Podcasts about Charles Spurgeon

British preacher, author, pastor and evangelist

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Charles Spurgeon

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Basic Training Bible Ministries
"I will bless those who bless you" -- The Forgotten Ministry of the Church

Basic Training Bible Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022


This video and the previous two describe the context and reason for "the blessed hope," the rapture of the Church. We have a few brief hours now before the rapture to embrace a divine mission, a “charter” of the church, if you will, that we've largely forgotten. That is the Christian's responsibility to Israel. If we've believed in Jesus Christ, 1st Peter 2:5-9 tells us that we are “a royal priesthood.” Why are we a royal priesthood? Because the high priest is a King, namely, the Lord Jesus Christ, who is also the “King of Righteousness and the “King of Peace,” and the true Melchizedek. The Church is a priesthood chosen for a specific purpose under true Melchizedek. To start, we learn in the Book of Genesis that God called a man who would be the head of two races. Abraham would be the father of many nations, but really the head of two spiritual races. Abraham would have a “seed,” of which Paul tells us in Galatians 3:16 speaks of Christ. But that seed would be “more in number than the stars of the heavens and the sand of the seashore.” A “heavenly people” anticipated the church, and an “earthly people” anticipated the nation of Israel (and those who “enter into her fold,” including Gentiles of every other nation.) The “seed” would be heavenly and earthly, and ultimately it would all be one. As Jesus said in John 10:16, “one flock, one Shepherd,” yet distinct and unique, but brought together as one. In Genesis Chapter 14, there's a story of nations hostile to Israel who come into the land. Abraham, of course, is living as a nomad. Five armies come into the land under Chedorlaomer, and they sweep through the land. And as they're snatching up captives, they take Lot and his family. Abraham hears about it. Genesis 14:13 says “One who had escaped came and told Abraham the Hebrew.” The word “Hebrew” means “the one who crosses the river.” And from Abraham comes a new Hebrew nation. He dwelt, “by the trees of Mamre,” which means “the teacher.” Abraham was staying at the trees of the teacher. Who's the teacher? Well, that is left for us to discover. Genesis 14:14-18 says, “Now when Abraham heard that his brother was taken captive, he armed his 318 trained servants, ... and he divided his forces against them by night, and his servants attacked them and pursued them as far as Hobah, which is north of Damascus. ... he brought back all the goods, and he brought back his brother Lot and his goods, as well as the women and the people. And the King of Sodom went out to meet him at the Valley of Shaveh (that is the King's Valley,) After his return from the defeat of Chedorlaomer and the Kings who were with him. Then Melchizedek, King of Salem brought out bread and wine ...” Isn't it interesting? 4000 years ago, a man steps on the scene to refocus Abraham, to deliver him from distraction, to deliver him from temptation. And he uses the same elements that Jesus used with the disciples in the upper room. Genesis 14:18 says Melchizedek "brought out bread and wine; He was the priest of the most high God, And he blessed him and said, ‘Blessed be Abraham of God, most high possessor of heaven on Earth, and blessed be God, most high, Who has delivered your enemies into your hand.'” Melchizedek blessed Abraham. What did God say in Genesis 12:3? “I will bless those who bless you and I will curse those who curse you.” And Melchizedek, who, I believe was Abram's mentor, the teacher who taught at the Oaks of Mamre, blessed Abraham. In Hebrews 5:1, we meet Melchizedek again: “For every high priest” not talking now about a general priesthood, but the High Priest, “is taken from among men is appointed for men in things pertaining to God.” High priests do have the role of standing between God and man, but the primary role of any priest is intercession. Genesis 5:3-6 says, “Because of this, he is required as for the people, so also for himself to offer sacrifices for sins. And no man takes this honor to himself. But he who is called by God, just as Aaron was.” Now, the crux is verse five. “So also, Christ did not glorify himself to become a high priest, but it was He who said to Him, ‘You are my son today. I have begotten you.'” We know from the Psalms that this was spoken to Jesus Christ after the resurrection. “This day I have begotten you. And he also says in another place, you are a priest forever.” This is a quote from Psalm 110:4. Jesus Christ became the High Priest of the Order of Melchizedek on His resurrection to form a priesthood of a new order. This new order did not follow the Levitical priesthood. It was not of the lineage of the Levitical priesthood, and had a completely different purpose. The priesthood of the order of Melchizedek, takes its cue from that shadowy, mysterious figure, who comes on the scene in Genesis 14. At at a critical time in the beginning of the history of the Hebrew people, Melchizedek brings focus and devotion and dedication. Let's look at Hebrews Chapter seven. Hebrews 7:1 says, “This Melchizedek King of Salem, priest of the most high God who met Abraham, returning from the slaughter of the Kings and blessed him to whom also Abraham gave a tenth part of all, first being translated king of righteousness, and then also King of Salem, meaning king of peace without father, without mother, without genealogy, having neither beginning of days nor end of life, but made like the Son of God.” This is not saying that he didn't have a mother and a father or a human earthly line. It simply means that because the Scripture shrouds him in mystery, we don't know where he came from, nor know his lineage. “He has been made like the Son of God” by virtue of how he's presented. He is not the Son of God. Hebrews 7:4-7 continues, “Now consider how great this man was, to whom even the Patriarch Abraham gave a tenth of the spoils. And indeed, those who are the sons of Levi, who receive the priesthood, have a commandment to receive tithes from the people according to the law that is from their brethren, though they have come from the loins of Abraham, but he whose genealogy is not derived from them, that is not of the Leviticus order, receive tithes from Abraham and blessed him who had the promises. Now beyond all contradiction, the lesser is blessed by the better.” What was it God, said to Abraham, again? "He who blesses you I will bless and he who curses you, I will curse." And the author of Hebrews says, "the lesser is blessed by the greater. Here mortal man receives ties, but there he receives them, of whom it is written that he lives. And even Levi, who receives tithes, paid tithes through Abraham, so to speak, or he was still in the loins of his father when Melchizedek met him.” Seven principles of the Melchizedek priesthood (from Hebrews Chapter 7) The priesthood is to bless the nation of Israel. You and I are not called to be their judge. We are called to be a priesthood standing in their behalf. We are to minister to them righteousness and peace. Here's our evangelistic outreach to the Jewish people. There are many ministries that are totally devoted to the evangelism of the Jewish people. All ministries should be devoted to some degree to the evangelism of the Jewish people. We are to be conformed to the character of Christ “made like the Son of God.” Romans 12:2 says, “Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind.” This priesthood is a royal and an eternal priesthood. In other words, it comes from the lineage of the King, but not through the lineage of Israel. And it lasts forever. That's your priesthood. “He remains a priest perpetually.” There is no end to this ministry. What are you and I going to be doing throughout the ages world without end? We're going to be functioning as a priesthood after the order of Melchizedek, ministering to them and to all who have come into their full faith. Our priesthood, after the order of Melchizedek, receives the spoils of victory as a tithe. There's a victory coming that is much greater than the victory Abraham had. There's a victory coming that is going to involve the entire world. It's going to be a tiny remnant of a shattered nation that is going to conquer the earth and they're going to win their victory because we'll be playing our part. The priesthood of Melchizedek is not of Jewish lineage. Notice verse six, “whose genealogy is not derived from them, received tithes from Abraham.” The priesthood after the order of Melchizedek is superior. Verse seven says, “Beyond all contradiction, the lesser is blessed by the better." You have the word "better." "Better" is a key word in the Book of Hebrews, and it means that which is superior by comparison. Hebrews 11:1 starts, “Faith is the substance of things hoped for in the evidence of things not seen.” Hebrews 11:6 tells us that, “Without faith it is impossible to please him. For he who comes to God must believe that He is and that He is a rewarder of those who diligently seek him.” And then Hebrews begins a roster of those who, through Old Testament times and generations of Old Testament believers, sought God, beginning back before Abraham. It's a lineage of faith and interesting to ask the question, “Why did he include the people he included, and why did he leave out the people he left out?” Notice what he says, starting in Hebrews 11:33, “Who, through faith, subdued kingdoms, worked righteousness, obtain promises, stop the mouths of lions, quench the violence of fire, escape the edge of the sword out of weakness were made strong.” This is the key to whom the writer of Hebrews chose to list. Hebrews 11:39 says, “And all these, having obtained a good testimony through faith, did not receive the promise.” Do you remember 1st Peter 1:10-12, where Peter reports that the prophets were perplexed because they saw that something was coming? Both "sufferings" and “glories.” How does this fit? Old Testament believers thought, “what kind of a time can this be?" Old Testament writer could not put it all together.” 1st Peter 1:12 answers, “But it was revealed to them that what they were ministering was not to themselves, but to us.” They didn't even know who we were. “A people that are not a nation of people yet to be created," but a people who one day are going to read their story and be made strong because of it and accomplish something because of it. A people who are “grafted in” so that “the root,” Israel, doesn't die. So that the root survives. So that the Olive Tree finally blossoms again and bears fruit. Look at Hebrews 11:40. “God, having provided something better for us, better again, superior.” Why did He do that? “So that they should not be made perfect without us.” So that they would not fulfill the plan of God for them as a nation without the help of the Church. So that God's plan for them could not be fulfilled until He created a new people, a nation that could “provoke them to jealousy,” a nation that could be an example to them. A nation that they would be able to look back like you and I look back at Hebrews 11 and the roster of 2000 years. They will look back at a roster of 2000 years, and they're going to read the stories of John Wesley, Charles Spurgeon, and D.L. Moody. Future Israelis are going to hear about Church Saints, great and small. They're going to be affected even by you and I. They're going to say, "how great were those people? How great was the love that they had for us?" They're going to know, once their eyes are opened at the rapture of the Church, and they see their foolish leadership sign a seven-year covenant, and those 144,000 evangelists get sealed, that the time of the tribulation period starts. And seven years later, preserved through horrible, unimaginable circumstances, they are going to meet Jesus Christ on the Mount of Olives. They are going to be gathered there waiting when He comes back. And guess who else going to meet them there? Us. We have a few brief hours to embrace this aspect of our mission. I think we've largely forgotten about our responsibilities to Israel and these yet-future people. Three Corrective Actions to Take Intercede on behalf of Israel. That's the greatest and the strongest thing you can do. Don't just pray for the nation now. Don't just pray that they will be delivered from their enemies. Now think ahead. Look ahead into the story and lodge prayers before the throne of God that are going to get answered. Then you pray for the 144,000. You pray that God might use you to start something, to send out a ripple that's going to have an impact on them. A book that you send a prayer that you pray. A witness that you give, you never know. Stand up for Israel. Stand up for them in the arena of world opinion. Stand up in the arena of your sphere of influence. Don't hold your tongue when people bad-mouth Israel. Shelter the Jews. The day may come that you'll have to shelter them. Anti-Semitism is sweeping the world again. Isn't it interesting hostility of a kind that we haven't seen since Nazi Germany is now in Germany, France, Britain, America? I would wrap all of this up under one phrase, “Don't let the blessed hope lose its blessing for you.” It's a blessed hope for a reason. And that is that we have fulfilled our mission and that God is now going to be able to bring the children of Israel to the knowledge of Him.

Knowing Faith
After The Fact: Spurgeon and the Trinity with Dr. Geoff Chang

Knowing Faith

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 7:08


Kyle Worley is joined by Dr. Geoff Chang to answer the question, did Charles Spurgeon believe in a big God?Questions Covered in This Episode:Did Charles Spurgeon believe in a big God?What is one thing from Spurgeon that you have been spiritually encouraged by?Guest Bio: Dr. Geoff Chang serves as Assistant Professor of Church History and Historical Theology and the Curator of the Spurgeon Library. He also serves the Book Review Editor for History & Historical Theology at Themelios, the academic journal for The Gospel Coalition. He is the author of and the author of Spurgeon the Pastor: Recovering a Biblical and Theological Vision for Ministry.  You can follow him on Facebook and Twitter.Sponsors:Discover how Midwestern Seminary can equip you to more faithfully serve your church through formal theological education or FREE For the Church resources we provide: mbts.edu/KnowingFaithFollow Us:Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | WebsiteOur Sister Podcasts:The Family Discipleship Podcast | Confronting ChristianitySupport Training the Church and Become a Patron:patreon.com/trainingthechurch

Christ Redeemer Church » Sermons
The Helper, The Spirit of Truth

Christ Redeemer Church » Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 33:55


QUOTES FOR REFLECTION“God's love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit who has been given to us. For while we were still weak, at the right time Christ died for the ungodly.”~Romans 5:5-6“The Spirit-filled life is not a special, deluxe edition of Christianity. It is part and parcel of the total plan of God for His people.”~A. W. Tozer“I have a great need for Christ; I have a great Christ for my need.”~Charles Spurgeon“The work of the Spirit is to impart life, to implant hope, to give liberty, to testify of Christ, to guide us into all truth, to teach us all things, to comfort the believer, and to convict the world of sin.”~Dwight L. Moody“Trying to do the Lord's work in your own strength is the most confusing, exhausting, and tedious of all work. But when you are filled with the Holy Spirit, then the ministry of Jesus just flows out of you.”~Corrie Ten Boom“It is futile for us to try to serve God without the power of the Holy Spirit. Talent, training, and experience cannot take the place of the power of the Spirit.”~Warren W. Wiersbe“If we think of the Holy Spirit only as an impersonal power or influence, then our thought will constantly be, how can I get hold of and use the Holy Spirit; but if we think of Him in the biblical way as a divine Person, infinitely wise, infinitely holy, infinitely tender, then our thought will constantly be, ‘How can the Holy Spirit get hold of and use me?'”~R. A. Torrey“Were it not for the work of the Holy Spirit there would be no gospel, no faith, no church, no Christianity in the world at all.”~J. I. PackerSERMON PASSAGEJohn 15:26-16:15 (ESV)John 15 26 “But when the Helper comes, whom I will send to you from the Father, the Spirit of truth, who proceeds from the Father, he will bear witness about me. 27 And you also will bear witness, because you have been with me from the beginning. John 16 1 “I have said all these things to you to keep you from falling away. 2 They will put you out of the synagogues. Indeed, the hour is coming when whoever kills you will think he is offering service to God. 3 And they will do these things because they have not known the Father, nor me. 4 But I have said these things to you, that when their hour comes you may remember that I told them to you. “I did not say these things to you from the beginning, because I was with you. 5 But now I am going to him who sent me, and none of you asks me, ‘Where are you going?' 6 But because I have said these things to you, sorrow has filled your heart. 7 Nevertheless, I tell you the truth: it is to your advantage that I go away, for if I do not go away, the Helper will not come to you. But if I go, I will send him to you. 8 And when he comes, he will convict the world concerning sin and righteousness and judgment: 9 concerning sin, because they do not believe in me; 10 concerning righteousness, because I go to the Father, and you will see me no longer; 11 concerning judgment, because the ruler of this world is judged. 12 “I still have many things to say to you, but you cannot bear them now. 13 When the Spirit of truth comes, he will guide you into all the truth, for he will not speak on his own authority, but whatever he hears he will speak, and he will declare to you the things that are to come. 14 He will glorify me, for he will take what is mine and declare it to you. 15 All that the Father has is mine; therefore I said that he will take what is mine and declare it to you.”

The 260 Journey
Do You Want To See Your Family Get Saved?

The 260 Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 6:00


Day 225 Today's Reading: 1 Peter 3 The story goes that a lady approached Charles Spurgeon and told him that she felt called to the ministry. Spurgeon asked about her home and family. When he heard she had thirteen children, he exclaimed, “Well, praise God, not only has He called you to the ministry, but He's given you a congregation as well!” Our family is our first ministry priority. But how do you win your family to Christ? Today's chapter is one of the most important sections of the New Testament that gives us brilliant advice on how to win family members to Christ. But let me first tell you what was happening in the early church. Women were getting saved faster than men. In fact, the women wrote to Paul in 1 Corinthians 7 asking if they should divorce their husbands since they were saved and their spouses were not. Paul told them, “Not so fast”: If a woman has a husband who is not a believer and he is content to live with her, she should not divorce him. For the unbelieving husband has been made holy by his believing wife. And the unbelieving wife has been made holy by her believing husband by virtue of his or her sacred union to a believer. Otherwise, the children from this union would be unclean, but in fact, they are holy. And wives, for all you know, you could one day lead your husband to salvation. Or husbands, how do you know for sure that you could not one day lead your wife to salvation? (1 Corinthians 7:13-16, TPT) Wives, for all you know, you could one day lead your husband to salvation. It seems once Paul got the women to stay with the unsaved spouses, Peter stepped in. Here is the strategy he gave to win them to Christ: In the same way, you wives, be submissive to your own husbands so that even if any of them are disobedient to the word, they may be won without a word by the behavior of their wives, as they observe your chaste and respectful behavior. (1 Peter 3:1-2) Peter's advice to the women: stop using words; stop talking. There comes a time when you must tell yourself; They have heard the gospel message from me. Now they must see the effects of the gospel through my life and not just through my lips. It's time for them to see Christ, not just hear about Christ. Preaching the gospel does not just need your voice. It is more powerful when it's shown through the other parts of your body. I think Peter's words to these women are not just for ladies with unsaved husbands but for anyone with an unsaved family member whom they want to win to the Lord. I love Peter's words: that they may be won without a word by the behavior of their wives. The way a son wins a father . . . the way a daughter wins a grandmother . . . the way a brother wins his sister . . . through behavior! They can watch the life of Christ as it comes through us in our attitudes, our commitments, and our actions. A. W. Tozer said: “There are those rare Christians whose very presence is an incitement to you to want to be a better Christian.” I want to be that rare Christian. I think the same is true for those who are not Christians wanting to become a Christian because someone's life inspired them. There comes a time when doing the dishes, being home at curfew when asked, respecting the rules of the home, showing wise stewardship over the family finances, and making family a priority preaches more than if you had a preacher in the home. Peter was giving advice not just to women but to all saved family members who live in the house with unsaved family members. The first words of verse 1 are so important: “In the same way . . .” He was referring to the verses in 1 Peter 2. The same way as . . . ? Here is who Peter was referencing: This is the kind of life you've been invited into, the kind of life Christ lived. He suffered everything that came his way so you would know that it could be done and also know how to do it, step-by-step. He never did one thing wrong, not once said anything amiss. They called him every name in the book, and he said nothing back. He suffered in silence, content to let God set things right. (1 Peter 2:21-23, MSG) That's his answer: In the same way that Jesus faced the cross is the way we deal with our home life with unsaved family. Our example is Jesus. Peter said that they can call us names—church boy, holier than thou, fanatic. Even then, we must be quiet with our words and not respond or retaliate. Well, we can retaliate . . . with good behavior, being content as we wait for God to set things straight. There's a story about Alexander the Great, a great military general. One night during a campaign, restless and unable to sleep, he left his tent and walked around his soldiers' campground. As he wandered around, he came across a soldier on guard duty who had fallen asleep, a very serious offense. One, in fact, that could get him killed. The soldier awoke as Alexander the Great approached him and immediately recognized who it was. “Do you know what the penalty is for falling asleep on guard duty?” Alexander the Great asked the soldier. “Yes, sir,” the soldier responded, his voice quivering. “Soldier, what's your name?” asked Alexander the Great. “Alexander, sir.” Alexander the Great repeated the question: “What is your name?” “My name is Alexander, sir,” the soldier repeated. A third time and more loudly, Alexander the Great asked, “What is your name?” A third time the soldier meekly said, “My name is Alexander, sir.” Alexander the Great looked the young man in the eye. “Soldier,” he said with intensity, “either change your name or change your conduct.” Let our actions speak loudly of who Jesus is, so our family can see the difference.

Joni and Friends Radio
Take Hold of His Character

Joni and Friends Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 4:00


Intimacy with God involves finding handholds and footholds in his character – plead with him on the basis of who he is! He is faithful and he will complete the good work he has begun in you.

The 260 Journey
Precious Is A Rare Word

The 260 Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 6:50


Day 223 Today's Reading: 1 Peter 1 Seventeenth-century evangelist John Wesley was returning home from a service one night when he was robbed. Unfortunately for the thief, Wesley had only very little money and some Christian literature. As the robber turned to leave, Wesley said, “Stop! I have something more to give you.” The surprised robber paused. “My friend,” said Wesley, “you may live to regret this sort of life. If you ever do, here's something to remember: ‘The blood of Jesus Christ cleanses us from all sin!'” The thief hurried away, and Wesley prayed for the man. Years later, after a Sunday service, a man approached him. It was the robber! Only now, he was a believer in Christ and a successful businessman. “I owe it all to you,” said the man. “Oh no, my friend,” Wesley said. “Not to me, but to the precious blood of Christ that cleanses us from all sin!” The word precious is not used in common things. We use it today when we are dealing with metals and stones. We refer to diamonds, rubies, sapphires, and emeralds as precious stones. And gold, platinum, and silver are our precious metals. They are precious because they are rare. The Bible uses this word precious sparingly. There are only four things called precious in the Bible, and we find all of them in Peter's epistles: precious cornerstone (1 Peter 2:6); precious blood of Jesus (1 Peter 1:19); precious faith (2 Peter 1:1); and precious promises (2 Peter 1:4). In today's chapter, we focus on the precious blood of Jesus. Here are Peter's words to remind us of the power of the blood of Jesus and why it is precious to us as believers: "You know that your lives were ransomed once and for all from the empty and futile way of life handed down from generation to generation. It was not a ransom payment of silver and gold, which eventually perishes, but the precious blood of Christ—who, like a spotless, unblemished lamb, was sacrificed for us. "This was part of God's plan, for he was chosen and destined for this before the foundation of the earth was laid, but he has been made manifest in these last days for you. It is through him that you now believe in God, who raised him from the dead and glorified him so that you would fasten your faith and hope in God alone." (1 Peter 1:18-21, TPT) The blood of Jesus does two things—and these are two big theological words—expiation and propitiation. Sometimes called atonement, expiation is what the blood does for us (it washes away our sin). Whereas propitiation, sometimes called satisfaction, is what the blood does for God (it turns away His wrath from us because the blood of His Son satisfies His justice). R. T. Kendall explains it well: “Charles Spurgeon used to say there are two words you need in your theological vocabulary: “substitution” and “satisfaction.” There is no gospel apart from these two concepts.” Jesus acted as our substitute. Substitution is that Jesus literally did everything on our behalf by His keeping the law for us and dying for us. This is why we put all our hope on Jesus and His death. And satisfaction means that God's justice has been completely and eternally satisfied by what Jesus did for us when He shed His blood. Why is the blood of Jesus precious to us? “Eternally speaking, there are two ways whereby God punishes sin: the fires of hell and the blood of Jesus,” R. T. Kendall says. “It's not a question of whether your sin will be punished; it's a question of how.” The blood of Jesus redeems you and me—not our hard work, not our tears, not our promises. The blood of Jesus is what God sees over our lives. The story goes that reformer Martin Luther had a dream one night in which Satan visited him and began attacking him. Satan unrolled a long scroll, which held a list of Luther's sins and showed it to him. Luther looked over the list, got to the end, and said, “Is that all?” “No,” said the devil and produced a second scroll. And then a third. After looking over all of his sins, Luther said, “You've forgotten something. Quickly write on each of them, ‘The blood of Jesus Christ God's Son cleanses us from all sins!'” Satan, defeated, howled in protest and disappeared. When you are wondering if you have really been forgiven of your sin, you always have to go back to the blood of Jesus. His blood was enough to satisfy God. When you doubt your salvation, you are putting the blood on trial. Consider this powerful story about putting the blood on trial: One night in a church service, a young woman felt the tug of God at her heart. She responded to God's call and accepted Jesus as her Lord and Savior. The young woman had a very rough past involving alcohol, drugs, and prostitution. But, the change in her was evident. As time went on, she became a faithful member of the church. She eventually became involved in the ministry, teaching young children. It was not very long until this faithful young woman had caught the eye and heart of the pastor's son. The relationship grew, and they began to make wedding plans. This was when the problems began. You see, about one-half of the church did not think that a woman with a past such as hers was suitable for a pastor's son. The church began to argue and fight about the matter. So they decided to have a meeting. As the people made their arguments and tensions increased, the meeting was getting completely out of hand. The young woman became very upset about all the things being brought up about her past. As she began to cry, the pastor's son stood to speak. He could not bear the pain it was causing his wife to be. He began to speak, and his statement was this: “My fiancée's past is not what is on trial here. What you are questioning is the ability of the blood of Jesus to wash away sin. Today you have put the blood of Jesus on trial. So, does it wash away sin or not?” The whole church began to weep as they realized that they had been slandering the blood of the Lord Jesus Christ. . . . If the blood of Jesus does not cleanse the other person completely, then it cannot cleanse us completely. If that is the case, then we are all in a lot of trouble. What can wash away our sins? Nothing but the blood of Jesus. End of case!

Solus Christus Reformed Baptist Church
Charles Spurgeon's Literary and Writing-Autobiography

Solus Christus Reformed Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 25:00


NO life of Mr. Spurgeon would be complete unless it contained all available information concerning the books he read, or wrote, or owned. All who have been intimately acquainted with him, from his childhood, or in later years, have testified to the omnivorous character of his reading. -From his autobiography-

C. H. Spurgeon on SermonAudio
Charles Spurgeon's Literary and Writing-Autobiography

C. H. Spurgeon on SermonAudio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 25:00


A new MP3 sermon from The Narrated Puritan is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Charles Spurgeon's Literary and Writing-Autobiography Subtitle: The Narrated Puritan - T M S Speaker: C. H. Spurgeon Broadcaster: The Narrated Puritan Event: Sunday Service Date: 11/7/2022 Length: 25 min.

Daily Audio Prayer
Thinking Highly of Christ and being fit for God

Daily Audio Prayer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 8:38


We pray with Charles Spurgeon and The Puritans in the Valley of Vision --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/shawn-odendhaldap/message

The 260 Journey
More Valuable Than Rubies And Much Easier To Get

The 260 Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 5:36


Day 218 Today's Reading: James 1 In May 2012, a thirty-two-carat Burmese ruby-and-diamond ring—from the collection of Lily Safra, one of the richest women in the world—was sold at auction. The pre-auction estimate for the ring was $3 to $5 million, but the final sale price ended at $6.7 million. It is believed to be the most expensive ruby ever sold. As valuable as rubies are, the Bible tells us there is something more valuable than that: wisdom. As Proverbs 8:11 says, “For wisdom is better than rubies; and all the things that may be desired are not to be compared to it” (KJV). In today's chapter, James begins by telling us how to find this invaluable and rare jewel called wisdom. First we need to understand that wisdom is not simply information. I know a lot of intelligent people who are not wise. Being old is no guarantee of wisdom. And neither education nor experience alone make someone wise, although wisdom does include experience and education. And wisdom is not knowledge either. As former first lady Eleanor Roosevelt once said, “Never mistake knowledge for wisdom. One helps you make a living; the other helps you make a life.” Knowledge speaks, but wisdom listens. As Doug Larson said, “Wisdom is the reward you get for a lifetime of listening when you would have preferred to talk.” Each year in the United States 800,000 new books and 400,000 periodicals are published. As Brian Buffini rightly said, “We are drowning in information and starving for wisdom.” So what is wisdom and how do we get it? Charles Spurgeon best defined it when he gave the difference between wisdom and knowledge: “Wisdom is the right use of knowledge. To know is not to be wise. Many men know a great deal, and are all the greater fools for it. But to know how to use knowledge rightly is to have wisdom.” R. T. Kendall, who has been a spiritual father and mentor to me, also offers definitions of wisdom: • Wisdom is saying or doing the right thing—at the right time! • Wisdom focuses on knowing the next step forward in making decisions. • Wisdom is to possess the ability to get things done. • Wisdom [is] knowing what to do next. • Wisdom is getting God's opinion. Kendall explains, “God always has an opinion on any matter. He therefore should be consulted first when we are wanting to know the next step forward.” God always knows the next step but is rarely asked. I have good news. Wisdom is not far away. And James 1:5 tells us where wisdom can be found. James says if you want wisdom, it's found in prayer: “If any of you lacks wisdom, let him ask of God, who gives to all generously and without reproach, and it will be given to him.” I think counseling has gone up in the church because prayer has gone down. We get counseling to gain wisdom when we could have started with God instead of an office. I think prayerlessness is an insult to God. Every prayerless day is a statement by a helpless individual that says, I do not need God today. Baptist preacher Vance Havner said, “If you lack knowledge, go to school. If you lack wisdom, get on your knees.” Wisdom is available to those who ask God in prayer for it. That means wisdom and prayer go together. You can't have one without the other. No one who is wise is prayerless. And no one who is prayerless will ever be wise. We will never attain wisdom apart from the presence of God. Colossians 2:3 says, “In him lie hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge” (NLT). So He is our source and the source of wisdom. That means we can have an MBA or a PHD and still be D-U-M-B. Because if God is divorced from our lives, then we are divorced from the all-wise God. Every man of wisdom is a man of prayer. What God has joined together, let no man put asunder . . . and in this case, the wise pray and the prayerful are wise. Proverbs 13:20 “Walk with the wise and become wise” (NLT). So those who walk with God will have to be wise. Why? There is no one wiser than God. Walk with God. Talk with God. Listen to God. And watch how He rubs off on you. I lived in Detroit for thirty years. I lived down the street from the first auto factory in the United States. There is a really cool story about that plant. Henry Ford asked Charlie Steinmetz, an electrical genius, to build the generators for his automobile factory. One day the generators stopped working, and the repairmen couldn't figure out the problem. Ford called Steinmetz, who tinkered with the machines for a few hours and then hit the switch. Immediately the generators came to life. When Ford got the bill from Steinmetz, he was stunned. The amount was $10,000. When he asked why the bill was so high, Steinmetz replied: For tinkering with the generators, $10. For knowing where to tinker, $9,990. Ford paid the bill. wisdom knows the exact spot to make things work. God is like Charlie Steinmetz, He knows how to make life work.

Sound Doctrine
Me, an Evangelist? Part 1b

Sound Doctrine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 26:00


Every Christian is either a missionary or an imposter. So, said famed British preacher Charles Spurgeon. But it's more than an assertion, it's a challenge for the Christian to really be a Christian. You see once we receive the gospel, we're then to share it. Today on Sound Doctrine pastor Jeff Johnson takes us to Romans chapter ten. The emphasis here is on reaching out with the gospel. To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/621/29

Jumpstart Your Faith
E209: God is our Judge (Jude 1:14-16)

Jumpstart Your Faith

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 38:48


On December 18, 1853, Charles Spurgeon preached his first sermon at the New Park Street Baptist Chapel, later known as the Metropolitan Tabernacle. There were about 80 people present in an auditorium that could comfortably seat 1,200. The congregation was in great decline. But, once Spurgeon accepted the pastorate in March 1854, droves of people […]

Solus Christus Reformed Baptist Church
Prayers of Charles Spurgeon, John Macduff, et al

Solus Christus Reformed Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 17:00


C. H. Spurgeon on SermonAudio
Prayers of Charles Spurgeon, John Macduff, et al

C. H. Spurgeon on SermonAudio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 17:00


A new MP3 sermon from The Narrated Puritan is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Prayers of Charles Spurgeon, John Macduff, et al Subtitle: Puritans Prayers Speaker: C. H. Spurgeon Broadcaster: The Narrated Puritan Event: Audio Book Date: 10/27/2022 Length: 17 min.

Every Day Light: A Reading of the One Year Daily Bible

Jeremiah 42:1-44:23 2 Timothy 2 Psalm 92-93 Proverbs 26:3-5 Jesus's Sweet Voice from Charles Spurgeon's Morning and Evening Song: Atch - Found You Music provided by Vlog No Copyright Music. Creative Commons - Attribution 3.0 Unported Video Link: https://youtu.be/G774NKvUm88#NoCopyrightMusic#VlogMusic#VlogNoCopyrightMusic

CCBC Sermons
Charles Spurgeon Workshop - Talk #1

CCBC Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 67:01


Geoff Chang, Associate Professor of Church History and Historical Theology and the Curator of the Spurgeon Library at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Kansas City, MO, summarizes the life, salvation testimony and other exciting things on the life of Charles Spurgeon.

CCBC Sermons
Charles Spurgeon Workshop - Talk #2

CCBC Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 46:56


Geoff Chang, Associate Professor of Church History and Historical Theology and the Curator of the Spurgeon Library at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Kansas City, MO, summarizes Spurgeon as a pastor, philosophy of ministry and what pastors and local churches can learn today from Charles Spurgeon's pastoral legacy.

CCBC Sermons
Charles Spurgeon Workshop - Q&A

CCBC Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 13:25


Geoff Chang, Associate Professor of Church History and Historical Theology and the Curator of the Spurgeon Library at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Kansas City, MO, summarizes Spurgeon answers questions about Charles Spurgeon and his ministry.

Christ Talker
How to converse with God

Christ Talker

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 60:00


A message by Charles Spurgeon.

Thought For Today

I greet you in Jesus' precious name! It is Saturday morning, the 22nd of October 2022, and this is your friend, Angus Buchan, with a thought for today.“For he was wiser than all men.”1 Kings 4:31Who are we talking about? We are talking about Solomon, the wisest man that ever lived. In 1 Kings 3:5, you will see that the Lord said to Solomon, “Ask! What shall I give you?”In verse 9, Solomon's response to God was: “Therefore give to Your servant an understanding heart to judge Your people, that I may discern between good and evil. For who is able to judge this great people of Yours?”1 Kings 3:9Wisdom is something that God gives us when we ask Him. Now, Solomon asked correctly. He didn't ask for anything for himself. He asked the Lord to give him the wisdom to be able to govern the great nation of Israel, and because God saw his generous, selfless heart, God gave him everything. He was the richest man that had ever lived, that's a fact, richer than Bill Gates or anybody else, they have worked it out in relation to the riches of those days. He was also the wisest man. Remember, two women, two prostitutes, came to Solomon with a baby that they both said was theirs. Solomon said to his servant, “Bring me a sharp sword.” He said to the two women, “Give me the baby and I will cut the baby in half and give you half each.” Of course, the real mother said, “No, no! Give the baby to the other woman.” Then the wisest man on earth said, “There is the real mother.”I want to say to you that God gives us wisdom, not to make ourselves special, but to help others. Charles Spurgeon said something very interesting. He said, “Wisdom is the right use of knowledge. To know is not to be wise, no - but to know how to use knowledge is to have wisdom.”I want to encourage you today to ask the Lord to give you wisdom so that you can remain humble and He can teach you. John Calvin was one of the greatest theologians of his time and he said, “This is our wisdom, to become learners to the end.” You never arrive. I must be honest with you, the older I am getting, the more I realise that I know very little or nothing, but wisdom comes from the Lord. Wisdom is to know when to speak and when not to speak but to listen.Remember young people, God gave us two ears and one mouth. Why? Because He wants us to listen twice as much as He wants us to speak!“In the multitude of words sin is not lacking,But he who restrains his lips is wise.”Proverbs 10:19God bless you and have a wonderful day.Goodbye.

Morning Manna
The Refuge

Morning Manna

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 5:49


A refuge is defined as a shelter or protection from danger or distress,a place that provides shelter or protection. Deut. 33:27 says; God is our refuge and His everlasting arms are under you. Enjoy today me sharing Charles Spurgeon's devotion on this verse and rest in His refuge and arms today.

Podcast - SHE PROVES FAITHFUL
SPF 224: Glorification & What Will Heaven Be Like?

Podcast - SHE PROVES FAITHFUL

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 34:16


Charles Spurgeon once preached "WE cannot too often turn our thoughts heavenward, for this is one of the great cures for worldliness.” Today I am discussing glorification and what happens when a Christian dies. How does the teaching of glorification impact our daily living? Show Notes: sheprovesfaithful.com/podcast/episode224 Support $5 a Month: patreon.com/sheprovesfaithful

The 260 Journey
Does Jesus Really Understand What I Am Going Through?

The 260 Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 6:11


Day 208 Today's Reading: Hebrews 4 The second most difficult book in the Bible to understand is Hebrews, because of its assumption that the reader is familiar with the Old Testament. It is dependent upon reader's understanding of the book of Leviticus and it is written to Jews who would know this book completely. The two key words in the book are sacrifices and priest. In today's culture, we are not familiar with the concept of priesthood and sacrifices. The basic premise of Hebrews is that these Jews were getting tired of the battles that go along with being a Christian. The more secular the world becomes, the more at odds we appear to be. The more we are committed to Christ, the more we experience conflict and collision. Some of these Hebrew believers were being persecuted and even their property was being taken from them. These new Christians' wondered, How can we make it? Is it worth it? They were considering going back to the world and back to their old ways. The author of Hebrews had one simple message to give them: Jesus. He wanted them to know they had a friend in high places who would get them through because He really understands what they were experiencing: “We do not have a high priest who cannot sympathize with our weaknesses, but One who has been tempted in all things as we are, yet without sin. Therefore let us draw near with confidence to the throne of grace, so that we may receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need.” (Hebrews 4:15-16) That message is still true today: you are not alone. You have Someone with you and He is Someone who has been through what you are going through. The Message says it like this: “We don't have a priest who is out of touch with our reality. He's been through weakness and testing, experienced it all—all but the sin. So let's walk right up to him and get what he is so ready to give. Take the mercy, accept the help.” Wow! We serve a Jesus who has experienced it all. Why is this important? Charles Spurgeon said it well: “A Jesus who never wept could never wipe away my tears.” Is this really true? Does Jesus understand what you are going through because He has been through it Himself? Jesus doesn't just know what you are going through, He knows what it's like to go through it. This makes Him a personal Savior. There is nothing you have gone through that He has not gone through in some form or fashion. He understands what it is to be let down by friends. He understands betrayal. He understands fear and wanting to quit. He knows the pain of losing loved ones. He understands having someone close to Him murdered. Just to name a few. He found out what it's like to discover your life is on the clock. (Some hear it like this: “You have cancer; you have three months to live.”) He was a carpenter. He knows what it is to work a 9-5 job. He had deadlines and work orders. He knew homelessness: Jesus said, “The foxes have holes and the birds of the air have nests, but the Son of Man has nowhere to lay His head” (Matthew 8:20). Jesus knew what it's like to cry out to God and ask why when things got tough: He said on the cross: “My God, My God, why . . .?” (Matthew 27:46). So what is the result of having this kind of Jesus? The writer of Hebrews tells us in the first word of the next verse: Therefore. It means, “here's the reason” I just told you what I told you. Hebrews 4:16 reads: “Therefore let us draw near with confidence to the throne of grace, so that we may receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need.” He says, now that you know you have a High Priest who understands the pain of life, what are you going to do about it? And he gives the answer: “draw near with confidence to the throne of grace.” The King James Version says we are to “come boldly.” That says it all. In other words, we can approach God with frankness, bluntness. We can be open, plain, and daring—telling it like it is. We can have freedom in what we say. We can speak unreservedly. It's real talk. It is going to Jesus, not trying to impress Him, but telling him, “This is who I am, and this is what I am going through, and this is how I feel.” You say things like, “I am afraid,” “I don't want to die,” “I don't want to live,” “I can't go on another day,” “I'm through with this marriage.” The more you know Jesus, the more you can be real with Him. “Jesus loves you as you are not as you ought to be.” (Brennan Manning) And He knows you! So you don't have to pretend with Him. We can go to the throne boldly. Or as The Message puts it, “So let's walk right up to him and get what he is so ready to give.” How can we do that? We have the Son who understands and will take us to the Father. Did you know there was a time in American history when any citizen could go to see the president? At the end of the Civil War, a dejected Confederate soldier was sitting outside the grounds of the White House. A young boy approached and asked what was wrong. The soldier explained that he had repeatedly tried to see President Lincoln and had been unable to do so. He wanted to tell the president that his farm in the South had been unfairly taken by the Union soldiers. But each time he tried to enter the White House, the guards turned him away. The boy motioned to the soldier to follow him. When they approached the guarded entrance, the soldiers came to attention, stepped back, and opened the door for the boy. He proceeded to the library where the president was resting and introduced the soldier to his father. The boy was Tad Lincoln. He was the son of the President of the United States. The soldier had gained access to the president through the president's son. How much more should we rejoice in our access to the grace of the King of kings? We are connected to the Son and He can get us in to see the Father in tough times. The Son allows us to walk right up to Him.

The Missions Podcast
Charles Spurgeon as a Sending Pastor With Geoff Chang – #FTC22

The Missions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 15:41


Charles Spurgeon is beloved as the “prince of preachers.” But what did his church do for global missions? We explore with Geoff Chang, Assistant Professor of Church History and Historical Theology and the Curator of the Spurgeon Library at Midwestern Seminary. Watch the video version of this episode here. You can access all of our For the Church National Conference exclusives here. Chang is a graduate of The University of Texas at Austin (B.B.A.), The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary (M.Div.). Most recently, he completed his Ph.D. at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, where he wrote his dissertation on Charles H. Spurgeon's ecclesiology. Prior to Midwestern, Geoff worked as a database consultant until he discerned a call to ministry. Since leaving the business world, he has served on the ministry staff at Houston Chinese Church (Houston, TX) and Capitol Hill Baptist Church (Washington, DC), and most recently as associate pastor at Hinson Baptist Church (Portland, OR). He also serves the Book Review Editor for History & Historical Theology at Themelios, the academic journal for The Gospel Coalition. You can follow him on Facebook and Twitter. Believe in our mission? Support this podcast. The Missions Podcast is a ministry resource of ABWE. Learn more at abwe.org. Want to ask a question or suggest a topic? Email alex@missionspodcast.com.

The Stone Chapel Podcasts
Episode 114 Spurgeon’s College with Helen Stokley

The Stone Chapel Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 20:45


Spurgeon's College was established 175 years ago in London by young Charles Spurgeon. Their mission is to train people in knowledge of the Bible, to preach, and be ministers and leaders. The post Episode 114 Spurgeon's College with Helen Stokley first appeared on Lanier Theological Library.

For the Gospel Podcast
3 Keys to Understanding Biblical Prayer

For the Gospel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 22:19


In this episode Costi Hinn provides practical keys to understanding prayer. These truths will not only help you establish the right foundation in your prayer life, but they will also equip you to help others grow in their own prayer life. It was Charles Spurgeon who said, "I'd rather teach one man to pray than ten men to preach," because he — even as a mighty preacher — believed in the power of prayer! Not all believers will be gifted with the ability to preach, but every believer has been given the gift of prayer. 

Genesis Church - Sermons
Why Doctrine Matters in Our Mission

Genesis Church - Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 56:15


Every once in a while I will hear someone complaining about “doctrine” in the church, proclaiming that doctrine divides while Jesus unites, or that doctrine is cold and dead. Do doctrine and theology matter? Our story this week reveals Paul making a quick trip through the important city of Ephesus on his way back to Antioch. He preaches Jesus and there is a new church, yet he doesn’t stay long. Paul’s old friends from Corinth, Priscilla and Aquila, remain in Ephesus and come into contact with a gifted young preacher named Apollos. The dude can wax eloquent and knows much of the Bible. Yet, there were some areas of the Gospel that he was unaware of and needed more training and discipleship for his ministry. Priscilla and Aquila pour into the life and doctrine of this young preacher. We are reminded here that passion and gifts are not enough—that doctrine really does matter. Gifted preachers can preach an erroneous or incomplete Jesus, which can lead to churches embracing false gospels. Charles Spurgeon is attributed as saying, “A mist in the pulpit will lead to a fog in the pew.” The story of Apollos reminds us that theological formation matters in our spiritual growth and that authentic discipleship will shape the things we believe.

Christ Redeemer Church » Sermons

QUOTES FOR REFLECTION “The presence of the Holy Spirit is the keystone of all our hopes.” ~John Nelson Darby, Minister and key leader of Plymouth Brethren “It is the Holy Spirit that unveils our eyes to see the glory of Christ. It is the Holy Spirit who softens our hardened hearts so that we will repent. It is Christ who we are commanded to place our faith in. It is Christ who saves us and it is Christ that gives us eternal life.” ~Jackie Hill Perry, American poet, writer, and hip hop artist “We are 100 percent responsible for the pursuit of holiness, but at the same time we are 100 percent dependent upon the Holy Spirit to enable us in that pursuit. The pursuit of holiness is not a pull-yourself-up-by-your-own-bootstraps approach to the Christian life.” “Sanctification is the work of the Holy Spirit in us whereby our inner being is progressively changed, freeing us more and more from sinful traits and developing within us over time the virtues of Christlike character.” ~Jerry Bridges, Author and speaker “The Church is the Body of Christ, and the Spirit is the Spirit of Christ. He fills the Body, directs its movements, controls its members, inspires its wisdom, supplies it's strength. He guides into truth, sanctifies its agents, and empowers for witnessing. The Spirit has never abdicated His authority nor relegated His power.” ~Samuel Chadwick, Wesleyan Methodist Minister “Without the Spirit of God we can do nothing. We are as ships without wind or chariots without steeds. Like branches without sap, we are withered. Like coals without fire, we are useless. As an offering without the sacrificial flame, we are unaccepted.” ~Charles Spurgeon, English Particular Baptist Pastor SERMON PASSAGE John 14:15-31 (ESV) 15 “If you love me, you will keep my commandments. 16 And I will ask the Father, and he will give you another Helper, to be with you forever, 17 even the Spirit of truth, whom the world cannot receive, because it neither sees him nor knows him. You know him, for he dwells with you and will be in you. 18 “I will not leave you as orphans; I will come to you. 19 Yet a little while and the world will see me no more, but you will see me. Because I live, you also will live. 20 In that day you will know that I am in my Father, and you in me, and I in you. 21 Whoever has my commandments and keeps them, he it is who loves me. And he who loves me will be loved by my Father, and I will love him and manifest myself to him.” 22 Judas (not Iscariot) said to him, “Lord, how is it that you will manifest yourself to us, and not to the world?” 23 Jesus answered him, “If anyone loves me, he will keep my word, and my Father will love him, and we will come to him and make our home with him. 24 Whoever does not love me does not keep my words. And the word that you hear is not mine but the Father's who sent me. 25 “These things I have spoken to you while I am still with you. 26 But the Helper, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, he will teach you all things and bring to your remembrance all that I have said to you. 27 Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you. Not as the world gives do I give to you. Let not your hearts be troubled, neither let them be afraid. 28 You heard me say to you, ‘I am going away, and I will come to you.' If you loved me, you would have rejoiced, because I am going to the Father, for the Father is greater than I. 29 And now I have told you before it takes place, so that when it does take place you may believe. 30 I will no longer talk much with you, for the ruler of this world is coming. He has no claim on me, 31 but I do as the Father has commanded me, so that the world may know that I love the Father. Rise, let us go from here.

Every Day Light: A Reading of the One Year Daily Bible

Jeremiah 26:1-27:22 2 Thessalonians 3 Psalm 85 Proverbs 25:16 Selection from Charles Spurgeon's Morning and Evening: A Salvation to Be Dreaded Song: Atch - Found You Music provided by Vlog No Copyright Music. Creative Commons - Attribution 3.0 Unported Video Link: https://youtu.be/G774NKvUm88#NoCopyrightMusic#VlogMusic#VlogNoCopyrightMusic

Thursday House
Piper, Spurgeon and their Godly Moms

Thursday House

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 53:57


We begin our fall Food extravaganza with pretzels, and fancy popcorn. We also continue our summer book series with a discussion about Charles Spurgeon and John Piper and their moms. 

Five Minutes from Friendship
The Kind of Revival We Need

Five Minutes from Friendship

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 6:08


Today, we look at a few thoughts from the writings of Mr. Charles Spurgeon. What is the kind of #revival we need?

Covenant Podcast
”Spurgeon the Pastor” with Geoffrey Chang

Covenant Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 42:13


Make sure you pick up a copy of this book, here: https://www.amazon.com/Spurgeon-Pastor-Recovering-Biblical-Theological/dp/1087747848/ref=sr_1_1?adgrpid=1345803868623566&hvadid=84113001097335&hvbmt=be&hvdev=c&hvlocint=49574&hvlocphy=50474&hvnetw=o&hvqmt=e&hvtargid=kwd-84113743968603%3Aloc-190&hydadcr=8238_13501884&keywords=spurgeon+the+pastor&qid=1664380337&qu=eyJxc2MiOiIxLjUwIiwicXNhIjoiMS4zNyIsInFzcCI6IjEuNjAifQ%3D%3D&sr=8-1 How would you get more than 5,000 people to show up at your church?   Almost every pastor feels the pressure to get people in the doors. More people means more success, more stability, and more godly influence, right? Often, in their zeal for fruit and growth, pastors and church leaders adopt worldly mechanisms for church growth that end up undermining the very call God has given them.   Charles Spurgeon, the Prince of Preachers, was a pastor to well over 5,000 people in a day long before "mega-churches" were the norm. But you might be surprised to know that Spurgeon's vision for ministry was not pragmatic. He did not borrow "best practices" from the business leaders of his day. Rather, his ministry vision was decidedly, staunchly biblical and theological in nature—and it was a ministry vision we ought to adopt more than a century later.   In Spurgeon the Pastor, Geoff Chang, director of the Spurgeon Library at Midwestern Seminary, shows how Spurgeon models a theological vision of ministry in preaching, baptism and the Lord's supper, meaningful church membership, biblical church leadership, leadership development, and more.   Don't get caught up in worldly methods to pursue ministry growth. Follow the example of the Prince of Preachers, and entrust your ministry to the sovereignty of the Prince of Peace.

Covenant Podcast
”Spurgeon the Pastor” with Geoffrey Chang

Covenant Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 42:13


Make sure you pick up a copy of this book, here: https://www.amazon.com/Spurgeon-Pastor-Recovering-Biblical-Theological/dp/1087747848/ref=sr_1_1?adgrpid=1345803868623566&hvadid=84113001097335&hvbmt=be&hvdev=c&hvlocint=49574&hvlocphy=50474&hvnetw=o&hvqmt=e&hvtargid=kwd-84113743968603%3Aloc-190&hydadcr=8238_13501884&keywords=spurgeon+the+pastor&qid=1664380337&qu=eyJxc2MiOiIxLjUwIiwicXNhIjoiMS4zNyIsInFzcCI6IjEuNjAifQ%3D%3D&sr=8-1 How would you get more than 5,000 people to show up at your church?   Almost every pastor feels the pressure to get people in the doors. More people means more success, more stability, and more godly influence, right? Often, in their zeal for fruit and growth, pastors and church leaders adopt worldly mechanisms for church growth that end up undermining the very call God has given them.   Charles Spurgeon, the Prince of Preachers, was a pastor to well over 5,000 people in a day long before "mega-churches" were the norm. But you might be surprised to know that Spurgeon's vision for ministry was not pragmatic. He did not borrow "best practices" from the business leaders of his day. Rather, his ministry vision was decidedly, staunchly biblical and theological in nature—and it was a ministry vision we ought to adopt more than a century later.   In Spurgeon the Pastor, Geoff Chang, director of the Spurgeon Library at Midwestern Seminary, shows how Spurgeon models a theological vision of ministry in preaching, baptism and the Lord's supper, meaningful church membership, biblical church leadership, leadership development, and more.   Don't get caught up in worldly methods to pursue ministry growth. Follow the example of the Prince of Preachers, and entrust your ministry to the sovereignty of the Prince of Peace.

Living Words
Mark Five: A Biblical Understanding of Evangelism

Living Words

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022


Mark Five: A Biblical Understanding of Evangelism by William Klock In early 2007 Bishop Dorrington reached out to me to ask if I'd be interested in coming to pastor Living Word Church.  The first thing that told me this might be a healthy church was that you had started as a group of about a dozen after leaving St. Peter's, and that you'd grown to around sixty to seventy people.  Not just that, but most of those people added to your number were previously unchurched and nominally churched.  That told me you were a people committed to evangelism and a commitment to evangelism is one of the marks of a healthy church.  Let me be clear, it's not about the numbers.  A people can be committed to evangelism and still not see much numerical growth.  And there are sadly plenty of churches with impressive numbers, that have utterly failed to truly evangelise people.  Our work is to proclaim the good news.  Changing hearts and turning them to God is the unique work of the Holy Spirit.  Get that reversed—and it happens all too often—and you've got a recipe for an unhealthy church. So, first, what is evangelism?  In short, it's the proclamation of the evangel, the good news.  But, of course, it's not quite that simple, is it?  In a very real sense it should be.  But we've got so many conflicting ideas about evangelism circulating around us that it complicates the whole thing.  But at its very simplest, at its very core, evangelism is telling others the good news that we have experienced ourselves.  Stefan Paas is a professor of missiology in Amsterdam.  I read his recent book on evangelism in a secular age earlier this year and found he had a lot of excellent insights (and not a few problems, too), but I like the perspective he gives.  Think of it this way: “Human life is inescapably missionary.  Everybody evangelizes.  Whenever people become impressed by certain experiences, views, products or services, they feel the need to commend them to others.  Whenever people are struck by their own success or by the failure of others, they feel the responsibility to share something of their own blessings with others.  Clearly, there is nothing high and lofty about ‘mission' as such.  It is fully wedded with our social nature; we are witnessing, sharing, helping beings.  ‘The word is near you, on your lips and in your heart…' (Rom. 10.8)”[1] Have you ever thought about it that way?  When we have a good experience somewhere, we tell our friends so that they can share our good experience.  We spread the word about restaurants, mechanics, dentists, fishing holes, and hiking trails—and we make converts.  Back when I first started working as an Apple technician, Apple's marketing department was actually called “Apple Evangelism” and it wasn't surprising to me that so many people converted from Windows to Mac with an almost religious zeal.  This kind of telling is just what we do.  It's in our nature.  And yet, there's something different about actual evangelism, about the gospel—isn't there?  Nobody's going get angry with you for telling them they should give your favourite restaurant a try.  You're not going to lose a friend by giving them the name of your dentist or your mechanic.  And, of course, that's because none of these other things calls us to a completely new kind of life.  But this very basic human phenomenon really does get to what evangelism is at its core.  It's not complicated.  It's simply telling others the good news about Jesus that has been utterly good for us.  Yes, the thing that makes it different is that if it's true it doesn't leave you any choice.  You've got to repent, believe, and be baptised…and no restaurant or mechanic demands that kind of commitment…but it really is that simple when you boil it down.  In Jesus, God has done something wonderful for us and it should be instinctive for us to want to tell the people we know.  Paas goes on and writes this: “Like all people in all times and places the first Christians were social beings; they were steeped deeply in all kinds of communicative behaviour.  It would certainly amount to over-theorizing in most cases to ask about the missionary ‘methods' that they used.  They did what all people do: they bonded with friends, talked with relatives, raised their children, they ate together, played together, worked together.  And of course they shared the ‘tidings of great joy' they had heard; they ‘gossiped the gospel'.”[2] The gospel also went out in more formal ways.  Paul deliberately set out on journeys with a missionary purpose.  He went to the synagogues to confront his fellow Jews and he went to the town centres to preach and to confront the Greeks and Romans.  And some people are called to that kind of evangelism.  But, Brothers and Sisters, have you ever considered how simple everyday evangelism really is?  God, in Jesus, has done something amazing and you have experienced it.  Do you gossip the gospel…as Paas puts it? As we've been working through what it looks like to be a healthy church, I've been trying to frame these marks with the big narrative of scripture and I think that big story helps bring into focus what it means to evangelise and to be an evangelistic people.  The first thing the story helps us to get right is our purpose as the people of God.  Right from the beginning, when God created human beings, his purpose for us—the vocation he gave us—was to be his image in creation.  Other peoples built temples for their gods and put images of wood or stone in those temples—the images of their gods—to represent their rule on earth.  The point—or one of the points—of the Genesis story is to tell us that God created his own temple—and that makes him truly sovereign and better than all the other gods—and instead of putting a stone idol in it to bear his image and to represent his rule, he put human beings in that temple to be his stewards, his regents—first and foremost, his priests.  We were created to serve him.  Of course, part of that is serving each other.  He loves us and so we love each other, as St. John writes.  But it all first comes back to the fact that we exist to serve God.  Even today, our calling to proclaim the good news to the world is to make him know so that others will give him glory and commit themselves to his service. Sometimes we forget this.  We are called to serve others.  We are called to be a light to the nations.  But sometimes we forget that these things grow out of our duty to God.  In the Anglican Church in North America we have a diocese called “Churches for the Sake of Others” or locally, there was a church that used the motto, “In the Valley for the Valley”.  I'm sure these folks are well-meaning, but it's not surprising when their mission drifts and starts to be consumed by social and political agendas and, as C4SO's bishop put it this week, “hankering after cultural acceptance”.  If we aren't anchored first in our duty to God, our duty to others can easily be swept off-course.  If our churches exist “for the sake of God”, the “for the sake of others” part will come naturally.  If we're in the Valley for God, the part about being “for the Valley” will come naturally and—more importantly—will square with God's mission for the world, not the various human agendas that are out there. Second, the big biblical story gives us our model for evangelism.  Before his ascension, Jesus commissioned his disciples: “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me.  Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. And behold, I am with you always, to the end of the age.”  (Matthew 28:18-20) “Go.”  I think that word “go” sums up how most of us have been conditioned to think about evangelism—often so much so that we feel guilty or we feel like we're falling short if we don't leave everything behind to go to a far off country to proclaim the good news.  Brothers and Sisters, let me suggest that scripture's narrative tells us that when it comes to the mission of the people of God, we ought to think first not of “go” but of “presence”. Think of Israel in the Old Testament.  God chose them as a people and lived in their midst.  His presence was with them, first in the tabernacle, and then in the temple in Jerusalem.  As his people, he set them apart by giving them his law, and their calling was to be a light to the nations.  Their witness was meant to reveal the Lord, his love for his people, and his mighty deeds to the nations, so that the nations would come to Jerusalem to give glory to the Lord and to learn his ways.  We see this model throughout the prophets, but here's what we read in Micah 4:1-2. It shall come to pass in the latter days          that the mountain of the house of the Lord shall be established as the highest of the mountains,          and it shall be lifted up above the hills; and peoples shall flow to it, and many nations shall come, and say: “Come, let us go up to the mountain of the Lord,          to the house of the God of Jacob, that he may teach us his ways          and that we may walk in his paths.” For out of Zion shall go forth the law,          and the word of the Lord from Jerusalem.   The Lord did send some of his people out on rare occasions to the nations.  He did that with Jonah.  But his mission for Israel was primarily through his presence in the temple, in the midst of a priestly people who then mediated that presence—they made it known—to the nations and drew them to the Lord.  This is what we see fulfilled in Revelation with the New Jerusalem and the nations streaming to it to worship God.  This model of mission is what Jesus gets at in the Sermon on the Mount when he reminds the people of their calling to be salt and light and the city on a hill.  He said, In the same way, let your light shine before others, so that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father who is in heaven.  (Matthew 5:16) Let your light so shine before others, so that they will be ultimately moved to give glory to God.  That's Israel's mission in a nutshell right there.  And, of course, it didn't work.  Israel—or most of Israel—hid her light under a basket.  The Lord came in judgement.  He threw the unsalty salt into the street where it was trod underfoot.  But he also came himself in Jesus, died and rose from the grave, and did so to create a new people, forgiven and full of his own Holy Spirit.  And here's where Jesus' great commission enters the story. The old temple in Jerusalem was gone—or about to be gone at the time Jesus spoke—and a new temple was created.  Instead of an earthy temple of bricks and mortar in which the Lord was present in the midst of his people, through Jesus and the Spirit he made the members of this new people, themselves, to be his temple and the place of his presence.  “Living stones,” St. Peter calls us, built on Jesus, the living cornerstone.  And so Jesus sent his people out—not all of them, but some of them—to establish outposts of this new, living temple, first throughout Judea, then Samaria, and throughout the Roman Empire.  The Lord's temple gradually established in every city and town, establishing his presence amongst the nations, and building the kingdom of God and declaring the Lordship of Jesus in anticipation of the Empire's conversion. Brothers and Sisters, Jesus shares his ministry with us.  That means we are a priestly people.  We mediate the presence of God to the world.  We are a prophetic people, meaning that we are called to proclaim the good news about Jesus, crucified and risen, we are called to confront the world with the good news that he is Lord, and we have a duty to call the world to repentance and faith—to allegiance to him and to his kingdom.  And Jesus shares his dominion with us.  We are a royal people who anticipate the day when we will rule with our Lord.  The church mediates God's presence and proclaims his good news and his kingdom where we are.  There will always be those called, like Paul, to “go”—to establish beachheads of the kingdom in other places, but for most of us our calling is to be gospel people right where we are, to be the church—the tabernacle of God's Spirit—and to mediate this God who is present with us to the people and to the community around us. But what is it that we need to communicate?  When I talk about presence, it's easy to think that all we need to do is be good Christians and people around us will become Christians by osmosis.  There's a popular saying, falsely attributed to St. Francis: “Preach the gospel at all times.  Use words if necessary.”  It gives people an out and reinforced this idea that we fulfil our calling and avoid offence by witnessing with our lives.  Brother and Sisters, our lives should be a witness of Jesus and gospel.  We are to be salt and light.  We are to be the light on the hilltop.  But you can't preach the gospel without words.  It's the way God works.  As I've stressed so many times, his word gives life.  We ought to live our lives and we ought to live together as the Church in such a way that we make the people around us constructively curious.  But at some point we will have to use words and explain what it's all about.  That's the challenge.  Sometimes we're afraid of offending people or of being rejected.  Sometimes we just don't know what to say.  And that last part is getting increasingly difficult.  Just a few decades ago, most people in our culture had respect for Christians and had a general idea of what Christianity is about—even if some of their ideas were wrong.  We largely all shared a common understanding of the nature of sin.  That's not really the case anymore and that means we need to be prepared more than in the past.  We need to know our Bibles.  We need to know the story.  We need to understand what the gospel is.  And it means that effective evangelism is going to take place in the context of long-term relationships with people—not in a short encounter while you sit next to someone on an airplane or in the doctor's waiting room.  In many ways that's a good thing, because it's in those relationships that we have the opportunity show the gospel and to make them curious. But at some point we will need to tell people the story and we will need to explain to them what God has done in Jesus and what each of us needs to do in response.  We need to tell them the truth and to be honest with them.  They're not joining a social club.  Jesus has died to forgive sins and he has risen to give life.  He has ascended and reigns as Lord.  He gives his Spirit to those who repent and believe to transform them from the inside out.  He is making all things new and the point of all of this is to make a new and holy people ready to be part of God's new creation and live, once again, as his priests and stewards.  When a person passes through the waters of baptism, it's to take hold of this good news and its promise, and to cross into a new life and a new world on the other side.  Repentance is costly.  It means living God's new creation now—being heaven-on-earth people—even when it's counter to everything around us.  It means letting go of our idols and our sources of security in order to trust in God and to commit to his vision for humanity and the world.  But in doing so we are set free from our bondage to death to share the presence of the living God. And not everyone will be receptive.  Brothers and Sisters, remember that changing a person's heart is not our duty.  Again, evangelism goes wrong when we confuse our part with God's part.  Speaking at the Lusanne conference on evangelism back in 1974, the great evangelical Anglican preacher, John Stott, said: “Evangelism must not be defined in terms of its results, for this is not how the word is used in the New Testament. …There is no mention whether the word which was “evangelized” was believed, or whether the inhabitants of the towns and villages “evangelized” were converted. To “evangelize” in biblical usage does not mean to win converts (as it usually does when we use the word) but simply to announce the good news, irrespective of the results.”[3] That conference went on to give this definition of evangelism in what's known as the Lausanne Covenant: “To evangelize is to spread the good news that Jesus Christ died for our sins and was raised from the dead according to the Scriptures, and that, as the reigning Lord, he now offers the forgiveness of sins and the liberating gifts of the Spirit to all who repent and believe.”[4] Brothers and Sisters, we do the telling.  The Spirit does the converting.  Getting that wrong inevitably leads to all sorts of pragmatic and manipulative practises.  We water down the message to make it more palatable.  We use manipulation to win people over.  We start acting like salesmen and all too often we end up treating the gospel as if it were a car with a bunch of flaws to be hidden from the customer.  And we start treating our listeners like customers and laying high pressure sales techniques on them to produce a decision.  Friends the gospel itself is powerful—more powerful than you or I can ever be.  Proclaim God's word and let the Spirit do the work. Keeping this perspective also keeps us from feeling as though we've failed.  Many Christians don't evangelise because they don't think they're able to convince someone to choose Jesus and some have been crippled by what they see as past failures.  Hear me: If someone doesn't believe, it's not your fault.  That part's not up to you; it's up to God.  Again, trust God's word and God's Spirit.  And sometimes you may end up surprised at the ways the word and the Spirit work.  Charles Spurgeon tells how George Whitfield, “he great eighteenth-century evangelist, was hounded by a group of detractors who called themselves the “Hell-fire Club.”  When Whitfield would stand outside preaching this little group of guys would stand off on the side and mimic him.  They didn't believe a word of it.  The ring leader was called Thorpe.  One day Thorpe was mimicking Whitefield to his cronies, delivering his sermon with brilliant accuracy, perfectly imitating his tone and facial expressions, when he himself was so pierced that he sat down and was converted on the spot.”[5] Brothers and Sisters, sometimes our duty is merely to plant the seed.  Sometimes it's to water what someone else has planted.  Sometimes we reap the harvest that results from decades of others planting and watering.  But never forget that it is the Spirit who brought the growth. Now, let me close with one last very important thing.  Knowing that the fruit of our evangelism is not produced by us, but by the Spirit, Brothers and Sisters, pray.  J. I. Packer, in his wonderful little book Evangelism and the Sovereignty of God, wrote this: “In evangelism…we are impotent; we depend wholly upon God to make our witness effective; only because He is able to give men new hearts can we hope that through our preaching of the gospel sinners will be born again.  These facts ought to drive us to prayer.  It is God's intention that they should drive us to prayer.  God means us, in this as in other things, to recognise and confess our impotence, and to tell Him that we rely on Him alone, and to plead with Him to glorify His name.  It is His way regularly to withhold His blessing until His people start to pray. ‘Ye have not, because ye ask not.' ‘Ask, and it shall be given you; seek, and ye shall find; knock, and it shall be opened unto you: for every one that asketh receiveth; and he that seeketh findeth; and to him that knocketh it shall be opened.'  But if you are too proud or lazy to ask, we need not expect to receive.  This is the universal rule, in evangelism as elsewhere.  God will make us pray before He blesses our labours in order that we may constantly learn afresh that we depend on God for everything.  And then, when God permits us to see conversions, we shall not be tempted to ascribe them to our own gifts, or skills, or wisdom, or persuasiveness, but to His work alone, and so we shall know whom we ought to thank for them.”[6] Friends, pray.  Pray you will be captivated by the glory of the gospel yourself, by love and faithfulness of God made manifest in Jesus and that your daily life will make the people around you constructively curious.  Pray that God will give you a heart for the lost.  Pray for opportunities to proclaim the good news.  Pray for the eyes to see those opportunities.  Pray for the boldness and courage to take advantage of them when they come.  Pray for the words to say—but don't let that be an excuse for not being prepared in advance!  And most of all, pray for the Spirit to be at work in the hearts of those to whom you preach.  Pray.  Pray.  Pray.  And with that, Brothers and Sisters, let's pray: Almighty God and Father, be at work in our hearts by your Holy Spirit and fill us with passion, with enthusiasm, with gratitude, with joy for what you have done through Jesus.  He died and rose again to deliver us from sin and death and he has ascended to your right hand and reigns with power and authority.  You have shown us your glory and I pray that your Spirit will give us a passion to make your glory known—to be salt, to be light, to be a city on a hill—to cause the nations of the earth to come streaming to your temple to give you glory and to know your ways.  Be at work in our hearts we pray.  Fill us with a desire to proclaim your good news.  And be at work in the hearts of the people who hear our proclamation.  Make them fertile soil for the word that we plant.  Cause your word to take root and grow that all the world might give you glory we pray.  Amen. [1] Pilgrims and Priests (London: SCM Press, 2019), 6. [2] Ibid. 7 [3] https://lausanne.org/content/john-stott-biblical-basis-of-evangelism [4] https://lausannecanada.com/lausanne-covenant [5] Charles H. Spurgeon, The Metropolitan Tabernacle Pulpit (Pasadena, Texas: Pilgrim, 1974), 34:115, cited in Mark Dever, Nine Marks of a Healthy Church (Wheaton: Crossway, 2004), 141-142. [6] J. I. Packer, Evangelism and the Sovereignty of God (Downers Grove, Ill.: IVP Academic, 1991), 122

The Craig T. Owens Audio Blog
The proof in the longing

The Craig T. Owens Audio Blog

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 3:38


Never be satisfied with what you have already attained. Be delighted with what God has done, but crave that He will continue to do more and more and more! Check out this wisdom from Psalm 119 and Charles Spurgeon. ►► Would you please prayerfully consider supporting this ministry? My Patreon supporters get behind-the-scenes access to exclusive materials. ◀︎◀︎

Vera Vita
150: 31 - Quali sono i benefici ai quali partecipano, in questa vita, coloro a cui è stata rivolta questa chiamata efficace?

Vera Vita

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 3:01


Tanti credono in molte cose, ma purtroppo pochi hanno una fede basata sulla Parola di Dio. Questo catechismo ti aiuterà ad avere una fede solida. Questo è domanda e risposta n. 31 della serie di domande e risposte brevi dal catechismo battista del 1693 - versione di Charles Spurgeon.Domanda: Quali sono i benefici ai quali partecipano, in questa vita, coloro a cui è stata rivolta questa chiamata efficace?Risposta:  Coloro ai quali è stata rivolta la chiamata efficace, in questa vita sono partecipi della giustificazione, dell'adozione, della santificazione, e delle diverse benedizioni che, in questa vita, sono ad esse connesse o da esse scaturiscono.Versetti:Romani 8: 30 - e quelli che ha predestinati, li ha pure chiamati; e quelli che ha chiamati, li ha pure giustificati; e quelli che ha giustificati, li ha pure glorificati.Efesini 1: 5 - avendoci predestinati nel suo amore a essere adottati per mezzo di Gesù Cristo come suoi figli, secondo il disegno benevolo della sua volontà,1 Corinzi 1: 30 - Ed è grazie a lui che voi siete in Cristo Gesù, che da Dio è stato fatto per noi sapienza, giustizia, santificazione e redenzione;Link:Ebook - Fede RiformataConfessione di Fede BattistaVerità & Vita PodcastLa Soluzione per la tua PauraLibretto gratis - Mi ConnettoLibretto gratis - Riforma 500Libretto gratis - LiberoSpeakpipe - Lasciaci una domanda o commento Catechismo Playlist

God Feeding Station
Our Advocate

God Feeding Station

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 3:00


"Morning and Evening" - Charles Spurgeon 1 John 2:1

Today in the Word Devotional
How Great a Salvation

Today in the Word Devotional

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022


What did people living in Old Testament times understand about salvation? Charles Spurgeon explained how the message of the Cross runs throughout the entire Bible: “The Old Testament and the New are one, inspired by the same Spirit and filled with the same Subject, namely, the one promised Messiah. The Prophets foretold what the Apostles reported. The Seers looked forward and the Evangelists look backward—but their eyes meet at one place—they see eye to eye and both behold the Cross.” Peter explains our salvation in biblical and historical context. The gospel is all about the “sufferings of the Messiah and the glories that would follow” (v. 11). The Old Testament prophets looked forward to His coming, which was revealed to them by the Spirit. But although they “searched intently and with the greatest care,” their curiosity about exactly when and how this would happen was not satisfied (v. 10). Like others, they “did not receive the things promised; they only saw them and welcomed them from a distance” (Heb. 11:13). It was revealed to the prophets “that they were not serving them- selves but you” (v. 12). They were providing pieces of the larger puzzle and didn’t always understand the full implications of their own words. Not even angels have been given the full picture of God’s gracious plan of redemption. With Christ’s first advent, death, and resurrection, it has now been more clearly revealed, both to Peter’s original audience and to believers today (see Rom. 16:25–27). This is encouraging for at least two reasons. First, as we’re following a Messiah who suffered and then was glorified, we, too, can expect our suffering to lead to glorification. Second, the same Spirit who worked in the Old Testament prophets works in the church today (v. 12)! >> Have you trusted Christ for your salvation and spiritual rebirth? If not, please take this important step today! To learn more, go to moodybible.org and search for “How to Know Christ.”

Kerusso Daily Devotional
Doubt Is a Fact of Life

Kerusso Daily Devotional

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 3:22


Have you ever wondered about how convinced well-known Christians are of their faith? We all know they never doubt, right? Wrong.   A well-known preacher, Charles Spurgeon, once said of doubt, “I think when a man says, ‘I never doubt,' it is quite time for us to doubt him.” That is a fact of life for many of us, although most don't like to admit it. In fact, doubt is mentioned often in the Bible. The Bible is full of great faith stories, but it's interesting to notice that there are plenty of doubters, too.   Sarah simply didn't believe God's promise that she and Abraham would have a child. Peter's bravado evaporated when he realized it was dangerous to be known as one of Christ's followers. Job's wife told him he should curse God and die because of his misfortunes, and Job wished he'd never been born.   Humans can be quirky. Imagine seeing Jesus with your own eyes and watching Him perform miracles. In the book of Matthew, we read about the apostles with Jesus on a mountain in Galilee after His resurrection. You can't get more miraculous than that, but it says some still doubted.   Mark 9:24 says, “Immediately, the boy's father exclaimed, ‘I do believe. Help me overcome my unbelief.'” This is the story of a father who sought Jesus to heal his son, and he seemed to believe, and to struggle with belief, at the same time. Amazing, but not so unusual.   As we're learning, doubting is not the worst thing. Keeping silent about it is worse. Seeking God and trusting a friend or friends to talk it through is healthy. God doesn't punish us for doubting.   Andrea Lucado, who has been around churches and preachers all her life, understands the struggle. She says, “Most of us at some time or another ask the question, why do I believe what I believe?” Those of us who identify as lifelong Christians sometimes have the most doubt. We've grown up in church, memorized scripture, and volunteered at VBS, but that thought: why do I believe what I believe, sometimes hits us in a moment we'd least expect. There are plenty of resources and plenty of believing friends who have gone through the same thing to see you through this. So when you're in a season of doubt, remember one thing: you're not alone.   Let's pray.    Father, doubt comes to us all at some point, and it's then that we need each other the most. We need your spirit to bring us comfort and calm. We thank you. You don't leave us in our time of doubt, but you long to help us through the valley. In Jesus' name. Amen.

Faith Over Fear
Courage to Share Your Mental Health Struggles (With Josh Lillie) -Ep. 123

Faith Over Fear

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 37:31


Mental health experts stress the importance of maintaining a strong support system when battling anxiety and depression. The more we feel known, the more we tend to feel loved. It takes courageous transparency to build the depth of relationships our souls crave. What if we share honestly and others judge or reject us or use our weaknesses against us? In this episode, Josh Lillie, an ordained minister with the Christian and Missionary Alliance, the Executive Assistant of one of the largest churches in Omaha, Nebraska, and one of the hosts of the Your Daily Bible Verse podcast shares how he found the courage to openly share his experience with depression, what challenged that courage, and how he received encouragement through the life of an eighteenth century hymn writer who once had considered himself “mad.” (Scroll down to find the group discussion questions)Find Josh Lillie at: https://www.cccomaha.org/staffhttps://www.lifeaudio.com/your-daily-bible-verse/ Find Jennifer at: https://jenniferslatterylivesoutloud.comhttps://www.instagram.com/avapennington3/https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100083247680572Find Wholly Loved Ministries at:WhollyLoved.comJoin the private Faith Over Fear Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/442736966614671Join the Private Wholly Loved Community Group (also on Facebook):https://www.facebook.com/groups/443325386241769Group Discussion Questions:What resonated with you most in today's episode?What are your thoughts regarding Jennifer's statement that one only feels loved to the extent that they feel known? What are some reasons people might feel reluctant to tell others about their mental health challenges?What fears, anxieties, or insecurities most challenge your vulnerability?In what ways can a strong support system help those who suffer from anxiety and depression?What most resonated with you when you heard Joshua and Jennifer discuss Psalm 22?How do you feel knowing that someone so anointed as Charles Spurgeon battled depression?What is one action step God might be asking you to take having listened to this episode?

Pastor Matters
Pastoral Lessons From Charles Spurgeon with Alex DiPrima - EP82

Pastor Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 45:08


Who was Charles Spurgeon and what makes him relevant today? What are some specific lessons pastors can learn from Spurgeon and years of his ministry? Join Ronjour and Brandon this week as they sit down with Dr. Alex DiPrima to discuss important pastoral lessons church leaders can learn from observing Charles Spurgeon. Learn more about the Center for Preaching and Pastoral Leadership by visiting www.pastorscenter.org/.

Christian Podcast Community
Daily Devotionals | Jon Hus

Christian Podcast Community

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022


Daily Devotionals with Religionless Christianity are a quick walk through the word. Each day we look at either a verse or two from scripture a meaningful commentary or other inspirational writing. Also, we include a daily Psalm, Proverb and a prayer. In today's show, September 30th 2022, we are looking at a sermon from Charles Spurgeon. "...I'm a gauged in is against the Pope's customs and against the power not bestowed on him by God but invented by the devil." Daily devotionals Monday-Friday Religionless Christianity Podcast every Saturday If you enjoy the content, please leave us a review and join us on social media through the links below. Check out the website: www.religionlesschristianitypodcast.com Dwell Bible App- www.dwellapp.io/RCpodcast PLEASE COME JOIN US ON SOCIAL MEDIA OR CONSIDER SUPPORTING THE MINISTRY: DISCORD- https://discord.gg/W5nACNcVUx FACEBOOK- https://www.facebook.com/ReligionlessChristianityPodcast TWITTER- https://twitter.com/ReligionlessC PARLER- https://parler.com/user/ReligionlessChristianityPodcast SUPPORT THE MINISTRY: AMAZON AFFILIATE- https://amzn.to/3lV4cBP BUY ME A COFFEE- https://www.buymeacoffee.com/RCPodcast Listen to other Podcasts on the Christian Podcast Community Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brandsPrivacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy

Christian Podcast Community
Daily Devotionals | Charles Spurgeon

Christian Podcast Community

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022


Daily Devotionals with Religionless Christianity are a quick walk through the word. Each day we look at either a verse or two from scripture a meaningful commentary or other inspirational writing. Also, we include a daily Psalm, Proverb and a prayer. In today's show, September 29th 2022, we are looking at a sermon from Charles Spurgeon. "The Lord Jesus doth by his messengers, his Word, and His Spirit, sweetly and graciously compel men to come in that they may eat of his marriage-supper." Daily devotionals Monday-Friday Religionless Christianity Podcast every Saturday If you enjoy the content, please leave us a review and join us on social media through the links below. Check out the website: www.religionlesschristianitypodcast.com Dwell Bible App- www.dwellapp.io/RCpodcast PLEASE COME JOIN US ON SOCIAL MEDIA OR CONSIDER SUPPORTING THE MINISTRY: DISCORD- https://discord.gg/W5nACNcVUx FACEBOOK- https://www.facebook.com/ReligionlessChristianityPodcast TWITTER- https://twitter.com/ReligionlessC PARLER- https://parler.com/user/ReligionlessChristianityPodcast SUPPORT THE MINISTRY: AMAZON AFFILIATE- https://amzn.to/3lV4cBP BUY ME A COFFEE- https://www.buymeacoffee.com/RCPodcast Listen to other Podcasts on the Christian Podcast Community Advertising Inquiries: https://redcircle.com/brandsPrivacy & Opt-Out: https://redcircle.com/privacy

God Feeding Station

"Morning and Evening" - Charles Spurgeon 1 Kings 18:43

God Feeding Station
True Wisdom

God Feeding Station

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 2:59


"Morning and Evening" - Charles Spurgeon 1 Corinthians 1:30

Pastor Mike Impact Ministries
Psalm 2 - Delighting or Denying

Pastor Mike Impact Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 5:05


“Why do the nations rage, And the people plot a vain thing? The kings of the earth set themselves, And the rulers take counsel together, Against the LORD and against His Anointed, saying, "Let us break Their bonds in pieces And cast away Their cords from us." He who sits in the heavens shall laugh; The LORD shall hold them in derision. Then He shall speak to them in His wrath, And distress them in His deep displeasure: "Yet I have set My King On My holy hill of Zion." "I will declare the decree: The LORD has said to Me, 'You are My Son, Today I have begotten You. Ask of Me, and I will give You The nations for Your inheritance, And the ends of the earth for Your possession. You shall break them with a rod of iron; You shall dash them to pieces like a potter's vessel.' " Now therefore, be wise, O kings; Be instructed, you judges of the earth. Serve the LORD with fear, And rejoice with trembling. Kiss the Son, lest He be angry, And you perish in the way, When His wrath is kindled but a little. Blessed are all those who put their trust in Him.” Today we will begin looking at Psalm 2. Already as I was studying to do these chats, I begin to realize how little I really know about the Psalms and their background. It is like when we were going through Revelation, I was amazed at how I learned so much more about the book as we took time each day to look at a few verses. As I said a few days ago, I've read through the book of Psalms over 600 times in the past 50 years. Every day I read at least 5 Psalms. I've memorized hundreds of verses in the Psalms. I have preached many messages out of the Psalms over the years. But I've never gone through the Psalms, in a study like this. And already I have been very blessed and excited about what we are going to learn over the next several months as we study them together with you! The great pastor and preacher from yesteryear, Charles Spurgeon called Psalm 2, The Psalm of Messiah the Prince.” He also wrote a very large book on all the Psalms called the “Treasury of David”. It is still in print today and would be a great reference in your personal study of the Psalms. There is an interesting contrast between the first two psalms. Psalm 1 is personal and focuses on the Law, while Ps. 2 is national and focuses on prophecy. The New Testament writers looked at the Old Testament writers in two divisions and often referred to it as the Law and the Prophets. Even Jesus referred to the Old Testament in this way in Luke 24:27, 44, calling it the “Law of Moses and the Prophets”. We see another contrast in Psalm 1, where the people delighted and meditated on the law of God. But in Psalm 2, the people rebel and defy the law of God. A noticeable feature in the Book of Psalms is the systematic arrangement. The first psalm presents the perfect man, the happy man. (And I believe it pictures the Lord Jesus Christ as the last Adam.) Now in contrast to the perfect man, the blessed man in Psalm 1, we see the rebellious man in Psalm 2. We can call this the Genesis section of the Book of Psalms, and the parallel is striking. Genesis begins with the perfect man, the happy man, in the Garden of Eden. But he became the rebellious man who ran away from God, was no longer seeking Him, who had no capacity for Him. Now here in Psalm 2 we find the children of Adam – mankind in their rebellion against God. May the Lord use these studies in Psalms to motivate us to love and delight in the Lord our God more every day! God bless!

God Feeding Station

"Morning and Evening" - Charles Spurgeon 1 Samuel 1:27

The Living Waters Podcast
Ep. 90 - The Amazing Life of Charles Spurgeon

The Living Waters Podcast

Play Episode Play 55 sec Highlight Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 44:56


In today's episode, the guys discuss Charles Spurgeon. For those listeners who are unfamiliar, Spurgeon was an extraordinary preacher and human who was radically gifted by God. He was born in England in 1834 and called the “prince of preachers” and “Silver Tongue”. We are reminded that, without idolatry, it is great to have heroes in the faith. Spurgeon really took to heart what it meant to commune with God. His early death at age 57 is a reminder that God does not need anybody, and we are all indispensable regardless of our gifts.  Spurgeon gave his first sermon in 1850 and joined a layman group shortly after, with whom he traveled to nearby towns to preach. He was asked to become the preacher of Waterbeach Baptist Church before becoming the pastor of the Metropolitan Tabernacle. He was not formally educated, nor did he attend Bible college. People know Spurgeon primarily for his preaching, and secondarily for his commentaries and devotionals. Most people, however, don't know that he was an incredible pastor. Sturgeon was at the Metropolitan Tabernacle during the heart of the Industrial Revolution. When many other churches decided to leave the city and head to the suburbs, Spurgeon and the elders of the Tabernacle decided to stay in London and saw the opportunity to spread the gospel. They began over 60 organizations for those in need throughout the city.  Spurgeon was filled with light and joy, but also suffered from deep depression as a result of a personal tragedy, illness and stress. He believed that Chrisitan ministers should expect a special degree of suffering to be given to them as a way of forming them for Christ-like, compassionate ministry. He said,  “Many men owe the grandeur of their lives to their tremendous difficulties. There are some of your graces which would never be discovered if it were not for the trials in whom we experience.” A large takeaway of this discussion is the power of the written word. In closing, we are reminded that there is power in passing on truth and power in the example of a man whose life was surrendered to the Lord wholly and completely.  Thanks for listening! If you've been helped by this podcast, we'd be grateful if you'd consider subscribing, sharing, and leaving us a comment and 5-star rating!  Links:Visit the Living Waters website to learn more and to access helpful resources!Be sure to check out Tough Consequences. You can connect with us at podcast@livingwaters.com. We're thankful for your input!Learn more about the hosts of this podcast.Ray ComfortEmeal (“E.Z.”) ZwayneMark SpenceOscar Navarro

The Listening Porch
Chatting About Spurgeon

The Listening Porch

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 15:25


Let's chat about Charles Spurgeon.  Visit The Listening Porch online! You can view a video version of this episode and help support the show by becoming a Patron at patreon.com/rayhughes. You can also sign up for one of my online courses at selahministries.com or check out my beautiful, handmade ink pens at redriverturning.com.