:1-8,  Luke 8:3,  Acts 16 (JUST TO NAME A FEW!!!!) - Women using the wisdom they gained from survival and God blessing it, using it,  Jesus reflects the humble -- link to 100 verses about this  Luke 2:1-20-Jesus was born in a stable/cave, etc.  Matthew 2-His parents were young people fleeing their land  Revelation 19:11-Jesus in Revelation- the rider in white who is faithful and true  Jesus appears in the Old Testament in so many places (Awesome scripture list and commentary) God really cares about the righteousness of his kids (Big list!) Book of Ezekiel - (Watch this super helpful Bible Project video about this) Babylon is coming and making it really ugly, God meets them in exile  The book of Esther happens in exile (hear us talk about it and read the book aloud on the podcast) Mark 3:13-19,Matthew 10:1-4,Luke 6:12-16- -Jesus' disciples were a diverse group of people  Ruth and Naomi,-Ruth and Naomi  Genesis 38-Tamar Genealogy of Jesus with the women, (links to all of them in the top reference)-The women in the genealogy of Jesus and their complicated stories of survivalMatthew 7:24-26-Built on rock or on sand?  Psalm 103:6, Micah 6:8, Hosea 12:6, Psalm 37:27-40, Amos 5 -God is passionate about justice Deuteronomy 15:7-11, Deuteronomy 24:17-21, Psalm 82:3, Isaiah 1:17, Luke 14:12-14 (just as a few examples) -God is passionate about caring for women, orphans and those in the marginsActs 15: the council of Jerusalem (is circumcision necessary, do you have to stop being a Jew, etc.) Connecting with Emily and Simply Stories Podcast:Instagram (Em life // Podcast Life)FacebookTwitterBlog  *Intro and Outro music is from audionautix.com

Thesis on Joan
#2.14 Decolonizing the Process with the New Visions Fellowship

Thesis on Joan

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 85:40


This week's guests, ayla xuân chi sullivan, Nick Hadikwa Mwaluko, and Roger Q. Mason come from the inaugural New Vision Fellowship for Black trans and gender non-conforming playwrights, a partnership with the National Queer Theatre and Dramatist Guild! As the Fellowship co-founder/lead mentor, Roger shares the genesis of the program, the need for work, mentorship, time, space, and the opportunity to just be. Fellows Nick and ayla discuss their plays in development, having a space where they can be their fullest selves, learning from each other non-hierarchically, and decolonizing the process of professional work. The trio also gets into trans identity as spiritual identity, theatre as a ritual, assumptions about what Black, queer, trans joy looks like, and the gift and journey of preparing the road for the next generation. Hosts Holly and Meghan discuss how the last year and a half have affected their relationships to theatre, Kristina Wong, Sweatshop Overlord, and signing up for free bystander, conflict de-escalation, harassment response, and resilience training with Hollaback! You can find a full transcript of this episode here. Action of the Ep:  Sign up for a free Hollaback! Training! Hollaback!'s mission is to end harassment in all its forms by transforming the culture that perpetuates hate and harassment. They carry out this mission by building the power of everyday people to create safe and welcoming environments for all. The free trainings include bystander intervention, conflict de-escalation, responding to and preventing harassment, and resilience.  GUESTS:  New Visions Fellowship: Instagram ayla xuân chi sullivan: Website | Instagram | Twitter  Nick Hadikwa Mwaluko: New Play Exchange | Instagram | Twitter  Roger Q. Mason: Website | Instagram | Twitter Afrofuturism with Carnegie Hall  Queer Gives: Diamond Stylz: Marsha's Plate Podcast | Black Trans Women, Inc FIERCE NYC National Queer Theatre - with a comment for the New Visions Fellowship! Episode Credits: Edited by Holly Sansom Thesis on Joan: Follow Thesis on Joan on Instagram & Twitter  Leave us a voicemail at (845) 445-9251‬ Email us at thesisonjoan at gmail dot com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Brown Line Vineyard-Listen to Talks
Decolonizing Creation

Brown Line Vineyard-Listen to Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 44:18


Special guest and old friend of BLC Kristen Daly-Mosier unpacks three movements the Jesus tradition encourages us to make as a capitalistic, materialistic, colonizing culture: (1) From "stewardship" to "solidarity", (2) From "uses" to "gifts", (3) From "classification" to "revelation".

Practicing Gospel Podcast
Decolonizing Worship 1 PGE 53

Practicing Gospel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 59:12


Among the great evils of human history has been colonial imperialism and the rise of white male supremacy. The terrible legacy of these two interwoven realities still continues. Tragically and shamefully for the Church and Christianity, is that in a twisted and perverted logic that was and is a contradiction to the Gospel, the Church has played and continues to play a fundamental role in the creation, propagation, affirmation, support, and maintenance of that legacy. The Legacy permeates all aspects of Western culture and its relationships globally. In my mind the consequence of The Legacy has contributed substantively to the marked decline in Christianity and Evangelical and Mainline denominations in the United States, Canada, and Western Europe. For the Church to relevance and integrity it must repent by acknowledging the sinfulness and evil of The Legacy and the Church's complicity in it. But as Standing Rock Sioux Vine Deloria, Jr. persuasively made the case in his book, God Is Red: A Native View of Religion, repentance is not enough. Change must occur in the life and practices of Christians and the Church. One of the continuing influences of The Legacy has been in its standards of what counts as good, appropriate, and acceptable. These standards apply to a broad diversity of culture in things like proper behavior and etiquette, what counts as good scholarship, good art, good music, and, for Christianity, what counts as appropriate worship. Because worship is fundamental to who we are and what we do as Christians, one of the essential ways for the Church to repent and to change its life and practices is to decolonize its worship. What decolonizing Christianity's worship means is complicated and extensive. Conversations and experiments in change are just beginning and are in the process. There are not only issues related to local practices in congregations, but interconnected international issues as well. To help us begin our conversation on this podcast about decolonizing worship, I am grateful to Brian Hehn of The Hymn Society , who volunteered to invite conversation partners. So, it is my honor and delight to welcome to this two-part interview, Dr. Becca Whitla and Dr. Marcell Silva Steuernagel along with welcoming back Brian. Dr. Becca Whitla is the Professor of Pastoral Studies at St. Andrew's College in Saskatoon where she teachers worship, preaching, and Christian Education. She worked in Toronto for many years as a music director in both Anglican and United Churches (Church of the Holy Trinity, and Trinity St Paul's United Church). She also co-directed Echo, a 70 voice women's choir, and worked in the trade union movement developing leadership through choral singing.  Becca recently published her first book, Liberation, (De)Coloniality, and Liturgical Practices: Flipping the Song Bird (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020). Dr. Marcell Silva Steuernagel is Assistant Professor of Church Music and Director of the Master of Sacred Music Program at Southern Methodist University's Perkins School of Theology. Marcell writes at the intersection of church music, theology, musicology, and performance theory. He served as Minister of Worship, Arts, and Communication at Redeemer Lutheran Church in Curitiba, Brazil, for more than a decade and is an internationally active composer and performer. His most recent monograph is Church Music Through the Lens of Performance. Brian Hehn is Director of The Center for Congregational Song. Experienced using a variety of genres and instrumentations, he has lead worship for Baptists, Roman Catholics, United Methodists, Presbyterians, and many more across the U.S. and Canada. He received his Bachelor of Music Education from Wingate University, his Master of Sacred Music from Perkins School of Theology, Southern Methodist University, and is certified in children's church music (K-12) by Choristers Guild. He has articles published on sacred music and congregational song in multipl...

This Matters
How Canada's museums are decolonizing and transforming

This Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 11:18


Guest: Jeremy Nuttall, investigative reporter for the Toronto Star In the middle of societal and racial reckonings, many Canadians are asking questions about their shared histories, education and how reliable the stories of our past are. Are they written by the people and communities they're reflecting or is it colonial history? Some of Canada's biggest museums are now are taking a hard look at their exhibits and storytelling, especially when it comes to Indigenous history, which has often be treated as separate from Canada's past rather than a central part of it. The work of “decolonizing” the spaces where we share our stories has begun but what does that actually look like?

Welcome to the (AfAm) House
Decolonizing Healthcare

Welcome to the (AfAm) House

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 55:29


Ericka Hart Instagram: @ihartericka Website: http://ihartericka.com/ Wear Your Voice - They need to hit their patreon goal by Nov 30! Twitter: @WearYourVoice Patreon: @wearyourvoice patreon.com/wearyourvoice Baldwin 2nd Generation - Instagram Link to My Gender is Black article mentioned in the podcast

Going Beyond the Food: Intuitive Eating, Emotional Eating, Body Neutrality, Diet Mindset and Anti-Diet Podcast
BONUS - Undiet Your Coaching Podcast Ep #28 - Decolonizing Diet Culture-Panel Discussion with Unyime Oguta, Jin Kim, Tara Rivera & Marissa Prieto

Going Beyond the Food: Intuitive Eating, Emotional Eating, Body Neutrality, Diet Mindset and Anti-Diet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 11:30


Decolonizing diet culture and our approach to non-diet coaching is essential for the healing of all of our clients and it's goes beyond simply white people's food. Diet culture centers on the white narrative of what is “healthy”. Non-diet coaches need to know how to hold space for clients who have been taught that their food is “bad”, and play an active role in decolonizing diet culture in practice. What you'll learn listening to this episode:  How white culture sets the “standard” in diet culture  Why our language around culture & food matters  How to support clients whose culture is erased in diet culture  Tips for coaches to decolonize diet culture in practice  Links mentioned in the show: Non-Diet Professional Mentorship Program Free Professional Training & Resources Connect with our guests: Podcast - Unyime Instagram - Unyime Facebook - Unyime Instagram - Jin Website - Tara Instagram - Tara Facebook - Tara Website - Marissa Instagram - Marissa Facebook - Marissa

The Poor Prole's Almanac
Decolonizing Grazing with Joshua Muñoz-Jiménez of Resylien

The Poor Prole's Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 49:59


In this episode, we chat with Joshua about multispecies grazing, mob grazing, and what it means to decolonize grazing and regenerative agriculture both in theory and in practice. Further, we chat about indigenous farming practices both here in North America and in the global south, and how regenerative agriculture comes with different baggage in each region.   Check out Resylien at: https://www.resylien.com/     Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac    

Holistic Life Navigation
[Ep. 64] Somatic Education | Devie Rose (Holistic Coach & Teacher)

Holistic Life Navigation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 41:37


Devie Rosie is my guest today. She works as a substitute teacher for Canada's public school system. She's also a breathwork facilitator who is, both, trauma-informed & has studied somatic psychology.We speak about how learning is dependent on safety, connection, and capacity. Together, we chat about ideas and philosophies on why school can be so traumatic and how, one teacher at a time, we can create deeper co-regulation with students and support their nervous systems to learn and stay present.You can visit Devie's website here.

What On Earth
Why decolonizing COP can help keep 1.5 alive

What On Earth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 34:07


Negotiations continue at COP26 and Indigenous leaders are in Glasgow for the talks, even though they don't have seats at the bargaining table. Hear why some believe it's a waste of time to try to be heard, while others argue it's essential.

To The Best Of Our Knowledge
Decolonizing the Mind

To The Best Of Our Knowledge

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 51:47


Colonization in Africa was much more than a land grab. It was a project to replace — and even erase — local cultures. To label them inferior. Music, arts, literature and of course language. In other words, it permeated everything. So how do you undo that? How do you unlearn what you've been forced to learn? In this hour, produced in partnership with the Consortium of Humanities Centers and Institutes (CHCI) and Africa is a Country — we learn what it means to decolonize the mind. Original Air Date: March 20, 2021 Guests: Adom Getachew — Simon Gikandi — Ngugi wa Thiong'o Interviews In This Hour: Reckon with the Past To Decolonize the Future — Reclaiming the Hidden History of Blackness — Never Write In The Language of the Colonizer

To The Best Of Our Knowledge
Decolonizing the Mind

To The Best Of Our Knowledge

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 51:47


Colonization in Africa was much more than a land grab. It was a project to replace — and even erase — local cultures. To label them inferior. Music, arts, literature and of course language. In other words, it permeated everything. So how do you undo that? How do you unlearn what you've been forced to learn? In this hour, produced in partnership with the Consortium of Humanities Centers and Institutes (CHCI) and Africa is a Country — we learn what it means to decolonize the mind. Original Air Date: March 20, 2021 Guests: Adom Getachew — Simon Gikandi — Ngugi wa Thiong'o Interviews In This Hour: Reckon with the Past To Decolonize the Future — Reclaiming the Hidden History of Blackness — Never Write In The Language of the Colonizer

Get Up in the Cool
Episode 271: Brandi Waller-Pace, Nelson Williams, and Jake Blount (Old Time Bass, FWAAMfest, and Post-Quarantine Touring)

Get Up in the Cool

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 43:23


Welcome to Get Up in the Cool: Old Time Music with Cameron DeWhitt and Friends! This week's friends are Brandi Waller-Pace, Nelson Williams, and Jake Blount. We recorded this in September at IBMA in Raleigh, North Carolina. Tunes and songs in this episode: * Big Sciota (0:37) * Running in the Whist Oaks (11:20) * Will Adams' Wild Horses at Stony Point (20:11) * Sittin' On Top of the World (31:23) * Piney Woods Gal (38:49) * Bonus track: Sally Gooden Follow Nelson Williams on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bassic_nelson/ and hire him! nelson.williams.bass@gmail.com Visit Jake Blount's website: https://jakeblount.com/ Buy Spider Tales! https://freedirt.net/collections/jake-blount Visit (and sponsor!) the Fort Worth African American Roots Music Festival website: https://www.fwaamusicfest.com/ Follow on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/fwaamfest/ and on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fwaamusicfest/ Visit (and donate to!) Decolonizing the Music Room's website: https://decolonizingthemusicroom.com/ Follow on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/decolonizingthemusicroom/ and on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/decolonizemusic Visit Brandi Waller-Pace's website: https://brandipacemusic.com/ Follow on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brandipacemusic/ and on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brandipacemusic Support Get Up in the Cool on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/getupinthecool Buy Get Up in the Cool merch like t-shirts, phone cases, and masks! https://teespring.com/new-get-up-in-the-cool-swag Sign up at https://www.pitchforkbanjo.com/ for my clawhammer instructional series! Check out Cameron's other podcast, Think Outside the Box Set: https://boxset.fireside.fm/

The Elementary Music Teacher Podcast: Music Education
175- Decolonizing Music Education with Giuliana Conti

The Elementary Music Teacher Podcast: Music Education

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 46:52


What does decolonizing music education look like? Are there steps you can take to make sure you're making your music classroom equitable for every student who comes through your doors? In this episode, I brought on Giuliana Conti to discuss this with me. The advice she shares throughout the entire episode is awesome and you'll get practical tips you can apply into your teaching right away. One of the best quotes from this episode is that equity means access, accountability, and opportunity to learn. In the classroom, equity means thinking critically about what you're presenting, how you're presenting it, and your role in it. After listening in, I can't wait to hear what your key takeaways are. Giuliana Conti is a proud educator, education researcher, and leader. She has committed five years to representing nearly 15,000 colleagues in local, state, and national arenas while evaluating and developing the advancement of GPSS as an organization. She also has five years of teaching experience in the K-8 music setting. Her recent focus has been on increased communication with stakeholders and partners, professional development programming for our constituents, and providing her team with a strategic plan grounded in inclusive, effective, and sustainable processes for the next three years. As a PhD researcher she has carried out a sizable portfolio of qualitative and quantitative studies. These have involved standard and innovative processes within study design, need assessment, data collection, analysis, evaluation, and impact measurement. While my Doctorate is in music education specifically, she has a deep understanding of the practical and theoretical intersections between psychology, sociology, cognition, culture, learning, policy, reform, and student-centered curriculum development in K-12 settings. She loves teaching, and contributing to the success of others within education. Links mentioned in this episode: Connect with Giuliana on Twitter The Smithsonian Folkway website World Music Pedagogy books by Patricia Campbell Find out more about and sign up for the HARMONY membership waitlist here. Head to my website to grab your free music teaching resource. I'd love for you to leave a rating and a review of the podcast on I-tunes, be sure to share the podcast with any music teacher friends who would find it helpful and be sure to tag me on Instagram or Facebook.

Redefining Health & Wellness
Decolonizing Time and Liberating Flow with Ixchel Lunar | #115

Redefining Health & Wellness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 41:17


Time is something we're always talking about, trying to wrap our heads around, and proclaiming we don't have enough of, but I've never heard it spoken about in quite the way Ixchel Lunar does in this episode. Ixchel is a Decolonial Time Witch who helps people decolonize and reclaim their time so they can liberate their flow. We chatted about the differences between colonial time and indigenous time, how flow and rest are interconnected, and strategies for taking back your time from dominator culture. You can find the show notes and a full transcript of this episode at https://shohrehdavoodi.com/115.

Things Not Seen Podcast
#2143 - Decolonizing Theological Education: Elizabeth Conde-Frazier

Things Not Seen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 65:42


In her recent book, Atando Cabos, our guest Elizabeth Conde-Frazier explores the rich and varied contributions of Latinx communities to theological education. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Maverick Show with Matt Bowles
155: Decolonizing Ourselves, Cultivating an Anti-Oppression Lens, And Living in the Hyphen with Justine Abigail Yu

The Maverick Show with Matt Bowles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 77:52


Justine Abigail Yu takes us on her journey growing up in Toronto as a Filipina-Canadian, navigating that hyphenated identity, and living between two cultures.  She describes how travel has impacted her and reflects on the impact of traveling back to the Philippines at different points in her life.  Justine gives tips on visiting the Philippines, where you should go, and why you should definitely not skip Manila. She also talks about attending the Fringe Festival in Manila, and how it functions as a space for the expression of gender fluidity within a conservative society.  Justine then shares the story of how she met her relationship partner while traveling.  She shares their experiences traveling as a mixed race couple in Asia, and how it provoked some of her most profound reflections on the importance of decolonizing ourselves.  Justine also talks about her trip to East Africa and reflects on the evolution of her anti-oppression politics and the development of her 3DR Approach—Decolonize, Disrupt, Dismantle and Rebuild.  She then talks about her magazine, Living Hyphen, reflects on the importance of storytelling for marginalized communities, and discusses the expansion and future of the project.  Justine also talks about her role as the Marketing and Communications Director at Wanderful, and her involvement in developing their Anti-Oppression toolkit for content creators.  She then explains her role as the senior advisor for the RISE Travel Institute which promotes responsible, impactful, sustainable & ethical travel.  And, finally, Justine reflects on the concepts of allyship and solidarity and what travel means to her today.  FULL SHOW NOTES AVAILABLE AT: www.TheMaverickShow.com GET MATT'S FREE MAVERICK WHITE PAPER “Real Estate Investing for Digital Nomads:  How to Buy U.S. Rental Properties from Anywhere in the World and Finance an Epic International Lifestyle” GET MATT'S FREE MAVERICK PACKING VIDEO “Stylish Minimalism:  How to Travel the World Long-Term with Carry-On Luggage Only”

As Told By Nomads
592: How Flexible Funding and Decolonizing Development Works with Nabeeha Kazi Hutchins

As Told By Nomads

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 40:44


In today's episode of the As Told by Nomads Podcast, join me and Nabeeha Kazi Hutchins as we talk about why flexible funding is imperative to movement making and advocacies. As a third-culture kid, Nabeeha shares how her lived experiences of multi-culturalism helped her to grow up resilient and with an open mind. Now, as the President and CEO of PAI, Nabeeha helps us understand the colonization mindset in development as a whole, the problems that hinder easy access to quality women's reproductive healthcare, and how flexibility can be achieved in funding developmental projects and policies. A Tough Talk About DifferenceIn the early 70s, being an immigrant in America wasn't as talked about as it is now. For Nabeeha's parents, preparing her for how the setting would probably differ was essential. Even though she didn't have any significant negative experiences, Nabeeha understood so many things about her difference early. For example, Nabeeha understood that she'd probably be the only brown child in her circle. She'll also probably be the only immigrant and Muslim among her friends. Because she couldn't eat pork, Nabeeha was also made to understand that there is a possibility that she would not be catered to like other kids at school. But to prepare her for all of these, Nabeeha's mom made sure that she had everything she needed. Because they don't fit with the norm, Nabeeha's mom clarified how she couldn't always expect the world to meet her needs and meet her where she is... Yes, these all sound terrible to say to a child. But for Nabeeha, that upbringing gave her the resilience and open mind that she now leads with. Outline of the episode:● [03:20] Nabeeha's early years● [06:06] Growing up in a multi-cultural household…● [08:00] A parent's role is critical when raising third-culture kids● [13:29] How did Nabeeha navigate through her field of career?● [16:10] Following your curiosities can attract the right opportunities.● [18:11] What is PAI?● [20:11] The cross-cutting effects of accessible quality health care and advanced education on sexual and reproductive rights to young women● [24:35] What are some of the biggest barriers that hinder the advancement of better reproductive health care for young women?● [29:04] The colonization mindset in development● [32:20] We need to be flexible when it comes to fundings! ● [35:07] Where do accountability, awareness, and mechanism come in?Resources:Website: https://pai.org/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/nabeeha-kazi-hutchins-31ba286/ Connect with Tayo Rockson and the As Told By Nomads Podcast on:Personal Website: https://tayorockson.comUYD Management: https://uydmanagement.com/UYD Collective: https://tayorockson.com/uyd-collectiveLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tayorockson Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcastTwitter: https://twitter.com/TayoRockson See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.