Podcasts about Lake City

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Best podcasts about Lake City

Latest podcast episodes about Lake City

Hoop Heads
Greg Berge - Lincoln (Lake City, MN) High School Boys' Basketball Head Coach - Episode 746

Hoop Heads

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 95:03


Greg Berge is the Boys' Basketball Head Coach at Lincoln High School in Lake City, Minnesota. Greg has been a teacher, coach, and school administrator for the last 28 years and currently serves as the High School Principal at Lincoln High SchoolGreg's 17 years as a Varsity Basketball Coach and many other years as an assistant coach in multiple sports have given him tremendous insight into what makes great teams. Berge's teams have won ten conference championships (eight consecutive) and two section championships. As an assistant varsity coach, he has also helped coach teams that won multiple section championships in both football and girl's golf. Greg has been fortunate to coach multiple players who played college basketball at all levels (NCAA Division I, Division II, NAIA Division II, and Division III). Berge is also a Licensed Sports Leadership Facilitator through the Janssen Sports Leadership Center. If you're looking to improve your coaching please consider joining the Hoop Heads Mentorship Program. We believe that having a mentor is the best way to maximize your potential and become a transformational coach. By matching you up with one of our experienced mentors you'll develop a one on one relationship that will help your coaching, your team, your program, and your mindset. The Hoop Heads Mentorship Program delivers mentoring services to basketball coaches at all levels through our team of experienced Head Coaches. Find out more at hoopheadspod.com or shoot me an email directly mike@hoopheadspod.comFollow us on social media @hoopheadspod on Twitter and Instagram and be sure to check out the Hoop Heads Podcast Network for more great basketball content.Grab a notebook and pen before you listen to this episode with Greg Berge, Boys' Basketball Head Coach at Lincoln High School in Lake City, Minnesota.Website - gregberge.carrd.coEmail - gregberge@gmail.comTwitter - @gb1121Visit our Sponsors!Dr. Dish BasketballMention the Hoop Heads Podcast when you place your order and get $300 off a brand new state of the art Dr. Dish Shooting Machine! Fast Model SportsFastModel Sports has the most compelling and intuitive basketball software out there! In addition to a great product, they also provide basketball coaching content and resources through their blog and playbank, which features over 8,000 free plays and drills from their online coaching community. For access to these plays and more information, visit fastmodelsports.com or follow them on Twitter @FastModel. Use Promo code HHP15 to save 15%The Coaching PortfolioYour first impression is everything when applying for a new coaching job. A professional coaching portfolio is the tool that highlights your coaching achievements and philosophies and, most of all, helps separate you and your abilities from the other applicants. Special Price of just $25 for all Hoop Heads Listeners.Training Camp - Elite Skill Development & Performance CombineThe first

Preaching and Preachers
Episode 266: Cultivating Tenure in a Local Church

Preaching and Preachers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 20:40


Today, I want to welcome Dr. Bart Barber to the podcast. Bart Barber serves as the current President of the SBC. He also serves as Pastor of First Baptist Church in Farmersville, Texas, where he has been since 1999. Bart as a native of Lake City, Arkansas, and has served churches in Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Texas.

Idaho Basketball Coaching Podcast
Jim Winger, Lake City High School

Idaho Basketball Coaching Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 33:39


We are fortunate to have Jim Winger on this episode of the podcast. Winger is the long-time boys head coach at Lake City High School in Coeur d'Alene. Winger started as the head coach at Coeur d'Alene High in 1992 and then moved to Lake City when it opened in 1994. He stepped away from coaching for 5 years, but returned in 2008. At the time of this interview in early January, his team was the top-ranked 5A team in Idaho and in the top 40 rankings of teams nationally.

Q Media's Podcast
Lake City Chamber Chat 1.10.2023

Q Media's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 2:06


"Lake City Chamber Chat" Ava LaRue speaks with Elizabeth Greenawalt, Executive Director for the Lake City Chamber of Commerce and introduces Heather Thomas, the new Events and Office Coordinator at the Chamber, Shops of Lake City meeting the 12th, and their next Business After Hours on January 26th at Pepin Manufacturing.

Leave the Pin In
Episode 188-My Course Ep.3 The Jewel Golf Course with Stouds from Break 80 Podcast

Leave the Pin In

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 35:15


Welcome Back Podcast Patrons to Episode 188 of Leave the Pin Podcast. Shout out Tiger Hoods for our intro. Welcome to Episode 3 of our My Course series. On todays episode Dan sits down with Stouds from the Break 80 Podcast to discuss his favorite course, the Jewel. The Jewel is an amazing course set amongst the bluffs in Lake City, MN right next to the Mississippi River. Stouds is a Minnesota expert and there isn't a better person to discuss golf in the great white north with. Follow Break 80 on instragram @break80_golf and find them anywhere you get your podcasts Please go check out our Sponsor Gashouse Golf on instagram @gashousegolf and online at www.gashousegolf.com. Hit the ball a mile and look damn good doin' it. Please leave a review and rating on iTunes/Spotify if you enjoy the episode. Follow us on Instagram @leavethepin Tag us on your social media feed with #Leavethepin Follow us on TikTok @leavethepin Email us at Leavethepin@gmail.com Get busy golfing or get busy dying --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/leave-the-pin/message

Q Media's Podcast
Lake City Chamber Chat 1.3.2023

Q Media's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 1:42


"Lake City Chamber Chat" Ava LaRue speaks with Elizabeth Greenawalt, Executive Director for the Lake City Chamber of Commerce about their new hire at the Chamber, and their next Business After Hours on January 26th at Pepin Manufacturing.

Q Media's Podcast
Lake Hits Happenings 1.6.2023

Q Media's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 11:14


“Lake Hits Happenings” Host Bruce Carlstrom is joined by Scott Jensen, Public Works Director for the City of Lake City to talk about the snow removal process and procedures, and requirements for residents keeping their sidewalks free of snow and ice.

Stevie B’s Media Productions Presents
The Gospel Light Radio Show - (Episode 291)

Stevie B’s Media Productions Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 130:00


The proclamation of the gospel of Jesus Christ by members of the churches of Christ, with your Host Stevie R. Butler (Helen Street Church of Christ, Fayetteville, North Carolina). Co-host: Robert Lee Johnson               Subject: "Are You Fit for the Kingdom of God?"      Lesson Text: [Luke 9:62]               (New Horizon Church of Christ, Lake City, Florida) Host: Stevie R. Butler  "Shout It Out" question from his social media platform (Facebook). Co-host: Courtney Carthers (Colonial Village Church of Christ, Chicago, Illnios). Co-host:  Glenn McMillion                    Subject: "The Divinity of Christ" Part lll            (Waterview Church of Christ, Richardson, Texas) DATE:  January 5, 2023                   

Q Media's Podcast
Lake Hits Happenings 12.30.2022

Q Media's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 9:26


“Lake Hits Happenings” Host Bruce Carlstrom is joined by Sgt. Bill Weist of the Lake City Police Department to talk about being responsible while celebrating and driving. Also, parking restrictions during snow emergencies in Lake City.

Q Media's Podcast
Lake City Chamber Chat 12.27.2022

Q Media's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 2:02


"Lake City Chamber Chat" Ava LaRue speaks with Elizabeth Greenawalt, Executive Director for the Lake City Chamber of Commerce about Business After Hours on January 26th at Pepin Manufacturing, and Chamber membership in 2023.

Idaho Basketball Coaching Podcast
BDT Roundtable: Alex Sarama, James Anderson & Ty Keck

Idaho Basketball Coaching Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 57:01


We are fortunate to not just have one coach on this episode, but three coaches with us today. The common thread among today's guests? We all spent some time coaching basketball in Idaho this summer. Well, 3 of the coaches are actually from Idaho. The fourth coach, Alex Sarama, is from England and spent a week last June in the Gem State conducting clinics on implementing his BDT Offense with Lake City, Skyline, and Sandpoint girls basketball teams. Since that time, I've spent a lot of time discussing the game with Skyline's Ty Keck and Lake City's James Anderson. My conclusion: You won't find two more knowledgeable basketball coaches in the state — especially when it comes to Sarama's BDT offense. The podcast is a discussion about our experiences coaching the BDT offense since Sarama's visit. If you are considering adopting the BDT offense, this the podcast episode for you.

Q Media's Podcast
Lake City Chamber Chat 12.20.2022

Q Media's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 2:06


"Lake City Chamber Chat" Ava LaRue speaks with Elizabeth Greenawalt, Executive Director for the Lake City Chamber of Commerce about Christmas hours and Chamber membership in 2023.

The North Idaho Prepcast
12/14/22 - Stake It In the Berm

The North Idaho Prepcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 37:57


Ryan Scaggs and Brandon Baney recap dominant performances from Lake City and Lapwai boys basketball and Post Falls girls basketball.  They also preview the upcoming Tri-State Wrestling Meet in Coeur d'Alene.Follow our North Idaho Prepcast team on Twitter: @idahosports, @brandon_baney, @NIdahoGameNightLike our Facebook pageFor more Idaho high school sports coverage, visit www.idahosports.comSubscribe to our YouTube channel

Q Media's Podcast
Lake City Chamber Chat 12.13.2022

Q Media's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 2:17


"Lake City Chamber Chat" Ava LaRue speaks with Elizabeth Greenawalt, Executive Director for the Lake City Chamber of Commerce about the Rethos Assessment Meeting at Chamber today at noon, and a new group “Shops of Lake City” meeting January 12th at 8:30 AM at Chickadee Cottage Café.

Q Media's Podcast
Lake City Chamber Chat 12.6.2022

Q Media's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 1:45


"Lake City Chamber Chat" Ava LaRue speaks with Elizabeth Greenawalt, Executive Director for the Lake City Chamber of Commerce about hiring at the Chamber.

The North Idaho Prepcast
12/6/22 - The Race to Second Place

The North Idaho Prepcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 46:40


Ryan Scaggs and Brandon Baney preview the boys basketball team, highlighting Lake City, Sandpoint, Bonners Ferry, St. Maries, Lapwai, Lakeside, Kendrick and more.Follow our North Idaho Prepcast team on Twitter: @idahosports, @brandon_baney, @NIdahoGameNightLike our Facebook pageFor more Idaho high school sports coverage, visit www.idahosports.comSubscribe to our YouTube channel

Studio Noize Podcast
Southern Pride w/ fine art manager Kyle Coleman

Studio Noize Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 63:12


ArtFields is a southern art competition that is changing the landscape of art in South Carolina and giving real money out to artists. Kyle Coleman, fine art manager of ArtFields, joins Studio Noize to let us know about this 9-day celebration of art. We get to know the ins and outs of the Artfields competition, from the selection panels to the live events in Lake City, SC. We talk about the impact of a festival like this in the rural south, the response from the artists and the community, and what's coming in 2023 as ArtFields celebrates 11 years of this event. Listen, subscribe, and share!Episode 155 topics include:ArtFields in Lake City, SCcreating an art competition in the rural southcash prizes for artistsgrowing ArtFields over 11 yearsart selection panelscomparison to Art Basel and other art fairsArtfields Jr.interfacing with artists as an organizationArtFields started in 2013 with a simple goal: honor the artists of the Southeast with a week's worth of celebration and competition in the heart of a traditional Southern small town. The competition and exhibition offers over $145,000 in cash prizes. The winners of two People's Choice Awards are determined by the votes of people visiting ArtFields; a panel of art professionals selects all the other awards, including the $50,000 Grand Prize and $25,000 Second Place award.Kyle Coleman is the fine arts manager of ArtFields since 2019.See More: ArtFieldssc.org + ArtFields @artfieldssc Follow us:StudioNoizePodcast.comIG: @studionoizepodcastJamaal Barber: @JBarberStudioSupport the podcast www.patreon.com/studionoizepodcast

Stevie B’s Media Productions Presents
The Gospel Light Radio Show - (Episode 288)

Stevie B’s Media Productions Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 100:00


The proclamation of the gospel of Jesus Christ by members of the churches of Christ.  With your Host Stevie R. Butler (Helen Street Church of Christ, Fayetteville, North Carolina). Host: Stevie R. Butler "Shout It Out" question from his social media platform (Facebook).  Co-host: Brian Christian Coleman (Newark Church of Christ, Newark New Jersey). Co-host: Robert Lee Johnson            Subject:  "Jesus The Way To Salvation"       Lesson Text: [John 14:6]                      (New Horizon Church of Christ, Lake City, Florida) DATE: December 1, 2022

The North Idaho Prepcast
11/30/22 - Fluffy and Moves Easy

The North Idaho Prepcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 48:15


Ryan Scaggs and Brandon Baney preview the girls basketball season.  There's no shortage of good teams, including: CDA, Lake City, Post Falls, Sandpoint, Timberlake, Grangeville, Lapwai, Prairie, Deary and many others.Follow our North Idaho Prepcast team on Twitter: @idahosports, @brandon_baney, @NIdahoGameNightLike our Facebook pageFor more Idaho high school sports coverage, visit www.idahosports.comSubscribe to our YouTube channel

The North Idaho Prepcast
11/22/22 - But Wait...There's More!

The North Idaho Prepcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 50:25


Ryan Scaggs and Brandon Baney recap Lake City's girls swimming championship.  Then, Ryan unveils his All-North Idaho Football Team.Follow our North Idaho Prepcast team on Twitter: @idahosports, @brandon_baney, @NIdahoGameNightLike our Facebook pageFor more Idaho high school sports coverage, visit www.idahosports.comSubscribe to our YouTube channel

Armed Lutheran Radio
Episode 339 - 7th Annual Christmas Wish List Episode

Armed Lutheran Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 28:31


Its our 7th annual Christmas gift/wish list show. Lloyd, Mia, Bill, and the Padre share their gift and wish list ideas just in time for the start of the holiday season. Segments [00:00] - Blooper [00:43] - Opening and welcome [01:15] - Thanks to our Members [04:10] - Introduction [04:36] - Lloyd's Wish List [13:50] - Mia's Wish List [21:58] - Sgt. Bill's Wish List [24:05] - Pastor Bennett's Wish List [27:56] - Show Close Gift Ideas* Mia's Amazon Shop - https://www.amazon.com/shop/miaanstine Pre-Order Duty to Defend volume 2 - www.armedlutheran.us/duty The Executioner's Tale: A Gothic Horror Story - https://amzn.to/3U13S2Y Capital Treason by Rev. Richard Bolland - https://amzn.to/3GyJMd8 And Take they Our Life by Rev. Bryan Wolfmueller - https://amzn.to/3XhSCSs Come and See: Devotions for Advent by Rev. Joshua Scheer - https://amzn.to/3ErYS1z Persecution by Raymond Keating - https://amzn.to/3ENaSfn Warrior Monk by Raymond Keating - https://amzn.to/3i2DVCQ Cathedral by Raymond Keating - https://amzn.to/3i0g3zq Dry-Fire Training: For the Practical Pistol Shooter by Ben Stoeger - https://amzn.to/3UWFrF8 DryFire Reloaded by Ben Stoeger - https://amzn.to/3EnskFK Get to Work by Steven Anderson - https://amzn.to/3EKzgOG Armed Lutheran Radio is a listener-supported podcast. If you value the information and entertainment we provide, consider supporting the show by joining our membership site, The Reformation Gun Club! http://gunclub.armedlutheran.us Thank You to this Week's Members! Vincent from Tulare, CA John from Spokane, WA Tony from Little Elm, TX Eric from Buckeye, OH Frank from Lake City, MI Katherine from Casper, WY Melvin from Holt, MO Guillaume from Osage Beach, MO Donny from White Bear Lake, MN Steven from New Bern, NC Meet the Cast Lloyd Bailey - http://www.armedlutheran.us/about/ Mia Anstine - http://www.armedlutheran.us/mia/ Sergeant Bill Silvia - http://www.armedlutheran.us/bill/ Pastor John Bennett - http://www.armedlutheran.us/pastor/ Prayer of the Week Absolve, we implore You, O Lord, Your people from their offenses, that from the bonds of our sins which by reason of our frailty we have brought upon us we may be delivered by Your bountiful goodness; through Jesus Christ, Your Son, our Lord, who lives and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit , one God, now and forever. Amen. Use these Links to Support Armed Lutheran Radio If you value the information and entertainment we provide, consider supporting the show by joining our membership site, or shopping at your favorite online stores using the links below. Check out the other Great Armed Lutheran Books - http://www.ArmedLutheran.us/Books Shop at Amazon* - http://www.armedlutheran.us/amazon Shop at GunMagWarehouse* - http://www.armedlutheran.us/mags Get Regular Refills Coffee Subscriptions at Dunkin' Donuts* - www.ArmedLutheran.us/Coffee Armed Citizens Legal Defense Network - https://www.armedcitizensnetwork.org Get in Touch Visit our Feedback Page - http://www.armedlutheran.us/feedback Please tell your friends about us, leave an iTunes review, and like us on Facebook Join our Facebook group - http://www.armedlutheran.us/facebook Subscribe to us and follow us on Youtube - http://www.armedlutheran.us/youtube Check Out More at our Website- http://www.armedlutheran.us Disclaimer The links above which are indicated with an asterisk (*) are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, I will earn a commission. This commission comes at no additional cost to you. Please understand that I have experience with all of these items, and I recommend them because they are helpful and useful, not because of the small commissions I make if you decide to buy something. Please do not spend any money on these products unless you feel you need them or that they will help you. Original music by the Artist formerly known as METALloyd, copyright 2022. Keep Shooting, Keep Praying, We'll Talk to you Next time!

High School Coaches Club
74. Greg Berge, Lake City HS (MN)

High School Coaches Club

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 71:00


Longtime head boy's basketball coach at Lake City, principal, author, and leadership facilitator Greg Berge jumps on the call to discuss culture, foundational aspects of coaching, and the opportunities coaches have to impact student-athletes. You can follow him on Twitter @gb1121. You can also visit his website (gb1leadership.com) to grab a copy of his book, join his newsletter, snag free coaching plans, and check out his workshops.     Join the High School Coaches Club as a FREE member! (This is the ONLY way to get the weekly newsletter delivered straight to your inbox every Wednesday!) You can send recommendations for future guests by clicking here. You can pick up a High School Coaches Club sticker here. Contact Max Price via Twitter or email: max@highschoolcoachesclub.com Follow High School Coaches Club on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook. Visit highschoolcoachesclub.com for more.   Powered by @nettingpros

ATHLETE 1 PODCAST
Winning Culture - Greg Berge

ATHLETE 1 PODCAST

Play Episode Play 31 sec Highlight Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 46:41


Consistently successful teams have one thing that separates them from average teams.  A winning culture and the head coach is responsible for setting the tone.  Greg Berge is the Head Basketball Coach and Principal at Lincoln High School in Lake City, Minnesota.  He is a Sports Leadership Facilitator and author of "Culture WINS".  Coach Berge puts out a weekly newsletter: Great Teams - Better Leaders - 123In this episode:4 steps to building a winning programGetting the right players on the busDeveloping the edge - 2017 team5 types of leaders needed for a winning teamAdministrators need to have the coaches backSolutions to the officiating crisisFollow Greg Berge on Twitter - @gb1121 Follow: Twitter | Instagram @Athlete1Podcast https://www.athlete1.net Sponsor: The Netting Professionals https://www.nettingpros.com

Stevie B’s Media Productions Presents
What A Word From the Lord Radio Show - (Episode 239)

Stevie B’s Media Productions Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 105:00


The proclamation of the gospel of Jesus Christ by members of the churches of Christ.  With your Host Stevie R. Butler (Helen Street Church of Christ, Fayetteville, North Carolina). Special Guest Speaker:  Robert Lee Johnson            Subject:  "Prayer Works"     Lesson Text: [Luke 6:46]                (New Horizon Church of Christ, Lake City, Florida). [The Community Corner] Special Guest: Candidate Frances Jackson (House of Representatives of North Carolina). Co-host: Isom Mullins           Subject: "Hand Me Another Brick"          (Church of Christ, Cary, North Carolina) DATE: November 8, 2022  

Preaching and Preachers
Episode 262: Should Women Serve as Pastors? A Conversation with SBC President Bart Barber

Preaching and Preachers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 27:10


Today, I want to welcome Dr. Bart Barber to the podcast. Bart Barber serves as the current President of the SBC. He also serves as Pastor of First Baptist Church in Farmersville, Texas, where he has been since 1999. Bart is a native of Lake City, Arkansas, and has served churches in Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Texas.

The Watershed
27 | The Waters We Come From (Dakota County, MN)

The Watershed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 23:57


The We Are Water MN exhibit is on the road for its 2022 tour. Throughout the year, We Are Water MN will be visiting five different communities in the state of Minnesota: Winona, Lake City, Alexandria, Otter Tail County, and Dakota County. On The Watershed podcast, we'll be sharing series of episodes that reflect on the water stories of people who live in each of these places. We Are Water MN is currently visiting Dakota County. You can view the exhibit at the Pleasant Hill Library and outdoors at the Lebanon Hills Visitor Center October 13 through December 5. Learn more: https://www.co.dakota.mn.us/Environment/WaterResources/Pages/we-are-water.aspx On our final episode featuring Dakota County, our storytellers share about special places that formed their paths and commitments to water stewardship. We are Water MN is led by the Minnesota Humanities Center in partnership with the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency; the Minnesota Historical Society; the Minnesota Departments of Agriculture, Health, and Natural Resources; and University of Minnesota Extension, with support from the Clean Water, Land & Legacy Amendment and the National Endowment for the Humanities. To learn more about We Are Water MN, visit us at our website. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Stevie B’s Media Productions Presents
The Gospel Light Radio Show - (Episode 285)

Stevie B’s Media Productions Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 125:00


The proclamation of the gospel of Jesus Christ by members of the Churches of Christ.  Host by Stevie R. Butler (Helen Street Church of Christ, Fayetteville, North Carolina). Co-host:  Robert Lee Johnson           Subject: "The Courage to Live For Christ"   [Lesson Text: 2 Timothy 2:1 - 8]                   (New Horizon Church of Christ, Lake City, Florida) Host:  Stevie R. Butler "Shout It Out" question from his social media platform (Facebook); co-host: Courtney Caruthers (Colonial Village Church of Christ, Chicago, Illnois). Co-host:  Glenn McMillion           Subject: "The Divinity of Christ" Part ll         (Waterview Church of Christ, Richardson, Texas) DATE:  November 3, 2022

Old Time Radio Listener
Yours Truly Johnny Dollar - The Ghost to Ghost Matter

Old Time Radio Listener

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 26:25


Ian MacAndrews was the man who founded Lake City. He died five years ago and his life policy had been paid out but now it seemed that he had come back or his ghost had come back. Duration: 24:57 Starring: Bob Bailey Broadcast Date: 18th May 1958

The Watershed
26 | Water is Life (Dakota County, MN)

The Watershed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 26:18


The We Are Water MN exhibit is on the road for its 2022 tour. Throughout the year, We Are Water MN will be visiting five different communities in the state of Minnesota: Winona, Lake City, Alexandria, Otter Tail County, and Dakota County. On The Watershed podcast, we'll be sharing series of episodes that reflect on the water stories of people who live in each of these places. We Are Water MN is currently visiting Dakota County. You can view the exhibit at the Pleasant Hill Library and outdoors at the Lebanon Hills Visitor Center October 13 through December 5. Learn more: https://www.co.dakota.mn.us/Environment/WaterResources/Pages/we-are-water.aspx On today's episode, Dakota County storytellers share about the connection between the health of water, and health of ourselves. We are Water MN is led by the Minnesota Humanities Center in partnership with the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency; the Minnesota Historical Society; the Minnesota Departments of Agriculture, Health, and Natural Resources; and University of Minnesota Extension, with support from the Clean Water, Land & Legacy Amendment and the National Endowment for the Humanities. To learn more about We Are Water MN, visit us at our website. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

The Watershed
25 | Working with Water (Dakota County, MN)

The Watershed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 20:42


The We Are Water MN exhibit is on the road for its 2022 tour. Throughout the year, We Are Water MN will be visiting five different communities in the state of Minnesota: Winona, Lake City, Alexandria, Otter Tail County, and Dakota County. On The Watershed podcast, we'll be sharing series of episodes that reflect on the water stories of people who live in each of these places. We Are Water MN is currently visiting Dakota County. You can view the exhibit at the Pleasant Hill Library and outdoors at the Lebanon Hills Visitor Center October 13 through December 5. Learn more: https://www.co.dakota.mn.us/Environment/WaterResources/Pages/we-are-water.aspx On today's episode, we hear from Dakota County storytellers who share about the roles that water plays in the work they do. We are Water MN is led by the Minnesota Humanities Center in partnership with the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency; the Minnesota Historical Society; the Minnesota Departments of Agriculture, Health, and Natural Resources; and University of Minnesota Extension, with support from the Clean Water, Land & Legacy Amendment and the National Endowment for the Humanities. To learn more about We Are Water MN, visit us at our website. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

The Watershed
24 | The Nature of Water (Dakota County, MN)

The Watershed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 19:59


The We Are Water MN exhibit is on the road for its 2022 tour. Throughout the year, We Are Water MN will be visiting five different communities in the state of Minnesota: Winona, Lake City, Alexandria, Otter Tail County, and Dakota County. On The Watershed podcast, we'll be sharing series of episodes that reflect on the water stories of people who live in each of these places. We Are Water MN is currently visiting Dakota County. You can view the exhibit at the Pleasant Hill Library and outdoors at the Lebanon Hills Visitor Center October 13 through December 5. Learn more: https://www.co.dakota.mn.us/Environment/WaterResources/Pages/we-are-water.aspx On today's episode, we hear from Dakota County storytellers who share about the nature of water: what exactly is water, how do we describe it, and what philosophies of living can water teach us? We are Water MN is led by the Minnesota Humanities Center in partnership with the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency; the Minnesota Historical Society; the Minnesota Departments of Agriculture, Health, and Natural Resources; and University of Minnesota Extension, with support from the Clean Water, Land & Legacy Amendment and the National Endowment for the Humanities. To learn more about We Are Water MN, visit us at our website. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Post Bulletin Minute
Today's Headlines: Dining out? More of us have reservations

Post Bulletin Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 4:59


Stories in this episode: Day in History: 1922: Tax cut will return $1.00 to every man, woman and child Dining out? More of us have reservations Congressional, state, local candidates address Lake City voters in Tuesday night forum Southeast Minnesota was hotspot for bootleggers during Prohibition era RCTC coach will return to Ely as game will go on at Vermilion

Stevie B’s Media Productions Presents
The Gospel Light Radio Show - (Episode 281)

Stevie B’s Media Productions Presents

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 130:00


The proclamation of the gospel of Jesus Christ by members of the churches of Christ.  With your Host Stevie R. Butler (Helen Street Church of Christ, Fayetteville, North Carolina). Co-host:  Glenn McMillion                Subject: "The Deity of Christ"                  (Waterview Church of Christ, Richardson, Texas) Host: Stevie R. Butler "Shout It Out" question from his social media platform (Facebook); Co-host: Brian Christian Coleman (Newark Church of Christ, Newark, New Jersey). Co-host: Robert Lee Johnson          Subject: "I Am Not Ashamed of the Gospel"    Lesson Text: [Romans 1:16-17]                       (New Horizon Church of Christ, Lake City, Florida) DATE:  October 6, 2022

Embrace Your Strengths
Episode 76 Her Positivity is More Than ”Cupcakes and Butterflies” with Sheri McInvale

Embrace Your Strengths

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 29:23


Sheri's Top 5CliftonStrengths are: POSITIVITY, WOO, SELF ASSURANCE, INCLUDER & DEVELOPER Dubbed the “Queen Bee of Networking” by the Orlando Sentinel, Sheri McInvale  often rallies people and organizations around a cause through skilled consensus building and seeking out win-win solutions. Her  accomplishments in the nonprofit world and her stellar reputation for relationship building led her to the state capitol to serve two successful terms as a state legislator. Now she puts that same networking know-how to work in the private sector, providing lifestyle solutions for older adults and their families at All Care Senior Consulting. She currently serves as a Recent Past President of the Tallahassee Sunrise Rotary Club( 2019-2020) and Board Member of the Tallahassee Auburn Club. Recently she has moved to Lake City, Florida  where she is doing marketing and branding  for the Paul Estate which will launch soon as  Christian Retreat and Event Venue.  Sheri's favorite role is that of Mother to 3 adult children and SiSi to 2 Grand Daughters. CliftonStrengths Top 5 Assessment   Workshops and Coaching with Barbara Culwell Subscribe & Leave a Review on Embrace Your Strengths    

Post Bulletin Minute
Today's Headlines: Medical bills can be crippling. Mayo Clinic's charity care? Arguably lacking

Post Bulletin Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 5:19


Stories in this episode: Day in History: 1947: Riot after a high school football game in La Crosse Medical bills can be crippling. Mayo Clinic's charity care? Arguably lacking After years of making, Lydia Hansen finally calls herself an artist Charity care? They found it on ... TikTok 'She has the perfect demeanor': Lake City's Berge commits to MSU, Mankato

Dim Lights & Stiff Drinks
Back Door Pub

Dim Lights & Stiff Drinks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 40:37


Listen as the gang heads to Lake City this week! We talk small time capers, heavy metal, and the history of Lake City way! Let's listen! Support Dim Lights & Stiff Drinks with PatreonSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/dim-lights-stiff-drinks. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Hacks & Wonks
Darya Farivar, Candidate for 46th LD State Representative

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 40:11


On this midweek show, Crystal chats with Darya Farivar about her campaign for State Representative in the 46th Legislative District - why she decided to run and her thoughts on addressing issues such as homelessness, housing affordability and zoning, healthcare accessibility, progressive revenue and effective spending, education funding, climate change, and ballot access. As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Follow us on Twitter at @HacksWonks. Find the host, Crystal Fincher, on Twitter at @finchfrii and find today's guest, Darya Farivar, at @DaryaForHouse.   Resources Campaign Website - Darya Farivar: https://www.daryaforhouse.com/    Transcript   [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington State through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. So today I am excited to welcome to the program a candidate for the 46th Legislative District in Northeast Seattle running for State Representative - welcome, Darya Farivar. [00:00:49] Darya Farivar: Thank you so much for having me, Crystal and Bryce. I'm really excited to be here and to talk with you all about my campaign and the issues that are important to me and what I want the 46th to look like. So thank you for a warm welcome. [00:01:01] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. Thank you for joining us. The 46th doesn't have competitive races very often - it's been a decade basically since the last one, so this is a big opportunity for everyone in the 46th. I'm very happy that people are getting the chance to know you better. Just starting off - what is your background and what made you decide to run for office? [00:01:25] Darya Farivar: Yeah - there are a lot of different things that pushed me towards this decision to run. First and foremost is that the 46th is my home - I've lived here my whole life - I grew up here, I went to grade school here. My parents - when they fled Iran because of the revolution, they actually met at Roosevelt High School, which is my high school. And it's a very sweet story about how they met, but I'll spare you the details. They ended up putting down roots in the Lake City neighborhood and we've been there ever since. And I love this community fiercely - it is such a tight-knit community, a strong community. But it's also one that's been struggling pretty significantly over the years. In Lake City, I'm not really able to go anywhere without seeing folks who are experiencing homelessness, housing instability, mental illness, and substance use - and seeing folks get pulled into the criminal legal system when they don't get the help that they need. Those are my top priorities for this race - not just 'cause I see folks who are struggling every day, but also because it's the work that I'm doing in the Legislature right now. I'm the Public Policy Director at Disability Rights Washington, so I spend my days working on civil rights legislation, mostly at the intersection of challenges that Lake City is experiencing. I think it's really critical that we're electing folks who have a strong understanding of how to navigate Olympia successfully. My entire job relies on me being able to do that successfully - managing an organization's legislative agenda and legislative strategy. And I don't think that can be underlined enough - Olympia's a difficult place to participate and try and get bills passed. And I think it also relies on folks having a deep understanding of how these issues and this policy really translates to on-the-ground work. And I have some understanding there as well - I'm really lucky to have been part of a team that's overseeing 12 different behavioral health diversion programs across the state. There are programs that are doing well - well enough that they've been funded by the Legislature to keep going. And they're doing that really hard work of trying to meet people where they're at and provide help as soon as help is needed. And I know that we can create a state system even beyond just behavioral health that's built on that concept. And that's what I'm looking to do. [00:03:43] Crystal Fincher: Excellent. And I have definitely appreciated the work that you and others have been doing with Disability Rights Washington and the wins that you've been able to achieve, the work that you continue to do to try and make our state more equitable and help it serve everyone. You have talked - I've heard you talk before - about those challenges facing Lake City and the district at-large. And there are more homeless people now, more people struggling with being able to pay rent, to find shelter than there have been - than we've seen before. What can be done to help people stay in their homes and to get off of the street? What are your plans for that? [00:04:28] Darya Farivar: Yeah, it is certainly easier to keep folks in their homes at the beginning, rather than wait for folks to - for example, you have to be homeless for a night in order to access a lot of housing services. And that just doesn't make sense - to wait for someone to lose absolutely everything before intervening is not okay. It's not helpful. It's incredibly traumatizing to the individual. And it's also just not a good use of our funds too, and the very little resources we have as a state. So building up supports and tenant protections and making sure that - if it's a hundred dollars between someone experiencing homelessness or being able to stay in their home, making sure that we can find that to keep folks there, making sure that we've got those rental subsidies available for folks. And then also looking at folks who, unfortunately, did make it to that point and crisis, where they did end up on the streets - trying to look at what the underlying reasons that pushed them over the edge. And for many folks, it's disability. National numbers show that 40% of folks who are experiencing homelessness actually identify as having a disability. Now we can have a whole conversation about identifying as having a disability versus actually being diagnosed as having a disability - and very often, a lot more folks meet diagnosis criteria than actually identify with it - especially folks who are having behavioral health challenges. And so when I look at what's happening there, I see disability and I see behavioral health as a big part of it. And so I look at our behavioral health system - and our behavioral health system is missing the entire front end of it. We're waiting for folks, again, to fall through every last crack in the system before even attempting to provide help. And that's not working, right? There's so many folks that are struggling and suffering because of that - because either themselves or their loved ones have reached out for help and they haven't been able to get it. And leaving folks to access our last-resort behavioral health options and using those as the cornerstone of our system is not working. And so really focusing on diversion and intervention and making sure we're building up things like our newly established 988 hotline - making sure there's services to go along with that. Mobile crisis teams, options to have behavioral health professionals actually responding to crisis and getting folks into things like pure respite and crisis stabilization - that's what we need to be investing in. [00:06:58] Crystal Fincher: That certainly makes sense. And you're right - it is critical to keep people in housing and to intervene before we get to the point where they're at-risk or at the point where they're losing it. Affordability is a major, major contributor to homelessness and it's a big challenge that we're facing statewide - really countrywide - but definitely in this district. One big item that is attempting to help is Representative Jessica Bateman's missing middle housing bill that didn't successfully make it through last session but is coming back - looks like it has momentum. Do you support and will you vote for the missing middle housing bill? [00:07:40] Darya Farivar: Yes, absolutely. Absolutely. We are missing something around 250,000 units of housing across the state. That is a huge and terrifying number, right? And the way that we're gonna be able to address that is by making meaningful changes in the way that we're looking at density. I think - one of the things that I'm seeing a lot along the campaign trail is that folks have been pushed into this kind of false choice between extremes. It's either single-family zoning or it's apartment buildings, and folks don't see a lot of what's in the middle - and what's in the middle is where that conversation is happening or where it should be happening at least. The reality is that we need density. We need density now. And what that density's gonna look like is going to be different neighborhood to neighborhood. And we have to be flexible in allowing for that individualization and reality of the landscape we're working in. Seattle neighborhoods are just very different neighborhood to neighborhood - they look and feel different and the capacity that they have for density is going to vary. And so we have to stay open to that and have to push back against this all-or-nothing approach. There is so much that we can do in the middle. [00:08:50] Crystal Fincher: I think you're absolutely spot on with that. There are people who think that - okay, I'm gonna have some 20-story building - anytime someone talks about absorbing density. But also there are issues, as we saw in this last session, about what is the middle and where does it stand? Are you talking more in terms of sixplex and anything in middle like that? Are you talking higher density? What does the middle look like to you? [00:09:19] Darya Farivar: I think it depends on the neighborhood and the folks that we're talking about. I think sixplexes are a great place to start. I will never pretend to be an expert on that legislation. I'm always the first person to jump up and say, this is an issue I need to learn more about. I am no expert in housing zoning and how that policy is shaping up, and I'm really comfortable saying that because I know that the experts are around me. And I know that there are people that I can call on who are having much more in-depth conversations around this and understand the nuance and the detail with that. For me, it's about talking to folks who are being displaced and figuring out what's gonna keep them in the neighborhood. That's what the middle is to me. How do we keep folks, for example, in a neighborhood like Lake City that is seeing a lot of new development and growth, how do we make sure the long-term residents - like my family, like my parents - are able to age in place and stay in the neighborhood that they have chosen and grown to love. [00:10:11] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. And when it comes to that, you talk about zoning being essential and important. Is that the only thing that's necessary for keeping rents down, or do we also need to be looking at other policies beyond missing middle housing in order to make sure that we can stabilize rents and keep our communities affordable? [00:10:30] Darya Farivar: I think it's definitely part of it. I don't think that it's all of it. I think there are a lot of creative conversations happening about what we can be doing - not just to increase density, but actually put land and housing back in the hands of, again, folks who have been in these communities longest. Lot of conversations around building up nonprofit housing, which is really interesting and exciting to me. Trying to talk about land co-ops and joint ownership models - where if you can't afford to own all of the home that you're living in, you can own a piece of it. Really interested in having some more conversations about these grassroots solutions - things that communities of color have been talking about for a long time and trying to find ways for the state to support that. Not insert ourselves in the middle of it, but find a way to support that sort of mutual aid that's already happening naturally in a lot of different communities. [00:11:27] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, I think that's wise to look at. I also wanted to talk about - you have such a deep background in disability rights, which is so tied to our healthcare system. And you talked about some of the things you want to accomplish there. We are at a crisis point in many ways where we're looking at staffing shortages in basically every element of our healthcare system. I just read news that a intermediate transport company - taking people from the hospital to different appointments or to other care centers that are necessary and routine - is just shutting down. We have shortages of nurses, of frontline people, of ambulance drivers, just everywhere in the system. What can you as a legislator do to help address our capacity issues, our staffing issues across the healthcare system? And what else would you do to make sure better healthcare is more available to more people? [00:12:28] Darya Farivar: When I look at the workforce shortages across the system, especially in caregiving fields, two things really come to mind. And I'm really drawing from my experiences working with those diversion programs across the state. And they had two major challenges to address - how do we, where is the place to divert someone to housing? And also how do we keep our staff? And the fact that that was one of the biggest concerns, along with housing, is not a fun conversation, right? Because ultimately it comes down to making sure staff feel appreciated and they're being well taken care of. And the reality is that the rates just aren't there - this last legislative session, the Legislature increased rates by about - I believe it was 4% - though I'm probably getting this number wrong now that I haven't looked at the bill for months now. But we increased it just a little - oh, I think it was seven, 7% - that's right, because Massachusetts also increased their rates, but about 15%. And that is much closer to where we need to be. If we want to make sure that folks are gonna get the services and care that they need, we have to take care of the people who are caring for those individuals. And right now, I don't think we're doing that in Washington. The reality is we can think up all of the fabulous new programs that we want to see, but until we have folks to fill them, those are all just dreams and ideas. And it does come down to making sure people are paid a thriving wage - not surviving, not just barely scraping by - a thriving wage. And, the other issue that comes up here is that - especially in behavioral health, folks are really sick. Folks are - again, we're waiting for the system - we're waiting for folks to fall through every last crack in the system before engaging. And so by the time folks get into a place where they're receiving care from a healthcare provider, behavioral health professional - they're in a really, really bad state and it's really hard to help that individual. That can't be said enough. So to help our workforce situation, we have to cough up the money, we have to pay people better. And we need to not wait for folks to fall through all the last cracks in the system. We have to actually intervene earlier so that it is easier, and in a lot of situations safer for staff to intervene and provide the care that folks need. [00:14:58] Crystal Fincher: And obviously we're having so many of these conversations, whether it's about trying to get our unhoused neighbors into housing and the frontline workers that we're relying on doing that, or within the healthcare system. How much we are paying and taking care of these people is part of every conversation, which also gets back to a conversation about revenue. And do we have enough to take care of everyone we need to take care of? And the general consensus is - generally no. And a lot of conversation about implementing more progressive revenue measures in order to do that. Do you support more progressive revenue? And if so, what kind - what are you in favor of? [00:15:46] Darya Farivar: Absolutely. There's no way around it. We need more revenue and it has to be progressive revenue. We have to figure out a way to establish a state income tax. And I know that there are really brilliant people who are working on that. We - I'm really supportive of the capital gains tax, of the state excise tax. I'm really interested in finding ways for folks who are making a ton of money to really just pay their fair share - we're not asking for anything earth shattering. We're asking for folks to pay what is fair and for folks to really make sure that we're not putting the burden on folks who are ultimately accessing the social services that we are paying for - that they are ultimately paying for. That doesn't make any sense whatsoever. We have the most regressive tax structure in the country and that is something for us to be deeply ashamed of. So there's no way around it. We absolutely have to have progressive revenue. And at the same time, we also need to keep having this conversation about - are we spending our money wisely? Are we working with what we have the best we can? And I think the answer is also no. I don't think we're spending our money the best way we can possibly spend it. And looking at the behavioral health system is where I see one of those examples so clearly. One of the things that comes with waiting for folks to fall through the cracks in the system is that it is really expensive to get them into the care that they need. And sometimes - oftentimes - they tip over that line, over the line where you get care and into a really expensive system, which is the criminal legal system. And we are dumping so much money into that system as a way to try and compel people into getting care - when we could have been intervening earlier and saving money and saving lives and saving trauma. And we're not doing that. And so I think that there is - I think we have to keep having that conversation as well. When we want to pay for something or we feel that we have to pay for something, we find the funding for that. And in that system it has become really clear that we are spending the vast majority of our money on the criminal legal system and on expensive, really in a lot of ways ineffective institutionalization, when we could be doing a lot more earlier. [00:18:11] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. Expensive, ineffective, inefficient. And it's just not accomplishing what we need it to - I completely agree with you there. Another option that's currently being discussed is Representative Noel Frame's wealth tax that she had proposed that has some broad support. I assume you also are in favor of implementing that? [00:18:33] Darya Farivar: Absolutely. [00:18:34] Crystal Fincher: Makes complete sense. Also in the conversation - just about education and public schooling. We are in the Seattle School District - kids are just getting back to school after a teacher strike. And there's so many issues that teachers brought up that they're facing that are - that they're struggling with - and fundamentally boil down to still receiving insufficient funding at the state level from just where we're at in terms of class sizes, special education funding - those class sizes, the staff, just the ability and training to implement those programs and support kids in the way that they need to be supported. Counseling resources, which are more necessary now than they've ever been. In your role as a legislator, what can you do to help increase the amount of funding for schools and to make sure that we're doing the best job to educate our kids and prepare them for a successful life? [00:19:37] Darya Farivar: Yeah, yeah. So school funding, man, this is the kind of forever conversation, right? This is our paramount duty and we are failing pretty significantly. And one of the areas that you see this really clearly is in special education, is with disabled Black and Brown students especially. When I look at the way that we are funding education and - yeah, when I'm looking at the way we're funding education overall, right? The fact that we are funding based on enrollment is a problem. And we're seeing that more and more show up today - especially like in Seattle Public Schools. And so we really need to rethink that and really make sure that we are funding, I think, based on need, based on where that need is and how much that need is. And it's just not working - what we've been doing is not working, so changing the way that we are funding education fundamentally - it needs to happen. The other area that I look at in funding - for special education specifically - is around inclusion. We know that isolation and segregation and restraint leads kids into the school-to-prison pipeline. And yet our funding formulas encourage it. Our funding formulas say that you get more funding for students who spend time in a segregated classroom setting. It directly encourages against inclusion and that's not working either. And we need to flip how we are funding inclusion and special education as well. And this is another area where there's a lot of great experts working on this, right? A lot of folks who have been having these conversations about whether we stick to the prototypical model for funding or do we change it up. And it's another area where I really want to get in and listen to the folks who have been working on this, who have been the experts working in the community on this as well, and listen and figure out what can I do best. For every issue that is not my expertise, I'm really interested in listening and learning and taking direction from folks who know much better than I what's going on and how I can get in there and be the best ally I can to push these issues along in a way that really keeps folks, and in this case students, who are furthest from opportunity, which I really think are Black and Brown students with disabilities at the center of these conversations. And make sure that what we set out to do, which is support these students, ultimately carries through and our end result really does support those students. [00:22:21] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, that absolutely makes sense. And I appreciate your candor. Sometimes we hear politicians who - I have every answer, only I can implement the solution. And reality is no one ever does. And even those who think they do inevitably encounter some things that noone ever could have anticipated - like a pandemic, or things like that where it's just new - and having an infrastructure set up to be in communication and in community with people most impacted, people on the ground while bringing your principles, your perspective, your own experience through there is really important. And so I just appreciate you being candid about that and being willing to listen and learn. I think that says a lot about a candidate who does take that perspective. [00:23:16] Darya Farivar: Thank you. [00:23:17] Crystal Fincher: Sure. [00:23:18] Darya Farivar: I'm really glad to hear that. I will just also offer - working in a co-governance model is what I'm interested in. That's how I work with legislators when I'm lobbying and trying to bring advocates in. And I think because of that, we need more organizers as legislators. And that's exactly what I'm trying to do. We need to be co-governing - these decisions - we're elected to represent the people, our constituents, but ultimately we're making decisions that are gonna impact them directly. And so we have to stay in constant communication with folks who are gonna be impacted by it. [00:23:48] Crystal Fincher: In another area where - right now - folks who are least able to mitigate the impacts of climate change are most impacted by it. We're seeing it here locally, whether it's people being exposed to and endangered by extreme heat and extreme cold. Just today as we're recording this, it's another dangerous air advisory because of wildfire smoke and that being a direct threat to people's immediate health with asthma and increased heart attacks, lung irritation. These are all things that are impacting our communities and communities that are most vulnerable. What are your priorities for mitigating the current impacts the climate change on these communities and addressing just greenhouse gas emission reduction overall? [00:24:41] Darya Farivar: Yeah, I think it all comes back down to holding corporations accountable for the pollution that they have created and put on these underrepresented marginalized communities. It comes down to making sure, again, we're holding people accountable in a lot of different ways. And so there's just no way around that. We need to do a better job of doing that. The Climate Commitment Act is here, which is exciting and it's making some progress. It does seem to really rely on cap and trade measures, which is a start - but cap and trade measures also allow for folks who have the money to pay off those fines and keep producing pollution as they have been. And that's not the kind of accountability that we so desperately need. It's a start - it's a good start - but if we're really gonna be meeting these climate goals, we need to be a lot more aggressive about it. And say - that's enough, you need to stop producing and operating as you have been, because it is deeply harming the world and these communities that we say that we're trying to do right by. And so again, making sure that those communities have a direct line of communication into this process - that they're not just actually - beyond having a line of communication, making sure that they're at the table is gonna be really critical, especially indigenous communities. I am really interested in getting involved in transportation as a climate justice issue. That's the angle that I am also most familiar with - Disability Rights Washington has an incredible Disability Mobility Initiative, and I've been able to learn so much from the work that Anna Zivarts is doing there, and I hope to continue. And hope that we can build on that work. We know that cars and trucks are our number one cause of pollution. And so we have to address that head on and what that means is making sure that public transit works for everybody. It has to work for the folks who are relying on it - for example, folks with disabilities who don't have another option, public transportation is it .And also making it efficient enough so that folks who do have cars and can make the choice see it as the more efficient option, see it as the better option for them in every way. And there's a lot that we can be doing there. In the 46th, we've got some brand new light rail stations, which is really exciting. I'm a big fan of the light rail - used to take it to work every day before COVID - and they're closer now. But we gotta make sure that those are connected up with our bus routes as well. We gotta make sure that it is safe to get from point A to B to C. And I think an area that - it doesn't always get the attention that it really needs when thinking about transportation - is also pedestrian safety infrastructure. That is, at the most basic level, sidewalks. In any Seattle neighborhood - if you walk around that neighborhood, there is going to be a problem with the sidewalk you're walking on. There's gonna be a route that's like trying to climb out of it - there isn't gonna be a curb cut, it's gonna be some issue with it. And that's an issue that DRW has been working on over the years, which is really exciting also. Just recently we were getting some of this construction and new sidewalks put in in Lake City - fabulous - always one of the last neighborhoods to get improvements like this, but I'm excited. It's just down the block from me now - there's a real sidewalk there and I can safely walk on 35th, a really, really busy street. Making sure that there are sidewalks where there haven't been, repairing those sidewalks, and also having that hard conversation about whose responsibility is it as well - 'cause right now it's the homeowner's responsibility to figure out how to improve their sidewalk. And that is not equitable. We talk about all of our regressive taxes and the burden we are putting on property tax as a way to fund and fix everything. It's really difficult for a lot of the homeowners, at least in my neighborhood, to be able to stay. And just adding sidewalk repair as one other additional thing is not going to help. And frankly, folks aren't doing it - it's not working, folks aren't repairing it. And folks who are trying to access transportation are bearing the brunt of it. Folks, whether they're walking or rolling, are having to go into the middle of the street to get to where they need to go. And I digress from your original question, Crystal, but I think that it is a huge part of making sure that our transportation system is genuinely accessible and safe for folks to access, to get folks out of cars. [00:29:31] Crystal Fincher: No, you're absolutely right. And our transportation system is most responsible for greenhouse gas emissions - out of all of the different sectors, it's transportation. Highways are conversation there - historical conversations about - oh, there's traffic, let's widen a freeway - without regard for the reality, the fact that widening freeways actually worsens traffic and it worsens greenhouse gas emissions. Will you be voting for a transportation package that includes further highway expansion? [00:30:05] Darya Farivar: No, absolutely not. I will not be - there's so many other better ways that we can be spending our money. It's incredibly expensive and I just think that we can do better. And our public transportation system really needs that funding - and that's the future, right? I think transit and technology is the future, so we need to embrace it now and not later. Seattle has a very interesting history when investing in city infrastructure, especially transportation infrastructure, and we've seen the results of waiting and waiting and delaying and delaying - the future is here. We gotta invest in it now. [00:30:43] Crystal Fincher: I completely agree. In terms of just - obviously, you talk to lots of people, lots of groups who are sitting here and I've asked you questions. What issues do you see - issue or issues, do you see flying under the radar that you aren't asked about very often, or that people don't regularly invite you to talk about, but that you feel are necessary to talk about and address? [00:31:07] Darya Farivar: Wow. I would say overwhelmingly people want to talk about public safety. That's the number one thing that people want to talk about. And I am always happy to talk about it - it really is a lot of what my priorities make up - is that kind of topic area and conversation. There are a lot of issues that are flying under the radar as a result of that. One that I am really interested in that I haven't been able to talk a lot about is access to the ballot and voting. We have seen that it really makes a difference. You need to be able to show up and vote - in my race, we saw that made a difference, right? We ended up with 32% of the vote - we won the primary. That's huge - we're really excited about that. And I think one of the reasons we did that was because we were so committed to going out and earning every single vote, and just trying to engage people who haven't been engaged in this process before. And voting advocacy has been a significant part of my work at DRW and something that I really want to continue to work on - making sure at least, first and foremost, folks have access to the ballot. There's some really interesting conversations happening about electronic ballot return which would be an absolute game changer in Washington to make sure that folks are able to vote even easier. And make sure that people who are ultimately gonna be most impacted by these decisions that our lawmakers are going to make have a voice and a vote into this process. I'm really interested in doing work around making sure that that ballot is accessible. In Washington, we've got mail-in voting, which is great and it increases access for a huge population, but not everybody. Many folks with disabilities are not able to access it still because you need to be able to read and write and see the ballot. And that leaves out a huge chunk of people. And these are the same people who are also relying on our public transportation system and are gonna have a hard time getting to a vote center as well. So what can we do to make sure that folks really truly have a voice in this process? It's an issue that's really important to me, especially as a first-generation Iranian - coming from a background, a family history where your vote didn't count, your voice didn't matter. It was in fact dangerous for you to speak up. This was one of the appeals of coming to the United States for my family - is that you actually get to participate in this process. And that someone like me, from my background, is able to actually run for office and do it without a target on my back as well. So I think it just can't be talked about enough. There's a lot of work to be done there. I'm really excited to be working on it through my role at Disability Rights Washington and hopefully more to come in the upcoming sessions to really improve it. [00:34:11] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. And as now - voters are listening to you and will be trying to make a decision between you and your opponent on November 8th - as you consider this race and your position making it through to the general election with a very unique accomplishment in that all of the opponents who did not make it through to the general election have endorsed your candidacy, which does not happen very often. Obviously they took stock of both candidates and decided you were the clear choice. As you make your case to voters, what do you tell people who are trying to make that decision between you and your opponent, and how will their lives be different if they vote for you when you're elected? [00:35:06] Darya Farivar: Yeah, we are so excited and I'm really proud of the momentum we have built and the support we've been able to gain. It's been really, really humbling. And in some ways surprising, right? I ran into this thinking - I'm going to do this because I want to win. And most importantly, because I want to make sure that the issues that are important to me see the light of day, and that we have these important conversations about behavioral health in the criminal legal system that I think need to be elevated. And I guess what I would tell folks - I think that there are actually a lot of differences between me and my opponent. I think some of it comes down to professional experience, some of it comes down to lived experience, some of it comes down to philosophy as well. Again, being Public Policy Director, you get a look into the system that many folks do not get. It's a really important part of the process to show up and testify and meet with legislators. But that's about 15, 20% of what's actually happening. Most of that work is happening behind-the-scenes, it's happening at those negotiating tables. And I've been sitting at those tables. I've been a part of those negotiations, right? I've been a part of this kind of maneuvering and trying to figure out - oh, it's 11:00 PM and some random amendment got dropped on your bill. How do we defend against this now? And that is a very, very different look. We have some really tough issues to address - the ones I'm running on being front and center, really, I think for the entire state. And whatever else the Supreme Court is gonna throw at us. We need folks who can hit the ground running. And we need folks who are going to do it with a particular lens, because what we've been seeing has not been working. We need to make sure that folks who are underrepresented have a voice and a part of this process. I think that not only my professional experience points to that - starting as an organizer working - I started out working with immigrants and refugees who have loved ones with developmental disabilities and trying to figure out how do I uplift their voices and make sure they are front and center in these conversations. And so that experience, but also my own personal experience as being a young, first-generation, Iranian American woman. I really understand what it's like to not have my voice heard because I've been silenced over and over and over again. It's not easy to do this work in Olympia with a lived experience like mine, but I'm going in eyes wide open and with some strong allies in there who are going to help, or are going to be committed to these progressive priorities and trying to move the needle on these issues. And they also recognize that how to do it is by lifting the voices of communities who are most impacted. Now, figuring out what that looks like is the next challenge. And I have, I think, really demonstrated throughout my career and through my campaign that this is my priority, this is my pillar, this is my kind of north star - is to make sure that communities that haven't been heard are heard in this process. And I just - I can't underscore that enough. I think the way that your career looks and also the way you run your campaign is gonna say a lot about how you're going to legislate as well. And I think I have proven in the team that I have - I have a team of all young women from different backgrounds - from the LGBTQ community, women of color, immigrant women, women with disabilities - you name it, we've got that different representation captured in our team. And like I said at the beginning, these are people who felt left out of the process that now feel like they have a voice in this process, that feel like this is something that they can believe in. And I think that speaks volumes to the Legislature that we're ultimately trying to create. [00:39:03] Crystal Fincher: Thank you so much for speaking with us today, for helping people to get more acquainted with you, and best of luck on the campaign trail. [00:39:12] Darya Farivar: Thank you so much for having me. I really appreciate the chance to talk with y'all. [00:39:16] Crystal Fincher: Thank you all for listening to Hacks & Wonks. The producer of Hacks & Wonks is Lisl Stadler, our assistant producer is Shannon Cheng, and our post-production assistant is Bryce Cannatelli. You can find Hacks & Wonks on Twitter @HacksWonks, and you can follow me @finchfrii, spelled F-I-N-C-H-F-R-I-i. You can catch Hacks & Wonks on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever else you get your podcasts - just type "Hacks and Wonks" into the search bar. Be sure to subscribe to get our Friday almost-live shows and our midweek show delivered right to your podcast feed. If you like us, leave us a review wherever you listen. You can also get a full transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in the show at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the episode notes. Thanks for tuning in - talk to you next time.

Post Bulletin Minute
Today's Headlines: Luke Bryan Farm Tour stop acts as fundraiser for Dover-Eyota students

Post Bulletin Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 5:47


Stories in this episode: Day in History: 1947: New lighted football field at Lake City dedicated Luke Bryan Farm Tour stop acts as fundraiser for Dover-Eyota students Almost six months after Taopi tornado, recovery has progressed 'so quickly and so well' 83-year-old building on Rochester's Second Street sold for $900,000 Mayo smashes past JM to keep Addington Jug, set up battle of unbeatens The Post Bulletin is proud to be a part of the Trust Project. Learn more at thetrustproject.org.

The Daily Sun-Up
Greenhouse gas emissions in Colorado not dropping enough; Susan B. Anthony visits Lake City

The Daily Sun-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 18:19


Today - we're visiting with The Colorado Sun's environment reporter Michael Booth about greenhouse gas emissions in Colorado not dropping quickly enough and about efforts to change landscaping trends.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Clear Lake Connections
Episode 81: Clear Lake City Water Authority

Clear Lake Connections

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 29:51


This week on Clear Lake Connections Podcast presented by UTMB Health: Meet John Branch, President of the Clear Lake City Water Authority Board. In this week's episode John gives the listeners an overview of the history of the water authority and the role it plays today managing our water levels. John also tells the story of Exploration Green which for long time Clear Lake residents previously known as the closed Clear Lake Golf Course. If you want to hear more about the water authority and the many benefits of Exploration Green go to www.clearlakearea.com and make a reservation for the September 28th membership luncheon.

Today's Talk with Erika
Meet Kathy Newman

Today's Talk with Erika

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 12:21


Meet Kathy Newman, Nurse Practitioner and Owner of NewCare Primary Medicine in Lake City, Florida. Kathy's innovative approach to medicine is how she embraces many aspects of the medical field within her office alone, while delivering boutique-style care. She takes her time with each patient. Just wait until you see, what she has to offer! If you would like to be featured on Today's Talk with Erika, contact me: ErikaDelSordo1@gmail.com https://todaystalkwitherika.com/ https://erikadelsordo.com/ Today's Talk with Erika is broadcasted on Skyhawk Radio's Talk Channel Mondays at 5PM EST. http://skyhawkradio.com/ Today's Talk with Erika now has a mobile app! Take me on the go! Android Play Store: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.todaystalk.podcast iOS App: https://apps.apple.com/gy/app/todays-talk-with-erika/id1525930686 **Advertising opportunities available. Contact me for further information: ErikaDelSordo1@gmail.com Subscribe to Today's Talk with Erika video & audio podcasts. Please like and comment! YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/ErikaDelSordo-TodaysTalk Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/todays-talk-with-erika/id1507627777 Google Podcasts https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy8xYmU2YzE1MC9wb2RjYXN0L3Jzcw Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/5K93HBbABBy6d6aPPSV4Wd All audio & YouTube video podcasts, IMDb page, mobile app links, websites, plus social media pages can be found in this all-in-one link: https://linktr.ee/Todays_Talk_with_Erika --Links Mentioned in this episode: NewCare Primary Medicine Phone Number: (386) 319-8178 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NewCare-Primary-Medicine-102666018497702

Lake City Gville
Connecting People, Pt. 2

Lake City Gville

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 37:32


Connecting people is an integral part of our vision statement at Lake City. Why is that? Associate/Youth Pastor Seth Henegar explains, in this 2nd installment of Connecting People at Lake City. If you'd like to respond to the message or reach out to us for any reason, please follow this link: https://lakecityassembly.churchcenter.com/people/forms/162569

Armed Lutheran Radio
Episode 329 - Ask the Armed Lutherans

Armed Lutheran Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 56:41


This week Lloyd and the cast are answering a question about the guns we carry and why. What factors and features did we consider in choosing our carry guns and gear? Segments [00:00] - Blooper [00:34] - Opening and welcome [02:11] - Thanks to our Members [06:13] - Lloyd's Carry Gun Choices [15:43] - Mia's Carry Gun Choices [29:53] - Sgt. Bill's Carry Gun Choices [43:40] - Pastor John Bennett's Carry Gun Choices [56:06] - Show Close Armed Lutheran Radio is a listener-supported podcast. If you value the information and entertainment we provide, consider supporting the show by joining our membership site, The Reformation Gun Club! http://gunclub.armedlutheran.us Thank You to this Week's Members! Kevin from Marion, IA Dan from Indian Trail, NC Kevin from Fairfax, MO Kalroy from Boronn, CA John from Spokane, WA Frank from Lake City, MI Vincent from Tulare, CA Eric from Buckeye, OH Tony from Little Elm, TX Catherine from Casper, WY Russell from Trenton, NC (our newest member) Links of Interest The Gift of Fear by Gavin DeBecker - https://amzn.to/3AlWDfn* Meet the Cast Lloyd Bailey - http://www.armedlutheran.us/about/ Mia Anstine - http://www.armedlutheran.us/mia/ Sergeant Bill Silvia - http://www.armedlutheran.us/bill/ Pastor John Bennett - http://www.armedlutheran.us/pastor/ Our New Book is now Available for Pre-Order! Duty to Defend - 2nd Edition Prayer of the Week Let Your merciful ears, O Lord, be open to the prayers of Your humble servants; and that they may obtain their petitions, make them to ask such things as shall please You; through Jesus Christ, Your Son, our Lord. Amen. Use these Links to Support Armed Lutheran Radio If you value the information and entertainment we provide, consider supporting the show by joining our membership site, or shopping at your favorite online stores using the links below. Check out the other Great Armed Lutheran Books - http://www.ArmedLutheran.us/Books Shop at Amazon* - http://www.armedlutheran.us/amazon Shop at GunMagWarehouse* - http://www.armedlutheran.us/mags Get Regular Refills Coffee Subscriptions at Dunkin' Donuts* - www.ArmedLutheran.us/Coffee Armed Citizens Legal Defense Network - https://www.armedcitizensnetwork.org Get in Touch Visit our Feedback Page - http://www.armedlutheran.us/feedback Please tell your friends about us, leave an iTunes review, and like us on Facebook Join our Facebook group - http://www.armedlutheran.us/facebook Subscribe to us and follow us on Youtube - http://www.armedlutheran.us/youtube Check Out More at our Website- http://www.armedlutheran.us Disclaimer The links above which are indicated with an asterisk (*) are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, I will earn a commission. This commission comes at no additional cost to you. Please understand that I have experience with all of these items, and I recommend them because they are helpful and useful, not because of the small commissions I make if you decide to buy something. Please do not spend any money on these products unless you feel you need them or that they will help you. Music by the Artist formerly known as METALloyd, copyright 2022. Keep Shooting, Keep Praying, We'll Talk to you Next time!

The Watershed
23 | Friends and Family (Otter Tail County, MN)

The Watershed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 18:04


The We Are Water MN exhibit is on the road for its 2022 tour. Throughout the year, We Are Water MN will be visiting five different communities in the state of Minnesota: Winona, Lake City, Alexandria, Otter Tail County, and Dakota County. On The Watershed podcast, we'll be sharing series of episodes that reflect on the water stories of people who live in each of these places. We Are Water has now arrived in Otter Tail County, where the Fergus Falls Public Library will be hosting the exhibit August 18 - October 10. Learn more: https://ottertailcountymn.us/project/we-are-water-mn/ On our final episode featuring Otter Tail County, our storytellers share about the ways that water strengthens bonds with family. We are Water MN is led by the Minnesota Humanities Center in partnership with the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency; the Minnesota Historical Society; the Minnesota Departments of Agriculture, Health, and Natural Resources; and University of Minnesota Extension, with support from the Clean Water, Land & Legacy Amendment and the National Endowment for the Humanities. To learn more about We Are Water MN, visit us at our website. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Cornquest: A D&D Podcast
Cryptids & Creatures Episode 3

Cornquest: A D&D Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 70:22


Cryptids & Creatures Episode 3 -The Slide Rock BolterAnimal Control runs finally encounters the beast behind the recent land slides. The Slide Rock Bolter is a large whale-like creature that is riding landslides closer and closer to Lake City. But what can they do to stop it?  Starring James Fitton, Collin Hood, Shandon Rushton and Blake Hood.

Voyage Church
Words Matter - Pastor Lonnie Johns

Voyage Church

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 56:12


A Word is all you need to get started, but when you get a word from God you can't keep it to yourself. You have to act on it. This week, our guest, Pastor Lonnie Johns of Christ Central, Lake City, FL, discusses the importance of our words and the power they carry.

Armed Lutheran Radio
Episode 325 - Travel Safety, Getting Back in the Saddle, and Our Banana Republic

Armed Lutheran Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 45:56


The gang's all here in this week's variety show! Mia shares safety tips based on a recent travel experience, Sgt. Bill talks about getting back into the shooting game after a long break, and Pastor Bennett reflects on the state of the nation following the FBI raid on former President Trump's home in Florida. Segments [00:00] - Blooper [00:51] - Opening and welcome [01:56] - Thanks to our Members [08:31] - Mia's Motivations with Mia Anstine [17:36] - Ballistic Minute with Sgt. Bill [23:37] - Pastoral Pontifications with John Bennett [45:03] - Show Close Armed Lutheran Radio is a listener-supported podcast. If you value the information and entertainment we provide, consider supporting the show by joining our membership site, The Reformation Gun Club! http://gunclub.armedlutheran.us Thank You to this Week's Members! Kevin from Marion, IA Dan from Indian Trail, NC Kevin from Fairfax, MO Kalroy from Boronn, CA John from Spokane, WA Frank from Lake City, MI Vincent from Tulare, CA Eric from Buckeye, OH Tony from Little Elm, TX Catherine from Casper, WY Russell from Trenton, NC (our newest member) Links of Interest The Gift of Fear by Gavin DeBecker - https://amzn.to/3AlWDfn* Meet the Cast Lloyd Bailey - http://www.armedlutheran.us/about/ Mia Anstine - http://www.armedlutheran.us/mia/ Sergeant Bill Silvia - http://www.armedlutheran.us/bill/ Pastor John Bennett - http://www.armedlutheran.us/pastor/ Our New Book is now Available for Pre-Order! Duty to Defend - 2nd Edition Prayer of the Week Let Your merciful ears, O Lord, be open to the prayers of Your humble servants; and that they may obtain their petitions, make them to ask such things as shall please You; through Jesus Christ, Your Son, our Lord. Amen. Use these Links to Support Armed Lutheran Radio If you value the information and entertainment we provide, consider supporting the show by joining our membership site, or shopping at your favorite online stores using the links below. Check out the other Great Armed Lutheran Books - http://www.ArmedLutheran.us/Books Shop at Amazon* - http://www.armedlutheran.us/amazon Shop at GunMagWarehouse* - http://www.armedlutheran.us/mags Get Regular Refills Coffee Subscriptions at Dunkin' Donuts* - www.ArmedLutheran.us/Coffee Armed Citizens Legal Defense Network - https://www.armedcitizensnetwork.org Get in Touch Visit our Feedback Page - http://www.armedlutheran.us/feedback Please tell your friends about us, leave an iTunes review, and like us on Facebook Join our Facebook group - http://www.armedlutheran.us/facebook Subscribe to us and follow us on Youtube - http://www.armedlutheran.us/youtube Check Out More at our Website- http://www.armedlutheran.us Disclaimer The links above which are indicated with an asterisk (*) are affiliate links, which means that if you choose to make a purchase, I will earn a commission. This commission comes at no additional cost to you. Please understand that I have experience with all of these items, and I recommend them because they are helpful and useful, not because of the small commissions I make if you decide to buy something. Please do not spend any money on these products unless you feel you need them or that they will help you. Music by the Artist formerly known as METALloyd, copyright 2022. Keep Shooting, Keep Praying, We'll Talk to you Next time!

Hacks & Wonks
Week in Review: August 12, 2022 - with Melissa Santos

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 49:19


On this week-in-review, Crystal is joined by Axios reporter Melissa Santos. They start off looking at the larger trends from this last week's primary, including why the predicted ‘red wave' didn't materialize. Next, they talk about Olgy Diaz's appointment to the Tacoma City council, discussing her impressive credentials and watershed status as the first Latina to serve on the Council. In Seattle City Council news, Crystal and Melissa look at the two recent abortion- and trans-related protections the council passed this week. For updates on public health, our hosts look at how Washington state is lifting most of its COVID emergency orders, where the state is at with its COVID response, and what our outlook is for MPV and its vaccine. After that, the two discuss the redistricting plans for the Seattle City Council, and different neighborhoods' responses to the proposed new district lines and close the show by looking at the state of behavioral health crisis response in our neighborhoods, discussing the county's plans for an emergency walk-in centers, the county's plans to improve its behavioral health response, and our lack of crisis response staff.  As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. You can follow Hacks & Wonks on Twitter at @HacksWonks. Find the host, Crystal Fincher on Twitter at @finchfrii and find today's co-host, Melissa Santos, at @MelissaSantos1. More info is available at officialhacksandwonks.com.   Resources “Our blue legislature bucks GOP trend” by Melissa Santos from Axios: https://www.axios.com/local/seattle/2022/08/12/washington-state-blue-legislature-gop-trend    “Tacoma City Council selects its newest member. She's the first Latina to serve” by Liz Moomey from The News Tribune: https://www.thenewstribune.com/news/local/article264330356.html?taid=62f470bf1a1c2c0001b63754&utm_campaign=trueanthem&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter    “Seattle passes protections for abortion and gender affirming care” by KUOW Staff from KUOW: https://kuow.org/stories/seattle-passes-protections-for-abortion-and-gender-affirming-care   “MPV cases doubling nearly every week in WA, as U.S. declares public health emergency” by Elise Takahama from The Seattle Times: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/health/monkeypox-cases-doubling-nearly-every-week-in-wa-as-us-set-to-declare-public-health-emergency/   "US will stretch monkeypox vaccine supply with smaller doses" by Matthew Perrone from The Seattle Times: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/health/us-will-stretch-monkeypox-vaccine-supply-with-smaller-doses/   Washington state says goodbye to most COVID emergency orders” by Melissa Santos from Axios: https://www.axios.com/local/seattle/2022/08/09/washington-end-most-covid-emergency-orders   "New map would redraw Seattle's City Council districts, with changes for Georgetown, Magnolia" by Daniel Beekman from The Seattle Times: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/politics/new-map-would-redraw-seattles-city-council-districts-with-changes-for-georgetown-magnolia/   “Racial Equity Advocates Like Seattle's Newly Proposed Political Boundaries. Magnolia Residents Do Not.” by Hannah Krieg from The Stranger: https://www.thestranger.com/news/2022/08/04/77339585/racial-equity-advocates-like-seattles-newly-proposed-political-boundaries-magnolia-residents-do-not   “County Plans Emergency Walk-In Centers for Behavioral Health Crises” by Erica C. Barnett from Publicola: https://publicola.com/2022/08/11/county-plans-emergency-walk-in-centers-for-behavioral-health-crises/    "Local Leaders Announce New Coalition to Address Behavioral Health Crisis" by Will Casey from The Stranger: https://www.thestranger.com/news/2022/08/11/77680008/local-leaders-announce-new-coalition-to-address-behavioral-health-crisis   “Designated crisis responders, a ‘last resort' in mental health care, face overwhelming demand” by Esmy Jimenez from The Seattle Times: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/designated-crisis-responders-a-last-resort-in-mental-health-care-face-overwhelming-demand/   Transcript [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington State through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. Be sure to subscribe to get our Friday almost-live shows and our midweek show delivered to your podcast feed. If you like us, leave us a review because it helps a lot. Today, we are continuing our Friday almost-live shows where we review the news of the week with a cohost. Welcome back to the program today's cohost: Seattle Axios reporter, Melissa Santos. [00:01:00] Melissa Santos: Hello, thanks for having me. [00:01:01] Crystal Fincher: Hey, thanks for being back. We always enjoy having you. So there were a number of things that happened this week. I think we'll start off just talking about the elections real quick. We got more results this week. Things are looking more conclusive - a couple of late-straggling races have been decided, including one of the congressional - two, really of the congressional district races. It looks like in the 47th Legislative District race that Republican Bill Boyce will be facing Democratic candidate Senator - former Senator - Claudia Kauffman. And that in the 47th House seat, that Democrat Shukri Olow and Democrat Chris Stearns will both be getting through and Republicans will actually not be making it in that seat, despite that race including three different Republicans - one the pick of the GOP that raised over $200,000, Carmen Goers, who actually finished in last place. So a number of things got settled, but overall, as you look at these elections, what are your takeaways, Melissa? [00:02:16] Melissa Santos: On the legislative side, really things look mostly similar to what they looked like on primary night, in the sense that a lot of the races that Republicans had hoped to pick up, I think Democrats still look really strong in. And that's in a lot of those swing districts in the suburbs - in Island County, the Democrats have pretty strong performances in some House races that I think Republicans have been eyeing for a pickup in the 10th District. The 28th Legislative District looks pretty much like the incumbent Democrats are in really good shape there - that's around Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Lakewood, University Place. And I think that the Republicans not having someone in that 47th District open seat is maybe not what people would've predicted when talking about a red wave coming this year, and that Democrats have been saying - we're just trying to defend what we have, we're not really planning to add seats here. But they look like they're in a pretty good position to defend the seats. The only place where things look like it'll be rough for Democrats are seats up in the 47th - sorry, the 42nd Legislative District in Whatcom County, I think, have some disappointing results for Democrats when it comes to trying to get the former - the State Senate seat formerly held by Republican Doug Ericksen. That's gonna be a tough race where it looks like the State House Democratic Rep who's running for it might have a really tough race to fight in November. She wants to pick up that seat for the Democrats. But again, Democrats were trying to just defend mostly this year. So I think they look like they're in a pretty good position to do that. One thing that's a little bit interesting is a lot of the fringier types in the Republican legislative caucus in the House are actually not going to be returning to the legislature next year. And some of that's just because they ran for Congress in some cases, like Brad Klippert. [00:04:15] Crystal Fincher: And Vicki Kraft. [00:04:16] Melissa Santos: Yes, and Vicki Kraft. So I'm interested to see how that plays out. There are some races where legislative candidates who are being accused of being RINOs [Republicans In Name Only] actually have advanced through the primary. And I am wondering if some Republicans - are they more moderate or just hoping that they beat the more Trumpy Republicans essentially. So that's something I'm watching actually going forward is - while we certainly have situations across the nation where Trump-endorsed Republicans are getting through - we see this in the 3rd Congressional District race, here in our state, where Jaime Herrera Beutler who voted to impeach Trump will not be getting through to the general - that was finalized this week. But locally in legislative races, I'm not sure that the more far-right candidates will win out in all these races in November. So I'm watching that - how does our state picture, when it comes to the Republican party, compare to what we're seeing nationally. And it's always interesting to see how Washington does 'cause we're a little bit different sometimes as a state in how we vote versus the rest of the country. [00:05:25] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, absolutely. And that sets up an interesting dynamic for Republicans, I think, in that it is really helpful when - just from a campaign perspective - when everyone is consistent with the message that's being delivered for the party, what priorities are in terms of values. And so there have been - legislatively - some more moderate Republicans making it through. There are certainly some real extremists. And again, "moderate" is an interesting word for Republicans 'cause - when it is gonna come to some of these caucus votes, I think moderation is gonna effectively fly out of the window. Or being afraid to speak out on certain things that challenge some of the more extreme elements in the party, which essentially in my opinion, enables that element of the party. But with Joe Kent higher on the ticket and being so visible, being a frequent guest on Hannity, Trump-endorsed, and really vocal about a number of things like opposing aid to Ukraine, about wanting Jim Jordan - who is extremely problematic and has been accused of ignoring sexual assault allegations on his watch under his responsibility - wanting him to replace Kevin McCarthy as the leader of the party, certainly moving in a much more extreme direction. A number of those things are gonna be inconsistent, I think, with what some of the other Republicans, I think legislatively under JT Wilcox certainly, Republicans are gonna wanna be talking about. So there may be just a bit of a mismatched message there and it will be interesting to see how the party navigates that, but especially coming from a place where the extremism - you look at the primaries - certainly did not land. And some of, even the criticisms just legislatively, of Republicans who were on the message that they wanted to be on, did not turn out to be very effective at all - that presents a challenge for them in the general. [00:07:40] Melissa Santos: I think that was interesting in the Federal Way area. I think everyone, including Democrats, were saying - yeah, there's a lot of voters concerned about public safety there. I think everyone thought maybe the Democrats might be a little bit more vulnerable from attacks from Republicans in that area in South King County around Federal Way, with Republicans say - Hey, Democrats passed all these bills that hamstring police, so they can't keep you safe. I think everyone thought that line of argument might work better in some of those areas in South King County than it did. And so I'm wondering if Republicans will change their approach or not, or if they're just gonna stick with hammering Democrats on public safety. I think that maybe we'll see just more talk about economy and inflation and maybe a little less of the public safety attacks - possibly - based on those results. [00:08:29] Crystal Fincher: And they certainly hit hard on both of those. It is interesting to see - particularly - so you have Jamila Taylor, who is the incumbent representative there, there's another open House seat, and then Claire Wilson in the Senate seat. Jamila Taylor, who's the head of the Legislative Black Caucus, did play a leading role in passing a lot of, number of the police accountability reforms that police, a number of police unions, and people who are saying "Back the Blue" and these were problematic. She actually has a police officer running against her in that district. And also, the mayor of Federal Way, Jim Ferrell, is running for King County Prosecutor on a hard line, lock 'em up kind of message. They've been working overtime to blame legislators, primarily Jamila Taylor, for some of the crime that they've seen. And holding community meetings - really trying to ratchet up sentiment against Jamila Taylor - helping out both her challenger and Jim Ferrell was the plan. And again, that seemed to fall flat. Jamila Taylor finished with 54% in that race and the most votes out of any Democrat. You saw Democrats across the board, both Claire Wilson and Jamila Taylor, get 54% and 55% of the vote. In a primary, that is certainly where you would want to be and that's really a hard number to beat in the general. And then in the other open seat, you had two Democratic candidates combine for, I think, 55% of the vote. So it is - where they attempted to make that argument the hardest, it seemed to fall almost the flattest. And it goes to - we talked about this on the Post-Primary Recap a little bit - I think it goes to show that the conversation publicly - certainly the political conversation about public safety - I think is too flat and does not account for where the public actually is. I think people are absolutely concerned about crime and rightfully so - we have to attack gun violence, we have to attack property crime and violent crime. We have to do better than we're doing now. But I think people are recognizing that the things that we have been doing have not been successful. And we have been trying to lock people up and people see that there's a need for behavioral health interventions, for housing, for substance use treatment and that those things are absent. And that you can send a policeman to do that, but they don't have the tools to address that even if they were the appropriate responder. And there's a lot of people saying they aren't even the appropriate response for a number of these things. So I just think regular voters - regular people - just have a more nuanced and realistic view of what needs to happen. [00:11:42] Melissa Santos: I also think that message - we could talk about those races forever, probably - but I think that message might land especially flat in communities like South King County that are predominantly people of color in many of these communities. They want to address - well, okay, I should not group everyone together, let me back up here - but I think a lot of people see the effects of crime on their communities and their family members and want support, not just a crackdown. And I don't know if that - I don't know - I'm generalizing here and I shouldn't, but I think that maybe that - [00:12:09] Crystal Fincher: I think it's across the board. I feel like - we saw polling in Seattle where, even if you break it down by Seattle City Council district, whether it's North Seattle or West Seattle which are predominantly white areas, in addition to other areas with higher percentage of people of color - they're saying near universally - when given, asked the question - where would you allocate more of your tax dollars in the realm of public safety to make a difference? They start off by saying behavioral health treatment, substance use disorder treatment, treating root causes. And then "more officers" trails those things. So it's - and even before more officers, they're saying better training for officers so they do a better job of responding when they are called. So I just think that across the board, there's - Republicans have gotten far and have done a lot by talking about the problem. And I think what the primary showed is that you're gonna have to do a better job of articulating a logical and reasonable solution to the problem. 'Cause people have heard talk about the problem for a long time, this isn't new. They're ready for someone to do something about it and they want to hear something that sounds credible, with some evidence behind it, that'll make a difference. And I don't think Republicans articulated that at all. And I think Democrats are talking about things more in line with where voters are at. But certainly, we could talk about those election results forever, but we will move on to other news. Speaking of newly elected people, we have a new appointment of a person on the Tacoma City Council - Olgy Diaz was just unanimously appointed as the first Latina member of the Tacoma City Council last Tuesday night. She was one of 43 applicants to apply, ended up making the shortlist, and then was officially appointed on Tuesday night. What did you take away from this? You previously covered - based in Tacoma, covered Tacoma previously, worked at The News Tribune. What does Olgy bring to the Council? [00:14:41] Melissa Santos: Olgy is really experienced in politics, I want to say. For way back when - I think I started talking to Olgy years and years ago - she was, definitely in her role with leading One America, she's done a lot of policy work at the state level for a long time. She worked in the Legislature, so I talked to her in that capacity. And she brings a lot of experience to the table - I think more than a lot of people who apply for vacancies on city councils, for sure. But I honestly was also just - I was blown away to read - I didn't realize the Tacoma City Council has never had a Latina member before and that really blew my mind, given the diversity of Tacoma and given that that's a community where you have people who just weren't represented for such a long time. I worked in Tacoma for eight years at the paper and I didn't - I guess I didn't realize that was the case. So Olgy - separately - brings just a ton of experience. She leads the National Women's Political Caucus of Washington now as president and I talked to her for stories in that capacity, and she's always very knowledgeable and really thoughtful. But yeah, that's just - in terms of representation, she brings a lot to the Council that apparently it hasn't had - in terms of experience and lived experience as well. I didn't watch the whole appointment process every step of the way, but it seems like that is a very solid choice, given that you have someone coming in possibly that has way more, broader political knowledge than a lot of the sitting councilmembers in some cases. And that's not a knock on the sitting councilmembers, but you just have someone really, really versed in politics and policy in Washington State coming onto that city council. [00:16:26] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, and an unusual amount of experience. I think, to your point, not a knock on anyone else. Olgy just has an unusual amount of experience on both the policy and political side. She's the Government Affairs Director for Forterra, she's president of the National Women's Political Caucus as you said, on the Washington Wildlife and Recreation Coalition and Institute for a Democratic Future board. She's previously been on the city's Human Rights Commission. She just has so many, so much experience from within, working within the legislature and elsewhere. And if - full disclosure - Olgy Diaz is not just a friend, but also worked for Olgy as her consultant and love the woman. But just completely dynamic and if you know Olgy, you know she reps South Tacoma harder than anyone else just about that you've ever met. She deeply, deeply loves the city, particularly South Tacoma, and has been an advocate for the city in every role that she's had. So just really excited to see her appointed. In other local news - this week, Seattle, the Seattle City Council stood up and passed protections for abortion and gender affirming care. What did they do? [00:17:52] Melissa Santos: They passed something that makes it a misdemeanor for someone to interfere, intimidate, or try and threaten someone who is seeking an abortion and they also have some civil rights protections that they passed. Those are especially - you might not think that's necessarily an issue in Seattle all the time, but I think that - certainly the misdemeanors for trying to interfere for someone getting treatment or getting abortion care, I think that is something that could actually be used and called upon sometime in Seattle with certain individual cases. And I do think it's - not necessarily in a bad way - but a messaging bill on both of them - in a way saying - care is protected here. Even though in Washington State we do have some state law protections for abortion - better than in most states - I think it's partly about sending a message to people that your care will not be interfered with here. And maybe even a message to people in other states - that they can come - actually that is part of it - is that you can come to Seattle and get care and you will not, we will support you. And so that's part of why they're doing it - both on a practical level, but also sending a message that we will not tolerate people trying to dissuade, to discourage people who decided to get an abortion from getting the care that they are seeking. [00:19:18] Crystal Fincher: And I know Councilmember Tammy Morales has also said that she plans to introduce further legislation to prevent crisis pregnancy centers from misrepresenting the facts, misleading people - which has happened in other situations with pregnancy crisis centers, which sometimes bill themselves as abortion care providers. A person seeking an abortion finds them, goes, and unexpectedly is - in some situations - heavily pressured not to have an abortion. And there's been situations where they have been found to have been coerced into not having an abortion. And so that would just seek to make sure that everybody correctly represents themselves, and who they are, and what they are attempting to do. Lots of people do, to your point, look at Seattle and say - okay, but this - things were safe here anyway. I do think the first one - we see a lot of counter-protestors - of people making points in Seattle, going to Seattle to protest different things, because it has a reputation for being progressive, where progressive policy is. So it attacks people who really dislike those policies and moving in that direction. I think this is helpful for that. And it serves as model legislation. There are some very red areas here in the state. There are other localities - we may have neighboring states that - the right to abortion is coming to an end. And so having legislation like this that has passed in the region, that has passed nearby, that is in place, that survives legal challenges against them makes it easier for other localities to pass the same. And so I think that it is a very positive thing for Seattle to take the lead passing model legislation. Certainly aren't the first to pass, but having it in the region is very, very helpful. So glad to see that. Also this week - some challenging news. One - monkeypox, now referred to as MPV, cases have been doubling nearly every week in Washington and has been declared a public health emergency. Where do we stand here? [00:21:37] Melissa Santos: I think that right now, we have about 220 cases - and that's what I think I saw on the CDC website just earlier today. And last week, it was 70 fewer than that, at least - we have been seeing, especially early on, every week or so the cases were doubling in our state. And we remember how COVID started in a way - it was small at first and things just can really expand quickly. This isn't spread the same way COVID is - and I'm not saying it is - but we do definitely have a vaccine shortage here for this and that's a huge concern. I asked the State Department of Health - actually, I have not put this in the story yet, but I was like - how many people do you feel like you need to treat that are at high risk? And they said it's almost 80,000. And took me a long time to get that number, but I think we only have - we only are gonna have something like 20-something thousand vaccines doses coming in, maybe 25,000, through at least early September. So there's a lot of potential for this to spread before we get vaccines to treat the people who are most at risk. That's a big concern. And so I haven't checked in our state yet - this sort of decision that we can stretch these doses further by divvying them up and doing, making each dose into maybe five doses - that could really help here. So I need to check whether in our state we're going forward with that and if that meets the need or not. But we still need a second dose for everybody, even beyond that. So it looks like the math just doesn't work and we're still gonna be short. And in that time, how far will it spread? Because it's not just - it's not a sexually transmitted disease that only is going to spread among LGBT individuals - other people are getting it and will get it. So that is - and also that community needs as much support as they can get anyway, regardless. But this is not something that just affects someone else, for instance, if you're not a member of that community. It's something that can affect everybody, and it's - everyone's afraid of another situation like we had with COVID - could it spread before we get a handle on it? And I think it's still an unknown question right now. [00:23:57] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, big unknown question. And to your point, it was - the CDC just announced that the vaccine supply can be stretched by giving one-fifth of the normal dose, so stretched five times what we thought we previously had. But that was just announced, so our local plans for that are probably in progress and process and hopefully we'll hear more about that soon. But haven't yet as that information was just announced - I want to say yesterday, if not day before. With that, to your point, it is - some people are under the mistaken impression that this is a sexually transmitted infection. It is not. It can spread by just skin-to-skin contact. If two people are wearing shorts and at a concert, or have short-sleeve shirts and are rubbing against each other, it can be spread just by touching especially infected lesions, by surfaces if there's a high enough amount on a surface. It is pretty hardy - lasts a long time on a number of surfaces or clothes or different things like that. Certainly a lot of concern with kids going back into school, kids in daycare that we may see an increase particularly among children - just because they are around each other and touching each other and playing as they do and that is how this virus can spread. So certainly getting as many people, starting with the highest risk people, vaccinated is important. We are short - there are just no two ways about that and running behind. Testing capacity has also been a challenge. So hopefully with these emergency declarations that we've seen locally and nationally that we fast forward the response to that and get prepared pretty quickly, but we will say that. Also this week, most COVID emergency orders have been ended. What happened here? [00:26:08] Melissa Santos: Some of them are still getting phased out, but the governor just very recently announced in our state that he's going to be - he's ending 12 COVID emergency orders. And so I went - wait, how many are left then, 'cause I don't think we have that many. And the governor's office - there's only 10 - once these mostly healthcare, procedure-related orders are phased out, will only be 10 COVID emergency orders left. And honestly, some of those have even been scaled back from what they were. They're - one of the orders relates to practicing some safe distancing measures or certain precautions in schools - that's really a step back from having schools be completely closed, like we had at one point. So even those 10 aren't necessarily as stringent as the orders we were seeing earlier in the pandemic. What does that really signify? I think that the governor has said - because we have good treatment options available, it doesn't mean that COVID is no longer a threat, but we have better ways of dealing with it essentially. It's not like early in the pandemic when nobody was vaccinated. We have a fairly high vaccination rate in our state compared to some others. And we have some treatment options that are better. And at least right now - well, I say this - our hospitals aren't pushed completely beyond capacity. Although, however - this week Harborview actually is over capacity, so that's still a potential problem going forward. But we just have better ways of dealing with the virus than we did. It doesn't mean it's not a threat, it doesn't mean that people aren't still getting hospitalized and even dying - because they are. But we're moving to a different stage of this pandemic where we're just not going to have as many restrictions and we're going to approach the virus in a different way. [00:27:51] Crystal Fincher: Yeah. Yeah, that pretty much covers it there. [00:27:56] Melissa Santos: The thing - I do think for public - I've asked the governor a couple times - what is your standard for lifting the underlying emergency order? 'Cause we still are in a state of emergency over COVID and that does give the governor, if something comes up, quick power to ban some activity or something. And if there's a public health risk, he could order, for instance, indoor mask wearing again if he wanted. He has not indicated he plans to, but it gives him a little more power. Republicans are still mad about that, but in effect, there aren't that many orders actually in place anymore. We're just not living under as many restrictions as we once were. [00:28:34] Crystal Fincher: Yeah. So the protections are going away - there are lots of people who are very concerned about this. This does not seem tethered to - earlier in the pandemic - in some situations when cases were spreading at a lower amount than they were in some areas then than they are today - they tied it to certain metrics and to hospital capacity and different things. So there seemed like there was an underlying data-based justification that would dictate what the appropriate health response was. This seems untethered from all of that. And I think a lot of people's criticisms of this are - the actions that are taken, or realistically the actions that are no longer being taken, the justification behind that seems to be driven by convenience or by a desire just to get back to normal or fatigue. And instead of what health precautions dictate would be wise. I think at the very minimum we would be a lot better off if - we were very late in, from the CDCs perspective, in acknowledging that this is an airborne virus. And so air quality, air purification, air turnover in indoor spaces is extremely important, especially given how helpful that is for wildfire air mitigation. We're having a higher, more low-quality air days than we have before. Focusing on indoor air purification - I wish there were more of a push for that, more awareness for that, more assistance for that. Because it just seems like - given this and monkeypox, which has evidence that it is spread also via airborne - [00:30:37] Melissa Santos: Or at least droplets in close - yeah, at least like close breathy, breathing-ey stuff. [00:30:44] Crystal Fincher: Yes - that air purification is important. And so I wish we would make a greater push because still - that's not really aggressively talked about by most of our public health entities. And there's just not an awareness because of that, by a lot of people who are not necessarily being, saying - no, I don't want to do that - but just don't understand the importance of that. And many businesses that could take steps, but just don't know that that's what they should be doing. Sometimes it's still here - well, we're sanitizing all of these surfaces, which is going to come in handy for monkeypox certainly, but is not really an effective mitigation for COVID when - hey, let's talk about air purification instead of you wiping down surfaces. Just interesting and this may ramp up again, depending on what happens with MPV infections and spread. So we'll see how that continues. [00:31:47] Melissa Santos: But this time we have a vaccine at least - there is a vaccine that exists. Remember the beginning of COVID - of course, everyone remembers - there was no vaccine. So this feels like - theoretically, we should be able to address it faster because we have a vaccine, but there's just a shortage nationwide of the vaccine. So that's, I think, an extra frustrating layer of the monkeypox problem - is that we have a tool, but we just don't have enough of it. In COVID, we just were all completely in the dark for months and months and months and months - and anyway. [00:32:17] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, and unfortunately the effect on the ground of not having enough is the same as not having any. [00:32:23] Melissa Santos: Right. Yeah. [00:32:24] Crystal Fincher: And so people are left with greater exposure to the virus and to spreading the virus than there would be otherwise, because we don't have the adequate supply of it. Which they say they're working on, but of course those things - unless you are prepared beforehand and making an effort to be prepared beforehand, it takes a while to get that ramped up. I think they're saying the earliest we could anticipate additional supply would be in the September timeframe, and oftentimes that's when it starts to trickle. And so it could be October before we see a meaningful amount of additional supply or longer. Just stay on top of information, be aware out there, and we will see. Very important thing happening within the City of Seattle - is Seattle City Council district redistricting, and what's happening. There have been some good articles written recently - both in The Seattle Times, especially in The Stranger by Hannah Krieg - about racial equity advocates actually being happy about the newly proposed political boundaries for council districts. But some residents of Magnolia, the expensive and exclusive Magnolia community, who have been known to advocate against any type of growth, or development, or any change to their community, other people getting greater access to their community and the political power that comes with who they've been and their ability to have an outsized voice, realistically, in local politics. They're not that happy. What's happening here? [00:34:16] Melissa Santos: The proposal that at least is moving forward at this point would split Magnolia, right? So this is something that communities of color have argued as being - Hey, in other areas, our communities are split and that dilutes our voice. And now it's interesting that Magnolia, which is not historically an area where - that has been predominantly people of color - every district in Seattle is changing - safe to say that it's been a whiter area. They're saying - Hey, wait, whoa, whoa, whoa - wait, we're gonna get split, that's gonna dilute our voice. So it's an interesting dynamic there. And what's also interesting - and it makes sense because the same organizations have been working on city redistricting and state redistricting, to some degree - we're seeing this movement to really unite and ensure communities in South Seattle are not divided. So in this - this was something that they really were trying to do with congressional districts - is make sure that South Seattle communities of color have a coalition and aren't split. And especially having the - well, let's see, and at least in state redistricting - making sure the International District is connected in some way to other parts of South Seattle and Beacon Hill. That was a priority in one of the congressional district redistricting for some of these groups that are now working on Seattle redistricting. One of the things that it would do is put South Park and Georgetown in the same district, which is interesting because I think those two communities work together on a lot of issues that affect the Duwamish and affect - again, a lot of people of color that live in those districts - there are issues that really would affect both of them. And so putting them in the same district, I could see why that would make sense. And you also have - I want to make sure I have this right, but I think - making sure Beacon Hill and it is connected to South Seattle as well. I'm gonna check here - is it also the International District here we're talking as well? Oh, Yesler Terrace - that's right. [00:36:12] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, so CID and Yesler Terrace will be in District 2 - kept them both in District 2 - that those were some really, really important considerations. And large percentages of those communities have talked about how important that is. You just talked about Georgetown and South Park being in that district. Looking at Lake City, Northgate, and Broadview in District 5. Also keeping growing renter populations together in South Lake Union and Downtown together there has been making a difference. Both communities of color and, as we talk in the larger redistricting conversation, communities of interest - and now with more than half of the City being renters - renters have been largely overlooked in terms of redistricting and City policy until now. And really what a number of these organizations are saying is - we've been overlooked, we have not been absent, but we've been ignored in this and communities and voices from places like Magnolia have been overrepresented and have been catered to this time. And there's a saying - when you're used to privilege, equity looks like oppression. And so Magnolia is saying - we're losing our voice - and kind of collectively, interests from the rest of the City are saying - no, what you're doing is losing the ability to speak over our voices. But now that we're all at the table and all have a voice, it's time for us to also be recognized as valid and important and worthy of preservation and continuity and representation and not have it broken up in favor of predominantly wealthy homeowners who are saying - well, we're a historically important community. Well, are you historically important and the change that the rest of the City has seen hasn't come to your district because you have fought so vehemently against it. And then turn around and say - and that's why you should cater to us and keep us together because we continue to fight against any kind of change. And realistically saying - hey, other districts have changed and boundaries need to change in those other areas to accommodate that. And so this does - certainly not all that advocates have asked for, but some meaningful progress and some promising boundaries, I think, for a lot of people in the City, for a lot of people who are not wealthy, for people who are renters no matter what the income is - because of the challenges that just the rental population is facing. And to your point, neighborhoods who have worked together and who share interests, who now have the opportunity to have that represented politically within the City? I think that's very helpful and I definitely hope people stay engaged. In this redistricting process. And as the voices from some of those communities who have had greater access to an ability to participate in these redistricting and City processes, and who've had the inside track and who have been listened to to a greater degree than others, that you add your voice to the conversation to make sure that it isn't drowned out by anyone else. Looking at a recent announcement - and kind of announcement is a better word than a new policy or a plan - because it is just announced and announced the intention to take action, but we have yet to see. There was a press conference yesterday about emergency walk-in centers for behavioral health cases, addressing our regional behavioral health crisis here. What was announced and what is the deal? [00:40:32] Melissa Santos: What exactly is going to happen remains a little bit unclear to me exactly, but basically King County Executive Dow Constantine announced a plan to just expand services for people who are experiencing a behavioral health crisis. And it's going to be part of his 2023 budget proposal, which isn't coming out 'til next month. So the idea is having more short- and long-term treatment - so more walk-in treatment that's available and more places to send people who have acute mental health needs. He was talking about how the County's lost a third of its residential behavioral healthcare beds - Erica Barnett at PubliCola reported on this pretty extensively - and there's just a concern there just won't be enough. I was surprised by the stat that there's only one crisis stabilization unit in the County that's 16 beds - that's not very much, especially when we know people suffer mental health crises more frequently than that small number of beds might indicate. So what's interesting is we want to put more money in somewhere so people aren't getting treated in jails, that they have a better place to go, but we're not quite - we don't know exactly the scope of this, or how much money exactly we're talking about to put toward more beds. I guess there's some plans to do so - is what I got from the executive. [00:42:06] Crystal Fincher: Certainly from a regional perspective, we saw representation from the mayor's office for the City of Seattle, county executive certainly, county council, regional leaders in behavioral health treatment and homelessness - all saying that - Hey, we intend to take action to address this. Like you said, Dow said that he will be speaking more substantively to this in terms of details with his budget announcement and what he plans to do with that. Universal acknowledgement that this is a crisis, that they lack funding and resources in this area, and say that they intend to do better with a focus, like you said, on walk-in treatment and the ability to provide that. But we just don't know the details yet. We'll be excited to see that. And you covered this week, just the tall task ahead of them, because we've spoken about before and lots of people have talked about even in this press conference, a problem that we almost require that people - the only access that people can get to treatment sometimes is if they've been arrested, which is just a wildly inefficient way to address this, especially when it plays a role in creating some of the problems with crime and other things. But even with the newly rolled-out intervention system with an attempt to - if someone who previously would've called 911 now can call a dedicated kind of other crisis line to try and get an alternative response - but even that is severely underfunded. What's happening with that? [00:44:00] Melissa Santos: So with 988 - this is the three-digit number people can call when they have a mental health crisis and they'll be connected to a counselor who can help talk them through it. The idea is ultimately for that system to also be able to send trained crisis responders - largely instead of police in many, many cases - meet people in-person, not just talk to them on the phone. But we just don't have enough of these mobile crisis response teams. There's money in the state budget to add more over the next couple of years, especially in rural areas that just don't have the coverage right now. They just don't have enough teams to be able to get to people when they need it. That's something they want to expand so there's more of a response than - that isn't a police officer showing up at your door. So that's the ultimate vision for this new line you call - 988 - but it's not fully implemented right now. You still will get some support. And if you call, I'm not trying to say people should not call the line, but they don't necessarily have all the resources they want to be able to efficiently deploy people - I shouldn't say deploy, it sounds very military - but deploy civilian trained helpers to people who are experiencing a crisis. So that's where they want it to go and The Seattle Times had an article just about how some of those designated crisis responders right now are just stretched so thin and that's just not gonna change immediately, even with some new state money coming in to add more people to do those sorts of things. And designated crisis responders have other duties - they deal with actually to getting people to treatment - some involuntarily in certain cases. Again, it's different than a police response and right now there's just not enough of those folks. [00:45:55] Crystal Fincher: Which jeopardizes the willingness of people to continue to call. Certainly the possibility that a police response can ultimately happen from someone who was requesting a behavioral health or another type of intervention response. And that is still a possibility which some people find challenging or - hey, they expected to avoid that or have something different if they call this and that might not always be the case. But it's certainly a challenge and I think one of the things that was talked about yesterday, which kind of wraps this under a whole umbrella, is there needs to be a lot more done in terms of infrastructure and capacity from - with there being someone to call, someone appropriate to call for whatever the challenge is, an appropriate response. If that is a behavioral health trained person, a crisis intervener, someone like that - and places to take people. Someone does respond and then can connect that person to services that exist. We have problems in a number of areas saying - yeah, we offered services or services are available and they aren't, or they aren't appropriate for the crisis that's there. They don't meet the needs of the person and their situation. So certainly a lot to build out. I think it is a positive step that we're hearing acknowledgement of this and a unified plan to take action, but still need to see what actually results 'cause sometimes we hear big fanfare to start and don't get much substantive on the back end. Certainly I hope with a number of the people involved in this that we do get some substantive progress and I hope to see that, I would expect to see that - but I'm looking forward to it. With that, I think that wraps up this show today. Thank you so much for listening to Hacks & Wonks on this Friday, August 12th, 2022. The producer of Hacks & Wonks is Lisl Stadler, assistant producer is Shannon Cheng with assistance from Bryce Cannatelli - we have an incredible team here at Hacks & Wonks - just want to continue to say that it is not just me, it is completely our team and not possible without this full team. Our wonderful co-host today is Seattle Axios reporter Melissa Santos. You can find Melissa on Twitter @MelissaSantos1. You can follow Hacks & Wonks on the new Twitter account @HacksWonks, you can find me on Twitter @finchfrii (spelled F-I-N-C-H-F-R-I-I). Now you can follow Hacks & Wonks on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever else you get your podcasts - just type "Hacks and Wonks" into the search bar. Be sure to subscribe to get our Friday almost-live shows and our midweek show deliver to your podcast feed. If you like us, leave a review wherever you listen to Hacks & Wonks. You can also get a full transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in the show and Election 2022 resources at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the podcast episode notes. Thanks for tuning in - talk to you next time.

Cornquest: A D&D Podcast
Copy of Cryptids & Creatures Episode 2

Cornquest: A D&D Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 33:43


Cryptids & Creatures Episode 2 -Welcome to Lake City (Part II)Animal Control has officially arrived to Lake City to begin their search. After meeting some of the town's notable characters, they go under cover as geologists to investigate these mysterious landslide related disappearances.Starring James Fitton, Collin Hood, Shandon Rushton and Blake Hood.

TrueAnon
Episode 232: Soak Lake City

TrueAnon

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 100:58


For access to bonus episodes, subscribe at patreon.com/TrueAnonPod ---------- A DA accused of ritualistic sexual abuse and cannibalism. A sheriff who damns the law. A sex offender dead and reborn as a porcine professor in the UK. In this episode, we solve Utah. (Editor's note: The podcast Brace forgot to name is BYMPodcast twitter.com/bympodcast)