Podcasts about Mast

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Best podcasts about Mast

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Latest podcast episodes about Mast

Alexander Garrett
Adapting To Public Speaking With MasterTalk Founder Brenden Kumarasamy 1-21-23

Alexander Garrett

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023 34:17


This podcast was recorded LIVE at Houston Hall NYC (https://houstonhallny.com/) Find out more about Brenden, founder of Master Talk and how he helps his clients ADAPT in the public speaking world. Links: http://mastertalk.ca/; YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/Mast...; Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/episo... Thanks to PODMATCH for this connection! https://podmatch.com

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
Hallmark Playhouse 1951-04-26 (125) Two Years Before the Mast

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023 30:15


Hallmark Playhouse is an American old-time radio dramatic anthology series. It was broadcast on CBS from June 10, 1948, until February 1, 1953, and was described by one author as "a program that consistently produced the highest levels of production quality and value." Beginning on February 8, 1953, the program underwent changes of title, host, and format. It was broadcast as The Hallmark Hall of Fame until March 27, 1955, still on CBS Listen to our radio station Old Time Radio https://link.radioking.com/otradio Listen to other Shows at My Classic Radio https://www.myclassicradio.net/ Remember that times have changed, and some shows might not reflect the standards of today's politically correct society. The shows do not necessarily reflect the views, standards, or beliefs of Entertainment Radio

Ave Maria Radio: Mast Appeal
Mast Appeal - January 21, 2023

Ave Maria Radio: Mast Appeal

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2023 117:00


Sisters Who Scene It
The Brave Little Toaster

Sisters Who Scene It

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 58:35


Katie and Bridget AND THEIR SISTER MARY(!) all go hug their appliances as they re-watch the movie: The Brave Little Toaster! It's a classic 80's kids film which means - its filled with horrific nightmares and crippling existentialism! But don't worry, there are silly puns along the way, which makes it okay! Come along as we follow Toaster, Lampy, Blanky, Radio, and Kirby (he's a vacuum - we don't know why he gets a real name either) as they embark on a journey through the wilderness and into the city to find their Mast... Er, their "owner". Will the appliances be reunited before they are: thrown off a waterfall, sucked into quicksand, kidnapped by appliance Ed Gein, thrown into a dumpster, and almost turned into blocks of metal!? Well technically no since all of those things happen BEFORE they are reunited... But don't worry we all somehow make it out in the end! Released in 1987, it was based on the novel of the same name written by Thomas M. Disch.

Ave Maria Radio: Mast Appeal
Mast Appeal - January 14, 2023

Ave Maria Radio: Mast Appeal

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2023 117:00


ROAD TO GROWTH : Success as an Entrepreneur
Jafar ”Mast Jeff” Jafari - Founder and CEO of the PSC Academy, Inc., and Buildgoal, Inc.

ROAD TO GROWTH : Success as an Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023 38:34


In this episode of the Road to Growth podcast, we are pleased to introduce you to Jafar "Mast Jeff" Jafari. Jafar was a self-made millionaire by the age of 20 and both an entrepreneur and educator with over two decades of experience. He is the founder and CEO of the PSC Academy, Inc., and Buildgoal, Inc., serving more than 100,000 students and helping develop 5,000 coaches in nearly 40 countries. Launching PSC Academy in the US currently, Master Jeff would love to share some of his knowledge!   Learn more and connect with Jafar "Mast Jeff" Jafari by visiting him on Website: Www.masterjeff.io Website: https://www.pscacademy.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/masterjeffofficial Twitter: https://twitter.com/masterjeffpath       Be sure to follow us on Twitter: Twitter.com/to_growth on Facebook: facebook.com/Road2Growth   Subscribe to our podcast across the web: https://www.theenriquezgroup.com/blog Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2Cdmacc iTunes: https://apple.co/2F4zAcn Castbox: http://bit.ly/2F4NfQq Google Play: http://bit.ly/2TxUYQ2 Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKnzMRkl-PurAb32mCLCMeA?view_as=subscriber   If you are looking to be a Guest on Podcasts please click below  https://kitcaster.com/rtg/  For any San Diego Real Estate Questions Please Follow Us at web: www.TheEnriquezGroup.com Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCKnzMRkl-PurAb32mCLCMeA or Call : 858 -345 - 7829 Recently reduced properties in San Diego County * Click **** bit.ly/3cbT65C **** Here* ****************************************************************************

Ave Maria Radio: Mast Appeal
Mast Appeal - January 7, 2023

Ave Maria Radio: Mast Appeal

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 117:00


The Cinemast Podcast
Top 10 Movies of 2022 w/ Adam Mast

The Cinemast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 94:54


A long year of film comes to an end and, like they do every year, Brandon and Adam are getting together to list their top 10 films of 2022.

Ave Maria Radio: Mast Appeal
Mast Appeal - December 31, 2022

Ave Maria Radio: Mast Appeal

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 117:00


Surfing the Nash Tsunami
S3-E62.1 - Year-End Interview with Mazen Noureddin

Surfing the Nash Tsunami

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 30:03


In the Season 3 NAFLD Year-in-Review conversations series, Surfers Jörn Schattenberg, Louise Campbell and Roger Green embark on a string of interviews with a handful of Key Opinion Leaders who made headlines and advances in Fatty Liver disease in 2022. In this exclusive segment, Mazen Noureddin reflects on both personal and professional developments. Mazen begins by describing a move from Los Angeles to Houston where he is focused on establishing the state-of-the-art Houston Research Institute. He next highlights contributing to the development of a highly specific MRI-based (MAST) score to identify patients with fibrotic NASH as a major achievement of the year. In another underscore, Mazen points to presenting an abstract at AASLD last month on top-line results from a phase 2a trial on the mitochondrial uncoupler, HU6. Jörn joins to prod into the latter presentation and ask whether mechanisms trialed in obesity and other metabolic diseases are trending toward being investigated within hepatology. Mazen suggests that while mitochondrial uncouplers have been explored for many years, recent innovation in NASH can be an expected path given the nature of being a multi-systemic disease. He goes on to describe determining nuances in the efficacy of weight-loss medications and their different mechanisms of action.From here the conversation picks up on the increasing optimism around the use of NITs and Mazen's involvement  with the NAIL-NIT Consortium. Roger notes that earlier in the year, Mazen stood out as someone who aggressively pushed a closing window toward moving beyond the biopsy. Remarkably, Mazen's optimism and confidence in the development and implementation of NITs still projects these faster advancements. As the session winds down, Mazen speaks to what he hopes to see in the coming year. 

ECOUTE C'EST DJ MAST
DJ MAST - LE MIX DU NOUVEL AN 2023

ECOUTE C'EST DJ MAST

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 91:05


1 - Bellini - Samba de Janeiro 2 - Farruko - Pepas 3 - Louise Attaque - J't'emmène au vent (Willy William Remix) 4 - Boney M - Gotta Go Home 5 - Pitbull feat. Lil Jon - The Anthem 6 - Jennifer Lopez feat. Pitbull - On The Floor 7 - Lil Nas X - Industry Baby (Fat Tony Remix) 8 - David Guetta feat. Kid Cudi - Memories (2021 Remix) 9 - Lucenzo feat. Big Ali - Vem Dancar Kuduro 10 - Sean Paul - Temperature 11 - Kool Ang The Gang - Celebration (Adrien Toma Remix) 12 - DJ Antoine feat. The Beat Shaker - Ma Chérie 13 - Discobitch - La Bourgeoisie 14 - LMFAO feat. Lauren Bennett & Goon Rock - Party Rock Anthem 15 - Pakito - Living On Vidéo 16 - Geri Halliwell - It's Raining Men 17 - Darude - Sandstorm 18 - Cascada - Everytime we touch 19 - Soprano - Cosmo 20 - Vini Vici feat. Dimitri Vegas & Like Mike - Get in Trouble (So What) 21 - Fatal Bazooka feat. Big Ali - Ce matin va être une pure soirée 22 - Laurent H. - Lion King 23 - A-Ha - Take On Me (Dimitri Vegas & Like Mike Remix) 24 - Gabry Ponte feat. R3HAB & Timmy Trumpet - Call Me 25 - Sound Of Legend - Maniac 26 - Armin Van Buuren & Vini Vici feat. Hilight Tribe - Great Spirit 27 - Black Eyed Peas - Pump it 28 - Italo Brothers - Stamp On The Ground 29 - Partenaire Particulier - Partenaire Particulier 30 - George Harrison - I've got my mind set on you 31 - Indochine - L'aventurier (Getdown Remix) 32 - Loona - Vamos A La Playa 33 - Gayle - ABCDEFU (Fät Tony & Medun Remix) 34 - Dzeko & Torres feat. Delaney Jane - L'Amour Toujours 35 - Shouse - Love Tonight (Remix) 36 - Khaled - C'est la vie 37 - Elvis Crespo - Suavemente 38 - Gregor Salto feat. Curio Capoeira - Para Voce (Nylez Bootleg) 39 - David Guetta feat. Bebe Rexha - I'm Good (Blue) 40 - Gala - Freed From Desire 41 - Ricky Martin - Un, Dos,Tres, Maria (Jean Luc Remix) 42 - ABBA - Gimme Gimme Gimme (Fät Tony & Medun Remix) 43 - Earth, Wind & Fire - Boogie Wonderland 44 - Crew 7 & FSDW - Like a Prayer 45 - Deorro feat. Elvis Crespo - Bailar 46 - O-Zone - Dragostea Din Tei 47 - Dj Assad feat. Alain Ramanisum & Willy William - Li Tourner 48 - Magic System - Magic in The Air 49 - Boney M. - Rasputin (Majestic Remix) 50 - Keen'V feat. SAP - J'aimerais trop

Cheat!
Unwrapping Hipster Chocolate (Rerun)

Cheat!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 37:05


In 2007, two Iowa-born brothers launched an artisanal chocolate company, Mast Brothers, out of an apartment in Williamsburg, Brooklyn—the hipster heart of the growing farm-to-table movement. Mast quickly became a well-known operation, partly because their focus was on creating quality chocolate that only required two ingredients: cocoa beans and sugar. And these speciality bars—hand wrapped in expensive, beautifully designed paper—boasted a $10 price tag. It was something people were willing to spend for a product that also came with a compelling origin story. But that all changed when customers started to question the narrative of what they had been sold. A Somethin' Else & Sony Music Entertainment production. Find more great podcasts from Sony Music Entertainment at sonymusic.com/podcasts To bring your brand to life in this podcast, email podcastadsales@sonymusic.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Irish Tech News Audio Articles
Cape Clear islanders' mast effort connects them for Christmas

Irish Tech News Audio Articles

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 4:25


Islanders off the south coast are celebrating their first fully connected Christmas after a huge community effort brought mobile and broadband coverage to one of Ireland's most beautiful outcrops. Residents of Cape Clear, off Cork, often had to travel to the other side of the island to make calls, while businesses and tourists were left unconnected. But after discovering how well an amateur radio antenna worked on the island's highest point, locals seized the initiative, contacting a Vodafone store in Skibbereen – and offering to help install a mast at the same spot. In a massive engineering challenge, five cement lorries were barged from the mainland as locals prepared the groundwork for the structure which is revolutionising the way they live and work. The Cape Clear Island connectivity project was carried out by Vantage Towers under their Towers For Good programme – aimed at connecting rural communities, encouraging development and enabling job creation. “We really suffered due to a lack of mobile signal – driving to another part of the island to make a phone call was a way of life for some people,” said Mairtín Ó Méalóid, Chairman of Comharchumann Chléire Teoranta, the Cape Clear Co-operative. “I can now make a call from my house, which is something that I could never do. “There is a certain resilience which comes from island life, but something like this reduces our sense of isolation. “It also enables businesses such as the glamping site to offer connectivity to tourists, as well as providing service to parts of the mainland and Sherkin Island that were previously isolated.” The new installation is a massive boost to the community, according to Vantage Towers Ireland Managing Director, Brian McHugh. “It significantly improves mobile and data coverage not only to Cape Clear Island itself but also to the neighbouring island communities of Sherkin Island, Hare Island, and Long Island,” he said. “It will also have a positive impact on residences located in difficult to service areas dotted along the coastline between Baltimore and Crookhaven.” Fishing and leisure boat users on the waters between Crookhaven and Baltimore, as well as islanders, will also now be able to contact the emergency services if needed. Seamus Ó Drisceoil, founder and manager of Cape Clear Island Distillery, said that picking up and losing coverage around the island was a way of life. “We had to adjust our business as a result and accept that we would lose opportunities due to lost calls,” he said. “I now have a mobile phone signal in my house for the first time in 25 years – and I am getting a 5G signal at home and at work.” The sustainable community partnership saw Cape Clear islanders reuse an existing structure with services in place and build the base of the tower at Quarantine Hill, using concrete sourced in Skibbereen. Islanders also helped in the dismantling of a former wind turbine pole at the site, which will be recycled. The tower, which will go live with the Vodafone signal but be open to all service providers, was manufactured in Ireland by Carlow firm Delmec, who co-ordinated the complex transportation logistics. Vodafone Ireland Network Director, Sheila Kavanagh, emphasised the company's commitment to enhancing network infrastructure in the most rural areas of Ireland so that all communities can benefit in the digital society. “From the initial engagement with residents on the island, everyone was very supportive of the proposals to develop this unique telecommunications infrastructure,” she said. See more stories here. More about Irish Tech News Irish Tech News are Ireland's No. 1 Online Tech Publication and often Ireland's No.1 Tech Podcast too. You can find hundreds of fantastic previous episodes and subscribe using whatever platform you like via our Anchor.fm page here: If you'd like to be featured in an upcoming Podcast email us at Simon@IrishTechNews.ie now to discuss. Irish Tech News have a range of services available to help pr...

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows
Lux Radio Theatre - Two Years Before the Mast - 092247, episode 582

Golden Classics Great OTR Shows

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 59:27


Lux Radio Theatre, sometimes spelled Lux Radio Theater, a classic radio anthology series, was broadcast on the NBC Blue Network (1934–35) (owned by the National Broadcasting Company, later predecessor of American Broadcasting Company [ABC] in 1943–1945); CBS Radio network (Columbia Broadcasting System) (1935–54), and NBC Radio (1954–55). Initially, the series adapted Broadway plays during its first two seasons before it began adapting films. These hour-long radio programs were performed live before studio audiences. The series became the most popular dramatic anthology series on radio, broadcast for more than 20 years and continued on television as the Lux Video Theatre through most of the 1950s. The primary sponsor of the show was Unilever through its Lux Soap brand. Listen to our radio station Old Time Radio https://link.radioking.com/otradio Listen to other Shows at My Classic Radio https://www.myclassicradio.net/Podcast Service I Recommend https://redcircleinc.grsm.io/entertainmentradio7148 Remember that times have changed, and some shows might not reflect the standards of today's politically correct society. The shows do not necessarily reflect the views, standards, or beliefs of Entertainment Radio

Digital Islamic Reminder
How To Talk About Mast_rbation To Your Kids

Digital Islamic Reminder

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 13:58


How To Talk About Mast_rbation To Your Kids

Ave Maria Radio: Mast Appeal
Mast Appeal - December 17, 2022

Ave Maria Radio: Mast Appeal

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 117:00


RTÉ - News at One Podcast
Flags at half-mast in barracks for killed peacekeeper

RTÉ - News at One Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 5:47


We talk to Commandant Gemma Fagan of the Defence Forces Press Office following the death of Private Séan Rooney after a convoy of two vehicles carrying eight UNIFIL soldiers came under attack.

AP Audio Stories
No fuel, no mast, no water: Rescued sailors describe ordeal

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 0:56


AP correspondent Ed Donahue onOverdue Sailors Found

Illegal Motion
Episode 300: Pirate Flag at Half Mast

Illegal Motion

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 59:23


The guys eulogize Mike Leach after his sudden passing, and discuss his legacy on the game of college football before recapping the latest in the FCS playoffs and doing their first round of bowl previews.

Park Baptist Church- Rock Hill, SC
A Pastor and His People - Michael Diaz (Mast)

Park Baptist Church- Rock Hill, SC

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 22:18


Hail Varsity Radio Show
Half-Mast | Hail Varsity Radio

Hail Varsity Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 86:58


Chris Schmidt, Elijah Herbel, and Connor Clark and here on a Tuesday to remember the life and career of Mike Leach. Mitch Sherman and Bill Bender each join the show to discuss the legacy left behind by The Pirate, and we hear some of the best moments from Mike Leach gathered from a decade of having him on the show.Hail Varsity Radio is brought to you by Currency.An Exclusive Offer For Hail Varsity Radio Show Podcast Listeners!Get your subscription to Hail Varsity at a discount! Use Coupon Code: GBRA Hurrdat Media Production. Hurrdat Media is a digital media and commercial video production company based in Omaha, NE. Find more podcasts on the Hurrdat Media Network and learn more about our other services today on HurrdatMedia.com.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Ave Maria Radio: Mast Appeal
Mast Appeal - December 10, 2022

Ave Maria Radio: Mast Appeal

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 117:00


The Multiplier Effect
Justin Mast & Melissa Butler — Founder to Founder: Should I Be My Company's Brand Identity?

The Multiplier Effect

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 33:59


Justin Mast is the Founder of Bloomscape, a company that ships a variety of live plants straight from greenhouses to customers' homes. Melissa Butler is the founder and CEO of The Lip Bar, a beauty brand with a diverse line of vegan, cruelty-free cosmetics sold online and in over 1,000 stores nationwide, including Target and Walmart. These two founders have both built brands squarely intertwined in their personal identities, for better or worse. In this episode, Justin and Melissa are giving their best advice on what leaders of high growth companies who've worked hard to cultivate their brands can do to stay true to themselves – and their brands – as they scale their businesses. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/endeavornorthamerica/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/endeavornorthamerica/support

Mon Podcast Immo
Investissement immobilier : Quelle décote pour les passoires thermiques ? avec Thierry Vignal (Mastéos)

Mon Podcast Immo

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 9:05


Combien coute une rénovation énergétique ? Quelle décote  pour investir dans d'un bien immobilier noté E, F ou G ? Comment les prix des passoires thermiques s'ajustent à ceux  de la rénovation énergétique ? Thierry Vignal, président de Mastéos, répond au micro Mon Podcast Immo d'Ariane Artinian.

Ave Maria Radio: Mast Appeal
Mast Appeal - December 3, 2022

Ave Maria Radio: Mast Appeal

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 117:00


960 KZIM
PBR event in St Louis with Indiana Cowboy Marcus Mast

960 KZIM

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 13:35


93.9 the River
Humans in Tune: Marcus Mast, Professional Bull Rider

93.9 the River

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 15:07


FG MIXES | HOUSE
CLUB FG : MAST

FG MIXES | HOUSE

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 60:07


Revivez le club FG de Mast du samedi 26 novembre 2022 

ECOUTE C'EST DJ MAST
DJ MAST - CLUB FG LIVE - NOVEMBRE 2022

ECOUTE C'EST DJ MAST

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 60:51


1 - Mark Bale - Need Nobody (Kuba & Neitan Remix) 2 - Mau P - Drugs From Amsterdam 3 - Chris Lorenzo & Cobrah - Mami 4 - Fisher feat. MERYLL - Yeah The Girls 5 - Flashmob, Kolombo - Move Your Body (K2 AM Mix) 6 - Dom Dolla & Clementine Douglas - Miracle Maker 7 - Aback - Party time Tonight 8 - Daful, Gustavo Bravetti & David Amo - All Your Raw (Tony Romera Bootleg) 9 - Lumberjack & Djibril Cissé - Don't Stoppin' 10 - Malaa - How It Is 11 - Matroda & Bleu Clair - PWR 12 - David Jones - E Samba (Kuba & Neitan Remix) 13 - Dombresky & Crusy Ft. Mathieu Ruz - El Beso 14 - Retna - Can You Move To the Beat 15 - Tita Lau, James Hype - B2B 16 - Kadenza - Good For Nothing 17 - Damien N-Drix,Mosimann, STV - Treize (Mosimann Remix) 18 - Offaiah - Find A Way 19 - David Guetta & Bebe Rexha - I'm Good (Blue) (Cedric Gervais Remix) 20 - Damien N-Drix & STV - Really Want (Wannabe) 21 - Luca Debonaire & Maickel Telussa - Deeper Love 22 - Shiba San, Black V Neck, Nautik - Ba Da Bam 23 - Deeper Purpose - Party Diva 24 - Hugel & Westend feat. Cumbiafrica - Aguila 25 - Sam Smith feat. Kim Petras - Unholy (Gin & Sonic Remix)

Ave Maria Radio: Mast Appeal
Mast Appeal - November 26, 2022

Ave Maria Radio: Mast Appeal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 117:00


Dr. Lotte: Science with Soul
MCAS, Lyme, & Dysautonomia with Dr. Tania Dempsey, MD, ABIHM

Dr. Lotte: Science with Soul

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 53:38


Dr. Tania Dempsey, MD, ABIHM is Board-Certified in Internal Medicine and Integrative and Holistic Medicine. She received her MD degree from The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and her BS degree from Cornell University.  She completed her Internal Medicine Residency at New York University Medical Center. In 2011, she founded her own Integrative medicine practice which has evolved into AIM Center for Personalized Medicine, a destination Medical Center in Purchase, NY, focusing on complex, multi-system diseases. Dr. Dempsey is a leading expert in MCAS, Mast Cell Activation Syndrome, Dysautonomia, ME/CFS, (Myalgic encephalo-myelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome), Tick-Borne Infections and Autoimmunity. She is an accomplished international speaker and writer and is well published in the medical literature on topics related to MCAS.  She was involved in a research study in collaboration with the TILT (Toxicant Induced Loss of Tolerance) team at University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio, which led to the publication: Mast cell activation may explain many cases of chemical intolerance. Her most recent paper from January 2022 is titled “Post-HPV-Vaccination Mast Cell Activation Syndrome: Possible Vaccine-Triggered Escalation of Undiagnosed Pre-Existing Mast Cell Disease?”.    

Integrative Practitioner Podcast
Targeting Mast Cells and the Microbiome to Fight Autoimmunity

Integrative Practitioner Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 9:58


Tania Dempsey, MD, ABIHM, joins Integrative Practitioner associate editor, Avery St. Onge, to discuss the mast cell-microbiome connection, and how it relates to the development of autoimmunity. This episode is brought to you in part by the Integrative Healthcare Symposium. Find us at integrativepractitioner.com or e-mail us at IPEditor@divcom.com. Theme music: “Upbeat Party” by Scott Holmes via freemusicarchive.org and “Carefree” by Kevin Mcleod via incompetech.com.

Ave Maria Radio: Mast Appeal
Mast Appeal - November 19, 2022

Ave Maria Radio: Mast Appeal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 117:00


Live Like the World is Dying
S1E52 - Smokey on Mental First Aid

Live Like the World is Dying

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 67:41


Episode Notes Episode Summary Margaret and Smokey talk about ways to go about mental first aid, how to alter responses to trauma for you self and as a community, different paths to resiliency, and why friendship and community are truly the best medicine. Host Info Margaret can be found on twitter @magpiekilljoy or instagram at @margaretkilljoy. Publisher Info This show is published by Strangers in A Tangled Wilderness. We can be found at www.tangledwilderness.org, or on Twitter @TangledWild and Instagram @Tangled_Wilderness. You can support the show on Patreon at www.patreon.com/strangersinatangledwilderness. Next Episode Hopefully will come out Friday, December, 2nd and will probably be This Month In the Apocalypse. Transcript LLWD:Smokey on Mental First Aid Margaret 00:15 Hello and welcome to Live Like the World is Dying, your podcast are what feels like the end times. I'm your host, Margaret killjoy. And, this week or month...or let's just go with 'episode'. This episode is going to be all about mental health and mental health first aid and ways to take care of your mental health and ways to help your community and your friends take care of their mental health, and I think you'll like it. But first, this podcast is a proud member of the Channel Zero network of anarchists podcasts. And here's a jingle from another show on the network. Margaret 01:52 Okay, with me today is Smokey. Smokey, could you introduce yourself with your your name, your pronouns, and I guess a little bit about your background about mental health stuff? Smokey 02:04 Sure, I'm Smokey. I live and work in New York City. My pronouns are 'he' and 'him.' For 23 years, I've been working with people managing serious mental illness in an intentional community, I have a degree in psychology, I have taught psychology at the University level, I have been doing social work for a long time, but I've been an anarchist longer. Margaret 02:43 So so the reason I want to have you on is I want to talk about mental health first aid, or I don't know if that's the way it normally gets expressed, but that's the way I see it in my head. Like how are...I guess it's a big question, but I'm interested in exploring ways that we can, as bad things happen that we experience, like some of the best practices we can do in order to not have that cause lasting mental harm to us. Which is a big question. But maybe that's my first question anyway. Smokey 03:12 I mean, the, the truth is bad things will happen to us. It's part of living in the world, and if you are a person that is heavily engaged in the world, meaning, you know, you're involved in politics, or activism, or even just curious about the world, you will probably be exposed on a more regular basis to things that are bad, that can traumatize us. But even if you're not involved in any of those things, you're going to go through life and have really difficult things happen to you. Now, the good news is, that's always been the case for people. We've always done this. And the good news is, we actually know a lot about what goes into resilience. So, how do you bounce back quickly and hopefully thrive after these experiences? I think that is an area that's only now being really examined in depth. But, we have lots of stories and some research to show that actually when bad things happen to us, there is an approach that actually can help catalyst really impressive strength and move...change our life in a really positive direction. We also know that for most people, they have enough reserve of resiliency that....and they can draw upon other resiliency that they're not chronically affected by it, however, and I would argue how our society is kind of structured, we're seeing more and more people that are suffering from very serious chronic effects of, what you said, bad things happening, or what is often traumatic things but it's not just traumatic things that cause chronic problems for us. But, that is the most kind of common understanding so, so while most people with most events will not have a chronic problem, and you can actually really use those problems, those I'm sorry, those events, let's call them traumatic events, those traumatic events they'll really actually improve your thriving, improve your life and your relationship to others in the world. The fact is, currently, it's an ever growing number of people that are having chronic problems. And that's because of the system. Margaret 06:19 Yeah, there's this like, there was an essay a while ago about it, I don't remember it very well, but it's called "We Are Also Very Anxious," and it it was claiming that anxiety is one of the general affects of society today, because of kind of what you're talking about, about systems that set us up to be anxious all the time and handle things in... Smokey 06:42 I think what most people don't understand is, it is consciously, in the sense that it's not that necessarily it's the desire to have the end goal of people being anxious, and people being traumatized, but it is conscious in that we know this will be the collateral outcome of how we set up the systems. That I think is fairly unique and and really kind of pernicious. Margaret 07:17 What are some of the systems that are setting us up to be anxious or traumatized? Smokey 07:23 Well, I'm gonna reverse it a little bit, Margaret. I'm going to talk about what are the things we need to bounce back or have what has been called 'resilience,' and then you and I can explore how our different systems actually make us being able to access that much more difficult. Margaret 07:47 Okay. Oh, that makes sense. Smokey 07:49 The hallmark of resiliency, ironically, is that it's not individual. Margaret 07:57 Okay. Smokey 07:57 In fact, if you look at the research, there are very few, there's going to be a couple, there's gonna be three of them, but very few qualities of an individual psychology or makeup that is a high predictor of resiliency. Margaret 08:20 Okay. Smokey 08:21 And these three are kind of, kind of vague in the sense they're not, they're not terribly dramatic, in a sense. One is, people that tend to score higher on appreciation of humor, tends to be a moderate predictor of resiliency. Margaret 08:46 I like that one. Smokey 08:47 You don't have to be funny yourself. But you can appreciate humor. Seems to be a....and this is tends to be a cross cultural thing. It's pretty low. There are plenty of people that that score very low on that, that also have resiliency. That's the other thing, I'll say that these three personality traits are actually low predictors of resiliency. Margaret 09:13 Compared to the immunity ones that you're gonna talk about? Smokey 09:16 So one is appreciation of humor seems to be one. So, these are intrinsic things that, you know, maybe we got from our family, but but we hold them in ourselves, right? The second one is usually kind of put down as 'education.' And there tends to be a reverse bell curve. If you've had very, very low education, you tend to be more resilient. If you've had extreme professionalization, you know, being a doctor, being a lawyer, well, not even being a lawyer, because that's the only...but many, many years of schooling, PhD things like that, it's not what you study. There's something about... Smokey 10:10 Yeah, or that you didn't. They're almost equal predictors of who gets traumatized. And then the the last one is kind of a 'sense of self' in that it's not an ego strength as we kind of understand it, but it is an understanding of yourself. The people that take the surveys, that they score fairly high....So I give you a survey and say, "What do you think about Smokey on these different attributes?" You give me a survey and say, "Smokey, how would you rate yourself on these different attributes?" Margaret 10:11 It's that you studied. Margaret 10:32 Okay. Smokey 10:59 So, it's suggesting that I have some self-reflexivity about what my strengths and weaknesses are. I can only know that because they're married by these also. Margaret 11:11 Okay. So it's, it's not about you rating yourself high that makes you resilient, it's you rating yourself accurately tohow other people see you. Smokey 11:18 And again, I want to stress that these are fairly low predictors. Now, you'll read a million books, kind of pop like, or the, these other ones. But when you actually look at the research, it's not, you know, it's not that great. So those..however, the ones that are big are things like 'robustness of the social network.' So how many relations and then even more, if you go into depth, 'what are those relationships' and quantity does actually create a certain level of quality, interestingly, especially around things called 'micro-social interactions,' which are these interactions that we don't even think of as relationships, maybe with storepersons, how many of these we have, and then certain in depth, having that combined with a ring of kind of meaningful relationships. And meaningful meaning not necessarily who is most important to me, but how I share and, and share my emotions and my thoughts and things like that. So, there's a lot on that. That is probably the strongest predictor of resilience. Another big predictor of resilience is access to diversity in our social networks. So, having diverse individuals tend to give us more resiliency, and having 'time,' processing time, also gives us more...are high predictors of resiliency, the largest is a 'sense of belonging.' Margaret 13:14 Okay. Smokey 13:15 So that trauma...events that affect our sense of belonging, and this is why children who have very limited opportunities to feel a sense of belonging, which are almost always completely limited, especially for very young children to the family, if that is cut off due to the trauma, or it's already dysfunctional and has nothing to do with the trauma, that sense of belonging, that lack of sense of belonging makes it very difficult to maintain resilience. So. So those are the things that, in a nutshell, we're going to be talking about later about 'How do we improve these?' and 'How do we maximize?' And 'How do we leverage these for Mental Health First Aid?' We can see how things like the internet, social media, capitalism, you know, kind of nation state building, especially as we understand it today, all these kinds of things errode a lot of those things that we would want to see in building resilient people. Margaret 14:28 Right. Smokey 14:28 And, you know, making it more difficult to access those things that we would need. Margaret 14:34 No, that's...this...Okay, yeah, that makes it obvious that the answer to my question of "What are the systems that deny us resiliency?" are just all of this. Yeah, because we're like....most people don't have...there's that really depressing statistic or the series of statistics about the number of friends that adults have in our society, and how it keeps going down every couple of decades. Like, adults just have fewer and fewer friends. And that... Smokey 15:00 The number, the number is the same for children, though too. Margaret 15:05 Is also going down, is what you're saying? Smokey 15:07 Yes. They have more than adults. But compared to earlier times, they have less. So, the trend is not as steep as a trendline. But, but it is still going down. And more importantly, there was a big change with children at one point, and I'm not sure when it historically happened. But, the number of people they interacted with, was much more diverse around age. Margaret 15:39 Oh, interesting. Smokey 15:40 So they had access to more diversity. Margaret 15:43 Yeah, yeah. When you talk about access to diversity, I assume that's diversity in like a lot of different axis, right? I assume that's diversity around like people's like cultural backgrounds, ethnic backgrounds, age. Like, but even like... Smokey 15:56 Modes of thought. Margaret 15:58 Yeah, well, that's is my guess, is that if you're around more people, you have more of an understanding that like, reality is complicated, and like different people see things in different ways. And so therefore, you have a maybe a less rigid idea of what should happen. So, then if something happens outside of that, you're more able to cope, or is this...does... like, because I look at each of these things and I can say why I assume they affect resiliency, but obviously, that's not what you're presenting, you're not presenting how they affect resiliency, merely that they seem to? Smokey 16:34 Yeah, and I don't know, if we know exactly how they affect, and we don't know how they...the effect of them together, you know, social sciences, still pretty primitive. So they, they need to look at single variables, often. But you know, we know with chemistry and biology and ecology, which I think are a little more sophisticated...and physics, which is more sophisticated. The real interesting stuff is in the combinations. Margaret 17:09 Yeah. Okay. Smokey 17:10 So what happens when you have, you know, diversity, but also this diverse and robust social network? Is that really an addition? Or is that a multiplication moment? For resiliency. Margaret 17:23 Right. And then how does that affect like, if that comes at the expense of...well, it probably wouldn't, but if it came at the expense of processing time or something. Smokey 17:33 Exactly. Margaret 17:35 Or, like, you know, okay, I could see how it would balance with education in that, like, I think for a lot of people the access to diversity that they encounter first is like going off to college, right, like meeting people from like, different parts of the world, or whatever. Smokey 17:49 I forgot to mention one other one, but it is, 'meaning.' Meaning is very important. People that score high, or report, meaning deep, kind of core meaning also tend to have higher resiliency. That being said, they...and don't, don't ever confuse resiliency with like, happiness or contentment. It just means that the dysfunction or how far you're knocked off track due to trauma, and we're, we're using trauma in the larger sense of the word, you know, how long it takes you to get back on track, or whether you can even get back on track to where you were prior to the event is what we're talking about. So it's not, this is not a guide to happiness or living a fulfilled life. It's just a guide to avoid the damage. Margaret 19:01 But if we made one that was a specifically a 'How to have a happy life,' I feel like we could sell it and then have a lot of money.Have you considered that? [lauging] Smokey 19:11 Well one could argue whether that's even desirable to have a happy life. That's a whole philosophical thing. That's well beyond my paygrade Margaret 19:22 Yeah, every now and then I have this moment, where I realized I'm in this very melancholy mood, and I'm getting kind of kind of happy about it. And I'm like, "Oh, I'm pretty comfortable with this. This is a nice spot for me." I mean, I also like happiness, too, but you know. Okay, so, this certainly implies that the, the way forward for anyone who's attempting to build resiliency, the sort of holistic solution is building community. Like in terms of as bad stuff happens. Is that... Smokey 19:58 Community that's...and community not being just groups. Okay, so you can, I think, you know, the Internet has become an expert at creating groups. There lots of groups. But community, or communitas or the sense of belonging is more than just a shared interest and a shared knowledge that there's other like-minded people. You'll hear the internet was great for like minded people to get together. But, the early internet was really about people that were sharing and creating meaning together. And I think that was very powerful. That, you know, that seems harder to access on today's Internet, and certainly the large social media platforms are consciously designed to achieve certain modes of experience, which do not lend themselves to that. Margaret 21:06 Right, because it's like the...I don't know the word for this. Smokey 21:10 It's Capitalism. Like, yeah, we're hiding the ball. The ball is Capitalism. Margaret 21:14 Yeah. Smokey 21:14 And how they decided to go with an advertising model as opposed to any other model, and that requires attention. Margaret 21:21 Yeah. Because it seems like when you talk about a robust social network, I mean, you know, theoretically, social network, like social networks, you know, Twitter calls itself a social network, right? And is there anything in the micro social interactions that one has online? Is there value in that? Or do you think that the overall...I mean, okay, because even like looking at... Smokey 21:46 I think there has to be value, I think, yeah, they did. I was reading just today, actually, about research, it was in England, with...this one hospital decided to send postcards to people who had been hospitalized for suicidal attempts. Margaret 22:09 Okay. Smokey 22:10 Most of them ended up in the mental health thing, some of them didn't, because they they left beyond, you know, against medical advice, or whatever. But, anyone that came in presenting with that a month, and then three months later, they sent another postcard just saying, "You know, we're all thinking about you, we're hoping you're all you're doing, alright. We have faith in you," that kind of thing like that, right. Nice postcard, purposely chosen to have a nice scene, sent it out. And they followed up, and they found a significant reduction in further attempts, rehospitalizations of these people, so that's a very, you know, there's no, it's a one way communication, it's not person-to-person, and it had some impact on I would guess one could argue the resiliency of those people from giving into suicidal ideation. Right. Margaret 23:13 Yeah. Smokey 23:14 So I think this is to say that, you know, we'd be...unplugging the internet, you know, that kind of Luddite approach doesn't make sense. There is a value to answer your question to the the internet's micro social interactions. It's just we...it's complicated, because you can't just have micro-social interactions unfortunately, but you need them. Margaret 23:44 Yeah. No, that that's really interesting to me, because yeah, so there's, there is a lot of value that is coming from these things, but then the overall effect is this like, like, for example, even like access to diversity, right? In a lot of ways, theoretically, the Internet gives you access to like everything. But then, instead, it's really designed to create echo chambers in the way that the algorithms and stuff feed people information. And echo chambers of thought is the opposite of diversity, even if the echo chamber of thought is like about diversity. Smokey 24:16 Yeah, I mean, it's set up again, almost as if it were to kind of naturally organically grow, we would probably have just as chaotic and and people would still just be as angry at the Internet, but it probably would develop more resilience in people. Because it wouldn't be stunted by this need to attract attention. The easiest way to do that is through outrage. Easiest way to do that is quickly and fast, so it takes care of your processing time. And relative anonymity is the coin of these kinds of things, you know, that's why bots and things like that, you know, they're not even humans, right? You know, they're just...so all these kinds of things stunt and deform, what could potentially be useful, not a silver bullet, and certainly not necessary to develop resiliency, strong resiliency. You don't need the internet to do that. And there are certain...using the internet, you know, there's going to be certain serious limitations because of the design, how it's designed. Margaret 25:42 Okay, well, so hear me out. If the internet really started coming in latter half of the 20th century, that kind of lines up to when cloaks went out of style.... Smokey 25:54 Absolutely, that's our big problem. And they haven't done any research on cloak and resiliency. Margaret 26:00 I feel that everyone who wears a cloak either has a sense of belonging, or a distinct lack of a sense of belonging. Probably start off with a lack of sense of belonging, but you end up with a sense of belonging So, okay, okay. Smokey 26:15 So I want to say that there's two things that people confuse and a very important. One, is how to prevent chronic effects from traumatic experiences. And then one is how to take care of, if you already have or you you develop a chronic effect of traumatic experiences. Nothing in the psychology literature, sociology literature, anthropology literature, obviously, keeps you from having traumatic experiences. Margaret 26:52 Right. Smokey 26:54 So one is how to prevent it from becoming chronic, and one is how to deal with chronic and they're not the same, they're quite, quite different. So you know, if you already have a chronic traumatic response of some sort, post traumatic stress syndrome, or any of the other related phenomena, you will approach that quite differently than building resilience, which doesn't protect you from having trauma, a traumatic experience. It just allows you to frame it, understand it, maybe if you're lucky, thrive and grow from it. But at worst, get you back on track in not having any chronic problems. Margaret 27:48 Okay, so it seems like there's three things, there's the holistic, building a stronger base of having a community, being more resilient in general. And then there's the like direct first aid to crisis and trauma, and then there's the long term care for the impacts of trauma. Okay, so if so, we've talked a bit about the holistic part of it, you want to talk about the the crisis, the thing to do in the immediate sense as it's happening or whatever? Smokey 28:15 For yourself or for somebody else? Margaret 28:18 Let's start with self. Smokey 28:20 So, self is go out and connect to your social network as much as you can, which is the opposite of what your mind and body is telling you. And that's why I think so much of the quote unquote, "self-care" movement is so wrong. You kind of retreat from your social network, things are too intense, I'm going to retreat from your social network. The research suggests that's the opposite of what you should be doing, you should connect. Now, if you find yourself in an unenviable situation where you don't have a social network, then you need to connect to professionals, because they, they can kind of fill in for that social Network. Therapists, social workers, peer groups, support groups, things like that they can kind of fill in for that. The problem is you don't have that sense of belonging. Well, with support groups, you might. You see this often in AA groups or other support groups. You don't really get that in therapy or or group therapy so much. But that is the first thing and so connect to your group. Obviously on the other side, if you're trying to help your community, your group, you need to actively engage that person who has been traumatized. Margaret 29:33 Yeah, okay. Smokey 29:35 And it's going to be hard. And you need to keep engaging them and engaging them in what? Not distractions: Let's go to a movie, get some ice cream, let's have a good time. And not going into the details of the traumatic experience so much as reconnecting them to the belonging, our friendship, if that. Our political movement, if that. Our religious movement, if that. Whatever that...whatever brought you two together. And that could be you being the community in this person, or could be you as Margaret in this person connecting on that, doubling down on that, and often I see people do things like, "Okay, let's do some self care, or let's, let's do the opposite of whatever the traumatic experience was," if it came from, say oppression, either vicarious or direct through political involvement let's, let's really connect on a non-political kind of way. Margaret 31:19 Ah I see! Smokey 31:21 And I'm saying, "No, you should double down on the politics," reminding them of right what you're doing. Not the trauma necessarily not like, "Oh, remember when you got beaten up, or your, your significant other got arrested or got killed by the police," but it's connecting to meaning, and bringing the community together. Showing the resiliency of the community will vicariously and contagiously affect the individual. And again, doesn't have to be political could be anything. Margaret 32:01 Yeah. Is that? How does that that feels a little bit like the sort of 'get right back on the horse kind of thing.' But then like, in terms of like, socially, rather than, because we 'get back on the horse,' might mean might imply, "Oh, you got beat up at a riot. So go out to the next riot." And that's what you're saying instead is so "Involve you in the fundraising drive for the people who are dealing with this including you," or like... Smokey 32:28 And allowing an expectation that the individual who's been traumatized, might be having a crisis of meaning. And allowing that conversation, to flow and helping that person reconnect to what they found meaningful to start with. So getting right back on the horse again, it's reminding them why they love horses. Margaret 33:02 Yeah. Okay, that makes sense. Okay, I have another question about the the crisis first aid thing, because there's something that, you know, something that you talked to me about a long time ago, when I was working on a lot of like reframing. I was working on coping with trauma. And so maybe this actually relates instead to long term care for trauma. And I, I thought of this as a crisis first aid kind of thing, is I'll use a like, low key example. When I was building my cabin, I'm slightly afraid of heights, not terribly, but slightly. And so I'm on a ladder in the middle of nowhere with no one around and I'm like climbing up the ladder, and I'm nailing in boards. And I found myself saying, "Oh, well, I only have three more boards. And then I'm done. I can get off the ladder. "And then I was like, "No, what I need to do is say, it's actually fine, I am fine. And I can do this," rather than like counting down until I can get off the ladder. And so this is like a way that I've been working on trying to build resiliency, you can apply this to lots of things like if I'm on an airplane, and I'm afraid of flying or something I can, instead of being like, "Five more hours and then we're there. Four more hours and then we're there," instead of being like, "It's actually totally chill that I'm on an airplane. This is fine." And basically like telling myself that to reframe that. Is this....Am I off base with this? Is this tie into this, there's just a different framework? Smokey 34:27 That is what the individual should be trying to do is connect the three different things, keeping it simple. One, is to the community which gives them nourishment. On a plane or on your roof, that's not going to happen. Margaret 34:44 Yeah. Smokey 34:45 Though, actually, to be honest. If you're nervous and you have...go back to your roof example, which I think is a pretty good one. Let's say that you had more than three boards. Let's say it was gonna take you a couple hours to do that. But it's something you're nervous about, connecting to somebody in your social network, whether you, you have your earphones on, and you're just talking to them before or during...after doesn't help. That does one way. Or the other is connecting to what you were doing, which is connecting to kind of reframing or your own internal resilience. I've done something similar like this before. This is not something that is going to need to throw me, it is what's called pocketing the anxiety. Margaret 35:45 Okay. Smokey 35:45 Where you're other-izing it, being like, it's coming from you too, right? being like, "Hey, you could fall. This plane could go down," right? That that's still you, you're generating that. You're not hearing that over to, and you're saying, "Okay, but I'm going to try, you know, give primacy to this other voice in my head. That is saying, "You've got this, it's all right, you've done things like this before."" So that's the second thing. And that's what you were doing. So you could connect to your community, you could connect to kind of a reserve of resiliency. And to do that is allow that one to be pocketed. But be like, "Hey, I want to hear from what this core thing has to say. I want to hear from what the positive person on the front row has to say." You're not arguing with that one. You're just listening. You're changing your, your, what you're attuned to. And then the third one is, if you can, you connect to the meaning. What is the meaning of building the house for you? Where are you going on your flight? And why is it important? Margaret 37:03 Yeah. Okay, Smokey 37:05 And that anxiety and the fact that you're doing it, you want to give again, the primacy to the importance, that "Yeah, I'm really nervous, I'm really freaked out about this, but this thing is so important, or so good for me, or so healthy for me to do this. This must mean it's going to be really important. And I'm connecting to why it's important and focusing on that. So those are the three things that the individual can do. The helping person or community is engagement. The second one is the same, reconnecting to the meaning. Why did you love horses in the first place? Okay, don't have to get back on the horse. But let's not forget horses are awesome. Margaret 37:58 Yeah. Smokey 37:58 And Horseback riding is awesome. Margaret 38:01 Yeah. Smokey 38:01 And you were really good at it before you got thrown. But you know, you don't have to do it now, but let's, let's just let's just share our love of horses for a moment and see how that makes you feel. And then the third one is that kind of drawing upon, instead of drawing upon the individual resilience, which you were doing, like, "Hey, I got this," or the plane, you know, you were, you're hearing from other people, you're drawing upon their individual resilience. "Smokey, tell me about the time you did this thing that was hard." And I tell ya, you're like, "Well, Smokey can fucking do that I can do it. You don't even think...it doesn't even work necessarily consciously. Margaret 38:50 Right. Smokey 38:51 So you could see that what you're doing individually, the helper or the community is doing complementary. Margaret 38:59 Yeah. Smokey 39:00 And now you can see why a lot of self care narrative, a lot of taking a break a lot of burnout narrative, all these things, at best aren't going to help you and at worst, in my opinion, are kind of counterproductive. Margaret 39:17 Well, and that's the, to go to the, you know, working on my roof thing I think about...because I've had some success with this. I've had some success where I....there's certain fears that I have, like, suppressed or something like I've stopped being as afraid of...the fear is no longer a deciding factor in my decision making, because of this kind of reframing this kind of like, yeah, pocketing like...And it's probably always useful to have the like, I don't want to reframe so completely that I just walk around on a roof all the time, without paying attention to what I'm doing, right?Because people do that and then they fall and the reason that there's a reason that roofing is one of the most dangerous jobs in America. So a, I don't know I yeah, I, I appreciate that, that you can do that. And then if it's a thing you're going to keep doing anyway, it becomes easier if you start handling it like, carefully, you know? Smokey 40:17 Well, you don't want to give it too much. So why do we? Why is it natural for us to take anxiety or fear and focus on it? It's somewhat evolutionary, right? It's a threat, right? It's supposed to draw your attention, right? It's supposed to draw your attention. And if you're not careful, it will draw your attention away from other things that are quieter that like that resiliency in the front row you need to call on, because they're not as flashy, right? So I don't think you have to worry about threat....You're right. You don't want to get to the point where you and that's why I say 'pocket it,' as opposed to 'deny it, suppress it, argue with it. demolish it.' I think it's good to have that little, "Beep, beep, beep there's a threat," and then being like, "Okay, but I want to continue to do this. Let's hear from resiliency in the front row. What? What do you have to tell me too?" You have to not...what happens is we go into the weeds of the threat. Oh, so what? "Oh, I fall off and I compound fracture, and I'm way out here in the woods, and no one's going to get me. My phone isn't charged." That's not what the original beep was. Original beep like, "You're high up on a ladder, seems unstable. This seems sketchy," right? Okay. Got that. And then resilience is, "Yeah, you've done lots of sketchy stuff. You've written in the back of a pickup truck. That's sketchy, so seatbelt there, nothing, you know, let me remind you that that you can overcome." And, but by going into the anxiety, going into the fear, you're forcing yourself to justify the thing. And then it becomes more and more elaborate, and it gets crazier and crazier very quickly. You know, all of sudden, you're bleeding out and you're cutting your leg off with a pen knife. It's like, "Wow, how did all this happen?" Margaret 42:38 Yeah, well, and that's actually something that comes up a lot in terms of people interacting with the show and about like preparedness in general. Because in my mind, the point of paying attention to how to deal with forest fire while I live in the woods, is not to then spend all of my time fantasizing and worrying about forest fire. But instead, to compare it to this ladder, if I get this "Beep, beep, the ladder is unstable." I climb down, I stabilize the ladder as best as I can. And then I climb back up and I do the thing. And then when I think about like, with fire, I'm like, "Okay, I have done the work to minimize the risk of fire. And so now I can stop thinking about it." Like, I can listen to the little beep, beep noise and do the thing. And now I can ignore the beep beep because just like literally, when you're backing up a truck and it goes beep, beep, you're like, yeah, no, I know, I'm backing up. Thanks. You know, like, Smokey 43:35 Yeah, it's good to know, it's good to know, you're not going forward. Margaret 43:39 Yeah, no. No, okay. That's interesting. And then the other thing that's really interesting about this, the thing that you're presenting, is it means that in some ways, work that we present as very individual in our society, even in radical society, is actually community based on this idea, like so conquering phobias is something that we help one another do, it seems like, Smokey 44:02 Absolutely. I mean, the best stuff on all this stuff is that people reverse engineering it to make people do dangerous, bad things. The military. Margaret 44:18 Yeah, they're probably pretty good at getting people to conquer phobias. Yep. Smokey 44:21 They have a great sense of belonging. They have a great sense of pulling in internal resilient, group resilient, connecting to meaning even when it's absolutely meaningless what you're doing. It's all the dark side of what we're talking about, but it's quite effective and it literally wins wars. Margaret 44:47 Yeah, that makes sense. Because you have this whole... Smokey 44:50 Literally it changes history. And so, the good news is, we can kind of reclaim that for what I think it was originally purposed to do, which is to protect us from the traumas that we had to go through in our evolutionary existence. So we couldn't afford to have a whole bunch of us chronically disabled. Meaning unable to function, you know, they've just taken it and, and bent it a little bit, and learned very deeply about it, how to how to use it for the things that really cause, you know, physical death and injury. And, and, you know, obviously, they're not perfect, you have a lot of trauma, but not, not as much as you would expect for what they do. And every year they get better and better. Margaret 45:51 Hooray. Smokey 45:53 We have to get on top of our game. Margaret 45:56 Yeah. Smokey 45:57 And get people not to do what they do. I'm not suggesting reading...well maybe reading military, but not...you can't use those tools to make people truly free and resilient. Margaret 46:17 Yeah. Smokey 46:18 In the healthy kind of way. Yeah. Margaret 46:22 Okay, so in our three things, there's the holistic, prepared resiliency thing, then there's the immediate, the bad thing is happening first aid. Should we talk about what to do when the thing has, when you have the like, the injury, the mental injury of the trauma? Smokey 46:42 Like with most injuries, it's rehab, right? Margaret 46:45 Yeah. No, no, you just keep doing the thing, and then hope it fixes itself. [laughs] Smokey 46:53 My approach to most medical oddities that happen as I get older, it's like, "It'll fix itself, this tooth will grow back, right? The pain will go away, right?" Yeah, just like physical rehab, it does require two important aspects for all physical, what we think of when someone says I have to go to rehab, physical rehab, not not alcohol rehab, or psych rehab, is that there's two things that are happening. One, is a understanding, a deep understanding of the injury, often not by the person, but by the physical therapist. Right? That if they know, okay, this is torn meniscus, or this is this and I, okay, so I understand the anatomy, I understand the surgery that happened. Okay. And then the second is, short term, not lifelong therapy, not lifelong this or that. Short term techniques to usually strengthen muscles and other joints and things around the injury. Okay. And that's what, what I would call good recovery after you already have the injury. It's not after you've had the traumatic experience, because traumatic experience doesn't necessarily cause a chronic injury, and we're trying to reduce the number of chronic injuries, but chronic injuries are going to happen. chronic injuries already exist today. A lot of the people we know are walking around with chronic injuries that are impacting their ability to do what they want to do and what in my opinion, we need them to do, because there's so much change that needs to happen. We need everybody as much as possible to be working at their ability. So wherever we can fix injury, we should. So so one is where do I get an understanding of how this injury impacts my life? And I think different cognitive psychology, I think CBT, DBT, these things are very, very good in general. Margaret 49:22 I know what those are, but can you explain. Smokey 49:22 Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Dialectical Behavioral Therapy. These all come out of cognitive psychology from the 50s. Our techniques, but most therapists use versions of this anyway. So just going to therapy, what it is doing initially, is trying to, like the physical therapist, tell you, "This is the injury you have. This is why it's causing you to limp, or why you have weakness in your arm and wrist. And what we're going to do is we're going to give you some techniques to build up, usually the muscles, or whatever else needs to be built up around it so that you will be able to get more use out of your hand." And that is what we need to do with people that have this chronic injury. So, one, is you need to find out how the injury is impacting. So, I'm drinking more, I'm getting angry more, or I'm having trouble making relationships, or I'm having, and there's a series of, you know, 50 year old techniques to really kind of get down and see, okay, this injury is causing these things, that's how it's impacting me, and I don't want to drink more, or I want to be able to sleep better, or I want to be able to focus, or I want to be able to have meaningful relationship with my partner or my children or whatever, whatever that is, right? And then there are techniques, and they're developing new techniques, all the time, there's like EMDR, which is an eye thing that I don't fully understand. There DBT, dialectical behavioral therapy, has a lot of techniques that you kind of practice in groups. As you know, we have mutual aid cell therapy, MAST, which is also a group where you're sharing techniques to build up these different things and resilience. So, community, and meaning, and all those...reframing all those kinds of things. So, but they shouldn't, despite the length of the injury, how long you've been injured, how long you've been limping, and how much it's affected other parts of your psychic body in a way. These are things that still should be able to be remediated relatively quickly. Smokey 49:31 That's exciting. Yeah. Smokey 50:10 But this is not a lifelong thing. Now, that doesn't mean, if you're traumatized as a child for example, it's sort of like if you've completely shattered your wrist bone, and they've put in pins and things like that, that wrist, may never have the flexibility, it did, the actual wrist bone, you know, the bones in the wrist. But by building muscles, and other things around it, you could then theoretically have full flexibility that you had before, right? But it's not the actual wrist bone, but that that injury is still there. You've built up...Sometimes it's called strength-based approach or model where you're building up other strengths, you have to relieve the impact that that injury, so like, a common thing with with trauma is trust. My trust is very damaged. My ability to trust others, or trust certain environments, or maybe trust myself, right, is completely damaged. So if, if my...and that may never fully heal, that's like my shattered wrist bone. So then, by building up, let's say, I don't trust myself, I did something, really fucked up myself, you know, psychologically, traumatically, but by building up trust in others, and then in the environment, or other things, that can mediate that damage or vice versa. Margaret 53:53 You mean vice versa, like if you? Smokey 53:59 Like, if my problem is a trust of others, or trust with strangers, or trust with friends, you know, I've been betrayed in a really traumatic way by my mother, or my father or uncle or something like that then, you know, building up my friendships to a really strong degree will reduce and eventually eliminate, hopefully erase the impact of that injury on the rest of my life. I'm not doomed to have dysfunctional relationships, lack of sleep, alcoholism or whatever are the symptoms of that traumatic event, that chronic traumatic event. Margaret 54:54 Okay, so my next question is, and it's sort of a leading question, you mentioned MAST earlier and I kind of want to ask, like, do we need specialists for all of this? Do we have people who both generalize and specialize in this kind of thing? Are there ways that, you know, we as a community can, like, get better at most of this stuff while then some of it like, you know, obviously people specialize in and this remains useful? Like... Smokey 55:22 You need. I wouldn't say...You need, you do need specialists, not for their knowledge, per se so much as they're there for people that the injury has gone on so long that the resiliency, all those other things, they don't have a social network, they haven't had time, because the damage happened so early to build up those reserves, that that person in the front row, the front row, the seats are empty. That is, it's really great we live...Now, in other cultures, the specialists were probably shamans, religious people, mentors, things like that, that said, "Okay, my role is to," all therapy is self therapy. That was Carl Rogers, he was quite correct about that. The specialist you're talking about are the kind of stand in for people who don't have people to do that. I would argue all real therapy is probably community therapy. It's relational. So if you have friends, if you have community, if you have a place, or places you find belonging, then theoretically, no, I don't think you need....I think those groups, and I think most specialists would agree to actually, those groups, if they're doing this can actually do a much better job for that individual. They know that individual and there's a natural affinity. And there there are other non specifically therapeutic benefits for engaging in re engaging in these things that have nothing to do with the injury that are just healthy, and good to you. So sort of like taking Ensure, Ensure will keep you alive when you're you've had some surgery, you've had some really bad injury, or if you need saline solution, right? But we're not suggesting people walk around with saline bags. There are better ways to get that, more natural ways to get that. I'm not talking alternative, psychiatric or, you know, take herbs instead of psychiatric medication. But there are better ways to do that. And I think, but I'm glad we have saline. Margaret 58:08 Yeah, Smokey 58:08 I think it saves a lot of people's lives. But, we would never give up the other ways to get nutrients because of other benefits to it. You know, sharing a meal with people is also a really good thing. Margaret 58:21 And then even like from a, you know, the advantages of community, etc. I'm guessing it's not something that's like magically imbued in community. It's like can be something that communities need to actually learn these skills and develop like, I mean, there's a reason that well, you know, I guess I'm reasonably open about this. I used to have like fairly paralyzing panic attacks, and then it started generalizing. And then, you know, a very good cognitive behavioral therapist gave me the tools with which to start addressing that. And that wasn't something I was getting from....I didn't get it from my community in the end, but I got it from a specific person in the community, rather than like, everyone already knows this or something. Smokey 59:03 Well, I think what we're doing right here is, is....I mean, people don't know. So they read....People were trying to help you from your community. Undoubtedly, with the right. intentions, and the right motives, but without the information on what actually works. Margaret 59:27 Yep. Smokey 59:28 And that's all that was happening there. Margaret 59:30 Yeah, totally. Smokey 59:31 So, it's really, you know, as cliche as it sound. It's really about just giving people some basic tools that we already had at one time. Margaret 59:44 Yeah. Smokey 59:45 Forgot, became specialized. So you know, I'm throwing around CBT, DBT, EMDR. None of that people can keep in their head. They will....The audience listening today are not going to remember all those things. And nor do they have to. But they have to know that, you know, reconnecting to the horse, but not telling people to get back on the horse, that kind of tough love kind of thing isn't going to work, but neither is the self care, take a bubble bath... Margaret 1:00:19 Never see a horse again, run from a horse. Smokey 1:00:21 Never see a horse, again, we're not even going to talk about horses, let's go do something else, isn't going to work either. And I think once we...you know, it's not brain science...Though it is. [laughs] It is pretty, you know, these are, and you look at how religions do this, you know, you look at how the military does this, you look at how like, fascists do this, you know, all sorts of groups, communities can do this fairly effectively. And it doesn't cost money. It's not expensive. You don't have to be highly educated or read all the science to be able to do that. And people naturally try, but I think a lot of the self help kind of gets in the way. And some people think they know. "Okay, well, this is what needs to happen, because I saw on Oprah." That kind of thing. " Margaret 1:01:26 Yeah, Well, I mean, actually, that's one of the main takeaways that's coming from me is I've been, I've been thinking a lot about my own mental health first aid on a fairly individual basis, right? You know, even though it was community, that helped me find the means by which to pull myself out of a very bad mental space in that I was in for a lot of years. But I still, in the end was kind of viewing it as, like, "Ah, someone else gave me the tools. And now it's on me." It's like this individual responsibility to take care of myself. And, and so that's like, one of the things that I'm taking as a takeaway from this is learning to be inter-reliant. Smokey 1:02:06 There isn't enough research on it, again, because of our individualistic nature, and probably because of variables. But there's certainly tons of anecdotal evidence, and having done this for a long time talking to people and how the place I work is particularly set up, helping others is a really great way to help yourself. Margaret 1:02:30 Yeah. Smokey 1:02:31 it really works. It's very, I mean, obviously, in the Greeks, you know, you have the 'wounded healer,' kind of concept. Many indigenous traditions have said this much better than the Western. And I believe they have...and they needed to, but they had a much better kind of understanding of these things that we're we're talking about. You know, it. So, where people can...and I've heard this podcast, your podcast too, talking about this ability to be, you know, have self efficacy. But it's more than self efficacy. It's really helping others. Margaret 1:03:22 Yeah. Smokey 1:03:23 And that, that is really powerful. And there's not enough research on that. And I think that's why support groups, I think that's why, you know, AA, despite all its problems, has spread all over the world and has been around for, you know, 75 years, and is not going to go away anytime soon. Despite some obvious problems, is there's that there's that... they hit upon that they they re discovered something that we always kind of knew. Margaret 1:03:59 Yeah. Okay, well, we're coming out of time. We're running out of time. Are there any last thoughts, things that I should have asked you? I mean, there's a ton we can talk about this, and I'll probably try and have you on to talk about more specifics in the near future. But, is there anything anything I'm missing? Smokey 1:04:15 No, I think I think just re emphasizing the end piece that you know, for people that have resources, communities, meaning, social network, you know, that is worth investing your time and your energy into because that's going to build your...if you want to get psychologically strong, that is the easiest and the best investment, Put down the self help book. Call your friend. You know, don't search Google for the symptoms of this, that, or the other thing. Connect to what's important to you. And then lastly, try to help others or help the world in some way. And those are going to be profound and effective ways to build long lasting resilience as an individual. As a community, we should design our communities around that. Margaret 1:05:35 Yeah. All right. Well, that seems like a good thing to end on. Do you have anything that you want to plug like, I don't know books about mutual aid self therapy or anything like that? Smokey 1:05:46 I want to plug community. That's all I want to plug. Margaret 1:05:50 Cool. All right. Well, it's nice talking to you, and I'll talk to you soon. Smokey 1:05:54 Yep. Margaret 1:06:00 Thank you so much for listening. If you enjoyed this podcast, please tell people about it. Actually, I mean, honestly, if you enjoyed this episode, in particular, like think about it, and think about reaching out to people, and who needs to be reached out to and who you need to reach out to, and how to build stronger communities. But if you want to support this podcast, you can tell people about it. And you can tell the internet about it. And you can tell the algorithms about it. But, you can also tell people about it in person. And you can also support it by supporting the, by supporting Strangers In A Tangled Wilderness, which is the people who produce this podcast. It's an anarchist publishing collective that I'm part of, and you can support it on Patreon at patreon.com/strangersinatangledwilderness. And if you support at pretty much any level, you get access to some stuff, and if you support a $10 you'll get a zine in the mail. And if you support at $20, you'll get your name read at the end of episodes. Like for example, Hoss the dog, and Micahiah, and Chris, and Sam, and Kirk, Eleanor, Jennifer, Staro, Cat J, Chelsea, Dana, David, Nicole, Mikki, Paige, SJ, Shawn, Hunter, Theo, Boise Mutual Aid, Milica, and paparouna. And that's all, and we will talk to you soon, and I don't know, I hope you all are doing as well as you can. Find out more at https://live-like-the-world-is-dying.pinecast.co

WGTD's The Morning Show with Greg Berg
11/16/22 Political Science Professor Jerald Mast

WGTD's The Morning Show with Greg Berg

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 47:46


Dr/ Jerald Mast, Professor of Political Science at Carthage College, offers analysis of last week's mid-term elections. A so-called Red Wave was widely expected but did not materialize. Why not?

Sharing Passion and Purpose
82. Lisa Mast: Professional Digital Photo Organizer & Creative Entrepreneur

Sharing Passion and Purpose

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 29:59


Lisa Mast enjoyed over twenty years as a Music Educator and Chorale conductor at various age levels before she felt a shift to make a change. It took her some time to listen to her inner voice - and the hints from a few friends! - and decide to change career direction and forge a new path. Now, as the founder of Scissortail Digital, she educates and assists clients in their digital photo organizing and storage needs. This change still incorporates her love of educating, storytelling and creativity. During our visit, she will share more about her journey, the path to entrepreneurship and her current business. 

SFF Addicts
Ep. 31: Nautical Fantasy (with Andrea Stewart, RJ Barker & Joshua Phillip Johnson)

SFF Addicts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 105:20


Join host Adrian M. Gibson and authors Andrea Stewart, RJ Barker and Joshua Phillip Johnson as they sail the high seas of nautical fantasy. During the panel they discuss why the ocean is so captivating (and terrifying), why it blends well with fantasy stories, nautical worldbuilding, character development, maritime battles, magic systems, deep sea creatures and more. NOTE: Andrea had to leave the call around the one hour mark, so after that point it is just Adrian, RJ and Joshua. RESOURCES/BOOKS MENTIONED: - The Marine Art of Geoff Hunt (cover artist of the Aubrey/Maturin Novels) - The Scar by China Miéville - Two Years Before the Mast by Richard Henry Dana Jr. - Hornblower Saga by C. S. Forester - Master and Commander and the Aubrey/Maturin Novels by Patrick O'Brian - Moby Dick or, The Whale by Herman Melville EMAIL US WITH YOUR QUESTIONS & COMMENTS: sffaddictspod@gmail.com ABOUT THE AUTHORS: Andrea Stewart is the author of The Bone Shard Daughter and The Bone Shard Emperor, books one and two in The Drowning Empire Trilogy. Find Andrea on Twitter or her personal website. RJ Barker is the author of The Tide Child Trilogy and the Wounded Kingdom Trilogy. Find RJ on Twitter, his personal website or the Writeopolis podcast. Joshua Phillip Johnson is the author The Forever Sea, his debut novel. Find Joshua on Twitter or his personal website. FIND US ONLINE: FanFiAddict Book Blog Twitter Instagram MUSIC: Intro: "The Wind" by Astronoz Interlude 1 & 2: “Crescendo” by Astronoz Outro: “Cloudy Sunset” by Astronoz SFF Addicts is part of FanFiAddict, so check us out at https://fanfiaddict.com/ for the latest in book reviews, essays and all things sci-fi and fantasy, as well as the full episode archive for the podcast and the blog post accompanying this episode. Follow us on Instagram or Twitter @SFFAddictsPod, and please subscribe, rate and review us on your platform of choice, or share us with your friends. It helps a lot, and we greatly appreciate it. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sff-addicts/message

Change Academy
Lashing Yourself to the Mast

Change Academy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 28:58


If you have ever come up with a scheme to keep yourself from succumbing to temptation, you have experimented with a thing called a commitment device. As you'll see, you are not the first to try this.In this episode, we're talking about different types of commitment devices and whether they might be useful in staying on track with whatever you are trying to accomplish in your life–whether that's breaking a bad habit, establishing a new behavior, or meeting a challenge that you've set for yourself.Sick of not making progress? Let's fix that by going to https://weighless.life/quiz

Ave Maria Radio: Mast Appeal
Mast Appeal - November 12, 2022

Ave Maria Radio: Mast Appeal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 117:00


Habitat Podcast
Habitat Podcast #202 - Todd Graf - New IL Farm Habitat Projects, Most Effective Habitat vs. Biggest Mistake, Logging and Forestry, Mast Tree Planting, Pond Install & Big Buck Hunting

Habitat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 81:24


Habitat Podcast #202 - Todd Graf from www.bowhunting.com joins Jared Van Hees and Brian Halbeib on the show! Todd is another habitat manager just like the rest of us. This is an informative episode on all things habitat management with a brand new property. We cover: How Todd got into hunting or habitat and how Bowhunting.com came to be Todd's new property discussion - blank slate. We go over the whole rundown, details, etc. Habitat projects - 1st project, most effective, biggest mistake.  Habitat Features Todd has implemented - Ponds, no till food plots, forester/logging, tree planting... The power of Soil Health and no till food plots October Hunting plans / goals or strategies for this farm   Todd's favorite hunt where his habitat manipulation paid off  Favorite Tree --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Endless Horizons Archery (all of your archery needs) - https://bit.ly/3QBVNRl Rut27 Sale - https://exodusoutdoorgear.com/discount/rut27 Legendary Forest Products (Forestry and Logging) - https://bit.ly/LegendaryFPs Exodus Trail Cameras - https://bit.ly/ExodusHP FIRST LITE --> https://bit.ly/3EDbG6P LAND PLAN Property Consultations – HP Land Plans: LAND PLANS Leave us a review for a FREE DECAL - https://apple.co/2uhoqOO Vitalize Seed CARBON LOAD - FREE SHIPPING on Food Plot / Soil Builder Diverse Seed Mixes - https://bit.ly/vitalizeseed Packer Maxx - http://bit.ly/PACKERMAXX $25 off with code: HPC25 Morse Nursery Tree Dealer Pricing – info@habitatpodcast.com YOUTUBE - Habitat Podcast Email us: info@habitatpodcast.com Exodus Trail Cameras - https://bit.ly/ExodusHP Afflictor Broadheads - https://bit.ly/AfflictorBH Morse Nursery - http://bit.ly/MorseTrees 10% off w/code: HABITAT10 Michigan Whitetail Pursuit - http://bit.ly/MWpursuit Habitat Podcast AMAZON Store - https://www.amazon.com/shop/habitatpodcast Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Mother Wit Podcast
Rachel Mast, Midwife & Coach, returns to share her birth story and return to fitness journey

The Mother Wit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 77:11 Transcription Available


If you missed season 1 episode 12, I recommend listening to this one first. But for those of you who are not going to do that. Most of the time when I find a new show, I just jump in right and don't look back either so I get it.  In which case, here is a quick recap... Rachel is a very talented athlete. She is a gymnast, a crossfitter and does jujitsu competitively. She is a crossfit L2 coach and a Pregnancy & Postpartum Athleticism Coach (P&PA Coach). She is also a Certified Professional Midwife (CPM) who attends out of hospital births both at home and at a freestanding birthing center in Meridian Idaho at the New Beginnings Birthing Center.When she was on the show back in March she was pregnant with her first baby and suffering from hyperemesis. We talked about her experience and about why coaching and midwifery are so well aligned. Basically, we shared a soapbox for the better part of an hour. It is one of my most listened to episodes to date. So, I asked her to  join us again to share her birth story and to update us on her return to fitness. I am particularly interested to hear what might have felt unexpected, or if any given experience challenged her beliefs or changed her perspective. Because, while I don't believe we must have babies in order to be good at this work, it does provide a perspective that you cant get any other way.Enjoy the show.Resources and shout outsBlog Post that summarizes Rachel's tips on birth prep and return to fitness from this episodeExpecting Amy (Documentary about Amy Schumer's pregnancy/experience with hyperemesis)Dr. Jennifer Anacker, Anacker Clinic of Chiropractic, Meridian and Boise, IDWant to become a Pregnancy & Postpartum Athleticism Coach, find one, or purchase a training program to help you stay active during pregnancy and postpartum?Six exercises for the early postpartum period (Brianna Battles, owner/founder of Pregnancy & Postpartum Athleticism)Support the showThriving After Birth (an online course)Comprehensive Care60 Min Consultation: Use discount code- FirstConsult10%offInstagram: @mother.wit.maternityYou Tube Channel

Historically Thinking: Conversations about historical knowledge and how we achieve it

It is perhaps the greatest scandal and sea-story of the first half of 19th Century America that nearly everyone has forgotten. It led to a court martial, endless headlines, a fistfight in a meeting of the President's cabinet, and quite possibly to the foundation of the United States Naval Academy. And given that nearly everyone who went to see in the early American republic seemed to know one another, there was one degree of separation between this story and James Fenimore Cooper, Herman Melville, Richard Henry Dana, Jr., Commodore Matthew Calbraith Perry, and future Confederate naval captain Raphael Semmes. It was nothing less than an attempted mutiny aboard the USS Somers in November 1842, led by–of all the people in the United States of America—the son of the United States Secretary of War who supposedly wanted to become a pirate. With me to discuss this incredible story is James Delgado, historian and underwater archaeologist, whose new book is The Curse of the Somers: The Secret History Behind the US Navy's Most Infamous Mutiny   For Further Investigation James Fenimore Cooper: proud of his four years a merchant sailor and then a midshipman in the United States Navy, Cooper's fourth novel was The Pilot: A Tale of the Sea, probably the first American nautical novel. Richard Henry Dana, Jr.: now curiously forgotten, Dana was a Harvard dropout who enrolled as a merchant seaman, sailed to California and back, wrote about it in a bestseller titled Two Years Before the Mast, and then went on to become a prominent lawyer. Commodore Matthew Calbraith Perry: young brother of naval hero Oliver Hazard Perry, "Old Bruin" became one of the most prominent officers of the US Navy between 1814 and 1861, most famously leading the expedition that forced Japan open to trade and international interaction Raphael Semmes: once commander of the USS Somers, he became an officer in the Confederate Navy, and most famously commanded the CSS Alabama Herman Melville: elements of the Somers mutiny can be found in both White Jacket and Billy Budd

Inspired Living with Autoimmunity
Beth O'Hara: Is Your Autoimmunity Actually Mast Cell Activation Syndrome?

Inspired Living with Autoimmunity

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 50:43


Today we are joined by Beth O'Hara, Functional Naturopath specializing in complex, chronic cases of Mast Cell Activation Syndrome, Histamine Intolerance, and Mold Toxicity.  She is the founder of Mast Cell 360 where she provides healing protocols for patients, as well as providers.Beth's health journey began in childhood.  Growing up on a farm in a rural area, she was exposed to mold and Lyme and they didn't know anything about the risks back then.  A TBI threw her a curveball, and then a car accident that kept her out of high school for almost a year had her in bed and on pain meds.  College was a continued physical struggle.  Pain, fatigue, anxiety..all as she was working three jobs during her undergrad studies.  Although she had earned scholarships to medical school, which had been her lifelong dream, Beth knew that her health would never allow her to make it through residency, if she managed to survive med school.By age 28 Beth was walking with a cane or wheel chair.  She was misdiagnosed with Palandromic Arthritis.Because doctors didn't know what was wrong with her, they told her it was emotional.Years of therapy were helpful, but not for her health.Finally, Beth was diagnosed with Lyme Disease, but was too sick to tolerate treatments.Eventually, she learned she had mold toxicity.  And she learned how to reboot her nervous system.She slowly improved and was able to tolerate treatments.She eventually became a Doctor of Naturopathy.  And nowWhat is Mast Cell Activation SyndromeMast cells are immune cells that are found throughout our body.We have over 200 known kinds of mast cell receptors.  Their job is to keep us safe.  They respond to immune threats, like infection, and even stress.The problem occurs when mast cells don't have a chance to reset themselves.MCAS is a multisystem issue.It takes an average of 10 years to get diagnosed.  It still isn't taught in medical school.MCAS effect up to 17% of the population.Mold exposures are all across the country and world.  And numbers are rising which is increasing MCAS as well.EMF exposure increases mold activity as well.Multi systemic:with our without allergieswith or without anaphylaxiswith or without sensitivityPresentations are different!Mastcell360 is your resource for all things Mast Cell.Free Symptom SurveyCourses are available for lay people and practitioners.Healing takes time!Lifestyle change.We start with nervous system.  Vagal nerve system and lymbic system.MC360 Method:1-Stabilization of nervous system-Structural issues top of neck2-Remove triggers3-Mast cell calmingmodulate inflammosomesThe order of operations is key!Message of hope.WE CAN HEAL!!!!  AND DO!!!One Thing to doAlternate nostril breathing...it's free!Learn more about mast cell activation syndrome here

Let's Talk Wellness Now
Episode 192: MCAS: Mast Cell Activation – What Are The Triggers with Beth O'hara

Let's Talk Wellness Now

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 51:28


MCAS is triggered by Mold exposure and infections like Lyme, Co-infections, Strep and more. Dr. Deb and Beth O'hara talk about what causes Mast cell activation and how to treat it when you are so sensitive. Do not miss these highlights: 04:18 What is Mast Cell Activation Syndrome? 07:42 People are sicker now, and we're...

Ave Maria Radio: Mast Appeal
Mast Appeal - November 5, 2022

Ave Maria Radio: Mast Appeal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 117:00


Hypermobility Happy Hour
56 - Savita Sandhu (Savvy Dietetics) on Diet and Hypermobility (Part 1) Mast Cells & Diet

Hypermobility Happy Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 58:20


On today's episode, Savita Sandhu from Savvy Dietetics located in Brisbane, Australia discusses the relationship between hypermobility and our diets. Savita received her Bachelor Degree in Nutrition and Dietetics with Honours at the Queensland University of Technology and underwent postgraduate training with the Australasian College of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine. Savita also has an amazing instagram page at hypermobility.dietitian where she provides information and resources about food and micronutrients for hypermobile people. https://www.instagram.com/hypermobility.dietitian https://www.savitasandhu.com.au/

Health Mysteries Solved
130 Got a Mysterious Chronic Condition? It Might be Mast Cell Activation Syndrome

Health Mysteries Solved

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 50:33


The Case:  Julie has digestive issues, headaches, lots of skin rashes and irritation, brain fog, and fatigue She is also very sensitive to environmental triggers like fragrances, smoke, and chemicals.   She eats and lives as clean as possible but nothing seems to help.  She's seen a dozen doctors who have prescribed a variety of medications but nothing helped.  It's so common for conventional doctors to focus on treating the symptoms as if they are unrelated instead of considering what the collection of symptoms might mean. Julie knew that her symptoms had to be connected which is when she reached out to me. My feeling was that this was a systemic issue and we got to work investigating the root cause of her problems.  The Investigation With my suspicions of a systemic issue, I knew that Beth O'Hara would be a great source of information. She's been on Health Mysteries Solved before to speak about Oxalates (episode 67) and Histamines (episode 81). This time, I wanted to dive into the topic of Mast Cells and Mast Cell Activation Syndrome which is Beth's expertise. What are Mast Cells? Mast cells are one of the most important types of immune cells in our bodies. They're present at every interface between our bodies and the outside world, and they're also found in every single tissue except for the retina. So, if we think about that, they're in the skin, in the lining of the sinus passages, in the digestive tract from the mouth to the stomach, and they're also found in muscles and bones. They migrate to very important areas like nerve endings and the brain's limbic system. Mast cells are responsible for a number of functions ranging from the sleep-wake cycle to pregnancy and wound healing. They also help the body monitor for whether or not we're safe from things like toxins, mold, candida, pathogens, parasites, viruses and bacteria. They even monitor for co-infections (like lyme disease). Mast cells are also looking for all types of stressors including psychological stress, physical stress and stress caused by outside factors like electromagnetic fields (EMF) in the environment. How do Mast Cells Work? Mast cells use what are called receptors - you can think of them like little antennae on the outside of the cell. There are over 200 of these receptors sending out signals using mediators. There are over 1000 different mediators. All of these allow the cells to connect with and monitor the different functions of the body.  When a mast cell detects an issue it will respond, often causing inflammation. It is not the only immune response but it is one of the primary cells responsible for answering a threat to the immune system.  The problem is that our modern world has more threats to the immune system that can cause mast cells to react. These include things like mold, high levels of EMF (wifi, smart homes, etc add to these high levels), environmental chemicals and other toxins. The challenge is that the mast cells are constantly triggered (or in activation) by these things and they don't have time to rest and reset. This can overwhelm the mast cells and create a chronic issue.  The Link Between Autoimmunity and Mast Cell Activation Mast cells are heavily involved in the development of various autoimmune diseases. The mast cells are involved in both innate and adaptive immunity. Mast cells respond to the initial threat from a pathogen but when that fails, they shift their response and this can be what causes chronic inflammation. This continues as long as there are unresolved root triggers over an extended period of time. Over time, this opens the door for the development of autoimmunity in people who are predisposed for it.  So, if we want to avoid autoimmunity, we need to respond faster to the root trigger so that the mast cell response can be regulated. Regulating the mast cells can also reverse autoimmunity, in some cases, if you identify which mast cells have been activated.  Different mast cells can be triggered (and often triggered together to create a bigger issue). For example, the GI mast cells and the skin mast cells. After determining which mast cells have been activated, you need to understand which receptors are now hyper-sensitive and which mediators are involved.  Mast Cell Activation Syndrome Symptoms and Diagnosis The complexity of what is happening is one of the reasons why it is so hard to diagnose MCAS. Beth says that the average diagnosis takes up to 10 years and the criteria for diagnosis is still being debated. She shared that a population study (pre-COVID) found that up to 17% of the population are dealing with MCAS. That's hundreds of millions of people with MCAS, the majority of which are undiagnosed. Experts speculate that up to 75% of all chronic illness could involve MCAS. While there is a long list of potential symptoms, Beth shared some of the most common. The symptoms of Mast Cell Activation Syndrome include: Pain in the muscles and joins Brain fog Fatigue GI issues like:  Diarrhea Constipation Bloating Pain (in the gut or stomach) Discomfort after eating Esophagus swelling Mouth burning Acid reflux Depression or anxiety Insomnia (especially falling asleep or waking up between 2-4 am) Skin issues including: Rashes Hives Psoriasis Eczema Bladder Interstitial Cystitis (urinary pain and burning) Hormonal issue (hormonal imbalances) Breathing issues including: Shortness of breath Excess sinus mucus production (postnasal drip) Hypersensitivity (often to fragrances) To assess your symptoms, Beth has a free Symptoms Survey you can take here. There are some lab tests that will also help to diagnose MCAS but these tests are limited so it's important to also consider the symptoms.  What to do if You Suspect You Have Mast Cell Activation Syndrome This is a tricky question because the criteria for diagnosing MCAS is not universally agreed on (and false negatives can happen with lab testing). In addition, there is a lot of contradictory information on the internet which can be frustrating for anyone trying to figure things out on their own. And, may discover that one person's solution is another person's poison.  Beth uses a 5-step process which starts with the stabilization phase of calming everything down. This has to happen before doing major detoxification because that can trigger the mast cells. The stabilization phase starts with addressing issues in the nervous system. Beth's program focuses first on retraining the limbic system and then she addresses the vagal nerve system and finally deals with any structural issues that might be affecting the nervous system like a head or neck injury.  After this phase, Beth's plan moves into a gentle detox. This is more often than not, going to include dealing with mold exposure.  The next step in Beth's process is to decrease the infectious load. This can often mean addressing Lyme disease and the co infections that can come with it.  The fourth step in her process is to rebuild. This usually includes repairing the gut lining and improving the overall GI system. It may also include rebalancing the hormones and the mitochondria. The fifth and final step is to optimize. For this, Beth looks at the genetics (noting weaknesses that may need additional support) and then creates a wellness plan.  The whole 5-step process takes 2-4 years. She says there is no quick fix for reversing mast cell activation syndrome.  Mystery Solved Mast Cell Activation Syndrome is way more common than people realize and it became clear that Julia was one of these people.  To get started, I worked with Julie on calming her immune system through various modalities both biochemical as well as energetic and emotional, especially on the trauma side. We also found out she was very sensitive to EMFs so we supported that. We did some investigating into her triggers, infections, toxic exposure, and food sensitivities. We then used targeted supplements like quercetin to support her immune system.  We discovered she was an over-methylator so we decreased the methyl donors she was taking and supported her methylation instead. For more details on methylation and how it can impact your energy and wellbeing, listen to episode 108. We wanted to make sure that mold wasn't contributing to her condition. Julie was living in a brand new house, but as it turns out she did have past mold exposure which was still affecting her. We used a combination of Biotoxin Binder, high dose vitamin C, Molecular Hydrogen as well as some gentle antifungals to help support her body. Conclusion We took things slowly because Julie was very sensitive and we didn't want to set up any new triggers. And, we understood that reversing Mast Cell Activation Syndrome takes time.  Eight months into the protocol she started to really see an improvement with her digestion, energy and brain fog. Her skin was also less reactive. We still have work to do, but she and I are so encouraged with her progress and excited to see more and more in the coming months. Eliminating Health Mysteries For Julie we were able to find that missing piece of the health puzzle and get her on the road to renewed health. Could MCAS be the missing clue for you or someone in your life?    Links: Resources mentioned Thanks to my guest Beth O'Hara.  You can connect with her through her website, MastCell360.com   If you think histamine intolerance or Mast Cell Activation Syndrome may be causing your health mysteries, don't miss Beth's free, 3-day event with over 40 experts sharing their knowledge. Mast Cell Activation and Histamine Intolerance Summit Oct. 28 - 30, 2022 - Online Suggested Products Quercetin Biotoxin Binder Vitamin C Molecular Hydrogen  Related Podcast Episodes: The Case of Fatigue and Brain Fog Made Worse by B Vitamins The Mystery of Histamine Overload w/ Dr. Beth O'Hara How Very Healthy Foods can Create Aches, Pain and UTI Symptoms w/ Dr. Beth O'Hara Thanks for Listening If you like what you heard, please rate and review this podcast. Every piece of feedback not only helps me create better shows, it helps more people find this important information. Never miss an episode -  Subscribe NOW to Health Mysteries Solved with host, Inna Topiler on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher or Google Podcasts and remember to rate and review the show! Find out more at http://healthmysteriessolved.com PLEASE NOTE All information, content, and material on this podcast is for informational purposes only and is not intended to serve as a substitute for the consultation, diagnosis, and/or medical treatment of a qualified physician or healthcare provider. Some of the links provided are affiliate links. This means we may make a very small amount of money should you choose to buy after clicking on them. This will in no way affect the price of the product but it helps us a tiny bit in covering our expenses.

Bendy Bodies with the Hypermobility MD
54. Managing Mast Cell Pain with Linda Bluestein, MD

Bendy Bodies with the Hypermobility MD

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 46:04


Mast cell disorders are prevalent in the hypermobile population, but can often go undiagnosed. Persistent pain can be initiated and perpetuated by mast cells, which have also been referred to as “gatekeepers of pain”. How can someone who suspects mast cell issues go about seeking relief for mast cell-related pain? How can medical professionals accurately seek to diagnose and treat mast cell pain? For this conversation, we put Bendy Bodies founder, Linda Bluestein, MD, in the hot seat. With her many years as a practicing anesthesiologist and her long career treating people with hypermobility disorders, she's been in a unique position to research, diagnose, and treat these complex conditions. Dr. Bluestein defines mast cell disorders and ways they may present. She explains why people with hypermobility should be aware of mast cell disorders, and reveals the prevalence of pain associated with mast cell issues. Dr. Bluestein shares her techniques for evaluating pain in a patient, and offers advice on treating pain in a patient with mast cell issues. She suggests ways to communicate with a medical professional about your own pain, and shares her wish list of ways she would address mast cell disorders on a large scale. With practical advice for both medical practitioners looking to improve patient care, and hypermobile people searching for ways to mitigate their own chronic pain, this episode is filled with tips and insight into a complex problem. Additional notes: Excipients: All medications have excipients (“inactive” ingredients in medications that may cause problems in susceptible people). Mast cell disorder testing: Tryptase is just one mediator that is important to check (both at baseline and within four hours of a flare). I provide lab slips to my patients that they can take in for testing as needed. Tryptase levels can be helpful (especially if they are elevated) but a normal level does not rule out a mast cell problem. Pain sources: People with EDS and comorbidities (like mast cell disorders) can have all the types of pain. These include nociceptive (coming from actual or potential tissue damage), neuropathic (problem within the nervous system) and nociplastic (dysfunction of how pain signals are processed). Want to maximize your medical appointments? Check out this course created by Dr. Bluestein and Keeya Steel, founder of Hells Bells and Mast Cells. Visit our website for more information about becoming a client or patient. . . . . . #BendyBuddy #HypermobilityMD #JenniferMilner #MastCell #Disease #ChronicDisease #Hypermobile #Histamine #FoodIntolerance #ChronicPain #ButYouDontLookSick #MCAS #MastCellActivation #ComplexIllness #EhlersDanlos #DoctorsOfIG #ChronicIllnessSupport #LowHistamine #Histaminintoleranz #MastCellActivationSyndrome

Major Pain
Pauline’s Quest for an MCAS Diagnosis

Major Pain

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 87:08


Everybody has mast cells in their body, as they play a critical role in allergic response. Mast cells release mediators to attack allergens, but can sometimes overreact when no allergen is present. This is the case for Pauline, who was recently diagnosed with mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS). Though her […]

VIDA SANA CON JUAN CALOS SIMO
EPISODIO -75. HABLEMOS DE CÁNCER DE MAMA.

VIDA SANA CON JUAN CALOS SIMO

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 50:20


Tema: cáncer de mama. Invitada: Dra. Mirna Santiago, Médico general, Cirujana Oncóloga, Mastólogo. Host: Juan Carlos Simó (@jc_simo), Fisioterapeuta, Lic. Psicología Clínica, Consultor y Strength Coach. Encuéntranos en YouTube, Spotify y Apple Podcast.